Science.gov

Sample records for normal esophageal epithelium

  1. Characterization of the autofluorescence of normal and tumoral esophageal epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villette, Sandrine; Bourg-Heckly, Genevieve; Pigaglio, Sophie; Validire, Pierre; Grichine, Alexei; Vever-Bizet, Christine

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to characterize the autofluorescence spectra of normal and tumoral esophageal epithelial cells and to link the cellular spectra with a data basis of in vivo tissular spectra. Our preliminary results show that no difference in spectral distribution can be observed between squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and normal cells. A statistical significant difference is observed between the average intensity of the raw spectra of the different cell types. Nucleus autofluorescence presents the same spectral shape as cytoplasm, but with lower intensity.

  2. Nrf2 deficiency impairs the barrier function of mouse esophageal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Hu, Yuhui; Fang, Yu; Djukic, Zorka; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Orlando, Roy C.; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-01-01

    Objective As a major cellular defense mechanism, the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway regulates expression of genes involved in detoxification and stress response. Our previous study revealed activation of the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway at the maturation phase during mouse esophageal development, suggesting a potential function in epithelial defense. Here we hypothesize that Nrf2 is involved in the barrier function of esophageal epithelium, and plays a protective role against gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Design Human esophageal biopsy samples, mouse surgical models and Nrf2-/- mice were used to assess the role of the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway in esophageal mucosal barrier function. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured with mini-Ussing chambers. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine cell morphology, while gene microarray, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and ChIP analysis were used to assess the expression of pathway genes. Results Nrf2 was expressed in normal esophageal epithelium and activated in GERD of both humans and mice. Nrf2 deficiency and gastroesophageal reflux in mice, either alone or in combination, reduced TEER and increased intercellular space diameter in esophageal epithelium. Nrf2 target genes and gene sets associated with oxidoreductase activity, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy production were down-regulated in the esophageal epithelium of Nrf2-/- mice. Consistent with the antioxidative function of Nrf2, a DNA oxidative damage marker (8OHdG) dramatically increased in esophageal epithelial cells of Nrf2-/- mice compared with those of wild-type mice. Interestingly, ATP biogenesis, Cox IV (a mitochondrial protein) and Claudin-4 (Cldn4) expression were down-regulated in the esophageal epithelium of Nrf2-/- mice, suggesting that energy-dependent tight junction integrity was subject to Nrf2 regulation. ChIP analysis confirmed the binding of Nrf2 to Cldn4 promoter. Conclusion Nrf2 deficiency impairs esophageal barrier function through disrupting energy-dependent tight junction. Elucidating the role of this pathway in GERD has potential implications for the pathogenesis and therapy of the disease. PMID:23676441

  3. Effect of heat stress on rabbit esophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tobey, N A; Sikka, D; Marten, E; Caymaz-Bor, C; Hosseini, S S; Orlando, R C

    1999-06-01

    Hot beverages expose the esophageal epithelium to temperatures as high as 58 degrees C. To study the impact of such temperatures, rabbit esophageal epithelium was exposed to luminal heat or both luminal and serosal heat while mounted in Ussing chambers. Luminal heat, mimicking exposure to hot beverages, reduced potential difference (PD) and resistance (R) when applied at >/=49 degrees C and reduced short-circuit current (Isc) at >/=60 degrees C. At >/=60 degrees C, subepithelial blisters developed. Higher temperatures reduced R only moderately and reversibly. In contrast, the Isc declined sharply and irreversibly once threshold was reached. Luminal and serosal heat also reduced PD, Isc, and R, although the threshold for reduction in Isc was now similar to that for R. Additionally, luminal and serosal heat reduced Isc more than R for any given temperature and resulted in blisters at lower temperatures (50 degrees C) than luminal heat alone. The heat-induced decline in Isc was attributed in part to inactivation of Na-K-ATPase activity, although other transport systems could have been equally affected, and the decline in R to an increase in paracellular permeability. The latter effect on R also contributed to an increase in tissue sensitivity to luminal acid damage. Consumption of hot beverages exposes the esophagus to temperatures that can negatively impact epithelial structure and function. Impaired barrier function by heat increases the risk of esophageal damage by subsequent contact with (refluxed) gastric acid. These findings help explain in part the association between esophageal disease and consumption of hot beverages. PMID:10362635

  4. MicroRNA Expression Differentiates Squamous Epithelium from Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Owzar, Kouros; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Westfall, Kristen; Anderson, Blair R.; Souza, Rhonda F.; Diehl, Anna Mae; Provenzale, Dawn; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current strategies fail to identify most patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) before the disease becomes advanced and incurable. Given the dismal prognosis associated with EAC, improvements in detection of early-stage esophageal neoplasia are needed. Aims We sought to assess whether differential expression of microRNAs could discriminate between squamous epithelium, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and EAC. Methods We analyzed microRNA expression in a discovery cohort of human endoscopic biopsy samples from 36 patients representing normal squamous esophagus (n=11), BE (n=14), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/EAC (n=11). RNA was assessed using microarrays representing 847 human microRNAs followed by qRT-PCR verification of nine microRNAs. In a second cohort (n=18), qRT-PCR validation of five miRNAs was performed. Expression of 59 microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature was assessed in our training cohort. Known esophageal cell lines were used to compare miRNA expression to tissue miRNAs. Results After controlling for multiple comparisons, we found 34 miRNAs differentially expressed between squamous esophagus and BE/EAC by microarray analysis. However, miRNA expression did not reliably differentiate non-dysplastic BE from EAC. In the validation cohort, all five microRNAs selected for qRT-PCR validation differentiated between squamous samples and BE/EAC. Microarray results supported 14 of the previously reported microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature. Cell lines did not generally reflect miRNA expression found in vivo. Conclusions These data indicate that miRNAs differ between squamous esophageal epithelium and BE/EAC, but do not distinguish between BE and EAC. We suggest prospective evaluation of miRNAs in patients at high risk for EAC. PMID:23925817

  5. Barriers to paracellular permeability in rabbit esophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Orlando, R C; Lacy, E R; Tobey, N A; Cowart, K

    1992-03-01

    Morphological and electrophysiological techniques were used to define the location and nature of the barriers to diffusion across the intercellular space (paracellular pathway) of rabbit esophageal epithelium. Transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy coupled with histochemistry identified a series of tight junctions and an intercellular material staining positively for neutral and acidic glycoconjugates as likely barrier candidates. Additional studies with lanthanum and horseradish peroxidase showed that the barrier to diffusion of tracers was present throughout the stratum corneum and extended to the upper three to seven layers of stratum spinosum and that these findings were most compatible with the presence of the intercellular glycoconjugate material but not the tight junctions. Further positive staining for carbohydrate moieties at the electron microscopic level with periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate suggested that the glycoconjugate material was synthesized in the cells of the barrier layers and packaged in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles before secretion into the intercellular space. Although tight junctions were present in series within stratum corneum and, less commonly, extended to two to three cell layers of upper stratum spinosum, analysis of tracer studies, freeze-fracture replicas, electrophysiological data, and mannitol fluxes, while not conclusive, provided little to support a major role for these junctions in barrier function in this tissue. PMID:1537527

  6. Physicochemical basis for dilated intercellular spaces in non-erosive acid-damaged rabbit esophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tobey, N A; Gambling, T M; Vanegas, X C; Carson, J L; Orlando, R C

    2008-01-01

    Dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) within esophageal epithelium (EE) is a histopathologic feature of non-erosive reflux disease and early lesion in acid-damaged rabbit EE associated with increased paracellular permeability. Its cause remains unknown, but the lesion's morphology suggests a significant fluid shift into the intercellular spaces (ICS). Since water follows osmotic forces and consequently ion movements, we explored the role of active (ion) transport and ion gradients in its pathogenesis. This was done by quantifying the effect of inhibited active transport and altered ion gradients on electrical resistance (R(T)) and ICS diameter in acid-exposed Ussing-chambered rabbit EE. Compared with normal Ringer, pH 7.5, 30 minutes of luminal HCl (100 mmol/L), pH 1.1, increased permeability (R(T): +5 +/- 4% vs-52 +/- 4%) and ICS diameter (0.25 +/- 0.01 microm vs 0.42 +/- 0.02 microm), but had no effect on cell morphology or diameter. Ouabain pretreatment significantly reduced active transport but had no effect on the acid-induced changes. However, negating the chloride gradient created by luminal HCl either by adding choline chloride, 100 mmol/L, serosally or by replacing luminal HCl, pH 1.1, with luminal H(2)SO(4), pH 1.1, prevented the development of DIS while maintaining the increase in permeability. DIS was also prevented in the presence of a 100 mmol/L (choline) chloride gradient by luminal exposure at neutral pH. DIS in HCl-damaged EE is caused by an H(+)-induced increase in epithelial permeability; this enables Cl(-) to diffuse along its gradient into the ICS, creating an osmotic force for water movement into and (hydrostatic) dilation of the ICS. PMID:18522636

  7. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture. PMID:25030954

  8. [Defense mechanisms of the surface epithelium of the human esophageal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Bykov, V L; Iseeva, E A

    2006-01-01

    This review, which is based on the literature data and the results of personal research, contains an analysis of the current concepts on the tissue, cellular and molecular mechanisms, protecting human esophageal epithelium (EE) from gastric juice, bile, hot and rough food, microorganisms, alcohol, carcinogens, drugs and oxidizing agents. The response of EE to concrete environmental factors includes both specific and non-specific components, which depend on the nature of injurious agent. EE is damaged structurally and functionally only when it is exposed to the injurious factors of high intensity and/or long duration, which result in the exhaustion of resources of defense mechanisms. The insufficiency of EE defense mechanisms may be based on various genetic defects. PMID:17338211

  9. Alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium in Japanese men

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Inamori, Masahiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Mawatari, Hironori; Endo, Hiroki; Hosono, Kunihiro; Yoneda, Kyoko; Fujita, Koji; Yoneda, Masato; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Goto, Ayumu; Abe, Yasunobu; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the association between alcohol consumption and the gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) spectrum has been conflicting. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium in Japanese men. Methods The study population comprised 463 men subjects who had undergone an upper endoscopy at the Gastroenterology Division of Yokohama City University Hospital between August 2005 and July 2006. The presence of erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium was diagnosed based on the Los Angeles Classification and the Prague C and M Criteria, respectively. We divided the study population into four groups: never drinkers, light drinkers (less than 25.0 g of ethanol per day), moderate drinkers (25.0 to 50.0 g of ethanol per day), and heavy drinkers (more than 50.0 g of ethanol per day). A linear regression of the logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the dose-response trends. Results Compared with never drinkers, light drinkers (less than 25.0 g ethanol per day), moderate drinkers (25.0 to 50.0 g per day), and heavy drinkers (more than 50.0 g per day) had ORs for erosive esophagitis of 1.110 (95% CI: 0.553 – 2.228, p = 0.7688), 1.880 (95% CI: 1.015 – 3.484, p = 0.0445) and 1.988 (95% CI: 1.120 – 3.534, p = 0.0190), respectively. These groups had ORs for Barrett's epithelium of 1.278 (95% CI: 0.752 – 2.170, p = 0.3643), 1.458 (95% CI: 0.873 – 2.433, p = 0.1500), and 1.912 (95% CI: 1.185 – 3.086, p = 0.0079), respectively. The odds ratios/grams (alcohol)/day of dose response trends for erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium were 1.015 (95% CI: 1.004–1.026, p = 0.0066) and 1.012 (95% CI: 1.003–1.021, p = 0.0079), respectively. Conclusion These findings suggest that alcohol consumption in Japanese men tends to be associated with an increased risk of erosive esophagitis and Barrett's epithelium. PMID:19077221

  10. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make ... Epithelium. In: Kierszenbaum AL, Tres LL. Histology and Cell Biology - An Introduction to Pathology , 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  11. LRRC31 is induced by IL-13 and regulates kallikrein expression and barrier function in the esophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, R J; Caldwell, J M; Azouz, N P; Wen, T; Sherrill, J D; Hogan, S P; Rothenberg, M E

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus featuring increased esophageal interleukin-13 (IL-13) levels and impaired barrier function. Herein, we investigated leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 31 (LRRC31) in human EoE esophageal tissue and IL-13-treated esophageal epithelial cells. LRRC31 had basal mRNA expression in colonic and airway mucosal epithelium. Esophageal LRRC31 mRNA and protein increased in active EoE and strongly correlated with esophageal eosinophilia and IL13 and CCL26 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 26) mRNA expression. IL-13 treatment increased LRRC31 mRNA and protein in air-liquid interface-differentiated esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2s). At baseline, differentiated LRRC31-overexpressing EPC2s had increased barrier function (1.9-fold increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (P<0.05) and 2.8-fold decrease in paracellular flux (P<0.05)). RNA sequencing analysis of differentiated LRRC31-overexpressing EPC2s identified 38 dysregulated genes (P<0.05), including five kallikrein (KLK) serine proteases. Notably, differentiated LRRC31-overexpressing EPC2s had decreased KLK expression and activity, whereas IL-13-treated, differentiated LRRC31 gene-silenced EPC2s had increased KLK expression and suprabasal epithelial detachment. We identified similarly dysregulated KLK expression in the esophagus of patients with active EoE and in IL-13-treated esophageal epithelial cells. We propose that LRRC31 is induced by IL-13 and modulates epithelial barrier function, potentially through KLK regulation. PMID:26462420

  12. STUDIES OF NORMAL GENE EXPRESSION IN THE RAT NASAL EPITHELIUM USNG CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory


    Studies of Normal Gene Expression in the Rat Nasal Epithelium Using cDNA Array

    The nasal epithelium is an important target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity .Gene expression data are being used increasingly for studies of such conditions. In or...

  13. NORMAL GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE F344 RAT NASAL TRANSITIONAL/RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The nasal epithelium is an important target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity in rodents. Gene expression profiles were determined in order to provide normal baseline data for nasal transitional/respiratory epithelium from healthy rats. Ce...

  14. Mitogenic regulation of normal and malignant breast epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Lippman, M. E.; Dickson, R. B.

    1989-01-01

    The multiple roles of both estrogenic and polypeptide regulators of mammary epithelial cell growth are reviewed in this article. Effects of both steroidal and peptide hormones are complex and involve multiple interactions with malignant cells and non-malignant host components. Initial carcinogenesis and progression of mammary epithelium to cancer probably require both proliferative stimuli (estrogen, polypeptide growth factors) and genetic damage. This condition may lead to qualitatively different hormonal responses (hormone-responsive cancer). Estrogens can be shown to induce growth-regulatory polypeptide growth factors and interact with them in hormone-dependent breast cancer. Progression of hormone-dependent (estrogen-responsive) breast cancer to hormone independence probably involves multiple mechanisms, including oncogene activation, loss of the estrogen receptor, or loss of hormone responsivity of other gene products. One direction for further therapies may be blockade of hormonal stimulation and interference with necessary activated or induced components of malignant progression such as oncogenes or polypeptide growth factor-receptor systems. PMID:2697981

  15. Aspiration cytology of radiation-induced changes of normal breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Bondeson, L.

    1987-05-01

    From a case illustrated, it appears that irradiation may induce changes in normal breast epithelium indistinguishable from malignancy by means of aspiration cytology. This fact must be considered in the choice of diagnostic methods for the evaluation of lesions in irradiated breast tissue.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustn

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system. PMID:25488259

  17. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  18. Glycan profile of oviductal isthmus epithelium in normal and superovulated ewes.

    PubMed

    Desantis, Salvatore; Accogli, Gianluca; Silvestre, Fabio; Binetti, Francesco; Cox, Sharon Natasha; Roscino, Mariateresa; Caira, Michele; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

    2016-04-01

    Glycans of oviductal isthmus are implicated in sperm-isthmus interaction, sperm storage, survival, and capacitation. Isthmus morphology and glycoprotein production are controlled by sex steroids, which could be responsible for alterations of some reproductive events in the superovulated ewes (SE). In this study, the oviductal isthmus epithelium was evaluated in normal and in SE using morphologic and lectin histochemical analysis. The epithelium of normal isthmi was significantly taller in folds than in crypts, whereas it significantly decreased in the folds of SE. Nonciliated cells (NCs) from normal, showed apical blebs revealing apocrine secretory activity, which was missing in SE. The quantitative analysis of lectin staining revealed higher Con A, DBA, and PNA reactivity but lower affinity to KOH-sialidase- (Ks)WGA, GSA II, LTA, UEA I, SBA, GSA I-B4, RCA120, KsPNA, MAL II, SNA in control isthmi compared with superovulated ones. The NCs apical blebs showed terminal fucose (Fuc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), galactose (Gal), lactosamine, and O- and N-sialoglycans. In normal isthmi, the luminal surface of NCs and ciliated cells expressed Fuc, highly mannosilated N-glycans terminating with lactosamine as well as O-glycans ending with N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and GalNAc. Moreover, NCs microvilli contained Gal and α2-3-linked sialic acids. In SE, the luminal surface lacked Gal and GalNAcα1, 3(LFucα1,2)Galβ1,3/4GlcNAcβ1, whereas it was enriched with Fuc in the folds and with α2-3sialo-mucins both in crypts and in folds. The apical surface showed additional O- and N-linked sialoglycans in NCs and αGal in the cilia, which expressed α2-6-linked sialic acid only in the folds. The cytoplasm of control NCs showed highly mannosilated N-glycans throughout the epithelium and GlcNAc in the folds. After superovulation treatment, NCs expressed cytoplasmic terminal Fuc, βGalNAc, lactosamine, α2-3-, and α2-6-linked sialic acids in the folds. The cytoplasm of normal ciliated cells cells displayed a binding pattern similar to normal NCs except for the absence of higly mannosilated N-glycans in the folds, which appeared in superovulated samples. This study demonstrates glycan zone-specific distribution along the isthmus epithelium that is influenced by the superovulation treatment. Whether an alteration in the glycan distribution is implicated in the low-rate fertilization after natural mating of the superovulated sheep remains to be addressed. PMID:26792378

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of normal human corneal epithelium obtained by scraping-off in vivo.

    PubMed

    Versura, P; Bonvicini, F; Caramazza, R; Laschi, R

    1985-06-01

    The surface of normal human corneal epithelium was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study was carried out on specimens obtained by scraping-off in vivo, and immediately fixed. Four different types of microprojections were observed on the epithelial surface: microridges, microvilli, tufted microvilli and knobs. Detailed high magnification of surface microprojections showed that they consist of subunits. Our data suggest a correlation between surface morphology and maturity of the corneal epithelial cell. An evolutive sequence is proposed, from the youngest cell, provided with microridges, to the oldest exfoliating one, with knobs. PMID:4036566

  20. Corneal Epithelium Thickness Profile in 614 Normal Chinese Children Aged 7–15 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyan; He, Xiangui; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Lu, Lina; Zhu, Jianfeng; Zou, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe the values and distribution of corneal epithelium thickness (CET) in normal Chinese school-aged children, and to explore associated factors with CET. CET maps were measured by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) in normal Chinese children aged 7 to 15 years old from two randomly selected schools in Shanghai, China. Children with normal intraocular pressure were further examined for cycloplegic autorefraction, corneal curvature radius (CCR) and axial length. Central (2-mm diameter area), para-central (2- to 5-mm diameter area), and peripheral (5- to 6-mm diameter area) CET in the superior, superotemporal, temporal, inferotemporal, inferior, inferonasal, nasal, superonasal cornea; minimum, maximum, range, and standard deviation of CET within the 5-mm diameter area were recorded. The CET was thinner in the superior than in the inferior and was thinner in the temporal than in the nasal. The maximum CET was located in the inferior zone, and the minimum CET was in the superior zone. A thicker central CET was associated with male gender (p = 0.009) and older age (p = 0.037) but not with CCR (p = 0.061), axial length (p = 0.253), or refraction (p = 0.351) in the multiple regression analyses. CCR, age, and gender were correlated with para-central and peripheral CET. PMID:27004973

  1. [Cell oncogene expression in normal, metaplastic, dysplastic epithelium and squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix].

    PubMed

    Petrov, S V; Mazurenko, N N; Sukhova, N M; Moroz, I P; Katsenel'son, V M; Raĭkhlin, N T; Kiselev, F L

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of the protein expression c-myc, ets 1, ets 2, TPR-met, c-fos, c-jun, c-ras-pan, p53, yes, src in 79 samples of normal, metaplastic squamous epithelium, intraepithelial and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix was performed using polyclonal rabbit antibodies to the synthetic peptides homologous active areas of corresponding oncoproteins. Higher content of myc, fos, ets2, p53, ras is noted in metaplasia, dysplasia and in tumours as compared to the normal tissues. Protein myc is revealed in the cytoplasm at a grave dysplasia and in the nucleus in the intraepithelial carcinoma: this may serve as a criterion at a differential diagnosis of these conditions. Expression of the oncoproteins fos, ets2, p53, src in the metaplastic squamous cell carcinoma was higher than in the true squamous cell (ectocervical) carcinoma. When compared to the advanced carcinomas, increase of ets2, p53, and at some degree that of myc, the increase is noted in the latter. Invasive carcinoma with a high level of oncoproteins showed a tendency to the synchronization of myc and ras expression. Poor prognosis was associated with a low level (before treatment) of the expression of the majority of the oncoproteins studied. PMID:7848100

  2. Papillomavirus and c-myc antigen expression in normal and neoplastic cervical epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R G; Neill, W A; Norval, M

    1989-01-01

    Cervical punch biopsy specimens or brushings were collected from 33 patients with cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), or invasive cervical carcinoma, and from eight control patients with recent normal cervical cytology. Prostatic chippings obtained from six men with benign prostatic hypertrophy were used as further controls. Biopsy specimens and brushings were assayed by flow cytometry for c-myc oncogene antigen and papillomavirus antigen expression and rate of cell division (by measuring DNA content). Results obtained from analysis of specimens and brushings were similar in terms of c-myc antigen and total DNA content, but when the percentages of nuclei from biopsy and brush specimens staining positively with antibody to papilloma viral antigens were compared, brush specimens gave consistently higher percentages than biopsy specimens. More specimens from normal epithelium were c-myc antigen positive (five of eight, (63%) than specimens from CIN II or III (two of 10, 20%), or invasive carcinoma (0%). No association was found between c-myc antigen expression and cell division. HPV antigen positive specimens were found to contain more dividing cells than negative specimens. PMID:2537854

  3. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  4. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-03-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow.

  5. Abnormal esophageal transit in patients with typical reflux symptoms but normal endoscopic and pH profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, C.A.; Cullen, P.T.; Sutton, D.; Kennedy, N.; Cuschieri, A. )

    1991-06-01

    There is a small, well-known cohort of patients who, despite classic reflux symptoms, have a normal esophageal pH profile and endoscopic picture. The treatment of these patients has proved problematic. In an attempt at determining the pathophysiology of this subgroup, the authors investigated the esophageal transit, using the radiolabeled solid bolus esophageal egg transit technique, in 58 such patients: 25 males, 33 females, mean age 39.5 years (range: 13 to 65 years). The egg transit was normal in 31 (53.4%) patients. In the remaining 27 (46.6%) patients, the condensed image analysis showed the following specific abnormal transit patterns: step delay pattern, demonstrating segmental hold-up in mid- or distal esophagus in 16 (59.3%); nonspecific delay in 6 (22.2%); oscillatory pattern in 3 (11.1%); and total nonclearance during the study period (4 minutes) in 2 (7.4%) patients. The patients with abnormal transit patterns had demographic parameters and symptom scores similar to those found in patients with normal transit. This study shows that almost 50% of patients with reflux symptoms and negative pH and endoscopy have abnormal esophageal transit, and almost two thirds of these patients display segmental transit delay in the lower half of the esophagus. The effect on symptomatology by prokinetic agents in the patient subgroup needs evaluation.

  6. Gene expression abnormalities in histologically normal breast epithelium from patients with luminal type of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zubor, Pavol; Hatok, Jozef; Moricova, Petra; Kajo, Karol; Kapustova, Ivana; Mendelova, Andrea; Racay, Peter; Danko, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The gene expression profile of breast cancer has been described as a great breakthrough on the way to comprehend differences in cancer origin, behavior and therapy. However, gene expression profile in histologically normal epithelium (HNEpi) which could harbor genetic abnormalities predisposing breast tissue to develop malignancy was minor scope for scientists in the past. Thus, we aimed to analyze gene expressions in HNEpi and breast cancer tissue (BCTis) in order to establish its value as potential diagnostic marker for cancer development. We evaluated a panel of disease-specific genes in luminal type (A/B) of breast cancer and tumor surrounding HNEpi by qRT-PCR Array in 32 microdissected samples. There was 20.2 and 2.4% deregulation rate in genes with at least 2-fold or 5-fold over-expression between luminal (A/B) type breast carcinomas and tumor surrounding HNEpi, respectively. The high-grade luminal carcinomas showed higher number of deregulated genes compared to low-grade cases (50.6 vs. 23.8% with at least 2-fold deregulation rate). The main overexpressed genes in HNEpi were KLK5, SCGB1D2, GSN, EGFR and NGFR. The significant differences in gene expression between BCTis and HNEpi samples were revealed for BAG1, C3, CCNA2, CD44, FGF1, FOSL1, ID2, IL6R, NGFB, NGFR, PAPPA, PLAU, SERPINB5, THBS1 and TP53 gene (p < 0.05) and BCL2L2, CTSB, ITGB4, JUN, KIT, KLF5, SCGB1D2, SCGB2A1, SERPINE1 (p < 0.01), and EGFR, GABRP, GSN, MAP2K7 and THBS2 (p < 0.001), and GSN, KLK5 (p < 0.0001). The ontological gene analyses revealed high deregulations in gene group directly associated with breast cancer prognosis and origin. PMID:25407308

  7. Detection of a novel stem cell probably involved in normal turnover of the lung airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martnez, Marta; Rodrguez-Flores, Laura E; de-la-Garza-Gonzlez, Carlos; Ancer-Rodrguez, Jess; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of the lung airway epithelium after injury has been extensively studied. In contrast, analysis of its turnover in healthy adulthood has received little attention. In the classical view, this epithelium is maintained in the steady-state by the infrequent proliferation of basal or Clara cells. The intermediate filament protein nestin was initially identified as a marker for neural stem cells, but its expression has also been detected in other stem cells. Lungs from CD1 mice at the age of 2, 6, 12, 18 or 24 months were fixed in neutral-buffered formalin and paraffin-embedded. Nestin expression was examined by an immunohistochemical peroxidase-based method. Nestin-positive cells were detected in perivascular areas and in connective tissue that were in close proximity of the airway epithelium. Also, nestin-positive cells were found among the cells lining the airway epithelium. These findings suggest that nestin-positive stem cells circulate in the bloodstream, transmigrate through blood vessels and localize in the lung airway epithelium to participate in its turnover. We previously reported the existence of similar cells able to differentiate into lung chondrocytes. Thus, the stem cell reported here might be a bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMDMSC) able to generate several types of lung tissues. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there exist a BMDMSC in healthy adulthood that participates in the turnover of the lung airway epithelium. These findings may improve our knowledge about the lung stem cell biology and also provide novel approaches to therapy for devastating pulmonary diseases. PMID:26257389

  8. Tonal perceptions in normal laryngeal, esophageal, and electrolaryngeal speech of Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanjun; Wan, Mingxi; Ng, Manwa L; Wang, Supin; Lu, Chunmei

    2006-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate if alaryngeal speakers of Mandarin Chinese could differentially produce the four tone levels of Mandarin: high-level, mid-rising, falling-rising and high-falling, as perceived by native listeners. Syllables /ma/ and /ba/ produced at four different tone levels by 8 normal laryngeal (NL), 7 standard esophageal (SE), and 8 electrolaryngeal (EL) speakers of Mandarin were perceived by 8 naïve listeners. Results from the listening experiments showed a higher percent correct identification of tone for NL speech than SE and EL speech. Perceptual data showed different patterns of tone confusion associated with the three types of speech. SE and EL speakers were not able to produce the four tone levels as accurately as were NL speakers. NL speakers achieved a near-perfect level of accuracy in signaling tonal contrasts. SE speakers produced the falling-rising and high-falling tones more accurately than high-level and mid-rising tones, but tonal confusions existed between mid-rising tone and falling-rising tone, and between high-level tone and high-falling tone. In EL phonation, high-level tone was produced more accurately than the other tones which were often misidentified as a high-level tone. PMID:16966835

  9. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett's esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett's esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett's esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett's esophagus. PMID:25954094

  10. Next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the premenopausal breast epithelium using specimens from a normal human breast tissue bank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our efforts to prevent and treat breast cancer are significantly impeded by a lack of knowledge of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland. In order to provide the specimens that will facilitate such an understanding, The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB) was established. The KTB is, to our knowledge, the only biorepository in the world prospectively established to collect normal, healthy breast tissue from volunteer donors. As a first initiative toward a molecular understanding of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland, the effect of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on DNA expression in the normal breast epithelium was examined. Methods Using normal breast tissue from 20 premenopausal donors to KTB, the changes in the mRNA of the normal breast epithelium as a function of phase of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraception were assayed using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Results In total, 255 genes representing 1.4% of all genes were deemed to have statistically significant differential expression between the two phases of the menstrual cycle. The overwhelming majority (221; 87%) of the genes have higher expression during the luteal phase. These data provide important insights into the processes occurring during each phase of the menstrual cycle. There was only a single gene significantly differentially expressed when comparing the epithelium of women using hormonal contraception to those in the luteal phase. Conclusions We have taken advantage of a unique research resource, the KTB, to complete the first-ever next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the epithelial compartment of 20 normal human breast specimens. This work has produced a comprehensive catalog of the differences in the expression of protein-coding genes as a function of the phase of the menstrual cycle. These data constitute the beginning of a reference data set of the normal mammary gland, which can be consulted for comparison with data developed from malignant specimens, or to mine the effects of the hormonal flux that occurs during the menstrual cycle. PMID:24636070

  11. A normal and biotransforming model of the human bronchial epithelium for the toxicity testing of aerosols and solubilised substances.

    PubMed

    Prytherch, Zoë C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of the experimental workflow by the Lung and Particle Research Group at Cardiff University, that led to the development of the two in vitro lung models - the normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) model and the lung-liver model, Metabo-Lung™. This work was jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. The NHBE model is a three-dimensional, in vitro, human tissue-based model of the normal human bronchial epithelium, and Metabo-Lung involves the co-culture of the NHBE model with primary human hepatocytes, thus permitting the biotransformation of inhaled toxicants in an in vivo-like manner. Both models can be used as alternative test systems that could replace the use of animals in research and development for safety and toxicity testing in a variety of industries (e.g. the pharmaceutical, environmental, cosmetics, and food industries). Metabo-Lung itself is a unique tool for the in vitro detection of toxins produced by reactive metabolites. This 21st century animal replacement model could yield representative in vitro predictions for in vivo toxicity. This advancement in in vitro toxicology relies on filter-well technology that will enable a wide-spectrum of researchers to create viable and economic alternatives for respiratory safety assessment and disease-focused research. PMID:25635646

  12. Fatty acid synthase expression and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongli; Niu, Chunyan; Li, Yandong; Gao, Baohua; Zheng, Jianyun; Guo, Xiaoli; Ma, Weiguo

    2012-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) overexpression has also been associated with a variety of human malignancies including tumor progression, aggressiveness, and metastasis. To investigate the role of FASN expression in esophageal cancer, we evaluated 60 cases of squamous cell carcinoma, 20 cases of adenocarcinoma, and 10 cases of normal esophageal tissues. We found that FASN was detected in 95 % human squamous cell carcinoma, and in 90 % human adenocarcinoma samples. However, all cases of normal esophageal epithelium did not express the protein of FASN. Further, to investigate the role of FASN in tumorigenesis and development, we analyze the growth and migration by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), colony formation and wound healing assay. We found that inhibition of FASN expression in TE13 cells by RNAi suppressed the growth of cells. Decreased FASN expression mitigated the migration of TE13 cells. These studies demonstrated the functional importance of FASN in esophageal tumorigenesis, and suggested that inhibiting FASN might be applied to treat esophageal cancer. PMID:22723001

  13. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  14. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, G L; Braverman, L E; White, E M; Vander Salm, T J

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with 131I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism. PMID:7119407

  15. Pigment epithelium-derived factor enhances tumor response to radiation through vasculature normalization in allografted lung cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Dong, Y; Peng, F; Yu, Z; Zuo, Y; Dai, Z; Chen, Y; Wang, J; Hu, X; Zhou, Q; Ma, H; Bao, Y; Gao, G; Chen, M

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential therapeutic effects of the combination of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and radiation on lung cancer. The Lewis lung cancer (LLC) allografts in nude mice were treated with radiation, PEDF and PEDF combined with radiation. The morphologic changes of tumor vasculature and the hypoxic fraction of tumor tissues were evaluated. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed when radiation was applied between the 3rd and 7th day (the vasculature normalization window) after the initiation of PEDF treatment. During the vasculature normalization window, the tumor blood vessels in PEDF-treated mice were less tortuous and more uniform than those in the LLC allograft tumor treated with phosphate-buffered saline. Meanwhile, the thickness of the basement membrane was remarkably reduced and pericyte coverage was significantly increased with the PEDF treatment. We also found that tumor hypoxic fraction decreased during the 3rd to the 7th day after PEDF treatment, suggesting improved intratumoral oxygenation. Taken together, our results show that PEDF improved the effects of radiation therapy on LLC allografts by inducing a vascular normalization window from the 3rd to the 7th day after PEDF treatment. Our findings provide a basis for treating lung cancer with the combination of PEDF and radiation. PMID:25591809

  16. Targeting chemokine pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Makardhwaj S; Hussain, Zulfiqar; Giricz, Orsolya; Shenoy, Niraj; Polineni, Rahul; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is one of the fastest growing malignancies in the US and needs newer therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Chronic inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAC and contributes to the dysplastic conversion of normal esophageal epithelium to Barrett's esophagus and frank adenocarcinoma. Chemokines play important roles in mediating inflammation and recent evidence implicates these ligands and their receptors in the development and spread of various tumors. We demonstrated that the chemokines IL8, CXCL1 and CXCL3 are significantly overexpressed during esophageal carcinogenesis and accompanied by amplification and demethylation of the chr4q21 gene locus. We also demonstrated that IL8 levels can be detected in serum of patients with EAC and can serve as potential biomarkers. We now demonstrate that inhibition of IL8 receptor, CXCR2, leads to decreased invasiveness of esophageal adenocarcinoma derived cells without affecting cellular proliferation. Taken together, these studies reveal the important roles that chemokines play in development of esophageal cancer and demonstrate that these pathways can serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25485576

  17. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Screening PDQ Screening Information for Patients Esophageal Cancer Screening More information Clinical Trials to Screen for Esophageal Cancer Statistics Esophageal cancer statistics based ...

  18. The initial establishment and epithelial morphogenesis of the esophagus: a new model of tracheal-esophageal separation and transition of simple columnar into stratified squamous epithelium in the developing esophagus.

    PubMed

    Que, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    The esophagus and trachea are tubular organs that initially share a single common lumen in the anterior foregut. Several models have been proposed to explain how this single-lumen developmental intermediate generates two tubular organs. However, new evidence suggests that these models are not comprehensive. I will first briefly review these models and then propose a novel 'splitting and extension' model based on our in vitro modeling of the foregut separation process. Signaling molecules (e.g., SHHs, WNTs, BMPs) and transcription factors (e.g., NKX2.1 and SOX2) are critical for the separation of the foregut. Intriguingly, some of these molecules continue to play essential roles during the transition of simple columnar into stratified squamous epithelium in the developing esophagus, and they are also closely involved in epithelial maintenance in the adults. Alterations in the levels of these molecules have been associated with the initiation and progression of several esophageal diseases and cancer in adults. PMID:25727889

  19. TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression in normal oral epithelium oral dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Fernanda-Paula; Corrêa Pontes, Flávia-Sirotheau; Cury, Sérgio-Elias; Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Rebelo-Pontes, Hélder; Pinto-Júnior, Décio-dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of TWIST and p-Akt proteins in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), correlating their expressions with the histological features of the lesions. Study design: Immunohistochemical studies were carried out on 10 normal oral epithelium, 30 OL and 20 OSCC formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Immunoperoxidase reactions for TWIST and p-Akt proteins were applied on the specimens and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Results: Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post tests revealed a significant difference in TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression among normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between TWIST and p-Akt expressions according to the Pearson’s correlation test. Conclusions: The results obtained in the current study suggest that TWIST and p-Akt may participate of the multi-step process of oral carcinogenesis since its early stages. Key words: Oral cancer, oral leukoplakia, dysplasia, immunohistochemistry. PMID:21743395

  20. Role of Lynx1 and related Ly6 proteins as modulators of cholinergic signaling in normal and neoplastic bronchial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao Wen; Song, Ping Fang; Spindel, Eliot R

    2015-11-01

    The ly-6 proteins are a large family of proteins that resemble the snake three finger alpha toxins such as α-bungarotoxin and are defined by their multiple cysteine residues. Multiple members of the ly-6 protein family can modulate nicotinic signaling including lynx1, lynx2, slurp-1, slurp-2 and prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA). Consistent with the expression of multiple nicotinic receptors in bronchial epithelium, multiple members of the nicotinic-modulatory ly-6 proteins are expressed in lung including lynx1 and lynx2. We studied the role of lynx1 as an exemplar of the role of ly-6 proteins in lung. Our data demonstrates that lynx1 acts as a negative modulator of nicotinic signaling in normal and neoplastic lung. In normal lung lynx1 serves to limit the ability of chronic nicotine exposure to increase levels of nicotinic receptors and also serves to limit the ability of nicotine to upregulate levels of GABAA receptors in lung. In turn this allows lynx1 to limit the ability of nicotine to upregulate levels of mucin which is mediated by GABAergic signaling. This suggests that lynx1-mimetics may have potential for treatment of asthma and COPD. In that most lung cancer cells also express nicotinic receptor and lynx1 we examined the role of lynx-1 in lung cancer. Lynx1 levels are decreased in lung cancers compared to adjacent normal lung. Knockdown of lynx1 by siRNAs increased growth of lung cancer cells while expression of lynx1 in lung cancer cell decreased cell proliferation. This suggests that lynx1 is an endogenous regulator of lung cancer growth. Given that multiple small molecule negative and positive allosteric modulators of nicotinic receptors have already been developed, this suggests that lynx1 is a highly druggable target both for development of drugs that may limit lung cancer growth as well as for drugs that may be effective for asthma or COPD treatment. PMID:26025503

  1. A histometric/scanning electron microscope study of normal and loaded oral epithelium of the vervet monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, E S

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the functional significance of the epithelial cell surface features found in oral mucosa, a histometric analysis of the pits, microvilli and microplications was carried out in normal and mechanically loaded attached gingiva and alveolar mucosa of the vervet monkey throughout the full thickness of the epithelium. An electronic image analysing system and point counting methods were used to obtain the necessary data from micrographs of tissue specimens viewed in the scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the cell area increases and the density of microvilli and microplications decreases from the deepest to the superficial cell layers. There was no statistically significant difference between the diameter of the pits and microvilli in the attached gingiva. Similarly there was no statistically significant difference between the widths of the grooves on the oral cell surface and the microplications on the under-surfaces of the alveolar mucosa cells. This indicates that the cell surfaces are complementary within each tissue type. Furthermore mechanical loading caused a significant decrease in the density of microvilli and microplications in the two tissues, confirming that these structures serve as reserve areas for cell stretching. Images p85-a p85-b Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:3446668

  2. Esophageal development and epithelial homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rosekrans, Sanne L; Baan, Bart; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2015-08-15

    The esophagus is a relatively simple organ that evolved to transport food and liquids through the thoracic cavity. It is the only part of the gastrointestinal tract that lacks any metabolic, digestive, or absorptive function. The mucosa of the adult esophagus is covered by a multilayered squamous epithelium with a remarkable similarity to the epithelium of the skin despite the fact that these tissues originate from two different germ layers. Here we review the developmental pathways involved in the establishment of the esophagus and the way these pathways regulate gut-airway separation. We summarize current knowledge of the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis in esophageal epithelial renewal in the adult and the molecular mechanism of the development of Barrett's metaplasia, the precursor lesion to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Finally, we examine the ongoing debate on the hierarchy of esophageal epithelial precursor cells and on the presence or absence of a specific esophageal stem cell population. Together the recent insights into esophageal development and homeostasis suggest that the pathways that establish the esophagus during development also play a role in the maintenance of the adult epithelium. We are beginning to understand how reflux of gastric content and the resulting chronic inflammation can transform the squamous esophageal epithelium to columnar intestinal type metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26138464

  3. Gene expression profiles of estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers are detectable in histologically normal breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kelly; Ge, Xijin; de las Morenas, Antonio; Tripathi, Anusri; Rosenberg, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we found that gene expression in histologically normal breast epithelium (NlEpi) from women at high breast cancer risk can resemble gene expression in NlEpi from cancer-containing breasts. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene expression characteristic of a cancer subtype might be seen in NlEpi of breasts containing that subtype. Experimental Design We examined gene expression in 46 cases of microdissected NlEpi from untreated women undergoing breast cancer surgery. From 30 age-matched cases (15 estrogen receptor (ER)+, 15 ER-) we used Affymetryix U133A arrays. From 16 independent cases (9 ER+, 7 ER-), we validated selected genes using qPCR. We then compared gene expression between NlEpi and invasive breast cancer using 4 publicly available datasets. Results We identified 198 genes that are differentially expressed between NlEpi from breasts with ER+ (NlEpiER+) compared to ER- cancers (NlEpiER-). These include genes characteristic of ER+ and ER- cancers (e.g., ESR1, GATA3, and CX3CL1, FABP7). QPCR validated the microarray results in both the 30 original cases and the 16 independent cases. Gene expression in NlEpiER+ and NlEpiER- resembled gene expression in ER+ and ER- cancers, respectively: 25-53% of the genes or probes examined in 4 external datasets overlapped between NlEpi and the corresponding cancer subtype. Conclusions Gene expression differs in NlEpi of breasts containing ER+ compared to ER- breast cancers. These differences echo differences in ER+ and ER- invasive cancers. NlEpi gene expression may help elucidate subtype-specific risk signatures, identify early genomic events in cancer development and locate targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:21059815

  4. N-Ethylmaleimide–Sensitive Factor b (nsfb) Is Required for Normal Pigmentation of the Zebrafish Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hanovice, Nicholas J.; Daly, Christina M. S.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the number of albinism-causing mutations identified in human patients and animal models, there remain a significant number of cases for which no mutation has been identified, suggesting that our understanding of melanogenesis is incomplete. Previously, we identified two oculocutaneous albinism mutations in zebrafish, au13 and au18. Here, we sought to identify the mutated loci and determine how the affected proteins contribute to normal pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods Complementation analyses revealed that au13 and au18 belonged to a single complementation group, suggesting that they affected the same locus. Whole-genome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed to identify putative mutations, which were confirmed by cDNA sequencing and mRNA rescue. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image quantification were used to identify the cellular basis of hypopigmentation. Results Whole-genome sequencing and SNP mapping identified a nonsense mutation in the N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor b (nsfb) gene in au18 mutants. Complementary DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation (C893T), which truncates the nsfb protein by roughly two-thirds (Y297X). No coding sequence mutations were identified in au13, but quantitative PCR revealed a significant decrease in nsfb expression, and nsfb mRNA injection rescued the hypopigmentation phenotype, suggesting a regulatory mutation. In situ hybridization revealed that nsfb is broadly expressed during embryonic development, including in the RPE. Transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that average melanosome density and maturity were significantly decreased in nsfb mutants. Conclusions au18 and au13 contain mutations in nsfb, which encodes a protein that is required for the maturation of melanosomes in zebrafish RPE. PMID:26618645

  5. Recombinant human endostatin enhances the radioresponse in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by normalizing tumor vasculature and reducing hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Ding, Yuqiong; Liu, Jia; Lu, Jing; Zhan, Liangliang; Qin, Qin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Xiaochen; Yang, Yuehua; Yang, Yan; Liu, Zheming; Yang, Meiling; Zhou, Xifa; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recombinant human endostatin (rh-Endo) in combination with radiation therapy (RT) on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and explore the potential mechanisms. ECA109-bearing nude mice were administered RT and/or rh-Endo treatment. Tumor volume, survival, hypoxia and vascular parameters were recorded during the treatment schedule and follow-up as measures of treatment response. ESCC cell lines (ECA109 and TE13) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were developed to investigate the outcomes and toxicities of rh-Endo and RT in vitro. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also evaluated. In vivo studies of ECA109-bearing xenografts showed that rh-Endo improved the radioresponse, with normalization of tumor vasculature and a reduction in hypoxia. In vitro studies showed that rh-Endo did not radiosensitize ESCC cell lines but did affect endothelial cells with a time- and dose-dependent manner. Studies of the molecular mechanism indicated that the improved radioresponse might be due to crosstalk between cancer cells and endothelial cells involving HIF and VEGF expression. Our data suggest that rh-Endo may be a potential anti-angiogenic agent in ESCC especially when combined with RT. The improved radioresponse arises from normalization of tumor vasculature and a reduction in hypoxia. PMID:26412785

  6. p120-Catenin Down-Regulation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Overexpression Results in a Transformed Epithelium That Mimics Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L.; Yang, Xuebin; Welsh, Patricia A.; Stairs, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive and metastatic potential. The molecular pathogenesis underlying the invasive mechanism of ESCC is not well known because of the lack of existing models to study this disease. p120-Catenin (p120ctn) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have each been implicated in several cancers, including ESCC. p120ctn is down-regulated in 60% of ESCC tumors, whereas EGFR is the most commonly overexpressed oncogene in ESCC. For these reasons, we investigated the cooperation between p120ctn and EGFR and its effect on ESCC invasion. We show that p120ctn down-regulation is commonly associated with EGFR overexpression. By using a three-dimensional culture system, we demonstrate that the inverse relationship between p120ctn and EGFR has biological implications. Specifically, p120ctn down-regulation coupled with EGFR overexpression in human esophageal keratinocytes (EPC1-PE) was required to promote invasion. Morphological comparison of EPC1-PE cells grown in three-dimensional culture and human ESCC revealed identical features, including significantly increased cellularity, nuclear grade, and proliferation. Molecular characteristics were measured by keratin expression patterns, which were nearly identical between EPC1-PE cells in three-dimensional culture and ESCC samples. Altogether, our analyses have demonstrated that p120ctn down-regulation and EGFR overexpression are able to mimic human ESCC in a relevant three-dimensional culture model. PMID:25529795

  7. Barrett's esophagus: photodynamic therapy for ablation of dysplasia, reduction of specialized mucosa and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Bergein F.; Panjehpour, Masoud

    1995-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia were treated with photodynamic therapy. Four patients also had early, superficial esophageal cancers and 5 had esophageal polyps. Light was delivered via a standard diffuser or a centering esophageal balloon. Eight patients maintained on omeprazole and followed for 6 - 54 months are the subject of this report. Photodynamic therapy ablated dysplastic or malignant mucosa in patients with superficial cancer. Healing and partial replacement of Barrett's mucosa with normal squamous epithelium occurred in all patients and complete replacement with squamous epithelium was found in two. Side effects included photosensitivity and mild-moderate chest pain and dysphagia for 5 - 7 days. In three patients with extensive circumferential mucosal ablation in the proximal esophagus, healing was associated with esophageal strictures which were treated successfully by esophageal dilation. Strictures were not found in the distal esophagus. Photodynamic therapy combined with long-term acid inhibition provides effective endoscopic therapy of Barrett's mucosal dysplasia and superficial (Tis-T1) esophageal cancer. The windowed centering balloon improves delivery of photodynamic therapy to diffusely abnormal esophageal mucosa.

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  9. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett’s esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett’s esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett’s esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25954094

  10. The initial establishment and epithelial morphogenesis of the esophagus: a new model of tracheal–esophageal separation and transition of simple columnar into stratified squamous epithelium in the developing esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Que, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus and trachea are tubular organs that initially share a single common lumen in the anterior foregut. Several models have been proposed to explain how this single-lumen developmental intermediate generates two tubular organs. However, new evidence suggests that these models are not comprehensive. I will first briefly review these models and then propose a novel ‘splitting and extension’ model based on our in vitro modeling of the foregut separation process. Signaling molecules (e.g., SHHs, WNTs, BMPs) and transcription factors (e.g., NKX2.1 and SOX2) are critical for the separation of the foregut. Intriguingly, some of these molecules continue to play essential roles during the transition of simple columnar into stratified squamous epithelium in the developing esophagus, and they are also closely involved in epithelial maintenance in the adults. Alterations in the levels of these molecules have been associated with the initiation and progression of several esophageal diseases and cancer in adults. PMID:25727889

  11. Normal esophageal high-resolution manometry and impedance values in the supine and sitting positions in the population of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Gao, F; Gao, Y; Hobson, A R; Huang, W N; Shang, Z M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normal high-resolution manometry and impedance (HRiM) values in the supine and sitting positions in the population of Northern China, and to investigate the influence of different body positions and bolus consistency on esophageal HRiM findings. In this study, healthy volunteers in the supine position underwent esophageal HRiM examination of 10 swallows of 5 mL normal saline solution and 10 swallows of 5 mL synthetic gel of known viscosity, and in the sitting position of an additional five swallows of a synthetic gel of known viscosity. Total bolus transit time (TBTT), complete bolus transit rate (CBTR), distal contractile integral (DCI), distal esophageal amplitude (DEA), and integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) were measured. Sixty-two healthy volunteers were examined in the supine position and 45 of these performed additional swallows of the viscous gel in the sitting position. In the supine position, normal values for swallowing the liquid and viscous boli were as follows: TBTT 6.9 ± 0.9 and 8.0 ± 1.2 s (P < 0.001), CBTR 90.3 ± 14.0 and 77.9 ± 20.3% (P < 0.001), DCI 1891.5 ± 1131.9 and 1967.8 ± 1140.1 mmHg.s.cm (P = 0.227), DEA 95.3 ± 35.4 and 98.7 ± 37.5 mmHg (P = 0.148), and IRP 10.4 ± 4.9 and 9.0 ± 4.2 mmHg (P < 0.001), respectively. For swallows of the viscous boli in the sitting position, TBTT, DCI, DEA, and IRP were significantly decreased, while CBTR was unchanged (P = 0.075). Normal HRiM values of the population of Northern China were established. Esophageal transit times of viscous boli were significantly slower, more often incomplete and produced less normal peristalsis in the supine position than swallows of liquid boli. Independent reference values for different manometric systems, body positions, and population need to be established before clinical application. PMID:25516299

  12. An extended proximal esophageal myotomy is necessary to normalize EGJ distensibility during Heller myotomy for achalasia, but not POEM

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Ezra N.; Soper, Nathaniel J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Boris, Lubomyr; Nicodème, Frédéric; Lin, Zhiyue; Hungness, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Background For laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), the optimal myotomy length proximal to the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is unknown. In this study, we used a functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) to measure EGJ distensibility changes resulting from variable proximal myotomy lengths during LHM and peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM). Methods Distensibility index (DI) (defined as the minimum cross-sectional area at the EGJ divided by pressure) was measured with FLIP after each operative step. During LHM and POEM, each patient’s myotomy was performed in two stages: first, a myotomy ablating only the EGJ complex was created (EGJ-M), extending from 2cm proximal to the EGJ, to 3cm distal to it. Next, the myotomy was lengthened 4cm further cephalad to create an extended proximal myotomy (EP-M). Results Measurements were performed in 12 patients undergoing LHM and 19 undergoing POEM. LHM resulted in an overall increase in DI (1.6 ±1 vs. 6.3 ±3.4 mm2/mmHg, p<.001). Creation of an EGJ-M resulted in a small increase (1.6 to 2.3 mm2/mmHg, p<.01) and extension to an EP-M resulted in a larger increase (2.3 to 4.9 mm2/mmHg, p<.001). This effect was consistent, with 11 (92%) patients experiencing a larger increase after EP-M than after EGJ-M. Fundoplication resulted in a decrease in DI and deinsufflation an increase. POEM resulted in an increase in DI (1.3 ±1 vs. 9.2 ±3.9 mm2/mmHg, p<.001). Both creation of the submucosal tunnel and performing an EGJ-M increased DI, whereas lengthening of the myotomy to an EP-M had no additional effect. POEM resulted in a larger overall increase from baseline than LHM (7.9 ±3.5 vs. 4.7 ±3.3 mm2/mmHg, p<.05). Conclusions During LHM, an extended proximal myotomy was necessary to normalize distensibility, whereas during POEM, a myotomy confined to the EGJ complex was sufficient. In this cohort, POEM resulted in a larger overall increase in EGJ distensibility. PMID:24853854

  13. Methyl isocyanate induced morphological changes in the seminiferous epithelium of rats maintained on normal or protein deficient diets

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, M.; Vachhrajani, K.D.; Dutta, K.K. ); Jha, B.S. )

    1994-05-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC), a pulmonary toxicant, is also reported to cause reproductive anomalies. MIC exposure decreased mating performance and fertility of mice and rats. However, the target cell type responsible for the decreased fertility could not be identified. Therefore, present studies are undertaken to analyze the action of MIC on spermatogenesis during one cycle of seminiferous epithelium. Protein deficiency, an important aspect of malnourishment, alter toxic potentials of various chemicals. About 90% of the affected people of Bhopal gas calamity belonged to low income group and were categorized as malnourished. Nutritional deficiency is also known to impair spermatogenesis and fertility. Therefore, experiments were designed to evaluate whether the protein deficiency influence the toxic potentials of MIC on testicular tissues.

  14. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious esophagitis is rare. It often occurs in people whose immune systems are weakened. People who have ... people who are treated for an episode of infectious esophagitis need other, long-term medicines to suppress ...

