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Sample records for normal female fischer

  1. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing shows the uterus, myometrium (muscular outer layer ...

  2. Fluoxetine disrupts food intake and estrous cyclicity in Fischer female rats.

    PubMed

    Uphouse, Lynda; Hensler, Julie G; Sarkar, Jhimly; Grossie, Bruce

    2006-02-01

    Adult, regularly cycling female Fischer rats were injected daily with 10 mg/kg fluoxetine for 12-23 days. In the first experiment, body weight and vaginal smears were monitored daily. Fluoxetine treatment reduced body weight within the first 24 h of treatment. Fluoxetine treatment also elongated the estrous cycle, reduced blood levels of progesterone, and eliminated lordosis behavior. In the second experiment, body weight and food intake were examined and a pair-fed group was included to determine if fluoxetine-induced anorexia contributed to the disturbance of the estrous cycle. In pair-fed rats, effects similar to fluoxetine treatment were present. These results lead to the suggestion that fluoxetine's anorectic properties could disrupt the female's normal endocrine cyclicity and that this disruption could be relevant to the reduction in sexual behavior and motivation. However, when the duration of fluoxetine treatment was extended beyond 16 to 17 days, fluoxetine-treated female rats reinitiated vaginal cyclicity and showed evidence of normal sexual receptivity. In contrast, the estrous cycles of their pair-fed counterparts remained disrupted. Thus, restricted food intake appears to contribute to the disruption of the estrous cycle and elimination of sexual receptivity during fluoxetine treatment. However, compensatory changes in the serotonergic system that are associated with chronic fluoxetine administration may contribute to the gradual recovery of estrous cyclicity and sexual receptivity of the fluoxetine-treated animals. PMID:16423328

  3. School Behavior Problems of Mentally Retarded and Normal Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Douglas; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Female elementary, middle, and high school students (N=146) identified as educable mentally retarded were rated on the Quay-Peterson Behavior Problem Checklist by their teachers. Normal females were also rated for comparison. Analyses indicated that mentally retarded females exceeded normal females on the Conduct Disorder, Personality Problem, and…

  4. Spatial Reference Memory in Normal Aging Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 Hybrid Rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Nicolle, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (F344×BN-F1) hybrid rats express greater longevity with improved health relative to aging rodents of other strains; however, few behavioral reports have thoroughly evaluated cognition across the F344×BN-F1 lifespan. Consequently, this study evaluated spatial reference memory in F344×BN-F1 rats at 6, 18, 24 or 28 months (mo) of age in the Morris water maze. Reference memory decrements were observed between 6 mo and 18 mo and between 18 mo and 24 mo. At 28 mo, spatial learning was not worse than 24 mo, but swim speed was significantly slower. Reliable individual differences revealed that ~50% of 24-28 mo performed similarly to 6 mo while others were spatial learning-impaired. Aged rats were impaired at learning within daily training sessions, but not impaired at retaining information between days of training. Aged rats were also slower to learn to escape onto the platform, regardless of strategy. In summary, these data clarify the trajectory of cognitive decline in aging F344×BN-F1 rats and elucidate relevant behavioral parameters. PMID:25086838

  5. Educating women about normal female genital appearance variation.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gemma; Tiggemann, Marika

    2016-03-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of two online resources aimed at improving women's knowledge of the variation in normal female genital appearance and their attitudes towards their own genitals. The first consisted of a photographic array of normal female genitals and the second consisted of a video addressing digital airbrushing of women's genitals in media images. A sample of 136 female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to view the photographs, video, both the photographs and video, or neither. The video significantly increased women's perceptions of genital appearance diversity as well as awareness of digital airbrushing of genital images. Owing to relatively low levels of genital appearance concern, there was no effect of either resource on women's attitudes towards their own genitals; however, women who viewed the video indicated they would pass on their knowledge to help other women. Our results suggest that an educational video could be a useful tool. PMID:26723015

  6. Effects of repeated light-dark phase shifts on voluntary ethanol and water intake in male and female Fischer and Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Clark, James W; Fixaris, Michael C; Belanger, Gabriel V; Foster, James A

    2010-05-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate reciprocal interactions between excessive alcohol (ethanol) intake and dysregulation of circadian biological rhythms. Thus, chronic alcohol intake leads to widespread circadian disruption in both humans and experimental animals, while in turn, chronobiological disruption has been hypothesized to promote or sustain excessive alcohol intake. Nevertheless, the effects of circadian disruption on voluntary ethanol intake have not been investigated extensively, and prior studies have reported both increased and decreased ethanol intake in rats maintained under "shift-lag" lighting regimens mimicking those experienced by shift workers and transmeridian travelers. In the present study, male and female inbred Fischer and Lewis rats were housed in running wheel cages with continuous free-choice access to both water and 10% (vol/vol) ethanol solution and exposed to repeated 6-h phase advances of the daily light-dark (LD) cycle, whereas controls were kept under standard LD 12:12 conditions. Shift-lag lighting reduced overall ethanol and water intake, and reduced ethanol preference in Fischer rats. Although contrary to the hypothesis that circadian disruption would increase voluntary ethanol intake, these results are consistent with our previous report of reduced ethanol intake in selectively bred high-alcohol-drinking (HAD1) rats housed under a similar lighting regimen. We conclude that chronic circadian disruption is a form of chronobiological stressor that, like other stressors, can either increase or decrease ethanol intake, depending on a variety of poorly understood variables. PMID:20488643

  7. What's "normal": female genital mutilation, psychology, and body image.

    PubMed

    Adams, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    Despite international efforts to halt the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM), the number of African girls and women undergoing the procedure is not declining as rapidly as international observers had hoped when the World Health Organization began focusing attention on the practice in the 1960s. This article focuses on the psychological effects of FGM through the example of a patient who had undergone the procedure in childhood and now felt that her closed appearance was "normal" and that to be opened would be "abnormal." Western advocates must educate themselves about the various cultural forces that lead to FGM in order to help women who have undergone the procedure heal psychologically, thereby breaking the pattern of abuse from generation to generation. PMID:15354368

  8. Heightened airway responsiveness in normal female children compared with adults.

    PubMed

    Tepper, R S; Stevens, J; Eigen, H

    1994-03-01

    Studies have suggested that airway responsiveness declines with maturation; however, studies comparing infants, children, and adults are confounded by differences in size as well as maturation. Therefore, to determine whether maturation has a significant affect on airway responsiveness, we compared normal female children (n = 9; mean age = 13.6 yr) and adults (n = 7; mean age = 42.4 yr) who were matched for body size. Bronchial challenge tests were performed with increasing methacholine concentrations to a maximum of 30 mg/ml. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the two groups in lung volumes (TGV, RV, TLC) or flow-volume curves (FEV1, average forced expiratory flow rate between 25% and 75% of the vital capacity [FEF25-75], FVC). All subjects but one adolescent completed the challenge (30 mg/ml). The children had a greater percentage decline from baseline in FEV1 than the adults (17 versus 7%, p < 0.03). The percentage decline in FEF25-75 was greater for the children than for the adults, but the difference was not statistically significant (35 versus 20%, p < 0.10). Compared with the children, the adults more often demonstrated a plateau in their dose-response curves for FEV1 (22 versus 86%) and for FEF25-75 (33 versus 100%). We conclude that normal female children have a greater airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine than do adults, and that this difference is not related to baseline lung size, airway caliber, or delivered methacholine dose. PMID:8118636

  9. Dicer1 Is Essential for Female Fertility and Normal Development of the Female Reproductive System

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xiaoman; Luense, Lacey J.; McGinnis, Lynda K.; Nothnick, Warren B.; Christenson, Lane K.

    2008-01-01

    The ribonuclease III endonuclease, Dicer1 (also known as Dicer), is essential for the synthesis of the 19–25 nucleotide noncoding RNAs known as micro-RNAs (miRNAs). These miRNAs associate with the RNA-induced silencing complex to regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally by base pairing with 3′untranslated regions of complementary mRNA targets. Although it is established that miRNAs are expressed in the reproductive tract, their functional role and effect on reproductive disease remain unknown. The studies herein establish for the first time the reproductive phenotype of mice with loxP insertions in the Dicer1 gene (Dicer1fl/fl) when crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase driven by the anti-müllerian hormone receptor 2 promoter (Amhr2Cre/+). Adult female Dicer1fl/fl;Amhr2Cre/+ mice displayed normal mating behavior but failed to produce offspring when exposed to fertile males during a 5-month breeding trial. Morphological and histological assessments of the reproductive tracts of immature and adult mice indicated that the uterus and oviduct were hypotrophic, and the oviduct was highly disorganized. Natural mating of Dicer1fl/fl;Amhr2Cre/+ females resulted in successful fertilization as evidenced by the recovery of fertilized oocytes on d 1 pregnancy, which developed normally to blastocysts in culture. Developmentally delayed embryos were collected from Dicer1fl/fl; Amhr2Cre/+ mice on d 3 pregnancy when compared with controls. Oviductal transport was disrupted in the Dicer1fl/fl;Amhr2Cre/+ mouse as evidenced by the failure of embryos to enter the uterus on d 4 pregnancy. These studies implicate Dicer1/miRNA mediated posttranscriptional gene regulation in reproductive somatic tissues as critical for the normal development and function of these tissues and for female fertility. PMID:18703631

  10. Activation of GPR30 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle strength in senescent female Fischer344 × Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Alencar, Allan; Lin, Marina; Sun, Xuming; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Lowe, Dawn A; Groban, Leanne

    2016-06-17

    The molecular mechanisms of muscle weakness and sarcopenia in postmenopausal women are largely unknown. To determine the effect of a new estrogen receptor, GPR30, in the maintenance of exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function in females, the selective GPR30 agonist, G1 (100 μg/kg/day), or vehicle (V, soybean oil) was administered subcutaneously daily (n = 7 per group) to ovariectomized (OVX) 27-month-old Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (F344BN) female rats. Following 8 weeks of treatment, the exercise capacity (treadmill walk time to exhaustion) was reduced in OVX vs. sham rats (5.1 ± 1.4 vs. 11.0 ± 0.9 min, P < 0.05), and chronic G1 restored exercise capacity (12.9 ± 1.2 min; P < 0.05 vs. OVX-V). Similarly, the peak twitch of electrically stimulated soleus muscles was decreased by 22% in OVX vs. sham rats (P < 0.05), and G1 attenuated this decline (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis showed that chronic G1 treatment attenuated OVX-associated decreases in heat shock protein (HSP) 90, HSP70, and HSP27 expressions. In vitro studies using the L6 myoblast cell line demonstrated that G1 increased mRNA levels of HSPs in cultured cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the activation of GPR30 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen loss on exercise capacity and skeletal muscle contractile function in old F344BN rats. The protective effects of GPR30 might be through its upregulation of heat shock proteins in skeletal muscle. PMID:27173878

  11. Comparative pharmacokinetic and disposition studies of [1-14C]1-eicosanylcyclohexane, a surrogate mineral hydrocarbon, in female Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Halladay, Jason S; Mackerer, Carl R; Twerdok, Lorraine E; Sipes, I Glenn

    2002-12-01

    White oils or waxes [mineral hydrocarbons (MHCs)] with substantial levels of saturated hydrocarbons in the range of C18 to C32 have produced hepatic microgranulomas and lymph node microgranulomas (also referred to as histiocytosis) after repeated administration to female Fischer-344 (F-344) rats. Female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats are less sensitive to these MHC-induced hepatic and lymph node effects. Studies reported herein characterized the pharmacokinetics and disposition of a representative C-26 MHC, [1-(14)C]1-eicosanylcyclohexane ([(14)C]EICO), in these two rat strains. Female F-344 and S-D rats were administered by oral gavage either a high (1.80 g/kg) or a low (0.18 g/kg) dose of MHC in olive oil (1:4, v/v) containing [(14)C]EICO as a tracer. Blood, urine, feces, liver, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were analyzed for [(14)C]EICO and (14)C-metabolites. After the high dose, F-344 rats had a higher blood C(max) of [(14)C]EICO, a longer time to C(max), and a greater area under the systemic blood concentration-time curve from zero to time infinity compared with S-D rats. After the low dose, F-344 rats displayed a unique triphasic blood concentration-time profile, meaning two distinct C(max) values were observed. Fecal excretion was the major route of [(14)C]EICO elimination for both rat strains (70-92% of the dose). S-D rats eliminated the majority of [(14)C]EICO metabolites recovered in the urine by 16 h (8-17% of the dose), whereas F-344 rats did not excrete the same amount until 72 to 96 h. Beyond 24 h, a greater level of [(14)C]EICO was recovered in livers of F-344 rats; at 96 h, 3 and 0.1% of the dose was retained in livers of F-344 and S-D rats, respectively. The major urinary metabolites of EICO in both rat strains were identified as 12-cyclohexyldodecanoic acid and 10-cyclohexyldecanoic acid. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters and disposition profiles, the data indicate inherent strain differences in the total systemic exposure, rate of metabolism

  12. The normal microflora of the female rabbit's genital tract.

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, M; Olson, M E; Crichlow, A M; Osborne, A D; Costerton, J W

    1986-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with the vagina, cervix and uterus of rabbits were isolated and identified. The predominant microorganisms isolated from the vaginas and cervices were coagulase-negative staphylococci, micrococci, and nonfermentative bacilli. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated frequently, but in small numbers, from the uteri. The pH of the rabbit vagina was found to be near neutrality. Our data indicate that the genital flora of female rabbits is relatively simple, regarding the number and type of microorganisms. PMID:3756680

  13. Genus Indiopius Fischer, 1966 (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae) in Iran with a key to the world species

    PubMed Central

    Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Rahmani, Zahra; Belokobylskij, Sergey A.; Rakhshani, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Iranian species belonging to the genus Indiopius Fischer are reviewed. A description of the first recorded female of I. cretensis Fischer, 1966 is provided. A key to the world species of the genus Indiopius is given. PMID:24478581

  14. Can intraurethral stimulation inhibit micturition reflex in normal female rats?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Liao, Limin; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The study was designed to determine the effect of low frequency (2.5Hz) intraurethral electrical stimulation on bladder capacity and maximum voiding pressures. Materials and Methods The experiments were conducted in 15 virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats (220–250g). The animals were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection of urethane (1.5g/kg). Animal care and experimental procedures were reviewed and approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Antwerp University (code: 2013-50). Unipolar square pulses of 0.06mA were used to stimulate urethra at frequency of 2.5Hz (0.2ms pulse width) in order to evaluate the ability of intraurethral stimulation to inhibit bladder contractions. Continuous stimulation and intermittent stimulation with 5sec ‘‘on’’ and 5sec ‘‘off’’ duty cycle were applied during repeated saline cystometrograms (CMGs). Maximum voiding pressures (MVP) and bladder capacity were investigated to determine the inhibitory effect on bladder contraction induced by intraurethral stimulation. Results The continuous stimulation and intermittent stimulation significantly (p<0.05) decreased MVP and increased bladder capacity. There was no significant difference in MVP and bladder capacity between continuous and intermittent stimulation group. Conclusions The present results suggest that 2.5Hz continuous and intermittent intraurethral stimulation can inhibit micturition reflex, decrease MVP and increase bladder capacity. There was no significant difference in MVP and bladder capacity between continuous and intermittent stimulation group. PMID:27286128

  15. Normal and Abnormal Epithelial Differentiation in the Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the female reproductive tract (FRT) develops from a pair of paramesonephric or Müllerian ducts (MDs), which arise from coelomic epithelial cells of mesodermal origin. During development, the MDs undergo a dynamic morphogenetic transformation from simple tubes consisting of homogeneous epithelium and surrounding mesenchyme into several distinct organs namely the oviduct, uterus, cervix and vagina. Following the formation of anatomically distinctive organs, the uniform MD epithelium (MDE) differentiates into diverse epithelial cell types with unique morphology and functions in each organ. Classic tissue recombination studies, in which the epithelium and mesenchyme isolated from the newborn mouse FRT were recombined, have established that the organ specific epithelial cell fate of MDE is dictated by the underlying mesenchyme. The tissue recombination studies have also demonstrated that there is a narrow developmental window for the epithelial cell fate determination in MD-derived organs. Accordingly, the developmental plasticity of epithelial cells is mostly lost in mature FRT. If the signaling that controls epithelial differentiation is disrupted at the critical developmental stage, the cell fate of MD-derived epithelial tissues will be permanently altered and can result in epithelial lesions in adult life. A disruption of signaling that maintains epithelial cell fate can also cause epithelial lesions in the FRT. In this review, the pathogenesis of cervical/vaginal adenoses and uterine squamous metaplasia is discussed as examples of such incidences. PMID:21612855

  16. Competition between copper and silver in Fischer rats with a normal copper metabolism and in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats with an abnormal copper metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, N; Sugawara, C

    2000-07-01

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats inherently lacking in serum ceruloplasmin (CP) activity and biliary Cu excretion were established from a closed colony of Long-Evans rats. These deficiencies, linked to a dysfunction of P-type ATPase, stimulate deposition of Cu and then of Cu metallothionein (MT) in the liver. Male LEC and Fischer rats were injected subcutaneously with Ag (AgNO3), which is an antagonist to Cu. They were operated on 24 h after the injection while under anesthesia. Total uptake of Ag into the liver was not stimulated, but its uptake into the MT fraction increased significantly in the LEC rats. Ag injection notably decreased the activity of serum CP in the Fischer rats, but not in the LEC rats. The decrease was accompanied by a reduction of serum Cu. In Fischer rat serum treated with Ag, Ag was detected mainly in the albumin region and partly in the CP fraction. In LEC rat serum, however, the Ag concentration was about 1/20 of that in the Fischer rats, and Ag was not detected in the CP fraction. Ag injection decreased the biliary excretion of Cu in the Fischer rats (0.183-0.052 microg Cu/20 min sampling), but not in the LEC rats (0.014-0.014 microg Cu/20 min sampling). On the other hand, biliary excretion of Ag was much greater in the Fischer rats (1.25 microg Ag/20 min) than in the LEC rats (0.04 microg Ag/20 min). Our results suggest that uptake of Ag into the liver is not dependent on the hepatic Cu content and status, but that biliary excretion of Ag from the liver is affected by these. Hepatic MT is not a transporter of hepatobiliary excretion of Cu and Ag. It seems likely that, unlike Cu excretion, Ag is excreted by not only the CP route but also by another route into the serum. Ag may compete with Cu in the uptake into CP (conversion of apo-CP to holo-CP). PMID:10959791

  17. Lymph Region in the Female Internal Reproductive Organs during the Early Postpartum Period after Normal Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dergacheva, T I; Borodin, Yu I; Gorchakov, V N; Konenkov, V I

    2015-11-01

    The structural and functional changes in the lymph region of the female internal reproductive organs in rats were studied during the early postpartum period after normal pregnancy. The results indicated that the main role of the lymph region in pregnancy consisted in supporting sufficient lymph production and drainage in the hypertrophic uterus. PMID:26601833

  18. Towards a clean slit: how medicine and notions of normality are shaping female genital aesthetics.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Lindy Joan

    2013-01-01

    In the West, a specific ideal has emerged for female genitalia. The ideal is one of absence, a clean slit that can be attained through the removal of pubic hair and, increasingly, through female genital cosmetic surgery. This ideal is largely created in the media, which generates contradictory messages for women. The popular press, backed by medical opinion, explicitly acknowledges that a wide range of variation is normal--female genitals vary in appearance 'about as much as snowflakes'--but by showing only altered minimalist clean slits, it carries an implicit message that women should be worried if their genitals do not match up to this exacting ideal. Consequently, some women feel their genitals are not satisfactory and choose surgery. Using biomedicine to fix normal body parts in order to fashion desirable femininity, releases medicine from its rigid scientific underpinnings exposing it as an increasingly cultural and commercial pursuit. PMID:23656558

  19. Normal Maternal Behavior, But Increased Pup Mortality, in Conditional Oxytocin Receptor Knockout Females

    PubMed Central

    Macbeth, Abbe H.; Stepp, Jennifer E.; Lee, Heon-Jin; Young, W. Scott; Caldwell, Heather K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) and the Oxt receptor (Oxtr) are implicated in the onset of maternal behavior in a variety of species. Recently, we developed two Oxtr knockout lines: a total body knockout (Oxtr−/−) and a conditional Oxtr knockout (OxtrFB/FB) in which the Oxtr is lacking only in regions of the forebrain, allowing knockout females to potentially nurse and care for their biological offspring. In the current study, we assessed maternal behavior of postpartum OxtrFB/FB females toward their own pups and maternal behavior of virgin Oxtr−/− females toward foster pups and compared knockouts of both lines to wildtype (Oxtr+/+) littermates. We found that both Oxtr−/− and OxtrFB/FB females appear to have largely normal maternal behaviors. However, with first litters, approximately 40% of the OxtrFB/FB knockout dams experienced high pup mortality, compared to fewer than 10% of the Oxtr+/+ dams. We then went on to test whether or not this phenotype occurred in subsequent litters or when the dams were exposed to an environmental disturbance. We found that regardless of the degree of external disturbance, OxtrFB/FB females lost more pups on their first and second litters compared to wildtype females. Possible reasons for higher pup mortality in OxtrFB/FB females are discussed. PMID:20939667

  20. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: a BNCT approach.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Samereh; Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Khojasteh, Nasrin Baghban

    2012-06-01

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. PMID:22484141

  1. Normal Values of Metatarsal Parabola Arch in Male and Female Feet

    PubMed Central

    Munuera-Martinez, Pedro V.; Castillo-López, José Manuel; Ramos-Ortega, Javier; Albornoz-Cabello, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    There is not any method to measure metatarsal protrusion in the whole metatarsal. The aim of this research is to know the normal metatarsal parabola in male and female feet. The system of measurement devised by Hardy and Clapham to evaluate the protrusion between metatarsals I and II was adapted to study the whole metatarsal parabola and applied to the five metatarsals of 169 normal feet, 72 female feet and 97 male feet. Authors measured all metatarsal protrusion relative to metatarsal II. The results obtained show a female metatarsal protrusion relative to metatarsal II of +1.27% for metatarsal I, −3.36% for metatarsal III, −8.34% for metatarsal IV, and −15.54% for metatarsal V. Data obtained for male metatarsal parabola were +0.5% for metatarsal I, −3.77 for metatarsal III, −9.57 for metatarsal IV, and −17.05 for metatarsal V. Differences between both metatarsal parabola were significant. PMID:24688397

  2. 1990 Fischer Standard study

    SciTech Connect

    Roubik, G.J.

    1990-09-12

    The purpose of this work is to develop a set of Titanium areal density standards for calibration and maintenance of the Fischer`s X-ray Fluorescence measurement system characterization curve program. The electron microprobe was calibrated for Titanium films on ceramic substrates using an existing set of laboratory standards (Quantity: 6 Range: 0.310 to 1.605). Fourteen source assemblies were measured and assigned values. These values are based on a mean calculation, of five separate readings, from best curve fit equations developed form the plot of the laboratory standards areal density (Source Measure) versus electron microprobe measurement (reading). The best fit equations were determined using the SAS General Linear Modeling (GLM) procedure. Four separate best fit equations were evaluated (Linear, Quadratic, Cubic and Exponential). Areal density values for the Fischer Standards appear here ordered by best fit equation based on maximum R{sup 2}.

