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Sample records for normal healthy stomach

  1. Hyperbilirubinemia in normal healthy donors

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Veena; Kulkarni, R. K.; Cherian, Susan; Pillai, Raji; Shivali, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out in B.A.R.C. Hospital Blood Bank over a span of five years, and includes 2734 donors. All the bags were screened for HIV, HBsAg, HCV and VDRL and the plasma in the pilot tubes of the blood bags was observed to detect any abnormality in color. In 27 cases plasma was found to be icteric and liver function tests were carried out on these samples. Two donors showed higher SGPT level, and were excluded. No significant increases in liver enzymes were recorded in the others. Causes of icteric plasma in these apparently healthy donors are discussed. Differential diagnosis includes Gilbert’s disease, hemolytic anemia, drug-induced anemia and other hepatic causes of hyperbilirubinemia, of which Gilbert’s disease is most probable cause with a prevalence of 0.91% in our population. As there are no studies to document the safety of the recipients receiving such abnormal colored plasma as well as to document the hazards in its transfusion, the question arises whether to transfuse such units or not. This study highlights this dilemma. A reassessment of existing policies and regulations is merited. PMID:20808649

  2. What Is Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about stomach cancer? What is stomach cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... normal structure and function of the stomach. The stomach After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters ...

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of tenascin in normal stomach tissue, gastric carcinomas and gastric carcinoma in lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kajiyama, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Sasaki, O.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression of tenascin was examined in the normal adult mucosa of the stomach, primary tumours and lymph node metastases of gastric cancer patients. In normal gastric tissue tenascin was expressed in the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propria and vessel walls, however it was not expressed in either the mucosal connective tissue or the stromal tissue in the submucosal layer. In gastric cancer, tenascin was expressed in 35 of 85 primary tumours, and in 8 of 25 metastases in lymph nodes. Tenascin was located in the fibrous stroma surrounding foci of cancer. The expression of tenascin in the primary tumour did not correlate with the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis or prognosis. Tenascin appears during the process of either malignant transformation or tumour progression in gastric cancer, and the positive expression of tenascin may be useful as a stromal marker for the early detection of gastric cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:7541237

  4. Hyaluronan distribution in the normal epithelium of esophagus, stomach, and colon and their cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Tammi, M.; Guo, H.; Tammi, R.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of hyaluronan (HA) in normal gastrointestinal wall and in tumors originating from their epithelium was studied using a specific probe prepared from cartilage proteoglycan (bHABC, biotinylated hyaluronan binding complex). The normal stratified squamous epithelium of esophagus showed an intense HA staining in the basal and lower intermediate layers, whereas the simple epithelia in the stomach and large intestine were HA negative. Esophageal in situ carcinomas expressed HA also in the cell layers close to the luminal surface, in regions normally negative. Most of the invasive squamous cell carcinomas maintained their HA expression, but in very poorly differentiated types the tumor parenchyma was devoid of HA. In both gastric and colonic adenocarcinomas the tumor parenchyma showed no HA. The stromal tissue was intensely HA positive in all tumors. Cancer cells invading the intestinal smooth muscle were surrounded by copious amounts of HA, whereas the muscular layer was otherwise very poor in HA staining. These results show that relatively well differentiated carcinoma cells themselves retain the high or low HA expression pattern of their original epithelium, whereas tumors stimulate HA deposition in the surrounding stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8669472

  5. Diagnostic potential of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy in the stomach: differentiating dysplasia from normal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Teh, S K; Zheng, W; Ho, K Y; Teh, M; Yeoh, K G; Huang, Z

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a molecular vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of optically probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The purpose of this study was to explore near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy for identifying dysplasia from normal gastric mucosa tissue. A rapid-acquisition dispersive-type NIR Raman system was utilised for tissue Raman spectroscopic measurements at 785 nm laser excitation. A total of 76 gastric tissue samples obtained from 44 patients who underwent endoscopy investigation or gastrectomy operation were used in this study. The histopathological examinations showed that 55 tissue specimens were normal and 21 were dysplasia. Both the empirical approach and multivariate statistical techniques, including principal components analysis (PCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), together with the leave-one-sample-out cross-validation method, were employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classification of Raman spectra between normal and dysplastic gastric tissues. High-quality Raman spectra in the range of 800–1800 cm−1 can be acquired from gastric tissue within 5 s. There are specific spectral differences in Raman spectra between normal and dysplasia tissue, particularly in the spectral ranges of 1200–1500 cm−1 and 1600–1800 cm−1, which contained signals related to amide III and amide I of proteins, CH3CH2 twisting of proteins/nucleic acids, and the C=C stretching mode of phospholipids, respectively. The empirical diagnostic algorithm based on the ratio of the Raman peak intensity at 875 cm−1 to the peak intensity at 1450 cm−1 gave the diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 80.0%, whereas the diagnostic algorithms based on PCA-LDA yielded the diagnostic sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity 90.9% for separating dysplasia from normal gastric tissue. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed that the most effective

  6. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  7. The stomach in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer. PMID:26342014

  8. The stomach in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2015-10-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer. PMID:26342014

  9. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  10. Acid back-diffusion and mucosal H+ handling in the rat stomach under normal and stress-induced conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S