  15. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  16. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  17. Downregulation of LKB1 suppresses Stat3 activity to promote the proliferation of esophageal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Qi; Dai, Wei-Min; Chu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Sun, Yu'e

    2014-06-01

    The tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1) encodes a serine/threonine kinase. The defect in LKB1 is the primary cause of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Inactivation of LKB1 by mutations or loss of LKB1 expression is associated with ovarian, lung and pancreatic cancer; however, the correlation between LKB1 and esophageal carcinoma remains unknown. Thus, quantitative PCR was performed to determine the clinical significance of LKB1 expression in 60 cases of esophageal cancer and its adjacent normal epithelium. LKB1 expression was observed to significantly downregulate the accompanying cancer progression, which was verified at the protein level by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) level is reversibly associated with LKB1 expression. To determine the function of LKB1 in esophageal cancer, LKB1 expression is induced in TE1 esophageal cancer cells. The results show that LKB1 overexpression suppresses the proliferation of TE1 cells, downregulates the expression of cyclin D1 and Myc and represses Stat3 phosphorylation. Suppression of cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression by LKB1 is fully inhibited by constitutively active Stat3C coexpression, suggesting that LKB1 inhibits esophageal cancer cell proliferation through suppression of Stat3 transaction. In conclusion, downregulation of LKB1 expression suppresses Stat3 activity that may promote tumor growth during esophageal cancer progression. PMID:24676538

  18. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for esophageal cancer will soon be investigated further in a prospective trial at our institution.

  19. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:25212408

  20. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or capacity to form colonies. Thus under our culture conditions breast acinar formation is at least a two-step process involving {beta}1-integrin-dependent cellular growth followed by polarization of the cells into organized structures. The regulation of this pathway appears to be impaired or lost in the tumor cells, suggesting that tumor colony formation occurs by independent mechanisms and that loss of proper integrinmediated cell-ECM interaction may be critical to breast tumor formation.

  1. A Zebrafish Model for Studies on Esophageal Epithelial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Beasley, Andrea; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian esophagus exhibits a remarkable change in epithelial structure during the transition from embryo to adult. However, the molecular mechanisms of esophageal epithelial development are not well understood. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a common model organism for vertebrate development and gene function, has not previously been characterized as a model system for esophageal epithelial development. In this study, we characterized a piece of non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium similar to human esophageal epithelium in the upper digestive tract of developing zebrafish. Under the microscope, this piece was detectable at 5dpf and became stratified at 7dpf. Expression of esophageal epithelial marker genes (Krt5, P63, Sox2 and Pax9) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Knockdown of P63, a gene known to be critical for esophageal epithelium, disrupted the development of this epithelium. With this model system, we found that Pax9 knockdown resulted in loss or disorganization of the squamous epithelium, as well as down-regulation of the differentiation markers Krt4 and Krt5. In summary, we characterized a region of stratified squamous epithelium in the zebrafish upper digestive tract which can be used for functional studies of candidate genes involved in esophageal epithelial biology. PMID:26630178

  2. Changes in p53 and Waf1p21 expression and cell proliferation in esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Dong; Yang, Wan-Cai; Zhou, Qi; Xing, Ying; Jia, Yun-Ying; Zhao, Xin

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study the correlation between changes in p53 and Waf1p21 expression and cell proliferation, determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), at different stages of human esophageal carcinogenesis. METHODS: Biopsied and resected esophageal tissues from a high risk population of esophageal cancer in northern China were used in this study. All specimens were fixed in 85% alcohol and processed for routine histology. The avidin biotin peroxidase complex (ABC) method was used to detect p53, Waf1p21 and PCNA. RESULTS: Strong nuclear staining of p53, Waf1p21 and PCNA was observed in normal esophageal epithelium and epithelia with different lesion severities. As the lesions progressed to dysplasia (DYS) and to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the Waf1p21 immunoreactivity percentage decreased. The number of Waf1p21-positive cells slightly increased from normal to basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), but did not further increase in DYS and SCC. The total number of Waf1p21-positive cells was lower than the number of p53-positive cells in normal and BCH esophageal epithelia and much lower in DYS and SCC. Waf1p21-positive cells were located in the third and fourth cell layers in half of the samples examined, which was 2-4 cell layers higher than the cells expressing PCNA and p53 in the same histological categories of normal, BCH and DYS. CONCLUSION: Low Waf1p21 levels at the DYS stage may be related to a functional loss of p53. Other mechanisms may also be responsible for the decreased Waf1p21 expression in DYS and SCC.

  3. Impact of histone deacetylase 1 and metastasis-associated gene 1 expression in esophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Munemoto, Masayoshi; Shah, Furhawn A; Harmon, John W; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Shoji, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Koichi; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Kinoshita, Jun; Makino, Isamu; Nakamura, Keishi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Mukaisho, Kenichi; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-08-01

    Animal models are important for the development of novel therapies for esophageal cancer. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1)/metastasis-associated gene (MTA1) complexes inhibit p53 acetylation and thus, inhibit p53-induced apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate HDAC1 and MTA1 expression in esophageal carcinogenesis in rats. The rats underwent a total gastrectomy followed by esophagojejunostomy to induce chronic duodenal content reflux esophagitis. The rats were sacrificed sequentially at 20, 30, 40 and 50 weeks post-surgery and the esophagi were examined. Immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to assess the expression and localization of HDAC1 and MTA1. At 20 weeks post-surgery, squamous proliferative hyperplasia and Barrett's metaplasia (BM) were observed. While, adenocarcinoma-associated BM and squamous cell carcinoma were observed at 30-50 weeks post-surgery. The nuclear expression of HDAC1 and MTA1 was observed in all of the stages of squamous carcinogenesis and adenocarcinogenesis, although not in the normal esophageal epithelium. The expression of HDAC1 and MTA1 may be involved in duodenoesophageal reflux-induced neoplastic transformation of the esophageal mucosa into cancer cells with squamous and adeno differentiation. PMID:25009653

  4. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sushma S; Makar, Karen W; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y; Lampe, Paul D; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W; Potter, John D

    2015-12-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]). PMID:26697360

  5. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sushma S.; Makar, Karen W.; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y.; Lampe, Paul D.; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W.; Potter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) – accession number GSE71571 – was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]). PMID:26697360

  6. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  7. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower part of the esophagus near the stomach. Squamous cell carcinoma - the most common type of esophageal cancer worldwide. ... use, and diseases such as achalasia can cause squamous cell carcinoma, while gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can lead to ...

  8. Esophageal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... infants with EA have another defect called tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). This is an abnormal connection between the ... 2016:chap 42. Rothenberg SS. Esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula malformations. In: Holcomb GW, Murphy JP, Ostlie DJ, ...

  9. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  10. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or call 911 if: You have recently had surgery or a tube placed in the esophagus and you have pain, problems swallowing or breathing You have another reason to suspect that you may have esophageal perforation.

  11. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal contractions of the esophagus muscles that do not effectively move food to the stomach ( esophageal spasm )

  12. Basonuclin-Null Mutation Impairs Homeostasis and Wound Repair in Mouse Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Tseng, Hung

    2007-01-01

    At least two cellular processes are required for corneal epithelium homeostasis and wound repair: cell proliferation and cell-cell adhesion. These processes are delicately balanced to ensure the maintenance of normal epithelial function. During wound healing, these processes must be reprogrammed in coordination to achieve a rapid re-epithelialization. Basonuclin (Bnc1) is a cell-type-specific transcription factor expressed mainly in the proliferative keratinocytes of stratified epithelium (e.g., corneal epithelium, epidermis and esophageal epithelium) and the gametogenic cells in testis and ovary. Our previous work suggested that basonuclin could regulate transcription of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) and genes involved in chromatin structure, transcription regulation, cell-cell junction/communication, ion-channels and intracelllular transportation. However, basonuclin's role in keratinocytes has not been demonstrated in vivo. Here we show that basonuclin-null mutation disrupts corneal epithelium homeostasis and delays wound healing by impairing cell proliferation. In basonuclin-null cornea epithelium, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription is perturbed. This perturbation is unique because it affects transcripts from a subset of rDNA. Basonuclin-null mutation also perturbs RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts from genes encoding chromatin structure proteins histone 3 and HMG2, transcription factor Gli2, gap-junction protein connexin 43 and adheren E-cadherin. In most cases, a concerted change in mRNA and protein level is observed. However, for E-cadherin, despite a notable increase in its mRNA level, its protein level was reduced. In conclusion, our study establishes basonuclin as a regulator of corneal epithelium homeostasis and maintenance. Basonuclin likely coordinates functions of a subset of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) and a group of protein coding genes in cellular processes critical for the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:17971852

  13. Management of refractory and complicated reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Hirschowitz, B I

    1996-01-01

    Simple intermittent heartburn with minor or no esophagitis can be treated with simple measures including lifestyle changes and antacids as needed, or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RA), and has a good outcome. Problematic reflux includes resistance to therapy, stricture, Barrett's esophagus and aspiration. Severe reflux esophagitis, often resistant to H2RA therapy, requires more potent treatment with potent acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors, often indefinitely. When complicated by stricture, dilatations with potent acid suppression are needed. Barrett's esophagus is subject to esophagitis, which is no more difficult to treat than other cases of esophagitis. Reflux in Barrett's esophagus should be treated on its own merits without regard to the presence of Barrett's epithelium. Dysplasia leading to adenocarcinoma is a different problem, apparently not influenced by reduced exposure to acid. Indications for antireflux surgery are quite limited and should be carefully analyzed as a cost/risk/benefit problem. PMID:9165696

  14. Long noncoding RNA CCAT2 correlates with smoking in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Qiu, Mantang; Xu, Youtao; Li, Ming; Dong, Gaochao; Mao, Qixing; Yin, Rong; Xu, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, and most esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases are located in Asian area. Recent studies about long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) have offered a new perspective for cancer research and provided new approaches to understand the complex regulation network in cancer. Our group has reported that the novel lncRNA colon cancer-associated transcript 2 (CCAT2) has important biological function and could be a potential biomarkers in lung cancer. Here, we performed in silico analysis and characterized the expression profile of CCAT2 in a cohort of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients and cell lines. In silico analysis showed that no CpG island is found in the chromosome region of CCAT2, indicating that the expression of CCAT2 is possibly not regulated by DNA methylation. Compared with paired adjacent normal esophageal tissues, CCAT2 was significantly overexpressed in ESCC tissues with an average fold of 7.18. In ESCC cell lines, CCAT2 was mostly upregulated in KYSE410 cell (24.7-fold upregulation) when normalized to normal esophageal epithelium cell line (HEEC) and most CCAT2 transcripts were located in nucleus (> 95 %). Statistical analysis showed that CCAT2 expression level was significantly associated with smoking status (P = 0.036). Receiver operative curve and the area under curve were calculated to assess the diagnostic potential of CCAT2. Measured by area under curve (AUC), CCAT2 showed higher diagnostic performance than conventional serum biomarkers, like AFP, CA153, and NSE. In this study, we firstly characterized the expression profile of CCAT2 in ESCC and evaluated its potential diagnostic value as a biomarker. PMID:25677908

  15. A case of cervical esophageal duplication cyst in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shoko; Segawa, Osamu; Kimura, Shuri; Tsuchiya, Masayoshi; Henmi, Nobuhide; Hasegawa, Hisaya; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from a foregut budding error during the fourth to sixth week of embryonic development. Cervical esophageal duplication cysts are very rare and may cause respiratory distress in infancy. A full-term newborn girl who was born by normal delivery was transferred to our hospital because of swelling of the right anterior neck since birth. Cervical ultrasonography showed a 40 × 24 × 33 mm simple cyst on the right neck. Tracheal intubation was required at 2 weeks of age because of worsening external compression of the trachea. Fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed the existence of ciliated epithelium. At 1 month of age, exploration was performed through a transverse neck incision. The cyst had a layer of muscle connected to the lateral wall of the esophagus. Histopathological diagnosis was a cervical esophageal duplication cyst. We describe the clinical features of infantile cervical esophageal duplication cysts based on our experience of this rare disease in a neonate, along with a review of 19 cases previously reported in literature. PMID:27037803

  16. [Clinical application of cultured epithelium].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, N

    1998-03-01

    The author have done clinical application of cultured epithelium grafting since 1985. In this article, the results of auto- and allografting (patients: 365 cases) were reported. By the cultivation of epidermal cells, many amount of cultured epithelium could be obtained. Cultured autografts took well to the partial thickness wounds. Grafted sites healed promptly and histologically resembled normal skin. Disfigurement on the skin surfaces was well treated and improved by autografting. Full thickness wounds caused by burn or excision of congenital giant nevi were treated with cryopreserved allogeneic skin and fresh autologous cultured epithelium. The results showed good graft take and histology. Allogeneic cultured epithelium accelerated the wound healing on the grafted area. Thus, the autologous and allogeneic cultured epithelial grafting procedure is a promising treatment for many patients suffering from large skin wounds or disfigurement of skin surfaces. PMID:9710722

  17. Human esophageal myofibroblasts secrete proinflammatory cytokines in response to acid and Toll-like receptor 4 ligands.

    PubMed

    Gargus, Matthew; Niu, Chao; Vallone, John G; Binkley, Jana; Rubin, Deborah C; Shaker, Anisa

    2015-06-01

    The pathophysiology of esophageal injury, repair, and inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux-disease (GERD) is complex. Whereas most studies have focused on the epithelial response to GERD injury, we are interested in the stromal response. We hypothesized that subepithelial esophageal myofibroblasts in GERD secrete proinflammatory cytokines in response to injurious agents encountered via epithelial barrier breaches or through dilated epithelial intercellular spaces. We determined the percentage of myofibroblasts [-smooth muscle actin (-SMA)+vimentin+CD31-] in the subepithelial GERD and normal esophageal stroma by immunomorphologic analysis. We performed -SMA coimmunostaining with IL-6 and p65. We established and characterized primary cultures of -SMA+vimentin+CD31-CD45- human esophageal myofibroblasts (HuEso MFs). We modeled GERD by treatment with pH 4.5-acidified media and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands, LPS and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and determined myofibroblast cytokine secretion in response to GERD injury. We demonstrate that spindle-shaped cell myofibroblasts are located near the basement membrane of stratified squamous epithelium in normal esophagus. We identify an increase in subepithelial myofibroblasts and activation of proinflammatory pathways in patients with GERD. Primary cultures of stromal cells obtained from normal esophagus retain myofibroblast morphology and express the acid receptor transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and TLR4. HuEso MFs stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists LPS and HMGB1 increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via TRPV1 and NF-B activation. Our work implicates a role for human subepithelial stromal cells in the pathogenesis of GERD-related esophageal injury. Findings of this study can be extended to the investigation of epithelial-stromal interactions in inflammatory esophageal mucosal disorders. PMID:25882613

  18. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a prerequisite for complete esophageal replacement. Novel approaches need to be designed to allow for peristalsis and vascularization in the engineered esophagus. Although esophageal tissue engineering potentially offers a real alternative to conventional treatments for severe esophageal disease, important barriers remain that need to be addressed. PMID:23322987

  19. Precancerous esophageal epithelia are associated with significantly increased scattering coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing-Wei; Lin, Yang-Hsien; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsieh, Chao-Mao; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Yang, Pei-Wen; Wang, Chen-Ping; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Lee, Yi-Chia; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The progression of epithelial precancers into cancer is accompanied by changes of tissue and cellular structures in the epithelium. Correlations between the structural changes and scattering coefficients of esophageal epithelia were investigated using quantitative phase images and the scattering-phase theorem. An ex vivo study of 14 patients demonstrated that the average scattering coefficient of precancerous epithelia was 37.8% higher than that of normal epithelia from the same patient. The scattering coefficients were highly correlated with morphological features including the cell density and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. A high interpatient variability in scattering coefficients was observed and suggests identifying precancerous lesions based on the relative change in scattering coefficients. PMID:26504630

  20. Cytoskeletal changes induced by allosteric modulators of calcium-sensing receptor in esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen L; Rabon, Edd C; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Islam, Mohammed T; Schmieg, John J; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein-coupled receptor, plays a role in glandular and fluid secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, and regulates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells. We examined the expression of CaSR in normal and pathological conditions of human esophagus and investigated the effect of a CaSR agonist, cinacalcet (CCT), and antagonist, calhex (CHX), on cell growth and cell–cell junctional proteins in primary cultures of porcine stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. We used immunohistochemistry and Western analysis to monitor expression of CaSR and cell–cell adhesion molecules, and MTT assay to monitor cell proliferation in cultured esophageal cells. CCT treatment significantly reduced proliferation, changed the cell shape from polygonal to spindle-like, and caused redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, it reduced expression of β-catenin by 35% (P < 0.02) and increased expression of a proteolysis cleavage fragment of E-cadherin, Ecad/CFT2, by 2.3 folds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, CHX treatment enhanced cell proliferation by 27% (P < 0.01), increased the expression of p120-catenin by 24% (P < 0.04), and of Rho, a GTPase involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, by 18% (P < 0.03). In conclusion, CaSR is expressed in normal esophagus as well as in Barrett’s, esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Long-term activation of CaSR with CCT disrupted the cadherin–catenin complex, induced cytoskeletal remodeling, actin fiber formation, and redistribution of CaSR to the nuclear area. These changes indicate a significant and complex role of CaSR in epithelial remodeling and barrier function of esophageal cells. PMID:26603452

  1. Cytoskeletal changes induced by allosteric modulators of calcium-sensing receptor in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen L; Rabon, Edd C; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Islam, Mohammed T; Schmieg, John J; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-11-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein-coupled receptor, plays a role in glandular and fluid secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, and regulates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells. We examined the expression of CaSR in normal and pathological conditions of human esophagus and investigated the effect of a CaSR agonist, cinacalcet (CCT), and antagonist, calhex (CHX), on cell growth and cell-cell junctional proteins in primary cultures of porcine stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. We used immunohistochemistry and Western analysis to monitor expression of CaSR and cell-cell adhesion molecules, and MTT assay to monitor cell proliferation in cultured esophageal cells. CCT treatment significantly reduced proliferation, changed the cell shape from polygonal to spindle-like, and caused redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, it reduced expression of β-catenin by 35% (P < 0.02) and increased expression of a proteolysis cleavage fragment of E-cadherin, Ecad/CFT2, by 2.3 folds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, CHX treatment enhanced cell proliferation by 27% (P < 0.01), increased the expression of p120-catenin by 24% (P < 0.04), and of Rho, a GTPase involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, by 18% (P < 0.03). In conclusion, CaSR is expressed in normal esophagus as well as in Barrett's, esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Long-term activation of CaSR with CCT disrupted the cadherin-catenin complex, induced cytoskeletal remodeling, actin fiber formation, and redistribution of CaSR to the nuclear area. These changes indicate a significant and complex role of CaSR in epithelial remodeling and barrier function of esophageal cells. PMID:26603452

  2. Esophageal human beta-defensin expression in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Shauna; Robinson, Zachary D.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Hosford, Lindsay; Moore, Wendy; Pan, Zhaoxing; Harris, Rachel; Souza, Rhonda F.; Spechler, Stuart Jon; Fillon, Sophie A.; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed on mucosal surfaces that contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis by providing innate defense mechanisms for the epithelia. Defensin expression is altered in a number of diseases that affect mucosal surfaces, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Similar to atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic disease in which the squamous epithelial surface is affected by a similar TH2 microenvironment and eosinophil predominant inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized defensin expression would be decreased in EoE. Methods To address this, we measured defensin expression in vitro in cell lines derived from patients with EoE (EoE1-T) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NES-G4T cells), and ex vivo in esophageal mucosal biopsy samples from children with EoE, GERD, and control children without esophageal disease. Results IL-5 induced a decrease in human beta-defensin 1 (hBD1) and human beta-defensin 3 (hBD3) expression in EoE1-T but not in NES-G4T cells. Compared to esophageal biopsy specimens from GERD and control children, specimens from EoE pediatric patients revealed significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression for hBD1 and hBD3. Conclusion Diminished expression of hBD1 and hBD3 may make the esophageal epithelium more susceptible to the development and/or perpetuation of EoE. PMID:23385963

  3. Herpetic esophagitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpetic esophagitis is a herpes simplex infection causing inflammation and ulcers of the esophagus. Symptoms include difficulty swallowing and pain (dysphagia). Herpetic esophagitis can be effectively treated ...

  4. Evaluation of Esophageal Motor Function With High-resolution Manometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For several decades esophageal manometry has been the test of choice to evaluate disorders of esophageal motor function. The recent introduction of high-resolution manometry for the study of esophageal motor function simplified performance of esophageal manometry, and revealed previously unidentified patterns of normal and abnormal esophageal motor function. Presentation of pressure data as color contour plots or esophageal pressure topography led to the development of new tools for analyzing and classifying esophageal motor patterns. The current standard and still developing approach to do this is the Chicago classification. While this methodical approach is improving our diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders, it currently does not address all motor abnormalities. We will explore the Chicago classification and disorders that it does not address. PMID:23875094

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Merves, Jamie; Muir, Amanda; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Cianferoni, Antonella; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the understanding of the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and the role of the immune system in the disease process. Data Sources Peer-reviewed articles on EoE from PubMed searching for “Eosinophilic Esophagitis and fibrosis” in the period of 1995 to 2013. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, and management of EoE. Results Recent work has revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin and basophil have an increased role in the pathogenesis of disease. Additional understanding on the role of fibrosis in EoE is emerging. Conclusion The incidence of EoE is increasing like most atopic disease. Similar to other allergic diseases, EoE is treated with topical steroids and/or allergen avoidance. PMID:24566295

  6. Downregulation of S100 Calcium Binding Protein A9 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Harsh; Srikanth, Srinivas M.; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Sathe, Gajanan; Chavan, Sandip; Singal, Mukul; Manju, H. C.; Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah Veerendra; Vijayakumar, M.; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Gowda, Harsha; Kumar, Rekha V.

    2015-01-01

    The development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is poorly understood and the major regulatory molecules involved in the process of tumorigenesis have not yet been identified. We had previously employed a quantitative proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed proteins in ESCC tumors. A total of 238 differentially expressed proteins were identified in that study including S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9) as one of the major downregulated proteins. In the present study, we carried out immunohistochemical validation of S100A9 in a large cohort of ESCC patients to determine the expression and subcellular localization of S100A9 in tumors and adjacent normal esophageal epithelia. Downregulation of S100A9 was observed in 67% (n = 192) of 288 different ESCC tumors, with the most dramatic downregulation observed in the poorly differentiated tumors (99/111). Expression of S100A9 was restricted to the prickle and functional layers of normal esophageal mucosa and localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and nucleus whereas virtually no expression was observed in the tumor and stromal cells. This suggests the important role that S100A9 plays in maintaining the differentiated state of epithelium and suggests that its downregulation may be associated with increased susceptibility to tumor formation. PMID:26788548

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis–linked calpain 14 is an IL-13–induced protease that mediates esophageal epithelial barrier impairment

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Benjamin P.; Stucke, Emily M.; Khorki, M. Eyad; Litosh, Vladislav A.; Rymer, Jeffrey K.; Rochman, Mark; Travers, Jared; Kottyan, Leah C.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    We recently identified a genome-wide genetic association of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) at 2p23 spanning the calpain 14 (CAPN14) gene, yet the causal mechanism has not been elucidated. We now show that recombinant CAPN14 cleaves a calpain-specific substrate and is inhibited by 4 classical calpain inhibitors: MDL-28170, acetyl-calpastatin, E-64, and PD151746. CAPN14 is specifically induced (>100-fold) in esophageal epithelium after IL-13 treatment. Epithelial cells overexpressing CAPN14 display impaired epithelial architecture, characterized by acantholysis, epidermal clefting, and epidermolysis. CAPN14 overexpression impairs epithelial barrier function, as demonstrated by decreased transepithelial resistance (2.1-fold) and increased FITC-dextran flux (2.6-fold). Epithelium with gene-silenced CAPN14 demonstrates increased dilated intercellular spaces (5.5-fold) and less organized basal cell layering (1.5-fold) following IL-13 treatment. Finally, CAPN14 overexpression results in loss of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) expression, whereas the IL-13–induced loss of DSG1 is normalized by CAPN14 gene silencing. Importantly, these findings were specific to CAPN14, as they were not observed with modulation of CAPN1 expression. These results, along with the potent induction of CAPN14 by IL-13 and genetic linkage of EoE to the CAPN14 gene locus, demonstrate a molecular and cellular pathway that contributes to T helper type 2 responses in mucosal epithelium. PMID:27158675

  8. Reduction of E-cadherin by human defensin-5 in esophageal squamous cells.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoshiki; Tanabe, Hiroki; Moriichi, Kentaro; Igawa, Satomi; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Goto, Takuma; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2013-09-13

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is metaplastic columnar epithelium converted from normal squamous epithelia in the distal esophagus that is thought to be a precancerous lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma. BE is attributed to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and therefore gastric acid or bile acids are thought to be factors that cause epithelial cell damage and inflammation in the gastro-esophageal junction. The decrease of adherent junction molecules, E-cadherin has been reported to be associated with the progression of the Barrett's carcinoma, but the initiation of BE is not sufficiently understood. BE is characterized by the presence of goblet cells and occasionally Paneth cells are observed at the base of the crypts. The Paneth cells possess dense granules, in which human antimicrobial peptide human defensin-5 (HD-5) are stored and secreted out of the cells. This study determined the roles of HD-5 produced from metaplastic Paneth cells against adjacent to squamous cells in the gastro-esophageal junction. A human squamous cell line Het-1A, was incubated with the synthetic HD-5 peptide as a model of squamous cell in the gastro-esophageal junctions, and alterations of E-cadherin were investigated. Immunocytochemistry, flowcytometry, and Western blotting showed that the expression of E-cadherin protein was decreased. And a partial recovery from the decrease was observed by treatment with a CD10/neprilysin inhibitor (thiorphan). In conclusion, E-cadherin expression in squamous cells was reduced by HD-5 using in vitro experiments. In gastro-esophageal junction, HD-5 produced from metaplastic Paneth cells may therefore accelerate the initiation of BE. PMID:23958301

  9. Esophageal cyst producing CA19-9 and CA125.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2010-03-01

    The patient was a 59-year-old woman in whom computed tomography revealed a posterior mediastinal cyst and ovarian cystoma at a medical check-up in March 2007. Blood tests showed high CA19-9 and CA125 levels. She underwent left adnexectomy for ovarian cystoma in July 2008 and histopathological examination led to a diagnosis of dermoid cyst. The postoperative levels of CA19-9 and CA125 remained high. She developed dysphagia in February 2009, and the posterior mediastinal cyst showed a tendency to enlarge. Therefore, she underwent tumorectomy through a small thoracotomy. The cyst contained greenish fluid with CA19-9 and CA125 contents of 65,000 and 78,000 U/ml, respectively. Histologically, the cyst had a thickened wall, which contained two muscle layers, and was lined by squamous and pseudostratified ciliated epithelium. No cartilage or bronchial glands were identified. These findings led to a diagnosis of esophageal cyst. On immunohistochemical staining, the cyst-lining epithelial cells were positive for CA19-9 and CA125. The serum CA19-9 and CA125 levels returned to normal two months after surgery. We report a resected case of esophageal cyst producing CA19-9 and CA125. PMID:20008896

  10. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  11. True Intramural Esophageal Duplication Cyst.

    PubMed

    Al-Riyami, Salim; Al-Sawafi, Yaqoob

    2015-11-01

    Esophageal duplication is the second most common site of gastrointestinal duplication and most cases present with complications. These complications include bleeding, infection, dysphagia, and dyspnea. We report an incidental case of a true intramural esophageal duplication cyst in a new military recruit. The patient was diagnosed in Armed Forces Hospital, Oman. The patient came for a pre-recruitment routine check-up, he was found to have a suspicious soft tissue lesion on chest X-ray. He was referred to the thoracic surgeon for further investigations. The investigations included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging chest scans, barium swallow, endoscopy and, finally, an endoscopic ultrasound. All workup pointed to a diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst; therefore, the decision was made to excise the lesion after discussion with the patient about the possible diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The cyst was completely excised thoracoscopically with uneventful recovery. The patient was discharged a few days later and was doing well in subsequent visits to the outpatient department. The histopathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a true congenital duplication cyst, which was lined by pseudostrati?ed ciliated columnar epithelium overlying double layers of thick bundles of smooth muscle ?bers. PMID:26674014

  12. Immunologic function of dendritic cells in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenfeng; Yu, Jinming

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the frequently occurring malignant cancers. The current therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or a combination, is only to palliate the symptoms; overall the prognosis is poor. The immunotherapy of dendritic cells for esophageal cancer is a valuable method. Dendritic cells existing in the esophageal tissues play an important role in the host's immunosurveillance against cancer as the professional antigen-presenting cells. This review concerns the immunology of dendritic cells in esophageal cancer; it describes the expression of DCs in the normal esophageal tissues and benign disease of esophagus, relations between the DCs and cancer development in esophageal cancer, and the DC-based approach to establish treatment for esophageal cancer. PMID:18080193

  13. Can We Determine Appropriate Foods to Eliminate to Treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis? Share | Can we determine appropriate foods to eliminate to treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis? Published Online: ... not normally present. The disease is due to food allergies in almost all pediatric patients, but standard ...

  14. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial cells when exposed to conditioned media from irradiated vs. non-irradiated fibroblasts. We also observed enhanced invasion through a basement membrane matrix in similarly treated cells. Candidate factors that me-diate these effects were identified using antibody capture arrays, and their increased secretion in irradiated fibroblasts was confirmed using ELISAs. We are currently analyzing the effect of these individual factors on epithelial migration and invasion, as well as their influence on cell survival and DNA repair. Our current studies using high-LET radiation will elucidate radiation quality effects on these processes. These results should further our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation impacts the tissue microenvironment and how it influences cancer development processes.

  15. Cell lineage-specific and differentiation-dependent patterns of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha expression in the gut epithelium of normal and transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, C; Gordon, J I

    1993-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation programs of gut epithelial cells are expressed rapidly and perpetually along an anatomically well defined pathway. The mouse intestine thus provides an excellent in vivo model system to define the contributions of CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) and related bZIP proteins to these processes. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that C/EBP alpha is produced in villus-associated enterocytes located in the duodenum and jejunum of adult mice. The protein is located in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of these cells. C/EBP alpha is not detectable in proliferating and nonproliferating epithelial cells situated in small intestinal crypts nor is it evident in any gut epithelial cell lineage located in the ileum and colon. The related C/EBP beta and C/EBP delta proteins are not detectable by sensitive immunocytochemical methods in epithelial cells distributed along the duodenal-to-colonic axis. Developmental surveys indicate that C/EBP alpha is confined to postmitotic, villus-associated epithelial cells during conversion of the polyclonal intervillus epithelium to monoclonal crypts. Analyses of intestinal isografts reveal that these developmental stage-specific, lineage-specific, differentiation-dependent, and regional patterns of C/EBP alpha expression can be established and maintained in the absence of exposure to luminal contents. Transgenic mice containing nucleotides -1178 to +28 of the rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (I-FABP-1178 to +28) linked to the simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) gene express T antigen in villus-associated enterocytes. This results in reentry of enterocytes into the cell cycle and a silencing of C/EBP alpha expression without an apparent effect on the accumulation of several markers of this lineage's terminal differentiation program or on gut morphogenesis. These findings indicate that there is a relationship between expression of C/EBP alpha in enterocytes and their exit from the cell cycle and suggest that I-FABP-1178 to +28/simian virus 40 T antigen transgenic mice could provide a screening assay for examining the role of C/EBP alpha in regulating the activity of genes known to be transcribed during differentiation of this gut epithelial cell lineage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8415623

  16. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    PubMed Central

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly sug- gest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a prerequisite for complete esophageal replacement. Novel approaches need to be designed to allow for peristalsis and vascularization in the engineered esophagus. Although esophageal tissue engineering potentially offers a real alternative to conventional treatments for severe esophageal disease, important barriers remain that need to be addressed. PMID:23322987

  17. BMP-driven NRF2 activation in esophageal basal cell differentiation and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Ku, Wei-Yao; Zhou, Zhongren; Dellon, Evan S.; Falk, Gary W.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Mei-Lun; Liu, Kuancan; Wang, Jun; Katzka, David A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Lan, Xiaopeng; Que, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires balanced self-renewal and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells, especially in tissues that are constantly replenished like the esophagus. Disruption of this balance is associated with pathological conditions, including eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), in which basal progenitor cells become hyperplastic upon proinflammatory stimulation. However, how basal cells respond to the inflammatory environment at the molecular level remains undetermined. We previously reported that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway is critical for epithelial morphogenesis in the embryonic esophagus. Here, we address how this pathway regulates tissue homeostasis and EoE development in the adult esophagus. BMP signaling was specifically activated in differentiated squamous epithelium, but not in basal progenitor cells, which express the BMP antagonist follistatin. Previous reports indicate that increased BMP activity promotes Barrett’s intestinal differentiation; however, in mice, basal progenitor cell–specific expression of constitutively active BMP promoted squamous differentiation. Moreover, BMP activation increased intracellular ROS levels, initiating an NRF2-mediated oxidative response during basal progenitor cell differentiation. In both a mouse EoE model and human biopsies, reduced squamous differentiation was associated with high levels of follistatin and disrupted BMP/NRF2 pathways. We therefore propose a model in which normal squamous differentiation of basal progenitor cells is mediated by BMP-driven NRF2 activation and basal cell hyperplasia is promoted by disruption of BMP signaling in EoE. PMID:25774506

  18. Molecular Pathways: Pathogenesis and clinical implications of microbiome alteration in esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liying; Francois, Fritz; Pei, Zhiheng

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is preceded by the development of reflux-related intestinal metaplasia or Barrett’s esophagus which is a response to inflammation of the esophageal squamous mucosa, reflux esophagitis. Gastroesophageal reflux impairs the mucosal barrier in the distal esophagus, allowing chronic exposure of the squamous epithelium to the diverse microbial ecosystem or microbiome, and inducing chronic inflammation. The esophageal microbiome is altered in both esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, characterized by a significant decrease in Gram-positive bacteria and an increase in Gram-negative bacteria in esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a major structure of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria, can up-regulate gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines via activation of the TLR4 and NF-kB pathway. The potential impact of LPS on reflux esophagitis may be through relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter via iNOS and by delaying gastric emptying via COX-2. Chronic inflammation may be play a critical role in the progression from benign to malignant esophageal disease. Therefore analysis of the pathways leading to chronic inflammation in the esophagus may help to identify biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus patients for neoplastic progression and provide insight into molecular events suitable for therapeutic intervention in prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma development in patients with reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. PMID:22344232

  19. Expression of androgen receptor and its association with estrogen receptor and androgen receptor downstream proteins in normal/benign breast luminal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Yarid, Nicole; McMahon, Loralee; Yang, Qi; Hicks, David G

    2014-08-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is strongly expressed in the majority of breast carcinomas, but its role in breast hormonal carcinogenesis is not clear. We believe a better knowledge of the biology of normal/benign breast tissue will be the key to understanding this process. Using standard immunohistochemical staining on consecutive sections and dual immunohistochemical labeling, we studied the expression pattern of AR and estrogen receptor (ER) in normal/benign breast luminal epithelial cells. We found that most of the AR-positive cells are also ER positive, about 10% of the cells are AR-positive only, whereas ER-positive only cells are uncommon, a distribution pattern of hormone receptor expression similar to what was revealed in invasive breast carcinomas. Whereas the expression of AR downstream proteins, such as prostate-specific antigen and gross cystic disease fluid protein, was either negative or unrelated to the AR status. We conclude that AR and ER expression status in invasive breast carcinomas reflects that of their progenitor cells in terminal duct lobular units. Our study did not reveal the expression of AR downstream proteins in normal/benign luminal epithelial cells at the regular immunohistochemistry level. PMID:24897063

  20. Expression of androgen receptor and its association with estrogen receptor and androgen receptor downstream proteins in normal/benign breast luminal epithelium.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Wang X; Yarid N; McMahon L; Yang Q; Hicks DG

    2014-08-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is strongly expressed in the majority of breast carcinomas, but its role in breast hormonal carcinogenesis is not clear. We believe a better knowledge of the biology of normal/benign breast tissue will be the key to understanding this process. Using standard immunohistochemical staining on consecutive sections and dual immunohistochemical labeling, we studied the expression pattern of AR and estrogen receptor (ER) in normal/benign breast luminal epithelial cells. We found that most of the AR-positive cells are also ER positive, about 10% of the cells are AR-positive only, whereas ER-positive only cells are uncommon, a distribution pattern of hormone receptor expression similar to what was revealed in invasive breast carcinomas. Whereas the expression of AR downstream proteins, such as prostate-specific antigen and gross cystic disease fluid protein, was either negative or unrelated to the AR status. We conclude that AR and ER expression status in invasive breast carcinomas reflects that of their progenitor cells in terminal duct lobular units. Our study did not reveal the expression of AR downstream proteins in normal/benign luminal epithelial cells at the regular immunohistochemistry level.

  1. Robotic benign esophageal procedures.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jennifer M; Onaitis, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Robotic master-slave devices can assist surgeons to perform minimally invasive esophageal operations with approaches that have already been demonstrated using laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. Robotic-assisted surgery for benign esophageal disease is described for the treatment of achalasia, epiphrenic diverticula, refractory reflux, paraesophageal hernias, duplication cysts, and benign esophageal masses, such as leiomyomas. Indications and contraindications for robotic surgery in benign esophageal disease should closely approximate the indications for laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Given the early application of the technology and paucity of clinical evidence, there are currently no procedures for which robotic esophageal surgery is the clinically proven preferred approach. PMID:24780427

  2. Specificity of tumor necrosis factor toxicity for human mammary carcinomas relative to normal mammary epithelium and correlation with response to doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Dollbaum, C.; Creasey, A.A.; Dairkee, S.H.; Hiller, A.J.; Rudolph, A.R.; Lin, L.; Vitt, C.; Smith, H.S. )

    1988-07-01

    By using a unique short-term culture system capable of growing both normal and malignant breast epithelial tissue, human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) showed preferential cytotoxicity to malignant cells as compared to the corresponding nonmalignant cells. Most of the malignant specimens were sensitive to TNF with 13 of 18 specimens showing 90% inhibition of clonal growth (ID{sub 90}). In contrast, all 13 nonmalignant specimens tested clustered at the resistant end of the TNF response spectrum. This differential sensitivity to TNF was seen in three cases in which malignant and nonmalignant breast epithelial tissues from the same patient were studied. To investigate the mechanism of resistance to TNF by normal cells, the presence of receptors for TNF was determined. Five of six cultures showed specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled TNF and there was no relationship between the degree of resistance and the degree of specific binding. Simultaneous comparison of tumor responsiveness to doxorubicin and TNF revealed a positive correlation in ID{sub 90} values; these results may have important implications for the clinical use of TNF in cancer patients heavily pretreated with doxorubicin.

  3. [Esophageal stenting complications].

    PubMed

    Smoliar, A N; Radchenko, Iu A; Nefedova, G A; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze esophageal stenting complications in case of cancer and benign diseases. It was investigated complications in 8 patients in terms from 7 days to 1 year after intervention. In 4 patients esophageal stenting was performed for constrictive esophageal cancer and compression with pulmonary cancer metastases into mediastinal lymphatic nodes. 2 patients had esophageal stenting for post-tracheostomy tracheo-esophageal fistula, 1 patient - for spontaneous esophageal rupture, 1 patient - for post-burn scar narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach. Severe patients' condition with tumor was determined by intensive esophageal bleeding in 2 cases, bilateral abscessed aspiration pneumonia, tumor bleeding, blood aspiration (1 case), posterior mediastinitis (1 case). Severe patients' condition with benign disease was associated with decompensated esophageal narrowing about proximal part of stent (1 case), increase of tracheo-esophageal fistula size complicated by aspiration pneumonia (1 case), stent migration into stomach with recurrence of esophago-mediastino-pleural fistula and pleural empyema (1 case), decompensated narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach (1 case). Patients with cancer died. And patients with benign diseases underwent multi-stage surgical treatment and recovered. Stenting is palliative method for patients with esophageal cancer. Patients after stenting should be under outpatient observation for early diagnosis of possible complications. Esophageal stenting in patients with benign diseases should be performed only by life-saving indications, in case of inability of other treatment and for the minimum necessary period. PMID:25589315

  4. Mist1 Expressing Gastric Stem Cells Maintain the Normal and Neoplastic Gastric Epithelium and Are Supported by a Perivascular Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Stancikova, Jitka; Sakitani, Kosuke; Asfaha, Samuel; Renz, Bernhard W; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida A; Shibata, Wataru; Wang, Hongshan; Westphalen, Christoph B; Chen, Xiaowei; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Kim, Woosook; Khurana, Shradha S; Tailor, Yagnesh; Nagar, Karan; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D; Saha, Subhrajit; Ding, Lei; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G; Friedman, Richard A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Worthley, Daniel L; Korinek, Vladimir; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-12-14

    The regulation and stem cell origin of normal and neoplastic gastric glands are uncertain. Here, we show that Mist1 expression marks quiescent stem cells in the gastric corpus isthmus. Mist1(+) stem cells serve as a cell-of-origin for intestinal-type cancer with the combination of Kras and Apc mutation and for diffuse-type cancer with the loss of E-cadherin. Diffuse-type cancer development is dependent on inflammation mediated by Cxcl12(+) endothelial cells and Cxcr4(+) gastric innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). These cells form the perivascular gastric stem cell niche, and Wnt5a produced from ILCs activates RhoA to inhibit anoikis in the E-cadherin-depleted cells. Targeting Cxcr4, ILCs, or Wnt5a inhibits diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis, providing targets within the neoplastic gastric stem cell niche. PMID:26585400

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  6. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (≥15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented. PMID:26485101

  7. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M.; Shen, Dawen; Lee, Anna J.; Benitez, Alain; Dods, Kara; Gambanga, Fiona; Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Merves, Jamie; Noah, Yuliana; Toltzis, Sarit; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Malefyt, Rene deWaal; Muir, Amanda B.; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP), an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf) and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C). To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA), wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg) and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the barrier surface may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of EoE by regulating TSLP expression. PMID:26992000

  8. Recent advances in the treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Shauna; Atkins, Dan; Furuta, Glenn T

    2013-01-01

    First described nearly 20 years ago, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal epithelium. Over 50% of the current literature on EoE has been published in the last 3 years, signaling both a rising incidence and increased recognition of this disorder. Treatment options available for patients with EoE include dietary management and/or pharmacologic therapy. An individualized approach to treatment is preferred, with an emphasis on patientparental preference. The objective of this article is to discuss the current and future treatment options for EoE. PMID:20979557

  9. Distribution and ultrastructural characteristics of dark cells in squamous metaplasias of the respiratory tract epithelium. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Nettesheim, P.; Pine, A.; Martin, D.

    1981-05-01

    Dark epithelial basal cells were found in both carcinogen-induced and non-carcinogen-induced squamous metaplasias of the tracheal epithelium. Formaldehyde-induced squamous metaplasias exhibited 4% dark cells in the basal layer. Metaplasias induced by vitamin A deficiency and those induced by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) without atypia showed 18-20% basal dark cells. DMBA-induced metaplasias with moderate to severe atypia exhibited 50% basal dark cells. The labeling index of basal cells in metaplastic epithelia, regardless of the inducing agent, was 16-18%, ie, the same as that of the normal esophageal stratified squamous epithelium. The percentage of labeled dark basal cells per total dark cell population was approximately 19% in the non-carcinogen-induced metaplasias and in the DMBA-induced metaplasias without atypia. In the atypical metaplasias induced by DMA this percentage increased to 26. On the basis of ultrastructural observations, five types of dark epithelial cells could be distinguished in the metaplastic epithelia. Each type of squamous metaplasia could thus be recognized by a determined numerical distribution of dark cells in the basal layer and a specific pattern of distribution of the ultrastructurally defined dark cell categories.

  10. The ocular lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhat, S P

    2001-08-01

    An adult lens contains two easily discernible, morphologically distinct compartments, the epithelium and the fiber-cell mass. The fiber-cell mass provides the lens with its functional phenotype, transparency. Metabolically, in comparison to the fiber cells the epithelium is the more active compartment of the ocular lens. For the purposes of this review we will only discuss the surface epithelium that covers the anterior face of the adult ocular lens. This single layer of cells, in addition to acting as a metabolic engine that sustains the physiological health of this tissue, also works as a source of stem cells, providing precursor cells, which through molecular and morphological differentiation give rise to fiber cells. Morphological simplicity, defined developmental history and easy access to the experimenter make this epithelium a choice starting material for investigations that seek to address universal questions of cell growth, development, epithelial function, cancer and aging. There are two important aspects of the lens epithelium that make it highly relevant to the modern biologist. Firstly, there are no known clinically recognizable cancers of the ocular lens. Considering that most of the known malignancies are epithelial in origin this observation is more than an academic curiosity. The lack of vasculature in the lens may explain the absence of tumors in this tissue, but this provides only a teleological basis to a very important question for which the answers must reside in the molecular make-up and physiology of the lens epithelial cells. Secondly, lens epithelium as a morphological entity in the human lens is first recognizable in the 5th-6th week of gestation. It stays in this morphological state as the anterior epithelium of the lens for the rest of the life, making it an attractive paradigm for the study of the effects of aging on epithelial function. What follows is a brief overview of the present status and lacunae in our understanding of the biology of the lens epithelium. PMID:11900326

  11. RANK overexpression as a novel esophageal cancer marker: validated immunohistochemical analysis of two different ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaobin; Peng, Hao; Jin, Jing; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Shumao; Jin, Tingting; Li, Su; Liu, Chunxia; Liang, Weihua; Li, Feng; Chen, Yunzhao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) expression statuses of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN), low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (LGIN), and normal esophageal tissues (NETs) in Chinese Han and Kazakh ethnic, as well as the correlation of RANK expression with clinicopathological characteristics. RANK immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to investigate the expression of RANK in 113 ESCC, 36 HGIN, 63 LGIN, and 98 NETs from Han ethnic patients and in 196 ESCC and 76 NETs from Kazakh ethnic patients. The associations of RANK expression with ethnic and clinicopathological characteristics were examined using χ2-test. Upregulated RANK expression was detected in both Han and Kazakh ethnic ESCC tissues, compared with NETs (P = 1.11×10-5, 0.001, respectively). RANK expression was significantly increased during malignant transformation from normal epithelium into LGIN (P = 2.84×10-7) and HGIN (P = 7.83×10-6) tissues in Han ethnic patients. The increased expression of RANK also correlated with lymph node metastasis in Kazakh ethnic ESCC patients (P = 0.019). By contrast, no significant correlation existed between RANK expression and clinicopathological characteristics of Han ethnic ESCC patients. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that ESCC patients with higher expression of RANK protein had significantly worse prognosis than ESCC patients with low or no expression (P = 0.001). In conclusion, this study is the first to identify RANK overexpression as a novel esophageal cancer marker in both Kazakh and Han ethnic ESCC patients. The results support the association of RANK with ESCC across ethnicities. In summary, RANK could be a therapeutic target in ESCC patients. PMID:25973136

  12. Esophageal cyst in the duodenum of a foal.

    PubMed

    Loynachan, Alan T

    2014-03-01

    A 21-day-old Thoroughbred colt was euthanized following a history of recurrent colic. A 4.5 cm in diameter, occlusive, submucosal cyst was identified in the duodenum at necropsy. Histologically, the cyst was surrounded by a smooth muscle wall and was lined by both squamous and attenuated cuboidal to columnar epithelium. A diagnosis of an esophageal cyst was made based on the gross and histologic findings. PMID:24595302

  13. Role of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Archana; Polineni, Rahul; Hussein, Zulfiqar; Vigoda, Ivette; Bhagat, Tushar D; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus, a pre-malignant condition that can lead to esophageal adenocarcinoma, is characterized by histological changes in the normal squamous epithelium of the esophagus. Numerous molecular changes occur during the multistage conversion of Barrett's metaplasia to dysplasia and frank adenocarcinoma. Epigenetic changes, especially changes in DNA methylation are widespread during this process. Aberrant DNA methylation has been shown to occur at promoters of tumor suppressor genes, adhesion molecules and DNA repair genes during Barrett's esophagus. These epigenetic alterations can be used as molecular biomarkers for risk stratification and early detection of esophageal adenocarcinoma. We also show that genome wide analysis of methylation surprisingly reveals that global hypomethylation and not hypermethylation is the dominant change during Barrett's metaplasia. The transformation of Barrett's esophagus to frank adenocarcinoma is in turn characterized by much smaller wave of selective promoter hypermethylation. These studies reveal many novel, potential targets for new therapies and illustrate the utility of incorporating these epigenetic changes as biomarkers during endoscopic surveillance interval for patients with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:22808291

  14. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  15. LINE-1 expression and retrotransposition in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Rodi?, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Darbari, Isha; Abril, Gabriela; Choi, Jungbin A; Young Ahn, Ji; Cheng, Yulan; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Meltzer, Stephen J; Kazazian, Haig H

    2015-09-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common disease in which the lining of the esophagus transitions from stratified squamous epithelium to metaplastic columnar epithelium that predisposes individuals to developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We hypothesized that BE provides a unique environment for increased long-interspersed element 1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition. To this end, we evaluated 5 patients with benign BE, 5 patients with BE and concomitant EAC, and 10 additional patients with EAC to determine L1 activity in this progressive disease. After L1-seq, we confirmed 118 somatic insertions by PCR in 10 of 20 individuals. We observed clonal amplification of several insertions which appeared to originate in normal esophagus (NE) or BE and were later clonally expanded in BE or in EAC. Additionally, we observed evidence of clonality within the EAC cases; specifically, 22 of 25 EAC-only insertions were present identically in distinct regions available from the same tumor, suggesting that these insertions occurred in the founding tumor cell of these lesions. L1 proteins must be expressed for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), a protein encoded by L1, in eight of the EAC cases for which formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue was available. With immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p in all tumors evaluated. Interestingly, we also observed dim ORF1p immunoreactivity in histologically NE of all patients. In summary, our data show that somatic retrotransposition occurs early in many patients with BE and EAC and indicate that early events occurring even in histologically NE cells may be clonally expanded in esophageal adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:26283398

  16. LINE-1 expression and retrotransposition in Barretts esophagus and esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T.; Rodi?, Nemanja; Sharma, Reema; Darbari, Isha; Abril, Gabriela; Choi, Jungbin A.; Young Ahn, Ji; Cheng, Yulan; Anders, Robert A.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2015-01-01

    Barretts esophagus (BE) is a common disease in which the lining of the esophagus transitions from stratified squamous epithelium to metaplastic columnar epithelium that predisposes individuals to developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We hypothesized that BE provides a unique environment for increased long-interspersed element 1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition. To this end, we evaluated 5 patients with benign BE, 5 patients with BE and concomitant EAC, and 10 additional patients with EAC to determine L1 activity in this progressive disease. After L1-seq, we confirmed 118 somatic insertions by PCR in 10 of 20 individuals. We observed clonal amplification of several insertions which appeared to originate in normal esophagus (NE) or BE and were later clonally expanded in BE or in EAC. Additionally, we observed evidence of clonality within the EAC cases; specifically, 22 of 25 EAC-only insertions were present identically in distinct regions available from the same tumor, suggesting that these insertions occurred in the founding tumor cell of these lesions. L1 proteins must be expressed for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), a protein encoded by L1, in eight of the EAC cases for which formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue was available. With immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p in all tumors evaluated. Interestingly, we also observed dim ORF1p immunoreactivity in histologically NE of all patients. In summary, our data show that somatic retrotransposition occurs early in many patients with BE and EAC and indicate that early events occurring even in histologically NE cells may be clonally expanded in esophageal adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:26283398

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Chen, Hao; Hu, Yuhui; Djukic, Zorka; Tevebaugh, Whitney; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Orlando, Roy C.; Hu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    The barrier function of the esophageal epithelium is a major defense against gastroesophageal reflux disease. Previous studies have shown that reflux damage is reflected in a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance associated with tight junction alterations in the esophageal epithelium. To develop novel therapies, it is critical to understand the molecular mechanisms whereby contact with a refluxate impairs esophageal barrier function. In this study, surgical models of duodenal and mixed reflux were developed in mice. Mouse esophageal epithelium was analyzed by gene microarray. Gene set enrichment analysis showed upregulation of inflammation-related gene sets and the NF-κB pathway due to reflux. Significance analysis of microarrays revealed upregulation of NF-κB target genes. Overexpression of NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65) and NF-κB target genes (matrix metalloproteinases-3 and -9, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) confirmed activation of the NF-κB pathway in the esophageal epithelium. In addition, real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining also showed downregulation and mislocalization of claudins-1 and -4. In a second animal experiment, treatment with an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085 (20 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip for 10 days), counteracted the effects of duodenal and mixed reflux on epithelial resistance and NF-κB-regulated cytokines. We conclude that gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice and that targeting the NF-κB pathway may strengthen esophageal barrier function against reflux. PMID:23639809

  18. 5-ALA/PpIX fluorescence detection of esophageal and stomach neoplasia: effects of autofluorescence background from normal and inflammatory areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Lachezar

    2008-12-01

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging. In the case of 2-D video visualization the problem of relatively high levels of the autofluorescence signal in the red spectral region gives low contrast between normal and abnormal mucosa when standard CCD camera of the endoscope is applied. Sensitized inflammatory areas also give to the observer in 2-D mode low contrast between malignant areas and benign tissues and finally the emission signals are additionally altered from the re-absorption of the chromophores accumulated in the tissue investigated. The possibilities for proper discrimination between normal, inflammatory and malignant tissues using 5-ALA/PpIX and both - advantages and limitations of 1-D and 2-D fluorescent detection modes are discussed in relation to their clinical applicability.