  3. Relationship between Estradiol and Progesterone Concentrations and Cognitive Performance in Normally Cycling Female Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kromrey, Sarah A.; Czoty, Paul W.; Nader, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that cognitive function may be influenced by estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations, although few cognition studies involve normally cycling females. The present study examined cognitive performance in normally cycling female cynomolgus macaques (n=14), a species with similarities to humans in brain organization and a nearly identical menstrual cycle to women. Initial assessments compared cognitive measures to circulating concentrations of E2 and P4 (n=12). Once a relationship was characterized between hormones and cognitive performance, the menstrual cycle was divided into 4 distinct phases: early follicular (EF), late follicular (LF), early luteal (EL) and late luteal (LL), verified by the onset of menses and serum concentrations of E2 and P4. Concentrations of E2 were highest during the LF phase and P4 concentrations peaked during the EL phase. All monkeys were trained on two cognitive tasks: reversal learning, involving simple discrimination (SD) and reversal (SDR), which measured associative learning and behavioral flexibility, respectively (n=3–4 per phase) and a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) task which assessed working memory (n=11). P4 concentrations were positively correlated with number of trials and errors during SD performance, but not during acquisition of the SDR task or maintenance of the reversal-learning task. Across the menstrual cycle, significantly fewer errors were made in the SDR task during the LF phase, when E2 concentrations were high and P4 concentrations low. Working memory, assessed with the DMS task, was not consistently altered based on previously characterized menstrual cycle phases. These findings demonstrate a relationship between P4, E2 and cognitive performance in normally cycling cynomolgus monkeys that is task dependent. Knowledge of these interactions may lead to a better understanding of sex-specific cognitive performance. PMID:25921587

  4. Normal and cancer stem cells of the human female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    López, Jacqueline; Valdez-Morales, Francisco J; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis; Cerbón, Marco; Carrancá, Alejandro García

    2013-01-01

    The female reproductive system (FRS) has a great capacity for regeneration. The existence of somatic stem cells (SSC) that are likely to reside in distinct tissue compartments of the FRS is anticipated. Normal SSC are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny of cells that differentiate and maintain tissue architecture and functional characteristics, and respond to homeostatic controls. Among those SSC of the FRS that have been identified are: a) undifferentiated cells capable of differentiating into thecal cells and synthesizing hormones upon transplantation, b) ovarian surface epithelium stem cells, mitotically responsive to ovulation, c) uterine endometrial and myometrial cells, as clonogenic epithelial and stromal cells, and d) epithelial and mesenchymal cells with self-renewal capacity and multipotential from cervical tissues. Importantly, these cells are believed to significantly contribute to the development of different pathologies and tumors of the FRS.It is now widely accepted that cancer stem cells (CSC) are at the origin of many tumors. They are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny that will differentiate aberrantly and do not respond adequately to homeostatic controls. Several cell surface antigens such as CD44, CD117, CD133 and MYD88 have been used to isolate ovarian cancer stem cells. Clonogenic epithelial and stromal endometrial and myometrial cells have been found in normal and cancer tissues, as side population, label-retaining cells, and CD146/PDGF-R beta-positive cells with stem-like features. In summary, here we describe a number of studies supporting the existence of somatic stem cells in the normal tissues and cancer stem cells in tumors of the human female reproductive system. PMID:23782518

  5. Fischer-Tropsch process

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald; Withers, Howard P.

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing a product selective and stable catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  6. WNT4 is required for normal ovarian follicle development and female fertility

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Alexandre; Lapointe, Évelyne; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Cowan, Robert G.; Li, Huaiguang; Quirk, Susan M.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Richards, JoAnne S.; Boerboom, Derek

    2010-01-01

    To study the role of WNT4 in the postnatal ovary, a mouse strain bearing a floxed Wnt4 allele was created and mated to the Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr strain to target deletion of Wnt4 to granulosa cells. Wnt4flox/−;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ mice had reduced ovary weights and produced smaller litters (P<0.05). Serial follicle counting demonstrated that Wnt4flox/−;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ mice were born with a normal ovarian reserve and maintained normal numbers of small follicles until puberty but had only 25.2% of the normal number of healthy antral follicles. Some Wnt4flox/−;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ mice had no antral follicles or corpora lutea and underwent premature follicle depletion. RT-PCR analyses of Wnt4flox/−;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ granulosa cells and cultured granulosa cells that overexpress WNT4 demonstrated that WNT4 regulates the expression of Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp19, steroidogenic genes previously identified as downstream targets of the WNT signaling effector CTNNB1. Decreased serum progesterone levels were found in immature, gonadotropin-treated Wnt4flox/−;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ mice (P<0.05). WNT4- and CTNNB1-overexpressing cultured granulosa cells were analyzed by microarray for alterations in gene expression, which showed that WNT4 regulates additional genes involved in late follicle development via the WNT/CTNNB1 signaling pathway. Together, these data indicate that WNT4 is required for normal antral follicle development and may act by regulating granulosa cell functions including steroidogenesis.—Boyer, A., Lapointe, E., Zheng, X., Cowan, R. G., Li, H., Quirk, S. M., DeMayo, F. J., Richards, J. S., Boerboom, D. WNT4 is required for normal ovarian follicle development and female fertility. PMID:20371632

  7. Normality of colour vision in a compound heterozygous female carrying a protan and deutan defect

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Diane M.; Carroll, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background Inherited red-green colour vision defects are quite common, affecting nearly 1 in 10 males, but are less common in women, affecting about 1 in 250. However because red-green defects are X-linked, nearly 15% of females are heterozygous carriers of red-green colour deficiency. In addition, about 1 in 150 females are “double carriers”, where both of their X chromosomes have L/M gene arrays encoding a red-green defect. If a woman carries the same type of colour vision defect on each X-chromosome, she herself will be red-green colour deficient, whereas if she carries opposing defects (protan vs. deutan) on each X chromosome she will be trichromatic, owing to the process of X-inactivation. These women are referred to as compound heterozygotes, though very few have been reported. Moreover, questions remain as to whether the colour vision capacity of these women is comparable to that of “normal” trichromats. Methods We examined a compound heterozygote carrier of both protanopia and deuteranomaly. We also examined male members of her family representing both forms of red-green defect carried by the female proband. Complete colour vision testing was done, including Rayleigh matches, pseudoichromatic plates, unique hue measurements, and 100-Hue tests. Flicker-photometric ERG estimates of L:M cone ratio were obtained, as were Medmont C100 settings. Results Genetic analyses provided direct confirmation of compound heterozygosity. The compound heterozygote showed Schmidt’s sign, consistent with an extreme skew in her L:M cone ratio, and usually associated with protan carrier status. Conclusion Apart from Schmidt’s sign, we found the colour vision of the compound heterozygote to be indistinguishable from that of a normal trichromat. PMID:19473349

  8. Vitamin D receptor alleles and bone mineral density in a normal premenopausal Brazilian female population.

    PubMed

    Lazaretti-Castro, M; Duarte-de-Oliveira, M A; Russo, E M; Vieira, J G

    1997-08-01

    Studies on the association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism and bone mineral density (BMD) in different populations have produced conflicting results probably due to ethnic differences in the populations studied. The Brazilian population is characterized by a very broad genetic background and a high degree of miscegenation. Of an initial group of 164, we studied 127 women from the city of São Paulo, aged 20 to 47 years (median, 31 years), with normal menses, a normal diet and no history of diseases or use of any medication that could alter BMD. VDR genotype was assessed by PCR amplification followed by BsmI digestion of DNA isolated from peripheral leukocytes. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (Lunar DPX) at the lumbar site (L2-L4) and femoral neck. Most of the women (77.6%) were considered to be of predominantly European ancestry (20.6% of them reported also native American ancestry), 12.8% were of African-Brazilian ancestry and 9.6% of Asian ancestry, 41.0% (52) were classified as bb, 48.8% (62) as Bb and 10.2% (13) as BB. The BB, Bb and bb groups did not differ in age, height, weight, body mass index or age at menarche. Lumbar spine BMD was significantly higher in the bb group (1.22 +/- 0.16 g/cm2) than in the BB group (1.08 +/- 0.14; P < 0.05), and the Bb group presented an intermediate value (1.17 +/- 0.15). Femoral neck BMD was higher in the bb group (0.99 +/- 0.11 g/cm2) compared to Bb (0.93 +/- 0.12) and BB (0.90 +/- 0.09) (P < 0.05). These data indicate that there is a significant correlation between the VDR BsmI genotype and BMD in healthy Brazilian premenopausal females. PMID:9361720

  9. Normal Segregation of a Foreign-Species Chromosome During Drosophila Female Meiosis Despite Extensive Heterochromatin Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, William D.; Colwell, Eileen M.; Osiecki, David M.; Park, Suna; Lin, Deanna; Rathnam, Chandramouli; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The abundance and composition of heterochromatin changes rapidly between species and contributes to hybrid incompatibility and reproductive isolation. Heterochromatin differences may also destabilize chromosome segregation and cause meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian segregation of homologous chromosomes. Here we use a range of genetic and cytological assays to examine the meiotic properties of a Drosophila simulans chromosome 4 (sim-IV) introgressed into D. melanogaster. These two species differ by ∼12–13% at synonymous sites and several genes essential for chromosome segregation have experienced recurrent adaptive evolution since their divergence. Furthermore, their chromosome 4s are visibly different due to heterochromatin divergence, including in the AATAT pericentromeric satellite DNA. We find a visible imbalance in the positioning of the two chromosome 4s in sim-IV/mel-IV heterozygote and also replicate this finding with a D. melanogaster 4 containing a heterochromatic deletion. These results demonstrate that heterochromatin abundance can have a visible effect on chromosome positioning during meiosis. Despite this effect, however, we find that sim-IV segregates normally in both diplo and triplo 4 D. melanogaster females and does not experience elevated nondisjunction. We conclude that segregation abnormalities and a high level of meiotic drive are not inevitable byproducts of extensive heterochromatin divergence. Animal chromosomes typically contain large amounts of noncoding repetitive DNA that nevertheless varies widely between species. This variation may potentially induce non-Mendelian transmission of chromosomes. We have examined the meiotic properties and transmission of a highly diverged chromosome 4 from a foreign species within the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. This chromosome has substantially less of a simple sequence repeat than does D. melanogaster 4, and we find that this difference results in altered positioning when chromosomes align

  10. Normal segregation of a foreign-species chromosome during Drosophila female meiosis despite extensive heterochromatin divergence.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Osiecki, David M; Park, Suna; Lin, Deanna; Rathnam, Chandramouli; Barbash, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The abundance and composition of heterochromatin changes rapidly between species and contributes to hybrid incompatibility and reproductive isolation. Heterochromatin differences may also destabilize chromosome segregation and cause meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian segregation of homologous chromosomes. Here we use a range of genetic and cytological assays to examine the meiotic properties of a Drosophila simulans chromosome 4 (sim-IV) introgressed into D. melanogaster. These two species differ by ∼12-13% at synonymous sites and several genes essential for chromosome segregation have experienced recurrent adaptive evolution since their divergence. Furthermore, their chromosome 4s are visibly different due to heterochromatin divergence, including in the AATAT pericentromeric satellite DNA. We find a visible imbalance in the positioning of the two chromosome 4s in sim-IV/mel-IV heterozygote and also replicate this finding with a D. melanogaster 4 containing a heterochromatic deletion. These results demonstrate that heterochromatin abundance can have a visible effect on chromosome positioning during meiosis. Despite this effect, however, we find that sim-IV segregates normally in both diplo and triplo 4 D. melanogaster females and does not experience elevated nondisjunction. We conclude that segregation abnormalities and a high level of meiotic drive are not inevitable byproducts of extensive heterochromatin divergence. Animal chromosomes typically contain large amounts of noncoding repetitive DNA that nevertheless varies widely between species. This variation may potentially induce non-Mendelian transmission of chromosomes. We have examined the meiotic properties and transmission of a highly diverged chromosome 4 from a foreign species within the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. This chromosome has substantially less of a simple sequence repeat than does D. melanogaster 4, and we find that this difference results in altered positioning when chromosomes align

  11. Dieting practices, weight perceptions, and body composition: A comparison of normal weight, overweight, and obese college females

    PubMed Central

    Malinauskas, Brenda M; Raedeke, Thomas D; Aeby, Victor G; Smith, Jean L; Dallas, Matthew B

    2006-01-01

    Background Of concern to health educators is the suggestion that college females practice diet and health behaviors that contradict the 2005 dietary guidelines for Americans. In this regard, there remain gaps in the research related to dieting among college females. Namely, do normal weight individuals diet differently from those who are overweight or obese, and are there dieting practices used by females that can be adapted to promote a healthy body weight? Since it is well recognized that females diet, this study seeks to determine the dieting practices used among normal, overweight, and obese college females (do they diet differently) and identify dieting practices that could be pursued to help these females more appropriately achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. Methods A total of 185 female college students aged 18 to 24 years participated in this study. Height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and skinfold thickness were measured to assess body composition. Surveys included a dieting practices questionnaire and a 30-day physical activity recall. Participants were classified according to body mass index (BMI) as normal weight (n = 113), overweight (n = 35), or obese (n = 21). Data were analyzed using JMP IN® software. Descriptive statistics included means, standard deviations, and frequency. Subsequent data analysis involved Pearson X2 and one-way analysis of variance with comparison for all pairs that were significantly different using Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference test. Results Outcomes of this study indicate the majority of participants (83%) used dieting for weight loss and believed they would be 2% to 6% greater than current weight if they did not diet; normal weight, overweight, and obese groups perceived attractive weight to be 94%, 85%, and 74%, respectively, of current weight; 80% of participants reported using physical activity to control weight, although only 19% exercised at a level that would promote weight loss; only

  12. Normal phenotype with maternal isodisomy in a female with two isochromosomes: i(2p) and i(2q)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernasconi, F.; Dutly, F.; Schinzel, A.A.

    1996-11-01

    A 36-year-old normal healthy female was karyotyped because all of her five pregnancies had terminated in spontaneous abortions during the first 3 mo. Cytogenetic investigation disclosed a female karyotype with isochromosomes of 2p and 2q replacing the two normal chromosomes 2. Her husband and both of her parents had normal karyotypes. Molecular studies revealed maternal only inheritance for chromosome 2 markers. Reduction to homozygosity of all informative markers indicated that the isochromosomes derived from a single maternal chromosome 2. Except for the possibility of homozygosity for recessive mutations, maternal uniparental disomy 2 appears to have no adverse impact on the phenotype. Our data indicate that no maternally imprinted genes with major effect map to chromosome 2. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Homozygosity for a Robertsonian Translocation (13q;14q) in a Phenotypically Normal 44, XX Female with a History of Recurrent Abortion and a Normal Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Diantpour, Mehdi; Motevaseli, Elahe; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Robertsonian translocations are structural chromosomal abnormalities caused by fusion of two acrocentric chromosomes. In carriers of such translocations, different modes of segregations would result in the formation of either balanced (alternate segregation mode) or unbalanced (adjacent 1, adjacent 2, and 3:1 segregation modes) gametes. In addition, there is an increased risk for imprinting disorders in their offspring. Although it has been estimated that 1/1000 healthy persons carry a Robertsonian translocation, homozygosity for this type of structural chromosomal abnormality has been reported rarely. Most of reported cases are phenotypically normal but experience adverse pregnancy outcomes. Case Presentation: In this paper, a report was made on a normal female with a history of 4 consecutive first trimester fetal losses and a normal son referred to Center for Comprehensive Genetics Services, Tehran, Iran, in summer 2015. Cytogenetic analyses of proband and her infant showed 44, XX, der(13;14) (q10;q10)x2 and 45, XY, der(13;14)(q10;q10), respectively. Parents of proband have been shown to have 45, XY, der(13q;14q) and 45, XX, der(13q;14q) karyotypes, respectively. Conclusion: The present report was in agreement with the few reports of homozygosity for Robertsonian translocation which demonstrated normal phenotypes for such persons and possibility of giving birth to phenotypically normal heterozygote carriers of Robertsonian translocations. PMID:27478773

  14. Reactions to Approach-Distance in Overweight and Normal Weight College Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Ruth Ann; Thomas, Georgelle

    Research has found that the need for personal space is greater for normal persons who are interacting with stigmatized persons, such as overweight people, and that one who is identified as deviant may be more sensitive to environmental cues and react more strongly to affective stimuli. To investigate the reactions to approach/distance among…

  15. Heavy metal levels in Nucella lapillus (gastropoda: prosobranchia) from sites with normal and penis-bearing females from New England

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.R. III; Pondick, J.S.

    1984-11-01

    Pseudohermaphroditism, as manifested by reproductively normal females possessing non-functioning penises, has been reported for more than thirty species of dioecious neogastropods. This anomaly was shown to be unrelated to age or parasitism, but the geographic distribution of this phenomenon indicated that it was environmentally induced rather than genetically controlled. In a survey of N. lapillus populations along the New England Coast, Pondick found abnormal females at sites directly under the influence of industrial discharges, sewage effluent, or vessel-related activities. Histological sections revealed the presence of a penial duct. The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in metal levels in the snail populations studied by Pondick, with particular attention to metals associated with boating activity.

  16. Normal taste acuity and preference in female adolescents with impaired 6-n-propylthiouracil sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ayako; Kubota, Masaru; Sakai, Midori; Higashiyama, Yukie

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the relationship between 6-n-propylthiouracil sensitivity and taste characteristics in female students at Nara Women's University. Participants (n=135) were screened for 6-npropylthiouracil sensitivity using a taste test with 0.56 mM 6-n-propylthiouracil solution, and the sensitivity was confirmed by an assay for the bitter-taste receptor gene, TAS2R38. Based on the screening results, 33 6-npropylthiouracil tasters and 21 non-tasters were enrolled. The basic characteristics that are thought to influence taste acuity, including body mass index, saliva volume and serum micronutrient concentrations (iron, zinc and copper), were similar between the two groups. In an analysis using a filter-paper disc method, there were no differences in the acuity for four basic tastes (sweet, salty, sour and bitter) between 6-n-propylthiouracil tasters and non-tasters. In addition, the taste preference for the four basic tastes as measured by a visual analogue scale was also comparable between the two groups. This is the first study to demonstrate that 6-n-propylthiouracil nontasters have taste sensitivity for the four basic tastes similar to that in 6-n-propylthiouracil tasters, at least in female adolescents, as measured by the gustatory test using a filter-paper disc method. PMID:25164453

  17. WNT4 is required for normal ovarian follicle development and female fertility.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Alexandre; Lapointe, Evelyne; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Cowan, Robert G; Li, Huaiguang; Quirk, Susan M; DeMayo, Francesco J; Richards, JoAnne S; Boerboom, Derek

    2010-08-01

    To study the role of WNT4 in the postnatal ovary, a mouse strain bearing a floxed Wnt4 allele was created and mated to the Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr) strain to target deletion of Wnt4 to granulosa cells. Wnt4(flox/-);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) mice had reduced ovary weights and produced smaller litters (P<0.05). Serial follicle counting demonstrated that Wnt4(flox/-);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) mice were born with a normal ovarian reserve and maintained normal numbers of small follicles until puberty but had only 25.2% of the normal number of healthy antral follicles. Some Wnt4(flox/-);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) mice had no antral follicles or corpora lutea and underwent premature follicle depletion. RT-PCR analyses of Wnt4(flox/-);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) granulosa cells and cultured granulosa cells that overexpress WNT4 demonstrated that WNT4 regulates the expression of Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp19, steroidogenic genes previously identified as downstream targets of the WNT signaling effector CTNNB1. Decreased serum progesterone levels were found in immature, gonadotropin-treated Wnt4(flox/-);Amhr2(tm3(cre)Bhr/+) mice (P<0.05). WNT4- and CTNNB1-overexpressing cultured granulosa cells were analyzed by microarray for alterations in gene expression, which showed that WNT4 regulates additional genes involved in late follicle development via the WNT/CTNNB1 signaling pathway. Together, these data indicate that WNT4 is required for normal antral follicle development and may act by regulating granulosa cell functions including steroidogenesis. PMID:20371632

  18. Hepatic reference gene selection in adult and juvenile female Atlantic salmon at normal and elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become widespread due to its specificity, sensitivity and apparent ease of use. However, experimental error can be introduced at many stages during sample processing and analysis, and for this reason qPCR data are often normalised to an internal reference gene. The present study used three freely available algorithms (GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) to assess the stability of hepatically expressed candidate reference genes (Hprt1, Tbp, Ef1α and β-tubulin) in two experiments. In the first, female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) broodstock of different ages were reared at either 14 or 22°C for an entire reproductive season, therefore a reference gene that does not respond to thermal challenge or reproductive condition was sought. In the second, estrogen treated juvenile salmon were maintained at the same temperatures for 14 days and a reference gene that does not respond to temperature or estrogen was required. Additionally, we performed independent statistic analysis to validate the outputs obtained from the program based analysis. Results Based on the independent statistical analysis performed the stability of the genes tested was Tbp > Ef1α > Hprt1 > β-tubulin for the temperature/reproductive development experiment and Ef1α > Hprt1 > Tbp for the estrogen administration experiment (β-tubulin was not analysed). Results from the algorithms tested were quite ambiguous for both experiments; however all programs consistently identified the least stable candidate gene. BestKeeper provided rankings that were consistent with the independent analysis for both experiments. When an inappropriate candidate reference gene was used to normalise the expression of a hepatically expressed target gene, the ability to detect treatment-dependent changes in target gene expression was lost for multiple groups in both experiments. Conclusions We have highlighted the need to independently validate

  19. CHRONIC TOXICITY OF 1,3,5-TRINITROBENZENE IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic toxicity of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) in male and female Fischer 344 (F344) rats was evaluated by feeding a diet containing 0, 5, 60 and 300 ppm of TNB for 2 years. The calculated average TNB intake over 2 years for males and females was 0.22, 2.64, 13.44 and 0.23,...

  20. Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.D. ); Rao, V.U.S.; Cinquegrane, G.; Stiegel, G.J. )

    1990-02-01

    The slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process has attracted considerable attention recently. The process can make liquid fuels by reacting hydrogen-lean synthesis gas produced from modern energy-efficient gasifiers. continuing assessment of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) has a high priority within an indirect liquefaction program, a part of the liquid fuels program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and executed by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Funding for the indirect liquefaction program in 1990:0090 is anticipated to be about $8.5 million compared to $6.6 million in 1989 and a like amount in the year before. The studies within the program are conducted by industry, universities, national laboratories and in-house PETC research and development. This article reviews preparation and properties of iron-based catalysts, including recent patent activities and in-depth process analysis of slurry-phase FTS. The review provides an analysis of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst research and development trends and describes options to increase selectivity for iron-based catalysts in a slurry phase.

  1. Pathway-Based Genome-Wide Association Studies for Plasma Triglycerides in Obese Females and Normal-Weight Controls

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Price, R. Arlen; Li, Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Pathway-based analysis as an alternative approach can provide complementary information to single-marker genome-wide association studies (GWASs), which always ignore the epistasis and does not have sufficient power to find rare variants. In this study, using genotypes from a genome-wide association study (GWAS), pathway-based association studies were carried out by a modified Gene Set Enrichment Algorithm (GSEA) method (GenGen) for triglyceride in 1028 unrelated European-American extremely obese females (BMI≥35kg/m2) and normal-weight controls (BMI<25kg/m2), and another pathway association analysis (ICSNPathway) was also used to verify the GenGen result in the same data. The GO0009110 pathway (vitamin anabolism) was among the strongest associations with triglyceride (empirical P<0.001); the result remained significant after FDR correction (P = 0.022). MMAB, an obesity-related locus, included in this pathway. The ABCG1 and BCL6 gene was found in several triglyceride-related pathways (empirical P<0.05), which were also replicated by ICSNPathway (empirical P<0.05, FDR<0.05). We also performed single-marked GWAS using PLINK for TG levels (log-transformed). Significant associations were found between ASTN2 gene SNPs and plasma triglyceride levels (rs7035794, P = 2.24×10−10). Our study suggested that vitamin anabolism pathway, BCL6 gene pathways and ASTN2 gene may contribute to the genetic variation of plasma triglyceride concentrations. PMID:26308950

  2. SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY OF 1,3,5-TRINITROBENZENE IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subchronic toxicity of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) in male and female Fischer 344 rats was evaluated by feeding a powdered certified laboratory diet containing 0, 66.7, 400 and 800 mg TNB/kg diet for 90 days. The calculated average TNB intake was 4.29, 24.70, and 49.28 mg/kg...

  3. Technology development for iron and cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1999-11-01

    The impact of deuterium on the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was studied with a precipitated iron catalyst in the slurry phase. Deuterium has been used by several research groups to better understand the mechanism of CO hydrogenation. Inverse (k{sub H}/k{sub D} < 1), normal (k{sub H}/k{sub D} > 1) and no isotope effect (k{sub H}/k{sub D} = 1) have been reported. The conflicting results are thought to arise because rate of reaction is a combination of kinetic and equilibrium factors. In summary, the presence of boron produced only minor changes on the properties of the cobalt catalyst. In earlier studies, it was shown that the presence of boron made the catalyst less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. Steady-state supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied in the work using a fixed-bed reactor and an unpromoted Co/SiO{sub 2} catalyst. This serves as the baseline for promoted catalyst studies. A pentane-hexane mixture was used as the supercritical solvent. Overall reactor pressure, syngas partial pressure and contact time were kept constant to obtain a valid comparison of the impact of solvent density in the catalytic activity and selectivity. Three different partial pressures of the mixture were chosen based on the density-pressure curve in order to investigate the pressure tuning effect to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis near critical region.

  4. Research Opportunities for Fischer-Tropsch Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-06-30

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was discovered in Germany in the 1920's and has been studied by every generation since that time. As technology and chemistry, in general, improved through the decades, new insights, catalysts, and technologies were added to the Fischer-Tropsch process, improving it and making it more economical with each advancement. Opportunities for improving the Fischer-Tropsch process and making it more economical still exist. This paper gives an overview of the present Fischer-Tropsch processes and offers suggestions for areas where a research investment could improve those processes. Gas-to-liquid technology, which utilizes the Fischer Tropsch process, consists of three principal steps: Production of synthesis gas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) from natural gas, the production of liquid fuels from syngas using a Fischer-Tropsch process, and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Each step will be studied for opportunities for improvement and areas that are not likely to reap significant benefits without significant investment.

  5. Tailored fischer-tropsch synthesis product distribution

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong; Cao, Chunshe; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-06-19

    Novel methods of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are described. It has been discovered that conducting the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a catalyst with a catalytically active surface layer of 35 microns or less results in a liquid hydrocarbon product with a high ratio of C.sub.5-C.sub.20:C.sub.20+. Descriptions of novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and reactors are also provided. Novel hydrocarbon compositions with a high ratio of C.sub.5-C.sub.20:C.sub.20+ are also described.

  6. Oskar Fischer and the study of dementia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The centenary of Alois Alzheimer's description of the case of Auguste Deter has renewed interest in the early history of dementia research. In his 1907 paper Alzheimer described the presence of plaques and tangles in one case of presenile dementia. In the same year, Oskar Fischer reported neuritic plaques in 12 cases of senile dementia. These were landmark findings in the history of research in dementia because they delineated the clinicopathological entity that is now known as Alzheimer's disease. Although much has been written about Alzheimer, only little is known about Fischer. The present article discusses Fischer's work on dementia in the context of his life and time. PMID:18952676

  7. Prenatal Testosterone Exposure Decreases Aldosterone Production but Maintains Normal Plasma Volume and Increases Blood Pressure in Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    More, Amar S; Mishra, Jay S; Hankins, Gary D; Kumar, Sathish

    2016-08-01

    Plasma testosterone levels are elevated in pregnant women with preeclampsia and polycystic ovaries; their offspring are at increased risk for hypertension during adult life. We tested the hypothesis that prenatal testosterone exposure induces dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is known to play an important role in water and electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation. Female rats (6 mo old) prenatally exposed to testosterone were examined for adrenal expression of steroidogenic genes, telemetric blood pressure, blood volume and Na(+) and K(+) levels, plasma aldosterone, angiotensin II and vasopressin levels, and vascular responses to angiotensin II and arg(8)-vasopressin. The levels of Cyp11b2 (aldosterone synthase), but not the other adrenal steroidogenic genes, were decreased in testosterone females. Accordingly, plasma aldosterone levels were lower in testosterone females. Plasma volume and serum and urine Na(+) and K(+) levels were not significantly different between control and testosterone females; however, prenatal testosterone exposure significantly increased plasma vasopressin and angiotensin II levels and arterial pressure in adult females. In testosterone females, mesenteric artery contractile responses to angiotensin II were significantly greater, while contractile responses to vasopressin were unaffected. Angiotensin II type-1 receptor expression was increased, while angiotensin II type-2 receptor was decreased in testosterone arteries. These results suggest that prenatal testosterone exposure downregulates adrenal Cyp11b2 expression, leading to decreased plasma aldosterone levels. Elevated angiotensin II and vasopressin levels along with enhanced vascular responsiveness to angiotensin II may serve as an underlying mechanism to maintain plasma volume and Na(+) and K(+) levels and mediate hypertension in adult testosterone females. PMID:27385784

  8. Fischer-Tropsch Wastewater Utilization

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Lalit S.

    2003-03-18

    The present invention is generally directed to handling the wastewater, or condensate, from a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor. More particularly, the present invention provides a process wherein the wastewater of a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor, such as a Fischer-Tropsch reactor, is sent to a gasifier and subsequently reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas. The wastewater may also be recycled back to a slurry preparation stage, where solid combustible organic materials are pulverized and mixed with process water and the wastewater to form a slurry, after which the slurry fed to a gasifier where it is reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas.

  9. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  10. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  11. Thermal Stability Testing of a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel and Various Blends with Jet A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klettlinger, Jennifer Suder; Surgenor, Angela; Yen, Chia

    2010-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) jet fuel composition differs from petroleum-based, conventional commercial jet fuel because of differences in feedstock and production methodology. Fischer-Tropsch fuel typically has a lower aromatic and sulfur content and consists primarily of iso and normal parafins. The ASTM D3241 specification for Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT) break point testing method was used to test the breakpoint of a baseline conventional Jet A, a commercial grade F-T jet fuel, and various blends of this F-T fuel in Jet A. The testing completed in this report was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  12. Effect of Aromatic Concentration of a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel on Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klettlinger, Jennifer Lindsey Suder

    2012-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) jet fuel composition differs from petroleum-based, conventional commercial jet fuel because of differences in feedstock and production methodology. Fischer­ Tropsch fuel typically has a lower aromatic and sulfur content and consists primarily of iso and normal parafins. The ASTM D3241 specification for Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT) break point testing method was used to test the breakpoint of a baseline commercial grade F-T jet fuel, and various blends of this F-T fuel with an aromatic solution. The goal of this research is to determine the effect of aromatic content on the thermal stability of Fischer-Tropsch fuel. The testing completed in this report was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  13. Enhanced proliferation of transfused marrow and reversal of normal growth inhibition of female marrow in male hosts 2 months after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Mulcahy, K.; Tjio, J.H.; Raveche, E.

    1985-01-01

    We have previously shown that bone marrow will seed and proliferate in normal recipients. Transfusion of 50 million cells on each of 4 or 5 consecutive days, a total of 200-250 million cells, resulted in the recipient's marrow being 20-40% of donor origin. The present paper reported on the marked enhancement of proliferation of donor cells in animals that were exposed to sublethal doses of irradiation of 300-900 R. Two months later, when their peripheral blood values had returned to normal, they were transfused with 100 million cells. The number of donor cells in the recipients exposed to 600-900 R reached 55-100% at various intervals after transfusion, with controls averaging 24% and never exceeding 40%. Since the transfused cells numbered less than 40% of the host's own complement of marrow cells, they could not replace 100% of them unless they proliferated more rapidly than the host cells. The implied competitive advantage of the donor cells was ascribed to a reduced capacity for self-renewal of the host's irradiated cells. In recipients exposed to 300 R and in nonirradiated controls, female cells failed to grow in male recipients, while male cells grew as well in female as in male hosts. The inhibition of growth of female cells in the male host was abolished by irradiation with 600 or 900 R, or by the exposure of the female donor cells to anti-Thy-1 serum and complement prior to transfusion. Experiments are under way to test the suggested immunologic nature of the inhibition phenomenon.

  14. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  15. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  16. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  17. [Normalization of hypercholesterolemia in a female stroke patient after switching from enteral tube feeding to oral feeding].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Kanemaru, A; Yamanaka, T; Sakurai, Y; Mochizuki, N; Matsukura, T; Fujitomi, A; Ashikawa, S

    1996-02-01

    A 70-year-old female was admitted to a general hospital in a rural area due to left putamenal cerebral hemorrhage in December 1994. She had right hemiplegia and was totally aphasic. In May 1995, she was moved to Tokyo where her son lives, and she was admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital in order to prepare a home care system. her family's support (serving her favorite dishes) allowed enteral tube feeding to be halted. After one month she could absorb enough energy to maintain her serum albumin level. The total calories ingested orally was comparable to that of enteral feeding but the fat composition was 62% of that of enteral feeding (fat was 19.6% and 31.7% of the total calories in the two diets, respectively). Her cholesterol level decreased from 286 mg/dl to 197 mg/dl. Nutrient-balanced tube feeding is useful, but may disturb lipid metabolism in patients used to having vegetable-rich diets. PMID:8656578

  18. Perspectiva sobre una Personalidad Senera: Carmen Fischer Ramirez (Perspective on a Singular Personality: Carmen Fischer Ramirez).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezeda, Dina Alarcon

    1992-01-01

    Traces the career of Carmen Fischer Ramirez, focusing on her work in improving early childhood education in Chile. Reviews her university career, work with the World Organization for Early Childhood Education, and major publications. (AC)

  19. Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

    2009-05-01

    There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be

  20. Development of the gonads in the triploid (ZZW and ZZZ) fowl, Gallus domesticus, and comparison with normal diploid males (ZZ) and females (ZW).

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Thorne, M H; Martin, I C; Sheldon, B L; Jones, R C

    1995-01-01

    Gonadal development in fowls aged from 1 day to more than 4.5 years was studied in 63 ZZW and 16 ZZZ triploid crossbreds and compared with normal diploid males (ZZ) and females (ZW). In the ZZW fowl, the right gonad developed into a testis (although this occurred earlier in the ZZ genotype), and a structurally-abnormal excurrent duct system containing some malformed spermatids and spermatozoa was associated with the gonad of young adults. The left gonad was an ovotestes at hatching and no excurrent ducts were associated with it. The ovarian component was much less developed than that in the ZW genotype-it started to degenerate by 1 week of age, and most of the oocytes had disappeared by about 3 weeks of age. The seminiferous tubules developed in the medullary region, but only abnormal spermatozoa were produced. Leukocytes infiltrated both gonads at about 9 months of age and the seminiferous epithelium had degenerated in most fowls over 1 year old. In ZZZ fowl, gonadal and excurrent duct development was normal, but occurred earlier than in the ZZ genotype. However, meiosis and spermiogenesis were abnormal and malformed spermatozoa were produced. The heads of spermatozoa from the ducts deferens were about 1.4-times longer in the ZZZ genotype than in the ZZ genotype, indicating that the former may be producing some diploid spermatozoa. PMID:8848586

  1. Diffusion limitations in Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.F.M.; Van'tHoog, A.C.; Minderhoud, J.K.; Sie, S.T. . Lab.)

    1989-07-01

    The extent of diffusion limitations in the catalytic conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons by the Fischer-Tropsch reaction has been established for a number of iron- and cobalt-based catalysts. The studies were performed in a fixed-bed microreactor system at temperatures in the range 473-523 {Kappa}. Variation of catalyst particle size in the range 0.2.-2.6 mm shows that the conversion of synthesis gas decreases considerably when the average particle size is increased. The effects of variation of particle size and pore diameter have been quantified with the Thiele model for diffusion limitations. Evidence has accumulated that the limited mobility of reactant molecules in the liquid-filled pores of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is the main cause of retardation of the reaction rates. The experimentally determined reaction rates with various catalysts operated under different conditions show an excellent fit with the theoretical model.

  2. Thermal Stability Testing of Fischer-Tropsch Fuel and Various Blends with Jet A, as Well as Aromatic Blend Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klettlinger, J.; Rich, R.; Yen, C.; Surgenor, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) jet fuel composition differs from petroleum-based, conventional commercial jet fuel because of differences in feedstock and production methodology. Fischer-Tropsch fuel typically has a lower aromatic and sulfur content and consists primarily of iso and normal parafins. The ASTM D3241 specification for Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT) break point testing method was used to test the breakpoint of a baseline conventional Jet A, a commercial grade F-T jet fuel, and various blends of this F-T fuel in Jet A. The testing completed in this report was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  3. Catalyst structure and method of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong; Vanderwiel, David P.; Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Gao, Yufei; Baker, Eddie G.

    2004-06-15

    The present invention includes Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, reactions using Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, methods of making Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, processes of hydrogenating carbon monoxide, and fuels made using these processes. The invention provides the ability to hydrogenate carbon monoxide with low contact times, good conversion rates and low methane selectivities. In a preferred method, the catalyst is made using a metal foam support.

  4. Catalyst structure and method of fischer-tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Vanderwiel, David P [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Baker, Eddie G [Pasco, WA

    2002-12-10

    The present invention includes Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, reactions using Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, methods of making Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, processes of hydrogenating carbon monoxide, and fuels made using these processes. The invention provides the ability to hydrogenate carbon monoxide with low contact times, good conversion rates and low methane selectivities. In a preferred method, the catalyst is made using a metal foam support.

  5. Dysfunctional play and dopamine physiology in the Fischer 344 rat

    PubMed Central

    Siviy, Stephen M.; Crawford, Cynthia A.; Akopian, Garnik; Walsh, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile Fischer 344 rats are known to be less playful than other inbred strains, although the neurobiological substrate(s) responsible for this phenotype is uncertain. In the present study, Fischer 344 rats were compared to the commonly used outbred Sprague-Dawley strain on several behavioral and physiological parameters in order to ascertain whether the lack of play may be related to compromised activity of brain dopamine (DA) systems. As expected, Fischer 344 rats were far less playful than Sprague-Dawley rats, with Fischer 344 rats less likely to initiate playful contacts with a playful partner and less likely to respond playfully to these contacts. We also found that Fischer 344 rats showed less of a startle response and greater pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), especially at higher pre-pulse intensities. The increase in PPI seen in the Fischer 344 rat could be due to reduced DA modulation of sensorimotor gating and neurochemical measures were consistent with Fischer 344 rats releasing less DA than Sprague-Dawley rats. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) revealed Fischer 344 rats had less evoked DA release in dorsal and ventral striatal brain slices and high-performance liquid chromatography revealed Fischer 344 rats to have less DA turnover in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. We also found DA-dependent forms of cortical plasticity were deficient in the striatum and prefrontal cortex of the Fischer 344 rat. Taken together, these data indicate that deficits in play and enhanced PPI of Fischer 344 rats may be due to reduced DA modulation of corticostriatal and mesolimbic/mesocortical circuits critical to the execution of these behaviors. PMID:21335036

  6. Requirement of mitoses for the reversal of X-inactivation in cell hybrids between murine embryonal carcinoma cells and normal female thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, N. )

    1988-04-01

    By means of a 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and acridine orange fluorescence staining method the authors studied reactivation of the inactivated X chromosome (X{sub i}) in newly formed cell hybrids between the near-diploid HPRT-deficient OTF9-63 murine embryonal carcinoma cell (ECC) with an XO sex chromosome constitution and the normal female mouse thymocyte. Synchronization of the late replicating S chromosome in such hybrid cells, indicative of reactivation, was found for the first time on Day 3, and the frequency of reactivation was attained 90% on Day 5. Inhibition of cell cycle progression either by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of polyamine metabolism, or by isoleucine-deficient medium after cell fusion delayed reactivation of the X{sub i}, which implied that the number of cell division cycles traversed by individual cells rather than the length of time after cell fusion is critical for the reactivation. Double-labeling experiments using ({sup 3}H)thymidine and BrdU indicated that hybrid cells had undergone three or four mitoses before reactivation of the X{sub i}. Most probably reactivation of the X{sub i} is consequent to reversion of the thymocyte genome to an undifferentiated state under the influence of OTF9 genome. DNA demethylation or dilution of X{sub i}-specific factors by mitoses may be involved in this process.

  7. Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

    1994-06-01

    We have successfully completed our first Fischer-Tropsch synthesis test with propane as the supercritical fluid. The catalyst activity and hydrocarbon product distribution under the SFT conditions were similar to those obtained during the normal Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, however, the use of supercritical fluid resulted in higher selectivity of the primary products. The use of a new trap with larger inside surface area, improved the collection of liquid products and thus enabling us to achieve better atomic and overall mass balance closures. This has also improved results from on-line GC analysis. However, further improvement are needed to achieve more stable and reproducible gas phase analysis, including the capability of the on-line analysis of the feed gas (mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and propane).

  8. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

  9. Advancement in understanding the central pathways that underlie the effects of exteroceptive signals on the gonadotropic axis of the female for initiation of puberty and maintenance of normal reproductive cycles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neural circuits within the brain regulate the proper temporal release of GnRH from hypothalamic neurons for the initiation of puberty and maintenance of normal reproductive cycles in the female. This process involves feedback from gonadal steroids and is metabolically gated. Full understanding of ...

  10. A monosegmented-flow Karl Fischer titrator.

    PubMed

    de Aquino, Emerson Vidal; Rohwedder, Jarbas José Rodrigues; Pasquini, Celio

    2007-02-28

    A monosegmented volumetric Karl Fischer titrator is described to mechanize the determination of water content in organic solvents. The system is based on the flow-batch characteristics of the monosegmented analysis concept and employs biamperometry to monitor the progress of the titration. The system shows accuracy and precision that are highly independent of the flow rate, does not require calibration, and is carried out in a closed system capable of minimizing contact of the sample and reagents with ambient moisture. Sample volumes in the range of 40-300muL are employed, depending on the water concentration. An automatic dilution is provided to deal with concentrated samples. The consumption of Karl Fischer reagent depends on the water content of the sample but is not larger than 100muL. The system was evaluated for determination of water in ethanol and methanol in the range 0.02-0.5% (w/w). The average relative precision estimated in that range (9-3%) is comparable to that obtained with a larger volume commercial system and no significant difference was observed between the results obtained for the two systems at the 95% confidence level. A complete titration can be performed in less than 5min employing the proposed system. PMID:19071447

  11. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, A.; Erickson, J.; Smiley, B.; Vaughan, C.

    1983-09-01

    The performance of an iron-copper Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was studied in a slurry CSTR at 227/sup 0/C and 790 kPa (100 psig). Catalyst performance was similar to other iron-based catalysts studied previously with respect to conversion of CO, conversion of CO + H/sub 2/, and to the product distribution. CO conversion increased with decreasing space velocity, ranging from approximately 60% at 1570 h/sup -1/ to over 90% at 488 h/sup -1/. The H/sub 2/ to CO usage ratio was approximately 0.7, indicating that the catalyst is a good water-gas shift catalyst as well as a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Reaction products could be described by a Flory distribution with a chain growth probability (..cap alpha..) of 0.67, which is in the gasoline range. In some runs, methanol was added continuously to the reactor feed, but instead of being incorporated into the reaction, the methanol oxidized and deactivated the catalyst. 31 references, 12 figures, 10 tables.

  12. Improved Sasol Fischer-Tropsch processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes can be used to produce either a light syncrude and light olefins or to produce heavy waxy hydrocarbons. The syncrude can be refined to environmentally friendly gasoline and diesel and the heavy hydrocarbons to specialty waxes or if hydrocracked, and/or isomerized, to produce excellent diesel, lube oils and a naphtha which is ideal feedstock for cracking. Over the last few years much better reactor systems have been developed for both high temperature FT (HTFT) and low temperature FT (LTFT). For HTFT the Sasol Advanced Synthol (SAS) reactor with solid-gas fluidization was developed. This gives very much the same product spectra as the CFB reactors, but does it much more effectively and cheaply. For LTFT, the Sasol Slurry Phase Distillate (SSPD) reactor, of the bubble column type, was developed which is a significant improvement on the tubular fixed bed (TFB) reactor used in the Arge process. The SSPD reactor can make products with the same carbon distribution as the TFB reactor with Schulz-Flory distribution alpha values 0,95 and higher. It has greater flexibility with respect to product distribution. The paper describes both reactors, and the integration of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with coal gasification.

  13. Irene K. Fischer (1907-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Foster; Chovitz, Bernard; Fischer, Michael M. J.

    2010-05-01

    Irene Kaminka Fischer, a prominent geodesist whose career spanned the years 1952-1977, died on 22 October 2009 at the age of 102 at an assisted living facility in Brighton, Mass. Born in Vienna, Austria, on 27 July 1907, Irene grew up there; graduating with a degree in mathematics from the Vienna Institute of Technology; and met and married her husband, Eric, a noted geographer. In 1939, the Fischers fled Nazi Austria, first to Palestine, and by 1941 had relocated to the United States. During the next 11 years, Irene worked at various jobs, as well as playing the role of mother to her son and daughter. But when her daughter was ready for college, she began to look for a position that would fully utilize her considerable talents in mathematics. She found a perfect fit at her husband's federal agency, the U.S. Army Map Service (AMS). Her entire career in geodesy was spent with that organization and its successors (currently the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)). Hired as a mathematician, she eventually was promoted to chief of the Geoid Branch in the Geodesy Division. She retained that position until her retirement in 1977.

  14. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Hilmen, A.M.; Bergene, E.

    1995-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an attractive possibility for conversion of natural gas into high quality liquid fuels. Due to its low water-gas shift activity, good activity/selectivity properties and relatively low price, cobalt is the choice of catalytic metal for natural gas conversion via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxygen is mainly rejected as water. In this paper we describe the influence of water on supported cobalt catalysts. The deactivation of supported Co catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor using synthesis gas feeds containing varying concentrations of water vapour.

  15. The optimally performing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst.

    PubMed

    Filot, Ivo A W; van Santen, Rutger A; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2014-11-17

    Microkinetics simulations are presented based on DFT-determined elementary reaction steps of the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. The formation of long-chain hydrocarbons occurs on stepped Ru surfaces with CH as the inserting monomer, whereas planar Ru only produces methane because of slow CO activation. By varying the metal-carbon and metal-oxygen interaction energy, three reactivity regimes are identified with rates being controlled by CO dissociation, chain-growth termination, or water removal. Predicted surface coverages are dominated by CO, C, or O, respectively. Optimum FT performance occurs at the interphase of the regimes of limited CO dissociation and chain-growth termination. Current FT catalysts are suboptimal, as they are limited by CO activation and/or O removal. PMID:25168456

  16. Diffusion limitations in Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.F.M.; Sie, S.T. Badhuisweg 3, 1031 CM Amsterdam )

    1988-01-01

    Indirect conversion of natural hydrocarbon resources such as natural gas into transportation fuels or chemicals usually involves the conversion to carbon monoxide and hydrogen (synthesis gas), followed by a catalytic conversion to the desired products via e.g. the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. In a fixed-bed mode of operation, the FT catalyst generally consists of particles of a few mm in size, for pressure-drop and heat-transfer considerations. To investigate whether diffusion limitations inside larger catalyst particles play a role during the synthesis reaction, the authors have made an extensive study using a number of iron- and cobalt-based catalysts, in which they have evaluated and quantified the effects of catalyst particle size and pore diameter on reaction rates. The effects due to variation of particle size and pore diameter have been quantified with the Thiele model for diffusion limitations.

  17. Upgrading of light Fischer-Tropsch products

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.

    1990-11-30

    The upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) light ends was studied at UOP in a program sponsored by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program was to increase the overall yield of marketable transportation fuels from the F-T upgrading complex by focusing on liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and naphtha. An overview of the entire light-ends program is presented in this paper. Although this contract is specifically concerned with light products (C{sub 3}-C{sub 11}), a separate DOE-sponsored program at UOP investigated the characterization and upgrading of the heavy end of the F-T product spectrum: F-T wax. An economic analysis of the light and heavy ends upgrading was performed to evaluate the conversion of F-T products to marketable transportation fuels. 9 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. The bold legacy of Emil Fischer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Murray; Cai, Weibo; Smith, Nicole D

    2003-09-01

    A century has passed since Emil Fischer won the Nobel Prize in chemistry. From his first synthesis of glycyl-glycine in 1901 he has been a luminary to peptide chemists over the past 100 years. In this paper, a brief summary of some of the major accomplishments in peptide chemistry will be covered followed by a description of several of our own endeavours in peptide chemistry which arose from the discoveries of the giants of our field. We will include the development of a novel activating agent (DEPBT), the synthesis of a novel building block, alpha-methyl-D-cysteine, its incorporation into biologically active opioids, and conclude with the synthesis of dendritic collagen mimetics. PMID:14552421

  19. {alpha},{beta}-Unsaturated Fischer carbene complexes as chemical multitalents

    SciTech Connect

    Meijere, A. de

    1995-12-31

    The well established reaction of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated Fischer carbenechromium complexes 6(R{sup 1} = H) with alkynes normally proceeds with carbonyl insertion to yield 4-alkoxyphenols 9. Led by the incidental formation of a cyclopentadiene 3 from certain {beta}-aminosubstituted complexes 6(X = NR{sub 2}{sup 3}, R{sup 1} = cPr) the authors have studied the influences of the nature of substituents (R{sup 1}, X on 6; R{sub L}, R{sub S} in the alkyne; R{sup 3} in the amino group), solvents, and temperature on the outcome of the reaction. Imino substitution on complexes 6 leads to 2H-pyrroles 1, a free primary amino group (X = NH{sub 2}) to pyridines 5, and bulky substituents R{sup 1} to cyclopenta[b]pyrans 8 with double insertion of an alkyne. Eventually, appropriate conditions have been developed which permit to selectively prepare either 3-alkoxy-5-(dialkylamino)cyclopentadienes 3 (as synthetic equivalents of cyclopentenones 4), 5-(dialkylaminomethylene)cyclopent-2-enones 7, 3-alkoxy-2-(1{prime}-morpholino-1{prime}-alkenyl)cyclopent-2-enones 10, and 2-acyl-3-(dialkylamino)cyclopent-2-enones 11 from easily accessible carbene complexes 6 (X = NR{sub 2}{sup 3}) in high yields. Mechanistic aspects and implications of these novel transformations will be discussed.