  19. Esophageal Granular Cell Tumor and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Two Interesting Entities Identified in the Same Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lucendo, Alfredo J.; De Rezende, Livia; Martín-Plaza, Jesús; Larrauri, Javier

    2008-01-01

    We illustrate the case of a 41-year-old male with allergic manifestations since childhood. He sought medical attention for intermittent, progressive dysphagia from which he had been suffering for a number of years, having felt the sensation of a retrosternal lump and a self-limited obstruction to the passage of food. Endoscopy detected a submucosal tumor in the upper third of the esophagus, which was typified, via biopsy, as a granular cell tumor with benign characteristics and probably responsible for the symptoms. Two years later, the patient sought medical attention once again as these symptoms had not abated, hence digestive endoscopy was repeated. This revealed stenosis of the junction between the middle and lower thirds of the organ which had not been detected previously but was passable under gentle pressure. Eosinophilic esophagitis was detected after biopsies were taken. Esophageal manometry identified a motor disorder affecting the esophageal body. Following three months of treatment using fluticasone propionate applied topically, the symptoms went into remission, esophageal stenosis disappeared and the esophageal biopsies returned to normal. This is the first documented case of the link between granular cell tumors and Eosinophilic esophagitis, two different disorders which could cause dysphagia in young patients. PMID:21490835

  20. Generation and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Esophageal Myofibroblast Line

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chao; Chauhan, Uday; Gargus, Matthew; Shaker, Anisa

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells with a myofibroblast phenotype present in the normal human esophagus are increased in individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We have previously demonstrated that myofibroblasts stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion using primary cultures of myofibroblasts established from normal human esophagus. While primary cultures have the advantage of reflecting the in vivo environment, a short life span and unavoidable heterogeneity limits the usefulness of this model in larger scale in vitro cellular signaling studies. The major aim of this paper therefore was to generate a human esophageal myofibroblast line with an extended lifespan. In the work presented here we have generated and characterized an immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast line by transfection with a commercially available GFP-hTERT lentivirus. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts demonstrate phenotypic, genotypic and functional similarity to primary cultures of esophageal myofibroblasts we have previously described. We found that immortalized esophageal myofibroblasts retain myofibroblast spindle-shaped morphology at low and high confluence beyond passage 80, and express α-SMA, vimentin, and CD90 myofibroblast markers. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also express the putative acid receptor TRPV1 and TLR4 and retain the functional capacity to respond to stimuli encountered in GERD with secretion of IL-6. Finally, immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also support the stratified growth of squamous esophageal epithelial cells in 3D organotypic cultures. This newly characterized immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast cell line can be used in future cellular signaling and co-culture studies. PMID:27055018

  1. Generation and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Esophageal Myofibroblast Line.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Chauhan, Uday; Gargus, Matthew; Shaker, Anisa

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells with a myofibroblast phenotype present in the normal human esophagus are increased in individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We have previously demonstrated that myofibroblasts stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion using primary cultures of myofibroblasts established from normal human esophagus. While primary cultures have the advantage of reflecting the in vivo environment, a short life span and unavoidable heterogeneity limits the usefulness of this model in larger scale in vitro cellular signaling studies. The major aim of this paper therefore was to generate a human esophageal myofibroblast line with an extended lifespan. In the work presented here we have generated and characterized an immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast line by transfection with a commercially available GFP-hTERT lentivirus. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts demonstrate phenotypic, genotypic and functional similarity to primary cultures of esophageal myofibroblasts we have previously described. We found that immortalized esophageal myofibroblasts retain myofibroblast spindle-shaped morphology at low and high confluence beyond passage 80, and express α-SMA, vimentin, and CD90 myofibroblast markers. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also express the putative acid receptor TRPV1 and TLR4 and retain the functional capacity to respond to stimuli encountered in GERD with secretion of IL-6. Finally, immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also support the stratified growth of squamous esophageal epithelial cells in 3D organotypic cultures. This newly characterized immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast cell line can be used in future cellular signaling and co-culture studies. PMID:27055018

  2. Quantitative analysis of disturbed cell maturation in dysplastic lesions of the respiratory tract epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Nettesheim, P.; Topping, D.C.; Olson, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Autoradiographic patterns of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation, nuclear/cytoplasmic ratios (N/C), and the percentage of dark epithelial cells were analyzed in a group of epithelial lesions induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) in rat tracheal transplants. It was found that similar lesions of different age exhibit the same labeling indices (LIs), therefore the lesions of different age were subsequently pooled in the following groups and studied by high resolution light microscopic autoradiography: squamous metaplasia without or with only mild atypia, squamous metaplasia with moderate atypia, squamous metaplasia with severe atypia, carcinoma in situ, and microinvasive carcinoma. Normal tracheal and esophageal epithelia were also analyzed. Gradients of increasing N/C (nucleus-cytoplasm ratios) values could be observed as the lesions increased in severity, especially in the middle and surface layers (e.g., in the surface layer regular metaplasia N/C = 0.08, squamous metaplasia with moderate atypia N/C = 0.26, and carcinoma in situ N/C = 0.50). Dark cells were absent in the normal esophageal epithelium, were present in moderate numbers in the basal layer of regular squamous metaplasia (18%), and increased markedly in the atypical epithelial lesions (approximately 50% in the atypical squamous metaplasias and 70% in carcinoma in situ). In the suprabasal layer dark cells increased from 3% in squamous metaplasia with moderate atypia to 28% in metaplasia with severe atypia and 56% in carcinoma in situ. The results confirm in a quantitative fashion that disturbances of cell maturation and cell proliferation are key features of dysplastic lesions induced by chemical carcinogens, and suggest the use of objective parameters for evaluation and classification of preneoplastic alterations.

  3. The functional relationships between hiatal hernia and reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Park, H J; Lee, J D; Jung, J K; Moon, B S; Collins, P J; Park, I S

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate functional studies by which the hiatal hernia (HH) may be relevant to a reflux esophagitis (RE). Group I consisted of healthy controls who were endoscopically normal (n = 21). Group II consisted of patients with hiatal hernia but no reflux esophagitis (n = 8). Group III had patients with hiatal hernia with reflux esophagitis (n = 9). Group IV had patients with reflux esophagitis but no hiatal hernia (n = 16). Esophageal manometry, ambulatory 24 hour intraesophageal pH monitoring, acid clearance test, and gastric emptying scan were performed in each of the patients. The contraction amplitude at 3 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter did not differ significantly among the four groups, but the mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was significantly decreased in group II. The DeMeester score in ambulatory 24 hour intraesophageal pH monitoring was significantly higher in group III compared with the controls. No significant difference among the groups was found with respect to acid clearance. Total and proximal gastric emptying times (T1/2) were significantly delayed in group III. We found that hiatal hernia combined with delayed gastric emptying may bear a relationship to the multifactorial origins of reflux esophagitis, and we suggest a rationale for using prokinetic agents as the therapeutic regimen in patients with HH complicated by RE. PMID:8942298

  4. [Is an esophageal transit scintigram necessary in patients with gastroesophageal reflux?].

    PubMed

    T?ranu, D; Oproiu, C; Aposteanu, G; Jovin, G; Murgoci, P; Timi?, E; Oproiu, A

    1989-01-01

    Efficient esophageal clearance has an important defence role in the pathogenesis of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Many GERD patients have esophageal disturbances associated with or secondary to reflux, producing delayed clearance. This delay exposes the esophageal mucosa to the reflux acid content. To determine esophageal transit we scanned the esophageal transit of a 15 ml bolus containing colloidal 300/cCi 99m Tc. The esophageal transit was calculated in seconds according to formula E.T. = T 1/2 x 5. The study included 74 GERD patients. The following investigations were carried out in all the cases: esophageal X-ray, GER scintigram, endoscopy, esophageal biopsy, Bernstein test and esophageal transit scintigram. Endoscopy revealed lesions of the esophagus (of 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree) in 39 patients, Barrett syndrome in 8 cases and normal in 27. Esophageal transit scanning was normal in 18 cases (24%), and prolonged in 56 cases (76%). Only 7 (39%) of the 18 patients with a normal transit presented lesions of the mucosa, the latter being more frequent in patients with a prolonged transit, i.e. 40 of 56 patients (71.5%). The mean value of the transit in different degrees of esophagitis (I, II, III) and Barrett syndrome were: 12.73 +/- 5.36; 13.30 +/- 7.90; 10.35 +/- 5.78; 17.25 +/- 11.17. In conclusion esophageal transit scanning is a useful test in GERD patients as it has a prognostic value. A prolonged esophageal transit is frequently associated with lesions, the more severe the slower is the transit. Moreover the test may indicate certain drugs acting upon the esophageal motor disturbances. PMID:2573947

  5. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  6. Relationships between Micro-Vascular and Iodine-Staining Patterns in the Vicinity of the Tumor Front of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shunsuke; Kawada, Kenro; Swangsri, Jirawat; Fujiwara, Naoto; Saito, Katsumasa; Fujiwara, Hisashi; Ryotokuji, Tairo; Okada, Takuya; Miyawaki, Yutaka; Tohkairin, Yutaka; Nakajima, Yasuaki; Kumagai, Youichi; Nagai, Kagami; Ito, Takashi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Tatsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between micro-vascular and iodine-staining patterns in the vicinity of the tumor fronts of superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs). Methods Ten consecutive patients with ESCCs who were treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) were enrolled. At the edge of the iodine-unstained area, we observed 183 sites in total using image-enhanced magnifying endoscopy. We classified the micro-vascular and iodine-staining patterns into three types: Type A, in which the line of vascular change matched the border of the iodine-unstained area; Type B, in which the border of the iodine-unstained area extended beyond the line of vascular change; Type C, in which the line of vascular change extended beyond the border of the iodine-unstained area. Then, by examining histopathological sections, we compared the diameter of intra-papillary capillary loops (IPCLs) in cancerous areas and normal squamous epithelium. Results We investigated 160 sites that the adequate quality of pictures were obtained. There was no case in which the line of vascular change completely matched the whole circumference of the border of an iodine-unstained area. Among the 160 sites, type A was recognized at 76 sites (47.5%), type B at 79 sites (49.4%), and type C at 5 sites (3.1%). Histological examination showed that the mean diameter of the IPCLs in normal squamous epithelium was 16.2±3.7μm, whereas that of IPCLs in cancerous lesions was 21.0±4.4μm. Conclusions The development of iodine-unstained areas tends to precede any changes in the vascularity of the esophageal surface epithelium. PMID:26301414

  7. Methylation in esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Long; Sui, Feng-Ying; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Xiao-Hong

    2006-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been demonstrated to be changes that are frequently involved in esophageal cancer pathogenesis. However, hypermethylation of CpG islands, an epigenetic event, is coming more and more into focus in carcinogenesis of the esophagus. Recent studies have proved that promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is frequently observed in esophageal carcinomas and seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this tumor type. In this review, we will discuss current research on genes that are hypermethylated in human esophageal cancer and precancerous lesions of the esophagus. We will also discuss the potential use of hypermethylated genes as targets for detection, prognosis and treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:17109513

  8. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines) can keep a peptic stricture from returning. Surgery is rarely needed. If you have eosinophilic esophagitis, you may need to take medicines or make changes to your diet to reduce the inflammation. In some cases, dilation is done.

  9. Comparison of long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs and messenger RNAs involved in initiation and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, SU-QING; LI, FENG; XIAO, YUN; WANG, CHUN-MEI; TUO, LEI; HU, JING; YANG, XIAO-BIN; WANG, JIN-SONG; SHI, WEI-HONG; LI, XIA; CAO, XIU-FENG

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, cancer research has focused on protein-coding genes, which are considered the principal effectors and regulators of tumorigenesis. Non-coding RNAs, in particular microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), have been widely reported to be important in the regulation of tumorigenesis and cancer development. However, to the best of our knowledge, investigation of the expression profiles of lncRNAs and a comparison of the involvement of lncRNAs, miRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in esophageal tumorigenesis and development have not previously been performed. In the current study, intrinsic associations among the expression profiles of lncRNAs, miRNAs and mRNAs from normal esophageal tissues and those from cancer tissues were investigated. Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to detect the expression profiles of the three types of RNA in the canceration processes of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues. It was demonstrated that the different RNAs exhibit associated patterns of expression among normal esophageal epithelium, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (LGIN), high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN), and carcinoma tissues, particularly in the critical period of canceration (HGIN to ESCC). Furthermore, the results indicated a high level of similarity in the potential function of lncRNAs, miRNAs and mRNAs in the processes of ESCC development. In the current study, a first generation atlas of lncRNA profiling and its association with miRNAs and mRNAs in the canceration processes of ESCC were presented. PMID:24888564

  10. Endoscopic and Abdominal Management of Complete Benign Esophageal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Benign esophageal strictures leading to complete esophageal occlusion are well known. In the pre-endoscopic era, such cases required surgery, but over the last decade, various novel endoscopic techniques have been developed to prevent morbidity and mortality. A 37-year-old man presented after 1 year of dysphagia and weight loss, and was found to have complete esophageal obstruction, not allowing even passage of guidewire. We used a combination antegrade endoscopic abdominal procedures to deploy a stent, obviating the need for surgery. His symptoms improved dramatically, and the stent was successfully removed 12 weeks later. He is now swallowing normally and has gained significant weight. PMID:27144192

  11. Altered esophageal histamine receptor expression in Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE): implications on disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Merves, Jamie; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Benitez, Alain J; Muir, Amanda B; Lee, Anna J; Lim, Diana M; Dods, Kara; Mehta, Isha; Ruchelli, Eduardo D; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Spergel, Jonathan M; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic disorder, whose pathobiology is incompletely understood. Histamine-producing cells including mast cells and basophils have been implicated in EoE. However, very little is currently known about the role of histamine and histamine receptor (HR) expression and signaling in the esophageal epithelium. Herein, we characterized HR (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) expression in human esophageal biopsies and investigate the role of histamine signaling in inducible cytokine expression in human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. HR expression was quantified in esophageal biopsies from non-EoE control (N = 23), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf, N = 26) and active EoE (>15 eos/hpf, N = 22) subjects using qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent localization. HR expression and histamine-mediated cytokine secretion were evaluated in human primary and telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells. H1R, H2R, and H4R expression were increased in active EoE biopsies compared to inactive EoE and controls. H2R was the most abundantly expressed receptor, and H3R expression was negligible in all 3 cohorts. Infiltrating eosinophils expressed H1R, H2R, and H4R, which contributed to the observed increase in HR in active subjects. H1R and H2R, but not H3R or H4R, were constitutively expressed by primary and immortalized cells, and epithelial histamine stimulation induced GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-8, but not TSLP or eotaxin-3 secretion. Epithelial priming with the TLR3 ligand poly (I:C) induced H1R and H2R expression, and enhanced histamine-induced GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-8 secretion. These effects were primarily suppressed by H1R antagonists, but unaffected by H2R antagonism. Histamine directly activates esophageal epithelial cytokine secretion in vitro in an H1R dependent fashion. However, H1R, H2R and H4R are induced in active inflammation in EoE in vivo. While systemic antihistamine (anti-H1R) therapy may not induce clinical remission in EoE, our study suggests that further study of histamine receptor signaling in EoE is warranted and that targeting of additional histamine receptors may lead to novel treatment strategies for this important disease. PMID:25723478

  12. Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... Return to Web version Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Overview What is esophageal atresia? In babies who ... gets into the stomach. What is a tracheoesophageal fistula? A fistula (say “fist-you-lah”) is a ...

  13. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the stomach. It is a test for gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ). In infants, this test is also ... to: Barrett's esophagus Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) Esophageal scarring Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Heartburn Reflux esophagitis You may need ...

  14. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics of drug-induced esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Jeong, Ji Bong; Kim, Ji Won; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Chang, Mee Soo; Im, Jong Pil; Kang, Hyoun Woo; Shin, Cheol Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate clinical, endoscopic and pathological characteristics of drug-induced esophagitis. METHODS: Data for patients diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis from April 2002 to May 2013 was reviewed. Patients diagnosed with malignancy, viral or fungal esophagitis were excluded. Clinical, endoscopic and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis were analyzed. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were diagnosed with drug-induced esophagitis. Their mean age was 43.9 ± 18.9 years and 35.9% were male. Common symptoms were chest pain (71.8%), odynophagia (38.5%) and dysphagia (29.5%). The endoscopic location was in the middle third of esophagus in 78.2%. Endoscopic findings were ulcer (82.1%), erosion (17.9%), ulcer with bleeding (24.4%), coating with drug material (5.1%), impacted pill fragments (3.8%) and stricture (2.6%). Kissing ulcers were observed in 43.6%. The main causative agents were antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. All the patients were treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or sucralfate, and the causative drugs were discontinued. Nineteen patients with drug-induced esophagitis were followed up with endoscopy and revealed normal findings, scars or healing ulcers. CONCLUSION: Drug-induced esophagitis mainly presents as chest pain, odynophagia and dysphagia, and may be successfully treated with PPIs and discontinuation of the causative drug. Kissing ulcers were observed in 43.6%. PMID:25152603

  15. Tenascin-C, a Prognostic Determinant of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen-Hua; Lee, Hak-Min; Xuan, Yan-Hua; Cui, Yan; Kim, Seok-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Tenascin-C, an adhesion modulatory extracellular matrix molecule, is highly expressed in numerous human malignancies; thus, it may contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We explored the clinicopathological significance of Tenascin-C as a prognostic determinant of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods In ESCC patient tissues and cell lines, the presence of isoforms were examined using western blotting. We then investigated Tenascin-C immunohistochemical expression in 136 ESCC tissue samples. The clinical relevance of Tenascin-C expression and the correlation between Tenascin-C expression and expression of other factors related to cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were also determined. Results Both 250 and 350 kDa sized isoforms of Tenascin-C were expressed only in esophageal cancer tissue not in normal tissue. Furthermore, both isoforms were also identified in all of four CAFs derived from esophageal cancer tissues. Tenascin-C expression was remarkably higher in ESCC than in adjacent non-tumor esophageal epithelium (p < 0.001). Tenascin-C expression in ESCC stromal fibroblasts was associated with patient’s age, tumor (pT) stage, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage, and cancer recurrence. Tenascin-C expression in cancer cells was correlated with an increase in tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) population, cancer recurrence, and hypoxia inducible factor1α (HIF1α) expression. Moreover, Tenascin-C overexpression in cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). In the Cox proportional hazard regression model, Tenascin-C overexpression in cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts was a significant independent hazard factor for OS and DFS in ESCC patients in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, Tenascin-C expression in stromal fibroblasts of the ESCC patients was positively correlated with platelet-derived growth factor α (PDGFRα), PDGFRβ, and smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression. The 5-year OS and DFS rates were remarkably lower in patients with positive expressions of both Tenascin-C and PDGFRα (p < 0.001), Tenascin-C and PDGFRβ (p < 0.001), Tenascin-C and SMA (p < 0.001), Tenascin-C and fibroblast activation protein (FAP) (p < 0.001), and Tenascin-C and fibroblast-stimulating protein-1 (FSP1) (p < 0.001) in ESCC stromal fibroblasts than in patients with negative expressions of both Tenascin-C and one of the abovementioned CAF markers. Conclusion Our results show that Tenascin-C is a reliable and significant prognostic factor in ESCC. Tenascin-C may thus be a potent ESCC therapeutic target. PMID:26731558

  16. Low mean impedance in 24-hour tracings and esophagitis in children: a strong connection.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, S; Salvatoni, A; Ummarino, D; Ghanma, A; Van der Pol, R; Rongen, A; Fuoti, M; Meneghin, F; Benninga, M Alexander; Vandenplas, Y

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal multiple intraluminal impedance baseline is an additional impedance parameter that was recently related to esophageal integrity. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between mean esophageal impedance value and endoscopic findings in a large group of children. Children with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux submitted to both endoscopy and impedance were included. Esophagitis was graded according to the Los Angeles classification. Mean impedance value was automatically calculated over 24-hour tracings. Data were adjusted for age through z-score transformation using percentiles normalized by the LMS (Lambda for the skew, Mu for the median, and Sigma for the generalized coefficient of variation) method. Nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests, multiple, and stepwise regression were used. P-value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. A total of 298 impedance tracings were analyzed. Endoscopic and histological esophagitis were detected in 30 and 29% patients, respectively. Median baseline z-score was significantly decreased both in proximal (P = 0.02) and distal (P = 0.01) esophagus in patients with endoscopic (but not histological) esophagitis. Patients with more severe esophagitis showed the lowest z-score. Bolus exposure index and the number of reflux episodes were the variables that were significantly associated with the baseline z-score. Impedance z-score is significantly decreased in infants and children with endoscopic esophagitis. Severity of esophagitis, bolus exposure index, and number of reflux episodes are factors influencing mean esophageal impedance. PMID:25345864

  17. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and CD44 splicing variants sharing exons 6 and 9 on gastric and esophageal carcinomas: a two-color flow-cytometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Maruyama, T; Adachi, S

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative analysis based on the percentage of positive cells by two-color flow cytometry was used to quantify the surface expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and exons v6 and v9 of CD44 splice variants on tumor. Almost all patients with primary gastric and esophageal carcinomas, and benign mucosa of the stomach and esophagus showed usually high levels of EGFR expression, a mean of approximately 60% of cells being positive. Metastatic gastric carcinoma showed significantly higher levels of EGFR expression, a mean of 80% of cells being positive. Reduced expression of EGFR was observed in irradiated esophageal carcinoma. Adenocarcinomas, including primary and metastatic lesions, or cancer cell lines of the stomach revealed consistently very low or undetectable levels of expression of exon v6 of the CD44 variant (CD44v) protein. However, CD44v containing exon v9 could be detected in normal gastric epithelium and primary gastric carcinoma as well as in six adenocarcinoma cell lines. Exon v9 is significantly overexpressed on metastatic adenocarcinoma cells obtained from malignant ascites. On the other hand, normal squamous epithelium and primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the esophagus, and two SCC cell lines showed coexpression of exons v6 and v9 of CD44v. The expression of the CD44v6 molecule was significantly reduced in the irradiated primary SCC, although CD44v9 expression on the primary SCC remained unchanged after the radiation therapy. These results suggest that up-regulation of EGFR and CD44v9 molecules on gastric carcinomas, especially metastatic adenocarcinomas, shows tumor growth and tumor progression. In addition, down-regulation of EGFR and CD44v6 molecules on irradiated esophageal carcinoma may be involved in the mechanisms suppressing tumor growth and metastatic potential. PMID:10037277

  18. Upregulation of miRNA-143, -145, -192, and -194 in esophageal epithelial cells upon acidic bile salt stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bus, P; Siersema, P D; Verbeek, R E; van Baal, J W P M

    2014-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus that occurs because of chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Previous studies have identified BE-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) in comparison with normal squamous epithelium (SQ). We hypothesized that BE-specific miRNAs could be induced in esophageal SQ cells by exposure to acid and/or bile salts. We aimed to determine whether BE-specific miRNAs are upregulated in an esophageal SQ cell line (Het-1A) in an environment with acid and/or bile salts and whether this is nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent. Acid and/or bile salt incubations were performed in Het-1A cells. Experiments were performed with or without inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine expression of miRNA-143, -145, -192, -194, cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2), mucin 2 (MUC2), and sex determining region Y-box 9. For validation, we determined levels of these miRNAs in biopsies from patients with reflux esophagitis and normal SQ. Significantly increased expression levels of miRNA-143 (2.7-fold), -145 (2.6-fold), -192 (2.0-fold), -194 (2.2-fold), COX2, MUC2, and sex determining region Y-box 9 were found upon acidic bile salt incubation, but not upon acid or bile salt alone. NF-κB pathway inhibition significantly decreased miRNA-143, -192, -194, COX2, and MUC2 expression. Additionally, miRNA-143, -145 and -194 expression was increased in reflux esophagitis biopsies compared with normal SQ, but no changes were found in miRNA-192 expression. Our findings suggest that upregulation of BE-specific miRNAs by acidic bile may be an early event in the transition of SQ to BE and that their expression is partly regulated by the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24006894

  19. Reliability of balloon-mesh cytology in detecting esophageal carcinoma in a population of US veterans.

    PubMed

    Tsang, T K; Hidvegi, D; Horth, K; Ostrow, J D

    1987-02-01

    A catheter, equipped with a terminal balloon covered with nylon mesh, was developed to study the reliability of abrasive cytology for the diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma. Eighty-seven balloon cytology analyses were attempted in 82 subjects. Four patients were unable to swallow the balloon. In the 78 successful attempts, the initial diagnoses were: esophagitis (34) and esophageal carcinoma (13), established by endoscopic examination and histologic sampling; and normal esophagus (31) confirmed histologically in 25. The remaining 6 controls were younger than 40 years old, without any significant history of smoking, drinking and esophageal symptoms. For esophageal carcinoma, the sensitivity of balloon cytology was 91% and the specificity was 94% with four false-positives. Balloon cytology was generally well-tolerated and easily performed. This method is now being tested for screening high-risk patients for esophageal carcinoma. PMID:3791164

  20. Virological Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Esophagitis by Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jazeron, Jean-François; Barbe, Coralie; Frobert, Emilie; Renois, Fanny; Talmud, Déborah; Brixi-Benmansour, Hedia; Brodard, Véronique; Andréoletti, Laurent; Diebold, Marie-Danièle

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) esophagitis diagnosis is routinely based on the endoscopic findings confirmed by histopathological examination of the esophagitis lesions. Virological diagnosis is not systematically performed and restricted to viral culture or to qualitative PCR assay from esophagitis biopsy specimens. The aim of this study was to assess the interest of quantitative real-time PCR assay in HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis by comparing the results obtained to those of histological examination associated with immunohistochemical staining, which is considered the “gold standard.” From 53 esophagitis biopsy specimens, the PCR assay detected HSV-1 in 18 of 19 histologically proven to have herpetic esophagitis and in 9 of 34 that had esophagitis related to other causes, demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 94.7%, 73%, 66.7%, and 96%, respectively. Interestingly, HSV-1 was not detected in 16 specimens without the histological aspect of esophagitis. The viral loads normalized per μg of total extracted DNA in each biopsy specimen detected positive by HSV PCR were then compared and appeared to be significantly higher in histopathologically positive herpetic esophagitis (median = 2.9 × 106 ± 1.1 × 108) than in histopathologically negative herpetic esophagitis (median = 3.1 × 103 ± 6.2 × 103) (P = 0.0009). Moreover, a receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed that a viral load threshold greater than 2.5 × 104 copies would allow an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis with a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, this work demonstrated that HSV quantitative PCR results for paraffin-embedded esophageal tissue was well correlated to histopathological findings for an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis and could be diagnostic through viral load assessment when histopathological results are missing or uncertain. PMID:22170921

  1. Virological diagnosis of herpes simplex virus 1 esophagitis by quantitative real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Jazeron, Jean-François; Barbe, Coralie; Frobert, Emilie; Renois, Fanny; Talmud, Déborah; Brixi-Benmansour, Hedia; Brodard, Véronique; Andréoletti, Laurent; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Lévêque, Nicolas

    2012-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) esophagitis diagnosis is routinely based on the endoscopic findings confirmed by histopathological examination of the esophagitis lesions. Virological diagnosis is not systematically performed and restricted to viral culture or to qualitative PCR assay from esophagitis biopsy specimens. The aim of this study was to assess the interest of quantitative real-time PCR assay in HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis by comparing the results obtained to those of histological examination associated with immunohistochemical staining, which is considered the "gold standard." From 53 esophagitis biopsy specimens, the PCR assay detected HSV-1 in 18 of 19 histologically proven to have herpetic esophagitis and in 9 of 34 that had esophagitis related to other causes, demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 94.7%, 73%, 66.7%, and 96%, respectively. Interestingly, HSV-1 was not detected in 16 specimens without the histological aspect of esophagitis. The viral loads normalized per μg of total extracted DNA in each biopsy specimen detected positive by HSV PCR were then compared and appeared to be significantly higher in histopathologically positive herpetic esophagitis (median = 2.9 × 10(6) ± 1.1 × 10(8)) than in histopathologically negative herpetic esophagitis (median = 3.1 × 10(3) ± 6.2 × 10(3)) (P = 0.0009). Moreover, a receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed that a viral load threshold greater than 2.5 × 10(4) copies would allow an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis with a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, this work demonstrated that HSV quantitative PCR results for paraffin-embedded esophageal tissue was well correlated to histopathological findings for an HSV-1 esophagitis diagnosis and could be diagnostic through viral load assessment when histopathological results are missing or uncertain. PMID:22170921

  2. Esophageal diverticulum exposed during endoscopic submucosal dissection of superficial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ishida, Tsukasa; Hoshi, Namiko; Morita, Yoshinori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now widely accepted as a strategy to treat superficial esophageal neoplasms. The rate of adverse events, such as perforation, has been decreasing with the improvement of devices and techniques. In this paper, we report a case of esophageal cancer that had a diverticulum under cancerous epithelium. The diverticulum was not detected during preoperative examination, and led to perforation during the ESD procedure. Our case shows that, although rare, some diverticula can exist underneath the mucosal surface without obvious depression. If there is any sign of hidden diverticula during ESD, surgeons should proceed with caution or, depending on the case, the procedure should be discontinued to avoid adverse events. PMID:25780314

  3. Alterations in p53 expression and cell proliferation in esophageal epithelia among patients from geographical areas with high or low incidence of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Dong; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Yu-Chun; Li, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Wen-Ping; He, Ling; Gao, Shan-Shan; Li, Young-Xin

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study changes in p53 expression and cell proliferation in esophageal epithelia of subjects from high or low esophageal cancer incidence areas in Henan Province to understand their molecular basis. METHODS: Esophageal endoscopic mucosa biopsies were acquired and histopathological examinations were performed on 220 subjects from high esophageal cancer incidence areas and 50 subjects from low incidence areas in Henan Province. Esophageal epithelia were diagnosed as normal, basal cell hyperplasia or dysplasia based on cell morphology and tissue structure. Immunohistochemistry avidin biotin peroxidase complex (ABC method) was performed to analyze alterations in p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in normal epithelia and epithelia with different lesion severities. The numbers of p53-positive and PCNA-positive cells were counted. RESULTS: p53- and PCNA-positive nuclei were present in esophageal epithelia from subjects from both high and low incidence areas. The number of PCNA-positive cells gradually increased with lesion severity for both the high and low incidence areas. The number of p53-positive cells was higher in high incidence areas compared to low incidence areas, and rapidly increased with lesion severity. p53 expression positively correlated with PCNA expression. CONCLUSION: The number of both p53- and PCNA-positive cells increased with lesion severity. p53 expression was higher in subjects from high esophageal cancer incidence areas compared to those from low incidence areas. These results may shed light into the molecular basis for the geographical distribution of esophageal cancer.

  4. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  5. Bacterial esophagitis associated with CD4+ T-lymphocytopenia without HIV infection. Possible role of corticosteroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Richert, S M; Orchard, J L

    1995-01-01

    Although infectious esophagitis is usually due to infection with Candida, herpes virus, or cytomegalovirus, bacterial esophagitis is occasionally observed. Recently, patients have been reported with CD4+ T-lymphocytopenia without HIV infection. Bacterial esophagitis per se has not been reported in these patients. We report the case of an 80-year-old patient admitted with a COPD exacerbation after being on chronic steroids. The patient developed esophageal symptoms and was found to have bacterial esophagitis by biopsy. Her CD4+ counts were found to be low, but she denied HIV risk factors and HIV testing was negative. Her CD4+ counts rose into the normal range as her steroids were tapered, and her esophagitis improved on antibiotics. This case is reported to alert physicians to the possible association of bacterial esophagitis with CD4+ T-lymphocytopenia without HIV infection and to discuss the possible etiological role of corticosteroid treatment. PMID:7821107

  6. Endoscopic resection of an esophageal leiomyoma with overlying dysplasia without specialized equipment.

    PubMed

    Ismaila, B O; Davwar, P M

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are rare benign esophageal tumors. Association of this subepithelial lesion with abnormal epithelium is rarer. Endoscopic mucosal resection is an alternative to surgery for removing suitable mucosal and submucosal lesions from the gastrointestinal tract. This procedure is seldom performed in developing countries due to limited equipment and expertise. We describe a case of esophageal leiomyoma with overlying dysplasia in the mid esophagus that was completely removed endoscopically in a developing country without the standard accessory equipment. Traditional thoracotomy would have been associated with higher cost and morbidity. PMID:27022812

  7. The pathogenesis of chronic eosinophilic esophagitis in SHARPIN-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chien, Syu-Jhe; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; HogenEsch, Harm; Sundberg, John P

    2015-12-01

    Increased numbers of eosinophils in the esophagus are common in several esophageal and systemic diseases, and a prominent feature of eosinophilic esophagitis. Mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms of eosinophil infiltration and their pathogenic role. SHARPIN-deficient cpdm mice develop a chronic proliferative dermatitis and an esophagitis characterized by epithelial hyperplasia and the accumulation of eosinophils in the serosa, submucosa, lamina propria and epithelium of the esophagus. We conducted a detailed investigation of the pathogenesis of the esophagitis by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression as the mice aged from 4 to 10 weeks. The thickness of the esophageal epithelium and the number of eosinophils in the esophagus both increased with age. There were scattered apoptotic epithelial cells in mice at 6-10 weeks of age that reacted with antibodies to activated caspase 3 and caspase 9. The expression of CCL11 (eotaxin-1), IL4, IL13 and TSLP was increased in cpdm mice compared with wild type (WT) mice, and there was no change in the expression of CCL24 (eotaxin-2), IL5 and IL33. The expression of chitinase-like 3 and 4 (YM1 and YM2) proteins, markers of type 2 inflammation, was greatly increased in cpdm mice, and this was replicated in vitro by incubation of WT esophagus in the presence of IL4 and IL13. Immunohistochemistry showed that these proteins were localized in esophageal epithelial cells. The severity of the esophagitis was not affected by crossing SHARPIN-deficient mice with lymphocyte-deficient Rag1 null mice indicating that the inflammation is independent of B and T lymphocytes. PMID:26321245

  8. Methyl-methanesulfonate sensitivity 19 expression is associated with metastasis and chemoradiotherapy response in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Hui-Yun; Yang, Qing; Lin, Shi-Yong; Luo, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical significance of methyl-methanesulfonate sensitivity 19 (MMS19) expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: Between June 2008 and May 2013, specimens from 103 patients who underwent endoscopic biopsy for the diagnosis of ESCC at the endoscopy center of Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center were collected; 52 matched-normal esophageal squamous epithelium samples were biopsied as controls. MMS19 protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. Of the 103 cases of ESCC, 49 received radical surgery following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisting of concurrent radiation in a total dose of 40 Gy and two cycles of chemotherapy with vinorelbine and cisplatin. Relationships between MMS19 expression, clinicopathologic characteristics and chemoradiotherapy response were analyzed. RESULTS: The MMS19 protein could be detected in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of most specimens. High cytoplasmic expression of MMS19 was detected in 63.1% of ESCC samples, whereas high nuclear expression of MMS19 was found in 35.0%. High cytoplasmic MMS19 expression was associated with regional lymph node metastases (OR = 11.3, 95%CI: 2.3-54.7; P < 0.001) and distant metastases (OR = 13.1, 95%CI: 1.7-103.0; P = 0.002). Furthermore, high cytoplasmic MMS19 expression was associated with a response of ESCC to chemoradiotherapy (OR = 11.5, 95%CI: 3.0-44.5; P < 0.001), with a high cytoplasmic MMS19 expression rates in 79.3% and 25.0% of patients from the good chemoradiotherapy response group and poor response group, respectively. Nuclear MMS19 expression did not show any significant association with clinicopathologic characteristics or chemoradiotherapy response in ESCC. CONCLUSION: The results of our preliminary study suggest that MMS19 may be a potential new predictor of metastasis and chemoradiotherapy response in ESCC. PMID:25892874

  9. Relationship between esophageal clinical symptoms and manometry findings in patients with esophageal motility disorders: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    FakhreYaseri, Hashem; FakhreYaseri, Ali Mohammad; Baradaran Moghaddam, Ali; Soltani Arabshhi, Seyed Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Manometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test for motility disorders in the esophagus. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The diagnostic value of particular esophageal clinical symptoms among patients suspected of esophageal motor disorders (EMDs) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy of presenting esophageal symptoms between abnormal and normal esophageal manometry findings. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 623 patients aged 11-80 years. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated after high-resolution manometry plots were reviewed according to the most recent Chicago Criteria. Results: The clinical symptoms were not sensitive enough to discriminate between EMDs. Nevertheless, dysphagia, noncardiac chest pain, hoarseness, vomiting, and weight loss had high specificity and high accuracy to distinguish EMDs from normal findings. Regurgitation and heartburn did not have good accuracy for the diagnosis of EMDs. Conclusion: Clinical symptoms are not reliable enough to discriminate between EMDs. Clinical symptoms can, however, discriminate between normal findings and EMDs, especially achalasia. PMID:26793662

  10. Esophageal trichomoniasis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, D H; Bickford, A A; Charlton, B R; Cooper, G L

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal trichomoniasis has been rarely reported in chickens. At the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System-Turlock Branch, this disease was recently diagnosed in two cases submitted from backyard chicken flocks. The esophageal lesions observed were similar to those seen in several other important diseases of chickens. The causative trichomonad organisms were readily demonstrated on wet smears and by histologic studies. In both cases, the investigated flocks were afflicted with several concurrent diseases. California has experienced an increase in the number of small nontraditional chicken production operations. These facilities are sometimes in close proximity to commercial poultry operations and biosecurity barriers occasionally fail. The poor husbandry practices often used in these small flocks make them a potential reservoir for rare diseases such as trichomoniasis and also for disease organisms that are devastating to commercial poultry. PMID:8719231

  11. Aberrant esophageal HLA-DR expression in a high percentage of patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, G; Püspök, A; Peck-Radosavlevic, M; Kutilek, M; Lamprecht, A; Chott, A; Vogelsang, H; Stolte, M

    1999-08-01

    Esophageal histology is not well studied in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We, therefore, analyzed the histologic and immunohistologic appearance of esophageal mucosa in CD. Biopsy specimens taken from the esophagus of 57 consecutive patients with known CD of the large and/or small bowel, of 200 Crohn's-free controls, of 15 cases with ulcerative colitis, and of 5 cases with viral esophagitis were evaluated. In controls, most patients had either HLA-DR negative esophageal epithelium or showed focal or diffuse basal staining. HLA-DR expression of all epithelial layers (transepithelial staining) was observed in only four (2%) control subjects, in one case with herpes esophagitis, but not in patients with ulcerative colitis. In contrast, transepithelial HLA-DR expression was found in 19 (33%) patients with CD (p < 0.0001). In CD patients, it was associated with a significantly increased epithelial content in T-cells (CD3+, TIA-1+, granzyme B+), B-cells (CD79a+), natural killer cells (CD57+), and macrophages (CD68+). There was no correlation with either histological findings elsewhere in the upper gastrointestinal tract or with laboratory findings, symptoms, CDAI, or medication. Transepithelial esophageal HLA-DR expression is common in CD. Immunohistochemistry may prove useful in supporting the histologic diagnosis of CD in staging procedures, for initial diagnosis as well as in doubtful cases. PMID:10435568

  12. [A Case of Synchronous Multiple Esophageal Cancers Composed of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Barrett's Adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Arita, Tomohiro; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment for multiple superficial esophageal cancers. Screening upper gastrointestinal endoscopy examination revealed a superficial squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at the middle thoracic esophagus and Barrett's epithelium and a superficial adenocarcinoma at the abdominal esophagus. We performed a subtotal esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction via the retrosternal route. Pathological examination revealed a Barrett's adenocarcinoma at the abdominal esophagus. Esophageal cancer is thought to be a multicentric disease, and we sometimes find multiple esophageal cancers. In Japan, most cases of multiple esophageal cancers are composed of SCCs, and the occurrence of multiple esophageal cancers composed of SCC and Barrett's adenocarcinoma is rare. In contrast, the number of the patients with Barrett's esophagus is increasing, and the number of the patients with Barrett's adenocarcinoma also seems to be on the rise. Therefore, it is important be aware of the possibility of multiple esophageal cancers composed of SCC and Barrett's adenocarcinoma while making diagnoses. PMID:26805207

  13. Esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia esophagus: simultaneous or peristaltic?

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Ho; Patel, Nirali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-05-01

    Absence of peristalsis and impaired relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter are the hallmarks of achalasia esophagus. Based on the pressurization patterns, achalasia has been subdivided into three subtypes. The goal of our study was to evaluate the esophageal contraction pattern and bolus clearance in type 3 achalasia esophagus. High-resolution manometry (HRM) recordings of all patients diagnosed with achalasia esophagus in our center between the years 2011 and 2013 were reviewed. Recordings of 36 patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for the characteristics of swallow-induced "simultaneous esophageal contraction." The HRM impedance recordings of 14 additional patients with type 3 achalasia were analyzed for bolus clearance from the impedance recording. Finally, the HRM impedance along with intraluminal ultrasound imaging was conducted in six patients to further characterize the simultaneous esophageal contractions. Among 187 achalasia patients, 30 were type 1, 121 type 2, and 36 type 3. A total of 434 swallows evaluated in type 3 achalasia patients revealed that 95% of the swallow-induced contractions met criteria for simultaneous esophageal contraction, based on the onset of contraction. Interestingly, the peak and termination of the majority of simultaneous esophageal contractions were sequential. The HRM impedance revealed that 94% of the "simultaneous contractions" were associated with complete bolus clearance. Ultrasound image analysis revealed that baseline muscle thickness of patients in type 3 achalasia is larger than normal but the pattern of axial shortening is similar to that in normal subjects. The majority of esophageal contractions in type 3 achalasia are not true simultaneous contractions because the peak and termination of contraction are sequential and they are associated with complete bolus clearance. PMID:26950858

  14. Activin A expression in esophageal carcinoma and its association with tumor aggressiveness and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHENHUA; ZHANG, NING; SONG, RUIFENG; FAN, RUITAI; YANG, LIUQIN; WU, LIPING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of activin A in esophageal carcinoma and its association with tumor differentiation and metastasis. A total of 57 esophageal carcinoma patients and 36 controls were included in the current study. The mRNA and protein expression levels of activin A in esophageal tumors or normal esophageal tissues were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, the association of activin A expression with esophageal carcinoma differentiation, metastasis and recurrence postoperatively was analyzed. The mRNA and protein expression levels of activin A in esophageal carcinoma were significantly higher compared with those in normal esophageal tissues (P<0.05). The expression of activin A was higher in poorly-/moderately-differentiated esophageal tumor tissues compared with that of well-differentiated or control tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the expression of activin A in poorly-differentiated esophageal tumor tissues was higher compared with that of moderately-differentiated tissues (P<0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between differentiation degree and activin A expression. The expression of activin A was higher in patients with lymph node metastasis compared with those without metastasis (P<0.05). The cumulative survival rate of patients with a high expression of activin A at 1, 2 and 3 years postoperatively was significantly decreased compared with that of patients with a lower expression of activin A (P<0.05); by contrast, the cumulative recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with a lower activin A expression (P<0.05). In conclusion, abnormal expression of activin A was detected in esophageal tumor tissues, which was correlated with the tumor differentiation, metastasis, survival and recurrence. In conclusion, activin A may be used as an auxiliary index in the diagnosis and prognosis of clinical esophageal carcinoma. PMID:26170990

  15. Expression microarray analysis identifies novel epithelial-derived protein markers in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Matoso, Andres; Mukkada, Vincent A; Lu, Shaolei; Monahan, Renee; Cleveland, Kelly; Noble, Lelia; Mangray, Shamlal; Resnick, Murray B

    2013-05-01

    Gene expression studies in eosinophilic esophagitis support an immune-mediated etiology associated with differential regulation of inflammatory and epithelial-derived genes. We aimed to further characterize epithelial gene expression alterations in eosinophilic esophagitis and to explore the use of immunohistochemistry to identify these alterations. Esophageal biopsies from pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis before and after therapy with topical steroids (N=7) were screened by gene expression microarray and results were validated by RT-PCR. A larger group of eosinophilic esophagitis patients (N=42) was then used to evaluate protein expression by immunohistochemistry compared with reflux patients (N=15) and normal controls (N=17). Microarray and RT-PCR studies identified overexpression of ALOX15 and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced factor 6 (TNFAIP6) and underexpression of filaggrin (FLG), SLURP1 and cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) in eosinophilic esophagitis. Immunohistochemistry for ALOX15 was positive in 95% of eosinophilic esophagitis and negative in all controls, all eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy and all reflux biopsies (P<0.001). TNFAIP6 was positive in 88% of eosinophilic esophagitis samples versus 47% of controls, 29% of eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy and 40% of reflux samples (P=0.002). Overexpression of both ALOX15 and TNFAIP6 directly correlated with the degree of eosinophilic infiltration. FLG was positive in 88% of controls and 100% of reflux biopsies, but negative in all eosinophilic esophagitis samples, and its expression was regained in 86% of eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy patients (P<0.001). SLURP1 expression was positive in all controls and reflux samples, but only positive in 5% of eosinophilic esophagitis and was re-expressed to 100% positivity in eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy patients (P<0.001). The majority of controls (89%) and reflux biopsies (100%) were positive for CRISP3 while eosinophilic esophagitis before therapy were positive in 14% of samples (P<0.001) with partial recovery after treatment (43%, P=0.105). This study identified five epithelial-derived markers differentially expressed in eosinophilic esophagitis easily detectable by immunohistochemistry with potential diagnostic utility. PMID:23503644

  16. Genetics Home Reference: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tracheoesophageal Fistula and Esophageal Atresia Repair Health Topic: Esophagus Disorders Educational Resources (2 links) MalaCards: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula Orphanet: Esophageal atresia Patient Support ...

  17. Widespread Hypomethylation Occurs Early and Synergizes with Gene Amplification during Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Hector; Sohal, Davendra; Fazzari, Melissa J.; Yu, Yiting; Montagna, Christina; Montgomery, Elizabeth A.; Canto, Marcia; Dunbar, Kerry B.; Wang, Jean; Roa, Juan Carlos; Mo, Yongkai; Bhagat, Tushar; Ramesh, K. H.; Cannizzaro, Linda; Mollenhauer, J.; Thompson, Reid F.; Suzuki, Masako; Meltzer, Stephen; Melnick, Ari; Greally, John M.; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Although a combination of genomic and epigenetic alterations are implicated in the multistep transformation of normal squamous esophageal epithelium to Barrett esophagus, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma, the combinatorial effect of these changes is unknown. By integrating genome-wide DNA methylation, copy number, and transcriptomic datasets obtained from endoscopic biopsies of neoplastic progression within the same individual, we are uniquely able to define the molecular events associated progression of Barrett esophagus. We find that the previously reported global hypomethylation phenomenon in cancer has its origins at the earliest stages of epithelial carcinogenesis. Promoter hypomethylation synergizes with gene amplification and leads to significant upregulation of a chr4q21 chemokine cluster and other transcripts during Barrett neoplasia. In contrast, gene-specific hypermethylation is observed at a restricted number of loci and, in combination with hemi-allelic deletions, leads to downregulatation of selected transcripts during multistep progression. We also observe that epigenetic regulation during epithelial carcinogenesis is not restricted to traditionally defined “CpG islands,” but may also occur through a mechanism of differential methylation outside of these regions. Finally, validation of novel upregulated targets (CXCL1 and 3, GATA6, and DMBT1) in a larger independent panel of samples confirms the utility of integrative analysis in cancer biomarker discovery. PMID:21483804

  18. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in esophageal carcinoma in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Georgantis, Georgios; Syrakos, Theodoros; Agorastos, Theodoros; Miliaras, Spiridon; Gagalis, Asterios; Tsoulfas, Georgios; Spanos, Konstantinos; Marakis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To detect human papillomavirus (HPV) in the esophageal mucosa and the possible relationship with esophageal cancer in Greece. METHODS: Forty-nine patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and esophageal biopsy at a university hospital that acts as a referral center for Northern Greece. Nineteen of these patients (14 male and 5 female) had esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and 30 (15 male and 15 female) did not have any reported esophageal malignancy. Histopathological assessment was followed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of all the samples. Patient demographic data (age, sex, and place of birth) and information regarding smoking habits, alcohol consumption or sexual habits were collected. A method of statistical interference, verification of hypotheses based on homogeneity and independent χ2 test, was used. RESULTS: From the 49 patients that underwent EGD and biopsy, 19 had ESCC and 30 had normal esophageal mucosa, with a mean age of 65.2 years. Regarding the prevalence of oncogenic risk factors for esophageal carcinoma, an interesting conclusion was that 78% of the patients used tobacco and almost one-third had multiple sexual partners, whereas only 20% of the patients consumed alcohol, which was not statistically significant, when compared to the control group. In the ESCC group, the only two positive samples were among the male patients (2/14 male patients with ESCC, 14.5%). No HPV was identified in the control group. The predominant HPV types identified were 11 and 31, which have a low malignancy potential. The presence of HPV DNA in the ESCC group was not statistically significant, 95% confidence interval (χ2 = 3.292, P = 0.07). CONCLUSION: This is the first relevant study in Greece, and despite the lack of statistical significance, the issue of HPV infection and ESCC does merit further investigation. PMID:25741141

  19. Bile salts disrupt human esophageal squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-07-15

    Reflux of acid and bile acids contributes to epithelial tissue injury in gastro-esophageal reflux disease. However, the influence of refluxed material on human esophageal stratified epithelial barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of acid and bile acids on barrier function and TJ protein distribution using a newly developed air-liquid interface (ALI) in vitro culture model of stratified squamous epithelium based on primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). Under ALI conditions, HEECs formed distinct epithelial layers on Transwell inserts after 7 days of culture. The epithelial layers formed TJ, and the presence of claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin were detected by immunofluorescent staining. The NP-40-insoluble fraction of these TJ proteins was significantly higher by day 7 of ALI culture. Exposure of HEECs to pH 2, and taurocholic acid (TCA) and glycocholic acid (GCA) at pH 3, but not pH 4, for 1 h decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increased paracellular permeability. Exposure of cell layers to GCA (pH 3) and TCA (pH 3) for 1 h also markedly reduced the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and -4. We found that deoxycholic acid (pH 7.4 or 6, 1 h) and pepsin (pH 3, 24 h) significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability. Based on these findings, ALI-cultured HEECs represent a new in vitro model of human esophageal stratified epithelium and are suitable for studying esophageal epithelial barrier functions. Using this model, we demonstrated that acid, bile acids, and pepsin disrupt squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating TJ proteins. These results provide new insights into understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis. PMID:22575221

  20. Manometric features of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Esophageal Pressure Topography

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Hirano, Ikuo; Kwiatek, Monika A; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Chen, Joan; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2010-01-01

    Backgrounds Although most patients with EoE have mucosal and structural changes that could potentially explain their symptoms, it is unclear whether EoE is associated with abnormal esophageal motor function. The aims of this study were to evaluate the esophageal pressure topography (EPT) findings in EoE and to compare them with controls and patients with gastro-esophageal disease (GERD). Methods EPT studies in 48 EoE patients, 48 GERD patients and 50 controls were compared. The esophageal contractile pattern was described for ten 5-ml swallows for each subject and each swallow was secondarily characterized based on the bolus pressurization pattern: absent, pan-esophageal pressurization, or compartmentalized distal pressurization. Key Results 37% of EoE patients were classified as having abnormal esophageal motility. The most frequent diagnoses were of weak peristalsis and frequent failed peristalsis. Although motility disorders were more frequent in EoE patients than in controls, the prevalence and type were similar to those observed in GERD patients (p=0.61, Chi square test). Pan-esophageal pressurization was present in 17% of EoE and 2% of GERD patients while compartmentalized pressurization was present in 19% of EoE and 10% of GERD patients. These patterns were not seen in control subjects. Conclusions & Inferences The prevalence of abnormal esophageal motility in EoE was approximately 37% and was similar in frequency and type to motor patterns observed in GERD. EoE patients were more likely to have abnormal bolus pressurization patterns during swallowing and we hypothesize that this may be a manifestation of reduced esophageal compliance. PMID:21091849

  1. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  2. AKAP4 mediated tumor malignancy in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujun; Qin, Xuebo; Li, Yanjie; Guo, Anrui; Ma, Liguo; Jiao, Fang; Chai, Song

    2016-01-01

    AKAP4 as a new Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen is expressed not only in human germ cells, but also expressed in various tumor cells. AKAP4 is correlated with tumor malignancy; however, the role of AKAP4 in esophageal cancer remains unknown. Here we explored the function of AKAP4 in esophageal cancer. We found that AKAP4 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the esophageal cancer tissues compared to normal control. In KYSE150 cell line, inhibition of AKAP4 suppressed cell growth and invasiveness. Overexpression of AKAP4 promoted cell growth and invasiveness. In addition, expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and ZO-1) was up-regulated or down-regulated and expression of mesenchymal markers (vimentin and N-cadherin) was down-regulated or up-regulated after knockdown or overexpression of AKAP4 in vitro. In vivo in a xenograft model silencing AKAP4 suppressed tumor growth. We also found that NF-κB p65 bound to AKAP4 promoter and regulated expression of AKAP4. In conclusion, overexpression of AKAP4 is associated with esophageal cancer progression. Inhibition of AKAP4 leads to suppressed growth and invasion of esophageal cancer.