  20. Chronic toxicity and oncogenicity of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane in the Fischer 344 Rat.

    PubMed

    Jean, Paul A; Plotzke, Kathleen P; Scialli, Anthony R

    2016-02-01

    Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) is a cyclic polydimethylsiloxane used in the synthesis of silicon-based materials and as a component in consumer products. Male and female Fischer 344 rats were exposed to D5 vapor (0, 10, 40, 160 ppm; whole-body inhalation) for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk, for up to 104 weeks. Microscopic examination of tissues revealed test article effects at 160 ppm in the upper respiratory tract (hyaline inclusions in males and females at 6, 12, and 24 months) and an increased incidence of uterine endometrial adenocarcinoma at 24-months. The hyaline inclusions were considered a non-adverse tissue response for lack of any other respiratory tract non-neoplastic or neoplastic changes. Uterine endometrial adenocarcinoma was not anticipated. Toxicity testing (mutagenicity/genotoxicity, acute, sub-acute and sub-chronic descriptive toxicity) performed prior to the conduct of the chronic bioassay provided no indication that the uterus was a potential target organ. The target organ and tumor type specificity (adenocarcinoma is a common spontaneous tumor in the aged Fischer 344 rat) suggests the effect is associated with estrous cycle alteration. A robust assessment of potential mode(s) of action responsible for the uterine tumors and relevance to humans is addressed in a companion manuscript (Klaunig et al., 2015). PMID:26184430

  1. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Bergene, E.; Adnanes, E.

    1995-12-31

    As a result of the highly exothermic nature of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, heat transfer considerations limit the maximum conversion per pass in fixed-bed processes, whereas slurry reactors can operate at higher conversions. During Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on cobalt catalysts, high conversions will generate high partial pressures of water at the reactor exit, due to the low water gas shift activity of cobalt. In addition, the extensive back-mixing in slurry reactors will give a relatively uniform concentration profile in the reactor, characterized by a high concentration of water and low reactant concentrations. From the commercial iron-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in fixed-bed (Arge) reactors it is known that the catalyst deactivates by oxidation of iron by CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O near the exit of the reactor. Although bulk oxidation of cobalt during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is not thermodynamically favored, it was early speculated that surface oxidation of cobalt could occur during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of the present work is to describe the influence of water on the deactivation behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported cobalt catalysts. The possibility of cobalt oxidation during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was investigated by model studies.

  2. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  3. NORMAL MAMMARY GLAND MORPHOLOGY IN PUBERTAL FEMALE MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO GENISTEIN AT LEVELS COMPARABLE TO HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of in utero and lactational exposure to genistein (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg/day) on mammary gland morphology in female B6D2F1 mice at levels comparable to or greater than human exposures. The effect of diethylstilbest...

  4. Neck Kaposiform haemangioendothelioma in a Fischer's lovebird (Agapornis fischeri).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giacomo; Galosi, Livio; Berardi, Sara; Piano, Maria Assunta; Robino, Patrizia; Rose, Timothy; Calabrò, Maria Luisa

    2016-06-01

    A six-year-old female Fischer's lovebird (Agapornis fischeri) presented at necropsy with a cutaneous mass on the neck, 3.5cm in diameter, yielding and with blood content. Histopathological findings showed a neoplasm characterized by proliferation of vascular endothelial cells. The histology of the mass revealed a multinodular, focally infiltrating tumor. Deeper dermal nodules were made of spindle cells forming vascular slits reminiscent of the histology seen in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). More superficially located dermal nodules consisted of small blood vessels, with histology resembling capillary hemangioma. The spindle cells and capillaries were strongly positive for Vimentin, endothelial cell marker CD31, and negative for sarcomeric α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Intravascular platelet trapping and Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive hyaline globules were also observed. Differential diagnosis included Kaposi's sarcoma, capillary haemangioma, spindle cell haemangioendothelioma, and epithelioid haemangioendothelioma. Based on morphological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as a cutaneous Kaposiform haemangioendothelioma (KHE), a rare, low-grade malignant vascular neoplasm. Other organs showed no abnormalities. PCR amplifications, conducted using Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-specific primers and degenerate sets of primers designed to detect and characterize members of the Herpesviridae, on DNA extracted from tumor tissue and from whole blood failed to amplify any KSHV-related sequence. Moreover, no specific signal was obtained using primers for detection of psittacine herpesvirus, known to be linked to Pacheco's disease in parrots. To the best of our knowledge, this unusual case is the third report of KHE in a non-human animal species, the first described in a bird. PMID:27234547

  5. Slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zarochak, M.F.; McDonald, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in the slurry phase has attracted attention in recent years due to its numerous advantages. Among these advantages are the ability of the liquid phase to handle the large heats of reaction and thereby control reaction temperature, the ability to handle low H/sub 2//CO ratio synthesis gas without needing a preliminary water-gas shift step, and the relatively low capital and operating costs for slurry systems. Slurry-phase work at PETC has focused on understanding effects of catalyst preparation and pretreatment, of reaction conditions (T, P, H/sub 2//CO), and of operating conditions (space velocity, methods of wax removal) on catalyst synthesis behavior (activity, selectivity, and maintenance of activity and selectivity). Better understanding of the effects of these factors on F-T synthesis leads to improvements in process technology. This work focuses on the effects of catalyst pretreatment on synthesis behavior. Developing an effective F-T catalyst pretreatment procedure is a problem limited almost exclusively to iron catalysts. This paper reports some recent results on the effects of pretreatment. Synthesis runs were made using one of two different pretreatments given a potassium-promoted precipitated iron catalyst. Besides these reaction experiments, catalyst samples were periodically withdrawn from the stirred autoclave for characterization by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  6. INTEGRATED FISCHER TROPSCH MODULAR PROCESS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Richard Boardman; Anastasia M. Gribik; Rick A. Wood; Robert A. Carrington

    2007-12-01

    With declining petroleum reserves, increased world demand, and unstable politics in some of the world’s richest oil producing regions, the capability for the U.S. to produce synthetic liquid fuels from domestic resources is critical to national security and economic stability. Coal, biomass and other carbonaceous materials can be converted to liquid fuels using several conversion processes. The leading candidate for large-scale conversion of coal to liquid fuels is the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. Process configuration, component selection, and performance are interrelated and dependent on feed characteristics. This paper outlines a flexible modular approach to model an integrated FT process that utilizes a library of key component models, supporting kinetic data and materials and transport properties allowing rapid development of custom integrated plant models. The modular construction will permit rapid assessment of alternative designs and feed stocks. The modeling approach consists of three thrust areas, or “strands” – model/module development, integration of the model elements into an end to end integrated system model, and utilization of the model for plant design. Strand 1, model/module development, entails identifying, developing, and assembling a library of codes, user blocks, and data for FT process unit operations for a custom feedstock and plant description. Strand 2, integration development, provides the framework for linking these component and subsystem models to form an integrated FT plant simulation. Strand 3, plant design, includes testing and validation of the comprehensive model and performing design evaluation analyses.

  7. Disposition of citral in male Fischer rats

    SciTech Connect

    Diliberto, J.J.; Usha, G.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1988-09-01

    The disposition of citral, an essential oil occurring in many foods and fragrances, was studied in male Fischer rats after iv, po, and dermal treatments. The pattern of distribution and elimination was the same after iv or oral exposure. Urine was the major route of elimination of citral-derived radioactivity, followed by feces, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, and expired volatiles. However, after dermal exposure, relatively less of the material was eliminated in the urine and more in the feces, suggesting a role for first-pass metabolism through the skin. Citral was almost completely absorbed orally; due to its extreme volatility, much of an applied dermal dose was lost. The citral remaining on the skin was fairly well absorbed. No effect of oral dose, from 5 to 500 mg/kg, was detected on disposition. Although the feces was a minor route of excretion, approximately 25% of the administered dose was eliminated via the bile within 4 hr of an iv dose. The metabolism of citral was both rapid and extensive. Within 5 min of an iv dose, no unmetabolized citral could be detected in the blood. Repeated exposure to citral resulted in an increase in biliary elimination, without any significant change in the pattern of urinary, fecal, or exhaled excretion. This suggests that citral may induce at least one pathway of its own metabolism. The rapid metabolism and excretion of this compound suggest that significant bioaccumulation of citral would not occur.

  8. Lewis rats have greater response impulsivity than Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Potenza, Marc N; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity, a tendency toward immediate action without consideration of future consequences, is associated with a wide array of problematic behaviors. Response impulsivity, a type of behaviorally-assessed impulsivity characterized by behavioral disinhibition, is also associated with health risk behaviors. Response impulsivity is distinct from choice impulsivity, which is characterized by intolerance for delay. Lewis rats have higher levels of choice impulsivity than Fischer rats (Anderson & Woolverton, 2005; Madden et al., 2008; Stein et al., 2012). However, no studies have examined whether Lewis and Fischer rats have different levels of response impulsivity. The present research examined response impulsivity in the two rat strains. Subjects were 16 male Lewis and Fischer rats. Rats' response impulsivity was measured using the Five Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT). In addition, their locomotor activity was measured in locomotor activity chambers. Lewis rats had more premature responses than Fischer rats during the 5-CSRTT assessment [F(1, 14)=5.34, p<0.05], indicating higher levels of response impulsivity. Locomotor activity did not differ between rat strain groups [F(1, 14)=3.05, p=.10], suggesting that overall movement did not account for group differences in response impulsivity on the 5-CSRTT. It can be concluded from this research that Lewis rats have higher levels of response impulsivity than Fischer rats, and therefore provide a valid rat model of individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:24613059

  9. Normal-weight and overweight female adolescents with and without extreme weight-control behaviours: Emotional distress and body image concerns.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Sáez, Soledad; Pascual, Aitziber; Salaberria, Karmele; Echeburúa, Enrique

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse emotional distress and concerns related to body image in 712 normal-weight and overweight adolescent girls. A total of 12.3 per cent of the normal-weight girls and 25 per cent of the overweight girls showed extreme weight-control behaviours. In normal-weight adolescents, their engagement in extreme weight-control behaviours was associated with high levels of somatic symptoms, a drive for thinness and control over eating. In overweight girls, high levels of drive for thinness and anxiety were associated with extreme weight-control behaviours. Finally, the implications for preventive and therapeutic programmes are discussed. PMID:26032790

  10. Early high dose chemotherapy intensification with autologous bone marrow transplantation in lymphoma associated with retention of fertility and normal pregnancies in females. Scotland and Newcastle Lymphoma Group, UK.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G H; Wood, A; Taylor, P R; Lennard, A L; Lucraft, H; Heppleston, A; Robinson, P; Moore, J; Proctor, S J

    1997-12-01

    As more centres consider autologous bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for patients with high risk Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in first complete remission (CR1) the long term sequelae of such treatments have to be considered. One of the most important side effects of such intensive treatment is loss of fertility. Sperm banking before treatment commences is available for males but unfortunately cryopreservation of ova/ovarian tissue is not yet possible for females. We have transplanted 30 women, 23 were under 40 years and report ten females who have had successful pregnancies (including two twin pregnancies and one triplet pregnancy), leading to live births following autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for poor prognosis HD and NHL in first or second complete remission. None of these children have shown evidence of birth defects (median follow up of two years). Of the twenty one pregnancies reported to the European Bone Marrow Transplantation Registry (EBMTR) following ABMT for lymphoma, eight of the seventeen unassisted cases came from our centres. The Newcastle/SNLG autotransplant differs from the approach in many EBMTR centres in that it uses melphalan or melphalan/etoposide alone instead of the more common four drug containing regimens and yet sustained complete remission rates indicate that the non-ablative approach is equally effective as more aggressive regimens on the disease with the huge advantage of preserved fertility in females. This approach to conditioning for ABMT should be considered when treating women in the reproductive age group. PMID:9498711

  11. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in the supercritical phase employing a commercial precipitated iron catalysts. As the supercritical fluid the authors used propane and n-hexane. The catalyst had a nominal composition of 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis and was used in a fixed bed reactor under both normal (conventional) and supercritical conditions. Experimental data were obtained at different temperatures (235 C, 250 C, and 260 C) and synthesis gas feed compositions (H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.67, 1.0 and 2.0) in both modes of operation under steady state conditions. The authors compared the performance of the precipitated iron catalyst in the supercritical phase, with the data obtained in gas phase (fixed bed reactor) and slurry phase (STS reactor). Comparisons were made in terms of bulk catalyst activity and various aspects of product selectivity (e.g. lumped hydrocarbon distribution and olefin content as a function of carbon number). In order to gain better understanding of the role of intraparticle mass transfer during FTS under conventional or supercritical conditions, the authors have measured diffusivities of representative hydrocarbon products in supercritical fluids, as well as their effective diffusion rates into the pores of catalyst at the reaction conditions. They constructed a Taylor dispersion apparatus to measure diffusion coefficients of hydrocarbon products of FTS in sub and supercritical ethane, propane, and hexane. In addition, they developed a tracer response technique to measure the effective diffusivities in the catalyst pores at the same conditions. Based on these results they have developed an equation for prediction of diffusion in supercritical fluids, which is based on the rough hard sphere theory.

  12. The evolution of cervical mucus infrastructure in normal cyclic baboons (Papio anubis) and castrated females receiving hormonal supplies. A scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F C

    1980-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope was used to study the evolution of the infrastructure of cervical mucus in normal cyclic baboons and in castrated animals treated with ovarian hormones for establishing an artificial cycle. In both groups, the results make conspicuous the progressive enlargement of the filamentous woof, which attains a maximum at midcycle and then decreases by degrees in the second part of the cycle. It was shown that the evolution of the framework is very similar during normal and artificial cycle, with only variations of slight amplitude. Moreover, the variations in the baboon mucus infrastructure closely resemble those described in the human. The results are briefly discussed in the light of known data. PMID:6770577

  13. Activity-based anorexia during adolescence disrupts normal development of the CA1 pyramidal cells in the ventral hippocampus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara G; Ríos, Mariel B; Chan, Thomas E; Cassataro, Daniela S; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Aoki, Chiye

    2014-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by restricted eating and irrational fears of gaining weight. There is no accepted pharmacological treatment for AN, and AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. Anorexia nervosa most commonly affects females during adolescence, suggesting an effect of sex and hormones on vulnerability to the disease. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a rodent model of AN that shares symptoms with AN, including over-exercise, elevation of stress hormones, and genetic links to anxiety traits. We previously reported that ABA in adolescent female rats results in increased apical dendritic branching in CA1 pyramidal cells of the ventral hippocampus at postnatal day 44 (P44). To examine the long-term effects of adolescent ABA (P44) in female rats, we compared the apical branching in the ventral hippocampal CA1 after recovery from ABA (P51) and after a relapse of ABA (P55) with age-matched controls. To examine the age-dependence of the hippocampal plasticity, we examined the effect of ABA during adulthood (P67). We found that while ABA at P44 resulted in increased branching of ventral hippocampal pyramidal cells, relapse of ABA at P55 resulted in decreased branching. ABA induced during adulthood did not have an effect on dendritic branching, suggesting an age-dependence of the vulnerability to structural plasticity. Cells from control animals were found to exhibit a dramatic increase in branching, more than doubling from P44 to P51, followed by pruning from P51 to P55. The proportion of mature spines on dendrites from the P44-ABA animals is similar to that on dendrites from P55-CON animals. These results suggest that the experience of ABA may cause precocious anatomical development of the ventral hippocampus. Importantly, we found that adolescence is a period of continued development of the hippocampus, and increased vulnerability to mental disorders during adolescence may be due to insults during this

  14. Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts for selective transportation fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, W.E.; Cilen, N.; Withers, H.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The future use of coal as a source of conventional transportation fuel will depend on the development of an economical and energy efficient liquefaction process. Technologies that have been commercially proven or that are close to commercialization include the fixed- and fluidized-bed Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol synthesis (fixed-bed and slurry-phase) and the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline process. Of these technologies, the Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis produces the widest slate of products and has been in operation for the longest period.

  15. Subjectivity, hygiene, and STI prevention: a normalization paradox in the cleanliness practices of female sex workers in post-socialist China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yeon Jung

    2013-09-01

    This article illuminates the principal mechanisms that increase the risk of STIs for female sex workers in China. It draws primarily on my 26 months of ethnographic fieldwork (2006-2009) in red-light district neighborhoods in Haikou that have become centers of internal migration in post-reform southern China. Chinese sex workers here challenge dominant representations of them as illegal, immoral, and unclean subordinates and understand themselves also as sacrificing, capable, and modern women. I show how the women's conflicted subjectivity, continuously shaped through social networks, affects their personal health decisions and, significantly, leads them to adopt clinically risky practices. I conclude by arguing that public health interventions in southern China in and around certain red-light districts should take these conflicted subjectivities into account in working to improve sex workers' health. PMID:24123232

  16. Toxicological evaluation of L-proline in a 90-day feeding study with Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Tada, Y; Yano, N; Takahashi, H; Yuzawa, K; Ando, H; Kubo, Y; Nagasawa, A; Ohashi, N; Ogata, A; Nakae, D

    2010-10-01

    L-proline (L-Pro) is a non-essential amino acid, and has become widely used as supplements and health foods, recently. A subchronic oral toxicity study of L-Pro was conducted with groups of 10 male and 10 female Fischer 344 rats fed a powder diet containing 0%, 0.625%, 1.25%, 2.5% and 5.0% of L-Pro for 90 days. No treatment-related clinical signs and mortality were noted. We observed no clear treatment-related effects with regard to body weight, food intake or urinalysis data. The average daily water intakes of the treated female groups were significantly increased compared to the controls. The hematology (red blood cell parameter) and serum biochemistry (glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine or uric acid) of the treated male and/or female groups were lower than those of the control groups. However, these changes were lacked dose-dependence, and no abnormalities were found in corresponding pathological findings. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for L-Pro was determined to be a dietary dose of 5.0% (2772.9 mg/kg body weight/day for males and 3009.3mg/kg body weight/day for females) under the present experimental conditions. PMID:20447433

  17. Lesions of the urinary tract produced in Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice after chronic administration of 11-aminoundecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, J K; Huff, J E; Haseman, J K; Boorman, G A

    1983-01-01

    11-Aminoundecanoic acid, the monomer of nylon 11, was toxic to the urinary tract of both male and female B6C3F1 mice and Fischer 344 rats, when administered in the diet at 7500 or 15 000 ppm for 103-104 weeks. Dose-related effects included a decrease in mean body weight gain and in survival for male rats and for mice of each sex; increased incidence of hyperplasia of the transitional epithelium of the kidney in rats of each sex; increased incidence of calcification of the kidney in the female rats; increased incidence of hyperplasia of the urinary bladder in male rats; and mineralization of the kidney in mice of each sex. Transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder of the male rat occurred with increased frequency in the high-dose group (control, 0/48; low-dose, 0/48; high-dose, 7/49). Additional evidence for carcinogenicity in the male rat was seen in the liver, where an increased frequency of neoplastic nodules was found in the treated animals (controls, 1/50; low-dose, 9/50; high-dose, 8/50). Therefore, under the conditions of these studies, 11-aminoundecanoic acid was carcinogenic for male Fischer 344 rats, inducing transitional cell carcinomas in the urinary bladder and neoplastic nodules in the liver. The test chemical was not demonstrated to be carcinogenic for female Fischer 344 rats or for B6C3F1 mice of either sex. PMID:6662302

  18. Body Composition, Hemodynamic and Biochemical Parameters in Young Female Normal-Weight Oligo-amenorrheic and Eumenorrheic Athletes and Non-athletes

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Vibha; de Lourdes Eguiguren, Maria; Eysenbach, Lindsey; Clarke, Hannah; Slattery, Meghan; Eddy, Kamryn; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Aims Low-weight hypogonadal conditions such as anorexia nervosa are associated with marked changes in body composition, hemodynamic and hematological parameters, and liver enzymes. The impact of athletic activity in normal-weight adolescents with/without amenorrhea on these parameters has not been assessed. Our aim was to examine these parameters in normal-weight athletes and non-athletes and determine any associations of body composition, oligo-amenorrhea and exercise intensity. Methods We assessed vital signs, complete blood counts, liver enzymes, and regional body composition in 43 oligo-amenorrheic athletes (OAA), 24 eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and 23 non-athletes 14-21 years of age. Results BMI was lower in OAA than EA. Systolic and pulse pressure, and temperature were lowest in OAA. Blood counts did not differ among groups. AST was higher in both groups of athletes, while ALT was higher in OAA than EA and non-athletes. Total and regional fat was lower in OAA than other groups, positively associated with heart rate and inversely with liver enzymes. Conclusions Athletic activity is associated with higher AST, whereas menstrual dysfunction is associated with lower total and regional fat and higher ALT. Higher liver enzymes are associated with reductions in total and regional fat. PMID:25376841

  19. Decreased stress responsivity of central and peripheral catecholaminergic systems in aged 344/N Fischer rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cizza, G; Pacak, K; Kvetnansky, R; Palkovits, M; Goldstein, D S; Brady, L S; Fukuhara, K; Bergamini, E; Kopin, I J; Blackman, M R

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of stress on central and peripheral sympatho-adrenal and sympatho-neural functions in healthy, intact young (3-4 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer 344/N rats. Extracellular fluid (ECF) levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE), dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were obtained by microdialysis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus at baseline and during immobilization (IMMO). The baseline levels of these substances were similar in both age groups, and their concentrations increased significantly in response to IMMO. The IMMO-induced increases of NE and MHPG, however, were significantly smaller in old than in young rats. Plasma levels of the catecholamines NE, DHPG, MHPG, DOPAC, dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), epinephrine (EPI), dopamine (DA), and HVA were also determined in young and old rats during IMMO. Basal levels of these substances were significantly higher in old than in young rats. The magnitude of the IMMO-induced increases in the majority of these compounds however, was significantly smaller in old than in young rats. We conclude that, at the basal state, aging in the Fischer rat is associated with normal PVN ECF, but high plasma catecholamine levels; at stress state, however, old rats have substantially lesser activation of their central and peripheral catecholaminergic systems than young rats. Images PMID:7883970

  20. Developmental variation of the diaphragm and liver in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, C C; Mull, R L; Lochry, E A; Christian, M S

    1988-06-01

    The nature and frequency of a developmental variation of the diaphragm and liver in Fischer 344 rats are described. Totals of 20, 98 and 55 (25 for caesarean-sectioning and 30 for natural delivery) mated female rats were used for Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Each rat was intubated (gavage) with either an aqueous suspension of 0.2% METHOCEL, 0.25% methyl cellulose, or distilled water as a single daily dose from days 6 through 15 (inclusive) of gestation. On the 20th day of gestation, a caesarean-section was performed, and the uterine contents of each rat were examined. A gross necropsy was performed on the pups of 30 mated female rats on day 21 postpartum. The visceral examinations conducted on these fetuses and pups included an evaluation of a developmental variation in the diaphragm and liver. The variation consisted of a thin fibrous central tendon of the diaphragm with an area of liver (0.5-3 mm diameter) that protruded within the thin central tendon of the diaphragm. The incidence (mean % of fetuses affected per litter) of the diaphragm/liver developmental variation was 9% and 11% for METHOCEL- and water-treated groups, respectively. A thin central tendon was present in the diaphragm of all fetuses of methyl cellulose-treated dams; these fetuses did not have a raised area of the liver present within the diaphragm's central tendon. However, in a few weaned pups of the Fischer 344 rats in this study, liver protruded within the central tendon of the diaphragm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3400072

  1. Fischer-Tropsch wax characterization and upgrading: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.; Sturtevant, G.C.; Gregor, J.H.; Humbach, M.J.; Padrta, F.G.; Steigleder, K.Z.

    1988-06-06

    The characterization and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch wax was studied. The focus of the program was to maximize the yield of marketable transportation fuels from the Fischer-Tropsch process. The wax was characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and various other physical analyses. Hydrocracking studies conducted in a pilot plant indicate that Fischer-Tropsch wax is an excellent feedstock. A high yield of excellent quality diesel fuel was produced with satisfactory catalyst performance at relatively mild operating conditions. Correlations for predicting key diesel fuel properties were developed and checked against actual laboratory blend data. The blending study was incorporated into an economic evaluation. Finally, it is possible to take advantage of the high quality of the Fischer-Tropsch derived distillate by blending a lower value light cycle oil (produced from a refinery FCC unit) representing a high aromatic and low cetane number. The blended stream meets diesel pool specifications (up to 60 wt % LCO addition). The value added to this blending stream further enhances the upgrading complex return. 22 refs., 39 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  3. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Derr, Jr., W. Rodman; Garwood, William E.; Kuo, James C.; Leib, Tiberiu M.; Nace, Donald M.; Tabak, Samuel A.

    1987-01-01

    The waxy liquid phase of an oil suspension of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing dissolved wax is separated out and the wax is converted by hydrocracking, dewaxing or by catalytic cracking with a low activity catalyst to provide a highly olefinic product which may be further converted to premium quality gasoline and/or distillate fuel.

  4. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Derr, W.R. Jr.; Garwood, W.E.; Kuo, J.C.; Leib, T.M.; Nace, D.M.; Tabak, S.A.

    1987-08-04

    The waxy liquid phase of an oil suspension of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing dissolved wax is separated out and the wax is converted by hydrocracking, dewaxing or by catalytic cracking with a low activity catalyst to provide a highly olefinic product which may be further converted to premium quality gasoline and/or distillate fuel. 2 figs.

  5. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1990-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  6. Simulation models and designs for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.; Tam, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Process designs and economics were developed for three grass-roots indirect Fischer-Tropsch coal liquefaction facilities. A baseline and an alternate upgrading design were developed for a mine-mouth plant located in southern Illinois using Illinois No. 6 coal, and one for a mine-mouth plane located in Wyoming using Power River Basin coal. The alternate design used close-coupled ZSM-5 reactors to upgrade the vapor stream leaving the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. ASPEN process simulation models were developed for all three designs. These results have been reported previously. In this study, the ASPEN process simulation model was enhanced to improve the vapor/liquid equilibrium calculations for the products leaving the slurry bed Fischer-Tropsch reactors. This significantly improved the predictions for the alternate ZSM-5 upgrading design. Another model was developed for the Wyoming coal case using ZSM-5 upgrading of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor vapors. To date, this is the best indirect coal liquefaction case. Sensitivity studies showed that additional cost reductions are possible.

  7. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, H.

    1990-07-31

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation. 1 fig.

  8. Fischer and Schrock Carbene Complexes: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    An exercise in molecular modeling that demonstrates the distinctive features of Fischer and Schrock carbene complexes is presented. Semi-empirical calculations (PM3) demonstrate the singlet ground electronic state, restricted rotation about the C-Y bond, the positive charge on the carbon atom, and hence, the electrophilic nature of the Fischer…

  9. Alternative Fuel Research in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently constructed an Alternative Fuels Laboratory which is solely being used to perform Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactor studies, novel catalyst development and thermal stability experiments. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst screening experiments while focusing on reducing energy inputs, reducing CO2 emissions and increasing product yields within the F-T process. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which reacts syn-gas (a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), over the surface of a catalyst material which is then converted into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions1. These hydrocarbons can then be further processed into higher quality liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The experiments performed in this laboratory will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics to focus on newly formulated catalysts, improved process conditions and enhanced catalyst activation methods. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor used solely for cobalt catalyst activation.

  10. Segregation of Fischer-Tropsch reactants on cobalt nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E A; Le, D; Jewell, A D; Murphy, C J; Rahman, T S; Sykes, E C H

    2014-06-21

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy, we have visualized the segregation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, the two reactants in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, on cobalt nanoparticles at catalytically relevant coverages. Density functional theory was used to interrogate the relevant energetics. PMID:24825772

  11. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a process for the separation of catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The separation is accomplished by extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic. The purified catalyst can be upgraded by various methods.

  12. BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC).

  13. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF ATRAZINE METABOLITES IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we have shown that atrazine, a commonly used herbicide, causes full-litter resorption (FLR) in Fischer 344 rats at 50 mg/kg. In this study, we tested four atrazine metabolites for their potential to cause FLR and developmental toxicity. Desethylatrazine (DEA), desis...

  14. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.; Bochniak, D.; Snavely, K.

    1993-01-01

    Our goals for this quarter were to complete construction of the reactor and analytical units for carrying out Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in liquid (n-hexadecane) and in supercritical n-hexane phases. Progress during this quarter was slower than expected.

  15. Hindbrain estrogen receptor-beta antagonism normalizes reproductive and counter-regulatory hormone secretion in hypoglycemic steroid-primed ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Shrestha, Prem K

    2016-09-01

    Hindbrain dorsal vagal complex A2 noradrenergic signaling represses the pre-ovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in response to energy deficiency. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia augments A2 neuron adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ) expression, coincident with LH surge suppression. We hypothesized that ERβ is critical for hypoglycemia-associated patterns of LH secretion and norepinephrine (NE) activity in key reproduction-relevant forebrain structures. The neural mechanisms responsible for tight coupling of systemic energy balance and procreation remain unclear; here, we investigated whether ERβ-dependent hindbrain signals also control glucose counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycemia. Gonadal steroid-primed ovariectomized female rats were pretreated by caudal fourth ventricular administration of the ERβ antagonist 4-[2-phenyl-5,7-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]phenol (PHTPP) or vehicle before insulin injection at LH surge onset. Western blot analysis of laser-microdissected A2 neurons revealed hypoglycemic intensification of AMPK activity and dopamine-β-hydroxylase protein expression; the latter response was attenuated by PHTPP pretreatment. PHTPP regularized LH release, but not preoptic GnRH-I precursor protein expression in insulin-injected rats, and reversed hypoglycemic stimulation of glucagon and corticosterone secretion. Hypoglycemia caused PHTPP-reversible changes in NE and prepro-kisspeptin protein content in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARH), but not anteroventral periventricular nucleus. Results provide novel evidence for ERβ-dependent caudal hindbrain regulation of LH and counter-regulatory hormone secretion during hypoglycemia. Observed inhibition of LH likely involves mechanisms at the axon terminal that impede GnRH neurotransmission. Data also show that caudal hindbrain ERβ exerts site-specific control of NE activity in forebrain projection sites during

  16. Female-pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Female-pattern baldness is a pattern of hair loss (alopecia) caused by hormones, aging and genetics. Unlike male-pattern baldness, female-pattern baldness is an over-all thinning which maintains the normal ...

  17. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2011-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  19. Trapping Planetary Noble Gases During the Fischer-Tropsch-Type Synthesis of Organic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.; Meshik, A.

    2010-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO arc exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions!, Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these rcactions:u . The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic materiaL Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  20. Compression-ignition fuel properties of Fischer-Tropsch syncrude

    SciTech Connect

    Suppes, G.J.; Terry, J.G.; Burkhart, M.L.; Cupps, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    Fischer-Tropsch conversion of natural gas to liquid hydrocarbon fuel typically includes Fischer-Tropsch synthesis followed by refining (hydrocracking and distillation) of the syncrude into mostly diesel or kerosene with some naphtha (a feedstock for gasoline production). Refining is assumed necessary, possibly overlooking the exception fuel qualities of syncrude for more direct utilization as a compression-ignition (CI) fuel. This paper evaluates cetane number, viscosity, cloud-point, and pour-point properties of syncrude and blends of syncrude with blend stocks such as ethanol and diethyl ether. The results show that blends comprised primarily of syncrude are potentially good CI fuels, with pour-point temperature depression being the largest development obstacle. The resulting blends may provide a much-needed and affordable alternative CI fuel. Particularly good market opportunities exist with Environmental Policy Act (EPACT) applications.

  1. Application of equilibrium analysis to a Fischer-Tropsch product

    SciTech Connect

    Norval, G.W. ); Phillips, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    In the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process, synthesis gas is converted, inter alia, to aliphatic hydrocarbons, consisting predominantly of n-alkanes and n-alkenes, over iron- or cobalt-based catalysts. The product composition follows an Anderson-Schults-Flory (ASF) distribution. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that the ASF distribution (Eq. (1)) can be derived from an equilibrium basis, and the consequences arising therefrom are discussed.

  2. Surface characterization of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Butt, J.B.; Stair, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors address XPS characterization of the iron phases associated with Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Results obtained for single-phase metal, oxide, and carbide samples are presented. Methods for estimating the extent of carbide formation during low conversion synthesis, and the extent of catalyst oxidation at high conversions are illustrated. This approach is used to monitor the evolution of an initially reduced, unsupported iron catalyst during synthesis at low conversion levels.

  3. The role of zeolite in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over cobalt-zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sineva, L. V.; Asalieva, E. Yu; Mordkovich, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The review deals with the specifics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for the one-stage syncrude production from CO and H2 in the presence of cobalt-zeolite catalytic systems. Different types of bifunctional catalysts (hybrid, composite) combining a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and zeolite are reviewed. Special attention focuses on the mechanisms of transformations of hydrocarbons produced in the Fischer-Tropsch process on zeolite acid sites under the synthesis conditions. The bibliography includes 142 references.

  4. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with coal derived syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Raje, A.; O`Brien, R.J.; Davis, B.H.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of potassium on catalyst activity, kinetic parameters and selectivity has been investigated for a precipitated iron catalyst with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas. A wide range of synthesis gas conversions have been obtained by varying space velocities over catalysts with various potassium loadings. Differing trends in catalyst activity with potassium loading were observed depending on the space velocity or synthesis gas conversion. As potassium loading increased, the catalyst activity either decreased (low conversions), passed through a maximum (intermediate conversions) or increased (high conversions). This is shown to be a result of the increasing dependency of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the hydrogen formed by the water-gas shift reaction with increasing synthesis gas conversions. Both the rate constant and the adsorption parameter in a common two-parameter Fischer-Tropsch rate expression decreased with potassium loading; therefore, observed maxima in Fischer-Tropsch rate with potassium loading can be due to the opposing influences of these parameters.

  5. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    DOEpatents

    White, Curt M.; Quiring, Michael S.; Jensen, Karen L.; Hickey, Richard F.; Gillham, Larry D.

    1998-10-27

    In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by slurring them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation.

  6. Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry

    DOEpatents

    White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

    1998-10-27

    In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst-free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by mixing them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation. 2 figs.

  7. Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1998-10-19

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

  8. The Process of Reversible Phosphorylation: the Work of Edmond H. Fischer

    PubMed Central

    Kresge, Nicole; Simoni, Robert D.; Hill, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Edmond H. Fischer was awarded the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his joint research with Edwin G. Krebs on reversible protein phosphorylation. The two Classics reprinted here relate some of Fischer and Krebs' early discoveries in their phosphorylase research Phosphorylase Activity of Skeletal Muscle Extracts (Krebs, E. G., and Fischer, E. H. (1955) J. Biol. Chem. 216, 113–120) Conversion of Phosphorylase b to Phosphorylase a in Muscle Extracts (Fischer, E. H., and Krebs, E. G. (1955) J. Biol. Chem. 216, 121–132) PMID:21294299

  9. Normal faults, normal friction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Sibson, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    Debate continues as to whether normal faults may be seismically active at very low dips (δ < 30°) in the upper continental crust. An updated compilation of dip estimates (n = 25) has been prepared from focal mechanisms of shallow, intracontinental, normal-slip earthquakes (M > 5.5; slip vector raking 90° ± 30° in the fault plane) where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. The dip distribution for these moderate-to-large normal fault ruptures extends from 65° > δ > 30°, corresponding to a range, 25° < θr < 60°, for the reactivation angle between the fault and inferred vertical σ1. In a comparable data set previously obtained for reverse fault ruptures (n = 33), the active dip distribution is 10° < δ = θr < 60°. For vertical and horizontal σ1 trajectories within extensional and compressional tectonic regimes, respectively, dip-slip reactivation is thus restricted to faults oriented at θr ≤ 60° to inferred σ1. Apparent lockup at θr ≈ 60° in each dip distribution and a dominant 30° ± 5° peak in the reverse fault dip distribution, are both consistent with a friction coefficient μs ≈ 0.6, toward the bottom of Byerlee's experimental range, though localized fluid overpressuring may be needed for reactivation of less favorably oriented faults.

  10. Long-term Pulmonary Responses to Quadweekly Intermittent Intratracheal Spray Instillations of Magnetite (Fe3O4) Nanoparticles for 52 Weeks in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Yukie; Yano, Norio; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Katsuhiro; Ando, Hiroshi; Kubo, Yoshikazu; Nagasawa, Akemichi; Inomata, Akiko; Ogata, Akio; Nakae, Dai

    2013-01-01

    Information about potential risks of iron nanomaterials is still limited, while a wide variety of applications are expected. We recently reported acute phase responses of male and female Fischer 344 rats after a single intratracheal spray instillation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetite), clearly showing dose-dependent pulmonary inflammatory changes (Tada et al., J Toxicol Pathol 25, 233–239, 2012). The present study assessed long-term responses of male and female Fischer 344 rats to multiple administrations of magnetite. Ten-week-old male and female Fischer 344 rats (n=20/group) were exposed to a total of 13 quadweekly intermittent intratracheal spray instillations of magnetite during the experimental period of 52 weeks, at doses of 0, 0.2 (low), 1.0 (medium) and 5.0 (high-dose) mg/kg body weight per administration. Absolute and relative lung weights of the high-dose group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Macroscopically, slight enlargement and scattered black patches were recognized in the lungs and the lung-associated lymph nodes of the high-dose group. Histopathologically, infiltration of macrophages phagocytosing magnetite (all dose groups) and of chronic inflammatory cells (medium- and high-dose males and high-dose females), alveolar bronchiolization and granuloma (high-dose group) were observed. In addition, alveolar hyperplasias were observed in some rats of the high-dose group, and cytoplasmic overexpression of β-catenin protein was immunohistochemically found in such lesions. The present results clearly show that instilled magnetite causes chronic inflammatory responses in the lung. These responses occur in a dose-dependent manner without apparent differences among sexes PMID:24526812

  11. Mast Cell Inhibition Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling and Diastolic Dysfunction in Middle-aged, Ovariectomized Fischer 344 × Brown Norway Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; da Silva, Jaqueline; Alencar, Allan; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Lin, Marina R; Sun, Xuming; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Ferrario, Carlos M; Groban, Leanne

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) increases in women after menopause, yet the mechanisms are unclear. Because mast cells participate in the pathological processes of various cardiac diseases, we hypothesized that mast cell inhibition would protect against estrogen loss-induced LVDD. The mast cell stabilizer, cromolyn sodium (30 mg·kg·d), or vehicle was administered subcutaneously by osmotic minipump to ovariectomized (OVX) female Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (F344BN) rats starting at 4 weeks after surgery. Eight weeks after OVX, systolic blood pressure increased by 20% in OVX versus sham rats, and this effect was attenuated after 4 weeks of cromolyn treatment. Also, cromolyn mitigated the adverse reductions in myocardial relaxation (e') and increases in left ventricle (LV) filling pressures (E/e'), LV mass, wall thicknesses, and interstitial fibrosis from OVX. Although cardiac mast cell number was increased after OVX, cardiac chymase activity was not overtly altered by estrogen status and tended to decrease by cromolyn. Contrariwise, Ang II content was greater in hearts of OVX versus sham rats, and cromolyn attenuated this effect. Taken together, mast cell inhibition with cromolyn attenuates LV remodeling and LVDD in OVX-Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats possibly through actions on the heart level and/or through vasodilatory effects at the vascular level. PMID:26981683

  12. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10178 Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as distillates (Fischer-Tropsch),...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  18. Microkinetics of oxygenate formation in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, Rutger A; Ghouri, Minhaj; Hensen, Emiel M J

    2014-06-01

    Microkinetics simulations are presented on the intrinsic activity and selectivity of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction with respect to the formation of long chain oxygenated hydrocarbons. Two different chain growth mechanisms are compared: the carbide chain growth mechanism and the CO insertion chain growth mechanism. The microkinetics simulations are based on quantum-chemical data on reaction rate parameters of the elementary reaction steps of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction available in the literature. Because the overall rate constant of chain growth remains too low the CO insertion chain growth mechanism is not found to produce higher hydrocarbons, except for ethylene and acetaldehyde or the corresponding hydrogenated products. According to the carbide mechanism available quantum-chemical data are consistent with high selectivity to long chain oxygenated hydrocarbon production at low temperature. The anomalous initial increase with temperature of the chain growth parameter observed under such conditions is reproduced. It arises from the competition between the apparent rate of C-O bond activation to produce "CHx" monomers to be inserted into the growing hydrocarbon chain and the rate of chain growth termination. The microkinetics simulations data enable analysis of selectivity changes as a function of critical elementary reaction rates such as the rate of activation of the C-O bond of CO, the insertion rate of CO into the growing hydrocarbon chain or the rate constant of methane formation. Simulations show that changes in catalyst site reactivity affect elementary reaction steps differently. This has opposing consequences for oxygenate production selectivity, so an optimizing compromise has to be found. The simulation results are found to be consistent with most experimental data available today. It is concluded that Fischer-Tropsch type catalysis has limited scope to produce long chain oxygenates with high yield, but there is an opportunity to improve the yield of C2

  19. Mechanism and microkinetics of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, R A; Markvoort, A J; Filot, I A W; Ghouri, M M; Hensen, E J M

    2013-10-28

    The increasing availability of quantum-chemical data on surface reaction intermediates invites one to revisit unresolved mechanistic issues in heterogeneous catalysis. One such issue of particular current interest is the molecular basis of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Here we review current molecular understanding of this reaction that converts synthesis gas into longer hydrocarbons where we especially elucidate recent progress due to the contributions of computational catalysis. This perspective highlights the theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis that aims for kinetic prediction from quantum-chemical first principle data. Discussion of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction from this point of view is interesting because of the several mechanistic options available for this reaction. There are many proposals on the nature of the monomeric single C atom containing intermediate that is inserted into the growing hydrocarbon chain as well as on the nature of the growing hydrocarbon chain itself. Two dominant conflicting mechanistic proposals of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction that will be especially compared are the carbide mechanism and the CO insertion mechanism, which involve cleavage of the C-O bond of CO before incorporation of a CHx species into the growing hydrocarbon chain (the carbide mechanism) or after incorporation into the growing hydrocarbon chain (the CO insertion mechanism). The choice of a particular mechanism has important kinetic consequences. Since it is based on molecular information it also affects the structure sensitivity of this particular reaction and hence influences the choice of catalyst composition. We will show how quantum-chemical information on the relative stability of relevant reaction intermediates and estimates of the rate constants of corresponding elementary surface reactions provides a firm foundation to the kinetic analysis of such reactions and allows one to discriminate between the different mechanistic options. The paper will

  20. Multicomponent modelling of Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vuuren, D.S.; Heydenrych, M.D.

    1985-08-01

    In the multicomponent model developed for a Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactor, the water-gas shift reaction is assumed to be in equilibrium. This is supported by literature data on iron-based catalysts above 523 K and synthesis gas conversion above about 50%. A Schulz-Flory product distribution is used. Investigation of the effects of back-mixing and interphase mass transfer using the model shows that, although the mass transfer rates in full-scale reactors are fast compared with reaction rates, the ratio of the mass transfer rates of reactants and products is important in determining gas velocity and gas hold-up and hence reactor performance.

  1. Deactivation of slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The influence of the liquid medium on Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) chemistry has received only minimal attention in the literature. The focus of this investigation was to determine the impact of the liquid starting medium on syngas (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion in a 1-liter CSTR. The results of the work indicate a greater deactivation rate for the F-T reaction in heavier starting media, average carbon number {ge}48, versus a medium with an average carbon number of 28.

  2. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-30

    The effects of copper on Fischer-Tropsch activity, selectivity and water-gas shift activity were studied over a wide range of syngas conversion. Three catalyst compositions were prepared for this study: (a) 100Fe/4.6Si/1.4K, (b) 100Fe/4.6Si/0.10Cu/1.4K and (c) 100Fe/4.6Si/2.0Cu/1.4K. The results are reported in Task 2. The literature review for cobalt catalysts is approximately 90% complete. Due to the size of the document, it has been submitted as a separate report labeled Task 6.

  3. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

    1997-10-31

    The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent.

  4. Quantitative separation and evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch reaction products having low sup 14 C-isotopic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbagh, H.A.; Chawla, B.; Halasz, J.; Davis, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to effect the separation of Fischer-Tropsch products, predominately hydrocarbons, into, first, alkane and alkene fractions, and, secondly, each of these fractions into their normal and branched components. Conditions for methods using a dry silica column for the first separation and molecular sieves for the second separation have identified that permit collection of sufficiently large samples for subsequent separations. The first separation has been effected so the normal to branched chain ratio has not been altered. Liquid chromatographic conditions have been found whereby the n-alkane fraction can then be separated to provide a pure sample of each alkane in the C{sub 8}--C{sub 24} carbon number range. The alkane fractions have been collected so that the {sup 14}C activity can be determined for each alkane.

  5. Effects of short-term cigarette smoke exposure on Fischer 344 rats and on selected lung proteins.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charleata A; Misra, Manoj

    2010-04-01

    A short-term 5-day cigarette smoke exposure study was conducted in Fischer 344 rats to identify smoke-induced lung protein changes. Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats at 5 weeks of age were randomly assigned to one of four exposure groups. Animals received filtered air (control) or 75, 200, or 400 mg total particulate matter (TPM)/m(3) of diluted Kentucky reference 3R4F cigarette smoke. Nose-only exposures were conducted for 3 hours/day for 5 consecutive days. Mean body weights were significantly reduced only in male rats exposed to 400 mg TPM/m(3). Body weight gains were significantly reduced in 200- and 400-mg TPM/m(3)-exposed males and in all smoke-exposed females compared with controls. Alveolar histiocytosis increased slightly in all smoke exposed-females and 200- and 400-mg TPM/m(3)-exposed males. Cyclooxygenase-2 staining increased at 400 mg TPM/m(3). Matrix metalloproteinase-12 staining of alveolar macrophages and bronchiolar epithelia increased in smoke-exposed animals, especially 400-mg TPM/m(3)-exposed females. Protein kinase C-alpha staining increased in macrophages at 200- and 400-mg TPM/m(3) doses. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases staining decreased in smoke-exposed tissues. The identified changed proteins play roles in inflammation, transformation, proliferation, stress activation, and apoptosis. PMID:20215583

  6. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.

    1991-02-28

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. The three routes to be investigated are: addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. Work conducted during the first quarter has concentrated in the design of a laboratory-scale bubble column slurry reactor (BCSR) capable of operating at suitable temperatures and pressures for each of the three routes defined above. For design purposes the reactor has been configured as a one-inch diameter bubble column reactor for conversion of synthesis gas and operating with a wax paraffin (C{sub 30}{sup +}) liquid medium. This design has been finalized, thereby reaching milestone M1. The paper discusses the important design parameters (hydrodynamics, mass transfer, kinetics, and heat transfer) as well as the relationship of lab scale to industrial scale BCSR, parameter estimations, and the design of the bench-scale BCSR. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Methyl isocyanate eight-day vapor inhalation study with Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, D.E.; Fowler, E.H.; Snellings, W.M.; Pritts, I.M.