  3. Feasibility of Imaging Esophageal Cancer with Labeled Somatostatin Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Herlin, Gunnar; Idestrm, Lars; Lundell, Lars; Aspelin, Peter; Axelsson, Rimma

    2011-01-01

    Background. While the surface of a cell normally has some amount of somatostatin receptors, these receptors are overexpressed to a very high degree in multiple neoplastic diseases. No data exist for esophageal carcinoma. Purpose. To find out whether esophageal carcinoma could be imaged using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Material and Methods. 34 patients with esophageal lesions were prospectively examined by 99mTc-depreotide scintigraphy 2 and 4 hours after injection. Quantitative evaluation of 99mTc-depreotide uptake was performed around the lesion (T) and in healthy lung parenchyma (B). The relative uptake was calculated as T?B/B. Scintigraphy results were compared with histopathology from surgery or biopsy specimens from endoscopic ultrasonography. Results. 21 patients had esophageal cancer, and 13 lesions were benign. Visual assessment revealed positive 99mTc-depreotide uptake in 16 of the 21 cancers. The 13 patients without cancer had no depreotide uptake. The Mann-Whitney U test showed a statistically significant difference (P < .005) between 99mTc-depreotide uptake in malignant and benign lesions, for both the 2-hour and the 4-hour measurements. Conclusion. Scintigraphic examination with 99mTc-depreotide is feasible for imaging esophageal cancer, but the method is not suitable neither for screening or primary diagnosis, because of methods modest sensitivity. Our first results showed high specificity which should be used with caution, as the number of patients was relatively low. Further studies are needed to determine the role of the method. PMID:21716646

  4. Free radicals and antioxidant systems in reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Pilar; Piazuelo, Elena; Sánchez, M. Teresa; Ortego, Javier; Soteras, Fernando; Lanas, Angel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Experimental studies suggest that free radicals are involved in acid and pepsin-induced damage of esophageal mucosa. The profile and balance between free radicals and antioxidant systems in human esophagitis are unknown. METHODS: Superoxide anion and its powerful oxidant reaction with nitric oxide (peroxynitrite) generation were determined in esophageal mucosal biopsies from 101 patients with different gastro-esophageal reflux diseases and 28 controls. Activity of both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, were also assessed. Expression of Cu,ZnSOD, MnSOD and tyrosine-nitrated MnSOD were analyzed by Western blot and/or immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The highest levels of superoxide anion generation were found in patients with severe lesions of esophagitis. Peroxynitrite generation was intense in Barrett’s biopsies, weaker in esophagitis and absent/weak in normal mucosa. Expression of Cu,ZnSOD and MnSOD isoforms were present in normal mucosa and increased according to the severity of the lesion, reaching the highest level in Barrett’s esophagus. However, SOD mucosal activity significantly decreased in patients with esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus, which was, at least in part, due to nitration of its tyrosine residues. Catalase activity and GSH levels were significantly increased in mucosal specimens from patients with esophagitis and/or Barrett’s esophagus. CONCLUSION: A decrease in SOD antioxidant activity leading to increased mucosal levels of superoxide anion and peroxynitrite radicals may contribute to the development of esophageal damage and Barrett’s esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux. Administration of SOD may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of patients with esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:15884106

  5. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  6. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  7. Mechanisms of airway responses to esophageal acidification in cats.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Haworth, Steven T; Medda, Bidyut K; Forster, Hubert; Shaker, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Acid in the esophagus causes airway constriction, tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and a decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport rate. This study was designed to investigate the neuropharmacological mechanisms controlling these responses. In chloralose-anesthetized cats (n= 72), we investigated the effects of vagotomy or atropine (100 μg·kg(-1)·30 min(-1)iv) on airway responses to esophageal infusion of 0.1 M PBS or 0.1 N HCl at 1 ml/min. We quantified1) diameter of the bronchi,2) tracheobronchial mucociliary transport rate,3) tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and4) mucous content of the tracheal epithelium and submucosa. We found that vagotomy or atropine blocked the airway constriction response but only atropine blocked the increase in mucous output and decrease in mucociliary transport rate caused by esophageal acidification. The mucous cells of the mucosa produced more Alcian blue- than periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained mucosubstances, and the mucous cells of the submucosa produced more PAS- than Alcian blue-stained mucosubstances. Selective perfusion of the different segments of esophagus with HCl or PBS resulted in significantly greater production of PAS-stained mucus in the submucosa of the trachea adjacent to the HCl-perfused esophagus than in that adjacent to the PBS-perfused esophagus. In conclusion, airway constriction caused by esophageal acidification is mediated by a vagal cholinergic pathway, and the tracheobronchial transport response is mediated by cholinergic receptors. Acid perfusion of the esophagus selectively increases production of neutral mucosubstances of the apocrine glands by a local mechanism. We hypothesize that the airway responses to esophageal acid exposure are part of the innate, rather than acute emergency, airway defense system. PMID:26846551

  8. Markers of tyrosine kinase activity in eosinophilic esophagitis: A pilot study of the FIP1L1-PDGFRα fusion gene, pERK 1/2, and pSTAT5

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Bower, Jacquelyn J.; Keku, Temitope O.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Miller, C. Ryan; Woosley, John T.; Orlando, Roy C.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is incompletely understood. In certain eosinophilic diseases, activation of tyrosine kinase after fusion of the Fip1-like-1 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α genes (F-P fusion gene) mediates eosinophilia via downstream effectors such as extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT5). This mechanism has not been examined in EoE. Our aim was to detect the F-P fusion gene, pERK1/2, and pSTAT5 in esophageal tissue from patients with EoE, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and normal controls. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional pilot study comparing patients with steroid-responsive and steroid-refractory EoE, to GERD patients and normal controls. EoE cases were defined by consensus guidelines. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to detect the F-P fusion gene and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to detect pERK1/2 and pSTAT5 in esophageal biopsies. Results Twenty-nine subjects (median age 30 yrs (range 1–59); 16 male; 24 Caucasian) were included: 8 normal, 6 GERD, and 15 EoE (5 steroid-refractory). On FISH, 98%, 99%, and 99% of the nuclei in the normal, GERD, and EoE groups, respectively, were normal (p=0.42). On IHC, a median of 250, 277, and 479 nuclei/mm2 stained for pERK1/2 in the normal, GERD, and EoE groups, respectively (p=0.07); the refractory EoE patients had the highest degree pERK1/2 staining (846 nuclei/mm2; p=0.07). No trend was seen for pSTAT5. Conclusions The F-P fusion gene was not detected with increased frequency in EoE. Patients with EoE had a trend towards higher levels of pERK1/2, but not STAT5, in the esophageal epithelium, with highest levels in steroid-refractory EoE patients. PMID:21819482

  9. Relevance of N-nitrosamines to esophageal cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.H.; Montesano, R.; Zhang, M.S.; Feng, L.; Luo, F.J.; Chui, S.X.; Umbenhauer, D.; Saffhill, R.; Rajewsky, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the relevance of the N-nitrosamines to esophageal cancer in China are reviewed. Although a causal association between nitrosamines exposure and esophageal cancer in China has not yet been rigorously established, exposure of Lin-Xian subjects to nitrosamines either directly or as a result of their in vivo formation has been detected in our study. Several N-nitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMBzA, NPyr, NPip, and NSAR) in gastric juice collected from Lin-Xian inhabitants have been detected. A correlation was found between the lesions of esophageal epithelium and the amount of nitrosamines present. In addition, the amounts of N-nitrosamino acids excreted in 24-hr urine of subjects in Lin-Xian were significantly higher than those in Fan-Xian, indicating a higher exposure to N-nitroso compound and their precursors of the inhabitants in the high-risk area. The effect of nitrosamines on human esophagus has been investigated at the cellular levels. The amounts of O/sup 6/-MedG in DNA of esophageal or stomach mucosa of patients from Lin-Xian were higher than that from Europe. The presence of O/sup 6/-MedG in the human fetal esophagus cultured with NMBzA was also detected. These findings indicate that the elevated levels of O/sup 6/-MedG in esophageal DNA could be the result of a recent exposure to N-nitroso compounds or a genetically determined reduced cellular capacity for repair of O/sup 6/-MedG from DNA. The hyperplasia was induced in the esophagus of human fetus that cultured with NMBzA for 2 weeks to 2 months. The intervention studies of esophageal cancer in Lin-Xian have been pursued. Intake of moderate doses of ascorbic acids by Lin-Xian subjects effectively reduced the urinary levels of N-nitrosamino acids to those found in undosed subjects in the low-risk area.

  10. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Targeted therapy in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ma, Jiaojiao; Han, Yu; Liu, Jinqiang; Zhou, Wei; Hong, Liu; Fan, Daiming

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of patients are diagnosed with esophageal cancer at an advanced stages, and only a small group of them can benefit from the traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. So far, multiple monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed, alone or in combination with traditional therapy, to improve the prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal cancer. This review summarizes the recent advances of targeted therapies against EGFR, HER2, VEGFR and c-MET in esophageal cancer. More clinical trials should be performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of various targeted therapy regimens. Future basic research should focus on investigating the molecular mechanisms of therapeutic targets in esophageal cancer. PMID:26895097

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Domain Mutations in Esophageal and Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Eunice L.; Jankowski, Janusz; Thayer, Sarah P.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Brannigan, Brian W.; Harris, Patricia L.; Okimoto, Ross A.; Haserlat, Sara M.; Dris coll, David R.; Ferry, David; Muir, Beth; Settleman, Jeff; Fuchs, Charles S.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Ryan, David P.; Clark, Jeff W.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Haber, Daniel A.; Bell, Daphne W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Specific activating mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) identify a subset of non – small cell lung cancers with dramatic sensitivity to the specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib. Despite the abundant expression of EGFR protein in a broad range of epithelial cancers, EGFR mutations have not been reported in a substantial fraction of other cancers. Given recent reports of TKI-responsive cases of esophageal and pancreatic cancer, this study was designed to determine the prevalence of EGFR mutations in these gastrointestinal cancers. Experimental Design We sequenced exons 18 to 21 of EGFR from 21cases of Barrett's esophagus, 5 cases of high-grade esophageal dysplasia, 17 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, and 55 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Subsets of esophageal (n = 7) and pancreatic cancer cases (n = 5) were obtained from patients who were subsequently treated with gefitinib or erlotinib-capecitabine, respectively. Results Mutations of EGFR were identified in two esophageal cancers (11.7%), three cases of Barrett's esophagus (14.2%), and two pancreatic cancers (3.6%). The mutations consisted of the recurrent missense L858R and in-frame deletion delE746-A750, previously characterized as activating EGFR mutations in non – small cell lung cancer. We also identified the TKI drug resistance – associated EGFR T790M mutation in an untreated case of Barrett's esophagus and the corresponding adenocarcinoma. Conclusion The presence of activating mutations within EGFR in both esophageal and pancreatic adenocarcinomas defines a previously unrecognized subset of gastrointestinal tumors in which EGFR signaling may play an important biological role. EGFR mutations in premalignant lesions of Barrett's esophagus also point to these as an early event in transformation of the esophageal epithelium. The role of genotype-directed TKI therapy should be tested in prospective clinical trials. PMID:16857803

  13. Upper esophageal and pharyngeal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jonathan M.; Howell, Amy B.; Johnston, Nikki; Kresty, Laura A.; Lew, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on laryngopharyngeal reflux as a risk factor for laryngeal cancer; the role of pepsin in laryngopharyngeal neoplasia; natural fruit and vegetable compounds for the prevention and treatment of pharyngeal and esophageal cancers; and evaluation of cranberry constituents as inhibitors of esophageal adenocarcinoma utilizing in vitro assay and in vivo models. PMID:25266014

  14. Epigenetic regulation of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ellen N; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2015-11-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an ideal model system for the study of normal and pathological differentiation processes. The mammalian intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer comprising proliferative crypts and differentiated villi. The crypts contain both proliferating and quiescent stem cell populations that self-renew and produce all the differentiated cell types, which are replaced every 3-5days. The genetics of intestinal development, homeostasis, and disease are well defined, but less is known about the contribution of epigenetics in modulating these processes. Epigenetics refers to heritable phenotypic traits, including gene expression, which are independent of mutations in the DNA sequence. We have known for several decades that human colorectal cancers contain hypomethylated DNA, but the causes and consequences of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In contrast, tumor suppressor gene promoters are often hypermethylated in colorectal cancer, resulting in decreased expression of the associated gene. In this review, we describe the role that epigenetics plays in intestinal homeostasis and disease, with an emphasis on results from mouse models. We highlight the importance of producing and analyzing next-generation sequencing data detailing the epigenome from intestinal stem cell to differentiated intestinal villus cell. PMID:26220502

  15. Esophageal malignancy: a growing concern.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-12-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  16. Effect of bolus taste on the esophageal transit of patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Alves, L M T; Fabio, S R C; Dantas, R O

    2013-04-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia but may also cause alterations in esophageal motility. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of bolus taste on the esophageal transit of patients with stroke and controls. Esophageal transit and clearance were evaluated by scintigraphy in 36 patients in the chronic phase of stroke (44-82 years, mean: 63 years) and in 30 controls (33-85 years, mean: 59 years). The patients had a stroke 1-84 months (median: 5.5 months) before the evaluation of esophageal transit. Eight had dysphagia. Each subject swallowed in random order and in the sitting position 5 mL of liquid boluses with bitter (pH=6.0), sour (pH=3.0), sweet (pH=6.9), and neutral (pH=6.8) taste. Transit and clearance duration and the amount of residues were measured in the proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in esophageal transit or clearance duration. In the distal esophagus, the transit and clearance durations were longer with the sour bolus than with the other boluses in both patients and controls. The amount of residues in the esophageal body was greater in patients than in controls after swallows of the neutral bolus. In control subjects, after swallows of a sour bolus, there was an increase in the amount of residues in the middle and distal esophagus compared with the other boluses. In conclusion, a sour bolus with low pH causes a longer transit and clearance duration in the distal esophageal body. There was no effect of bolus taste or pH on the esophageal transit of patients in the chronic phase of stroke compared with normal volunteers. The longer transit and clearance duration in the distal esophageal body with the sour bolus appears to be a consequence of the low pH of the bolus. PMID:22642501

  17. Prospective assessment of the diagnostic utility of esophageal brushings in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kern, E; Lin, D; Larson, A; Yang, G-Y; Taft, T; Zalewski, A; Gonsalves, N; Hirano, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) undergo multiple endoscopies with biopsy for both diagnosis and assessment of treatment response, which is inconvenient and costly. Brush cytology has been examined in Barrett's esophagus to reduce the need for repeated endoscopic biopsies. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the ability of brush cytology to detect mucosal eosinophilia in patients with EoE. This prospective study included adults with untreated and treated esophageal eosinophilia undergoing endoscopy at a tertiary care center. Patients received paired brushings and biopsies at the proximal and distal esophagus. A blinded pathologist quantified the number of eosinophils and epithelial cells per high-power field (hpf) on the cytology slides. The ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells was used to normalize the cytology specimens for density of cells collected. The main outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of brush cytology, and correlation between cytology and histology. Twenty-eight patients enrolled. The average age of the cohort was 37.7 ± 10.4 years; 75% of subjects were male. The sensitivity of cytology was 67-69% at the proximal esophagus and 70-72% at the distal esophagus. The specificity was 61-67% proximally and 70-75% distally. Histology was not significantly correlated with the max ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells per hpf or the absolute number of eosinophils on cytology slides. Cytology using esophageal brushing has limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of esophageal mucosal eosinophilia. The presence of exudates on endoscopy increased the detection of eosinophilia, which could make cytology useful in pediatric EoE, which often has a more exudative presentation. Diagnostic yield may improve with alternative acquisition techniques or the incorporation of eosinophil degranulation proteins. PMID:25515533

  18. Effect of peroral esophageal myotomy for achalasia treatment: A Chinese study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Shuo; Cai, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and feasibility of peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) in patients with achalasia. METHODS: From January 2012 to March 2014, 50 patients (28 men, 22 women; mean age: 42.8 years, range: 14-70 years) underwent POEM. Pre- and postoperative symptoms were quantified using the Eckardt scoring system. Barium swallow and esophagogastroscopy were performed before and after POEM, respectively. Esophageal motility was evaluated in all patients, both preoperatively and one month after POEM treatment, using a high-resolution manometry system. Manometry data, Eckardt scores, lower esophageal sphincter pressure and barium swallow results were used to evaluate the effect of the procedure. RESULTS: POEM was successfully completed for all patients. The mean procedure time was 55.4 ± 17.3 min and the mean total length of myotomy of the circular esophagus was 10.5 ± 2.6 cm. No specific complications occurred, with the exception of two patients that developed asymptomatic pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. Clinical improvement in symptoms was achieved in all patients. Approximately 77.5% of patients experienced weight gain 6 mo after POEM, with an average of 4.78 kg (range: 2-15 kg). The lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure, four second integrated relaxation pressure and Eckardt scores were all significantly reduced after POEM (Ps < 0.05). A small segment of proximal esophageal peristalsis appeared postoperatively in two patients, but without normal esophageal peristalsis. The average diameter of the esophageal lumen decreased significantly from 4.39 to 3.09 cm (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: POEM can relieve achalasia symptoms, improve gastroesophageal junction relaxation and restore esophageal body motility function, but not normal esophageal peristalsis. PMID:25987787

  19. Mapping Local Cytosolic Enzymatic Activity in Human Esophageal Mucosa with Porous Silicon Nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Ciro; Campagnolo, Paola; Almeida, Carina S; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Chow, Lesley W; Hanna, George B; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-09-16

    Porous silicon nanoneedles can map Cathepsin B activity across normal and tumor human esophageal mucosa. Assembling a peptide-based Cathepsin B cleavable sensor over a large array of nano-needles allows the discrimination of cancer cells from healthy ones in mixed culture. The same sensor applied to tissue can map Cathepsin B activity with high resolution across the tumor margin area of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26197973

  20. 1H-NMR based metabonomic profiling of human esophageal cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The biomarker identification of human esophageal cancer is critical for its early diagnosis and therapeutic approaches that will significantly improve patient survival. Specially, those that involves in progression of disease would be helpful to mechanism research. Methods In the present study, we investigated the distinguishing metabolites in human esophageal cancer tissues (n = 89) and normal esophageal mucosae (n = 26) using a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) based assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant anlaysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyse 1H-NMR profiling data to identify potential biomarkers. Results The constructed OPLS-DA model achieved an excellent separation of the esophageal cancer tissues and normal mucosae. Excellent separation was obtained between the different stages of esophageal cancer tissues (stage II = 28; stage III = 45 and stage IV = 16) and normal mucosae. A total of 45 metabolites were identified, and 12 of them were closely correlated with the stage of esophageal cancer. The downregulation of glucose, AMP and NAD, upregulation of formate indicated the large energy requirement due to accelerated cell proliferation in esophageal cancer. The increases in acetate, short-chain fatty acid and GABA in esophageal cancer tissue revealed the activation of fatty acids metabolism, which could satisfy the need for cellular membrane formation. Other modified metabolites were involved in choline metabolic pathway, including creatinine, creatine, DMG, DMA and TMA. These 12 metabolites, which are involved in energy, fatty acids and choline metabolism, may be associated with the progression of human esophageal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of esophageal cancer tissues, indicating the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of esophageal cancer. The potential biomarkers provide a promising molecular diagnostic approach for clinical diagnosis of human esophageal cancer and a new direction for the mechanism study. PMID:23556477

  1. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  6. Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Stem Cell (RPESC).

    PubMed

    Saini, Janmeet S; Temple, Sally; Stern, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a pigmented cellular monolayer that supports photoreceptor cells located in the overlying neural retina. The RPE is critical for vision and its dysfunction results in numerous pathologies, several with limited available disease-altering strategies. Regeneration of the retina from RPE is robust in lower vertebrates, but is not normally exhibited in mammals. We recently found that a subpopulation of human RPE cells can be stimulated in culture to generate multipotent self-renewing cells-the RPE stem cell (RPESC). RPESC can be expanded to generate RPE progeny that are a potential source for cell replacement therapy. Alternatively, RPESC can produce mesenchymal progeny which serve as a disease model of epiretinal membrane formation. Yet another potential application of RPESCs is activation within the eye to awaken dormant endogenous repair. PMID:26427459

  7. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1, PAR2 and PAR4 expressions in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, Si-Man; JIANG, Ping; XIANG, Yang; WANG, Wei-Wei; ZHU, Yue-Chun; FENG, Wei-Yang; LI, Shu-De; YU, Guo-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Here, we used reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot to detect protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1, PAR 2 and PAR 4 expression in cancer tissues and cell lines of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and investigated the co-relationship between PAR expression and clinic-pathological data for esophageal cancer. The methylation of PAR4 gene promoter involved in esophageal carcinoma was also analyzed. By comparing the mRNA expressions of normal esophageal tissue and human esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC), we found that among the 28 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, PAR1 (60%) and PAR2 (71%) were elevated in 17 and 20 cases, respectively, and PAR4 (68%) expression was lowered in 19 cases. Whereas, in human esophageal squamous cells (TE-1 and TE-10), PAR1 and PAR2 expression was increased but PAR4 was decreased. Combined with clinical data, the expression of PAR1 in poorly differentiated (P=0.016) and middle and lower parts of the esophagus (P=0.016) was higher; expression of PAR4 in poorly differentiated carcinoma was lower (P=0.049). Regarding TE-1 and TE-10 protein expression, we found that in randomized esophageal carcinoma, PAR1 (P=0.027) and PAR2 (P=0.039) expressions were increased, but lowered for PAR4 (P=0.0001). In HEEpiC, TE-1, TE-10, esophageal and normal esophagus tissue samples (case No. 7), the frequency of methylation at the 19 CpG loci of PAR4 was 35.4%, 95.2%, 83.8%, 62.6% and 48.2%, respectively. Our results indicate that the expression of PAR1 and PAR2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is increased but PAR4 is decreased. Hypermethylation of the promoter of the PAR4 gene may contribute to reduced expression of PAR4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25297082

  8. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  9. Computed tomographic features of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlberg, J.L.; Sandler, M.A.; Madrazo, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    A patient wit esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) was examined with computed tomography (CT). CT demonstrated marked thichening of the esophageal wall, diffuse irregularity of the esophageal lumen, and intramural gas collections-features typical of this entity. In the proper clinical setting, CT can confirm the diagnosis of EIPD, especially when other studies are equivocal. However, this case also demonstrates some of the limitations of CT in differentiating benign and malignant esophageal disorders.

  10. Is There any Association Between Passive Smoking and Esophagitis in Pediatrics?

    PubMed Central

    Monajemzadeh, Maryam; Haghi-Ashtiani, Mohammad-Taghi; Soleymani, Roohallah; Shams, Sedigheh; Taleb, Shayandokht; Motamed, Farzaneh; Najafi, Mehri; Abbasi, Ata

    2013-01-01

    Objective Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is one of the major factors of predisposing children to develop several hazardous health problems. We decided to investigate the association between nicotinine, one of the nicotine metabolites and esophagitis in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods In a case control study 46 children suffering from esophagitis referred to endoscopy ward were recruited. The control group consisted of 45 healthy children. Urine samples were collected and urinary cotinine level (UCL) measured. Findings The mean age of esophagitis and control groups were 5.11±2.93 and 6.72±2.8 respectively. Sixty children were passive smokers; 31 of them had non-smoker parents. In control group, 32 (71.1%) children and in esophagitis group 29 (63%) children had non-smoker parents. The mean value of UCL in patients suffering from esophagitis was significantly higher than those in normal group (P=0.04, 24.98±6.4 ng/ml vs. 15.16 ± 3.9 ng/ml). Considering 50ng/ml as a cutoff point for UCL, it was significantly higher in passive smoker group than in non smoker group (P=0.02). The mean cotinine level differed significantly in esophagitis and control group. Conclusion Our results indicate the increased risk of developing esophagitis in children with ETS exposure. PMID:23724182

  11. LYN, a Key Gene From Bioinformatics Analysis, Contributes to Development and Progression of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dabiao

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a lethal malignancy whose incidence is rapidly growing in recent years. Previous reports suggested that Barretts esophagus (BE), which is represented by metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma transition, is regarded as the premalignant lesion of esophageal neoplasm. However, our knowledge about the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is still very limited. Material/Methods In order to acquire better understanding about the pathological mechanisms in this field, we obtained gene profiling data on BE, esophageal adenocarcinoma patients, and normal controls from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, were conducted. Results Our results revealed that several pathways, such as the wound healing, complement, and coagulation pathways, were closely correlated with cancer development and progression. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was discovered to be responsible for the predisposition stage of cancer; while response to stress, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, nod-like receptor signaling pathway, and ECM-receptor interaction were chief contributors of cancer progression. More importantly, we discovered in this study that LYN was a critical gene. It was found to be the key nodule of several significant biological networks, which suggests its close correlation with cancer initiation and progression. Conclusions These results provided more information on the mechanisms of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which enlightened our way to the clinical discovery of novel therapeutic makers for conquering esophageal cancer. Keywords: esophageal adenocarcinoma; LYN; Go analysis; KEGG pathway. PMID:26708841

  12. CT diagnosis of an esophageal foreign body

    SciTech Connect

    Gambia, J.L.; Heaston, D.K.; Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-02-01

    Although of proven value in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal malignancy, computed tomography (CT) has had limited application in the evaluation of benign esophageal disease. The first case of a CT-detected esophageal foreign body is reported. The foreign body, a piece of bone present for possibly 3 years, had escaped prior detection by plain chest radiography, barium swallow, and esophagoscopy.

  13. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device...

  14. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device...

  15. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device...

  16. Multilayered epithelium in a rat model and human Barrett's esophagus: Similar expression patterns of transcription factors and differentiation markers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoxin; Qin, Rong; Liu, Ba; Ma, Yan; Su, Yinghao; Yang, Chung S; Glickman, Jonathan N; Odze, Robert D; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2008-01-01

    Background In rats, esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) without concomitant chemical carcinogen treatment leads to gastroesophageal reflux disease, multilayered epithelium (MLE, a presumed precursor in intestinal metaplasia), columnar-lined esophagus, dysplasia, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previously we have shown that columnar-lined esophagus in EGDA rats resembled human Barrett's esophagus (BE) in its morphology, mucin features and expression of differentiation markers (Lab. Invest. 2004;84:753–765). The purpose of this study was to compare the phenotype of rat MLE with human MLE, in order to gain insight into the nature of MLE and its potential role in the development of BE. Methods Serial sectioning was performed on tissue samples from 32 EGDA rats and 13 patients with established BE. Tissue sections were immunohistochemically stained for a variety of transcription factors and differentiation markers of esophageal squamous epithelium and intestinal columnar epithelium. Results We detected MLE in 56.3% (18/32) of EGDA rats, and in all human samples. As expected, both rat and human squamous epithelium, but not intestinal metaplasia, expressed squamous transcription factors and differentiation markers (p63, Sox2, CK14 and CK4) in all cases. Both rat and human intestinal metaplasia, but not squamous epithelium, expressed intestinal transcription factors and differentiation markers (Cdx2, GATA4, HNF1α, villin and Muc2) in all cases. Rat MLE shared expression patterns of Sox2, CK4, Cdx2, GATA4, villin and Muc2 with human MLE. However, p63 and CK14 were expressed in a higher proportion of rat MLE compared to humans. Conclusion These data indicate that rat MLE shares similar properties to human MLE in its expression pattern of these markers, not withstanding small differences, and support the concept that MLE may be a transitional stage in the metaplastic conversion of squamous to columnar epithelium in BE. PMID:18190713

  17. Esophageal fistula associated with intracavitary irradiation for esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1986-05-01

    Fifty-three patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Ten patients developed esophageal fistula. Perforations were found in the bronchus (four), major vessels (four), pericardium (one), and mediastinum (one). The frequency of fistula occurrence in these patients was not remarkably different from that in 30 other patients treated only with greater than or equal to 50 Gy external irradiation. From the time of the development of esophageal fistula, intracavitary irradiation did not seem to accelerate the development of fistula. The fistulas in our ten patients proved to be associated with tumor, deep ulcer (created before intracavitary irradiation), chemotherapy, infection, and trauma rather than the direct effect of intracavitary irradiation.

  18. Spontaneous intramural esophageal dissection: an unusual onset of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Rodríguez Alonso, Lorena; Romero Martínez, Natalia M

    2016-03-01

    A 35-year-old man, with a history of rhinitis, eczema and a dubious achalasia was admitted due to chest pain and sialorrhea. Upper endoscopy showed a little hole and a narrowing of the distal esophagus. A CT-scan with oral contrast exposed a discontinuity of the lumen of the middle third of the esophagus and a dissection of submucosal space 16 cm long. The patient recovered after parenteral nutrition. After four months, an esophageal endoscopic showed transient whitish exudates, longitudinal furrows and esophageal lacerations. The biopsies illustrated significant eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophilic microabscesses and basal cell hyperplasia. PMID:26949147

  19. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  20. Esophageal cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xia; Tan, Cheng; Wang, Feng; Yang, Baixia; Ge, Yangyang; Guan, Zhifeng; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a lethal disease with high morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the incidence has been increasing in recent years. Although the diagnosis and treatment of EC have improved considerably, EC has rapidly progressed in the clinical setting and has a poor prognosis for its metastasis and recurrence. The general idea of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is primarily based on clinical and experimental observations, indicating the existence of a subpopulation of cells that can self-renew and differentiate. The EC stem cells, which can be isolated from normal pluripotent stem cells by applying similar biomarkers, may participate in promoting esophageal tumorigenesis through renewal and repair. In this review, major emphasis is given to CSC markers, altered CSC-specific pathways, and molecular targeting agents currently available to target CSCs of esophageal cancer. The roles of numerous markers (CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase, CD133, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2) and developmental signaling pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog, and Hippo) in isolating esophageal CSCs are discussed in detail. Targeting CSCs can be a logical strategy to treat EC, as these cells are responsible for carcinoma recurrence and chemoradiation resistance. PMID:27143920

  1. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  2. Sloughing Esophagitis: A Not So Common Entity

    PubMed Central

    Akhondi, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sloughing esophagitis, also known as esophagitis dissecans superficialis, is a very rare and underdiagnosed entity with unknown incidence rate. It can be associated with bullous dermatoses and medications such as central nervous system depressants and those causing esophageal injury. CASE REPORT: A 55-years-old woman was recovering from renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis when she developed dysphagia and odynophagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy was performed for suspected bullous pemphigus and confirmed sloughing esophagitis. She improved with intravenous steroids. CONCLUSIONS: Sloughing Esophagitis should enter our differential diagnosis more frequently. It is mostly a benign, self-limiting process but when associated with bullous dermatoses will require steroid treatment. PMID:25598761

  3. Squamous Tissue Lymphocytes in the Esophagus of Controls and Patients with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett’s Esophagus Are Characterized by a Non-Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Alexandra; Koenderman, Leo; Kusters, Johannes G.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Reflux esophagitis (RE) is characterized by inflammation of the squamous epithelium (SQ) of the esophagus and may progress to Barrett’s esophagus (BE) characterized by intestinal metaplasia. The role of inflammation in this transition has been postulated but lacks experimental evidence. Here, the inflammatory responses in the esophagus of these patients were investigated. Patients and Methods Fifty-one esophageal biopsies from with patients BE (n = 19), RE (n = 8) and controls (n = 23) were analyzed. T-cells were analyzed before and after ex vivo expansion (14 days) by multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The following markers were studied: CD3, CD4, CD8 (T-cell markers), Granzyme B (marker of cytotoxicity), CD103 (αE/epithelial integrin) and NKg2a (inhibitory receptor on T-cells and NK-cells). Results Analysis of ex vivo cultures from normal looking SQ from controls, RE patients, and BE patients revealed no significant differences in the number and phenotypes of T-cells. In contrast, tissue from RE was different to normal SQ in four aspects: 1) higher percentages of CD3+CD4+-cells (72±7% vs 48±6%, p = 0.01) and 2) CD8+GranzymeB+ -cells (53±11% vs 26±4%, p<0.05), while 3) lower percentages of CD4+CD103+-cells (45±19% vs 80±3%, p = 0.02) and 4) CD8+NKg2a+- cells (31±12% vs 44±5%). Conclusion Despite the fact that both tissues are exposed to the same reflux associated inflammatory triggers, the immune response observed in RE is clearly distinct from that in SQ of BE. The differences in immune responses in BE tissue might contribute to its susceptibility for transformation into intestinal metaplasia. PMID:25170842

  4. Microperoxisomes in retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Robison, W G; Kuwabara, T

    1975-11-01

    Microperoxisomes were found to be abundant in the retinal pigment epithelium of the human, rhesus monkey, mice, rats, domestic fowl, and frog by ultrastructural histochemistry. They were rare in other cells of the retina and choroid. These organelles had a granular matrix, ranged in diameter from 0.15 mum to 0.30 mum, and were bound by a single tripartite membrane which often maintained slender connections with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and other microperoxisomes. They exhibited a positive reaction (electron opaque product) following incubation in diaminobenzidine and H2O2 for the demonstration of the peroxidatic activity of catalase (Novikoff et al., J. Histochem. Cytochem. 20: 1006, 1972). The reaction was inhibited by: (1) aminotriazole; (2) dichlorophenol-indophenol; (3) preheating at 95 degrees C.; or (4) elimination of H2O2. Microperoxisomes, like the well-known peroxisomes (microbodies) of liver cells have been inplicated in various aspects of lipid metabolism and the detoxification of H2O2. We demonstrated for the first time that microperoxisomes respond to drug-induced changes in lipid metabolism, as previously shown for peroxisomes. Nafenopin is a recently utilized drug which greatly decreases serum lipids, increases hepatic catalase activity, and induces an increased size and number of hepatic peroxisomes. Black, beige, albino, and obese mutant mice of the C57BL/6J strain treated with nafenopin for several weeks showed a two- to threefold increase in the number of microperoxisomes in the retinal pigment epithelium. Microperoxisomes of the retinal pigment epithelium may be involved in the transport, storage, and rapid turnover of lipids associated with the maintenance of photoreceptor outer segment disc membranes. PMID:810456

  5. Dietary treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-06-01

    Emerging evidence supports impaired epithelial barrier function as the key initial event in the development of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and other allergic diseases. Symptom resolution, histologic remission, and prevention of both disease and treatment-related complications are the goals of treatment. Successful dietary treatments include elemental, empirical elimination and allergy test directed diets. Dietary therapy with exclusive elemental diet offers the best response. Cow's milk, wheat, egg, soy, peanut/tree nut, and fish/shellfish are the 6 food antigens most likely to induce esophageal inflammation. PMID:24813522

  6. Interactions of oxygen radicals with airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D T; Cohn, L A; Li, H; Fischer, B; Li, C M; Adler, K B

    1994-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disease processes. Epithelial cells lining the respiratory airways are uniquely vulnerable regarding potential for oxidative damage due to their potential for exposure to both endogenous (e.g., mitochondrial respiration, phagocytic respiratory burst, cellular oxidases) and exogenous (e.g., air pollutants, xenobiotics, catalase negative organisms) oxidants. Airway epithelial cells use several nonenzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant mechanisms to protect against oxidative insult. Nonenzymatic defenses include certain vitamins and low molecular weight compounds such as thiols. The enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutatione peroxidase are major sources of antioxidant protection. Other materials associated with airway epithelium such as mucus, epithelial lining fluid, and even the basement membrane/extracellular matrix may have protective actions as well. When the normal balance between oxidants and antioxidants is upset, oxidant stress ensues and subsequent epithelial cell alterations or damage may be a critical component in the pathogenesis of several respiratory diseases. Oxidant stress may profoundly alter lung physiology including pulmonary function (e.g., forced expiratory volumes, flow rates, and maximal inspiratory capacity), mucociliary activity, and airway reactivity. ROS may induce airway inflammation; the inflammatory process may serve as an additional source of ROS in airways and provoke the pathophysiologic responses described. On a more fundamental level, cellular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of ROS may involve activation of intracellular signaling enzymes including phospholipases and protein kinases stimulating the release of inflammatory lipids and cytokines. Respiratory epithelium may be intimately involved in defense against, and pathophysiologic changes invoked by, ROS. PMID:7705313

  7. Expression of Cofilin-1 and Transgelin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liao, Ruyi; Li, Hui; Liu, Ling; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Hongming

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has attracted much research attention around the world, and the number of ESCC cases has increased gradually in recent years. Identifying the specific biomarkers of ESCC is an effective approach for the early diagnosis of tumors. Material/Methods Immunohistochemical streptavidin-peroxidase method was used to determine the expressions of Cofilin-1 and transgelin in 68 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and 48 individuals with normal esophageal tissues. In addition to the relationships between the expression of Cofilin-1 and transgelin, the clinicopathologic features of ESCC were also discussed. The correlation between Cofilin-1 and transgelin protein expression in ESCC was analyzed. Results (1) The positive expression rates of Cofilin-1 and transgelin were 60.3% (41/68) and 54.4% (37/68) in esophageal carcinoma tissue, respectively. The positive expression rates of Cofilin-1 and transgelin in normal esophageal tissue were 27.1% (13/48) and 29.1% (14/48), respectively. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). (2) The positive expression rate of Cofilin-1 did not differ significantly (P>0.05) with sex, age, ethnicity, tumor size, or infiltration depth; but did have a statistically significant (P<0.05) difference with various degrees of tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stages. (3) The positive expression rate of transgelin did not differ significantly (P>0.05) with sex, age, ethnicity, tumor size, infiltration depth, and clinical stage, but did significantly (P<0.05) differ with degree of tumor differentiation and lymph node metastasis. Conclusions Cofilin-1 and transgelin may play roles in the carcinogenesis and development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Cofilin-1 may be useful as an important biomarker for indicating the degree of malignancy of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and the detection of transgelin is valuable in early diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26344167

  8. Quantification of esophageal wall thickness in CT using atlas-based segmentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Kang, Min Kyu; Kligerman, Seth; Lu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Esophageal wall thickness is an important predictor of esophageal cancer response to therapy. In this study, we developed a computerized pipeline for quantification of esophageal wall thickness using computerized tomography (CT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based segmentation scheme. The esophagus in each atlas CT was manually segmented to create a label map. Using image registration, all of the atlases were aligned to the imaging space of the target CT. The deformation field from the registration was applied to the label maps to warp them to the target space. A weighted majority-voting label fusion was employed to create the segmentation of esophagus. Finally, we excluded the lumen from the esophagus using a threshold of -600 HU and measured the esophageal wall thickness. The developed method was tested on a dataset of 30 CT scans, including 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute distance (MAD) between the segmented esophagus and the reference standard were employed to evaluate the segmentation results. Our method achieved a mean Dice coefficient of 65.55 ± 10.48% and mean MAD of 1.40 ± 1.31 mm for all the cases. The mean esophageal wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls was 6.35 ± 1.19 mm and 6.03 ± 0.51 mm, respectively. We conclude that the proposed method can perform quantitative analysis of esophageal wall thickness and would be useful for tumor detection and tumor response evaluation of esophageal cancer.

  9. Targeted imaging of esophageal neoplasia with a fluorescently labeled peptide: First in-human results

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Matthew B.; Joshi, Bishnu P.; Lu, Shaoying; Piraka, Cyrus; Khondee, Supang; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Kwon, Richard S.; Beer, David G.; Appelman, Henry; Turgeon, D. Kim; Wang, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in incidence, and usually develops from Barrett’s esophagus, a precursor condition commonly found in patients with chronic acid reflux. Pre-malignant lesions are challenging to detect on conventional screening endoscopy because of their flat appearance. Molecular changes can be used to improve detection of early neoplasia. We have developed a peptide that binds specifically to high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. We first applied the peptide ex vivo to esophageal specimens from 17 patients to validate specific binding. Next, we performed confocal endomicroscopy in vivo in 25 human subjects after topical peptide administration and found 3.8-fold greater fluorescence intensity for esophageal neoplasia compared with Barrett’s esophagus and squamous epithelium with 75% sensitivity and 97% specificity. No toxicity was attributed to the peptide in either animal or patient studies. Therefore, our first-in-humans results show that this targeted imaging agent is safe, and may be useful for guiding tissue biopsy and for early detection of esophageal neoplasia and potentially other cancers of epithelial origin, such as bladder, colon, lung, pancreas, and stomach. PMID:23658246

  10. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  11. Tight Junctions in Salivary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial cell tight junctions (TJs) consist of a narrow belt-like structure in the apical region of the lateral plasma membrane that circumferentially binds each cell to its neighbor. TJs are found in tissues that are involved in polarized secretions, absorption functions, and maintaining barriers between blood and interstitial fluids. The morphology, permeability, and ion selectivity of TJ vary among different types of tissues and species. TJs are very dynamic structures that assemble, grow, reorganize, and disassemble during physiological or pathological events. Several studies have indicated the active role of TJ in intestinal, renal, and airway epithelial function; however, the functional significance of TJ in salivary gland epithelium is poorly understood. Interactions between different combinations of the TJ family (each with their own unique regulatory proteins) define tissue specificity and functions during physiopathological processes; however, these interaction patterns have not been studied in salivary glands. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data regarding the regulatory components of the TJ that could potentially affect cellular functions of the salivary epithelium. PMID:20182541

  12. Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms Are Associated with Reduced Esophageal Vitamin D Receptor Expression and Reduced Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Janmaat, Vincent T; van de Winkel, Anouk; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Spaander, Manon C W; Uitterlinden, André G; Pourfarzad, Farzin; Tilanus, Hugo W; Rygiel, Agnieszka M; Moons, Leon M G; Arp, Pascal P; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Kuipers, Ernst J; van der Laan, Luc J W

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that vitamin D exerts a protective effect on the development of various solid cancers. However, concerns have been raised regarding the potential deleterious role of high vitamin D levels in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). This study investigated genetic variation in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in relation to its expression and risk of Barrett esophagus (BE) and EAC. VDR gene regulation was investigated by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and gel shift assays. Fifteen haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the VDR gene were analyzed in 858 patients with reflux esophagitis (RE), BE or EAC and 202 healthy controls. VDR mRNA expression was higher in BE compared with squamous epithelium. VDR protein was located in the nucleus in BE. An rs1989969T/rs2238135G haplotype was identified in the 5′ regulatory region of the VDR gene. It was associated with an approximately two-fold reduced risk of RE, BE and EAC. Analysis of a replication cohort was done for BE that confirmed this. The rs1989969T allele causes a GATA-1 transcription factor binding site to appear. The signaling of GATA-1, which is regarded as a negative transcriptional regulator, could explain the findings for rs1989969. The rs2238135G allele was associated with a significantly reduced VDR expression in BE; for the rs1989969T allele, a trend in reduced VDR expression was observed. We identified a VDR haplotype associated with reduced esophageal VDR expression and a reduced incidence of RE, BE and EAC. This VDR haplotype could be useful in identifying individuals who benefit most from vitamin D chemoprevention. PMID:25910066

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis: trials and tribulations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Katrina J; Heine, Ralf G

    2011-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a recently recognized form of pan-esophagitis, which is characterized by the presence of at least 15 eosinophils per high power field on esophageal histology. EE is closely associated with atopic disorders and occurs predominantly in male patients. Young children are more likely to be sensitized to food allergens whilst aeroallergen sensitization predominates in older children and adults--a pattern reminiscent of the "atopic march". EE presents with a diverse range of gastrointestinal symptoms, including regurgitation, vomiting, feeding difficulties or refusal in infancy, in addition to dysphagia and food bolus impaction in older children and adults. The diagnosis may also be ascertained incidentally in patients undergoing gastroscopy for other suspected gastrointestinal conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease or celiac disease. Complications mainly relate to subepithelial remodeling and fibrosis which may result in dysmotility, dysphagia and esophageal strictures. The proportion of EE patients at risk of these complications is unknown due to a paucity of data on the natural history of EE. There are only few randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of treatment modalities for EE, which currently either involve food allergen elimination or use of swallowed aerosolized corticosteroids. This article aims to discuss the complex issues of the diagnosis and long-term management that confront clinicians who care for children with EE. PMID:21415771

  14. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Pathological characteristics of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHI, HONG-YUN; ZHU, SHU-CHAI; SHEN, WEN-BIN; LIU, MIAO-LING

    2014-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, which include regularly occurring multiple carcinogenic lesions (MLs), severe dysplasia (SD) and direct intramural infiltration (DI), were investigated using large pathological sections. A total of 52 esophageal cancer patients underwent surgical resection and were diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Large sections of the surgical resection specimens were then made for pathological examination. The actual length of the carcinoma was calculated during surgery from the length determined microscopically. ML, SD and DI were identified during pathological examination of the large sections by microscope and were statistically analyzed. The lesion lengths obtained by the various inspection methods differed from each other. ML, SD and DI were identified in 15, 28 and 41 patients, respectively. Furthermore, a higher incidence of DI was observed in patients with lymphatic infiltration or those with a later stage of disease. ML, SD and DI were identified as characteristics of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and ML and DI were found to correlate with lymphatic infiltration. PMID:25013466

  16. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  17. TKTL1 promotes cell proliferation and metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhu, Shu-Chai; Li, Shu-Guang; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Jin-Rui; Song, Chun-Yang

    2015-08-01

    Transketolase-like-1 (TKTL1), which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the non-oxidative part of the pentose-phosphate pathway, has been demonstrated to promote carcinogenesis through enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Dysregulation of TKTL1 expression also leads to poor prognosis in patients with urothelial and colorectal cancer. However, the expression pattern and underlying cellular functions in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain largely unexplored. In this study, we measured TKTL1 expression in ESCC cell lines and paraffin-embedded ESCC tumor tissues. Our results revealed that TKTL1 expression was upregulated in all of the four ESCC cell lines and in 61.25% (98/160) of ESCC specimens detected, while only 27.5% (11/40) in normal epithelium. Silencing of TKTL1 expression decreased cell proliferation through inhibiting the expression of MKI67 and cyclins including Ccna2, Ccnb1, Ccnd1 and Ccne1. Meanwhile, down-regulation of TKTL1 also associated with increased apoptotic ratio and altered protein expression of Bcl-2 family in ESCC cells. Furthermore, knockdown of TKTL1 significantly reduced the invasive potential of ESCC cells through up-regulation of anti-metastasis genes (MTSS1, TIMP2 and CTSK) and down-regulation of pr-metastasis genes (MMP2, MMP9, MMP10 and MMP13). Taken together, our results indicate that TKTL1 is associated with a more aggressive behavior in ESCC cells and suppresses its expression or enzyme activity might represents a potential target for developing novel therapies in human ESCCs. PMID:26349965

  18. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Restoring esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition for long-gap esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Dionigi, Beatrice; Bairdain, Sigrid; Smithers, Charles Jason; Jennings, Russell W.; Hamilton, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The Foker process is a method of esophageal lengthening through axial tension-induced growth, allowing for subsequent primary reconstruction of the esophagus in esophageal atresia (EA). In this unique case, the Foker process was used to grow the remaining esophageal segment long enough to attain esophageal continuity following failed colonic interpositions for long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA). Initially developed for the treatment of LGEA in neonates, this case demonstrates that (i) an active esophageal lengthening response may still be present beyond the neonate time-period; and, (ii) the Foker process can be used to restore esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition if the lower esophageal segment is still present. PMID:25907539

  20. LYN, a Key Gene From Bioinformatics Analysis, Contributes to Development and Progression of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dabiao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a lethal malignancy whose incidence is rapidly growing in recent years. Previous reports suggested that Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is represented by metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma transition, is regarded as the premalignant lesion of esophageal neoplasm. However, our knowledge about the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is still very limited. MATERIAL AND METHODS In order to acquire better understanding about the pathological mechanisms in this field, we obtained gene profiling data on BE, esophageal adenocarcinoma patients, and normal controls from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, were conducted. RESULTS Our results revealed that several pathways, such as the wound healing, complement, and coagulation pathways, were closely correlated with cancer development and progression. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was discovered to be responsible for the predisposition stage of cancer; while response to stress, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, nod-like receptor signaling pathway, and ECM-receptor interaction were chief contributors of cancer progression. More importantly, we discovered in this study that LYN was a critical gene. It was found to be the key nodule of several significant biological networks, which suggests its close correlation with cancer initiation and progression. CONCLUSIONS These results provided more information on the mechanisms of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which enlightened our way to the clinical discovery of novel therapeutic makers for conquering esophageal cancer. PMID:26708841

  1. Added Value of pH Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance in Adults Operated for Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Gatzinsky, Vladimir; Andersson, Olof; Eriksson, Anders; Jönsson, Linus; Abrahamsson, Kate; Sillén, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and dysphagia are common following repaired esophageal atresia (EA). The risk of esophagitis and Barrett esophagus is increased compared with the general population. As yet, the causes are not fully explained. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate how GER, measured by pH multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII), is correlated to the esophageal symptoms and histological findings. Methods Twenty-nine adult subjects operated for EA in Gothenburg from 1968 to 1983 were evaluated with pH-MII, manometry, and gastroscopy. Results pH-MII was performed in 15, manometry in 19, and gastroscopy in 24 subjects. Eleven subjects displayed pathological reflux parameters of any kind, mainly nonacid reflux (10/15). Dysphagia correlated to the number of weakly acidic reflux episodes. Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence, which correlated to a pathological number of acid reflux episodes (p = 0.012), was noted in 21/24 subjects, but the majority had a normal resting pressure. Esophagitis was present in 14/24, two of whom had Barrett esophagus. Histological changes correlated to the reflux index and the number of weakly acidic reflux episodes (p = 0.028 and 0.040) and tended to correlate to dysphagia (p = 0.052). Conclusion pH-MII adds further information when it comes to explaining what causes symptoms and esophageal histological changes in adults operated for EA. PMID:25643247

  2. The clonal organization of the squamous epithelium of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Seddon, S V; Walker, D M; Williams, D; Williams, E D

    1992-03-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics and stem cell localization of the mouse lingual epithelium is largely based on studies using DNA labelling techniques. We have adopted a different approach, using histochemistry for the X-linked enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). We have deduced clone size and morphology from studies of patch size and distribution in mice heterozygous for G6PD deficiency and from the identification of clonal enzyme loss induced in normal mice by application of a mutagen. Lingual epithelium of female mice (CBA X GPDX) heterozygous for G6PD deficiency showed multiple clearly defined patches of strong or weak enzyme activity, corresponding in intensity to the strong staining uniformly present in the normal parental strain (CBA) or to the weak staining uniformly present in the G6PD deficient parental strain (GPDX). This pattern results from the random suppression of either the paternal or the maternal X chromosome in each cell early in embryonic development, and the subsequent inheritance of X inactivation in daughter cells, giving rise to phenotypic patches each composed of one or more clones. The patch borders intersected the base of the lingual epithelium at small indentations or at the apices of connective tissue papillae; the surface intersection in some cases bisected filiform papillae. Patch width measured in tissue sections at the mid rete ridge level, showed a clear mode close to 40 microns, corresponding very closely to the mode for rete ridge width (i.e. distance between connective tissue papillae). Further evidence for clonal organization was obtained by inducing mutations in the lingual epithelium of CBA mice by topical mutagen application. A few clearly defined patches of enzyme loss were found with a mean diameter of 36 microns. Their morphology was very similar to that of patches in the heterozygous animals. We interpret these patches as clones derived from stem cells with induced somatic G6PD mutations. We conclude that the mouse lingual epithelium is a stem cell epithelium composed of clonal units of about 40 microns diameter, based on the rete ridge structure and that both connective tissue papillae and filiform papillae occur at the junction of two or more epithelial clones. PMID:1554817

  3. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction. PMID:24281163

  4. Voice evaluation of myomucosal shunt after total laryngectomy: comparison with esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Brasnu, D; Strome, M; Buchman, L C; Pfauwadel, M C; Menard, M; Martinez, P; Laccourreye, H

    1989-01-01

    The vocal quality attained with a tracheoesophageal myomucosal shunt (MMS) as described by Strome was evaluated in four patients and compared with three esophageal speakers and two normal subjects. The patients with MMSs acquired speech sooner. Fundamental frequency, pitch, timbre, and melody were analyzed with computerized electroglottography and sonography. Intelligibility was deemed better after the MMS primarily because phonation time approximated that of normal speech, and this study suggests that, following total laryngectomy, the vocal quality achieved using the MMS is preferrable to that of esophageal speech. PMID:2764239

  5. Changes in the esophageal mucosa of patients with non erosive reflux disease: How far have we gone?

    PubMed Central

    Triantos, Christos; Koukias, Nikolaos; Karamanolis, Georgios; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The normal esophageal mucosa creates a protective epithelial barrier that constrains the acidic reflux in the esophageal lumen. Microscopic findings and functional studies indicate that this barrier might be impaired in patients with non erosive reflux disease (NERD) but not in patients with functional heartburn (FH). Whereas endoscopy and pH monitoring are the most important diagnostic tools in the diagnosis of NERD, recent studies suggest that esophageal biopsies might have a complementary role. Particularly in the differential diagnosis between NERD and FH, the application of histological severity scores showed very promising results. Further evaluation of the scores could lead to routine application of histology in specific NERD populations. PMID:26019440

  6. Near-infrared confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA-LDA multivariate analysis for detection of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Wang, Yue; Liu, Nenrong; Lin, Duo; Weng, Cuncheng; Zhang, Jixue; Zhu, Lihuan; Chen, Weisheng; Chen, Rong; Feng, Shangyuan

    2013-06-01

    The diagnostic capability of using tissue intrinsic micro-Raman signals to obtain biochemical information from human esophageal tissue is presented in this paper. Near-infrared micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis was applied for discrimination of esophageal cancer tissue from normal tissue samples. Micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on 54 esophageal cancer tissues and 55 normal tissues in the 400-1750 cm-1 range. The mean Raman spectra showed significant differences between the two groups. Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured tissue spectra suggested some changes in protein structure, a decrease in the relative amount of lactose, and increases in the percentages of tryptophan, collagen and phenylalanine content in esophageal cancer tissue as compared to those of a normal subject. The diagnostic algorithms based on principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 87.0% and specificity of 70.9% for separating cancer from normal esophageal tissue samples. The result demonstrated that near-infrared micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA-LDA analysis could be an effective and sensitive tool for identification of esophageal cancer.

  7. In vivo overactivation of the Notch signaling pathway in the developing cochlear epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Susumu; Imayoshi, Itaru; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2015-09-01

    Notch signaling is thought to play important roles in both prosensory domain specification and cell fate determination during inner ear development. Inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway in prosensory cells results in excessive hair cell formation, while activation of the Notch signaling pathway by overexpression of activated Notch1 (Notch1-intercellular domain, NICD) in the cochlear epithelium results in ectopic sensory patches where NICD is expressed. However, the effect of Notch activation on the prosensory domain is not fully understood. To elucidate the precise roles of Notch signaling in cochlear prosensory epithelium we examined the effects of Notch overactivation on cochlear prosensory cells of transgenic mice with conditional NICD expression. The histology of the cochlear epithelium was investigated in these mice. The cochlear duct of conditional NICD embryos was wide and short, and the epithelium formed an abnormal tubular structure. Hair cell numbers were reduced though some hair cells developed where NICD was overexpressed. The decrease in hair cells was not accompanied by Hes5-positive and Prox1-positive supporting cell overproduction. Ectopic expression of early prosensory markers, such as Jag1 and Hes/Hey genes, was observed but no expression of Hes5 was found. Our data shows that NICD overexpression disrupts the extension of cochlear epithelium, and reduces the total numbers of hair cells and supporting cells in the sensory epithelium. Thus, an appropriate level of Notch signaling is needed for the normal extension of the cochlear epithelium and for differentiation of both hair cells and supporting cells. PMID:26209882

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease. PMID:23579771

  9. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  10. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  11. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event. PMID:26452739

  13. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  14. [Surgical treatment of esophageal diverticula].