    1987-06-01

    Groups of ten male and ten female Fischer 344 rats were exposed by inhalation 3.1, 0.6, 0.15, or 0.0 (control) ppm of methyl isocyanate (MIC) vapor 6 hr per day for 8 days (two 4-day sessions separated by a 2-day rest). Evaluation of toxic effects included body weight, food consumption, organ weights, and selected hematologic, ophthalmic, neurologic, gross anatomic, and histologic examinations. There were no deaths during the study. Rats of the 3.1 ppm exposure group had decreased body weights, food consumption, and blood oxygen saturation (males only). An increase in hemoglobin concentration (males only) and in lung weights (absolute and as a percentage of body weight) were also observed in the 3.1 ppm rats. Ophthalmic or neurofunctional behavior evaluations were negative for all MIC exposure groups. Only 3.1 ppm of MIC vapor resulted in lesions in the respiratory tract, 0.6 or 0.15 ppm did not. The types of lesions observed were inflammation and squamous metaplasia in the nasal cavity, trachea, and bronchi; inflammation of the bronchioles and alveoli; and submucosal fibroplasia of the bronchioles. No significant lesions were observed in tissues other than those of the respiratory tract in all MIC exposure groups. The results of this study indicate the current 0.2 ppm threshold limit value for MIC is not too high regarding toxicity.

  8. Female circumcision.

    PubMed

    Abu Daia, J M

    2000-10-01

    It is uncertain when female circumcision was first practiced, but it certainly preceded the founding of both Christianity and Islam. A review of past and current historical, popular and professional literature was undertaken, and 4 types of female circumcision were identified. Typically female circumcision is performed by a local village practitioner, lay person or by untrained midwives. Female genital mutilation is not accepted by any religious or medical opinion, and is a violation of human rights against helpless individuals who are unable to provide informed consent and who must therefore be protected through education and legislation. Complications of female circumcision can present after many years. Any medical practitioner (either for adult or pediatric) can be confronted with this issue of female circumcision, even in countries where this custom is not present, thus mandating the understanding of this complex issue. PMID:11369952

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B gene PTPN1: selection of tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and association with body fat, insulin sensitivity, and the metabolic syndrome in a normal female population.

    PubMed

    Spencer-Jones, Nicola J; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Carter, Nicholas D; O'Dell, Sandra D

    2005-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B negatively regulates leptin and insulin signaling, potentially contributing to hormonal resistance. We selected six tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 18 common variants in the protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B gene (PTPN1) and tested their effect on serum leptin, body fat, and measures of insulin sensitivity and the metabolic syndrome in a large sample of normal female Caucasian twins (n = 2,777; mean age, 47.4 +/- 12.5 years) from the St. Thomas' U.K. Adult Twin Registry. SNP rs718049 was significantly associated with waist circumference (P = 0.008) and central fat (P = 0.035) and also with Avignon's insulin sensitivity index (SiM) (P = 0.007), fasting insulin (P = 0.004), fasting glucose (P = 0.022), triglyceride (P = 0.023), and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.046). SNPs rs2282146 and rs1885177 were associated with SiM (P = 0.049 and P = 0.013, respectively), and 1484insG was associated with triglyceride (P = 0.029). A risk haplotype (7.3%) was associated with lower SiM (P = 0.036) and a protective haplotype (5.2%) with higher SiM (P = 0.057), with mean values in homozygotes differing by >1 SD (P = 0.003). The protective haplotype also showed lower triglyceride (P = 0.045) and lower systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006). Fine mapping analyses predicted significant associations with SiM and fasting insulin for several ungenotyped SNPs. PTPN1 variants appear to contribute to central fat and metabolic syndrome traits, secondary to their effect on insulin sensitivity. PMID:16249458

  10. Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald; Withers, Howard P.

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  11. Amino acids in a Fischer Tropsch type synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Lawless, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    One postulation is described for the presence of organic compounds in meteorites which states that they were formed during the condensation of the solar nebula. A viable laboratory simulation of these conditions can be modeled after the industrial Fischer Tropsch reaction, which is known to produce organic compounds called hydrocarbons. In this simulation, a mixture of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and ammonia is heated in the presence of iron meteorite. The reaction products for amino acids, a class of organic compounds important to life, were examined. A large number of these compounds is found in meteorites and other chemical evolution experiments, but only small quantities of a few amino acids were found in the present simulation work. These results are at odds with the existing literature in which many amino acids were reported.

  12. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for clean transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Bao, S.; O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Davis, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    The products from the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and the rates of conversion of the reactants (H{sub 2} and CO) have been determined for a range of flow rates. Based upon conversion rates, an iron catalyst should be utilized at lower CO conversion levels. The fraction of CO converted to hydrocarbons decreases with increasing CO conversion. Thus, it is suggested that a F-T process employing recycle or multiple reactors is more appropriate for an iron catalyst than operating a single reactor at high (> 95%) CO conversion levels. The data indicate that an iron catalyst is preferred over a cobalt catalyst for some process conditions (e.g., high space velocity, high total pressure).

  13. Studies of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction on Co(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerlings, J. J. C.; Zonnevylle, M. C.; de Groot, C. P. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch reaction has been studied over Co(0001) in the temperature range between 220 and 300 °C at 1 bar total pressure and an H 2 : CO ratio of 2 : 1. It was found that the activation energies for methane, ethane and propane formation are equ which suggests similar rate determining steps. We propose that α-hydrogenation of a C nH 2 n+1 surface species is rate limiting. Olefins are formed via β-dehydrogenation of the same species. The olefins take part in a consecutive reaction and are finally converted to paraffins. The product distribution was found to follow Schulz-Flory kinetics with a chain growth probability of 0.2 at 250 °C. Post-reaction spectroscopy with EELS and Auger indicated the presence of CO and CH x ( x = 1, 2, 3) fragments on the surface.

  14. The surface chemistry of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, D.J.; Hardenburgh, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    The indirect conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons via steam gasification followed by synthesis gas (CO/H/sub 2/) chemistry has been the subject of intensive study for a number of decades. A key technological challenge facing researchers in this area is control over the product distribution during the hydrocarbon synthesis step. In the case of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, it has been known that the addition of alkali to the metal catalyst has a significant impact on the product distribution. Iron catalysts treated with alkali produce less methane more alkenes and higher molecular weight products. In spite of numerous investigations, the details of this promotional effect are not understood on a molecular level. To explore the role of alkali in the surface chemistry of iron catalysts, the authors have carried out a combined surface science and catalytic kinetic study of a model iron catalyst with and without surface alkali.

  15. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Abrevaya, H.; Gala, H.B.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. The catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. Typical feed used to attain this level of conversion is preferred to have H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  16. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalyst for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  17. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale-up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2}:CO in the ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2}conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/h/gFe. The methane + ethane selectivity is desired to be no more than 4% and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

  18. Deuterated methoxyflurane anesthesia and renal function in Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, J.M.; Rice, S.A.; Mazze, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Inorganic fluoride (F-) production and renal function were assessed in six groups of Fischer 344 rats administered either methoxyflurane (MOF) or deuterated methoxyflurane (d4-MOF). One untreated and one phenobarbital (PB)-treated group were exposed for two hours to either air, 0.5 per cent (V/v) MOF, or 0.5 per cent (v/v) d4-MOF. Serum and urinary F- and serum urea nitrogen and creatinine were measured. Urine volume and urinary F- excretion were only slightly greater among MOF than among d4-MOF exposed animals. Pretreatment with PB, however, greatly enhanced F- production in MOF-exposed animals leading to marked renal impairment but only slightly enhanced F- production in d4-MOF animals leading to mild renal impairment. Thus, only in PB-pretreated animals could a biologically significant difference in nephrotoxicity be demonstrated for MOF and d4-MOF.

  19. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.

    1995-05-01

    The goal of the proposed research is to develop novel reactor operating strategies for the catalytic conversion of syngas to transportation grade fuels and oxygenates using near-critical (nc) fluids as reaction media. This will be achieved through systematic investigations aimed at a better fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical rate processes underlying catalytic syngas conversion in nc reaction media. Syngas conversion to fuels and fuel additives on Fe catalysts (Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) was investigated. Specific objectives are to investigate the effects of various nc media, their flow rates and operating pressure on syngas conversion, reactor temperature profiles, product selectivity and catalyst activity in trickle-bed reactors. Solvents that exhibit gas to liquid-like densities with relatively moderate pressure changes (from 25 to 60 bars) at typical syngas conversion temperatures (in the 220-280{degree}C range) will be chosen as reaction media.

  20. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  1. Product evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch derived fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.; Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have placed stringent requirements on the quality of transportation fuels. Most petroleum refiners are scrambling to meet provisions of the Amendments to be implemented between 1995 and 2000. These requirements will also have significant implications for the production of alternative fuels. These have been examined for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) derived fuels. This analysis was conducted in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project, Baseline Design/Economics for Advanced Fischer-Tropsch Technology, conducted by Bechtel and Amoco. The goal of this study was to develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal using gasification, syngas conversion in slurry reactors with iron catalysts, and conventional refinery upgrading of the F-T derived hydrocarbon liquids. One alternative case using ZSM-5 upgrading technology was also considered. This study included complete capital and operating cost estimates for the processes. To perform economic analyses for the different design cases, the products from the liquefaction plant had to be valued relative to conventional transportation fuels. This task was accomplished by developing a Linear Programming (LP) model for a typical midwest refinery, and then feeding the F-T liquids to the refinery. In this way, the breakeven value determined for these materials is indicative of the price they could command if available in the marketplace. Inputs to the LP model include: refinery size, configuration, feedstocks, products, specifications, prices, and operating and capital recovery costs. The model was set up to be representative of conditions anticipated for the turn of the century. This required inclusion of fuel specifications from the CAAA of 1990 which have or will come into force by the year 2000.

  2. Use of silicate crystallite mesoporous material as catalyst support for Fischer Tropsch reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Reinikainen, M.; Onodera, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Ebina, T.; Nagase, T.; Torii, K.; Kataja, K.; Chatterjee, A.

    1998-06-01

    Novel uniform mesoporous materials (silicate crystallite mesoporous material, SCMM) were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of Si, Mg and/or Al containing hydroxide precipitates, along with quaternary ammonium salt, and were applied as catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch reaction. SCMM is composed of aggregates of homogeneous layer silicate crystallites, as identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photographs which are structurally analogous to smectite clay. The mesopore of SCMM corresponds to interparticle space of disk-shaped crystallites (6-25 nm in diameter) aggregated by edge-to-face bonding. Two kinds of SCMM with variable negative charge locations were used as support materials of Co-catalysts for hydrogenation of CO. Conversion of CO was high on SCMM compared with that of silica gel. Furthermore, the main products obtained were hydrocarbons. In case of SCMM type with negative charge near the surface, olefins and branched hydrocarbons were efficiently produced in CO conversion reaction; where as another SCMM type having negative charge at the middle of crystallite platelets produced mainly normal hydrocarbons for the same reaction. This may be due to the role of the negative charge of SCMM which affects the chemical state of Co-catalyst supported on SCMM. The function of SCMM as compared to other mesoporous materials is better in terms of homogeneous and site-specific distribution of negative charge, which is further helpful in controlling the surface phenomenon as confirmed by the existence of linear CO species adsorbed on Co.

  3. Electrochemical determination of water in environmental hydraulic fluids using the karl Fischer reaction.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A; Lundström, M

    1997-10-01

    Different procedures based on the Karl Fischer reaction were investigated with respect to their applicability for water determinations in environmental hydraulic fluids:  (i) continuous coulometry using a recently described diaphragm-free cell; (ii) on-line stripping of water at elevated temperature using either continuous coulometry or direct potentiometry for detection of the liberated water. Except for one of the oils, Statoil PA, which is a poly(α-olefin) with certain polymers added, no significant difference was found among coulometry using an optimized imidazole-buffered methanolic reagent containing 75% (v/v) chloroform, the two different stripping techniques (working in the temperature interval 100-110 °C), and the commercially available Hydranal Coulomat AG-H. The high stability and sensitivity of the coulometric technique described made it possible to work with sample amounts in the low milligram-range, and this is shown to increase the reliability of the coulometric method as compared to normally used procedures. PMID:21639214

  4. Age-related changes in the rate of esterification of plasma cholesterol in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Carlile, S I; Kudchodkar, B J; Wang, C S; Lacko, A G

    1986-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and selected molecular species of plasma cholesteryl esters and triglycerides were determined in 6-, 12-, 15-, 18-, 21-, and 24-month-old Fischer-344 rats. Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity was also determined using two independent methods utilizing endogenous and exogenous substrates. Plasma cholesterol levels increased up to 18 months of age and then plateaued. Of the plasma triglyceride molecular species investigated (C50, C52, C54 and C56), only the levels of C52 increased linearly with age. The concentration of other triglyceride molecular species did not change with age. The fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification showed a decreasing trend with age, whereas, the net cholesterol esterification rate showed a gradual age related increase. However, this latter parameter remained unchanged with age when the data were normalized for body weight. The cholesterol esterification rates measured using an exogenous substrate (estimating LCAT enzyme levels) showed essentially no change with age. These data indicate that changes in the levels and/or composition of lipoprotein substrate(s) for LCAT are likely causes of the observed age-related changes in the fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification. The net esterification rate of plasma cholesterol was significantly correlated with the plasma triglyceride levels when the animals for all age groups were treated as one experimental group. PMID:3959602

  5. Thermal Stability Results of a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel With Various Blends of Aromatic Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Jennifer; Klettlinger, Suder

    2013-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) jet fuel composition differs from petroleum-based, conventional commercial jet fuel because of differences in feedstock and production methodology. F-T fuel typically has a lower aromatic and sulfur content and consists primarily of iso and normal paraffins. The ASTM D3241 specification for Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT) break point testing method was used to test the breakpoint of a baseline commercial grade F-T jet fuel, and various blends of this F-T fuel with an aromatic solution. The goal of this research is to determine the effect of aromatic content on the thermal stability of F-T fuel. The testing completed in this report was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. Two different aromatic content fuels from Rentech, as well as these fuels with added aromatic blend were analyzed for thermal stability using the JFTOT method. Preliminary results indicate a reduction in thermal stability occurs upon increasing the aromatic content to 10% by adding an aromatic blend to the neat fuel. These results do not specify a failure based on pressure drop, but only on tube color. It is unclear whether tube color correlates to more deposition on the tube surface or not. Further research is necessary in order to determine if these failures are true failures based on tube color. Research using ellipsometry to determine tube deposit thickness rather than color will be continued in follow-up of this study.

  6. Female Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  7. Female condoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... female condoms at most drugstores, STI clinics, and family planning clinics. You need to plan to have a ... Jensen JT, Mishell DR. Family planning: contraception, ... Katz VL, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  8. Iron on mixed zirconia-titania substrate Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Nordquist, Andrew F.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising iron co-deposited with or deposited on particles comprising a mixture of zirconia and titania, preferably formed by co-precipitation of compounds convertible to zirconia and titania, such as zirconium and titanium alkoxide. The invention also comprises the method of making this catalyst and an improved Fischer-Tropsch reaction process in which the catalyst is utilized.

  9. Diesel production from Fischer-Tropsch: the past, the present, and new concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Dieter Leckel

    2009-05-15

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is technically classified into two categories, the high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) and the low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) processes. The criterion for this classification is the operating temperature of the synthesis, which ranges between 310-340{sup o}C for the HTFT process and 210-260{sup o}C for the LTFT process. A Fischer-Tropsch facility can be divided into roughly three sections, synthesis gas (syngas) generation, FT synthesis, and refining of the synthetic crude (syncrude). Fischer-Tropsch refineries differ regarding the product upgrading, and both transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced. Regarding the FT refinery history, the configuration of each refinery also reflects the requirements of the fuel specification at that time. This paper gives a condensed overview of how Fischer-Tropsch facilities changed during the last 70 years and focuses in particular on the diesel fuel produced. Some conceptual flow schemes are additionally presented with emphasis on the combined upgrading of the high boiling part of the FT product spectrum with liquids derived from coal pyrolysis. 52 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Synthesis gas solubility in Fischer-Tropsch slurry: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K.C.; Lin, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the phase equilibrium behavior of synthesis gases and products in a Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactor. A semi-flow apparatus has been designed and constructed for this purpose. Measurements have been made for hydrogen, cabon monoxide, methane, ethane, ethylene, and carbon dioxide in a heavy n-paraffin at temperatures from 100 to 300)degree)C and pressures 10 to 50 atm. Three n-paraffin waxes: n-eicosane (n-C/sub 20/), n-octacosane )n-C/sub 28/), and n-hexatriacontane (n-C/sub 36/), were studied to model the industrial wax. Solubility of synthesis gas mixtures of H/sub 2/ and CO in n-C/sub 28/ was also determined at two temperatures (200 and 300)degree)C) for each of three gas compositions (40.01, 50.01, and 66.64 mol%) of hydrogen). Measurements were extended to investigate the gas solubility in two industrial Fischer-Tropsch waxes: Mobilwax and SASOL wax. Observed solubility increases in the order: H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, CO/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, at a given temperature pressure, and in the same solvent. Solubility increases with increasing pressure for all the gases. Lighter gases H/sub 2/ and CO show increased solubility with increasing temperature, while the heavier gases CO/sub 2/, ethane, and ethylene show decreased solubility with increasing temperature. The solubility of methane, the intermediate gas, changes little with temperature, and shows a shallow minimum at about 200)degrees)C or somewhat above. Henry's constant and partial molal volume of the gas solute at infinite dilution are determinedfrom the gas solubility data. A correlation is developed from the experimental data in the form on an equation of state. A computer program has been prepared to implement the correlation. 19 refs., 66 figs., 39 tabs.

  11. Eight-five day postexposure follow-up study in Fischer 344 rats after repeated exposures to methyl isocyanate vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, E.H.; Dodd, D.E.

    1987-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic lesions in the respiratory tract of Fischer 344 rats as a result of 4- or 8-days exposure (6 hr/day) of 3 ppm MIC and to characterize the postexposure development of these lesions up to day 85. All rats survived the exposure regimen, although significant decreases in body weight and encrustation of the eyes, nose, or mouth were observed. During the first 15 days of postexposure, the rats were hypoactive and had increased respiratory rates. Male mortality was as high as 63%; only 5% of the MIC-exposed females died. The cause of death was interpreted to be respiratory compromise complicated by anorexia and probably dehydration as well. During the next 28 postexposure days, 48% of the male survivors died, while only 3% of the female survivors died. Throughout the 85-day postexposure period, body weight gains in the MIC-treated groups were consistently below control values. Inflammatory and squamous metaplastic lesions of the respiratory tract, observed the day following completion of either the 4- or 8-day exposure regimen, decreased in both frequency and/or severity in survivors of the 85-day postexposure period, indicating recovery from the cytotoxic and irritating effects of MIC vapor. The squamous metaplastic epithelium was replaced by regenerative epithelium beginning in the deeper portion of the respiratory tract. Maturation of collagen occurred in the areas of submucosal fibroplasia.

  12. Der Anspruchshorizont des zweifach Anderen in der Bildungsphilosophie von Franz Fischer (The Horizon of Claims of the Twofold Other in the Educational Philosophy of Franz Fischer).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmied-Kowarzik, Wolfdietrich

    1999-01-01

    Examines two models of educational theory developed by Franz Fischer. One model defines education as a categorical reflection on the difference between a presupposed versus scientifically-explicable world, while the other grounds moral education on awareness of demands of the other person. Applies the models to the problem of otherness. (CMK)

  13. Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

    1989-02-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

  14. Intensified Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Process with Microchannel Catalytic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Hu, Jianli; Li, Shari; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Wang, Yong

    2009-02-28

    A microchannel catalytic reactor with improved heat and mass transport has been used for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to produce fuels and chemicals. This type of novel reactor takes advantages of highly active and selective catalysts with increased site density so that the FT synthesis process can be intensified. It was demonstrated that this microchannel reactor based process can be carried out at gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) as high as 60,000 hr-1 to achieve greater than 60% of one-pass CO conversion while maintaining low methane selectivity (<10%) and high chain growth probability(>0.9). Such superior FT synthesis performance has not ever been reported in the prior open literatures. The overall productivity to heavy hydrocarbons has been significantly improved over the conventional reactor technology. In this study, performance data were obtained in a wide range of pressure (10atm-35atm) and hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio (1-2.5). The catalytic system was characterized by BET, scanning electron microcopy (SEM), transmission electron microcopy(TEM), and H2 chemisorption. A three dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model were used to simulate temperature profiles in the exothermic reaction system in order to optimize the reactor design and intensify the synthesis process. Intraparticle non-isothermal characteristics are also analyzed for the FT synthesis catalyst.

  15. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Lech Nowicki; Jiang Wang; Wen-Ping Ma

    2003-09-29

    This report covers the first year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sup 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we have completed one STSR test with precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany). This catalyst was initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. The catalyst was tested at 13 different sets of process conditions, and had experienced a moderate deactivation during the first 500 h of testing (decrease in conversion from 56% to 50% at baseline process conditions). The second STSR test has been initiated and after 270 h on stream, the catalyst was tested at 6 different sets of process conditions.

  16. The development of a selective ruthenium Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Abrevaya, H.

    1989-01-01

    A new stable Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with very high selectivity to distillate fuels and with low light ends production was developed. This catalyst, which was made by a reverse micelle technique, contains 2.8% (by weight) ruthenium in the form of 4--6 nm particles on alumina and a proprietary modifier. The new modified ruthenium catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 814 hours at about 80% CO conversion, 2H{sub 2}:1 CO feed ratio, 208{degree}C at inlet, 62 atm and 150 gas hourly space velocity. In order to determine the catalyst's tolerance, the operational severity was increased between 814 hours and 1700 hours by increasing the temperature and space velocity to 225{degree}C at inlet and to 205 hr{sup {minus}1}, respectively. A deactivation rate of about 0.016%/hour was measured under these more severe conditions at about 70% conversion level. These results with the new modified ruthenium catalyst compare favorably with those reported for the two commercial Sasol processes. The Arge process makes approximately 38% distillate fuel with 14--18% light ends, while the Synthol process makes about 48% distillate with 38% light ends. 82 refs., 360 figs., 66 tabs.

  17. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Objectives are to develop active, stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. For a H[sub 2]-CO in molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, catalyst performance target is 88% CO+H[sub 2] conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe, with no more than 4% methane/ethane selectivity and 1% conversion loss per week. During this period, it was found that the performance of the slurry-phase iron and copper oxide-based catalyst depends on the amount of K. Five catalysts with differing K contents were studied. The catalysts with the lowest K were more active than the ones with higher K levels. The one with the middle K level was judged best.

  18. The hydrocarbon selectivity of cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1991-07-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was studied in a continuous-flow, well-stirred slurry reactor at 220 to 240{degrees}C, 0.5 to 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratios between 1.5 and 3.5, H{sub 2} conversions between 6 and 68%, and CO conversions between 11 and 73%. Increasing space velocity (decreasing conversion) or decreasing reactor H{sub 2}/CO ratio decreased the yield of (undesired) C{sub 1} products and increased the yield of (desired) C{sub 10}+ products. Reactor temperature and pressure had little effect on the carbon number distribution. These findings are interpreted in terms of the extent of the readsorption of 1-alkenes into growing chains on the catalyst surface. The relative selectivity to 1-alkenes by the primary synthesis and secondary reaction of l-alkenes to n-alkanes and 2-alkenes depends on reactor H{sub 2}/CO ratio and CO concentration. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  19. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, W.R. Jr.; Garwood, W.E.; Kuo, J.C.; Leib, T.M.; Nace, D.M.; Tabak, S.A.

    1987-08-04

    A processor is described for converting synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbons comprising the steps of: (a) charging the synthesis gas to a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis conversion zone containing a catalyst providing CO reducing characteristics to produce a waxy hydrocarbon liquid; (b) separating hydrocarbon wax from the waxy liquid; (c) catalytically cracking the wax in a fluidized bed of acid crystalline zeolite at cracking temperature under process conditions requiring a supply of heat to effect cracking, producing olefinic liquid hydrocarbon crackate in the gasoline and distillate boiling range along with olefinic light gas; (d) recovering distillate range hydrocarbons from the liquid crackate; (e) further converting the olefinic gasoline range hydrocarbon crackate and olefinic light gas under oligomerization conditions in contact with a shape selective medium pore acid oligomerization catalyst to upgrade at least a portion of the olefinic crackate and olefinic light gas to distillate range hydrocarbon product and producing by-product light fuel gas; (f) separating the light fuel gas from step (e) and passing the light fuel gas to cracking step (c) to supply heat.

  20. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.

    1992-10-01

    The goal of this research is to thoroughly investigate the feasibility of using supercritical fluid (SCF) solvent medium for carrying out Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. Research will address the systematic experimental investigations of FT synthesis over supported Fe and Co catalysts in a CSTR and in a fixed-bed reactor at typical synthesis temperatures (240-260[degrees]C). The SCF medium to be employed is n-Hexane (P[sub c] = 29.7 bar; [Tc] = 233.7[degrees]C), while n-Hexadecane will be employed as the liquid reaction medium. Overall conversion, product distribution and catalyst deactivation will be measured in each case for various feed H[sub 2]/CO ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2. Product analyses will be carried out using GC/TCD, GC/FID and GC/MS systems. The fresh and used catalysts will be characterized with respect to active metal dispersion, surface area and pore size distribution.

  1. Romania program targets methanol and Fischer-Tropsch research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    Currently, the chemical organic industry, the petrochemical and engine fuels industry in Romania are entirely based on hydrocarbons from oil. To reduce the oil dependence of this sector and to ensure the stipulated growth rate of 8-9%, research and development programs have been set up with a view to the diversification of raw materials. In research on hydrocarbons from alcohol conversion, three process variants are known, i.e. olefins from methanol, gasolines from methanol and a combined gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons from methanol. The Romanian process of methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is very flexible, with all the variants mentioned being carried out in the same plant by modifying the catalysts. In research on hydrocarbons from synthesis gas a modern process is being developed for gasification of brown coal in a fluidized bed, under pressure, in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. In the field of carbon oxide hydrogenation, studies have been carried out on selective Fischer-Tropsch processes in which the reaction products are high value hydrocarbon fractions.

  2. XPS characterization of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuivila, C.S.; Stair, P.C.; Butt, J.B.

    1986-04-01

    Analysis of Fe(2p) XPS and iron Auger spectra, combined with C(1s) XPS measurements, provides a valuable technique for studying the compositional behavior of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The extent of catalyst oxidation during synthesis at high conversions may be estimated in terms of the area contribution of oxide phases to the Fe(2p) spectrum. Similarities between the metal and carbide core level spectra are likely to complicate the determination of these phases when oxides are present. Analysis of the metal and carbide contributions to the iron Auger spectrum provides an alternate method for monitoring surface carbide formation during low conversion synthesis. The ''surface compositions'' obtained in this manner are at best semi-quantitative, since the contribution of a particular phase to the XPS or Auger spectrum will depend on both the amount and distribution of that phase within the detected volume. In spite of this, the spectrum fitting technique should prove to be useful in characterizing the time and conversion dependent nature of the active catalyst surface.

  3. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

  4. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, G.T.; Wilson, R.B.; McCarty, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The monoruthenium cluster catalyst with a molecular sieve support and the tetraruthenium cluster catalyst with a sodium-Y zeolite support have been examined for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) performance at high pressure (6.9 MPa) in a slurry reactor and compared with conventional ruthenium with an alumina support and clean fused iron catalysts. Of the four catalysts tested, only the conventional ruthenium catalyst exhibited a chain growth factor of 0.88 and a methane selectivity of 6.6%, which are typical of slurry reactor results reported for iron catalysts under similar conditions. The other three catalysts tested showed low chain growth factors (ranging from 0.44 to 0.57) and high methane selectivity (ranging from 20 to 32%). A cobalt catalyst with approximately 50% sulfur coverage was prepared and tested for FTS activity and selectivity at ambient pressure and compared with the FTS performance of the clean and fully sulfided cobalt catalysts. The introduction of sulfur caused a decrease in methane selectivity and an increase in olefin selectivity with only a moderate decline in activity. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

  5. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1998-04-01

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ''standard-catalyst'' developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  6. Technology development for iron fischer-tropsch catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1997-05-14

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the `standard-catalyst` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low- alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high- alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for 5 catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  7. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-04-30

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94% {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C.

  8. Technology Development for Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1997-12-16

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the `standard-catalyst` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  9. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Keogh, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low-or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the {open_quotes}standard-catalyst{close_quotes} developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  10. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur

    2004-09-29

    This report covers the second year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the second year of the project we completed the STSR test SB-26203 (275-343 h on stream), which was initiated during the first year of the project, and another STSR test (SB-28603 lasting 341 h). Since the inception of the project we completed 3 STSR tests, and evaluated catalyst under 25 different sets of process conditions. A precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany) was used in all tests. This catalyst was used initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. Also, during the second year we performed a qualitative analysis of experimental data from all three STSR tests. Effects of process conditions (reaction temperature, pressure, feed composition and gas space velocity) on water-gas-shift (WGS) activity and hydrocarbon product distribution have been determined.

  11. Bicervical Normal Uterus with Normal Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, CE; Anele, TI; Onyejelam, CC

    2014-01-01

    This is a report of the form of uterine anomaly involving a dual cervical canal in a side-by-side disposition with normal uterine cavity and normal vagina. It portrays a form of congenital uterine anomaly not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies. However, there has been a proposed reclassification of mullerian anomalies, which includes this type of anomaly under Type IIIc. The patient was a 31-year-old woman being managed for “secondary infertility.” To report a case of uterine anomaly that is not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, only few cases of bicervical normal uterus with normal vagina exist in the literature; one of the cases had an anterior-posterior disposition. This form of uterine abnormality is not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies and suggests that a complex interplay of events beyond the classical postulate gives rise to the female genital tract. PMID:25364608

  12. An Entry to Mixed NHC-Fischer Carbene Complexes and Zwitterionic Group 6 Metal Alkenyls.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Miguel A; Merinero, Alba D; Giner, Elena A; Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Ramírez de Arellano, Carmen

    2016-09-12

    The addition of NHCs to α,β-unsaturated Cr(0) and W(0) (Fischer) carbene complexes is strongly dependent on the electrophilicity of the carbene carbon. Electrophilic alkoxy-carbene complexes quantitatively react with NHCs to yield stable zwitterionic (racemic) Cr(0) - and W(0) -alkenyls with total regio- and E-stereoselectivity. Less electrophilic aminocarbenes react with NHCs to promote the displacement of a CO ligand and yield "mixed" NHC/Fischer biscarbenes in a process that is unprecedented in group 6 metal-carbene chemistry. In fact, the compounds prepared, are some of the scarce examples of Fischer bisylidenes reported in the literature. The electrochemistry of the zwitterionic Cr(0) - and W(0) -alkenylcomplexes made, show that these compounds have a strong reductor character, which is demonstrated in their reactions towards [Ph3 C][PF6 ]. The oxidation processes lead to new types of cationic Fischer mono- and biscarbene complexes having a charged NHC fragment in their structures, in a new example of the use of electron-transfer reactions as a method to prepare novel group 6 (Fischer) carbene complexes. PMID:27459647

  13. Female sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35–40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  14. Female sexuality.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M

    2015-07-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35-40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  15. Mechanism and kinetics of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over supported ruthenium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kellner, C.S.

    1981-06-01

    A detailed study of the kinetics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons, methanol, and acetaldehyde, over alumina- and silica-supported ruthenium catalysts has been carried out over a broad range of reaction conditions. Based on these results and information taken from the literature, mechanisms for the formation of normal paraffins, ..cap alpha..-olefins, methanol, and acetaldehyde have been proposed. Rate data were obtained between 448 and 548K, 1 and 10 atm, and H/sub 2//CO ratios between 1 and 3, utilizing a micro flow reactor operated at very low conversions. In addition to the studies performed with H/sub 2//CO mixtures, a series of experiments were carried out utilizing D/sub 2//CO mixtures. These studies were used to help identify rate limited steps and steps that were at equilibrium. A complementary investigation, carried out by in situ infrared spectroscopy, was performed using a Fourier Transform spectrometer. The spectra obtained were used to identify the modes of CO adsorption, the CO coverage, and the relative reactivity of different forms of adsorbed CO. It was established that CO adsorbs on alumina-supported Ru in, at least, two forms: (i) Ru-CO and (ii) OC-Ru-CO. Only the first of these forms participates in CO hydrogenation. The coverage of this species is described by a simple Langmuir isotherm. A reaction mechanism is presented for interpreting the kinetics of hydrocarbon synthesis, the olefin to paraffin ratio for each product, and the probability of chain propagation. Rate expressions based on this mechanism are reasonably consistent with the experimental data. Acetaldehyde, obtained mainly over silica-supported Ru, appears to be formed by a mechanism related to that for hydroformulation of olefins. The effect of the dispersion of Ru/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts on their specific activity and selectivity was also investigated. The specific activity for all products decreased rapidly with increasing dispersions.

  16. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Female Reproductive System Print A ... and female reproductive systems. continue What Is the Female Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  17. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    JAMES G. GOODWIN, JR.; JAMES J. SPIVEY; K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; SANTOSH K. GANGWAL

    1998-09-17

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity. The effect of silica addition via coprecipitation and as a binder to a doubly promoted Fischer-Tropsch synthesis iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K) was studied. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation, followed by binder addition and drying in a 1

  18. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; James J. Spivey; K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-03-29

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H2 ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity. The effect of silica addition via coprecipitation and as a binder to a doubly promoted Fischer-Tropsch synthesis iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K) was studied. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation, followed by binder addition and drying in a 1 m

  19. Carbon Isotope Effects in the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kliger, G.; Sevastyanov, V.

    2006-05-01

    Carbon isotopic composition was measured in products of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in flow reactor on the modified by clays Fe-catalyst at 280-300C and 30 atm. The initial gas mixture (synthesis-gas, SG) consisted of 50 vol% of N2, 20% of CO and 30% of H2. Using the GS-MS technique we analyzed 13C/12C in CO, CO2, CH4, higher hydrocarbons until C4 and the oil fraction in the reaction products. Two catalysts with different modification were used: with high and low yield of olefins. Three of 70-hours runs for each catalyst were realized. Five gas samples were taken during each run: 10, 20, 30, 50 and 70 hours and one cumulative oil sample after each run. The 13C/12C distribution vs carbon number is time-dependent for the olefin-rich products. For the olefin-poor runs the stationary state is characterized by depletion in 13C of heavier than CH4 hydrocarbons, thus, showing the "synthetic" pattern, like in DesMarais et al. (1982) experiments or in Murchison meteorite. However, the olefin-rich runs demonstrate these patterns only in the non-stationary, initial (10 h, 20 h) time range. The steady-state (50-70h) distribution (high and stable conversion of CO) for olefin-rich runs shows almost no fractionation between CH4 and higher hydrocarbons. The concentration distribution of light hydrocarbons in our experiments was similar to that obtained by Hu et al. (1998), but with much higher conversion of CO (>95%).

  20. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on ALD-synthesized Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Norman, Staci A.

    Cobalt catalysts were prepared on porous Al2O 3 and W/Al2O3 supports by atomic layer deposition (ALD) that used sequential reactions of cobaltocene (CoCp2) and H 2 at 483 to 523 K. This preparation method avoided formation of an intermediate oxide, so the catalysts could be activated at lower temperatures. Some of these catalysts had CO reaction rates per g of Co in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) that were three times those reported for Co catalysts prepared by incipient wetness. The FTS reacts CO and H2 to form hydrocarbon liquids that can used as synthetic fuels. The rate of FTS depended on the number of ALD cycles, and catalysts prepared with one cycle had activities equivalent to incipient wetness Co catalysts; the highest reaction rate per g of catalyst was obtained for catalysts prepared using four ALD cycles. Two types of Co were observed on the alumina surface using TEM: Co particles with diameters between 0.6 and 1.8 nm (75% were smaller than 1 nm), and Co crystalline planes that were as large as 35 nm. Cobalt catalysts prepared by ALD retained adsorbed ligands that appeared to be stable for at least eight months at room temperature. Tungsten was deposited onto porous Al2O 3 by ALD to provide a catalyst support with higher thermal conductivity because the FTS reaction is highly exothermic. The W indeed increased thermal conductivity, and the resulting supports were used for Co ALD following deposition of an Al2O3 ALD layer. However, although Co deposits on ALD Al2O3, the Co had no activity for FTS, apparently because the ALD Al2O3 was amorphous. In contrast ALD Al 2O3 that was heat treated at high temperature was partially crystalline and served as a support for an active FTS catalyst.

  1. Recent developments in Sasol Fischer-Tropsch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, M.E.

    1986-04-01

    When considering improvements in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) route for producing liquid fuels from coal, it is important to bear in mind the relative costs of the various process steps. The advantage of a big improvement in the selectivity of the FT synthesis (an ideal case would be one which produces only gasoline and diesel fuel) is that this would lower the costs of both the product separation and the refinery sections, which, together account for 22% of the total, Obvious provisos, however, are that the cost of the catalyst should not be markedly increased and that its conversion activity should remain high; otherwise the gains in say the refinery would be negated by increased FT synthesis costs. Elimination of certain products do not necessarily improve the economics. If the FT process made no ethylene, the expensive cryogenic separation unit could be replaced by a cheaper process but this would not be a real gain as the market value of ethylene relative to that of liquid fuels justifies its recovery. A similar situation holds for the alcohols and ketones produced in the FT process. If these products were absent then the expensive process of first recovering them from the FT water and then refining them would significantly lower the overall costs. (Note that these products would have to be completely absent and not just lowered as the latter would have little impact on the economics of recovery as the volume of water to be processed would remain unchanged.) These low molecular mass alcohols and ketones, however, sell at high prices; and furthermore, the alcohols are valuable as gasoline octane boosters. Thus the production and recovery of these components are justified.

  2. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND CONBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Burtron H. Davis

    2000-10-01

    The use of alkali promoters has been widely practiced. However, data to compare various promoters is limited for the iron-based catalysts and much of the available data were obtained at low pressure or under a variety of reaction conditions. The importance of the alkali promoter in determining catalytic activity, stability and selectivity merits a comparison of the promoters under suitable reaction conditions. The present study utilizes medium pressure synthesis conditions to compare the alkali promoters under the same reaction conditions and over a wide range of conversion levels. Iron-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts undergo a series of phase transformations during activation and use. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas typically results in the conversion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and ultimately to one or more carbides. During FT synthesis, iron carbides can be oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} if the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2}/CO ratios are high enough. There has been considerable debate about the active phase of the FT synthesis. Some studies have indicated an active oxide species while most have supported a carbide species. Moessbauer spectroscopy has proven to be an effective technique for the analysis of iron-based FT catalysts. In situ Moessbauer studies have been reported; however, these studies have been performed at low pressure and low conversions. Studies performed at industrially relevant conditions have generally involved removing the catalyst from the reactor followed by passivation which, if not performed properly, will oxidize the catalyst. Herein are reported the Moessbauer results obtained on an unpromoted precipitated iron catalyst that was activated and reacted in a slurry phase, continuous stirred tank reactor at high conversion and under industrially relevant conditions.

  3. Ultrafine particles of iron in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, D.; Pandya, K.

    1994-12-31

    Though direct combustion of natural gas is the most efficient use of this abundant, inexpensive, and cleaner fossil fuel, its potential to replace existing less efficient feedstocks for downstream processes is enormous. Direct conversion of methane to useful products under mild conditions is an ongoing area of research, and a few reported successes include higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}-C{sub 6}) synthesis on Pt at 250{degrees}C, Hg-catalyzed synthesis of methanol at 180{degrees}C, and acetic acid synthesis catalyzed by aqueous RhCl{sub 3} at 100{degrees}C. Since these approaches are in early stages of development, improvements in other known routes are of interest. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is an indirect route to catalytic production of liquid fuels from synthesis gas derived from carbonaceous sources. The process is still uneconomical for widespread use due to low space-time-yield (STY), low product selectivity, and catalyst intolerance to sulfur. To address these aspects, a few reports describe the use of ultrafine particle (UFP) catalysts in slurry-phase F-T synthesis, We recently reported that a commercially available unsupported UFP FeZO{sub 3} material (NANOCAT{trademark}) (Mean particle diameter (MPD) = 3 nm; surface area (SA) - 255 m{sup 2}/g) slurried in a C{sub 30} hydrocarbon solvent, after reduction at 280{degrees}C under CO, catalyzed conversion of balanced synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO = 2/1) at {>=} 220{degrees}C and {<=} 3 MPa. Described below are additional runs carried out to further scrutinize the Fe UFP system.

  4. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Goodwin, J.G.; Spivey, J.J.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-03-26

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRS) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modem coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the FT catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity.

  5. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Goodwin, J.S.; Spivey, J.J.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-09-22

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity.

  6. Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

    2008-10-28

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

  7. The renaissance of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: on the multifaceted catalyst deactivation behaviour.

    PubMed

    de Smit, Emiel; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, which are applied in the conversion of CO and H2 into longer hydrocarbon chains, are historically amongst the most intensively studied systems in heterogeneous catalysis. Despite this, fundamental understanding of the complex and dynamic chemistry of the iron-carbon-oxygen system and its implications for the rapid deactivation of the iron-based catalysts is still a developing field. Fischer-Tropsch catalysis is characterized by its multidisciplinary nature and therefore deals with a wide variety of fundamental chemical and physical problems. This critical review will summarize the current state of knowledge of the underlying mechanisms for the activation and eventual deactivation of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and suggest systematic approaches for relating chemical identity to performance in next generation iron-based catalyst systems (210 references). PMID:19020686

  8. Process design and solvent recycle for the supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wensheng Linghu; Xiaohong Li; Kenji Asami; Kaoru Fujimoto

    2006-02-01

    A recycle reactor system for supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was successfully designed and tested. The new reactor system has these characteristics: (1) integration of supercritical Fischer-Tropsch reactions, natural separation of produced wax from liquid phase, and recycle of the solvent and (2) natural recycle of solvent driven by self-gravity. A 20% Co/SiO{sub 2} catalyst and n-hexane were used as a catalyst and supercritical fluid, respectively. The results show that the average CO conversion at the steady state was 45% with recycle and 58% without recycle. The lumped hydrocarbon products distribution did not have any obvious difference between with and without recycle operation; however, {alpha}-olefin content of products with recycle was lower than that without recycle. The XRD result indicates that most of the reduced cobalt remains in the metallic state during the Fischer-Tropsch reactions for both cases. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts must undergo a pretreatment in order to be active. As part of the authors comprehensive study to maximize the activity of iron based precipitated Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, they are currently attempting to optimize the activation procedure. Although they are able to achieve high activity using CO pretreatment, the catalysts tend to deactivate suddenly and rapidly after 500 hr of synthesis. Kolbel reports high CO conversion comparable to these results at a lower gas flow (2.4 vs. 3.4 nL/hr-g(Fe)); however, he achieved greater stability with conversions reported to be 90% after 1,400 hrs. One possibility for Kolbel`s higher stability could be due to the activation procedure. Herein are reported the initial results of a study to optimize the catalyst composition and the operating conditions for the iron based slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis when synthesis gas activation is utilized.

  10. Low nitrogen iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and conversion of synthesis gas therewith

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, W.K.; Haag, W.O.; Kirker, G.W.; Klocke, D.J.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a process for converting syngas to hydrocarbons comprising: (a) contacting an iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with a syngas stream under conditions effective to achieve high conversion of the syngas to substantial amounts of C/sub 3//sup +/ carbon compounds; (b) contacting the effluent stream from (a) with a shape selective crystalline zeolite having a Constraint Index of about 1 to 12; and (c) recovering from the effluent stream of (b) gasoline and distillate materials; the improvement which comprises preparing the iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst by a process which continuously precipitates an aqueous solution containing iron nitrate with aqueous ammonia at a pH of about 6.5 to 6.9 and a temperature ranging from about 70/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C and thereafter washing the resulting precipitate with an aqueous wash solution to produce a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing less than about 500 ppm nitrogen.

  11. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  12. Plasma visfatin levels and mRNA expression of visfatin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages from normal weight females with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JING; ZHOU, LINGLING; TANG, LIULIN; XU, LIANGZHI

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common reproductive endocrinology disease, however, an explicit etiology is not known. Insulin resistance (IR) appears to be central to the pathogenesis of PCOS and inflammation may be significant in the pathogenesis of IR in PCOS. The aims of the present study were to investigate the plasma visfatin level and the gene expression of visfatin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (PBMMs) from PCOS patients, in addition to investigating the association between PCOS and IR. A total of 21 PCOS patients and 21 control subjects were enrolled in the study; the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was considered to be a stratified method for establishing the subgroups. Fasting blood samples were collected and the levels of sex hormones, insulin, glucose, blood lipids and visfatin were measured. In addition, visfatin gene expression levels in PBMCs and PBMMs were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The plasma visfatin and gene expression levels of visfatin in PBMCs and PBMMs were not observed to increase in the normal weight PCOS and normal weight IR patients. Furthermore, plasma visfatin levels did not correlate with the normal weight PCOS patients or the normal weight IR patients per se. Further investigation into the role of visfatin in the pathogenesis of PCOS or IR should examine macrophages in the tissues, rather than macrophages in the peripheral blood. PMID:24940414

  13. Studying the fischer tropsch synthesis on alumina support cobalt base catalyst in fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oues, Adnan Khalil

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composed of cobalt supported on alumina was prepared. This catalyst was cobalt/alumina (Co/AL2O3). The physical characterization of the catalyst was conducted using surface area analysis through the BET method, and particle size analysis. Fischer-Tropsch experiments were conducted in a fixed bed reactor. A flow rate of 100sml/min was selected based experimentally. Two temperatures were 330, and 350°C, and three different pressures as follows 145, 217.6, and 290 psig. The results were evaluated and studied based on conversion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, in addition to selectivity of products.

  14. Synthesis of octane enhancer during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.

    1991-12-15

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

  15. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.

    1992-06-10

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

  16. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.

    1991-10-15

    The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butytl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; (2) addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and, (3) addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

  17. Certification of the reference material of water content in water saturated 1-octanol by Karl Fischer coulometry, Karl Fischer volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Ma, Kang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jia; Sun, Guohua; Li, Hongmei

    2012-10-15

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) of water content are widely used in the calibration and validation of Karl Fischer coulometry and volumetry. In this study, the water content of the water saturated 1-octanol (WSO) CRM was certified by Karl Fischer coulometry, volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (Q NMR). The water content recovery by coulometry was 99.76% with a diaphragm-less electrode and Coulomat AG anolyte. The relative bias between the coulometry and volumetry results was 0.06%. In Q NMR, the water content of WSO is traceable to the International System (SI) of units through the purity of internal standard. The relative bias of water content in WSO between Q NMR and volumetry was 0.50%. The consistency of results for these three independent methods improves the accuracy of the certification of the RM. The certified water content of the WSO CRM was 4.76% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.09%. PMID:23442697

  18. A STUDY OF FISCHER 344 RATS EXPOSED TO SILICA DUST FOR SIX MONTHS AT CONCENTRATIONS OF 0, 2, 10 OR 20 MG / M3.

    SciTech Connect

    KUTZMAN,R.S.

    1984-02-01

    The major objective of this study was to relate the results of a series of functional tests to the compositional and structural alterations in the rat lung induced by subchronic exposure to silica dust. Fischer-344 rats were exposed for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 6 months to either 0, 2, 10, or 20 mg SiO{sub 2}/m{sup 3}. The general appearance of the exposed rats was not different from that of the controls. Interestingly, female rats exposed to silica dust, at all tested concentrations, gained more weight than the controls. The lung weight and the lung-to-body weight ratio was greater in the male rats exposed to the highest concentration of silica dust.