    PubMed

    Constantinoiu, S; Constantin, A; Predescu, D; Mates, I N; Mocanu, A; Gheorghe, M; Hoară, P; Achim, F; Cociu, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the methods and therapeutic principles of esophageal diverticula pathology. We analyze the main pathological mechanisms which establish the therapeutic attitude linked with a complex pretherapeutic evaluation. In our study we enrolled 12 patients operated between 2001-2009 for esophageal diverticula with different topography. In this period of time there were much more patients diagnosed with this pathology, but the need for surgery was establish very tight regarding the actual practical guide which impose the identification and interception of physiological mechanisms by the surgical procedure. We highlight the particular technical details, as well as the important differences of postoperatory complications according to the topography of the diverticula pouch. PMID:21523958

  15. No evidence of HPV DNA in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a population of Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Lus Carlos Moreira; Prolla, Joo Carlos; de Barros Lopes, Antonio; da Rocha, Marta Pires; Fagundes, Renato Borges

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in southern Brazil. METHODS: We studied 189 esophageal samples from 125 patients from three different groups: (1) 102 biopsies from 51 patients with ESCC, with one sample from the tumor and another from normal esophageal mucosa distant from the tumor; (2) 50 esophageal biopsies from 37 patients with a previous diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); and (3) 37 biopsies from esophageal mucosa with normal appearance from 37 dyspeptic patients, not exposed to smoking or alcohol consumption. Nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the MY09/11 and GP5/6 L1 primers was used to detect HPV L1 in samples fixed in formalin and stored in paraffin blocks. All PCR reactions were performed with a positive control (cervicovaginal samples), with a negative control (Human Genomic DNA) and with a blank reaction containing all reagents except DNA. We took extreme care to prevent DNA contamination in sample collection, processing, and testing. RESULTS: The histological biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of ESCC in 52 samples (51 from ESCC group and 1 from the HNSCC group) and classified as well differentiated (12/52, 23.1%), moderately differentiated (27/52, 51.9%) or poorly differentiated (7/52, 13.5%). One hundred twenty-eight esophageal biopsies were considered normal (51 from the ESCC group, 42 from the HNSCC group and 35 from dyspeptic patients). Nine had esophagitis (7 from the HNSCC and 2 from dyspeptic patients). Of a total of 189 samples, only 6 samples had insufficient material for PCR analysis: 1 from mucosa distant from the tumor in a patient with ESCC, 3 from patients with HNSCC and 2 from patients without cancer. In 183 samples (96.8%) GAPDH, G3PDH and/or ?-globin were amplified, thus indicating the adequacy of the DNA in those samples. HPV DNA was negative in all the 183 samples tested: 52 with ESCC, 9 with esophagitis and 122 with normal esophageal mucosa. CONCLUSION: There was no evidence of HPV infection in different ESCC from southern Brazil. PMID:24151387

  16. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R.; King, N.; Alroy, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3132858

  17. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; King, N; Alroy, J

    1988-06-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. PMID:3132858

  18. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging chronic atopic clinical-pathologic disease with an estimated prevalence of 1/1000 similar to the one of Crohn's diseases. Usually, EoE is firstly suspected due to symptoms that are caused by esophageal dysfunction and/or fibrosis. EoE diagnosis is confirmed if the esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf) as a peak value in one or more of at least four specimens obtained randomly from the esophagus. Most of the patients affected by EoE have other atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, IgE-mediated food allergies, and/or atopic dermatitis. The local inflammation is a T helper type 2 (Th2) flogosis, which most likely is driven by a mixed IgE and non-IgE-mediated reaction to food and/or environmental allergens. Recently published genetic studies showed also that EoE is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on genes which are important in atopic inflammation such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) located close to the Th2 cytokine cluster (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) on chromosome 5q22. When the EoE diagnosis is made, it is imperative to control the local eosinophilic inflammation not only to give symptomatic relief to the patient but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EoE is treated like many other atopic diseases with a combination of topical steroids and/or food antigen avoidance. PMID:26194940

  19. Temporal evolution in caveolin 1 methylation levels during human esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer ranks eighth among frequent cancers worldwide. Our aim was to investigate whether and at which neoplastic stage promoter hypermethylation of CAV1 is involved in human esophageal carcinogenesis. Methods Using real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP), we examined CAV1 promoter hypermethylation in 260 human esophageal tissue specimens. Real-time RT-PCR and qMSP were also performed on OE33 esophageal cancer cells before and after treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC). Results CAV1 hypermethylation showed highly discriminative ROC curve profiles, clearly distinguishing esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) from normal esophagus (NE) (EAC vs. NE, AUROC = 0.839 and p < 0.0001; ESCC vs. NE, AUROC = 0.920 and p < 0.0001). Both CAV1 methylation frequency and normalized methylation value (NMV) were significantly higher in Barrett’s metaplasia (BE), low-grade and high-grade dysplasia occurring in BE (D), EAC, and ESCC than in NE (all p < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, among 41 cases with matched NE and EAC or ESCC, CAV1 NMVs in EAC and ESCC (mean = 0.273) were significantly higher than in corresponding NE (mean = 0.146; p < 0.01, Student’s paired t-test). Treatment of OE33 EAC cells with 5-Aza-dC reduced CAV1 methylation and increased CAV1 mRNA expression. Conclusions CAV1 promoter hypermethylation is a frequent event in human esophageal carcinomas and is associated with early neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:24885118

  20. Gene expression profile of human esophageal squamous carcinoma cell line TE-1

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hong-Xing; Zhu, Zheng-Qiu; Sun, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhou-Ru; Chen, Yan-Bo; Dong, Guo-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common and deadly causes of cancer worldwide. However, to date, the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain unclear. The present study investigated the gene expression profile of human esophageal cancer cell line TE-1, a cell model for ESCC, to gain insight to the genetic regulation of this disease. Human esophageal cancer TE-1 cells and normal esophageal HET-1A cells were cultured for isolation of total RNA. Differential expression of RNA transcripts was assessed using the Agilent 4×44 K microarray, combined with real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) for validation. Classification and function of the differential genes were illustrated by bioinformatics processing including hierarchical clustering and gene ontology (GO) analysis. We identified 4,986 transcripts with differential expression (fold-change ≥1.5, P<0.05), including 2,368 up-regulated and 2,618 down-regulated transcripts. GO analysis showed that the dysregulated transcripts were associated with biological process, cellular component, and molecular function. After bioinformatic analysis of significantly regulated signaling pathways, we found these transcripts may target 35 gene pathways, including p53 signaling, glioma, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, insulin signaling, cell cycle, inositol phosphate metabolism, mTOR signaling, and MAPK signaling. The differentially expressed transcripts were screened between the esophageal cancer cell line TE-1 and normal esophageal cell line HET-1A, as well as their target gene pathways. Further data mining is related to prevention and treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:26550410

  1. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  2. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-31

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  3. Pathohistological changes of tracheal epithelium in laryngectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marinela; Prgomet, Drago; Marjanović, Ksenija; Pušeljić, Silvija; Kraljik, Nikola

    2015-11-01

    Total laryngectomy results in a permanent disconnection of the upper and lower airways. Thus, the upper airways are bypassed and can no longer condition, humidify, and filter the inhaled air, leading to damage of the tracheobronchial epithelium. There is little scientific information available about the effects of tracheostoma breathing and the degree of mucosal damage in laryngectomized patients. The aims of this study were to determine the histopathologic findings and investigate the potential impact of using a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) on the tracheal epithelium in long-term tracheostomy patients. Tracheal mucosal biopsies were taken from a total of 70 patients. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined by a light microscope. Normal pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium was found in only 9 (12.9%) cases; while, 17 (24.3%) cases had some degree of basal cell hyperplasia. Squamous metaplasia was the most common finding (50%). Pre-invasive lesions (mild and moderate squamous dysplasia) were found in only one patient who used an HME, and in eight (11.4%) non-users. Although the HME cannot completely restore the physiological functions of the upper respiratory track, it delivers a better quality of air to the lower airways and has a positive effect on tracheal mucosa. PMID:25399353

  4. Effect of carbonated drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Ayesha; Ilyas, Muhammad Sharjeel; Jafari, Fahim Haider; Farzana, Fauzia

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbonated drinks are the second most consumed non-alcoholic beverages in the world after tea. The effects of these drinks on hard tissues and vital organs of the body have been proved beyond doubt. This study, however, explains the effect of these drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium. Methods Thirty-six male Wistar rats were considered for the study. A circular wound of 3.0 mm was created on the buccal mucosa of all animals and they were divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 were fed with chow pellet and water, while those in group 2 were fed with a commercially available carbonated drink instead of water. Six animals from each group were euthanized at 0, 7, and 21 days. Wound site was histologically assessed for differences in thickness and characteristics of the regenerating epithelium between two groups. Results There was a marked difference in the healing pattern between the two groups. Animals in group 1 showed a normal healing pattern at the end of day 21. In the group 2, the regenerated epithelium showed hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis along with acanthosis at the end of the experiment with a subsequent delayed inflammatory reaction at day 21. Conclusion Consumption of carbonated drinks can disrupt oral wound healing. The contents in carbonated drinks have a proinflammatory action on the soft tissue. Results suggest that epithelial changes seen in experimental group 2 could be a result of constant irritation by the acidic and fizzy nature of carbonated drinks. PMID:26937370

  5. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  6. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  7. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  8. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  9. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  10. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  11. Lichenoid esophagitis: clinicopathologic overlap with established esophageal lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Salaria, Safia N; Abu Alfa, Amer K; Cruise, Michael W; Wood, Laura D; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Lichen planus (LP) affects mucocutaneous surfaces and is characterized by intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytosis and squamous cell apoptosis (Civatte bodies). Lichen planus esophagitis (LPE) is underrecognized; concurrent cutaneous disease is present in some patients, but LPE alone is more common. We diagnose patients with characteristic pathologic findings of LPE and known correlation with skin disease or immunofluorescence (IF) results as LPE but use descriptive terminology ("lichenoid esophagitis pattern" [LEP]) when confirmation is unavailable. We reviewed clinicopathologic features of patients diagnosed at our institution with LPE or LEP. There were 88 specimens with LPE or LEP from 65 patients. Most patients were female. Seventeen patients had LPE confirmed by IF. Five patients had both esophageal (1 with IF) and skin LP. Strictures were a prominent presenting feature in LPE patients, with disease distribution more frequent in the upper and lower esophagus. Dysphagia was a common reason for endoscopy in LEP patients. Rheumatologic diseases are more common in patients with LPE compared with LEP. Viral hepatitides and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are associated with LEP. We defined polypharmacy as patients taking >3 medications; this finding was present in both LPE and LEP cohorts; however, this is a prominent feature in those with established LPE. Progression to dysplasia was noted in both cohorts. About 5% of LPE patients have tandem skin manifestations. LPE is more likely than LEP to arise in women, result in stricture formation, and be associated with rheumatologic disorders and polypharmacy, whereas LEP is associated with viral hepatitis and HIV. Both can progress to neoplasia. As the risk of stricture formation is high in patients with LPE, it is worth performing pertinent IF studies to confirm LPE, although knowledge of the clinical association of LEP with viral hepatitis, HIV, and use of multiple medications is of value in daily practice. PMID:24061525

  12. The anti-esophageal cancer cell activity by a novel tyrosine/phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor PP121

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yi; Zhou, Yajuan; Cheng, Long; Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhaohua; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Fuxiang

    2015-09-11

    Here we explored the potential effect of PP121, a novel dual inhibitor of tyrosine and phosphoinositide kinases, against human esophageal cancer cells. We showed that PP121 exerted potent cytotoxic effect in primary (patient-derived) and established (Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-3 lines) esophageal cancer cells, possibly through activating caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis. PP121 was, however, non-cytotoxic to the normal human esophageal epithelial cells (EECs). At the molecular level, we showed that PP121 blocked Akt-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation in esophageal cancer cells, which was restored by introducing a constitutively-active Akt (CA-Akt). Yet, CA-Akt only partly inhibited cytotoxicity by PP121 in Eca-109 cells. Importantly, we showed that PP121 inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling activation in esophageal cancer cells, which appeared independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. In vivo, oral administration of PP121 remarkably inhibited Eca-109 xenograft growth in nude mice, and significantly improved mice survival. Further, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot assays analyzing xenografted tumors showed that PP121 inhibited Akt-mTOR and NFκB activations in vivo. Together, we demonstrate that PP121 potently inhibits esophageal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, possibly through concurrently inhibiting Akt-mTOR and NFκB signalings. - Highlights: • PP121 is cytotoxic against primary and established esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 induces caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 blocks Akt-mTOR activation in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 inhibits NFκB activation, independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. • PP121 inhibits Eca-109 xenograft growth and Akt-mTOR/NFκB activation in vivo.

  13. [Endoscopic methods of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) treatment and their complications].

    PubMed

    Gil, Jerzy; Błaszak, Antoni; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Wojtkowiak, Marek

    2007-05-01

    Tretament in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is in constant change. It is caused by the fact of change and development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Alternative methods of treatment are still searched beacause patients do not accept many years long drug treatment or surgical procedures. New methods are developed. Some of them as endoscopic fundoplication or methods of polimerizing substances injection in the area of lower esophageal sphincer have been abandoned because of low quickly diminishing efficacy Endoscopic sewing that implicate all layers of gaster is still under clinical trials and is considered as interesting. Stertt's procedure that is based on electromagnetic wave application in the area of lower esophageal sphincter is used in clinical practice. Despite effective methods of diagnosing and treatment of GERD there is no evidence of lowering incidence of complications of GERD. It is still common to find esophagus stricture as the first illness manifastation. Chronic character of GERD is associated with intestinal metaplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus in its distal part. The most effective endoscopic methods of the treatment include: endoscopic dilation of the strictures and endoscopic methods of patological epithelium removal in Barrett's esophagus. These are: photodynamic therapy, argon coagulation, laser thermoablation, multipolar ablation and endoscpic mucosectomy. The paper is the review of the methods aimed at GERD and its complication treatment. PMID:17679388

  14. Association of esophageal candidiasis and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Delsing, C.E.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; van de Veerdonk, F.L.; Tol, J.; van der Meer, J.W.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic esophageal candidiasis is an infection that is mostly seen in immunocompromised conditions, among which is chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Recently an association between CMC and esophageal carcinoma has been reported. Here we present two patients with chronic esophageal candidiasis who developed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and we discuss the etiologic role of Candida-induced nitrosamine production, the loss of STAT1 function and impaired tumor surveillance and T-lymphocyte function in the development of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:24371724

  15. Esophageal stents: when and how.

    PubMed

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Pannala, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are devices used to alleviate dysphagia and treat leaks and perforations. Successful esophageal stenting requires definition of the abnormal anatomy such as stricture length or location of the leak, proper stent selection and deployment. This requires detailed knowledge of characteristics of the currently available stents. Self-expanding metal stents whether fully or partially covered have become the mainstay of treatment of esophageal cancer-related dysphagia as they provide quick relief of symptoms and have a favorable safety and efficacy profile, compared to other modalities such as radiation, laser, and argon plasma coagulation. They are also the initial treatment of choice for both malignant and benign fistulae. Stents are also used in benign refractory strictures but long-term stricture resolution rates are low in this setting. Fully covered metal stents are relatively easier to remove compared to partially covered stents; optimal time interval for removal depends on the indication for stenting and the clinical status of the patient. Stent related adverse events include chest pain, reflux, migration, and recurrent obstruction. Serious adverse events occur in less than 5% with procedure-related mortality of less than 2%. Techniques such as placement of hemostatic clips, Over The Scope clips, and endoscopic suturing are being used to decrease the migration risk but the optimal approach has not been defined. Antireflux measures are needed when a stent is placed across the gastroesophageal junction. Stents with antireflux designs do not appear to offer additional benefit compared to the conventional stent designs. Newer stent designs including biodegradable, drug eluting and radioactive stents are currently being investigated. PMID:26824424

  16. A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Elie; Cheesman, Antonio; Hammami, Muhammad; Taylor, Jason R.; Poddar, Nishant; Garrett, Robert W.; Alkaade, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. PMID:25802497

  17. Esophageal Cancer Dose Escalation Using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Palmer, Matthew B.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Liao Zhongxing; Swisher, Steven G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Steven H.; Gomez, Daniel; Likhacheva, Anna; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that 75% of radiation therapy (RT) failures in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer are in the gross tumor volume (GTV). We performed a planning study to evaluate if a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique could selectively deliver a boost dose of radiation to the GTV in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using four different approaches (two-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [2D-CRT] to 50.4 Gy, 2D-CRT to 64.8 Gy, intensity-modulated RT [IMRT] to 50.4 Gy, and SIB-IMRT to 64.8 Gy) and optimized for 10 patients with distal esophageal cancer. All plans were constructed to deliver the target dose in 28 fractions using heterogeneity corrections. Isodose distributions were evaluated for target coverage and normal tissue exposure. Results: The 50.4 Gy IMRT plan was associated with significant reductions in mean cardiac, pulmonary, and hepatic doses relative to the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan. The 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT plan produced a 28% increase in GTV dose and comparable normal tissue doses as the 50.4 Gy IMRT plan; compared with the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan, the 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT produced significant dose reductions to all critical structures (heart, lung, liver, and spinal cord). Conclusions: The use of SIB-IMRT allowed us to selectively increase the dose to the GTV, the area at highest risk of failure, while simultaneously reducing the dose to the normal heart, lung, and liver. Clinical implications warrant systematic evaluation.

  18. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-07-16

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis. PMID:22816012

  19. The tumor suppressor PTEN and the PDK1 kinase regulate formation of the columnar neural epithelium.

    PubMed

    Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Castel, Pau; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Baselga, Jos; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis and stability are essential for normal development and organ homeostasis. The mouse neural plate is a cuboidal epithelium that remodels into a columnar pseudostratified epithelium over the course of 24 hr. Here we show that the transition to a columnar epithelium fails in mutant embryos that lack the tumor suppressor PTEN, although proliferation, patterning and apical-basal polarity markers are normal in the mutants. The Pten phenotype is mimicked by constitutive activation of PI3 kinase and is rescued by the removal of PDK1 (PDPK1), but does not depend on the downstream kinases AKT and mTORC1. High resolution imaging shows that PTEN is required for stabilization of planar cell packing in the neural plate and for the formation of stable apical-basal microtubule arrays. The data suggest that appropriate levels of membrane-associated PDPK1 are required for stabilization of apical junctions, which promotes cell elongation, during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:26809587

  20. A report of three cases of surgical removal of esophageal schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiankai; Liu, Xianben; Fu, Huaiping; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Ruixiang; Wang, Zongfei; Zheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal schwannomas are rarely observed, and the most frequent presenting symptom is dysphagia. In such cases, esophageal endoscopy shows a mucosal protrusion with normal esophageal mucosa. Esophagography shows a protruding smooth mass in the middle thoracic esophagus. Both fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasonography-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) are limited for diagnosing the case. Diagnosis of this condition before surgery is difficult. The most common and effective treatment is enucleation through surgery or endoscopy. Thoracoscopic surgery is gradually becoming used more often, and the prognosis is particularly good. In comparison, thoracoscopy surgery is less invasive, with a shorter length of hospital stay, and reduced pain at the surgical wound site. Extended lymph node dissection was not performed. The positive expression of S-100 on immunohistochemistry examination indicates the nature of the schwannoma. In the present cases, the postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of recurrence has been noted. PMID:27162699

  1. A report of three cases of surgical removal of esophageal schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiankai; Li, Yin; Liu, Xianben; Fu, Huaiping; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Ruixiang; Wang, Zongfei; Zheng, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal schwannomas are rarely observed, and the most frequent presenting symptom is dysphagia. In such cases, esophageal endoscopy shows a mucosal protrusion with normal esophageal mucosa. Esophagography shows a protruding smooth mass in the middle thoracic esophagus. Both fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasonography-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) are limited for diagnosing the case. Diagnosis of this condition before surgery is difficult. The most common and effective treatment is enucleation through surgery or endoscopy. Thoracoscopic surgery is gradually becoming used more often, and the prognosis is particularly good. In comparison, thoracoscopy surgery is less invasive, with a shorter length of hospital stay, and reduced pain at the surgical wound site. Extended lymph node dissection was not performed. The positive expression of S-100 on immunohistochemistry examination indicates the nature of the schwannoma. In the present cases, the postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of recurrence has been noted. PMID:27162699

  2. A late diagnosed case of Spontaneous esophageal perforation in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lu; Wang, Fei; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal perforation, also known as Boerhaave’s syndrome, is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition, especially in elderly patients with more complications, speedy development and higher mortality. Successful handling of the disease depends on a timely diagnosis and the appropriate choice of treatment. Unfortunately, late diagnosis is common because of the non-specific clinical presentation. We here present a 72-year-old patient of spontaneous esophageal perforation who complained of chest pain, but sharply deteriorated with septic shock. With a vomiting history and gastrointestinal-genic bacterium identified in the chest fluid, the patient was highly suspected for esophageal perforation, though the oral methylene blue test was negative for three times. The diagnosis was finally established by esophagoscopy on the 10th day. The perforation was successfully healed by active conservative management and the patient was discharged home on the 43rd day eating normal diet. PMID:26379988

  3. An Unusual Case of Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture after Swallowing a Boneless Chicken Nugget.

    PubMed

    Aga, Zeenia; Avelino, Jackie; Darling, Gail E; Leung, Jo Jo

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old previously healthy man presented to our Emergency Department with shortness of breath and epigastric pain after swallowing a boneless chicken nugget one hour prior to presentation. Physical examination revealed epigastric rigidity and tenderness. Serology was normal except for mildly elevated bilirubin and amylase. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed a distal esophageal rupture with accompanying pneumomediastinum and left-sided pleural effusion. Treatment was initiated with administration of intravenous fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Subsequently, an esophageal stent was inserted endoscopically in addition to VATS (Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery) drainage of the left-sided pleural space. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of Boerhaave's syndrome: a rare and life-threatening form of noniatrogenic esophageal rupture most often preceded by forceful vomiting. Our case demonstrates that physicians should maintain an index of suspicion for spontaneous esophageal rupture in patients presenting with shortness of breath and epigastric pain even in the absence of preceding vomiting, cough, or seizure. Additionally, ingestion of boneless, shell-less foods may be sufficient to cause rupture in individuals without underlying esophageal pathology. CT scan of the thorax and upper abdomen should be performed in these patients to rule out this rare and life-threatening diagnosis. PMID:26949552

  4. Effect of Perilla frutescens fixed oil on experimental esophagitis in albino Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Arya, Ekta; Saha, Sudipta; Saraf, Shubhini A; Kaithwas, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of Perilla frutescens fixed oil on experimental esophagitis in albino rats. A group of rats (n = 6), treated with control vehicle (0.9% NaCl in double distilled water, 3 mL/kg, i.p.) and Perilla frutescens fixed oil (100%) (1, 2, and 3 mL/kg, i.p.), or pantoprazole (30 mg/kg, i.p.), were subjected to pylorus and forestomach ligation. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h and evaluated for the gastric pH, volume of gastric juices, total acidity, esophagitis index and free acidity. Esophageal tissues were further subjected to estimations of TBARS, GSH, catalase, and SOD. Treatment with fixed oil significantly inhibited the gastric secretion, total acidity, and esophagitis index. The oil also helped to restore the altered levels of oxidative stress parameters to normal. The present study also makes evident the in vitro antihistaminic and anticholinergic activity of alpha linolenic acid (ALA) (18 : 3, n - 3) on isolated rat ileum preparation. The lipoxygenase inhibitory, histamine antagonistic, antisecretory (anticholinergic), and antioxidant activity of the oil was attributed for its efficacy in reflux esophagitis. PMID:24027769

  5. Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging of Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfa; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; zhou, Guangzhao; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2014-01-01

    The electron density resolution is 1000 times higher for synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast CT imaging than conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, with which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. In the present study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagus and esophageal carcinoma specimens. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall-- mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The surface of the mucous layer was smooth. In esophageal carcinoma, because of tumor tissue infiltration, the submucosa layer was absent, which indicated destruction of the submucosa. The boundary between normal tissue and tumor was comparatively fuzzy, the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall was indistinct. The surface of the mucous layer was rugose. The technology might be helpful in tumor staging of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:24939041

  6. An Unusual Case of Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture after Swallowing a Boneless Chicken Nugget

    PubMed Central

    Aga, Zeenia; Avelino, Jackie; Darling, Gail E.; Leung, Jo Jo

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old previously healthy man presented to our Emergency Department with shortness of breath and epigastric pain after swallowing a boneless chicken nugget one hour prior to presentation. Physical examination revealed epigastric rigidity and tenderness. Serology was normal except for mildly elevated bilirubin and amylase. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed a distal esophageal rupture with accompanying pneumomediastinum and left-sided pleural effusion. Treatment was initiated with administration of intravenous fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Subsequently, an esophageal stent was inserted endoscopically in addition to VATS (Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery) drainage of the left-sided pleural space. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of Boerhaave's syndrome: a rare and life-threatening form of noniatrogenic esophageal rupture most often preceded by forceful vomiting. Our case demonstrates that physicians should maintain an index of suspicion for spontaneous esophageal rupture in patients presenting with shortness of breath and epigastric pain even in the absence of preceding vomiting, cough, or seizure. Additionally, ingestion of boneless, shell-less foods may be sufficient to cause rupture in individuals without underlying esophageal pathology. CT scan of the thorax and upper abdomen should be performed in these patients to rule out this rare and life-threatening diagnosis. PMID:26949552

  7. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated expression is associated with tobacco smoke exposure in esophageal cancer tissues and benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Liang, Zheng D; Wu, Tsung T; Cao, Liyu; Zhang, Hongfu; Xu, Xiao-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a substantial health problem because of its usually late stage at diagnosis and poor prognosis. Tobacco smoking and alcohol use are the most important risk factors in the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Our previous study demonstrated the binding of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE), a carcinogen present in tobacco smoke and environmental pollution, to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene. To understand how this binding affects the alteration of ATM expression and to identify biomarkers for the detection of esophageal cancer, we analyzed ATM mRNA expression in tissue specimens from patients with esophageal SCC and premalignant lesions using in situ hybridization. We then performed in vitro experiments to verify and extend our ex vivo observations. We found that ATM expression was increased in esophageal SCC and its premalignant lesions when compared with normal tissues and that increased ATM expression was associated with tobacco smoke exposure and tumor de-differentiation. Moreover, BPDE induced ATM expression in esophageal SCC cell lines in a time-dependent manner. In summary, the BPDE in tobacco smoke may be responsible for increased ATM expression in premalignant and malignant esophageal tissues. Our findings suggest that the ATM gene should be further evaluated as a biomarker for the early detection of esophageal cancer and tobacco use in patients. PMID:17019709

  8. Timing and intensity of changes in FDG uptake with symptomatic esophagitis during radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study whether esophageal FDG activity changes by time of mid-course of fractionated radiotherapy (RT), and whether these changes are associated with radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Fifty patients with stage I-III NSCLC were enrolled prospectively and, all received ≥60 Gy RT. FDG-PET/CT scans were acquired prior to, and during-RT after delivery of 45 Gy. Normalized standardized uptake values (NSUV), defined by the esophageal maximum SUV relative to intravascular background level in the aortic arch, were sampled in the esophagus at the level of the primary tumor, sternal notch, aortic arch, carina, and gastro-esophageal junction. Symptomatic radiation esophagitis was defined as an event. Results Compared to baseline, esophageal NSUV increased significantly during-RT at the level of the primary tumor (1.09 ± 0.05 vs.1.28 ± 0.06, p = 0.001), but did not change at other levels in the esophagus. 16 patients had radiation esophagitis events and these patients had significantly higher during-RT to baseline NSUV ratios than those without esophagitis (1.46 ± 0.12, 95% CI 1.20-1.71; vs. 1.11 ± 0.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.21, p = 0.002). Maximum esophageal dose (p = 0.029), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.022) and esophageal FDG PET NSUV ratio (during-RT to baseline, p = 0.007), were independent factors associated with esophagitis and area under curves (AUC) were 0.76, 0.70 and 0.78, respectively. Combining esophageal maximum dose and FDG PET NSUV Ratio at the tumor level increased AUC to 0.85 (p = 0.016). Conclusion FDG uptake increased in esophagus during-RT and this increase may predict radiation esphagitis during later course of treatment. PMID:24467939

  9. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  10. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  11. [Dietary and pharmacological aspects of eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; Juhász, Márk

    2015-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is considered to be a chronic antigen-driven disease whereby food and/or aeroallergens induce a chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the esophagus leading to pathological hyperplasia of the epithelial and muscular layers, fibrosis of the lamina propria and symptoms of dysphagia and food impaction. Eosinophilic esophagitis is often associated with other allergic diseases such as asthma or atopic dermatitis. Current first line treatments of the disease include strict dietary modification and topical anti-inflammatory steroids. In this review the authors summarize currently available treatment strategies of eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:26027600

  12. Interferon γ-Induced Nuclear Interleukin-33 Potentiates the Release of Esophageal Epithelial Derived Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jing; Oshima, Tadayuki; Wu, Liping; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophageal epithelial cells are an initiating cell type in esophageal inflammation, playing an essential role in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A new tissue-derived cytokine, interleukin-33 (IL-33), has been shown to be upregulated in esophageal epithelial cell nuclei in GERD, taking part in mucosal inflammation. Here, inflammatory cytokines secreted by esophageal epithelial cells, and their regulation by IL-33, were investigated. Methods In an in vitro stratified squamous epithelial model, IL-33 expression was examined using quantitative RT-PCR, western blot, ELISA, and immunofluorescence. Epithelial cell secreted inflammatory cytokines were examined using multiplex flow immunoassay. IL-33 was knocked down with small interfering RNA (siRNA) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). Pharmacological inhibitors and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) siRNA were used to explore the signaling pathways. Results Interferon (IFN)γ treatment upregulated nuclear IL-33 in HEECs. Furthermore, HEECs can produce various inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in response to IFNγ. Nuclear, but not exogenous IL-33, amplified IFN induction of these cytokines. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and janus protein tyrosine kinases (JAK)/STAT1 were the common signaling pathways of IFNγ-mediated induction of IL-33 and other cytokines. Conclusions Esophageal epithelial cells can actively participate in GERD pathogenesis through the production of various cytokines, and epithelial-derived IL-33 might play a central role in the production of these cytokines. PMID:26986625

  13. Status of epigenetic chromatin modification enzymes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in northeast Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Singh, Laishram C; Singh, Avninder P; Sharma, Jagannath; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Debnath, Arundhati; Rai, Avdhesh K; Phukan, Rup K; Mahanta, Jagadish; Kataki, Amal C; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer incidence is reported in high frequency in northeast India. The etiology is different from other population at India due to wide variations in dietary habits or nutritional factors, tobacco/betel quid chewing and alcohol habits. Since DNA methylation, histone modification and miRNA-mediated epigenetic processes alter the gene expression, the involvement of these processes might be useful to find out epigenetic markers of esophageal cancer risk in northeast Indian population. The present investigation was aimed to carryout differential expression profiling of chromatin modification enzymes in tumor and normal tissue collected from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Differential mRNA expression profiling and their validation was done by quantitative real time PCR and tissue microarray respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the epidemiological data. mRNA expression data was analyzed by Student t-test. Fisher exact test was used for tissue microarray data analysis. Higher expression of enzymes regulating methylation (DOT1L and PRMT1) and acetylation (KAT7, KAT8, KAT2A and KAT6A) of histone was found associated with ESCC risk. Tissue microarray done in independent cohort of 75 patients revealed higher nuclear protein expression of KAT8 and PRMT1 in tumor similar to mRNA expression. Expression status of PRMT1 and KAT8 was found declined as we move from low grade to high grade tumor. Betel nut chewing, alcohol drinking and dried fish intake were significantly associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer among the study subject. Study suggests the association of PRMT1 and KAT8 with esophageal cancer risk and its involvement in the transition process of low to high grade tumor formation. The study exposes the differential status of chromatin modification enzymes between tumor and normal tissue and points out that relaxed state of chromatin facilitates more transcriptionally active genome in esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26045981

  14. Status of epigenetic chromatin modification enzymes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in northeast Indian population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virendra; Singh, Laishram C; Singh, Avninder P; Sharma, Jagannath; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Debnath, Arundhati; Rai, Avdhesh K; Phukan, Rup K; Mahanta, Jagadish; Kataki, Amal C; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer incidence is reported in high frequency in northeast India. The etiology is different from other population at India due to wide variations in dietary habits or nutritional factors, tobacco/betel quid chewing and alcohol habits. Since DNA methylation, histone modification and miRNA-mediated epigenetic processes alter the gene expression, the involvement of these processes might be useful to find out epigenetic markers of esophageal cancer risk in northeast Indian population. The present investigation was aimed to carryout differential expression profiling of chromatin modification enzymes in tumor and normal tissue collected from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Differential mRNA expression profiling and their validation was done by quantitative real time PCR and tissue microarray respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the epidemiological data. mRNA expression data was analyzed by Student t-test. Fisher exact test was used for tissue microarray data analysis. Higher expression of enzymes regulating methylation (DOT1L and PRMT1) and acetylation (KAT7, KAT8, KAT2A and KAT6A) of histone was found associated with ESCC risk. Tissue microarray done in independent cohort of 75 patients revealed higher nuclear protein expression of KAT8 and PRMT1 in tumor similar to mRNA expression. Expression status of PRMT1 and KAT8 was found declined as we move from low grade to high grade tumor. Betel nut chewing, alcohol drinking and dried fish intake were significantly associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer among the study subject. Study suggests the association of PRMT1 and KAT8 with esophageal cancer risk and its involvement in the transition process of low to high grade tumor formation. The study exposes the differential status of chromatin modification enzymes between tumor and normal tissue and points out that relaxed state of chromatin facilitates more transcriptionally active genome in esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26045981

  15. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  16. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice.

    PubMed

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  17. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-08-14

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  18. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  19. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP.

  20. Fluoroscopic findings post-peroral esophageal myotomy.

    PubMed

    Harmath, Carla; Horowitz, Jeanne; Berggruen, Senta; Hammond, Nancy A; Hammond, Nancy; Nikolaidis, Paul; Miller, Frank H; Miller, Frank; Goodhartz, Lori A; Goodhartz, Lori; Teitelbaum, Ezra N; Teitlebaum, Erza; Hungness, Eric S; Hungness, Eric; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2015-02-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a surgical technique that has been evolving rapidly. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was initiated in 1999, in Japan, for en-bloc resection of large lesions of the stomach (Zhou et al., World J Gastroenterol 19:6962-6968, 2013, ; Kobara et al., Clin Exp Gastroenterol 7:67-74, 2014). Since then, many additional therapies utilizing natural transluminal endoscopic approach have evolved. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a minimally invasive type of transluminal endoscopic surgery that was recently developed for the treatment of achalasia and esophageal motility disorders. The peroral endoscopic myotomy is a less invasive surgical treatment that is suitable for all types of achalasia and used as an alternate to the Heller myotomy. The radiographic findings of achalasia and surgical changes after Heller myotomy have been described, however, very little is available on the post-POEM esophagram appearance. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the anatomy, surgical procedure, and normal and abnormal findings seen on esophagrams in patients who have undergone a POEM. PMID:25128214

  1. Ambulatory High Resolution Manometry, Lower Esophageal Sphincter Lift and Transient Lower Esophageal Sphincter Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravinder K.; Karstens, Anna; Leslie, Eric; Babaei, Arash; Bhargava, Valmik

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) lift seen on high resolution manometry (HRM) is a possible surrogate marker of the longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus. Recent studies suggest that longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation. Aim Our goal was to determine, 1) the feasibility of prolonged ambulatory HRM and 2) to detect LES lift with LES relaxation using ambulatory HRM color isobaric contour plots. Methods In vitro validation studies were performed to determine the accuracy of HRM technique in detecting axial movement of the LES. Eight healthy normal volunteers were studied using a custom designed HRM catheter and a 16 channel data recorder, in the ambulatory setting of subject’s home environment. Color HRM plots were analyzed to determine the LES lift during swallow-induced LES relaxation as well as during complete and incomplete transient LES relaxations. Results Satisfactory recordings were obtained for 16 hours in all subjects. LES lift was small (2 mm) in association with swallow-induced LES relaxation. LES lift could not be measured during complete transient LES relaxations (TLESR) because the LES is not identified on the HRM color isobaric contour plot once it is fully relaxed. On the other hand, LES lift, mean 7.6 ± 1.4 mm, range 6–12 mm was seen with incomplete TLESRs (n = 80). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the feasibility of prolonged ambulatory HRM recordings. Similar to a complete TLESR, longitudinal muscle contraction of the distal esophagus occurs during incomplete TLESRs, which can be detected by the HRM. Using prolonged ambulatory HRM, future studies may investigate the temporal correlation between abnormal longitudinal muscle contraction and esophageal symptoms. PMID:22074595

  2. Radioprotective Effects of Amifostine on Acute and Chronic Esophageal Injury in Rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Thrasher, Bradley A.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Brizel, Marla B.; Brizel, David M.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the protective benefit of amifostine against esophageal injury from fractionated radiation in a rodent model. Methods: Fractionated or sham esophageal irradiation was administered to Fisher-344 rats for 5 consecutive daily fractions of 9 Gy using 150 kV X-rays. Animals received an intraperitoneal injection of amifostine or placebo 30 min before each fraction. Histopathologic analyses for mucosal thickness, submucosal collagen deposition, activation of macrophages, oxidative stress and expression/activation of integrin{alpha}v{beta}6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} were performed 5 days and 10 weeks after irradiation. Results: Pre-RT mean mucosal thickness was 35 {mu}m in both the placebo and the amifostine groups. Five days post-RT, mean mucosal thicknesses were 30 {mu}m in the placebo group versus 37 {mu}m in the amifostine group (p = 0.024). At 10 weeks post-RT, the group receiving amifostine experienced a significant decrease in tunica muscularis damage (p = 0.002), submucosal collagen deposition (p = 0.027), and macrophage accumulation (p = 0.026) when compared with the placebo group. The levels of immunoreactivity for oxidative stress, TGF-{beta}, and integrin{alpha}v{beta}6 were significantly decreased 10 weeks post-RT in the group receiving amifostine treatment compared with placebo group. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that amifostine given before each radiation fraction protects against acute and chronic esophageal injury in a rodent model. Protection of the mucosal epithelium integrity by amifostine prevents integrin{alpha}v{beta}6 expression which reduces TGF-{beta} activation and subsequent development of chronic esophageal injury in this model. Further investigation is necessary to determine the clinical relevance of these findings.

  3. THE EFFECT OF SO2 ON THE UPTAKE OF PARTICLES BY MOUSE BRONCHIAL EPITHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In three experiments, the authors have explored the uptake and transport of collidal gold (Au) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) by normal and SO2-injured bronchial epithelium. In the first experiment mice were exposed to a 2-hr aerosol of Au; in the second experiment, mice were exposed to ...

  4. Response of esophageal cancer cells to epigenetic inhibitors is mediated via altered thioredoxin activity.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Theresa D; Timme, Sylvia; Ostendorp, Jenny; Bogatyreva, Lioudmilla; Hoeppner, Jens; Hopt, Ulrich T; Hauschke, Dieter; Werner, Martin; Lassmann, Silke

    2016-03-01

    We previously showed that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and 5-azacytidine (AZA) treatment selectively induced cell death of esophageal cancer cells. The mechanisms of cancer selectivity, however, remained unclear. Here we examined whether the cancer selectivity of HDACi/AZA treatment is mediated by the thioredoxin (Trx) system and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in esophageal cancer cells. For this, we first analyzed human tissue specimens of 37 esophageal cancer patients by immunohistochemistry for Trx, Trx-interacting protein (TXNIP) and Trx reductase (TXNRD). This revealed a loss or at least reduction of nuclear Trx in esophageal cancer cells, compared with normal epithelial cells (P<0.001). Although no differences were observed for TXNIP, TXNRD was more frequently expressed in cancer cells (P<0.001). In the two main histotypes of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs, n=19) and esophageal adenomcarcinomas (EAC, n=16), similar Trx, TXNIP and TXNRD expression patterns were observed. Also in vitro, nuclear Trx was only detectable in non-neoplastic Het-1A cells, but not in OE21/ESCC or OE33/EAC cell lines. Moreover, the two cancer cell lines showed an increased Trx activity, being significant for OE21 (P=0.0237). After treatment with HDACi and/or AZA, ROS were exclusively increased in both cancer cell lines (P=0.048-0.017), with parallel decrease of Trx activity. This was variably accompanied by increased TXNIP levels upon AZA, MS-275 or MS-275/AZA treatment for 6 or 24?h in OE21, but not in Het-1A or OE33 cells. In summary, this study evaluated Trx and its associated proteins TXNIP and TXNRD for the first time in esophageal cancers. The analyses revealed an altered subcellular localization of Trx and strong upregulation of TXNRD in esophageal cancer cells. Moreover, HDACi and AZA disrupted Trx function and induced accumulation of ROS with subsequent apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells exclusively. Trx function is hence an important cellular mediator conferring non-neoplastic cell resistance for HDACi and/or AZA. PMID:26692290

  5. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  6. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  7. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  8. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency.

    PubMed

    Del Genio, Gianmattia; Del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-03-16

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for Barrx(TM) RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  9. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  10. Promoter hypermethylation and inactivation of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and its reactivation in cell lines.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Fang MZ; Jin Z; Wang Y; Liao J; Yang GY; Wang LD; Yang CS

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the role of DNA hypermethylation in the loss of expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) during the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to investigate its reactivation in cell lines. Samples were collected from Linzhou City of the Henan province in northern China, a high-risk area of this disease. The hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands of the MGMT gene was examined by methylation-specific PCR in ESCC and neighboring non-tumorous tissues, as well as in laser capture microdissected samples with normal epithelium, basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), and dysplasia (DYS). The MGMT mRNA and protein expression were determined with RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Five of 17 (29%) normal, 10 of 20 (50%) BCH, 8 of 12 (67%) DYS, and 13 of 18 (72%) ESCC samples had DNA hypermethylation in the MGMT promoter region, showing a gradual increase with the progression of carcinogenesis. The frequency of the loss of MGMT mRNA and protein expression progressively decreased from normal to BCH, DYS, and ESCC, and it was highly correlated with MGMT promoter hypermethylation according to Fisher's exact tests. When each individual sample was considered, good concordance between DNA hypermethylation and the loss of expression of MGMT was also observed. In samples from the same patient, if hypermethylation was detected in earlier lesions, it was usually observed in more severe lesions. In the ESCC cell line KYSE 510, treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine partially reversed the CpG hypermethylation status and restored mRNA expression of the MGMT gene. Similar reactivation of MGMT gene by dietary polyphenols, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and genistein, has also been observed. The results suggest that the DNA hypermethylation of MGMT is an important mechanism for MGMT gene silencing in the development of ESCC, and this epigenetic event may be prevented or reversed by these polyphenols for the prevention of carcinogenesis.

  11. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. PMID:25573637

  12. Mechanisms of Disease of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin P; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-05-23

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized inflammatory disease of the esophagus with clinical symptoms derived from esophageal dysfunction. The etiology of EoE is now being elucidated, and food hypersensitivity is emerging as the central cornerstone of disease pathogenesis. Herein, we present a thorough picture of the current clinical, pathologic, and molecular understanding of the disease with a focus on disease mechanisms. PMID:26925500

  13. Local hyperthermia for esophageal cancer in a rabbit tumor model: Magnetic stent hyperthermia versus magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayi; Li, Ning; Li, Li; Li, Danye; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Lingyun; Tang, Jintian; Li, Liya

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic-mediated hyperthermia (MMH) is a promising local thermotherapy approach for cancer treatment. The present study investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of MMH in esophageal cancer using a rabbit tumor model. The therapeutic effect of two hyperthermia approaches, magnetic stent hyperthermia (MSH), in which heat is induced by the clinical stent that is placed inside the esophagus, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), where magnetic nanoparticles are applied as the agent, was systematically evaluated. A rabbit esophageal tumor model was established by injecting VX2 carcinoma cells into the esophageal submucosa. The esophageal stent was deployed perorally into the tumor segment of the esophagus. For the MFH, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were administered to the rabbits by intratumoral injection. The rabbits were exposed under a benchtop applicator using an alternative magnetic field (AMF) with 300 kHz frequency for the hyperthermia treatment. The results demonstrated that esophageal stents and MNPs had ideal inductive heating properties upon exposure under an AMF of 300 kHz. MSH, using a thermal dose of 46°C with a 10-min treatment time, demonstrated antitumor effects on the rabbit esophageal cancer. However, the rabbit esophageal wall is not heat-resistant. Therefore, a higher temperature or longer treatment time may lead to necrosis of the rabbit esophagus. MFH has a significant antitumor effect by confining the heat within the tumor site without damaging the adjacent normal tissues. The present study indicates that the two hyperthermia procedures have therapeutic effects on esophageal cancer, and that MFH may be more specific than MSH in terms of temperature control during the treatment. PMID:24260045

  14. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W; Kang, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA172638.

  15. Cell cycle of globose basal cells in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huard, J M; Schwob, J E

    1995-05-01

    The olfactory epithelium of adult mammals has the unique property of generating olfactory sensory neurons throughout life. Cells of the basal compartment, which include horizontal and globose basal cells, are responsible for the ongoing process of neurogenesis in this system. We report here that the globose basal cells in olfactory epithelium of rats, as in mice, are the predominant type of proliferating cell, and account for 97.6% of the actively dividing cells in the basal compartment of the normal epithelium. Globose basal cells have not been fully characterized in terms of their proliferative properties, and the dynamic aspects of neurogenesis are not well understood. As a consequence, it is uncertain whether cell kinetic properties are under any regulation that could affect the rate of neurogenesis. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have determined the duration of both the synthesis phase (S-phase) and the full cell cycle of globose basal cells in adult rats. The duration of the S-phase was found to be 9 hr in experiments utilizing sequential injections of either IdU followed by BrdU or 3H-thy followed by BrdU. The duration of the cell cycle was determined by varying the time interval between the injections of 3H-thy and BrdU and tracking the set of cells that exit S shortly after the first injection. With this paradigm, the interval required for these cells to traverse G2, M, G1, and a second S-phase, is equivalent to the duration of one mitotic cycle and equals 17 hr. These observations serve as the foundation to assess whether the cell cycle duration is subject to regulation in response to experimental injury, and whether such regulation is partly responsible for changes in the rate of neurogenesis in such settings. PMID:7647371

  16. In vitro reconstruction of human junctional and sulcular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Dabija-Wolter, G; Bakken, V; Cimpan, M R; Johannessen, A C; Costea, D E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to develop and characterize standardized in vitro three-dimensional organotypic models of human junctional epithelium (JE) and sulcular epithelium (SE). METHODS Organotypic models were constructed by growing human normal gingival keratinocytes on top of collagen matrices populated with gingival fibroblasts (GF) or periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PLF). Tissues obtained were harvested at different time points and assessed for epithelial morphology, proliferation (Ki67), expression of JE-specific markers (ODAM and FDC-SP), cytokeratins (CK), transglutaminase, filaggrin, and basement membrane proteins (collagen IV and laminin1). RESULTS The epithelial component in 3- and 5-day organotypics showed limited differentiation and expressed Ki-67, ODAM, FDC-SP, CK 8, 13, 16, 19, and transglutaminase in a similar fashion to control JE samples. PLF supported better than GF expression of CK19 and suprabasal proliferation, although statistically significant only at day 5. Basement membrane proteins started to be deposited only from day 5. The rate of proliferating cells as well as the percentage of CK19-expressing cells decreased significantly in 7- and 9-day cultures. Day 7 organotypics presented higher number of epithelial cell layers, proliferating cells in suprabasal layers, and CK expression pattern similar to SE. CONCLUSION Both time in culture and fibroblast type had impact on epithelial phenotype. Five-day cultures with PLF are suggested as JE models, 7-day cultures with PLF or GF as SE models, while 9-day cultures with GF as gingival epithelium (GE) models. Such standard, reproducible models represent useful tools to study periodontal bacteria–host interactions in vitro. PMID:22947066

  17. Expression of semaphorin 3A in the rat corneal epithelium during wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Ko, Ji-Ae; Morita, Yukiko; Nishida, Teruo

    2010-05-14

    The neural guidance protein semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is expressed in corneal epithelial cells of the adult rat. We have now further investigated the localization of Sema3A in the normal rat corneal epithelium as well as changes in its expression pattern during wound healing after central corneal epithelial debridement. The expression pattern of Sema3A was compared with that of the tight-junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), the gap-junction protein connexin43 (Cx43), or the cell proliferation marker Ki67. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Sema3A was present predominantly in the membrane of basal and wing cells of the intact corneal epithelium. The expression of Sema3A at the basal side of basal cells was increased in the peripheral epithelium compared with that in the central region. Sema3A was detected in all layers at the leading edge of the migrating corneal epithelium at 6 h after central epithelial debridement. The expression of Sema3A was markedly up-regulated in the basal and lateral membranes of columnar basal cells apparent in the thickened, newly healed epithelium at 1 day after debridement, but it had largely returned to the normal pattern at 3 days after debridement. The expression of ZO-1 was restricted to superficial epithelial cells and remained mostly unchanged during the wound healing process. The expression of Cx43 in basal cells was down-regulated at the leading edge of the migrating epithelium but was stable in the remaining portion of the epithelium. Ki67 was not detected in basal cells of the central epithelium at 1 day after epithelial debridement, when Sema3A was prominently expressed. Immunoblot analysis showed that the abundance of Sema3A in the central cornea was increased 1 day after epithelial debridement, whereas that of ZO-1 or Cx43 remained largely unchanged. This increase in Sema3A expression was accompanied by up-regulation of the Sema3A coreceptor neuropilin-1. Our observations have thus shown that the expression of Sema3A is increased markedly in basal cells of the newly healed corneal epithelium, and that this up-regulation of Sema3A is not associated with cell proliferation. They further suggest that Sema3A might play a role in the regulation of corneal epithelial wound healing.

  18. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery or radiation to the chest (for example, treatment for lung cancer) Taking certain medicines without drinking plenty of water. These medicines include alendronate, doxycycline, ibandronate, risedronate, tetracycline, ...

  19. Digital histologic analysis reveals morphometric patterns of age-related involution in breast epithelium and stroma.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Chollet-Hinton, Lynn; Kirk, Erin L; Midkiff, Bentley; Troester, Melissa A

    2016-02-01

    Complete age-related regression of mammary epithelium, often termed postmenopausal involution, is associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, most studies have qualitatively assessed involution. We quantitatively analyzed epithelium, stroma, and adipose tissue from histologically normal breast tissue of 454 patients in the Normal Breast Study. High-resolution digital images of normal breast hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were partitioned into epithelium, adipose tissue, and nonfatty stroma. Percentage area and nuclei per unit area (nuclear density) were calculated for each component. Quantitative data were evaluated in association with age using linear regression and cubic spline models. Stromal area decreased (P = 0.0002), and adipose tissue area increased (P < 0.0001), with an approximate 0.7% change in area for each component, until age 55 years when these area measures reached a steady state. Although epithelial area did not show linear changes with age, epithelial nuclear density decreased linearly beginning in the third decade of life. No significant age-related trends were observed for stromal or adipose nuclear density. Digital image analysis offers a high-throughput method for quantitatively measuring tissue morphometry and for objectively assessing age-related changes in adipose tissue, stroma, and epithelium. Epithelial nuclear density is a quantitative measure of age-related breast involution that begins to decline in the early premenopausal period. PMID:26772400

  20. Tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting overcomes radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. . E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org; Zhang Xiaochun; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cheung, Rex; Fang Bingliang

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To overcome radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma by tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting using tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Methods and Materials: Adenoviral vector Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD with a tumor-specific human telomerase reverse transcription promoter was used to transfer TRAIL gene to human esophageal adenocarcinoma and normal human lung fibroblastic cells (NHLF). Activation of apoptosis was analyzed by Western blot, fluorescent activated cell sorting, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate labeling (TUNEL) assay. A human esophageal adenocarcinoma mouse model was treated with intratumoral injections of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus local radiotherapy. Results: The combination of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy increased the cell-killing effect in all esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines but not in NHLF cells. This combination also significantly reduced clonogenic formation (p < 0.05) and increased sub-G1 deoxyribonucleic acid accumulation in cancer cells (p < 0.05). Activation of apoptosis by Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus radiotherapy was demonstrated by activation of caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase in vitro and TUNEL assay in vivo. Combined Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy dramatically inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mean survival in the esophageal adenocarcinoma model to 31.6 days from 16.7 days for radiotherapy alone and 21.5 days for Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The combination of tumor-specific TRAIL gene targeting and radiotherapy enhances the effect of suppressing esophageal adenocarcinoma growth and prolonging survival.