  19. CHAIN-LIMITING OPERATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal

    2000-11-01

    The use of pulsing to limit the chain growth of the hydrocarbon products of the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis in order to maximize the yield of diesel-range (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}) products was examined on three high-chain-growth-probability ({alpha} {ge} 0.9) FT catalysts. On a Co-ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} FT synthesis catalyst the application of H{sub 2} pulsing causes significant increase in CO conversion, and only an instantaneous increase in undesirable selectivity to CH{sub 4}. Increasing the frequency of H{sub 2} pulsing enhances the selectivity to C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} compounds but the chain-growth probability {alpha} remains essentially unaffected. Increasing the duration of H{sub 2} pulsing results in enhancing the maximum obtained CO conversion and the instantaneous selectivity to CH{sub 4}. An optimum set of H{sub 2} pulse parameters (pulse frequency and duration) is required for maximizing the yield of desirable diesel-range C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} products. On a high-{alpha} Fe/K/Cu/SiO{sub 2} FT synthesis catalyst H{sub 2} pulsing enhances the yield of C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} but at the same time decreases the catalyst activity (CO conversion) and increases the selectivity to CH{sub 4}. On the other hand, pulsing with CO also increases the yield of C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} but has no impact on the selectivity to CH{sub 4} or CO{sub 2} and decreases catalytic activity only moderately. In contrast to these catalysts, H{sub 2} pulsing on a high-{alpha} Ru/alumina FT synthesis catalyst has only minimal effect on activity and product distribution, showing enhanced activity towards methanation and water-gas-shift at the expense of FT synthesis. However, these observations are based on experiments performed at a significantly lower reaction pressure (ca. 26 atm) and higher reaction temperature (210-250 C) than those commonly used for supported-Ru FT catalysts (typically 100-1000 atm, 160-170 C).

  20. FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2003-04-23

    This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. X. Lang; Dr. S. Chokkaram; Dr. L. Nowicki; G. Wei; Dr. Y. Ding; Dr. B. Reddy; Dr. S. Xiao

    1999-07-22

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the US will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Some of the F-T catalysts synthesized and tested at Texas A and M University under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89868 were more active than any other known catalysts developed for maximizing production of high molecular weight hydrocarbons (waxes). The objectives of the present contract were to demonstrate repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of preparation procedures of two of these catalysts on a laboratory scale. Improvements in the catalyst performance were attempted through the use of: (a) higher reaction pressure and gas space velocity to maximize the reactor productivity; (b) modifications in catalyst preparation steps; and (c) different pretreatment procedures. Repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of catalyst synthesis procedure have been successfully demonstrated in stirred tank slurry reactor tests. Reactor space-time-yield was increased up to 48% by increasing reaction pressure from 1.48 MPa to 2.17 MPa, while maintaining the gas contact time and synthesis gas conversion at a constant value. Use of calcination temperatures above 300 C, additional CaO promoter, and/or potassium silicate as the source of potassium promoter, instead of potassium bicarbonate, did not result in improved catalyst performance. By using different catalyst activation procedures they were able to increase substantially the catalyst activity, while maintaining low methane and gaseous hydrocarbon selectivities. Catalyst productivity in runs SA-0946 and SA-2186 was 0.71 and 0.86 gHC/g-Fe/h, respectively, and this represents 45-75% improvement in productivity relative to that achieved in Rheinpreussen's demonstration plant

  2. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  3. Subtask 3.4 - Fischer - Tropsch Fuels Development

    SciTech Connect

    Strege, Joshua; Snyder, Anthony; Laumb, Jason; Stanislowski, Joshua; Swanson, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Under Subtask 3.4, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) examined the opportunities and challenges facing FischerTropsch (FT) technology in the United States today. Work was completed in two distinct budget periods (BPs). In BP1, the EERC examined the technical feasibility of using modern warm-gas cleanup techniques for FT synthesis. FT synthesis is typically done using more expensive and complex cold-gas sweetening. Warm-gas cleanup could greatly reduce capital and operating costs, making FT synthesis more attractive for domestic fuel production. Syngas was generated from a variety of coal and biomass types; cleaned of sulfur, moisture, and condensables; and then passed over a pilot-scale FT catalyst bed. Laboratory and modeling work done in support of the pilot-scale effort suggested that the catalyst was performing suboptimally with warm-gas cleanup. Long-term trends showed that the catalyst was also quickly deactivating. In BP3, the EERC compared FT catalyst results using warm-gas cleanup to results using cold-gas sweetening. A gas-sweetening absorption system (GSAS) was designed, modeled, and constructed to sweeten syngas between the gasifier and the pilot-scale FT reactor. Results verified that the catalyst performed much better with gas sweetening than it had with warm-gas cleanup. The catalyst also showed no signs of rapid deactivation when the GSAS was running. Laboratory tests in support of this effort verified that the catalyst had deactivated quickly in BP1 because of exposure to syngas, not because of any design flaw with the pilot-scale FT reactor itself. Based on these results, the EERC concludes that the two biggest issues with using syngas treated with warm-gas cleanup for FT synthesis are high concentrations of CO{sub 2} and volatile organic matter. Other catalysts tested by the EERC may be more tolerant of CO{sub 2}, but volatile matter removal is critical to ensuring long-term FT catalyst operation. This subtask was funded through

  4. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight

  5. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYSTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2005-09-29

    This report covers the third year of this research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we utilized experimental data from the STSR, that were obtained during the first two years of the project, to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations and estimate kinetic parameters. We used a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) with estimated values of binary interaction coefficients for the VLE calculations. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Occasional discrepancies (for some of the experimental data) between calculated and experimental values of the liquid phase composition were ascribed to experimental errors. The VLE calculations show that the vapor and the liquid are in thermodynamic equilibrium under reaction conditions. Also, we have successfully applied the Levenberg-Marquardt method (Marquardt, 1963) to estimate parameters of a kinetic model proposed earlier by Lox and Froment (1993b) for FTS on an iron catalyst. This kinetic model is well suited for initial studies where the main goal is to learn techniques for parameter estimation and statistical analysis of estimated values of model parameters. It predicts that the chain growth parameter ({alpha}) and olefin to paraffin ratio are independent of carbon number, whereas our experimental data show that they vary with the carbon number

  6. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of /sup 125/I-pindolol binding in Fischer 344 rat brain: changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density with aging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-05-01

    Age-related changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density in Fischer 344 rat brain were examined using in vitro /sup 125/I-pindolol (IPIN) binding and quantitative autoradiographic analysis. Localized protein concentrations were determined using a new quantitative histological technique, and these were used to normalize the densities of receptors. Saturation binding studies in brain sections revealed 40-50% decreases in beta-adrenergic receptor density in the thalamus of 23-25-month-old and the cerebellum and brainstem of both 18-19-month-old and 23-25-month-old compared to 4-6-month-old rats. The loss of cerebellar beta-adrenergic receptors may be correlated with reports of deficits in sensitivity to beta-adrenergic-mediated transmission in the cerebellum of aged rats. No changes in specific IPIN binding with age were observed in rat cortex or hippocampus. In all areas examined no age-related differences were observed in receptor affinity. No changes in protein concentration were found in any of the areas examined in the different aged animals. These results demonstrate a region-specific loss of beta-adrenergic receptors with age in the brain of Fischer 344 rats.

  7. DOSE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF THE ANTIPROGESTIN, RU486, ON SEXUAL BEHAVIOR OF NATURALLY-CYCLING FISCHER RATS

    PubMed Central

    Uphouse, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    Regularly cycling Fischer female rats were treated with either a low (5 mg/kg) or high (5 mg/RAT; approximately 30 mg/kg) dose of the antiprogestin, RU486, before the morning of proestrus or on the morning of proestrus. The emergence of sexual behavior after treatment with RU486 was examined in a mating test with a sexually active male rat. Lordosis behavior was remarkably resistant to the effects of RU486. Only the high dose of RU486 given the evening before proestrus, approximately 22 hours before mating, reduced lordosis behavior. Independent of dose or time of treatment, proceptivity was reduced and resistance to the male’s attempts to mount was increased by RU486 treatment. In addition, the effect of a 5 min restraint stress on sexual behavior was examined. In contrast to the relative resistance of lordosis behavior of unrestrained rats to RU486 treatment, RU486 treated rats showed a significant decline in lordosis behavior after restraint. These findings allow the suggestion that the emergence of lordosis behavior is relatively resistant to the antiprogestin while the maintenance of lordosis behavior after restraint may require participation of intracellular progesterone receptors. PMID:25591479

  8. Specialty applications offer added options to transportation fuel outlets for Fischer-Tropsch conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Oukaci, R.; Singleton, A.H.

    1998-12-31

    In the past decade estimated global reserves of natural gas have increased by more than 30 percent to more than 5,300 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF). Of the current total, about 2,800 TCF are surplus to any current or anticipated demand. This ``overhand`` of natural gas availability has precipitated the development of various forms of the Fischer-Tropsch process for converting this resource to liquid hydrocarbons having premium value as transportation fuel feedstocks. The Williams Companies has been active in this field through the development of the GasCat process that focuses on supported cobalt catalysts and the slurry bubble column reactor applied to reserves capable of producing 500 million SCFD and higher quantities of natural gas, converting this into liquids production of 50,000 barrels/day and greater. In the course of the development of the GasCat process, an evaluation has been made of certain specialty applications of the hydrocarbons that can be produced. The high normal paraffin content (98%+), high purity (no S-, N-, O-compounds, aromatics, or metal inclusions) of the liquid products, as well as their low or no odor, generally difficult to achieve with petroleum products, make these F-T products exceptionally valuable solvents for a wide range of specialty applications. Similarly, the normal paraffinic nature and high purity of the F-T waxes provide the latter with outstanding properties that may result in a gradual displacement of petroleum waxes in many applications. An extensive evaluation of F-T products upgrading processes for redirection of F-T product slate to higher value specialty chemicals and waxes was carried out using F-T reactor effluents collected during some long catalyst performance runs. The specialty products were evaluated by GC, FTIR, NMR and a number of ASTM methods to determine their composition and physical properties. The results suggest that the smaller but higher value specialty applications may beneficially influence

  9. Isopropanol vapor inhalation oncogenicity study in Fischer 344 rats and CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Burleigh-Flayer, H; Garman, R; Neptun, D; Bevan, C; Gardiner, T; Kapp, R; Tyler, T; Wright, G

    1997-04-01

    The potential oncogenic effects of isopropanol, a widely used solvent, were investigated. Four groups of animals, each consisting of 75 CD-1 mice/sex and 75 Fischer 344 rats/sex, were exposed to isopropanol vapor (CAS No. 67-63-0) at target concentrations of 0 (filtered air control), 500, 2500, or 5000 ppm. Animals assigned to the core group (55 mice/sex/group and 65 rats/sex/group) were exposed for 6 hr/day, 5 consecutive days/week for at least 78 weeks for the mice or 104 weeks for the rats. Ten mice/sex/group and 10 rats/sex/group were assigned to an interim euthanasia group and were terminated during Weeks 54 and 73, respectively. In addition, 10 mice/sex/group were assigned to a recovery group and did not receive any further exposure following Week 53 but were retained until the core group of animals was euthanized. Transient signs of narcosis were observed for both mice and rats during exposure to 2500 and 5000 ppm and following exposure for mice from the 5000-ppm group. Increased mortality (100% versus 82% for controls) and a decreased mean survival time (577 days versus 631 days for controls) were noted for male rats from the 5000-ppm group. Increases in body weight and/or body weight gain were typically observed for both sexes of mice and rats from the 2500- and 5000-ppm groups throughout the study. Urinalysis and urine chemistry changes indicative of impaired kidney function (i.e., decreased osmolality and increased total protein, volume, and glucose) were noted for male rats from the 2500-ppm group as well as for male and female rats from the 5000-ppm group. At the interim euthanasia, a concentration-related increase in testes weight (absolute and relative as a percentage of body and brain weight) was observed for male rats. Concentration-related increases in absolute and relative liver weight (as a percentage of body weight) were observed for male and female mice. In addition, increased absolute and/or relative (as a percentage of body and brain weight

  10. Comparative 90-day dietary study of paraffin wax in Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Griffis, L C; Twerdok, L E; Francke-Carroll, S; Biles, R W; Schroeder, R E; Bolte, H; Faust, H; Hall, W C; Rojko, J

    2010-01-01

    Highly refined mineral hydrocarbons (MHCs) such as low melting point paraffin wax (LMPW) and low viscosity white oils can cause inflammatory changes in the liver and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of the Fischer-344 (F-344) rat. In contrast, only minimal MLN changes are seen in the Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rat with no changes in the liver. In this study, the response of female F-344 and S-D rats was compared after 90days dietary treatment with 0%, 0.2% or 2% LMPW. Effects in the F-344 rats were significantly greater than in the S-D rats: increased liver and splenic weights and inflammatory changes (hepatic microgranulomas) in these tissues were observed only in the F-344 rats. Microgranulomas in the MLNs were observed in both strains but the effects were substantially greater in the F-344 rats. Cellular markers of inflammation were examined in a subset of rats from each group using immunohistochemical staining. An increase in staining for CD3 (T-cells), CD8a (suppresser/cytotoxic T-cells) and CD4 (helper T-cells) correlated with an increase in lymphoid cells in the livers of treated F-344 rats. The majority of macrophages in the hepatic microgranulomas of treated F-344 rats were negative for the ED2 marker, indicating a likely origin from non-resident macrophages. Electron microscopy showed Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in treated F-344 rats. However, lysozyme staining (indicating activation of epithelioid macrophages) decreased with increasing granuloma size. Non-ED2 expressing cells may have been recruited but not sufficiently activated to be lysozyme positive. Inflammatory changes in the cardiac mitral valve noted in previous studies of LMPW were also seen in the F-344 rats in this study but not in the S-D rats. Chemical analysis showed that MHC accumulated in livers from treated F-344 but not S-D rats and the concentration was more than 2-fold greater in MLNs from the F-344 than from the S-D rats. The F-344 appears to be more immunologically sensitive to

  11. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  12. IMPAIRMENT OF CALCIUM HOMEOSTASIS BY HEXACHLOROBENZENE (HCB) EXPOSURE IN FISCHER 344 RATS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) has resulted in demineralization of bone with osteoporosis resulting. Experiments were undertaken to investigate the effects of HCB on the homeostatic mechanism of calcium metabolism. Fischer 344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 or ...

  13. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOTOXICITY OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED 2-METHOXYACETIC ACID IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that the glycol ether 2-methoxyethanol (ME) immunotoxic in the rat. n this study, the immunotoxicity of 2-methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the principal metabolite of ME, was evaluated in adult male Fischer 3 rats. ats were dosed by gavage with MAA on ten cons...

  14. Effect of potassium promotion on iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Raje, A.P.; O`Brien, R.J.; Davis, B.H.

    1998-11-15

    The effect of potassium on Fischer-Tropsch catalyst activity, kinetic parameters, and selectivity has been investigated for a precipitated iron catalyst that was employed with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas. A wide range of synthesis gas conversions have been obtained by varying space velocities over catalysts with various potassium loadings. Differing trends in catalyst activity with potassium loading were observed depending on the space velocity of synthesis gas conversion. As potassium loading increased, the catalyst activity either decreased (low conversion), passed through a maximum (intermediate conversion), or increased (high conversion). This is shown to be a result of the increasing dependency of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the hydrogen formed by the water-gas shift reaction with increasing synthesis gas conversions. Both the rate constant and the adsorption parameter in a common two-parameter Fischer-Tropsch rate expression decreased with potassium loading; therefore, observed maxima in Fischer-Tropsch rate with potassium loading can be due to the opposing influences of these parameters. The effect of potassium on alkene selectivity was dependent on the number of carbon atoms of the hydrocarbons as well as the carbon monoxide conversion level. The extent of isomerization of 1-alkene product decreased with potassium loading, while the selectivity to methane decreased only slightly with increasing potassium content at CO conversions about 50% and higher.

  15. Ordered mesoporous carbon nanochannel reactors for high-performance Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Kwak, Geunjae; Jun, Ki-Won; Hwang, Jongkook; Lee, Jinwoo

    2013-06-01

    A hexagonally ordered mesoporous carbon, CMK-3, was utilized as a support for a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Each array of elongated pore structures with Co nanoparticles can be regarded as a nanochannel reactor. Due to the pore confinement and the hydrophobic nature of the support, this catalyst demonstrated excellent catalytic performance. PMID:23482917

  16. Fischer-Tropsch kinetic studies with cobalt-manganese oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, M.J.; Everson, R.C.; Espinoza, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to establish the reaction mechanism for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, in the presence of the water-gas shift reaction, over a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst under conditions favoring the formation of gaseous, liquid, and solid (waxes) hydrocarbons (210--250 C and 6--26 bar). A micro-fixed-bed reactor was used with a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst prepared by a coprecipitation method. An integral reactor model involving both Fischer-Tropsch and water-gas shift reaction kinetics was used to describe the overall performance. Reaction rate equations based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson models for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction (hydrocarbon forming) and empirical reaction rate equations for the water-gas shift reaction from the literature were tested. Different combinations of the reaction rate equation were evaluated with the aid of a nonlinear regression procedure. It was found that a reaction rate equation for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction based on the enolic theory performed slightly better than a reaction rate equation based on the carbide theory. Reaction rate constants for the cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst are reported, and it is concluded that this catalyst also behaves very much like iron-based catalysts.

  17. The facile fabrication of magnetite nanoparticles and their enhanced catalytic performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shenke; Sun, Jiaqiang; Song, Dechen; Chen, Zheng; Chen, Jiangang

    2015-07-14

    Uniform and crystalline magnetite nanoparticles are facilely fabricated and utilized as an efficient catalyst in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The catalyst exhibits a high and stable activity with low methane selectivity, attributed to its remarkable structural and chemical stability at the realistic conditions of FTS. PMID:26074335

  18. IMMUNOTOXICITY OF 2-METHOXYETHANOL FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The immunotoxicity of the glycol ether 2-methoxyethanol (ME) as evaluated in adult Fischer 344 rats using a variety of in vitro and in vivo immune function assays. n the first phase of this study, male rats are dosed by oral gavage with ME in water, at dosages ranging from 50 to ...

  19. Age and dietary form of vitamin K affect menaquinone-4 concentrations in male Fischer 344 rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phylloquinone, the primary dietary form of vitamin K, is converted to menaquinone-4 (MK-4) in certain tissues. MK-4 may have tissue-specific roles independent to those traditionally identified with vitamin K. Fischer 344 male rats of different ages (2, 12 and 24mo, n=20 per age group) were used to...

  20. Nickel-catalyzed [3+1+1] cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl Fischer carbene complexes with methylenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ken; Shimizu, Yasunori; Takemoto, Shin; Matsuzaka, Hiroyuki

    2006-08-31

    Methylenecyclopentanones were synthesized by the nickel-catalyzed [3+1+1] cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl Fischer carbene complexes with methylenecyclopropanes. The methylenecyclopropane was transformed into the C(2)-symmetric bis-cyclopentapyridazine derivative by reacting with p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazine. PMID:16928061

  1. Heterosexual Persons' Perceptions Regarding Language Use in Counseling: Extending Dorland and Fischer (2001)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Amanda D.; Waehler, Charles A.; Gray, Torie N.

    2013-01-01

    An important original study by Dorland and Fischer noted how the use of inclusive language can affect the therapeutic relationship positively for gay, lesbian, and bisexual clients. In this extension of that study with heterosexual participants ("N" = 179), there seemed to be low, but positive, salience of the language used by the…

  2. Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

    1996-05-01

    Our objectives for this quarter were: (1) to install and test the temperature probe and the flammable gas detector: (2) to conduct Fischer-Tropsch synthesis experiments at baseline conditions and at a high pressure in order to test the newly constructed fixed bed reactor assembly.

  3. POTENTIATION OF 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE GENOTOXICITY IN FISCHER-344 RATS BY PRETREATMENT WITH AROCLOR 1254

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pretreatment of Fischer 344 rats for 5 weeks with Aroclor 1254, a commercial mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls, potentiated the genotoxicity of 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT), a component f an industrial chemical used in the production of polyurethane foams. his interaction resulted...

  4. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media. Progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.; Bochniak, D.; Snavely, K.

    1993-01-01

    Our goals for this quarter were to complete construction of the reactor and analytical units for carrying out Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in liquid (n-hexadecane) and in supercritical n-hexane phases. Progress during this quarter was slower than expected.

  5. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, D. E.; Stuart, B. O.; Rothenberg, S. J.; Kershaw, M.; Mann, P. C.; James, J. T.; Lam, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    Dimethylethoxysilane (DMES), a volatile liquid, is used by NASA to waterproof the heat-protective silica tiles and blankets on the Space Shuttle. Acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation exposures to DMES vapor were conducted in male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the acute study, rats were exposed to 4000, 2000, 1000, 500, or 0 (control) ppm DMES for 4 h and observed for 14 days. There were no deaths. Narcosis and ataxia were observed in rats of the two highest concentrations only. These signs disappeared within 1 h following exposure. There were no DMES-related gross or microscopic tissue lesions in rats of all exposure groups. In the 2-wk study, rats were exposed for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 3000, 1000, 300, 100, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, narcosis was observed in rats of the 3000 and 1000 ppm groups. There was a mild decrease in body weight gain in rats of the 3000 ppm group. A decrease in platelet count, an increase in bile acids, and reduced weights of the thymus, testis, and liver were observed in rats of the 3000 ppm group. Microscopically, hypospermatogenesis and spermatid giant cells were observed in the seminiferous tubules of the testes of rats exposed to 3000 ppm DMES. In the 13-wk study, rats were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 2000, 600, 160, 40, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, rats of the 2000 ppm group exhibited mild narcosis and loss of startle reflex. Recovery from these central nervous system signs was rapid. Body weights were mildly decreased for rats of the 2000 ppm group. There were no exposure-related effects in hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Female rats of the 2000 ppm group had delayed estrous cycles (6 days compared to 5 days in control rats). Noteworthy organ weight changes in rats of the 2000 ppm group included decreases in thymus, liver, and testicular weights; however, pathologic lesions were observed in the testes only. Sperm motility, epididymal sperm count, and testicular spermatid count were dramatically reduced

  6. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Female Reproductive System Print A ... the egg or sperm. continue Components of the Female Reproductive System Unlike the male, the human female has a ...

  7. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  8. Gender Verification of Female Olympic Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Barry D.; Genel, Myron; Robinowitz, Carolyn B.; Turner, Patricia L.; Woods, Gary L.

    2002-01-01

    Gender verification of female athletes has long been criticized by geneticists, endocrinologists, and others in the medical community. Recently, the International Olympic Committee's Athletic Commission called for discontinuation of mandatory laboratory-based gender verification of female athletes. This article discusses normal sexual…

  9. Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.; Wei, G.; Xiao, S.

    1995-08-17

    Work continued on the development of catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Six catalysts were synthesised. The effects of a calcium oxide promoter were evaluated. Catalysts were characterized for pore size and BET surface area.

  10. CHAIN-LIMITING OPERATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal

    2003-06-01

    The use of pulsing in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to limit the hydrocarbon chain growth and maximize the yield of diesel-range (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}) products was examined on high-chain-growth-probability ({alpha} {ge} 0.9) FT catalysts. Pulsing experiments were conducted using a stainless-steel fixed-bed micro-reactor, equipped with both on-line (for the permanent gases and light hydrocarbons, C{sub 1}-C{sub 15}) and off-line (for the heavier hydrocarbons, C{sub 10}-C{sub 65}) gas chromatography analysis. Additional experiments were performed using a highly active attrition-resistant iron-based FT synthesis catalyst in a 1-liter continuous stirred-tank rector (CSTR). On both a Co-ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} and a Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} FT synthesis catalyst application of H{sub 2} pulsing causes significant increase in CO conversion, and only an instantaneous increase in undesirable selectivity to CH{sub 4}. Increasing the frequency of H{sub 2} pulsing enhances the selectivity to C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} compounds but the chain-growth probability {alpha} remains essentially unaffected. Increasing the duration of H{sub 2} pulsing results in enhancing the maximum obtained CO conversion and an instantaneous selectivity to CH{sub 4}. An optimum set of H{sub 2} pulse parameters (pulse frequency, pulse duration) is required for maximizing the yield of desirable diesel-range C{sub 10}-C{sub 20} products. Application of a suitable H{sub 2} pulse in the presence of added steam in the feed is a simple method to overcome the loss in activity and the shift in paraffin vs. olefin selectivity (increase in the olefin/paraffin ratio) caused by the excess steam. A decrease in syngas concentration has a strong suppressing effect on the olefin/paraffin ratio of the light hydrocarbon products. Higher syngas concentration can increase the chain growth probability {alpha} and thus allow for better evaluation of the effect of pulsing on FT synthesis. On a high-{alpha} Fe/K/Cu/SiO{sub 2} FT