  1. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitors suppress angiogenesis and growth of esophageal carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Lei, X; Zhu, S; Zhang, S

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors decrease the risk of cancer. However, studies to date have not investigated esophageal carcinoma. Therefore, we investigated the inhibitory effect of ACE inhibitors on growth of esophageal carcinoma xenografts. We used the EC9706 cell line, which expresses the highest vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA level, to establish xenografts in 21 BALB/c nude mice. The mice were then randomly allocated to receive normal saline, perindopril (4 mg/kg), or benazepril (6 mg/kg). Five weeks later, the nude mice were sacrificed and all tumors were dissected and weighed. The number of microvessels was counted by immunostaining endothelial cells for CD31 and the microvessel density was assessed. The EC9706 cell line showed the highest expression of VEGF mRNA of four esophageal squamous cell carcinoma lines. After treatment, the average tumor inhibitory rate in the benazepril group was 45.4%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Similar findings were observed when we used tumor weight as an index for tumor growth inhibition (P < 0.05). By contrast, there was no significant difference between the perindopril group and the control group (P > 0.05). The benazepril group appeared to show less vascularization than the control group (P < 0.05), but we did not find a significant difference between the perindopril group and the control group (P > 0.05). The EC9706 cell line showed the highest expression of VEGF mRNA level of the four esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines examined. Benazepril inhibited the growth of esophageal carcinoma in vivo. The potential mechanism of benazepril seems to involve suppression of new vessel formation. Therefore, benazepril could be used as an effective agent for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:22309361

  2. Chronic inflammatory airway diseases: the central role of the epithelium revisited.

    PubMed

    Gohy, S T; Hupin, C; Pilette, C; Ladjemi, M Z

    2016-04-01

    The respiratory epithelium plays a critical role for the maintenance of airway integrity and defense against inhaled particles. Physical barrier provided by apical junctions and mucociliary clearance clears inhaled pathogens, allergens or toxics, to prevent continuous stimulation of adaptive immune responses. The "chemical barrier", consisting of several anti-microbial factors such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, constitutes another protective mechanism of the mucosae against external aggressions before adaptive immune response starts. The reconstruction of damaged respiratory epithelium is crucial to restore this barrier. This review examines the role of the airway epithelium through recent advances in health and chronic inflammatory diseases in the lower conducting airways (in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Better understanding of normal and altered epithelial functions continuously provides new insights into the physiopathology of chronic airway diseases and should help to identify new epithelial-targeted therapies. PMID:27021118

  3. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  4. Role of Proton Pump Inhibitor on Esophageal Carcinogenesis and Pancreatic Acinar Cell Metaplasia Development: An Experimental In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Olmo, Luigi; Fassan, Matteo; Dassie, Elisa; Scarpa, Marco; Realdon, Stefano; Cavallin, Francesco; Cagol, Matteo; Battaglia, Giorgio; Pizzi, Marco; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Franceschinis, Erica; Pasut, Gianfranco; Rugge, Massimo; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Realdon, Nicola; Castoro, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic gastro-duodenal reflux in the esophagus is a major risk for intestinal metaplasia and Barrett’s adenocarcinoma. A role for chronic use of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in the increased incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Western countries has been previously suggested. The aim of this work was to study the effect of chronic administration of omeprazole (a proton pump inhibitor) per os in a model of reflux induced esophageal carcinogenesis. One week after esophago-gastro-jejunostomy, 115 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive 10 mg/Kg per day of omeprazole or placebo, 5 days per week. The esophago-gastric specimens were collected 28±2 weeks after randomization and analyzed in a blinded fashion. Mortality and esophageal metaplasia rates did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.99 for mortality, p = 0.36 for intestinal metaplasia and p = 0.66 for multi-layered epithelium). Gastric pancreatic acinar cell metaplasia (PACM) was more frequently observed in PPI-treated rats (p = 0.003). Severe ulcer lesions significantly prevailed in the placebo group (p = 0.03). Locally invasive esophageal epithelial neoplasia were observed in 23/39 PPI-treated versus 14/42 placebo-animals (p = 0.03). In conclusion, chronic omeprazole treatment improved the healing of esophageal ulcerative lesions. Locally invasive neoplastic lesions and PACM prevailed among PPI-treated animals. However, neither an effect on the overall mortality nor on the incidence of pre-neoplastic lesions was observed in this work. PMID:25415190

  5. Value of two-phase dynamic multidetector computed tomography in differential diagnosis of post-inflammatory strictures from esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Buryakina, Svetlana A; Kondratiev, Evgeny V; Yang, Qin; Ruchkin, Dmitry V; Kalinin, Dmitry V

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with post-inflammatory esophageal strictures (corrosive and peptic) and reveal the optimal scanning phase protocols for distinguishing post-inflammatory esophageal stricture and esophageal cancer. METHODS: Sixty-five patients with esophageal strictures of different etiology were included in this study: 24 patients with 27 histopathologically confirmed corrosive strictures, 10 patients with 12 peptic strictures and 31 patients with esophageal cancer were evaluated with a two-phase dynamic contrast-enhanced MDCT. Arterial and venous phases at 10 and 35 s after the attenuation of 200 HU were obtained at the descending aorta, with a delayed phase at 6-8 min after the start of injection of contrast media. For qualitative analysis, CT scans of benign strictures were reviewed for the presence/absence of the following features: “target sign”, luminal mass, homogeneity of contrast medium uptake, concentric wall thickening, conically shaped suprastenotic dilatation, smooth boundaries of stenosis and smooth mucous membrane at the transition to stenosis, which were compared with a control group of 31 patients who had esophageal cancer. The quantitative analysis included densitometric parameter acquisition using regions-of-interest measurement of the zone of stenosis and normal esophageal wall and the difference between those measurements (ΔCT) at all phases of bolus contrast enhancement. Esophageal wall thickening, length of esophageal wall thickening and size of the regional lymph nodes were also evaluated. RESULTS: The presence of a concentric esophageal wall, conically shaped suprastenotic dilatation, smooth upper and lower boundaries, “target sign” and smooth mucous membrane at the transition to stenosis were suggestive of a benign cause, with sensitivities of 92.31%, 87.17%, 94.87%, 76.92% and 82.05%, respectively, and specificities of 70.96%, 89.66%, 80.65%, 96.77% and 93.55%, respectively. The features that were most suggestive of a malignant cause were eccentric esophageal wall thickening, tuberous upper and lower boundaries of stenosis, absence of mucous membrane visualization, rupture of the mucous membrane at the upper boundary of stenosis, cup-shaped suprastenotic dilatation, luminal mass and enlarged regional lymph nodes with specificities of 92.31% 94.87%, 67.86%, 100%, 97.44%, 94.87% and 82.86%, respectively and sensitivities of 70.97%, 80.65%, 96.77%, 80.65%, 54.84%, 87.10% and 60%, respectively. The highest tumor attenuation occurred in the arterial phase (mean attenuation 74.13 ± 17.42 HU), and the mean attenuation difference between the tumor and the normal esophageal wall (mean ΔCT) in the arterial phase was 23.86 ± 19.31 HU. Here, 11.5 HU of ΔCT in the arterial phase was the cut-off value used to differentiate esophageal cancer from post-inflammatory stricture (P = 0.000). The highest attenuation of post-inflammatory strictures occurred in the delayed phase (mean attenuation 71.66 ± 14.28 HU), and the mean ΔCT in delayed phase was 34.03 ± 15.94 HU. Here, 18.5 HU of ΔCT in delayed phase was the cut-off value used to differentiate post-inflammatory stricture from esophageal cancer (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The described imaging findings reveal high diagnostic significance in the differentiation of benign strictures from esophageal cancer. PMID:26269677

  6. Expression and mechanism of PinX1 and telomerase activity in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jing; Wang, Da-Hu; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Liang; Liu, Feng-Ling; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Esophageal tissues were collected from an esophageal carcinoma high-risk area of China and were used to detect the telomere length and the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by immuhistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization; esophageal carcinoma tissues, paired-adjacent mucosa and paired normal mucosa were obtained from resected surgical specimens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in order to determine telomerase activity and expression of hTERT and Pin2/TRF1 interacting protein X1 (PinX1) by telomeric repeat amplification protocol-silver staining, RT-PCR and flow cytometry (FCM). The cell proliferation and apoptosis of Eca109 cells were analyzed by FCM and MTT assay. We found that the length of telomere DNA decreased and hTERT protein expression increased in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells; telomerase activity was significantly upregulated followed by a decrease of PinX1 expression in esophageal carcinoma compared with dysplasia and normal patients, which notably correlated with grade and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of PinX1 inhibited cell growth, arrested cells at the G0/G1 stage and induced cell apoptosis in Eca109 cells. In addition, PinX1 overexpression significantly inhibited telomerase activity. In conclusion, the length shortening of telomere was an important characteristic in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells, followed by increase of telomerase activity and downregulation of PinX1. Overexpression of PinX1 blocked Eca109 cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis by downregulating telomerase activity. PMID:23912465

  7. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  8. Transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage for lower esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Harufumi; Azuma, Masaki; Kanamaru, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Motohiro; Okamoto, Kazuya; Shimamura, Takahiro; Kyo, Kennoki; Maema, Atsushi; Nakamura, Toshio; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of use of thoracoscopy for esophageal perforation has not been fully evaluated. We herein report a case of esophageal perforation for which a transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage was performed. PMID:26628716

  9. In vitro culture of embryonic mouse intestinal epithelium: cell differentiation and introduction of reporter genes

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Jonathan M; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Hornsey, Mark A; Tosh, David; Slack, Jonathan MW

    2006-01-01

    Background Study of the normal development of the intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable model systems, in particular ones that enable the introduction of exogenous genes. Production of such a system would advance our understanding of normal epithelial development and help to shed light on the pathogenesis of intestinal neoplasia. The criteria for a reliable culture system include the ability to perform real time observations and manipulations in vitro, the preparation of wholemounts for immunostaining and the potential for introducing genes. Results The new culture system involves growing mouse embryo intestinal explants on fibronectin-coated coverslips in basal Eagle's medium+20% fetal bovine serum. Initially the cultures maintain expression of the intestinal transcription factor Cdx2 together with columnar epithelial (cytokeratin 8) and mesenchymal (smooth muscle actin) markers. Over a few days of culture, differentiation markers appear characteristic of absorptive epithelium (sucrase-isomaltase), goblet cells (Periodic Acid Schiff positive), enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A) and Paneth cells (lysozyme). Three different approaches were tested to express genes in the developing cultures: transfection, electroporation and adenoviral infection. All could introduce genes into the mesenchyme, but only to a small extent into the epithelium. However the efficiency of adenovirus infection can be greatly improved by a limited enzyme digestion, which makes accessible the lateral faces of cells bearing the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor. This enables reliable delivery of genes into epithelial cells. Conclusion We describe a new in vitro culture system for the small intestine of the mouse embryo that recapitulates its normal development. The system both provides a model for studying normal development of the intestinal epithelium and also allows for the manipulation of gene expression. The explants can be cultured for up to two weeks, they form the full repertoire of intestinal epithelial cell types (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells and enteroendocrine cells) and the method for gene introduction into the epithelium is efficient and reliable. PMID:16725020

  10. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  11. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, José Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ‪The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  12. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  13. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  14. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

  15. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. PMID:26711880

  16. Molecular staging of lung and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christine L; Moore, Mary-Beth H; Brooks, Kelly R; D'Amico, Thomas A; Harpole, David H

    2002-06-01

    In both esophageal and NSCLC, the TNM stage at diagnosis remains the most important determinant of survival. Significant research to investigate the biology of NSCLC and esophageal carcinoma is ongoing, and the roles of proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, angiogenic factors, extracellular matrix proteases, and adhesion molecules are being elucidated. While evidence is accumulating that various markers are involved in NSCLC and esophageal tumor virulence, the current studies are compromised by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations, and variations in techniques. Large prospective studies with homogenous groups designed to evaluate the role of these various markers should clarify their potential involvement in NSCLC and esophageal cancer. Identification of occult micrometastases in lymph nodes and bone marrow using immunohistochemical techniques and rt-PCR is intriguing. These techniques are promising as a method to more accurately stage patients, and therefore to predict outcomes and to determine therapies. Perhaps the most promising area of research is the development of novel drugs whose mechanism of action targets the pathways of various molecular markers. Molecular biologic substaging offers an opportunity to individualize a chemotherapeutic regimen based on the molecular profile of the tumor, thus providing the potential for improved outcomes with less morbidity in patients with both NSCLC and esophageal cancer. PMID:12371582

  17. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-27

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  18. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  19. Esophageal Cancer: Insights From Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Marie-Pier

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer and the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite recent advances in the development of surgical techniques in combination with the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the prognosis for esophageal cancer remains poor. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer are still poorly understood. Hence, understanding these mechanisms is crucial to improving outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer. Mouse models constitute valuable tools for modeling human cancers and for the preclinical testing of therapeutic strategies in a manner not possible in human subjects. Mice are excellent models for studying human cancers because they are similar to humans at the physiological and molecular levels and because they have a shorter gestation time and life cycle. Moreover, a wide range of well-developed technologies for introducing genetic modifications into mice are currently available. In this review, we describe how different mouse models are used to study esophageal cancer. PMID:26380556

  20. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing; Wei, Caimiao; Myles, Bevan; Guo Xiaomao; Palmer, Matthew; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical outcomes are encouraging. Prospective comparison with more traditional approach is warranted.

  1. Treatment and long-term outcome of chronic radiation esophagitis after radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: A report of 13 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Silvain, C.; Barrioz, T.; Besson, I.; Babin, P.; Fontanel, J.P.; Daban, A.; Matuchansky, C.; Beauchant, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The natural history of chronic radiation esophagitis occurring in previously normal esophagus is still unknown. The authors describe here the long-term outcome of chronic esophagitis arising after neck irradiation for oropharynx and larynx carcinomas in 13 consecutive adult patients. The first clinical signs of radiation esophagitis were dysphagia or impossibility of oral intake, which appeared within 26 months (range 2--120 months) after the end of radiation for pyriform fossae carcinoma (N = 5), tonsil carcinoma (N = 2), larynx carcinoma (N = 2), pharynx carcinoma (N = 2), base of the tongue (N = 1), and thyroid carcinomas (N = 1). During upper endoscopy, an esophageal stenosis was found in 11 cases and was associated with ulceration in three cases. An isolated esophageal ulceration was present in only two cases. Chronic radiation esophagitis diagnosis was confirmed by histology and surgery in seven cases. In the last six cases, diagnosis was supported by the absence of first cancer relapses within a median follow-up of two years (16 months to nine years) and by endoscopic findings. Seven patients received parenteral or enteral nutrition. Ten patients were treated by peroral dilatations. These treatments allowed nearly normal oral diet in 11/13 patients. Only one patient was lost of follow-up after 20 months. Four patients died from chronic radiation esophagitis. One of these patients died from massive hemorrhage after peroral dilatation. Four patients died of a second carcinoma with no first cancer recurrence. Four patients were alive after six months to nine years of follow-up. Moderate dysphagia was still present, allowing nearly normal oral feeding. In conclusion, chronic radiation esophagitis is a severe disease with an underestimated frequency. In this study, peroral dilatations appeared to be necessary and were not associated with an increased morbidity. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Signal transduction in esophageal and LES circular muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, K. M.; Cao, W.; Kim, N.; Sohn, U. D.; Rich, H.; Behar, J.; Biancani, P.

    1999-01-01

    Contraction of normal esophageal circular muscle (ESO) in response to acetylcholine (ACh) is linked to M2 muscarinic receptors activating at least three intracellular phospholipases, i.e., phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), phospholipase D (PLD), and the high molecular weight (85 kDa) cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) to induce phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism, production of diacylglycerol (DAG) and arachidonic acid (AA), resulting in activation of a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. In contrast, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) contraction induced by maximally effective doses of ACh is mediated by muscarinic M3 receptors, linked to pertussis toxin-insensitive GTP-binding proteins of the G(q/11) type. They activate phospholipase C, which hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), producing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and DAG. IP3 causes release of intracellular Ca++ and formation of a Ca++-calmodulin complex, resulting in activation of myosin light chain kinase and contraction through a calmodulin-dependent pathway. Signal transduction pathways responsible for maintenance of LES tone are quite distinct from those activated during contraction in response to maximally effective doses of agonists (e.g., ACh). Resting LES tone is associated with activity of a low molecular weight (approximately 14 kDa) pancreatic-like (group 1) secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and production of arachidonic acid (AA), which is metabolized to prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These AA metabolites act on receptors linked to G-proteins to induce activation of PI- and PC-specific phospholipases, and production of second messengers. Resting LES tone is associated with submaximal PI hydrolysis resulting in submaximal levels of inositol trisphosphate (IP3-induced Ca++ release, and interaction with DAG to activate PKC. In an animal model of acute esophagitis, acid-induced inflammation alters the contractile pathway of ESO and LES. In LES circular muscle, after induction of experimental esophagitis, basal levels of PI hydrolysis are substantially reduced and intracellular Ca++ stores are functionally damaged, resulting in a reduction of resting tone. The reduction in intracellular Ca++ release causes a switch in the signal transduction pathway mediating contraction in response to ACh. In the normal LES, ACh causes release of Ca++ from intracellular stores and activation of a calmodulin-dependent pathway. After esophagitis, ACh-induced contraction depends on influx of extracellular Ca++, which is insufficient to activate calmodulin, and contraction is mediated by a PKC-dependent pathway. These changes are reproduced in normal LES cells by thapsigargin-induced depletion of Ca++ stores, suggesting that the amount of Ca++ available for release from intracellular stores defines the signal transduction pathway activated by a maximally effective dose of ACh. PMID:10780577

  3. Propagation of normal human epithelial cell populations using an in vivo culture system: description and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Terzaghi, M.; Mirkin, L.D.; Martin, D.; Shiba, M.

    1982-08-01

    A new model using xenotransplanted human epithelia was developed for the study of toxic and carcinogenic effects of chemicals. Epithelial cells from the respiratory tract of 4 male and 3 female premature and full-term fetuses were enzymatically removed and inoculated into deepithelialized rat tracheas. These were sealed at both ends and transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 3 to 4 weeks, a normal mucociliary epithelium covered the tracheal lumen. At this stage the epithelial cells could be isolated again and transplanted into new denuded rat tracheas. This passaging could be repeated up to six times, each permitting an amplification factor of approximately 3. Tracheal transplants containing cells of human origin (in vivo Passages 2 to 4) were treated with 7,120dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Hyperplasias, squamous metaplasias, and dysplasias were seen 1 to 8 weeks after initiation of treatment, indicating that the responses of human and rodent epithelial cells to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are similar. Initial experiments with skin and esophageal epithelia suggest that other covering epithelia could also be used in this fashion for evaluation of toxicants and carcinogens that are likely to come into contact with these tissues.

  4. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  5. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  6. Intrinsic Defense Mechanisms of the Intestinal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Deepshika; Cadwell, Ken

    2016-04-13

    The intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer that facilitates the absorption of nutrients but also provides a tight barrier to prevent pathogen invasion and dissemination of commensal microbes. Specialized epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract achieve this frontline defense by working in concert with lymphoid, myeloid, and stromal cells to secrete an array of factors that limit direct contact between the epithelium and infectious agents. The importance of these mechanisms is underscored by the ability of enteric pathogens to target these mechanisms to achieve invasion and dissemination. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of these intricate molecular and cellular mechanisms adopted by these cells to promote spatial segregation and barrier maintenance. PMID:27049583

  7. Identification of human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Olga L; Navarro, Leticia; Saldivar, Jesus; Sanchez-Sosa, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal squamous papilloma (ESP) and determine p16, p53 and Ki67 expression in a Mexican cohort. METHODS: Nineteen cases diagnosed as ESP, corresponding to 18 patients were reviewed; nineteen cases of normal esophageal mucosa were used as negative controls. HPV detection was performed by amplified chromogenic in situ hybridization (ACISH) using a wide spectrum-cocktail probe and PCR. RESULTS: The average age at presentation was 46.3 years (range 28-72 years). Patients included four (22.22%) males and 14 (77.77%) females. The most frequent location was upper third (11 cases), followed by middle third (3 cases) and unknown site (5 cases). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed basal and focal p53 expression in 17 cases (89%); p16 was expressed in eight cases (42.10%) and the Ki67 index ranged from 10% to 30%. HPV was detected in 14 out of 16 cases (87.5%) by ACISH: Twelve showed diffuse nuclear patterns and two showed granular patterns. HPV DNA was identified by PCR in 12 out of 14 cases (85.7%). Low-risk HPV types were detected in the most of the cases. CONCLUSION: This study provides identification of HPV infection in almost 80% of ESP using either ACISH or PCR; overall, all of these lesions show low expression of cell-cycle markers. We suggest ACISH as an alternative diagnostic tool for HPV detection in ESP. PMID:19084918

  8. X-ray microanalysis of hamster tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Roomans, G.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelia are of great interest if we are to understand the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystic fibrosis in which ion transport is abnormal. Concentrations of elements were determined in various subcellular regions of normal or isoproterenol-treated hamster tracheal epithelium, using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Samples of trachea were taken from animals under anesthesia and either frozen in situ or dissected and plunge frozen. Concentrations of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca were higher in cytoplasm and nuclei of control epithelial cells in dissected samples than in cryoneedle samples. Following treatment with isoproterenol, a large decrease in the concentration of Cl was observed. The results confirm that cyclic AMP-regulated chloride secretion is unaffected by anesthesia.

  9. Recent developments in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Jesper; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2013-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is characterized by 6 striking features: increasing incidence, male predominance, lack of preventive measures, opportunities for early detection, demanding surgical therapy and care, and poor prognosis. Reasons for its rapidly increasing incidence include the rising prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux and obesity, combined with the decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The strong male predominance remains unexplained, but hormonal influence might play an important role. Future prevention might include the treatment of reflux or obesity or chemoprevention with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or statins, but no evidence-based preventive measures are currently available. Likely future developments include endoscopic screening of better defined high-risk groups for EAC. Individuals with Barrett esophagus might benefit from surveillance, at least those with dysplasia, but screening and surveillance strategies need careful evaluation to be feasible and cost-effective. The surgery for EAC is more extensive than virtually any other standard procedure, and postoperative survival, health-related quality of life, and nutrition need to be improved (eg, by improved treatment, better decision-making, and more individually tailored follow-up). Promising clinical developments include increased survival after preoperative chemoradiotherapy, the potentially reduced impact on health-related quality of life after minimally invasive surgery, and the new endoscopic therapies for dysplastic Barrett esophagus or early EAC. The overall survival rates are improving slightly, but poor prognosis remains a challenge. PMID:23818335

  10. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  11. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  12. Morphological Alterations of the Palpebral Conjunctival Epithelium in a Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Johanna Tukler; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Farley, William; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Burns, Alan R.; Bergmanson, Jan P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the normal palpebral conjunctival histology in C57BL/6 mice, and the structural changes that occur in a dry eye model. Methods 24 male and female C57BL/6 mice, 8 untreated (UT) and 16 exposed to experimental ocular surface desiccating stress (DS). Ocular dryness was induced by administration of scopolamine hydrobromide (0.5 mg/0.2 ml) QID for 5 (DS5) or 10 (DS10) days. Counts and measurements were obtained using anatomical reference points and goblet cell density was investigated with a variety of stains. Results Near the junction between the lid margin and the normal palpebral conjunctiva, the epithelium had an average thickness of 45.6±10.5μm, 8.8±2.0 cell layers, versus 37.7±5.6μm, 7.4±1.3 layers in DS10 (P<0.05). In the goblet cell populated palpebral region the normal epithelium was thicker (P<0.05) than in DS5 and DS10. In the control, 43% of the goblet cells were covered by squamous epithelium, compared to 58% (DS5) and 63% (DS10) (P<0.05). A decreased number of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue stained goblet cells was observed in the dry eye. Not all goblet cells stained with PAS and Alcian blue. Conclusions The mouse palpebral conjunctival epithelium was structurally similar to the human. After DS the palpebral conjunctival epithelium decreased in thickness and goblet cell access to the surface appeared to be inhibited by surrounding epithelial cells, potentially slowing down their migration to the surface. Differential staining with PAS and Alcian blue suggests there may be different subtypes of conjunctival goblet cells. PMID:23146932

  13. [The Buccal Epithelium as Environmental Indicator].

    PubMed

    Korsakov, A V; Yablokov, A V; Troshin, V P; Mikhalev, V P

    2015-01-01

    The use of the buccal mucosa cell micronucleus test for comparison of chemical, radiation, and radiation-chemical environmental pollution has been considered. The combined impact of chemical and radiation factors has been found to cause additive effects, synergism, and inhibition. It has been noted that the cytogenetic characteristics of the buccal epithelium may be used as a "biological dosimeter" of the total level of environmental pollution. PMID:26349240

  14. Minimally invasive esophageal resection and intrathoracic anastomosis for lower thoracic esophageal cancer with single position

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lufeng; Ge, Jianjun; Li, Wenshan; Luo, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    There are various esophagectomy approaches for lower thoracic esophageal cancer, and the minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) approach shows the advantages of less discomfort, shorter length of stay and a faster recovery to baseline status than open approaches. The current study reports a case of lower thoracic esophageal cancer was treated using a single-position, minimally invasive surgical technique with laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. A 68-year-old man, whose gastroscopy identified the esophageal carcinoma, came to our medical center due to dysphagia for over 1 year. The patient underwent tumor radical resection and intrathoracic anastomosis by laparoscopy and thoracoscopy with single position. The patient has recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26380776

  15. Duramycin enhances chloride secretion in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M M; Guernsey, L; Mattes, P; Koeppen, B

    1990-09-01

    The effect of duramycin, a polypeptide antibiotic, on Cl- transport in canine tracheal epithelium mounted in Ussing chambers was studied. Over a narrow concentration range, duramycin increased short-circuit current (Isc) and net Cl- secretion and had no effect on mannitol flux when added to the mucosal bathing solution. The maximum increase in Isc was observed at a duramycin concentration of 2 X 10(-6) M and was associated with an increase in both unidirectional Cl- fluxes. Higher duramycin concentrations produced a decrease in Isc. Submucosal addition of duramycin had no effect on Isc except at high concentrations. Pretreatment of tissues with mucosal amiloride (10(-4) M) to reduce basal Na+ transport had no effect on the subsequent response to duamycin. In other tissues pretreated with 10(-3) M dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), duramycin produced a further increase in Isc and net Cl- secretion similar to its effect in nonpretreated tissues. In all instances the increase in Isc was entirely accounted for by an increase in net Cl- secretion. We conclude that duramycin increases Isc and Cl- secretion in airway epithelium. Although the mechanism of activation is not known, these data demonstrate that duramycin increases Cl- secretion by a pathway other than cAMP. An understanding of the mechanism of action of duramycin may further our understanding of Cl- secretion regulation in airway epithelium. PMID:2169195

  16. Progenitor Epithelium: Sorting Out Pancreatic Lineages.

    PubMed

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2015-08-01

    Insulin-producing ? cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell-cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing ? cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which ? cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to ? cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  17. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  18. [Esophageal melanoma: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Butte, Jean M; Visscher, Alvaro; DE LA Fuente, Hernán; Meneses, Manuel; Carrasco, Ana María; Amaral, Horacio; Waugh, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal melanomas correspond to 0.1 to 0.2% of esophageal tumors. We report two patients with the disease. The first patient is a 51 year-old woman pre-sentingwith dysphagia and weight loss. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a polypoid ulcerated lesion in the middle third of the esophagus. The pathological study ofthe biopsy disclosed a malignant melanoma. The patient was subjected to an esophagectomy with a satisfactory postoperative evolution. Four months later, liver metastases were detected and the patient died eleven months after the operation. The second patient is a 59 year-old mole that consulted by dysphagia. An endoscopy showed a pigmented esophageal lesion whose pathological diagnosis was a malignant melanoma. The patient was subjected to an esophagectomy and sixteen months after surgery there was no evidence of relapse. PMID:20361155

  19. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  20. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. RESULTS: Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients. PMID:26217096

  1. The imaging features of protruding esophageal lesions.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hayato; Miyakawa, Kunihisa; Wada, Shinji; Okamoto, Satoko; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kishimoto, Keiko; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Except for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, lesions that protrude into the esophagus are rare, and include benign and malignant tumors. The imaging findings of these lesions on esophagography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often non-specific. However, some of them reveal characteristic imaging findings. In addition, esophagography, CT, and MRI are useful to evaluate location, extent, invasion, vascularity, lymphadenopathy, and metastasis. Knowledge of the imaging features of protruding esophageal lesions helps to narrow the differential diagnosis. We describe the main features of esophageal protruding lesions. PMID:26968999

  2. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  3. MicroRNAs and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Mallick, Reema

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a highly aggressive disease associated with an overall poor prognosis. There is an insistent need for improving our understanding of the molecular basis of this disease. The recent emergence of observations on the role of microRNAs in cancer and their potential as biomarkers has prompted many investigations to examine their relevance to esophageal cancer. This article provides an introduction to microRNA biology and the techniques involved in studying them, and summates what is now known about their role and utility in regard to neoplastic esophageal diseases. PMID:22811805

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  5. Treatment of early-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Polish, Ariel; Mulcahy, Mary F

    2013-06-01

    Although T2,N0,M0 esophageal adenocarcinoma is grouped with other locoregional disease by NCCN, no consensus exists about how it should be treated. One of the inherent complexities of treating T2,N0,M0 esophageal adenocarcinoma is the inaccuracy of the clinical staging. In addition, conflicting evidence exists about whether neoadjuvant therapy adds any benefit to esophagectomy. A 52-year-old patient recently seen at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center illustrates the complexity of these issues. PMID:23744863

  6. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  7. Initiation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a murine 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and alcohol carcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Urvalek, Alison M; Tang, Xiao-Han; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2015-03-20

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) are very common, aggressive tumors, and are often associated with alcohol and tobacco abuse. Because ESCCs exhibit high recurrence rates and are diagnosed at late stages, identification of prognostic and drug targets for prevention and treatment is critical. We used the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) murine model of oral carcinogenesis and the Meadows-Cook model of alcohol abuse to assess changes in the expression of molecular markers during the initial stages of ESCC. Combining these two models, which mimic chronic alcohol and tobacco abuse in humans, we detected increased cellular proliferation (EGFR and Ki67 expression), increased canonical Wnt signaling and downstream elements (?-catenin, FoxM1, and S100a4 protein levels), changes in cellular adhesive properties (reduced E-cadherin in the basal layer of the esophageal epithelium), and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38. Additionally, we found that treatment with ethanol alone increased the numbers of epithelial cells expressing solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter, member 1) (SLC2A1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and increased the phosphorylation of p38. Thus, we identified both 4-NQO- and ethanol-specific targets in the initial stages of esophageal carcinogenesis, which should lead to the development of potential markers and therapeutic targets for human ESCC. PMID:25714027

  8. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Criblez, Dominique H.; Dellon, Evan S.; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection. PMID:27144193

  9. Acute Herpes Simplex Viral Esophagitis Occurring in 5 Immunocompetent Individuals With Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dorothee; Criblez, Dominique H; Dellon, Evan S; Bussmann, Christian; Pfeifer, David; Froh, Matthias; Straumann, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is an acute, severe viral infection of the esophagus, rarely occurring in immunocompetent individuals. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a rare immune-mediated esophageal disorder. We recently observed 5 severe HSE cases in diagnosed EoE patients. Four of the 5 patients had active, untreated EoE at the time of infection, so HSE is not likely a side effect of swallowed topical corticosteroids, the first-line medical treatment of EoE. However, this coincidence of these 2 rare conditions raises the question of a causal relationship between these 2 forms of esophagitis, and whether active EoE might predispose to HSE infection. PMID:27144193

  10. Development and characterization of a surgical mouse model of reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thai H; Genta, Robert M; Spechler, Stuart Jon; Souza, Rhonda F; Wang, David H

    2014-02-01

    Ideally, an animal model of Barrett's esophagus should recapitulate the human disease histologically and immunohistochemically, and be readily susceptible to genetic manipulation. We have developed such a model using a strain of mice commonly used for transgenic and knockout manipulations. We induced reflux by esophagojejunostomy (EJ) in 20 C57Bl/6 mice. At defined time points, sections of the esophagus were stained with H&E and Alcian blue, and immunohistochemical staining was performed for Sox9 (a transcription factor in Barrett's metaplasia), cytokeratin (CK) 8/18 (a columnar marker) and CK14 (a squamous marker). Procedural mortality was 40% for the first ten animals, 20% for the next 10. Reflux esophagitis developed by 13 weeks, and intestinal metaplasia with goblet cells developed by 34 weeks. The metaplasia expressed CK8/18, but not CK14, and exhibited nuclear immunostaining for Sox9. Nuclear Sox9 was also seen in scattered basal cells of squamous epithelium close to the EJ anastomosis. EJ can be performed successfully in C57Bl/6 mice, resulting in reflux esophagitis and intestinal metaplasia that exhibits phenotypic and molecular features of human Barrett's metaplasia. This surgical model in a mouse strain that is easy to manipulate genetically should be a valuable tool for studying the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus. PMID:24190247

  11. [Esophageal perforation following a biopsy in a patient with eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Benítez Cantero, José Manuel; Angel Rey, José Manuel; Rodríguez Perálvarez, Manuel; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Jurado García, Juan; Soto Escribano, Pilar; Hervás Molina, Antonio José; Poyato González, Antonio; González Galilea, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an underdiagnosed disease that should be suspected in all patients with dysphagia and food impaction. Although these are the leading symptoms, the clinical and endoscopic spectrum is highly varied. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of endoscopy-related complications in this disorder. Precautions should be maximized in endoscopic examinations to avoid iatrogenic damage. We describe the case of a young patient with esophageal stricture and dysphagia who suffered a perforation following a biopsy. PMID:21703721

  12. Relationship among esophageal dysfunction, diabetic gastro-enteropathy, and autonomic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S.; Wu, L.C.; Lin, H.D.; Wang, S.J.; Lin, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    This study assessed the relationship of esophageal radionuclide transit (RT) to diabetic gastroenteropethy (CEP) and autonomic neuropathy (AN). Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position. A modified computer routine was used to calculate: (A) total mean transit time (TMTT) in sec, (B) residual fraction after the first swallow (RF), and )C) retrograde index (RI). Twenty-one patients (pts) with diabetes and 25 normal subjects (N) were studied. Eleven pts belonged to Group 1 with symptomatic GEP and AN; 5, Group 2 with no GEP but with AN; and 5, Group 3 with neither. Abnormal RT mainly occurred in Group 1. RI was the best parameter with respective sensitivity and specificity of 0.91 (10/110 and 0.96 (24/25. RI was abnormal in 10/11 pts with GEP (Group 1), but normal in all 10 pts without GEP (Groups 2 and 3). All 5 pts only with AN (group 2) had normal RI. The authors conclude that esophageal dysfunction is present in nearly all pts with diabetic GEP. However, the presence of AN alone will not explain esophageal transit abnormality.

  13. Elevated DNA polymerase iota (Poli) is involved in the acquisition of aggressive phenotypes of human esophageal squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haoyao; Zou, Shitao; Zhang, Shuyu; Liu, Biao; Meng, Xingjun; Li, Xiaoqing; Yu, Jian; Wu, Jinchang; Zhou, Jundong

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase iota (Polι) can repair several types of DNA damage but has extremely low fidelity. Previous studies have shown an aberrantly elevated Polι expression in human esophageal squamous cell cancer tissues. However, there were few reports describing the role of Polι in esophageal cancer progression. Based on Real-time PCR assay, we found Polι expression was up-regulated in esophageal cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and overexpression of Polι was correlated to lymph node metastasis. Clonogenic assay and transwell chamber assay showed that overexpression of Polι had higher clongenic capability and invasive tendency in human esophageal squamous cell cancer cells. Expression of cyclin D1, an important cell cycle regulator, was found to be associated with that of Polι in tissue samples and cancer cells as analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and imunofluorescence assay. Flow cytometry analysis further showed that cell cycle distribution was altered in Polι overexpressing cells. These results indicated that expression of Polι correlates significantly with tumor proliferation and invasion. We conclude that Polι is involved in the degree of aggressiveness of human esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:26097541

  14. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p < 0.001). In particular, those individuals whose both parents with esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95% CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  15. p53 immunoreactivity in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and non-neoplastic cervical squamous epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffers, M D; Richmond, J; Farquharson, M; McNicol, A M

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the pattern of p53 immunoreactivity in cervical squamous epithelium and to investigate the relation between p53 immunostaining and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. METHODS--Immunocytochemistry for p53 was performed in 65 specimens of formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded cervical tissue using a polyclonal antibody against recombinant p53. Microwave oven heating was used for antigen retrieval. Eight normal biopsy specimens, eight cases with histological features of HPV infection, and 49 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were examined. Thirty one cases of CIN were examined. Thirty one cases of CIN were examined for evidence of HPV infection using in situ hybridisation with probes directed against wide spectrum HPV, HPV 16 and HPV 18. RESULTS--p53 immunoreactivity was seen in seven of eight (87%) of specimens with histological features of HPV infection, five of eight (62%) normal specimens, 13 of 22 (59%) CIN III, three of 14 (21%) CIN II and five of 13 (38%) CIN I specimens. The numbers of positive nuclei were small in cases of CIN and the location of positive nuclei within the epithelium paralleled the degree of dysplasia. Eleven of 15 (73%) CIN specimens which were immunoreactive for p53 yielded a positive signal for HPV by in situ hybridisation. A positive signal for HPV was also seen in 10 of 16 (63%) of CIN specimens in which p53 staining was absent. CONCLUSIONS--p53 immunoreactivity can be demonstrated in a small proportion of cells in the cervical squamous epithelium in a significant proportion of cases of CIN. This immunoreactivity seems to be independent of the presence of HPV, as assessed by in situ hybridisation. p53 immunoreactivity also occurs in non-neoplastic cervical squamous epithelium with a pattern of distribution within the epithelium which differs from that seen in CIN. Antigen retrieval by microwave oven heating enhances p53 immunostaining and may result in visualisation of cellular p53 in the absence of mutation. Images PMID:7876377

  16. EXPRESSION OF PAX6 AND SOX2 IN ADULT OLFACTORY EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Packard, Adam; Krolewski, Richard C.; Harris, Margaret T.; Manglapus, Glen L.; Schwob, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium maintains stem and progenitor cells that support the neuroepithelium’s life-long capacity to reconstitute after injury. However, the identity of the stem cells – and their regulation – remain poorly defined. The transcription factors Pax6 and Sox2 are characteristic of stem cells in many tissues, including the brain. Therefore, we assessed the expression of Pax6 and Sox2 in normal olfactory epithelium and during epithelial regeneration after methyl bromide lesion or olfactory bulbectomy. Sox2 is found in multiple kinds of cells in normal epithelium, including sustentacular cells, horizontal basal cells, and some globose basal cells. Pax6 is co-expressed with Sox2 in all these, but is also found in duct/gland cells as well as olfactory neurons that innervate necklace glomeruli. Most of the Sox2/Pax6-positive globose basal cells are actively cycling, but some express the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1, and are presumably mitotically quiescent. Among globose basal cells, Sox2 and Pax6 are co-expressed by putatively multipotent progenitors (labeled by neither anti-Mash1 nor anti-Neurog1) and neuron-committed transit amplifying cells (which express Mash1). However, Sox2 and Pax6 are expressed by only a minority of immediate neuronal precursors (Neurog1- and NeuroD1-expressing). The assignment of Sox2 and Pax6 to these categories of globose basal cells is confirmed by a temporal analysis of transcription factor expression during the recovery of the epithelium from methyl bromide-induced injury. Each of the Sox2/Pax6-colabeled cell types is at a remove from the birth of neurons; thus, suppressing their differentiation may be among the roles of Sox2/Pax6 in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:20852734

  17. Comparison of expression profiles in ovarian epithelium in vivo and ovarian cancer identifies novel candidate genes involved in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J; Clarke, Christine L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D L; Harnett, Paul R; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute to the development of ovarian cancer. PMID:21423607

  18. Inter-observer Variability in Esophageal Body Measurements with High Resolution Manometry among New Physician Users

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Erick; Rife, Christopher; Clayton, Steven; Naas, Peter; Nietert, Paul; Castell, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Goals To evaluate inter-observer variability among four new physician users on measures of esophageal body function. Background Esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM) allows observation of esophageal motility via pressure topography plots. Little is known about the inter-observer variability among physicians. Study Two resident and two fellow level physicians each interpreted 10 liquid swallows of 20 esophageal HRM studies (n=200 swallows) using the BioVIEW Analysis Suite (Sandhill Scientific, Inc.). Studies evaluated were from patients referred for evaluation of dysphagia but found to have normal esophageal manometry and complete liquid bolus transit. Physicians received an orientation session and reviewed recent literature. Each physician recorded contractile front velocity (CFV) and distal contractile integral (DCI) for each liquid swallow. STATISTICS: Inter-observer agreements for CFV and DCI were assessed by intraclass correlation (ICC) values. Linear correlations between measurements by two readers were assessed using linear regression modeling techniques. Results CFV and DCI values of up to 200 data points were analyzed. Four reader results for CFV and DCI showed strong agreement although stronger for DCI measures (ICC=0.94; 0.91 - 0.98) in comparison to CFV (ICC=0.79; 0.52 - 0.82). Further correlation was performed with two readers; readers 1 and 2 revealed excellent correlation for DCI (r=0.95, p<0.001) and good correlation for CFV (r=0.61, p<0.001). Conclusions With a thorough orientation session, good to excellent agreement for CFV and DCI measurements can be obtained from new physician users. CFV measures exhibit greater inter-observer variability possibly due to the artifact produced by intraesophageal pressurization. PMID:22647828

  19. Acute esophageal necrosis caused by alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Tetsu; Sakamoto, Juichi; Sato, Ken; Takimoto, Miyako; Shimaya, Koji; Mikami, Tatsuya; Munakata, Akihiro; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2005-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) is extremely rare and the pathogenesis of this is still unknown. We report a case of AEN caused by alcohol abuse. In our case, the main pathogenesis could be accounted for low systemic perfusion caused by severe alcoholic lactic acidosis. After the healing of AEN, balloon dilatation was effective to manage the stricture. PMID:16222758

  20. A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjæstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njål; Røkke, Ola

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

  1. Esophageal testing: What we have so far.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  2. Esophageal testing: What we have so far

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  3. Ontogeny of the mouse vocal fold epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lungova, Vlasta; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Herriges, John; Sun, Xin; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation provides the first systematic determination of the cellular and molecular progression of vocal fold (VF) epithelium development in a murine model. We define five principal developmental events that constitute the progression from VF initiation in the embryonic anterior foregut tube to fully differentiated and functional adult tissue. These developmental events include (1) the initiation of the larynx and vocal folds with apposition of the lateral walls of the primitive laryngopharynx (embryonic (E) day 10.5); (2) the establishment of the epithelial lamina with fusion of the lateral walls of the primitive laryngopharynx (E11.5); (3) the epithelial lamina recanalization and separation of VFs (E13.5–18.5); (4) the stratification of the vocal folds (E13.5–18.5); and (5) the maturation of vocal fold epithelium (postnatal stages). The illustration of these morphogenetic events is substantiated by dynamic changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as the expression pattern of key transcription factors, FOXA2, SOX2 and NKX2-1 that specify and pattern the foregut endoderm. Furthermore, we documented the gradual conversion of VF epithelial cells from simple precursors expressing cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the embryo into mature stratified epithelial cells also expressing cytokeratins 5 and 14 in the adult. Interestingly, in the adult, cytokeratins 5 and 14 appear to be expressed in all cell layers in the VF, in contrast to their preferential localization to the basal cell layer in surrounding epithelium. To begin investigating the role of signaling molecules in vocal fold development, we characterized the expression pattern of SHH pathway genes, and how loss of Shh affects vocal fold development in the mutant. This study defines the cellular and molecular context and serves as the necessary foundation for future functional investigations of VF formation. PMID:25601450

  4. Local synthesis of pepsin in Barrett’s esophagus and the role of pepsin in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Tina; Hoekzema, Craig; Gould, Jon; Goldblatt, Matthew; Frelich, Matthew; Bosler, Matthew; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Johnston, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) continues to rise. PPIs reduce reflux acidity, but only transiently inactivate gastric enzymes. Nonacid reflux, specifically nonacid pepsin, contributes to carcinogenesis in the larynx. Given the carcinogenic potential of pepsin and inefficacy of PPIs to prevent EAC, the presence and effect of pepsin in the esophagus should be investigated. Methods Normal and Barrett’s biopsies from eight Barrett’s esophagus patients were collected for pepsin analysis via Western blot and RT-PCR. Human esophageal cells cultured from healthy patients were treated with pepsin (0.01-1mg/ml; 1-20hours), acid (pH4) +/− pepsin (5minutes); real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and cell migration were assayed. Results Pepsin was detected in all eight Barrett’s, and four of eight adjacent normal specimens. Pepsinogen mRNA was observed in two Barrett’s, but not in normal adjacent samples. Pepsin induced PTSG2 (COX-2) and IL1β expression and cell migration in vitro. Conclusions Pepsin is synthesized by metaplastic, Barrett’s esophageal mucosa. Nonacid pepsin increases metrics of tumorigenicity in esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. These findings implicate refluxed and locally synthesized pepsin in development and progression of EAC and, in part, explain the inefficacy of PPIs in prevention of EAC. PMID:26077392

  5. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces, intraepithelial eosinophil microabscess, pustule, T lymphocytes, eosinophils, and pSTAT3 positivity can be added to histopathological features of pill-induced esophagitis, other than non-specific ulcer. Besides, distal pill-induced esophagitis may be histopathologically differentiated from reflux esophagitis. PMID:26047496

  6. Effect of bisphosphonates on the mandibular bone and gingival epithelium of rats without tooth extraction

    PubMed Central

    DE PONTE, FRANCESCO SAVERIO; CATALFAMO, LUCIANO; MICALI, GREGORIO; RUNCI, MICHELE; CUTRONEO, GIUSEPPINA; VERMIGLIO, GIOVANNA; CENTOFANTI, ANTONIO; RIZZO, GIUSEPPINA

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is an adverse effect of bisphosphonate treatment that has become the subject of increasing investigations, in particular due to its poorly understood pathogenesis. Several experimental studies on animal models have been conducted; however, the majority of these replicate human ONJ following tooth extraction, and describe alterations in the bone and gingival epithelium when necrosis is manifested. The aim of the present study was to analyze the rat mandibular bone and gingival epithelium during 45 days of zoledronate treatment (which is a bisphosphonate agent), without tooth extraction. Intraperitoneal injections of zoledronate acid (0.1 mg/kg) were performed three times a week in normal male Wistar rats (n=20), while a control group of rats (n=20) was treated with saline solution for 45 days. After 7, 15, 30 and 45 days of drug treatment, all rats were sacrificed and hematoxilin and eosin staining, immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed. The results of the analyses after 7 and 15 days of treatment were similar in the treatment and control group. After 30 and 45 days of treatment, structural alterations were observed in the bone. No structural alterations to the gingival epithelium were observed. Based on these results, it was hypothesized that low doses of zoledronate act directly on the bone tissues to induce morphological alterations from bone to necrotic tissue following surgical procedures, although no cytotoxic effects were detected in the gingival epithelium. PMID:27168789

  7. Snai1 regulates cell lineage allocation and stem cell maintenance in the mouse intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Horvay, Katja; Jard, Thierry; Casagranda, Franca; Perreau, Victoria M; Haigh, Katharina; Nefzger, Christian M; Akhtar, Reyhan; Gridley, Thomas; Berx, Geert; Haigh, Jody J; Barker, Nick; Polo, Jose M; Hime, Gary R; Abud, Helen E

    2015-05-12

    Snail family members regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during invasion of intestinal tumours, but their role in normal intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Studies in breast and skin epithelia indicate that Snail proteins promote an undifferentiated state. Here, we demonstrate that conditional knockout of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium results in apoptotic loss of crypt base columnar stem cells and bias towards differentiation of secretory lineages. In vitro organoid cultures derived from Snai1 conditional knockout mice also undergo apoptosis when Snai1 is deleted. Conversely, ectopic expression of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium in vivo results in the expansion of the crypt base columnar cell pool and a decrease in secretory enteroendocrine and Paneth cells. Following conditional deletion of Snai1, the intestinal epithelium fails to produce a proliferative response following radiation-induced damage indicating a fundamental requirement for Snai1 in epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that Snai1 is required for regulation of lineage choice, maintenance of CBC stem cells and regeneration of the intestinal epithelium following damage. PMID:25759216

  8. Morphological and Functional Features of Hepatic Cyst Epithelium in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Domenico; Onori, Paolo; Alpini, Gianfranco; Franchitto, Antonio; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Torrice, Alessia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Stefanelli, Fabrizio; Mancino, Maria Grazia; Strazzabosco, Mario; Angelico, Mario; Attili, Adolfo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the morphological and functional features of hepatic cyst epithelium in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In six ADPKD patients, we investigated the morphology of cyst epithelium apical surface by scanning electron microscopy and the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptors (IGF1-R), growth hormone receptor, the proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Proliferation of liver cyst-derived epithelial cells was evaluated by both MTS proliferation assay and [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. The hepatic cyst epithelium displayed heterogeneous features, being normal in small cysts (<1 cm), characterized by rare or shortened cilia in 1- to 3-cm cysts, and exhibiting the absence of both primary cilia and microvilli in large cysts (>3 cm). Cyst epithelium showed marked immunohistochemical expression of ER, growth hormone receptor, IGF1, IGF1-R, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT. IGF1 was 10-fold more enriched in the hepatic cyst fluid than in serum. Serum-deprived liver cyst-derived epithelial cells proliferated when exposed to 17?-estradiol and IGF1 and when exposed to human cyst fluid. ER or IGF1-R antagonists inhibited the proliferative effect of serum readmission, cyst fluid, 17?-estradiol, and IGF1. Our findings could explain the role of estrogens in accelerating the progression of ADPKD and may suggest a potential benefit of therapeutic strategies based on estrogen antagonism. PMID:18202196

  9. Asymmetric ( UC)albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-10-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, UC-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, ( UC)albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space.

  10. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  11. Distinct microRNA expression profiles in follicle-associated epithelium and villous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nakato, Gaku; Hase, Koji; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    M cells in follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) covering intestinal lymphoid follicles serve as a portal of entry for particulate antigens (Kanaya and Ohno, 2014 [1]). Despite their biological significance, molecular mechanisms that govern M-cell differentiation and function have not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have a role to control host gene expression profiles that modulate cellular physiology and characteristic. Many studies have shown that miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes including developmental timing, differentiation and growth control of cells and tissues (Ivey and Srivastava, 2010 [2]). miRNAs are also relevant to differentiation and function of intestinal epithelium (McKenna et al., 2010 [3]; Runtsch et al., 2014 [4]). Expression profiles and functions of miRNAs in the intestinal epithelium have been examined in jejunal and colonic mucosa [3]. In contrast, those in FAE remain uncharacterized. To address this deficiency, we isolated Peyer's Patch (PP) FAE and villous epithelium (VE) surrounding the FAE, and compared the miRNA expression profiles of FAE and VE by microarray analysis. This revealed that 43 miRNAs were up-regulated, whereas 9 miRNAs were down-regulated, in FAE compared to VE. A unique pattern of miRNA expression by FAE may reflect important diversity in cellular phenotypes and/or functional features of FAE. All microarray data has been deposited at GEO under accession number GSE46264. PMID:26484293

  12. Activation of the IL-6/JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway in human middle ear cholesteatoma epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xie, Shumin; Chen, Xing; Rao, Xingwang; Ren, Hongmiao; Hu, Bing; Yin, Tuanfang; Xiang, Yuyan; Ren, Jihao

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is one of the most important cytokines which has been shown to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) in middle ear cholesteatoma epithelium in an effort to determine the role of IL-6/JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of IL-6 and p-STAT3 in 25 human middle ear cholesteatoma samples and 15 normal external auditory canal (EAC) epithelium specimens. We also analyzed the relation of IL-6 and p-STAT3 expression levels to the degree of bone destruction in cholesteatoma. We found that the expression of IL-6 and p-STAT3 were significantly higher in cholesteatoma epithelium than in normal EAC epithelium (p<0.05). In cholesteatoma epithelium, a significant positive association was observed between IL-6 and p-STAT3 expression (p<0.05). However, no significant relationships were observed between the degree of bone destruction and the levels of IL-6 and p-STAT3 expression (p>0.05). To conclude, our results support the concept that IL-6/JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway is active and may play an important role in the mechanisms of epithelial hyper-proliferation responsible for cholesteatoma. PMID:24551293

  13. Histatin-1 Expression in Human Lacrimal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Zeeshan; Jaboori, Assraa Jassim; Jassim, Sarmad H.; Jain, Sandeep; Aakalu, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Study of human lacrimal cell biology is limited by poor access to tissue samples, heterogeneous cell composition of tissue and a lack of established lacrimal epithelial markers. In order to further our understanding of lacrimal cell biology, we sought to find a better marker for human lacrimal epithelial cells, compared to what has been reported in the literature. Methods We utilized human Muller’s muscle conjunctival resection (MMCR) specimens containing accessory lacrimal gland (ALG) and cadaveric main lacrimal gland (MLG) as sources of lacrimal tissue. Candidate markers were sought using human ALG tissue from MMCR specimens, isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM). Affymetrix® analysis was performed on total RNA isolated from FFPE samples to profile transcription in ALG. MMCR tissue sections were assessed by immunofluorescence using antibodies for histatin-1, lactoferrin, E-cadherin (E-cad) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to analyze the expression of histatin-1, E-cad and lactoferrin from cadaveric MLG. Results Histatin-1 is expressed in ALG and MLG, localizes to lacrimal epithelium, and to a greater degree than do other putative lacrimal epithelial markers. Conclusions Histatin-1 is a good marker for human lacrimal epithelium in ALG and MLG and can be used to identify lacrimal cells in future studies. PMID:26824896

  14. Oropharyngeal/Esophageal Candidiasis ("Thrush")

    MedlinePlus

    ... that occurs when there is overgrowth of a yeast called Candida . Candida yeasts normally live on the skin or mucous membranes ... inside the mouth or throat becomes imbalanced, the yeasts can multiply and cause symptoms. Candida overgrowth can ...

  15. A striking local esophageal cytokine expression profile in eosinophilic esophagitis1

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Carine; Stucke, Emily M.; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Beatriz; Burwinkel, Karen; Collins, Margaret H.; Ahrens, Annette; Alexander, Eileen S.; Butz, Bridget K. Buckmeier; Jameson, Sean C.; Kaul, Ajay; Franciosi, James P.; Kushner, Jonathan P.; Putnam, Philip E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an emerging worldwide disease that mimics gastroesophageal reflux disease. Objective Early studies have suggested that esophageal eosinophilia occurs in association with T helper type 2 allergic responses, yet the local and systemic expression of relevant cytokines has not been well characterized. Methods A human inflammatory cytokine and receptor PCR array containing 84 genes followed by PCR validation and multiplex arrays were used to quantify cytokine mRNA in esophageal biopsies and blood levels. Results Esophageal transcripts of numerous chemokines [e.g. CCL1, CCL23, CCL26 (eotaxin-3), CXCL1, and CXCL2], cytokines (e.g. IL13 and ABCF1), and cytokine receptors (e.g. IL5RA) were induced at least 4-fold in individuals with EE. Analysis of esophageal biopsies (n=288) revealed that eotaxin-3 mRNA level alone had 89% sensitivity for distinguishing EE from non-EE individuals. The presence of allergy was associated with significantly increased esophageal expression of IL4 and IL5 mRNA in active EE patients. We identified 8 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p70, CD40L, IL-1α, and IL-17) whose blood levels retrospectively distinguished 12 non-EE from 13 EE patients with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. When applied to a blinded, prospectively recruited group of 36 patients, the cytokine panel scoring system had a 79% positive predictive value, 68% negative predictive value, 61% sensitivity, and 83% specificity for identifying EE. Conclusion Evidence is presented that IL13 and IL5 associate with eosinophil and eotaxin-3 levels, indicating the key role of adaptive Th2 immunity in regulating eotaxin-3-driven esophageal eosinophilia in the absence of a consistent systemic change in cytokines. PMID:21211656

  16. Characteristics of pertechnetate movement across the canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Man, S.F.; Ahmed, I.H.; Man, G.C.; Nguyen, A.

    1985-01-01

    Several /sup 99m/Technetium-labeled markers have been used to study the barrier properties of the pulmonary epithelium; among these compounds is sodium pertechnetate (TcO/sub 4/-). As TcO/sub 4/- has pseudohalide properties, and as the characteristics of the movement of this ion across the airway epithelium are unknown, we examined its bidirectional permeability coefficients, and compared them with those of radiolabeled Cl- and mannitol in canine tracheal epithelium in vitro. We found that this ion behaves similarly to Cl- in its translocation across the airway epithelium.

  17. Effect of ammonium on bacterial adherence to bladder transitional epithelium.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C L; Stauffer, C; Mulholland, S G; Griffith, D P

    1984-08-01

    The virulence of urease-producing bacteria depends on the ability of urease to degrade urea into ammonia and thereby to alkalinize the urine. Infections caused by urease-producing organisms such as Proteus mirabilis are particularly difficult to manage clinically. We have shown that the layer of glycosaminoglycans at the bladder surface protects against infection by blocking the adherence of bacteria to the epithelium. To determine whether urease-producing urinary pathogens owe their virulence in part to an ability to inactivate the protective effect of the glycosaminoglycan layer, we tested the ability of ammonium chloride to alter bacterial adherence to the normal vesical mucosa. We used an in vivo adherence assay that we have described previously in rabbits. Control animals received sodium chloride adjusted to the same pH as the ammonium chloride. We found that 0.25 M ammonium chloride significantly increases bacterial adherence to normal vesical mucosa as compared to adherence in controls receiving 0.25 M sodium chloride (p less than 0.05). These data suggest that urease plays a hitherto undescribed role in bacterial virulence by altering the antiadherence activity of the glycosaminoglycan layer present at the transitional cell surface. PMID:6376829

  18. Measurement of the human esophageal cancer in an early stage with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ishigaki, Mika; Taketani, Akinori; Andriana, Bibin B.; Ishihara, Ryu; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    The esophageal cancer has a tendency to transfer to another part of the body and the surgical operation itself sometimes gives high risk in vital function because many delicate organs exist near the esophagus. So the esophageal cancer is a disease with a high mortality. So, in order to lead a higher survival rate five years after the cancer's treatment, the investigation of the diagnosis methods or techniques of the cancer in an early stage and support the therapy are required. In this study, we performed the ex vivo experiments to obtain the Raman spectra from normal and early-stage tumor (stage-0) human esophageal sample by using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra are collected by the homemade Raman spectrometer with the wavelength of 785 nm and Raman probe with 600-um-diameter. The principal component analysis (PCA) is performed after collection of spectra to recognize which materials changed in normal part and cancerous pert. After that, the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is performed to predict the tissue type. The result of PCA indicates that the tumor tissue is associated with a decrease in tryptophan concentration. Furthermore, we can predict the tissue type with 80% accuracy by LDA which model is made by tryptophan bands.

  19. Effect of palonosetron (5HT-3 antagonist) and pantoprazole (proton pump inhibitor) against surgical esophagitis induced by forestomach and pylorus ligation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Gautam, S; Rawat, J K; Singh, M; Saraf, S A; Kaithwas, G

    2016-01-01

    This study was embarked upon to evaluate the effects of pantoprazole and palonosetron on experimental esophagitis in albino wistar rats. Groups of rats, fasted for 36 h, were subjected to pylorus and forestomach ligation, supervened by treatment with normal saline (3 ml/kg, po, sham control), esophagitis control (3 ml/kg, po), pantoprazole (30 mg/kg, po), palonosetron (0.5 mg/kg, po), and their combination. Animals were sacrificed after 12 h and appraised for the volume of gastric juices, total acidity, free acidity, and esophagitis index. Esophageal tissues were further figured out biochemically for markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators. The combination therapy comparably inhibited the esophagitis index (52.86%), gastric volume (66.04%), free acidity (43.76%), and total acidity (42.60%) in comparison with toxic control. The combination therapy also subsidized the biochemical and inflammatory markers to the purview less than toxic control. The morphological changes were scrutinized by scanning electron microscopy and were observed to demonstrate momentous protection by the amalgamation therapy. Combination therapy with pantoprazole and palonosetron flaunted sententious protection against experimental esophagitis. PMID:25743726

  20. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-Ze; Jin, Guang-Fu; Shen, Hong-Bing

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis. The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing, whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly, particularly in Western men. Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia, and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, hot beverage drinking, and poor nutrition. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma predominately affects the whites, and the risk factors include smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, Asians and Caucasians may have different susceptibilities to esophageal cancer due to different heritage backgrounds. However, comparison studies between these two populations are limited and need to be addressed in the near future. Ethnic differences should be taken into account in preventive and clinical practices. PMID:22507220

  1. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  2. High-activity intraluminal 192iridium endocurietherapy for treatment of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P P; Good, R R

    1986-01-01

    Intraluminal endocurietherapy (ECT) with high-activity 192Iridium administered via catheter following megavoltage external-beam radiotherapy, allows delivery of 8,000-10,000 rad to the target volume without exceeding the normal tissue radiation tolerances of surrounding vital structures. The endocurietherapy does not require surgery, general or local anesthesia. The technique is accurate, cost-effective, and allows safe delivery of higher radiation doses than could be tolerated by multiple-field external-beam megavoltage radiotherapy techniques alone. In a pilot Phase-1 toxicity study of six patients treated with minimum tumor doses of 8,000 rad, the majority of patients developed benign esophageal stricture 2-6 months following ECT which was managed by dilatation or gastrostomy. No patients developed esophageal perforation. Local tumor control was excellent, but a high proportion of patients developed distant metastatic disease. PMID:3099341

  3. Remapping the body: learning to eat again after surgery for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, David; Donovan, Jenny L; Kavadas, Vas; Cramer, Helen; Blazeby, Jane M

    2007-07-01

    Surgery for esophageal cancer offers the hope of cure but might impair quality of life. The operation removes tumors obstructing the esophagus but frequently leaves patients with eating difficulties, leading to weight loss. Maintaining or increasing body weight is important to many patients, both as a means of returning to "normal" and as a means of rejecting the identity of the terminal cancer patient, but surgery radically alters embodied sensations of hunger, satiety, swallowing, taste, and smell, rendering the previously taken-for-granted experience of eating unfamiliar and alien. Successful recovery depends on patients' learning how to eat again. This entails familiarization with physiological changes but also coming to terms with the social consequences of spoiled identity. The authors report findings from in-depth interviews with 11 esophageal cancer patients, documenting their experiences as they struggle to achieve a process of adaptation that is at once physiological, psychological, and social. PMID:17582019

  4. Identification of a high-molecular-mass Lactobacillus epithelium adhesin (LEA) of Lactobacillus crispatus ST1 that binds to stratified squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Sanna M; Lehti, Timo A; Kainulainen, Veera; Antikainen, Jenni; Kylväjä, Riikka; Baumann, Marc; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Korhonen, Timo K

    2012-07-01

    Lactobacilli belong to the normal gastrointestinal and genital tract microbiota of human and animal hosts. Adhesion is important for bacterial colonization; however, only a few Lactobacillus adhesins have been identified so far. We studied extracted surface proteins from an adhesive Lactobacillus crispatus strain, ST1, which efficiently colonizes the chicken alimentary tract, for their binding to tissue sections of the chicken crop, and identified a novel high-molecular-mass repetitive surface protein that shows specific binding to stratified squamous epithelium. The adhesin binds to both crop epithelium and epithelial cells from human vagina, and was named Lactobacillus epithelium adhesin (LEA). Expression of LEA is strain-specific among L. crispatus strains and corresponds directly to in vitro bacterial adhesion ability. The partial sequence of the lea gene predicts that the LEA protein carries an N-terminal YSIRK signal sequence and a C-terminal LPxTG anchoring motif, as well as a highly repetitive region harbouring 82 aa long repeats with non-identical sequences that show similarity to Lactobacillus Rib/alpha-like repeats. LEA-mediated epithelial adherence may improve bacterial colonization in the chicken crop and the human vagina, which are the natural environments for L. crispatus. PMID:22516222

  5. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE = Upper gastro endoscopy, PET-CT = Positron Emission Tomography, APC = argon plasma coagulation, PDT = photo dynamic therapy, PCT = Poli-chemotherapy, RT = Radio-therapy PMID:25866578

  6. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PEREIRA, Douglas Rizzanti; do AMARAL, Paula Casals; LIMA, Juliana Carolina Alves; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. Aim To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Methods Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. Results The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with return to swallowing. Conclusion The strategy proposed for the surgical treatment of idiopathic esophageal achalasia according to the stages of the disease was of great value, due to post-surgical low morbidity complications and proper recovery of swallowing. PMID:26176243

  7. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G; Peters, Jeffrey H; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-07-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of Barrett's esophagus, 18 cases of low-grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high-grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and chromogenic in situ hybridization methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by chromogenic in situ hybridization and high-density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by chromogenic in situ hybridization (18%; 21 out of 116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16%, 19 out of 116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12% (14 out of 116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 7% (1 out of 15) of high-grade dysplasia. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in Barrett's esophagus or low-grade dysplasia. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by chromogenic in situ hybridization than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18 vs 12%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER2 testing is recommended for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER2 trial. PMID:21460800

  8. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, J D; KC, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenb, M E

    2014-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3 (DSG3). Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin, a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as periostin. PMID:24220297

  9. Intramural esophagic hematoma secondary to coumarinic anticoagulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Esophagic Intramural Hematoma is an uncommon clinical condition, with a prognosis which is essentially benign. On most cases, a predisposing or precipitating factor may be seen, with the most common ones being the history of esophagic instrumentation, food impactations and thrombocytopenia. In the following manuscript, the authors present the case of a 54-years-old male with history of valve replacement surgery, who was treated at the Clinica Cardiovascular (Medellin, Colombia), with a clinical case of Intramural Esophagic Hematoma that was later confirmed to be due to a Coumarinic overanticoagulation. On this case, it is evidenced that Intramural Esophagic Hematoma is an unrecognized complication of Courmarinic anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20069068

  10. Esophageal cancer: Recent advances in screening, targeted therapy, and management

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Puja; Kim, Min P.; Dunkin, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal cancer remains on the rise worldwide and despite aggressive research in the field of gastrointestinal oncology, the survival remains poor. Much remains to be defined in esophageal cancer, including the development of an effective screening tool, identifying a good tumor marker for surveillance purposes, ways to target esophageal cancer stem cells as well as circulating tumor cells, and developing minimally invasive protocols to treat early-stage disease. The goal of this chapter is to highlight some of the recent advances and ongoing research in the field of esophageal cancer. PMID:25395880

  11. Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Secondary to Mediastinitis due to Esophageal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Claudia Patricia; Aluja Jaramillo, Felipe; Velásquez Castaño, Sergio Andrés; Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucía; Granada, Julio Cesar; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates; it requires early diagnosis and treatment. The most common complication of esophageal rupture is mediastinitis. There are several case reports in the literature of mediastinitis secondary to esophageal perforation and development of aortic pseudoaneurysm as a complication. We report the case of a patient with an 8-day history of esophageal perforation due to foreign body (fishbone) with mediastinitis and aortic pseudoaneurysm. The diagnosis was made using Computed Tomography (CT) with intravenous and oral water-soluble contrast material. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy did not detect the perforation. PMID:26977330

  12. Relative permeability of retina and retinal pigment epithelium to the diffusion of tritiated water from vitreous to choroid

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.; Goodnight, R.; Lean, J.S.

    1986-11-01

    The movement of intravitreally injected tritiated water from the vitreous to the choroid was accelerated by the removal of intervening retina. Both rate of transfer and peak choroidal levels of the tracer were increased, but the proportion of the intravitreal dose recovered was unaltered. In contrast, the movement of tritiated water after diffuse damage to the retinal pigment epithelium by sodium iodate was similar to that of control eyes. The main resistance to the diffusion of this tracer from the vitreous to the choroid is the retina. The differential permeability of the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium may have a role in normal retinal adhesion.

  13. Barrier function of airway tract epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Comstock, Adam T; Sajjan, Uma S

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelium contributes significantly to the barrier function of airway tract. Mucociliary escalator, intercellular apical junctional complexes which regulate paracellular permeability and antimicrobial peptides secreted by the airway epithelial cells are the three primary components of barrier function of airway tract. These three components act cooperatively to clear inhaled pathogens, allergens and particulate matter without inducing inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis. Therefore impairment of one or more of these essential components of barrier function may increase susceptibility to infection and promote exaggerated and prolonged innate immune responses to environmental factors including allergens and pathogens resulting in chronic inflammation. Here we review the regulation of components of barrier function with respect to chronic airways diseases. PMID:24665407

  14. Spatially limited growth of an epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforet, Maxime; Cochet, Olivier; Buguin, Axel; Silberzan, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    We present a study dealing with the growth of an epithelium on a spatially limited adhesive substrate. Adhesive patterns (typical size: 50μm to 500μm) are created by micro-fabrication techniques: A protein repellent polymeric gel homogeneously grafted on a coverslip is selectively ablated by plasma treatment through a thin layer of photoresist. The technique achieves a high resolution of patterning (around 2μm). After seeding cells (MDCK) on circular adhesive patterns, we let the monolayer grow for 30 hours after reaching the confluence. We use physical descriptors to describe migration and compaction. Two days after the confluence, we observe and characterize by confocal microscopy, the appearance of a tridimensionnal assembly of cells in the peripherical zone of the adhesive pattern (a ``rim''). Moreover using other patterns, the existence of a tissue line tension and internal pressure is investigated.

  15. Neuropilin 1 Receptor Is Up-Regulated in Dysplastic Epithelium and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Gallottini, Marina; Martins, Fabiana; Li, Erik; Mudge, Dayna R; Nakayama, Hironao; Hida, Kyoko; Panigrahy, Dipak; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2016-04-01

    Neuropilins are receptors for disparate ligands, including proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibitory class 3 semaphorin (SEMA3) family members. Differentiated cells in skin epithelium and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma highly express the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor. We examined the expression of NRP1 in human and mouse oral mucosa. NRP1 was significantly up-regulated in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NRP1 receptor localized to the outer suprabasal epithelial layers in normal tongue, an expression pattern similar to the normal skin epidermis. However, dysplastic tongue epithelium and OSCC up-regulated NRP1 in basal and proliferating epithelial layers, a profile unseen in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. NRP1 up-regulation is observed in a mouse carcinogen-induced OSCC model and in human tongue OSCC biopsies. Human OSCC cell lines express NRP1 protein in vitro and in mouse tongue xenografts. Sites of capillary infiltration into orthotopic OSCC tumors correlate with high NRP1 expression. HSC3 xenografts, which express the highest NRP1 levels of the cell lines examined, showed massive intratumoral lymphangiogenesis. SEMA3A inhibited OSCC cell migration, suggesting that the NRP1 receptor was bioactive in OSCC. In conclusion, NRP1 is regulated in the oral epithelium and is selectively up-regulated during epithelial dysplasia. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester proangiogenic ligands within the neoplastic compartment, thereby recruiting neovessels toward tumor cells. PMID:26877262

  16. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  17. Microbiome, innate Immunity, and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Jonathan; Chaudhary, Noami; Pei, Zhiheng; Yang, Liying

    2014-01-01

    With the development of culture-independent technique, a complex microbiome has been established and described in the distal esophagus. Over recent decades, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC)—a relatively rare cancer with high mortality—has increased dramatically in the United States. Several studies documenting an altered microbiome associated with EAC and its precedents (i.e., Barrett’s esophagus and reflux esophagitis) suggest that dysbiosis may be contributing to carcinogenesis, potentially mediated by interactions with toll-like receptors. Investigations attempting to associate viruses, in particular human papilloma virus, with EAC have not been as consistent. Regardless, currently available data is cross-sectional and therefore cannot prove causal relationships. Prospectively, microbiome studies open a new avenue to the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of reflux disorders and EAC. PMID:25439272

  18. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  19. Down-regulation of the Notch Pathway in Human Airway Epithelium in Association with Smoking and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Ann E.; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Heguy, Adriana; Hackett, Neil R.; Wang, Rui; O'Connor, Timothy P.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: The airway epithelium of smokers is subject to a variety of mechanisms of injury with consequent modulation of epithelial regeneration and disordered differentiation. Several signaling pathways, including the Notch pathway, control epithelial differentiation in lung morphogenesis, but little is known about the role of these pathways in adults. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that Notch-related genes are expressed in the normal nonsmoker small airway epithelium of human adults, and that Notch-related gene expression is down-regulated in healthy smokers and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: We used microarray technology to evaluate the expression of 55 Notch-related genes in the small airway epithelium of nonsmokers. We used TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to confirm the expression of key genes and we used immunohistochemistry to assess the expression of Notch-related proteins in the airway epithelium. Changes in expression of Notch genes in healthy smokers and smokers with COPD compared with nonsmokers were evaluated by PCR. Measurements and Main Results: Microarray analysis demonstrated that 45 of 55 Notch-related genes are expressed in the small airway epithelium of adults. TaqMan PCR confirmed the expression of key genes with highest expression of the ligand DLL1, the receptor NOTCH2, and the downstream effector HES1. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of Jag1, Notch2, Hes1, and Hes5 in airway epithelium. Several Notch ligands, receptors, and downstream effector genes were down-regulated in smokers, with more genes down-regulated in smokers with COPD than in healthy smokers. Conclusions: These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the Notch pathway likely plays a role in the human adult airway epithelium, with down-regulation of Notch pathway gene expression in association with smoking and COPD. PMID:19106307

  20. Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

    2014-08-21

    Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

  1. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: update on treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fotis, L; Xatzipsalti, M; Papadopoulou, A

    2012-01-01

    ?osinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinical entity with continuously increasing incidence in children and adults. Diet therapy and corticosteroids are the most important therapeutic interventions currently used, while new therapies are being developed, based on the research of the disease mechanisms. In this review we assess the results of the latest clinical trials on management of patients with EoE, and the advances in the development of novel drug therapies. Hippokratia 2012; 16 (3): 200-204 PMID:23935283

  2. Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

  3. Advances in Clinical Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Liacouras, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    EoE is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsies, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and PPI-REE. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (current incidence of 1/10,000 new cases per year and prevalence of 0.5-1/1,000 cases per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and non-directed empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenostic complications of EoE. There are number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment endpoints, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines—EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

  4. Lidocaine inhibition of esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter pressure in baboons.

    PubMed

    Sinar, D R; Carey, L C; Cordova, C; Fletcher, J R; Castell, D O

    1985-11-01

    Intravenous lidocaine was infused at 0.82 ml/min in a concentration of 1.2 mg/ml (2.3 mg/kg) for 120 min in awake chair-restrained baboons (Papio anubis), and measurements of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure were compared before and after lidocaine or control infusions. Lidocaine produced a progressive and significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in amplitude in the peristaltic wave in the smooth muscle portion of the distal esophagus during the 120-min infusion. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was similarly significantly lower than control after the infusion of lidocaine (P less than 0.05). Velocity and duration of the peristaltic wave were unchanged during the infusion. The decreased amplitude occurred during therapeutic and stable serum concentrations of lidocaine. It did not appear that the inhibitory effect of lidocaine was due to an induction of prostaglandin synthesis, because pretreatment of animals with indomethacin did not change the inhibitory effect of lidocaine, and serum metabolites of prostacyclin decreased during the infusion. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of lidocaine was not topical. The response to the muscarinic agonist, bethanechol was similar in lidocaine-treated animals and control animals. The preservation of a bethanechol response after lidocaine inhibition of LES pressure and distal esophageal amplitude suggests that lidocaine acts proximal to the muscarinic receptor in the esophageal body and smooth muscle portion of the lower esophageal sphincter. This study suggests that lidocaine produces an inhibitory effect on the peristaltic wave and lower esophageal sphincter pressure that is similar to inhibitory effects described after anticholinergic agents and calcium channel blocking drugs, but intravenous lidocaine infusion requires a longer period of time to produce inhibition of muscle function. PMID:2865090

  5. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  6. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  7. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  8. Esophageal Perforation: A Rare Complication of Transesophageal Echocardiography in a Patient with Asymptomatic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kabir; Lal, Yasir; Condron, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a commonly used procedure in patients with suspected endocarditis. A rare but dreadful complication of this procedure is perforation of the esophagus. We report the case of an elderly female with multiple comorbidities, who presented with polyarticular septic arthritis. TEE was performed to rule out endocarditis. Though the standard procedure protocol was followed, she developed esophageal perforation. It was managed with esophageal stenting but she developed multiorgan failure and did not survive. This case highlights the potential of severe morbidity and mortality associated with TEE. Appropriate screening must be done and high-risk individuals must be identified before such procedures are attempted. PMID:23341798

  9. Comparison of hepatic venous pressure gradient and endoscopic grading of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunJi; Kim, Yong Jae; Goo, Dong Erk; Yang, Seung Boo; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices. METHODS: From September 2009 to March 2013, a total of 176 measurements of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) were done in 146 patients. Each transjugular HVPG was measured twice, first using an end whole catheter (EH-HVPG), and then using a balloon catheter (B-HVPG). The HVPG was compared with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices (according to the general rules for recording endoscopic findings of esophagogastric varices), which was recorded within a month of the measurement of HVPG. RESULTS: The study included 110 men and 36 women, with a mean age of 56.1 years (range, 43-76 years). The technical success rate of the pressure measurements was 100% and there were no complication related to the procedures. Mean HVPG was 15.3 mmHg as measured using the end hole catheter method and 16.5 mmHg as measured using the balloon catheter method. Mean HVPG (both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG) was not significantly different among patients with different characteristics, including sex and comorbid factors, except for cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (B-HVPG, P = 0.01; EH-HVPG, P = 0.02). Portal hypertension (> 12 mmHg HVPG) occurred in 66% of patients according to EH-HVPG and 83% of patients according to B-HVGP, and significantly correlated with Child’s status (B-HVPG, P < 0.000; EH-HVGP, P < 0.000) and esophageal varies observed upon endoscopy (EH-HVGP, P = 0.003; B-HVGP, P = 0.006). One hundred and thirty-five endoscopies were performed, of which 15 showed normal findings, 27 showed grade 1 endoscopic esophageal varices, 49 showed grade 2 varices, and 44 showed grade 3 varices. When comparing endoscopic esophageal variceal grades and HVPG using univariate analysis, the P value was 0.004 for EH-HVPG and 0.002 for B-HVPG. CONCLUSION: Both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG showed a positive correlation with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices, with B-HVPG showing a stronger correlation than EH-HVPG. PMID:27003998

  10. Esophageal Dose Tolerance to Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Diaconu, Claudiu; Reddy, Chandana A.; Xia, Ping; Woody, Neil M.; Greskovich, John; Makkar, Vinit; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To identify factors associated with grade ≥3 treatment related late esophageal toxicity after lung or liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 52 patients with a planning target volume within 2 cm of the esophagus from a prospective registry of 607 lung and liver SBRT patients treated between 2005 and 2011. Patients were treated using a risk-adapted dose regimen to a median dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 37.5-60 Gy in 3-10 fractions). Normal structures were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) defined criteria. Results: The median esophageal point dose and 1-cc dose were 32.3 Gy (range, 8.9-55.4 Gy) and 24.0 Gy (range, 7.8-50.9 Gy), respectively. Two patients had an esophageal fistula at a median of 8.4 months after SBRT, with maximum esophageal point doses of 51.5 and 52 Gy, and 1-cc doses of 48.1 and 50 Gy, respectively. These point and 1-cc doses were exceeded by 9 and 2 patients, respectively, without a fistula. The risk of a fistula for point doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 9.5% (n=2/21), 10.5% (n=2/19), and 12.5% (n=2/16), respectively. The risk of fistula for 1-cc doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 25% (n=2/9), 50% (n=2/4), and 50% (n=2/4), respectively. Eighteen patients received systemic therapy after SBRT (11 systemic chemotherapy, and 6 biologic agents, and 1 both). Both patients with fistulas had received adjuvant anti-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents within 2 months of completing SBRT. No patient had a fistula in the absence of adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents. Conclusions: Esophageal fistula is a rare complication of SBRT. In this series, fistula was seen with esophageal point doses exceeding 51 Gy and 1-cc doses greater than 48 Gy. Notably, however, fistula was seen only in those patients who also received adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents after SBRT. The potential interaction of dose and adjuvant therapy should be considered when delivering SBRT near the esophagus.

  11. Molecular follow-up of preneoplastic lesions in bronchial epithelium of former Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Chizhikov, Victor; Chikina, Svetlana; Gasparian, Alexander; Zborovskaya, Irina; Steshina, Ekaterina; Ungiadze, Guram; Samsonova, Maria; Chernyaev, Andrei; Chuchalin, Alexander; Tatosyan, Alexander

    2002-04-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent lung carcinogen, but the precise molecular damage associated with it is still unknown. In this study we investigated cancer-related molecular abnormalities including K-ras (codon 12) mutation, p16(INK4A) promoter hypermethylation and microsatellite alterations at seven chromosomal regions in successive biopsies obtained from former Chernobyl cleanup workers in comparison with smokers and nonsmokers who have never had radiation exposure. Our results indicate that prolonged persistence of inhaled radioactive particles is associated with appearance of allelic loss at 3p12, 3p14.2 (FHIT), 3p21, 3p22-24 (hMLH1) and 9p21 (p16INK4A) in bronchial epithelium of former Chernobyl clean-up workers. The prevalence of 3p14.2 allelic loss was associated with decreased expression of the FHIT mRNA in their bronchial epithelium in comparison with control group of smokers. During several years of our monitoring samples of epithelium were collected from the same area of bronchial tree. In epithelium exposed to carcinogens (tobacco smoke and/or radioactivity) the total number of molecular abnormalities was significantly higher in dysplasia and in morphologically normal foci progressed later to dysplasia than in these samples which never showed evidence of such progression. Our findings indicate that extensive cancer-related molecular abnormalities sequentially occur in radiation damaged bronchial epithelium of former Chernobyl clean-up workers. PMID:11948423

  12. Ascl1 (Mash1) knockout perturbs differentiation of nonneuronal cells in olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Krolewski, Richard C; Packard, Adam; Jang, Woochan; Wildner, Hendrik; Schwob, James E

    2012-01-01

    The embryonic olfactory epithelium (OE) generates only a very few olfactory sensory neurons when the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, ASCL1 (previously known as MASH1) is eliminated by gene mutation. We have closely examined the structure and composition of the OE of knockout mice and found that the absence of neurons dramatically affects the differentiation of multiple other epithelial cell types as well. The most prominent effect is observed within the two known populations of stem and progenitor cells of the epithelium. The emergence of horizontal basal cells, a multipotent progenitor population in the adult epithelium, is anomalous in the Ascl1 knockout mice. The differentiation of globose basal cells, another multipotent progenitor population in the adult OE, is also aberrant. All of the persisting globose basal cells are marked by SOX2 expression, suggesting a prominent role for SOX2 in progenitors upstream of Ascl1. However, NOTCH1-expressing basal cells are absent from the knockout; since NOTCH1 signaling normally acts to suppress Ascl1 via HES1 and drives sustentacular (Sus) cell differentiation during adult epithelial regeneration, its absence suggests reciprocity between neurogenesis and the differentiation of Sus cells. Indeed, the Sus cells of the mutant mice express a markedly lower level of HES1, strengthening that notion of reciprocity. Duct/gland development appears normal. Finally, the expression of cKIT by basal cells is also undetectable, except in those small patches where neurogenesis escapes the effects of Ascl1 knockout and neurons are born. Thus, persistent neurogenic failure distorts the differentiation of multiple other cell types in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:23284756

  13. Esophageal eosinophilia is increased in rural areas with low population density: Results from a national pathology database

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elizabeth T.; Hoffman, Kate; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Genta, Robert M.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an increasingly prevalent chronic disease arising from an allergy/immune-mediated process. Generally, the risk of atopic disease differs in rural and urban environments. The relationship between population density and EoE is unknown. Our aim was to assess the relationship between EoE and population density. Methods : We conducted a cross-sectional, case-control study of patients with esophageal biopsies in a U.S. national pathology database between January 2009 and June 2012 to assess the relationship between population density and EoE. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the population density (individuals/mile2) was determined for each patient zip code. The odds of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE were estimated for each quintile of population density and adjusted for potential confounders. Sensitivity analyses were conducted with varying case definitions and to evaluate the potential for bias from endoscopy volume and patient factors. Results Of 292,621 unique patients in the source population, 89,754 had normal esophageal biopsies and 14,381 had esophageal eosinophilia with ≥15 eosinophils per high-power field (eos/hpf). The odds of esophageal eosinophilia increased with decreasing population density (p for trend < 0.001). Compared to those in the highest quintile of population density, odds of esophageal eosinophilia were significantly higher amongst those in the lowest quintile of population density (aOR 1.27, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.36). A similar dose-response trend was observed across case definitions with odds of EoE increased in the lowest population density quintile (aOR 1.59, 95% CI: 1.45-1.76). Estimates were robust to sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Population density is strongly and inversely associated with esophageal eosinophilia and EoE. This association is robust to varying case definitions and adjustment factors. Environmental exposures more prominent in rural areas may be relevant to the pathogenesis of EoE. PMID:24667575

  14. Lysosomes: Regulators of autophagy in the retinal pigmented epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Debasish; Valapala, Mallika; Shang, Peng; Hose, Stacey; Grebe, Rhonda; Lutty, Gerard A; Zigler, J Samuel; Kaarniranta, Kai; Handa, James T

    2016-03-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is critically important to retinal homeostasis, in part due to its very active processes of phagocytosis and autophagy. Both of these processes depend upon the normal functioning of lysosomes, organelles which must fuse with (auto)phagosomes to deliver the hydrolases that effect degradation of cargo. It has become clear that signaling through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), is very important in the regulation of lysosomal function. This signaling pathway is becoming a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), where lysosomal function is defective. In addition, our laboratory has been studying animal models in which the gene (Cryba1) for βA3/A1-crystallin is deficient. These animals exhibit impaired lysosomal clearance in the RPE and pathological signs that are similar to some of those seen in AMD patients. The data demonstrate that βA3/A1-crystallin localizes to lysosomes in the RPE and that it is a binding partner of V-ATPase, the proton pump that acidifies the lysosomal lumen. This suggests that βA3/A1-crystallin may also be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in AMD. In this review, we focus on effector molecules that impact the lysosomal-autophagic pathway in RPE cells. PMID:26321509

  15. Identification of novel inducible genes in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schwiebert, L M; Mooney, J L; Van Horn, S; Gupta, A; Schleimer, R P

    1997-07-01

    DNA differential display analysis (DD-PCR) was utilized to identify genes that are expressed in airway epithelium and are relevant to airway inflammation; cytokine-mediated induction of gene expression and inhibition of that induction by glucocorticoids were the criteria for selection. The IB3-1 cell line was cultured in the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), dexamethasone, or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a control, and analyzed via DD-PCR and Northern blot analyses. With this approach, two TNF-alpha-inducible and dexamethasone (DEX)-sensitive expressed sequence tags (EST8 and EST19) were identified. In IB3-1 cells, TNF-alpha increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of EST8 (34%, P < or = 0.005) and EST19 (41%, P < or = 0.01), whereas dexamethasone reduced this expression to resting levels. This pattern of mRNA expression was also observed in normal human bronchial epithelial cells (EST8: 21%, P < or = 0.009; EST19: 11%, P < or = 0.02) and in the basophil leukemia cell line KU812 (EST8: 34%, P < or = 0.01). Through basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis, it was determined that these ESTs exhibited significant homology with the monomeric G protein rhoC (EST8: 100% homology, P = 1.6 x 10(-100)) and the UFO tyrosine kinase receptor (EST19: 86% homology, 5.3 x 10(-28). PMID:9224216

  16. Congenital esophageal stenosis diagnosed in an infant at 9 month of age.

    PubMed

    Savino, F; Tarasco, V; Viola, S; Locatelli, E; Sorrenti, M; Barabino, A

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis is a relatively uncommon condition in pediatrics and requires an accurate diagnostic approach. Here we report the case of a 9-month old female infant who presented intermittent vomiting, dysphagia and refusal of solid foods starting after weaning. She was treated for gastroesophageal reflux. At first, radiological investigation suggested achalasia, while esophagoscopy revelaed a severe congenital esophageal stenosis at the distal third of the esophagus. She underwent four endoscopic balloon dilatations that then allowed her to swallow solid food with intermittent mild dysphagia. After 17 months of esomeprazole treatment off therapy impedance-pH monitoring was normal. At 29 months of follow-up the child is asymptomatic and eats without problems.Infants with dysphagia and refusal of solid foods may have undiagnosed medical conditions that need treatment. Many disorders can cause esophageal luminal stricture; in the pediatric age the most common are peptic or congenital. Careful assessment with endoscopy is needed to diagnose these conditions early and referral to a pediatric gastroenterologic unit may be necessary. PMID:26444666

  17. Extra-esophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hom, Christopher; Vaezi, Michael F

    2013-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease that is often diagnosed based on typical symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation. In addition to these more classic manifestations, GERD is increasingly associated with extra-esophageal symptoms, including chronic cough, asthma, laryngitis, and dental erosions. Due to the poor sensitivity of endoscopy and pH monitoring, and the poor specificity of laryngoscopy, empiric therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is now considered the initial diagnostic step in patients suspected of having GERD-related symptoms. For those who improve with PPIs, GERD is the presumed etiology, but for those who remain unresponsive to such therapy, further diagnostic testing with impedance/pH monitoring may be necessary in order to exclude refractory acid or weakly acid reflux. In those with normal test results despite PPI therapy and continued symptoms, causes other than GERD may be pursued. Recent data suggest that in patients with extra-esophageal symptoms, objective findings of moderate-sized hiatal hernia and moderate reflux on pH testing may predict response to acid suppressive therapy. PPI-unresponsive patients usually have causes other than GERD for their extra-esophageal symptoms and continued PPI therapy in this group is not recommended. PMID:23881666

  18. Identification of galectin-7 as a potential biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common malignancies. Early diagnosis is critical for guiding the therapeutic management of ESCC. It is imperative to find more effective biomarkers of ESCC. Methods To identify novel biomarkers for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), specimens from 10 patients with ESCC were subjected to a comparative proteomic analysis. The proteomic patterns of ESCC samples and normal esophageal epithelial tissues (NEETs) were compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. And differentially expressed proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. For further identification of protein in selected spot, western blotting and immunohistochemistry were employed. Results Twelve proteins were up-regulated and fifteen proteins were down-regulated in the ESCC samples compared with the NEET samples. Up-regulation of galectin-7 was further confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of galectin-7 was performed on a tissue microarray containing ESCC samples (n = 50) and NEET samples (n = 10). The expression levels of galectin-7 were markedly higher in the ESCC samples than in the NEET samples (P = 0.012). In addition, tissue microarray analysis also showed that the expression level of galectin-7 was related to the differentiation of ESCC. Conclusions The present proteomics analysis revealed that galectin-7 was highly expressed in ESCC tissues. The alteration in the expression of galectin-7 was confirmed using a tissue microarray. These findings suggest that galectin-7 could be used as a potential biomarker for ESCC. PMID:20546628

  19. Genomic characterization of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Insights from next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Koyama, Ryota; Nakagaki, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi

    2016-02-21

    Two major types of cancer occur in the esophagus: squamous cell carcinoma, which is associated with chronic smoking and alcohol consumption, and adenocarcinoma, which typically arises in gastric reflux-associated Barrett's esophagus. Although there is increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Western counties, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most esophageal malignancies in East Asia, including China and Japan. Technological advances allowing for massively parallel, high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) of DNA have enabled comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large numbers of tumor samples. Recently, several studies were published in which whole exome or whole genome sequencing was performed in ESCC tumors and compared with matched normal DNA. Mutations were validated in several genes, including in TP53, CDKN2A, FAT1, NOTCH1, PIK3CA, KMT2D and NFE2L2, which had been previously implicated in ESCC. Several new recurrent alterations have also been identified in ESCC. Combining the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with information obtained from NGS studies may lead to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for ESCC. As this research becomes more prominent, it is important that gastroenterologist become familiar with the various NGS technologies and the results generated using these methods. In the present study, we describe recent research approaches using NGS in ESCC. PMID:26900290

  20. DADS Suppresses Human Esophageal Xenograft Tumors through RAF/MEK/ERK and Mitochondria-Dependent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoran; Zhang, Jun; Li, Xiaoning; Liu, Dong; Feng, Cheng; Liang, Rongrui; Zhuang, Kun; Cai, Chenlei; Xue, Xinghuan; Jing, Fuchun; Wang, Xijing; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xinlian; Ma, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a natural organosulfur compound isolated from garlic. DADS has various biological properties, including anticancer, antiangiogenic, and antioxidant effects. However, the anticancer mechanisms of DADS in human esophageal carcinoma have not been elucidated, especially in vivo. In this study, MTT assay showed that DADS significantly reduced cell viability in human esophageal carcinoma ECA109 cells, but was relatively less toxic in normal liver cells. The pro–apoptotic effect of DADS on ECA109 cells was detected by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI) staining. Flow cytometry analysis showed that DADS promoted apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and the apoptosis rate could be decreased by caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. Xenograft study in nude mice showed that DADS treatment inhibited the growth of ECA109 tumor in both 20 and 40 mg/kg DADS groups without obvious side effects. DADS inhibited ECA109 tumor proliferation by down-regulating proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). DADS induced apoptosis by activating a mitochondria-dependent pathway with the executor of caspase-3, increasing p53 level and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and downregulating the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in ECA109 xenograft tumosr. Based on studies in cell culture and animal models, the findings here indicate that DADS is an effective and safe anti-cancer agent for esophageal carcinoma. PMID:25026173

  1. Genomic characterization of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Insights from next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Koyama, Ryota; Nakagaki, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Two major types of cancer occur in the esophagus: squamous cell carcinoma, which is associated with chronic smoking and alcohol consumption, and adenocarcinoma, which typically arises in gastric reflux-associated Barrett’s esophagus. Although there is increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Western counties, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most esophageal malignancies in East Asia, including China and Japan. Technological advances allowing for massively parallel, high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) of DNA have enabled comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large numbers of tumor samples. Recently, several studies were published in which whole exome or whole genome sequencing was performed in ESCC tumors and compared with matched normal DNA. Mutations were validated in several genes, including in TP53, CDKN2A, FAT1, NOTCH1, PIK3CA, KMT2D and NFE2L2, which had been previously implicated in ESCC. Several new recurrent alterations have also been identified in ESCC. Combining the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with information obtained from NGS studies may lead to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for ESCC. As this research becomes more prominent, it is important that gastroenterologist become familiar with the various NGS technologies and the results generated using these methods. In the present study, we describe recent research approaches using NGS in ESCC. PMID:26900290

  2. Esophageal mucosa exfoliation induced by oxalic acid poisoning: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIERU; KAN, BAOTIAN; JIAN, XIANGDONG; WU, XIAOPENG; YU, GUANCAI; SUN, JING

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with oral oxalic acid poisoning. As the illness progressed, the patient exhibited severe metabolic acidosis, large-area esophageal mucosa injury and acute kidney injury, which required dialysis. A guide wire slipped out of position during the process of hemodialysis and moved back and forth in the veins, but was removed successfully by interventional endovascular treatment. However, the patient's esophageal mucosa exfoliated, which lead to severe benign esophageal stenosis and dysphagia. Balloon distention was conducted twice in the upper digestive tract using X-ray location in combination with a dumb-bell bladder and interventional wire. The patient exhibited convulsions, shock, embolism and loss of consciousness while undergoing the second balloon distention procedure. Following symptomatic treatment, the patient eventually remained in a stable condition, the digestive tract expansion procedure was not resumed and a jejunostomy was performed in order to facilitate enteral nutrition, which was administered via the jejunum and had little stimulatory effect on the pancreas. Following various treatments, the patient's condition improved markedly, with renal function returning to normal. PMID:26889241

  3. Overexpression of claudin proteins in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Elizabeth; Mamelak, Adam J; Gibson, Michael; Maitra, Anirban; Sheikh, Salwa; Amr, Samir S; Yang, Stephen; Brock, Malcolm; Forastiere, Arlene; Zhang, Shengle; Murphy, Kathleen M; Berg, Karin D

    2006-03-01

    Claudins are components of tight junctions important in intercellular barriers and cell polarity. The authors identified upregulation of Claudins 3, 4, and 7 in gastric adenocarcinoma using Affymetrix U-133 oligonucleotide microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC). While normal gastric mucosa lacked Claudin 3, 4, and 7 expression, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia showed these proteins. The authors hypothesized that Claudins would be similarly overexpressed in Barrett's esophagus (BE)/adenocarcinoma. Claudins 3, 4, and 7 gene expression was analyzed by Affymetrix U-133 microarrays in three esophageal adenocarcinomas, one case of BE, and three normal esophagi. IHC validation was performed using tissue microarrays constructed from esophageal resection specimens containing squamous (44 cases), gastric (40 cases), and non-dysplastic BE (16 cases), low-grade and high-grade dysplasia (16 and 26 cases), adenocarcinoma (58 cases), and nodal metastases (27 cases). IHC staining was scored semiquantitatively (0+ to 4+). By microarray analysis, Claudin 3 showed a marked increase in mRNA expression compared with normal esophagus (approximately 100-fold). Claudins 4 and 7 were modestly increased (2.2- and 1.3-fold). By IHC, Claudin 3 expression was 1+ in most (>95%) normal squamous or gastric tissues and 2+ to 4+ in more than 80% of high-grade dysplasia, adenocarcinoma, and metastases specimens. Claudin 4 protein expression was 2+ or less in most squamous and gastric mucosa (>90%) but 3+ or 4+ in BE, low- and high-grade dysplasia, adenocarcinoma, and metastases specimens (>90%). Claudin 7 expression was minimal in squamous and gastric mucosa but strong (3+ to 4+) in BE and low-grade dysplasia. In high-grade dysplasia, adenocarcinoma, and metastases, Claudin 7 was less intense, with 60% to 70% staining 3+ or 4+ and 30% to 40% staining weakly (1+ or 2+). The findings suggest that alterations in Claudin proteins are an early event in tumorigenesis and may provide targets for diagnosis and directed therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursors. PMID:16540726

  4. Prevention of esophageal strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Ohki, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Hosoi, Takahiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have recently been accepted as less invasive methods for treating patients with early esophageal cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia of Barrett’s esophagus. However, the large defects in the esophageal mucosa often cause severe esophageal strictures, which dramatically reduce the patient’s quality of life. Although preventive endoscopic balloon dilatation can reduce dysphagia and the frequency of dilatation, other approaches are necessary to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. This review describes several strategies for preventing esophageal strictures after ESD, with a particular focus on anti-inflammatory and tissue engineering approaches. The local injection of triamcinolone acetonide and other systemic steroid therapies are frequently used to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. Tissue engineering approaches for preventing esophageal strictures have recently been applied in basic research studies. Scaffolds with temporary stents have been applied in five cases, and this technique has been shown to be safe and is anticipated to prevent esophageal strictures. Fabricated autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets to cover the defective mucosa similarly to how commercially available skin products fabricated from epidermal cells are used for skin defects or in cases of intractable ulcers. Fabricated autologous oral-mucosal-epithelial cell sheets have already been shown to be safe. PMID:25386058

  5. Effects of effortful swallow on esophageal function in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    NEKL, C. G.; LINTZENICH, C. R.; LENG, X.; LEVER, T.; BUTLER, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment for esophageal dysmotility is currently limited to primarily pharmacologic intervention, which has questionable utility and frequently associated negative side effects. A potential behavioral intervention for esophageal dysmotility is the effortful oropharyngeal swallow. A previous pilot study using water perfusion manometry found an increase in distal esophageal amplitudes during effortful vs non-effortful swallowing. The current study sought to duplicate the previous study with improvements in methodology. Methods The effects of swallow condition (effortful vs non-effortful), sensor site, and gender on esophageal amplitude, duration, velocity, and bolus clearance were examined for 18 adults (nine males and nine females, mean age = 29.9 years) via combined solid-state manometry and intraluminal impedance. Key Results The effortful swallow condition yielded significantly higher esophageal amplitudes across all sensor locations (P < 0.05). Further, the effortful swallowing decreased the risk of incomplete bolus clearance when compared with non-effortful swallowing (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.30–0.86). Conclusions & Inferences With improved manometric instrumentation, larger participant numbers, and methodology that controlled for potential confounding factors, this study confirms and advances the results of the previous pilot study: Volitional manipulation of the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing using the effortful swallow indeed affects esophageal physiology. Thus, the effortful swallow offers a behavioral manipulation of the esophageal phase of swallowing, and future studies will determine its clinical potential for treating esophageal dysmotility in patient populations. PMID:22316290

  6. Ultrastructural study on the plical epithelium of the bursa of Fabricius in chick embryos: influence of partial decerebration and hypophyseal allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, N; Baldassini, M R; Abelli, L; Aita, M; Mastrolia, L

    1996-01-01

    The bursa of Fabricius of 18 day normal and partially decerebrated chick embryos, and partially decerebrated embryos bearing a hypophyseal allograft was analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, focusing on the ultrastructural characterisation of the plical epithelium. The plicae of the normal bursa consist of interfollicular (IFE) and follicle associated epithelium (FAE). The FAE is composed of typical polygonal cells and is supported by a layer of epithelial cells which appears as a continuation of the corticomedullary epithelium. Bordering cells lie between the FAE and IFE. The IFE is composed of 4 cell types: (1) undifferentiated, (2) goblet, at various stages of maturity, (3) prismatic, and (4) globular light cells. Partially decerebrated embryos showed a gross impairment of plical epithelium development and the complex of FAE and IFE cells was largely undifferentiated. Partially decerebrated embryos with a hypophyseal allograft displayed the same cellular types as observed in controls, thus indicating a restored differentiation of plical epithelium. These findings suggest that the hypophysis affects the differentiation of plical epithelium during ontogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Figs 8-11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 PMID:8655413

  7. Promoter hypermethylation and inactivation of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and its reactivation in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Jin, Zhe; Wang, Yimin; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu; Wang, Li-Dong; Yang, Chung S

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the role of DNA hypermethylation in the loss of expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) during the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to investigate its reactivation in cell lines. Samples were collected from Linzhou City of the Henan province in northern China, a high-risk area of this disease. The hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands of the MGMT gene was examined by methylation-specific PCR in ESCC and neighboring non-tumorous tissues, as well as in laser capture microdissected samples with normal epithelium, basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), and dysplasia (DYS). The MGMT mRNA and protein expression were determined with RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Five of 17 (29%) normal, 10 of 20 (50%) BCH, 8 of 12 (67%) DYS, and 13 of 18 (72%) ESCC samples had DNA hypermethylation in the MGMT promoter region, showing a gradual increase with the progression of carcinogenesis. The frequency of the loss of MGMT mRNA and protein expression progressively decreased from normal to BCH, DYS, and ESCC, and it was highly correlated with MGMT promoter hypermethylation according to Fisher's exact tests. When each individual sample was considered, good concordance between DNA hypermethylation and the loss of expression of MGMT was also observed. In samples from the same patient, if hypermethylation was detected in earlier lesions, it was usually observed in more severe lesions. In the ESCC cell line KYSE 510, treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine partially reversed the CpG hypermethylation status and restored mRNA expression of the MGMT gene. Similar reactivation of MGMT gene by dietary polyphenols, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and genistein, has also been observed. The results suggest that the DNA hypermethylation of MGMT is an important mechanism for MGMT gene silencing in the development of ESCC, and this epigenetic event may be prevented or reversed by these polyphenols for the prevention of carcinogenesis. PMID:15703815

  8. [Differentiation of the ruminal epithelium of cattle during intrauterine development].

    PubMed

    Marko, M; Kressin, M; Schnorr, B

    1992-09-01

    The prenatal development of the bovine ruminal epithelium was studied with light- and electronmicroscopical techniques. During the period of the nonstratified epithelium a pseudostratified epithelium is found in the dorso-cranial part, whereas the other areas possess a one-layered epithelium, which is, like the pseudostratified epithelium, transformed to a multilayered epithelium from the 7th week onwards. From the 9th week the period of the stratified epithelium starts with the formation of the stratum profundum and stratum superficiale. First signs of keratinization are seen in the superficial cells from 2.3 months onwards. With 4 months fetal cornified cells can be identified, with 5.5 months a single-layered stratum basale is seen on the differentiating papillar connective tissue, and the superficial cells are transformed to balloon-cells. In suprapapillar areas, a stratum spinosum is formed at the prenatal age of 7.5 months. During epitheliogenesis a horizontal and vertical differentiation of the cells can be observed. The first one includes the differentiation of undifferentiated, embryonal cells to the basal cells of the stratum profundum, the latter the development of the basal cells to spinous cells and then to fetal cornified and balloon-cells. The ultrastructural changes during the process of keratinization were especially considered. PMID:1443647

  9. NOTCH1 and NOTCH3 coordinate esophageal squamous differentiation through a CSL-dependent transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Shinya; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Kalman, Ross A.; Nakagawa, Momo; Wu, Lizi; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Diehl, J. Alan; Katz, Jonathan P.; Pear, Warren S.; Seykora, John T.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The Notch receptor family regulates cell fate through cell-cell communication. CSL (CBF-1/RBP-jκ, Su(H), Lag-1) drives canonical Notch-mediated gene transcription during cell lineage specification, differentiation and proliferation in the hematopoietic system, the intestine, the pancreas and the skin. However, the functional roles of Notch in esophageal squamous epithelial biology remain unknown. Methods Normal esophageal keratinocytes were stimulated with calcium chloride to induce terminal differentiation. The squamous epithelia were reconstituted in organotypic three-dimensional culture, a form of human tissue engineering. Notch was inhibited in culture with a γ-secretase inhibitor or dominant negative mastermind-like1 (DNMAML1). The roles of Notch receptors were evaluated by in vitro gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments. Additionally, DNMAML1 was targeted to the mouse esophagus by cytokeratin K14 promoter-driven Cre (K14Cre) recombination of Lox-STOP-Lox-DNMAML1. Notch-regulated gene expression was determined by reporter transfection, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR), Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Results NOTCH1 (N1) was activated at the onset of squamous differentiation in the esophagus. Intracellular domain of N1 (ICN1) directly activated NOTCH3 (N3) transcription, inducing HES5 and early differentiation markers such as involucrin (IVL) and cytokeratin CK13 in a CSL-dependent fashion. N3 enhanced ICN1 activity and was required for squamous differentiation. Loss of Notch signaling in K14Cre;DNMAML1 mice perturbed esophageal squamous differentiation and resulted in N3 loss and basal cell hyperplasia. Conclusions Notch signaling is important for esophageal epithelial homeostasis. In particular, the crosstalk of N3 with N1 during differentiation provides novel, mechanistic insights into Notch signaling and squamous epithelial biology. PMID:20801121

  10. In vitro construction and in vivo regeneration of esophageal bilamellar muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Gong, Changfeng; Zhu, Yabin

    2016-04-01

    In order to induce esophageal muscle cells' orientation, the silicon wafer with prototype 1 and prototype 2 was designed. Prototype 1 has micro-channels of 200 µm width and 30 µm depth with 30 µm wide wall as the interval. Prototype 2 has channels of 100 µm width and 30 µm depth with a discontinuous wall which has 30 µm gap for each 100 µm channel. The poly(ester urethane) scaffolds with pattern prototype 1 and prototype 2 were fabricated using solution casting method and abbreviated as PU1 and PU2, respectively. Silk fibroin was grafted individually on PU1 and PU2 surface (PU1-SF, PU2-SF) using our previous protocol, aiming at improving scaffolds' biocompatibility. The primary esophageal smooth muscle cell was seeded to evaluate the scaffolds' cytocompatibility in vitro. Characterizations like MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, scanning electron microscope, and Western blotting were applied. After that, poly(ester urethane) scaffolds with double patterns, prototype 1 on the exterior, and prototype 2 in the lumen were implanted into the rabbit esophagous to test the regeneration of the muscle tissue. Results from these preliminary tests showed that the growth and differentiation of primary smooth muscle cells were promoted, but also the muscle tissue with endocircular and exolongitudinal architecture was in regenerating, against non-constitution in the animals without the patterned scaffold or with poly(ester urethane) plane membrane at the defaulted sites. This micro-channel pattern together with silk fibroin grafting and vascular endothelial growth factor coating greatly promoted the regeneration of esophageal muscle with normal histological structure. PMID:26823400

  11. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms refractory to proton pump inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    de S, Cludia Cristina; Kishi, Humberto Setsuo; Silva-Werneck, Ana Luiza; de MoraesFilho, Joaquim Prado Pinto; Eisig, Jaime Natan; Barbuti, Ricardo Correa; Hashimoto, Cludio Lyioti; Navarro-Rodriguez, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: TREATMEN The contribution of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) to refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains unknown. When EoE and GERD overlap, the clinical, endoscopic and histological findings are nonspecific and cannot be used to distinguish between the two disorders. Limited data are available on this topic, and the interaction between EoE and GERD is a matter of debate. AIM: We have conducted a prospective study of adult patients with refractory GERD to evaluate the overlap of reflux and EoE. METHODS: Between July 2006 and June 2008, we consecutively and prospectively enrolled 130 male and female patients aged 18 to 70 years old who experienced persistent heartburn and/or regurgitation more than twice a week over the last 30 days while undergoing at least six consecutive weeks of omeprazole treatment (at least 40mg once a day). The patients underwent an upper digestive endoscopy with esophageal biopsy, and intraepithelial eosinophils were counted after hematoxylin/eosin staining. The diagnosis of EoE was based on the presence of 20 or more eosinophils per high-power field (eo/HPF) in esophageal biopsies. RESULTS: Among the 103 studied patients, 79 (76.7%) were females. The patients had a mean age of 45.5 years and a median age of 47 years. Endoscopy was normal in 83.5% of patients, and erosive esophagitis was found in 12.6%. Only one patient presented lesions suggestive of EoE. Histological examination revealed >20eo/HPF in this patient. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated a low prevalence of EoE among patients with refractory GERD undergoing omeprazole treatment. PMID:21655746

  12. Emerging techniques and efficacy of endoscopic esophageal reconstruction and lumen restoration for complete esophageal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Perbtani, Yaseen; Suarez, Alejandro L.; Wagh, Mihir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Complete esophageal obstruction (CEO) is a rare occurrence characterized by progressive esophageal stricture, which eventually causes lumen obliteration. With recent advances in flexible endoscopy, various innovative techniques exist for restoring luminal continuity. The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of patients undergoing combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation for CEO at our institution. The secondary aim was to review and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes, and adverse events after endoscopic treatment of CEO. Patients and methods: Our electronic endoscopy database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who underwent combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopy for CEO. Patient and procedural data collected included gender, age, technical success, pre- and post-dysphagia scores, and adverse events. Results: Six patients (67 % male, mean age 71.6 years [range 63 – 80]) underwent technically successful esophageal reconstruction with combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopy. All patients noted improvement in dysphagia with mean pre-procedure dysphagia score of 4 reduced to 1.33 (range 0 – 3) post-procedure. There were no adverse events and mean follow-up time was 17.3 months (range 3 – 48). Conclusions: Combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopic therapy for CEO is feasible and safe. We present our experience with endoscopic management of complete esophageal obstruction, and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes and adverse events related to this minimally invasive modality. PMID:26878039

  13. Tight junction proteins in gallbladder epithelium: different expression in acute acalculous and calculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko J; Karttunen, Tuomo; Koivukangas, Vesa; Laurila, Päivi A; Syrjälä, Hannu; Saarnio, Juha; Soini, Ylermi; Ala-Kokko, Tero I

    2007-06-01

    There is a paucity of information of tight junction (TJ) proteins in gallbladder epithelium, and disturbances in the structure of these proteins may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) and acute calculous cholecystitis (ACC). Using immunohistochemistry, we investigated the expression of TJ proteins claudin-1, -2, -3, and -4, occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), and E-cadherin in 9 normal gallbladders, 30 gallbladders with AAC, and 21 gallbladders with ACC. The number of positive epithelial and endothelial cells and the intensity of the immunoreaction were determined. Membrane-bound and cytoplasmic immunoreactivities were separately assessed. We found that TJ proteins were uniformly expressed in normal gallbladder epithelium, with the exception of claudin-2, which was present in less than half of the cells. In AAC, expression of cytoplasmic occludin and claudin-1 were decreased, as compared with normal gallbladder. In ACC, expression of claudin-2 was increased, and expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4, occludin, and ZO-1 were decreased, as compared with normal gallbladder or AAC. We conclude that there are significant differences in expression of TJ proteins in AAC and ACC, supporting the idea that AAC represents a manifestation of systemic inflammatory disease, whereas ACC is a local inflammatory and often infectious disease. PMID:17283368

  14. The Effect of Beta-Aminopropionitrile and Prednisolone on the Prevention of Fibrosis in Alkali Esophageal Burns: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Aciksari, Kurtulus; Yanar, Hakan Teoman; Hepgul, Gulcin; Yanar, Fatih; Agcaoglu, Orhan; Eser, Mediha; Tanriverdi, Gamze; Topacoglu, Hakan; Ayvaci, Baris Murat; Dogan, Halil; Gunay, Kayihan; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Celikmen, Ferudun

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) and prednisolone on the prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophageal burn. Method. Twenty-eight rats were divided into four equal groups. In groups 1, 2, and 3, caustic esophageal burns were generated by applying NaOH to the 1.5 cm segment of the abdominal esophagus. Group 4 was for the sham. Normal saline to group 1, BAPN to group 2, and prednisolone to group 3 were administered intraperitoneally as a single daily dose. Results. Treatment with BAPN decreased the stenosis index (SI) and histopathologic damage score (HDS) seen in caustic esophageal burn rats. The SI in group 4 was significantly lower compared with groups 1, 2, and 3. Group 2 had the minimum SI value in corrosive burn groups. The differences related to SI between groups 1, 2, and 3 were not statistically significant. The HDS was significantly lower in group 4 compared with groups 1, 2, and 3. The HDS in group 2 was significantly lower compared with groups 1 and 3. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that BAPN was able to decrease the development of stenosis and tissue damage better than prednisolone. PMID:24391667

  15. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Rhei Rhizoma and Coptidis Rhizoma Mixture on Reflux Esophagitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Jun; Kim, Min Yeong; Shin, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Reum; Lee, Joo Young; Seo, Bu-il; Shin, Mi-Rae; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Min, Byung Sun; Kim, Gyo-Nam; Noh, Jeong Sook; Rhee, Man Hee; Roh, Seong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the combined extract of Rhei rhizoma and Coptidis rhizoma (RC-mix) in experimental model of acute reflux esophagitis. The antioxidant activity was assessed by in vitro 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. RC-mix was given at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight 2 h prior to induction of reflux esophagitis (RE). After 5 h, the effects of RC-mix treated rats were compared with those of normal and control rats. The representative flavonoid contents of RC-mix, such as sennoside A, epiberberine, coptisine, palmatine, and berberine, were detected using HPLC. The elevated esophageal mucosa damage was markedly ameliorated by RC-mix treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the administration of RC-mix reduced the increase of serum reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). The improvement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels were marked in the group given RC-mix. Moreover, the elevation of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in control rats decreased by RC-mix pretreatment. These results indicate that RC-mix treatment reduces the pathological states of esophagitis via regulating NF-κB mediated inflammation related to oxidative stress.

  16. Human vomeronasal epithelium development: An immunohistochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Lóránd; Pap, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, Annamária; Gergely, István; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-06-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor structure of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in vertebrates. It is found bilaterally in the submucosa of the inferior part of the nasal septum. There are ongoing controversies regarding the functionality of this organ in humans. In this study we propose the immunohistochemical evaluation of changes in components of the human vomeronasal epithelium during foetal development. We used 45 foetuses of different age, which were included in three age groups. After VNO identification immunohistochemical reactions were performed using primary antibodies against the following: neuron specific enolase, calretinin, neurofilament, chromogranin, synaptophysin, cytokeratin 7, pan-cytokeratin and S100 protein. Digital slides were obtained and following colorimetric segmentation, surface area measurements were performed. The VNO was found in less than half of the studied specimens (42.2%). Neuron specific enolase and calretinin immunoexpression showed a decreasing trend with foetal age, while the other neural/neuroendocrine markers were negative in all specimens. Cytokeratin 7 expression increased with age, while Pan-Ctk had no significant variations. S100 protein immunoexpression also decreased around the VNO. The results of the present work uphold the theory of regression of the neuroepithelium that is present during initial stages of foetal development. PMID:26132837

  17. Primary culture of mammalian taste epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ozdener, Mehmet Hakan; Rawson, Nancy E

    2013-01-01

    Establishment of primary and immortalized cultures of many cell types has facilitated efforts to understand the signals involved in proliferation and differentiation and yielded tools to rapidly assay new molecules targeting specific receptor pathways. Taste cells are specialized sensory epithelial cells which reside within taste buds on the lingual epithelium. Only recently have successful culturing protocols been developed which maintain essential molecular and functional characteristics. These protocols provide a tractable tool to examine the molecular, regenerative, and functional properties of these unique sensory cells within a controlled environment. The method involves an enzymatic isolation procedure and standardized culture conditions, and may be applied to either dissected rodent tissue or human fungiform papillae obtained by biopsy. Human fungiform cells can be maintained in culture for more than seven passages, without loss of viability and with retention of the molecular and biochemical properties of acutely isolated taste cells. Cultured primary human fungiform papillae cells also exhibit functional responses to taste stimuli indicating the presence of taste receptors and at least some relevant signaling pathways. While the loss of the three-dimensional structure of the intact taste bud must be taken into consideration in interpreting results obtained with these cells, this culture protocol provides a useful model for molecular studies of the proliferation, differentiation, and physiological function of mammalian taste receptor cells. PMID:23097103

  18. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  19. Stroma–epithelium crosstalk in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yi-Nong; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2009-01-01

    The critical role played by stroma–epithelium crosstalk in carcinogenesis and progression of prostate cancer has been increasingly recognized. These interactions are mediated by a variety of paracrine factors secreted by cancer cells and/or stromal cells. In human prostate cancer, reactive stroma is characterized by an increase in myofibroblasts and a corresponding amplification of extracellular matrix production and angiogenesis. Permanent genetic mutations have been reported in stromal cells as well as in tumour cells. Transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor signalling pathways are involved in the process of angiogenesis, whereas hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, CXC12 and Interleukin-6 play active roles in the progression, androgen-independent conversion and distal metastasis of prostate cancer. Some soluble factors have reciprocal interactions with androgens and the androgen receptor (AR), and can even activate AR in the absence of the androgen ligand. In this article, we review the complex interactions between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment, and discuss the potential therapeutic targets in the stromal compartment of prostate cancer. PMID:19098934

  20. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  1. Serological identification of tumor antigens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Nakashima, Kazue; Ochiai, Takenori; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Takiguchi, Masaki; Nomura, Fumio; Hiwasa, Takaki

    2005-01-01

    Autoantibodies are often detected in the patients with esophageal cancer. We applied serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX) to a case of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in order to identify tumor antigens. A cDNA library derived from an esophageal cancer cell line was bacterially expressed and screened for interaction with antibodies in five allogeneic sera of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. To examine the specific immunoreactivity of the antigens, sera from 16 more patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 16 patients with gastric cancer, 16 patients with colon cancer, 16 patients with breast cancer and 37 healthy volunteers were screened. We identified 11 independent cDNA clones that potentially encoded esophageal cancer tumor antigens. The identified cDNA clones were SURF1, HOOK2, CENP-F, ZIC2, hCLA-iso, Ki-1/57, enigma, HCA25a, SPK and two EST clones named LOC146223 and AGENCOURT_7565913. The sero-positive rates of antibodies against SURF1 (48%), LOC146223 (38%), HOOK2 (14%) and AGENCOURT_7565913 (14%) were significantly higher in esophageal cancer patients than in healthy controls. At least one of these antibodies was detected in 18 (86%) of 21 sera from esophageal cancer patients. A disease-specific humoral immune response against SURF1, LOC146223, HOOK2 or AGENCOURT_7565913 was observed in most patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Antibodies against these SEREX antigens may represent a pool of candidates for serum tumor markers of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:15586227

  2. Current endoscopic methods of radical therapy in early esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    During the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer at the global level, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This is the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. If we refer to the countries of Western Europe and North America, we could see an increase in the esophageal adenocarcinoma in detriment of squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. Considering that the incidence of gastric cancer in Japan is very high, the endoscopic screenings performed inevitably led to an increased rate of early detection of esophageal cancer, reaching approximately 20% of all esophageal cancers detected. This has led to the possibility of developing therapeutic endoscopic techniques with radical visa that we will describe while presenting comparative data from literature. Currently, however, there are not enough data on the effectiveness of these types of therapies, compared to surgery, in order to be transformed into standard therapeutic endoscopic treatment for early esophageal cancer. However, the combined therapy, resection/ endoscopic ablation + chemoradiotherapy, appears as an alternative to be taken into account. Abbreviations EEC = esophageal early cancer, BE = Barrett’s esophagus, HGD = High-grade dysphagia, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE = Upper gastro endoscopy, PET-CT = Positron Emission Tomography, FNAB = Fine needle aspiration biopsy, EMR = Esophageal mucosal resection, ESD = Esophageal submucosal dissection, SCC = Squamous cellular cancer, PCT = Poli-chemotherapy, RT- Radio-therapy. PMID:25866570

  3. Upper esophageal sphincter during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation: effects of reflux content and posture

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Bhargava, Valmik

    2010-01-01

    Although some studies show that the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contracts during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR), others show that it relaxes. We hypothesized that the posture of the subject and constituents of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may determine the type of UES response during the TLESR. High-resolution manometry and esophageal pH/impedance recording were performed in 10 healthy volunteers in the right recumbent (1 h) and upright (1 h) positions following the ingestion of a 1,000-Kcal meal. The UES pressure response during TLESR and constituents of GER (liquid, air, and pH) were determined. 109 TLESRs (58 upright and 51 recumbent) were analyzed. The majority of TLESRs were associated with GER (91% upright and 88% recumbent) events. UES relaxation was the predominant response during upright position (81% of TLESRs), and it was characteristically associated with presence of air in the reflux (92%). On the other hand, UES contraction was the predominant response during recumbent position (82% of TLESRs), and it was mainly associated with liquid reflux (71%). The rate of esophageal pressure increase (dP/dt) during the GER, but not the pH, had major influence on the type of UES response during TLESR. The dP/dt during air reflux (127 ± 39 mmHg/s) was significantly higher than liquid reflux (31 ± 6 mmHg/s, P < 0.0001). We concluded that the nature of UES response during TLESR, relaxation or contraction, is related to the posture and the constituents of GER. We propose that the rapid rate of esophageal pressure increase associated with air reflux determines the UES relaxation response to GER. PMID:20167874

  4. Fusion of human bone hemopoietic stem cell with esophageal carcinoma cells didn't generate esophageal cancer stem cell.

    PubMed

    Fan, H; Lu, S

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies showed that cell fusion between bone marrow-derived cell (BMDC) and somatic cell might be the origin of cancer stem cell. Our previous study suggested that cell fusion of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) with esophageal cancer cell did not generate cancer stem cells. But up to now, the origin of cancer stem cell is still ambiguous. In this study, we carried out the cell fusion experiment between hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and human esophageal cancer cells, and found that cell fusion slowed the growth speed of esophageal cancer cells and decreased the clone formation ability and tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice. In addition, cell fusion did not increase the ratio of side population (SP) cells and the resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Collectively, our data indicated that cell fusion between HSCs and esophageal cancer cells has a therapeutic effect rather than generate cells with characteristics of esophageal cancer stem cells. PMID:25030437

  5. Effects of irradiation on canine tracheal epithelium: a physiological and morphological correlate

    SciTech Connect

    Man, S.F.; Logus, J.W.; Mok, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Ahmed, I.H.; Man, G.C.; Hulbert, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    We delivered 20 Gy irradiation in one fraction to a 6 cm segment of trachea in 11 dogs. Tracheal mucous transport was studied before and whenever possible at weekly intervals after irradiation using a gamma camera system and /sup 99m/technetium labeled sulfur colloid. Ten of the eleven animals were sacrificed at three different time intervals (1-2, 15-16 and 30-34 weeks) post-irradiation, and the tracheal epithelium removed for studies using Ussing chambers followed by preparation for microscopic analysis. Mucous transport along the length of the trachea was normal before irradiation, but following irradiation it became abnormal in the irradiated zone. Compared to the epithelium from the cranial and caudal segments, the irradiated epithelium had similar bioelectric measurements (potential difference, short-circuit current and resistance) and mannitol permeability. Also, the changes in the bioelectric measurements following indomethacin (10(-6) M) and epinephrine (10(-6) M) used sequentially, were similar in both the control and irradiated tissues. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the irradiated zone revealed patches of nonciliated epithelial cells among the ciliates. We conclude that irradiation caused a persistent replacement of ciliated cells with nonciliates throughout the entire study period and that this alteration impaired mucous transport but did not affect epithelial ion secretion or barrier function.

  6. Bovine corneal stroma and epithelium reconstructed in vitro: characterisation and response to surfactants.

    PubMed

    Parnigotto, P P; Bassani, V; Montesi, F; Conconi, M T

    1998-01-01

    In order to define safety profiles and proper handling procedures for new industrial products, it is essential to determine their potential for ocular irritation. The Draize test is normally employed but it involves using rabbits. There is today a great need for all researchers to limit the use of animals for laboratory experiments and to encourage the development and adoption of alternative in vitro methods to evaluate the potential toxicity of new products. This study proposes a three-dimensional model of bovine corneal stroma and epithelium that is not only easy to reproduce but may also be used in the toxicological field as an alternative to animal experimentation. The data presented here show that this model allows the growth of epithelium similar in features to in vivo epithelium. Basal cells are cube-shaped, whereas superficial areas are horizontally longer; desmosomes and 64 kDa keratin, as a marker for differentiation of corneal epithelial cells, are both expressed; the basal lamina is synthesised also. The 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was carried out on the model to evaluate the toxicity of some surfactants: benzalkonium chloride, Triton X-100, sodium dodecylsulphate and Tween 20. Since the in vitro data fit very well the results of the Draize test in vivo as reported in the literature, the three-dimensional culture may be used to predict the potential cytotoxicity of surfactants. PMID:9683960

  7. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  8. Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian LP

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barrett’s-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barrett’s cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

  9. Emerging Therapeutic Options for Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Timothy; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie L.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus that often occurs in atopic persons. Management strategies include pharmacotherapy, dietary modification, and endoscopic therapy, although patients will often have a relapsing and remitting course. Currently, the primary pharmacotherapy for EoE consists of corticosteroids. Immuno-modulators, leukotriene antagonists, biologies, and monoclonal antibodies are currently under study for treatment of EoE. The role of immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reactions has been well documented and may provide insight into the etiology and effective therapy of EoE. PMID:24803874

  10. Unusual esophageal foreign body: a table fork.

    PubMed

    Mevio, Emilio; Mevio, Niccol

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an esophageal foreign body (EFB) is a medical emergency requiring urgent evaluation and treatment. Swallowing of foreign bodies is most common in children aged between 6 months and 6 years, in whom it usually occurs during games. In adults, foreign bodies tend to be ingested accidentally together with food. The authors report an unusual case of EFB (a table fork) in an adult and briefly report the clinical presentation and the therapeutic procedures adopted in this case and similar cases. PMID:23634316

  11. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  12. Krüppel-like Factor 4 Promotes Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Differentiation by Up-regulating Keratin 13 Expression.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Li, Sheng; Hong, Yuan; Zou, Haojing; Chen, Hongyan; Ding, Fang; Wan, Yong; Liu, Zhihua

    2015-05-22

    Squamous cell differentiation requires the coordinated activation and repression of genes specific to the differentiation process; disruption of this program accompanies malignant transformation of epithelium. The exploration of genes that control epidermal proliferation and terminal differentiation is vital to better understand esophageal carcinogenesis. KLF4 is a member of the KLF family of transcription factors and is involved in both cellular proliferation and differentiation. This study using immunohistochemistry analysis of KLF4 in clinical specimens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) demonstrated that decreased KLF4 was substantially associated with poor differentiation. Moreover, we determined that both KLF4 and KRT13 levels were undoubtedly augmented upon sodium butyrate-induced ESCC differentiation and G1 phase arrest. Conversely, silencing of KLF4 and KRT13 abrogated the inhibition of G1-S transition induced by sodium butyrate. Molecular investigation demonstrated that KLF4 transcriptionally regulated KRT13 and the expression of the two molecules appreciably correlated in ESCC tissues and cell lines. Collectively, these results suggest that KLF4 transcriptionally regulates KRT13 and is invovled in ESCC cell differentiation. PMID:25851906

  13. Expression profiles of inhibitor of growth protein 2 in normal and cancer tissues: An immunohistochemical screening analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xue-Feng; Gou, Wen-Feng; Lu, Hang; Li, Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Zheng, Hua-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitor of growth protein 2 (ING2) has an important role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell proliferation, cell‑cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. The present study performed an immunohistochemical analysis for expression profiling of ING2 protein in an array of tissues comprising normal mouse and human tissues, as well as human hepatocellular (n=62), renal clear cell (n=62), pancreatic (n=62), esophageal squamous cell (n=45), cervical squamous cell (n=31), breast (n=144), gastric (n=196), colorectal (n=96), ovarian (n=208), endometrial (n=96) and lung (n=192) carcinoma tissues. In mouse tissues, ING2 was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the glandular epithelium of breast, hepatocytes, intestine, bronchium and alveoli, as well as the squamous epithelium of skin and glomeruli, and in myocardial cells, while it was located in the cytoplasm of renal tubules and striated muscle cells. ING2 protein was scattered in the brain and spleen. In human tissues, ING2 protein was principally distributed in the cytoplasm, while in it was present in the cytoplasm and nuclei in the stomach, intestine, cervix, endometrium trachea, breast and pancreas. The nuclear location of ING2 in the stomach was more prominent than that in the cytoplasm. High ING2 immunoreactivity was detected in the tongue, stomach, skin, pancreas, cervix and breast, whereas weakly in the brain stem, thymus, thyroid, lung, striated muscle, testis, bladder and ovary. In total, 617 out of 1,194 of the tested cancer tissues (51.7%) were ING2-positive. In most cases, ING2 expression was found to be restricted to the cytoplasm of all cancer tissues, while in certain cancer types, including renal clear cell, ovarian and colorectal carcinoma, it was occasionally present in the nuclei. Among the cancer tissues examined, ING2 was most frequently expressed in breast cancer (67.4%) and gynecological cancer types, including ovarian cancer (61.5%) and endometrial cancer (57.3%). Compared with that in the respective normal tissues, ING2 expression in breast cancer tissues was decreased, while that in cervical cancer was upregulated in the nuclei as well as the cytoplasm. In endometrial cancer, expression of ING2 was increased in the nuclei and declined in the cytoplasm compared with that in the normal endometrium. ING2‑positive cases were less frequent for renal clear cell carcinoma (17.7%). The results of the present study suggested that ING2 may be involved in the repair and regeneration of organs or tissues and is associated with breast and gynecological carcinogenesis. PMID:26717876

  14. Duramycin increases intracellular calcium in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M M; Guernsey, L; Sha'afi, R I

    1993-01-01

    Duramycin increases short-circuit current (Isc) and net Cl- secretion in tracheal epithelium. We measured the intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) response to duramycin using Indo-1 and bovine and canine tracheal cell suspensions, and the effect of an intracellular calcium chelator, BAPTA, and the protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine, on the Isc and [Ca2+]i response to duramycin. [Ca2+]i increased in a dose-dependent manner from basal levels of 34 +/- 5 to 949 +/- 136 nM at 5 x 10(-6) M duramycin. Both BAPTA (50 microM) and staurosporine (5-50 nM) pretreatment blunted the increase in Isc and net Cl- secretion produced by duramycin. BAPTA also blunted the rise in [Ca2+]i produced by duramycin (5 x 10(-6) M) in the presence of extracellular calcium (499 +/- 122 nM). In the absence of extracellular calcium, the duramycin-induced (5 x 10(-6) M) rise in [Ca2+]i was blunted from 949 +/- 136 nM (stimulation in the presence of Ca2+) to 621 +/- 122 nM, and was further decreased in the presence of BAPTA to 197 +/- 42 nM. In contrast, staurosporine (50 nM) pretreatment had no effect on the rise in [Ca2+]i produced by duramycin (basal 90 +/- 27 to 861 +/- 110 nM at 5 x 10(-6) M). Duramycin had no effect on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. These data demonstrate that duramycin releases calcium from intracellular stores and stimulates the influx of calcium in airway epithelial cells. These data also demonstrate that, in the presence of protein kinase C pathway blockade, an increase in intracellular free calcium is not sufficient for chloride secretion; thus, duramycin-stimulated chloride secretion may depend upon protein kinase C. PMID:8361390

  15. Live long and prosper: the enterprise of understanding diseased epithelium.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Avital; Moraes, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    The epithelium is a particularly complicated and dynamic tissue, and dysregulation of epithelial structure and function is a hallmark of several lung diseases. Motivated by the life and recent passing of Leonard Nimoy, we highlight several recent studies that explore the nuanced relationship between the epithelium and disease progression. Specifically, we focus on recent innovative and integrative approaches that shed new light on epithelial wounding, healing, and development. PMID:25872488

  16. Gastritis of the Herniated Stomach in Patients with Esophageal Hiatus Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Forstner, G. G.; Bogoch, A.

    1963-01-01

    Seven illustrative cases of gastritis of the herniated stomach in patients with sliding esophageal hiatus hernia are reported. Five had superficial gastritis (three mild, one moderate and one severe); two had atrophic gastritis. Gastritis was present in two patients whose mucosa appeared normal at esophagoscopy. Interstitial hemorrhage into the lamina propria was present in four of the seven biopsy specimens. The possibility that interstitial hemorrhage may be related to the development of gastric erosions is considered. The pathogenesis of this form of gastritis is discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:13958838

  17. A monoclonal antibody to a carbohydrate epitope expressed on glycolipid and on alpha3beta1 integrin on human esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Stoner, Gary D; Foote, Linda J; Lankford, Trish K; Davern, Sandra; Kennel, Stephen J

    2003-12-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb-9) produced by immunization with a human esophageal carcinoma cell line, TE-2 (derived from undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma) reacted specifically with about 30% of esophageal carcinoma cell lines and tissue sections from clinical samples. MAb-9 showed minimal reactivity with normal esophageal tissue. (125)I, fluorescent or gold particle labeled MAb-9 bound to TE-2 cell surfaces. (125)I-radiolabeled MAb-9 was used to detect reactive material from cell extracts in Western blot. Treatment of TE-2 membrane proteins with neuraminidase, N-glycanase or O-glycanase reduced antigen detection. Treatment of cells with periodic acid destroyed antibody binding in ELISA. Lipid extracts from cell membranes, containing glycolipids, also reacted with MAb-9. MAb-9 was used to purify target antigen from detergent solubilized membrane proteins and the prominent bands from subsequent gel electrophoresis were trypsin digested and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Peptides from alpha(3) and beta(1) integrin chains were identified. These data indicate that alpha3beta1integrin is prominently expressed on certain esophageal carcinomas and that a specific carbohydrate unit is selectively displayed on the alpha(3) integrin subunit as well as on glycolipid on the cell surface. The alpha3beta1 integrin expressed on A-431 carcinoma cells does not display this carbohydrate epitope and is not detected by MAb-9. Thus, expression of the carbohydrate epitope is the basis for the tumor selective reaction of MAb-9 with a subset of esophageal carcinomas. PMID:14683596

  18. Endoscopic assessment and management of early esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Hammad, Hazem; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma affects more than 450000 people worldwide and the incidence is rapidly increasing. In the United States and Europe, esophageal adenocarcinoma has superseded esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in its incidence. Esophageal cancer has a high mortality rates secondary to the late presentation of most patients at advanced stages. Endoscopic screening is recommended for patients with multiple risk factors for cancer in Barrett’s esophagus. These risk factors include chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, hiatal hernia, advanced age, male sex, white race, cigarette smoking, and obesity. The annual risk of esophageal cancer is approximately 0.25% for patients without dysplasia and 6% for patients with high-grade dysplasia. Twenty percent of all esophageal adenocarcinoma in the United States is early stage with disease confined to the mucosa or submucosa. The significant morbidity and mortality of esophagectomy make endoscopic treatment an attractive option. The American Gastroenterological Association recommends endoscopic eradication therapy for patients with high-grade dysplasia. Endoscopic modalities for treatment of early esophageal adenocarcinoma include endoscopic resection techniques and endoscopic ablative techniques such as radiofrequency ablation, photodynamic therapy and cryoablation. Endoscopic therapy should be precluded to patients with no evidence of lymphovascular invasion. Local tumor recurrence is low after endoscopic therapy and is predicted by poor differentiation of tumor, positive lymph node and submucosal invasion. Surgical resection should be offered to patients with deep submucosal invasion. PMID:25132925

  19. Esophageal obstruction in horses: a retrospective study of 34 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Feige, K; Schwarzwald, C; Fürst, A; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2000-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to describe the causes, possible complications, and prognoses of horses with esophageal obstruction. Of 34 cases presenting with esophageal obstruction, 28 cases were due to impaction of ingesta. Obstruction due to pre-existing esophageal disease occurred in 4 horses with megaesophagus, in 1 horse with stricture in the upper third of the esophagus, and in 1 horse with esophageal diverticulum. There was no significant difference in the contamination of the trachea between horses that subsequently developed aspiration pneumonia and those that did not. The duration of esophageal obstruction prior to admission was significantly longer in horses that developed aspiration pneumonia (median 18, range 2-48 h) than in those horses that did not (median 4, range 0.5-48 h). Although the obstruction was relieved in all 34 horses, 4 were euthanized because of recurring obstruction due to megaesophagus (n = 2), esophageal diverticulum (n = 1), and esophageal stricture (n = 1). Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10738598

  20. New Endoscopic Indicator of Esophageal Achalasia: “Pinstripe Pattern”

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal achalasia lacking typical endoscopic features can be extremely difficult. The aim of this study was to identify simple and reliable early indicator of esophageal achalasia. Patients and Methods This single-center retrospective study included 56 cases of esophageal achalasia without previous treatment. As a control, 60 non-achalasia subjects including reflux esophagitis and superficial esophageal cancer were also included in this study. Endoscopic findings were evaluated according to Descriptive Rules for Achalasia of the Esophagus as follows: (1) esophageal dilatation, (2) abnormal retention of liquid and/or food, (3) whitish change of the mucosal surface, (4) functional stenosis of the esophago-gastric junction, and (5) abnormal contraction. Additionally, the presence of the longitudinal superficial wrinkles of esophageal mucosa, “pinstripe pattern (PSP)” was evaluated endoscopically. Then, inter-observer diagnostic agreement was assessed for each finding. Results The prevalence rates of the above-mentioned findings (1–5) were 41.1%, 41.1%, 16.1%, 94.6%, and 43.9%, respectively. PSP was observed in 60.7% of achalasia, while none of the control showed positivity for PSP. PSP was observed in 26 (62.5%) of 35 cases with shorter history < 10 years, which usually lacks typical findings such as severe esophageal dilation and tortuosity. Inter-observer agreement level was substantial for food/liquid remnant (k = 0.6861) and PSP (k = 0.6098), and was fair for abnormal contraction and white change. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for achalasia were 83.8%, 64.7%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusion “Pinstripe pattern” could be a reliable indicator for early discrimination of primary esophageal achalasia. PMID:25664812

  1. Retrograde Lymphatic Spread of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Osaka, Yoshiaki; Tachibana, Shingo; Aoki, Takaya; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells appears to account for a subset of the essential mechanisms of cancer metastasis in various organs. However, no adequate data currently exist to illustrate the pathology of the retrograde lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells in human bodies. To shed light on this phenomenon, we report a case of a 63-year-old Japanese man who underwent an esophagectomy and lymph node dissection for early-stage esophageal cancer. The patient's clinical information was evaluated by board-certified surgeons and internists. Surgically excised materials were histopathologically evaluated by attending pathologists. Postoperative pathological examination revealed that the patient's tumor was a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with negative surgical margins (T1N0M0, stage I). Apart from the primary lesion, a single lymphatic vessel invasion was found between the lamina propria and lamina muscularis of the esophagus where intralymphatic cancer cells had spread against the direction of backflow prevention valves and skipped beyond these valves without destroying them. The present case demonstrated that the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells can occur in valve-equipped lymphatic vessels. Our study may not only provide a scientific basis for the concept of retrograde lymphatic metastasis but also explain a portion of the complexities associated with the lymphogenous metastasis of esophageal cancer. PMID:26166121

  2. [Management of caustic esophagitis in children].

    PubMed

    Mas, E; Breton, A; Lachaux, A

    2012-12-01

    In children, caustic ingestion is due to accidents at home and inadequate storage of caustic agents. In emergency, it is useful to remove the soiled clothes, rinse the affected area, and prevent vomiting and feeding. Caustic ingestion (pH<2 or>12) induces burns of the upper gastrointestinal tract requiring esophagogastro-duodenoscopy between H12 and H24. Strong alkalis cause necrosis with liquefaction of the esophagus, penetrating deeply with a high-risk of perforation. Management of these children requires a specialized care center with an intensive care unit, endoscopic equipment, and a surgical team. Esophageal stricture is the main complication; no prophylactic treatment (steroids) is effective. Strictures occur after the 3rd week, and barium swallow should be performed by the end of the 1st month. Stricture are often multiple, long, and tortuous; endoscopic dilatation is difficult with a high-rate of perforation and a low-rate of success. In situ application of mitomycin C or injection of triamcinolone could reduce the recurrence rate of stricture. In recalcitrant or recurrent strictures, it is recommended to perform an esophageal replacement using a colonic interposition or a gastric tube. Endoscopy should also be performed 15-20years after caustic ingestion to screen for early neoplastic lesions. Prevention is very important for avoiding caustic ingestions. Information and education should be given specifically to the parents of toddlers; caustic products should be stored out of reach of children and they should not be kept with food. PMID:23141564

  3. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (105 copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication. PMID:27076774

  4. Palliation of esophageal malignancy with photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, J S; Williams, T E; Bethel, B H

    1985-08-01

    Sixteen patients with esophageal malignancies received photodynamic therapy after 3 mg of hematoporphyrin derivative (Photofrin I) or 2 mg of Photofrin II per kilogram of body weight was injected intravenously two to six days prior to treatment. A tunable dye argon laser system delivered 630 nm light through quartz fibers passed through the biopsy channel of a gastroscope. All patients obtained improvement in swallowing, usually from total obstruction or clear liquids only to a regular diet within three weeks and with new techniques, at least liquids within three days of treatment. Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) and esophageal grades were measured before treatment, 1 month following treatment, and periodically until death. Ten patients died an average of 3.7 months after initial treatment (range, 0.6 to 19 months). Six patients are alive at 11, 10, 5, 2.5, 2 months, and 1 month after treatment. The median survival of 12 patients treated more than 6 months ago was 6.5 months and of 9 patients with an initial KPS higher than 30, 8.1 months. PMID:2411233

  5. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-04-14

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (10(5) copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication. PMID:27076774

  6. Plummer-Vinson Syndrome with Proximal Esophageal Web.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Haeri, Nami Safai; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Reddy, Madhavi

    2016-05-01

    Plummer-Vinson Syndrome is a condition where iron deficiency is associated with difficulty swallowing due to the presence of an esophageal web. Deficiency of iron-dependent oxidative enzymes causes gradual degradation of the pharyngeal muscles which lead to mucosal atrophy and formation of webs. Although it is a very rare condition, an increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma makes its identification very important. Dilation of the esophageal web using a Savary dilator is a more effective and safer approach compared to conventional balloon dilation. PMID:26658794

  7. Involvement of F-box proteins in esophageal cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Huang, Zheng; Huo, Ji-Rong

    2016-03-01

    The F-box proteins (FBPs) in esophageal tumorigenesis are pivotal as they govern a broad array of basic physiological responses including cell growth, cell death and DNA damage repair. Esophageal cancer (EC) is a common and highly aggressive cancer worldwide. Aberrant stabilization of crucial proteins participates in esophageal tumorigenesis. Recently, growing evidence has shown that FBPs play a critical role in oncogenesis, invasion, metastasis and prognosis assessment of EC. In this review we summarized published data on the roles of known FBPs, their respective substrates and the key signaling pathways, in the development of EC, aiming to uncover new ways for the rational design of targeted therapies in EC. PMID:26782762

  8. Spontaneous esophageal hematoma in a patient with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Roseanna; Ding, Linda; Watson, Thomas J; Hobbs, Susan K; Litle, Virginia R

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of a spontaneous esophageal hematoma in an anticoagulated patient with atrial fibrillation previously complicated by a cerebrovascular accident. A multidisciplinary discussion resulted in holding of anticoagulation until the esophageal hematoma resolved. The patient was managed nonoperatively and discharged, but returned with a new neurologic deficit 3 weeks later. Aspirin treatment was resumed. After complete resolution of hematoma on outpatient scans, warfarin treatment was restarted. The challenges of managing an esophageal hematoma in a patient requiring anticoagulation are discussed. PMID:23438542

  9. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response PMID:26609356

  10. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Pérez, Francisco; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Vázquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibáñez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case of a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  11. Exploring the physiologic role of human gastroesophageal reflux by analyzing time‐series data from 24‐h gastric and esophageal pH recordings

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Luo; Mu, John C.; Sloan, Sheldon; Miner, Philip B.; Gardner, Jerry D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our previous finding of a fractal pattern for gastric pH and esophageal pH plus the statistical association of sequential pH values for up to 2 h led to our hypothesis that the fractal pattern encodes information regarding gastric acidity and that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity by influencing gastric secretion of acid or bicarbonate. Under our hypothesis values of gastric pH should provide information regarding values of esophageal pH and vice versa. We used vector autoregression, a theory‐free set of inter‐related linear regressions used to measure relationships that can change over time, to analyze data from 24‐h recordings of gastric pH and esophageal pH. We found that in pH records from normal subjects, as well as from subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease alone and after treatment with a proton pump inhibitor, gastric pH values provided important information regarding subsequent values of esophageal pH and values of esophageal pH provided important information regarding subsequent values of gastric pH. The ability of gastric pH and esophageal pH to provide information regarding subsequent values of each other was reduced in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared to normal subjects. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity, and that this ability is impaired in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25347850

  12. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using low LET radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial cells when exposed to conditioned media from irradiated vs. non-irradiated fibroblasts. We also observed enhanced invasion through a basement membrane simulant. To identify chemotactic proteins secreted by irradiated stromal fibroblasts, we used antibody capture cytokine arrays and have identified several proteins as candidates. Increased secretion of these factors by irradiated fibroblasts was confirmed using ELISA. We are currently analyzing the contribution of these individual factors on epithelial migration and invasion, as well as their influence on cell survival and DNA repair. Studies using high-LET radiation will help determine radiation quality effects on these processes. These results should further our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation impacts the tissue microenvironment and how it influences cancer development processes.

  13. Homeostatic capabilities of the choroid plexus epithelium in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Conrad; McMillan, Paul; Tavares, Rosemarie; Spangenberger, Anthony; Duncan, John; Silverberg, Gerald; Stopa, Edward

    2004-01-01

    As the secretory source of vitamins, peptides and hormones for neurons, the choroid plexus (CP) epithelium critically provides substances for brain homeostasis. This distributive process of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume transmission reaches many cellular targets in the CNS. In ageing and ageing-related dementias, the CP-CSF system is less able to regulate brain interstitial fluid. CP primarily generates CSF bulk flow, and so its malfunctioning exacerbates Alzheimers disease (AD). Considerable attention has been devoted to the blood-brain barrier in AD, but more insight is needed on regulatory systems at the human blood-CSF barrier in order to improve epithelial function in severe disease. Using autopsied CP specimens from AD patients, we immunocytochemically examined expression of heat shock proteins (HSP90 and GRP94), fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFr) and a fluid-regulatory protein (NaK2Cl cotransporter isoform 1 or NKCC1). CP upregulated HSP90, FGFr and NKCC1, even in end-stage AD. These CP adjustments involve growth factors and neuropeptides that help to buffer perturbations in CNS water balance and metabolism. They shed light on CP-CSF system responses to ventriculomegaly and the altered intracranial pressure that occurs in AD and normal pressure hydrocephalus. The ability of injured CP to express key regulatory proteins even at Braak stage V/VI, points to plasticity and function that may be boosted by drug treatment to expedite CSF dynamics. The enhanced expression of human CP 'homeostatic proteins' in AD dementia is discussed in relation to brain deficits and pharmacology. PMID:15679944

  14. Response of the Upper Esophageal Sphincter to Esophageal Distension is Affected by Posture, Velocity, Volume, and Composition of the Infusate

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Dua, Kulwinder; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Lee, Justin; Katib, Omar; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond; Shaker, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Studies of the pressure response of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) to simulated or spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux have shown conflicting results. These discrepancies could result from uncontrolled influence of variables such as posture, volume, and velocity of distension. We characterized in humans the effects of these variables on UES pressure response to esophageal distension. Methods We studied 12 healthy volunteers (average 27±5 years old, 6 male) using concurrent esophageal infusion and high-resolution manometry to determine UES, lower esophageal sphincter, and intraesophageal pressure values. Reflux events were simulated by distal esophageal injections of room-temperature air and water (5, 10, 20, and 50 ml) in individuals in 3 positions (upright, supine and semi-supine). Frequencies of various UES responses were compared using χ2 analysis. Multinomial logistical regression analysis was used to identify factors that determine the UES response. Results UES contraction and relaxation were the overriding responses to esophageal water and air distension, respectively, in a volume-dependent fashion (P<.001). Water-induced UES contraction and air-induced UES relaxation were the predominant responses among individuals in supine and upright positions, respectively (P<.001). The prevalence of their respective predominant response significantly decreased in the opposite position. Proximal esophageal dp/dt significantly and independently differentiated the UES response to infusion with water or air. Conclusions The UES response to esophageal distension is affected by combined effects of posture (spatial orientation of the esophagus), physical properties, and volume of refluxate, as well as the magnitude and rate of increase in intraesophageal pressure. The UES response to esophageal distension can be predicted using a model that incorporates these factors. PMID:22248662

  15. Limiting esophageal temperature in radiofrequency ablation of left atrial tachyarrhythmias results in low incidence of thermal esophageal lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrio-esophageal fistula formation following radiofrequency ablation of left atrial tachyarrhythmias is a rare but devastating complication. Esophageal injuries are believed to be precursors of fistula formation and reported to occur in up to 47% of patients. This study investigates the incidence of esophageal lesions when real time esophageal temperature monitoring and temperature limitation is used. Methods 184 consecutive patients underwent open irrigated radiofrequency ablation of left atrial tachyarrhythmias. An esophageal temperature probe consisting of three independent thermocouples was used for temperature monitoring. A temperature limit of 40°C was defined to interrupt energy delivery. All patients underwent esophageal endoscopy the next day. Results Endoscopy revealed ulcer formation in 3/184 patients (1.6%). No patient developed atrio-esophageal fistula. Patient and disease characteristics had no influence on ulcer formation. The temperature threshold of 40°C was reached in 157/184 patients. A temperature overshoot after cessation of energy delivery was observed frequently. The mean maximal temperature was 40.8°C. Using a multiple regression analysis creating a box lesion that implies superior- and inferior lines at the posterior wall connecting the right and left encircling was an independent predictor of temperature. Six month follow-up showed an overall success rate of 78% documented as sinus rhythm in seven-day holter ECG. Conclusion Limitation of esophageal temperature to 40°C is associated with the lowest incidence of esophageal lesion formation published so far. This approach may contribute to increase the safety profile of radiofrequency ablation in the left atrium. PMID:20977747

  16. Increased expression of c-Ski as a co-repressor in transforming growth factor-beta signaling correlates with progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Minoru; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukai, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Masuda, Norihiro; Sohda, Makoto; Manda, Ryokuhei; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2004-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates cell growth inhibition, and inactivation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway contributes to tumor development. In our previous study, altered expression of TGF-beta, TGF-beta-specific receptors and Smad4 was shown to correlate with tumor progression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These components, however, were maintained normally in some patients with esophageal SCC. In our study, the mechanism by which aggressive esophageal SCC maintains these components was investigated, with particular emphasis on the participation of c-Ski and SnoN as transcriptional co-repressors in TGF-beta signaling. Immunohistochemistry for c-Ski and SnoN was carried out on surgical specimens obtained from 80 patients with esophageal SCC. The expression of c-Ski and SnoN was also studied in 6 established cell lines derived from esophageal SCC and compared to an immortalized human esophageal cell line by Western blotting. High levels of expression of c-Ski, detected immunohistologically, were found to correlate with depth of invasion (p = 0.0080) and pathologic stage (p = 0.0447). There was, however, no significant correlation between expression of SnoN and clinicopathologic characteristics. A significant correlation between c-Ski and TGF-beta expression was observed. Moreover, in patients with TGF-beta negative expression, the survival rates of patients with c-Ski positive expression were significantly lower than those of patients with c-Ski negative expression (p = 0.0486). c-Ski was expressed at a high level in 5 of 6 cell lines derived from esophageal SCC compared to immortalized esophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, p21 that was up-regulated by TGF-beta signaling was expressed at a low level in the 5 cell lines. The expression of c-Ski protein as a transcriptional co-repressor in TGF-beta signaling seems to be correlated with tumor progression of esophageal SCC. PMID:14712482

  17. Deletion of high-avidity T cells by thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M W; Heath, W R; Ruschmeyer, D; Miller, J F

    1995-10-10

    Tolerance induction by thymic epithelium induces a state of so-called "split tolerance," characterized in vivo by tolerance and in vitro by reactivity to a given thymically expressed antigen. Using a model major histocompatibility complex class I antigen, H-2Kb (Kb), three mechanisms of thymic epithelium-induced tolerance were tested: induction of tolerance of tissue-specific antigens exclusively, selective inactivation of T helper cell-independent cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and deletion of high-avidity T cells. To this end, thymic anlagen from Kb-transgenic embryonic day 10 mouse embryos, taken before colonization by cells of hemopoietic origin, were grafted to nude mice. Tolerance by thymic epithelium was not tissue-specific, since Kb-bearing skin and spleen grafts were maintained indefinitely. Only strong priming in vivo could partially overcome the tolerant state and induce rejection of some skin grafts overexpressing transgenic Kb. Furthermore, the hypothesis that thymic epithelium selectively inactivates those T cells that reject skin grafts in a T helper-independent fashion could not be supported. Thus, when T-cell help was provided by a second skin graft bearing an additional major histocompatibility complex class II disparity, tolerance to the Kb skin graft was not broken. Finally, direct evidence could be obtained for the avidity model of thymic epithelium-induced negative selection, using Kb-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice. Thymic epithelium-grafted TCR transgenic mice showed a selective deletion of those CD8+ T cells with the highest density of the clonotypic TCR. These cells presumably represent the T cells with the highest avidity for Kb. We conclude that split tolerance induced by thymic epithelium was mediated by the deletion of those CD8+ T lymphocytes that have the highest avidity for antigen. PMID:7568231

  18. Development of the airway epithelium and submucosal glands in the pig lung: changes in epithelial glycoprotein profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, A. N.; Lopez-Vidriero, M. T.; Haworth, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    Glycoproteins in the normal airway surface epithelium and submucosal glands of 13 Large White pigs were studied from birth to adult life using alcian blue (AB) staining at pH 2.6 or at pH 1.0, with and without sialidase digestion, and by the combination of AB and PAS (AB/PAS) stains. Immediately after birth the percentage of cells producing acidic and neutral glycoproteins increased in both airway surface epithelium and submucosal glands. In the airway surface epithelium, the percentage of mucus-secreting cells producing sulphated glycoprotein increased with age, whereas in the submucosal glands the glycoproteins were mainly sulfated between birth and 3 days and sialylated between 3 days and adult life. The percentage of cells producing neutral glycoprotein in the airway surface epithelium increased during the first 24 h of life after which there was little change with age. In the submucosal glands, however, the greatest increase in the percentage of cells producing neutral glycoprotein occurred between 7 days and adult life. The rapid increase of intracellular glycoprotein production at birth and the presence of the same types of glycoprotein in the immature pig and mature human lung, suggest that the pig may be a useful model in which to study mechanisms and changes of glycoprotein synthesis and secretion during lung development. PMID:3801296

  19. Collagen-immobilized poly(vinyl alcohol) as an artificial cornea scaffold that supports a stratified corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Hideyuki; Shimmura, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Asano-Kato, Naoko; Uchino, Yuichi; Kato, Masabumi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tanaka, Junzo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The cornea is a transparent tissue of the eye, which is responsible for the refraction of incoming light. Both biological corneal equivalents and synthetic keratoprostheses have been developed to replace donor tissue as a means to restore vision. However, both designs have drawbacks in terms of stability and biocompatibility. Clinically available synthetic devices do not support an intact epithelium, which poses a risk of microbial infection or protrusion of the prosthesis. In the present study, type I collagen was immobilized onto poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA-COL) as a possible artificial cornea scaffold that can sustain a functional corneal epithelium. Human and rabbit corneal epithelial cells were air-lift cultured with 3T3 feeder fibroblasts to form a stratified epithelial layer on PVA-COL. The epithelial sheet expressed keratin 3/12 differentiation markers, the tight junction protein occludin, and had characteristic microvilli structures on transmission electron microscopy. Functionally, the stratified epithelium contained normal glycogen levels, and an apical tight-junction network was observed to exclude the diffusion of horseradish peroxidase. Furthermore, the epithelium-PVA-COL composite was suturable in the rabbit cornea, suggesting the possibility of using PVA-COL as a biocompatible material for keratoprosthesis. PMID:16044431

  20. Effect of optical clearing agents on optical coherence tomography images of cervical epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gallwas, Julia; Stanchi, Anna; Ditsch, Nina; Schwarz, Theresa; Dannecker, Christian; Mueller, Susanna; Stepp, Herbert; Mortensen, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used as an adjunct to colposcopy in order to detect precancerous and cancerous cervical lesions. Optical clearing agents (OCAs) temporarily reduce the optical scattering of biological tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate their influence on OCT imaging. OCT images were taken from unsuspicious and suspicious areas of fresh conization specimens immediately after resection and 5, 10, and 20 min after application of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Corresponding histologies were obtained from all sites. The images taken 5, 10, and 20 min after application of OCA were compared to the initial images with respect to changes in brightness, contrast, and scanning depth using a standard nonparametric test of differences of proportions. Further, mean intensity backscattering curves were calculated from all OCT images in the histological groups CIN2, CIN3, inflammation, and normal epithelium. Mean difference profiles within each of these groups were determined, reflecting the mean differences between the condition before the application of OCA and the exposure times 5, 10, and 20 min, respectively. The null hypothesis was tested employing the Dicky-Fuller-test, Hotelings-test and run test. The visual analysis of 434 OCT images from 109 different sites of 24 conization specimens showed a statistically significant increase in brightness and contrast for normal and dysplastic epithelium after application of DMSO or PEG. Further, the analysis of mean intensity profiles suggests the existence of an increased backscattering intensity after application of DMSO or PEG. DMSO and PEG contribute substantially to optical clearing in cervical squamous epithelium and therefore influence OCT imaging in a positive way. With further refinement of the OCT technology, the observed changes may be beneficial in interpreting the tissue microstructure and identifying cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:25503301

  1. RPL38, FOSL1, and UPP1 Are Predominantly Expressed in the Pancreatic Ductal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Fikret; Qiu, Wanglong; Wilentz, Robb E.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Grosmark, Andres; Su, Gloria H.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Establishing more effective treatment of pancreatic cancer requires an understanding of the molecular events leading to the onset and progression of this disease. The biology of tumorigenesis may be better understood if cell type–specific genes in the pancreas are more recognized. This recognition may be as important as discovering a disease-responsible gene. Identification of a ductal epithelium–specific gene can contribute not only to our knowledge of pancreatic tumorigenesis, tumor marker discovery, and effective drug targeting but also is crucial for making a reliable animal model. Methods We used the x-Profiler engine online to compare the SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) libraries derived from 2 short-term cultures of normal human ductal epithelial cells from the pancreas against 34 other SAGE libraries generated from other normal human tissues to identify the best candidate gene specific for the ductal epithelium of the pancreas. Results We identified 3 genes, ribosomal protein L38 (RPL38), uridine phosphorylase (UPP1), and FOS-like antigen-1 (FOSL1), predominantly expressed in the pancreatic ductal epithelium. The expression patterns of these 3 genes were confirmed by virtual Northern analysis, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. Conclusion Although the expressions of these 3 genes are not completely restricted to the ductal epithelium of the pancreas, we showed that they have more specific expression patterns than CK19 and MUC1. We also demonstrated that all 3 genes are highly expressed in a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines and can potentially be useful in tumor targeting or as tumor markers. PMID:15714138

  2. Global Expression Profiling of Globose Basal Cells and Neurogenic Progression Within the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Krolewski, Richard C.; Packard, Adam; Schwob, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion. PMID:22847514

  3. Adding Targeted Therapy to Treatment for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, people with confirmed HER2-positive locally advanced esophageal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive preoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy, with or without trastuzumab.

  4. Poorer Black Patients Have Lower Survival from Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rates didn't vary by race at higher income levels, study found To use the sharing features ... Jan. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks with low incomes who are diagnosed with esophageal cancer don't ...

  5. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  6. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus associated with esophagitis dissecans superficialis.

    PubMed

    Yogarajah, Meera; Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Jaffe, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is one of the rare autoantibody mediated skin manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) demonstrating subepidermal blistering with neutrophilic infiltrate histologically. We present a case of a 40-year-old Hispanic female who presented with a several months' history of multiple blistering pruritic skin lesions involving the face and trunk, a photosensitive rash over the face and neck, swelling of the right neck lymph node, and joint pain involving her elbows and wrist. Her malady was diagnosed as bullous systemic lupus erythematosus based on the immunological workup and biopsy of her skin lesions. The patient also complained of odynophagia and endoscopy revealed esophagitis dissecans superficialis which is a rare endoscopic finding characterized by sloughing of the esophageal mucosa. The bullous disorders typically associated with esophagitis dissecans superficialis are pemphigus and rarely bullous pemphigoid. However, this is the first reported case of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus associated with esophagitis dissecans superficialis. PMID:25821624

  7. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Esophagitis Dissecans Superficialis

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is one of the rare autoantibody mediated skin manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) demonstrating subepidermal blistering with neutrophilic infiltrate histologically. We present a case of a 40-year-old Hispanic female who presented with a several months' history of multiple blistering pruritic skin lesions involving the face and trunk, a photosensitive rash over the face and neck, swelling of the right neck lymph node, and joint pain involving her elbows and wrist. Her malady was diagnosed as bullous systemic lupus erythematosus based on the immunological workup and biopsy of her skin lesions. The patient also complained of ody