    1983-02-01

    We determined acid back-diffusion and pepsin output simultaneously in vagotomized rats after instillation of HCl into the stomach under normal and stress-induced conditions. With exposure to 6 ml of 100 mM HCl, spontaneous acid back-diffusion increased with the duration of the experiment under both conditions, and the magnitude of the acid back-diffusion was decreased significantly by stress. There was no change in the output of pepsin. While disappearance of luminal acid caused by aspirin or taurocholic acid was not altered by stress, the pepsin output in response to H+ increased significantly in the stressed rats. With exposure to various concentrations of HCl for 3 hr, disappearance of the luminal acid increased linearly with the grade of HCl under both conditions. Except for the concentration of 300 mM, the magnitude of the acid back-diffusion was triple in the normal condition, and the ratio of pepsin output/net flux of H+ was significantly increased by stress. Thus, (1) spontaneous acid back-diffusion decreased with stress, while diffusion induced by chemical barrier breakers remained the same; (2) the action of H+ diffused back into the mucosa did not always parallel the amount of diffusion determined from the loss of H+ in the lumen; (3) intramucosal H+ may be largely dissipated in normal mucosa; and (4) the initiation or aggravation of drug-induced mucosal damages by stress may be related to insufficiency of the H+ dissipating mechanisms. PMID:6410110

  11. Ankle brachial pressure index of normal, healthy, younger adults.

    PubMed

    Niblo, Jane; Coull, Alison

    Doppler ultrasound and ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) calculations are used in the assessment of lower limb vascularity, specifically to determine arterial deficiency. ABPI is important as it is used as an indicator when deciding management options for the treatment of leg ulceration. This study aimed to investigate the range of ABPI measurement, using Doppler ultrasound and sphygmomanometry in 36 young healthy adults aged 18-55 years. The findings show a mean ABPI in the left leg of 1.19 and a mean ABPI of 1.17 in the right leg which, while within the normal range, are consistently in the upper range and significantly higher than the acknowledged 'normal' midpoint of 1.0. It would appear that younger people will have ABPIs within the upper aspect of the normal range and well above the established norm of 1.0. PMID:24151719

  12. "Stomach Flu"

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes "Stomach Flu" KidsHealth > For Kids > "Stomach Flu" Print A A A Text Size en español " ... virus estomacal" Many people talk about the "stomach flu" when they're feeling sick to their stomachs. ...

  13. Photodynamic therapy of the normal rat stomach: a comparative study between di-sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine and 5-aminolaevulinic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, C. S.; Bedwell, J.; MacRobert, A. J.; Krasner, N.; Phillips, D.; Bown, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    Dysplasia in the upper gastrointestinal tract carries a risk of invasive malignant change. Surgical excision of the affected organ is the only treatment available. Photodynamic therapy has been shown to be promising in the treatment of early and superficial tumours and may be useful for the ablation of dysplastic mucosa. Because of the diffuse nature of the disease, such treatment would necessarily involve destruction of large areas of mucosa and it is desirable to confine its effect to the mucosa in order that safe healing can take place. By means of photometric fluorescence microscopy, we have studied the pattern of photosensitisation in the normal rat stomach using di-sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc) and 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) as photosensitisizers. AlS2Pc resulted in a panmural photosensitisation of the gastric wall with the highest level encountered in the submucosa. The mucosa and muscularis propria were sensitised to equal extent. Following light exposure, a full thickness damage resulted. ALA is a natural porphyrin precursor and exogenous administration gave rise to accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in the cells. The resultant pattern of photosensitisation was predominantly mucosal and its photodynamic effect was essentially confined to the mucosa. ALA produced a selective photosensitisation of the gastric mucosa for its photodynamic ablation with sparing the underlying tissue layers. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 9 PMID:1520582

  14. Stomach (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The stomach is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for breaking down food. The lower esophageal sphincter at the top of the stomach regulates food passing from the esophagus into the ...

  15. Phospholipid Profile of the Stomach and Duodenum of Normal Rabbits Fed with Supplements of Unripe Pawpaw (Carica papaya) and Unripe Plantain (Musa sapientum) Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriyamremu, G. E.; Asagba, S. O.; Osagie, V. E.; Ojeaburu, S. I.; Lolodi, O.

    This study reports the effect of unripe pawpaw and/or unripe plantain extracts on the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum of normal rabbits. Supplementation of chow with unripe pawpaw or plantain extract significantly reduced (p< 0.05) the weight gained by rabbits compared with the control. The total phospholipids content in the stomach and duodenum were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. In the stomach and duodenum, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SGM) were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. Pawpaw occasioned a decrease in the PE/PC ratio in both tissues as against an increase observed in the SGM/PC ratio. The results presented suggests that unripe pawpaw meal and unripe plantain extract alter the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum in ways which may affect membrane fluidity of these tissues and would have profound effect on the gastro-duodenal mucosa and thus have implication(s) for gastric and duodenal ulcers in rabbits.

  16. Defining Normal Liver Stiffness Range in a Normal Healthy Chinese Population without Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fung, James; Lee, Cheuk-kwong; Chan, Monica; Seto, Wai-kay; Wong, Danny Ka-ho; Lai, Ching-lung; Yuen, Man-fung

    2013-01-01

    Background For patients with chronic liver disease, different optimal liver stiffness cut-off values correspond to different stages of fibrosis, which are specific for the underlying liver disease and population. Aims To establish the normal ranges of liver stiffness in the healthy Chinese population without underlying liver disease. Methods This is a prospective cross sectional study of 2,528 healthy volunteers recruited from the general population and the Red Cross Transfusion Center in Hong Kong. All participants underwent a comprehensive questionnaire survey, measurement of weight, height, and blood pressure. Fasting liver function tests, glucose and cholesterol was performed. Abdominal ultrasound and transient elastography were performed on all participants. Results Of the 2,528 subjects, 1,998 were excluded with either abnormal liver parenchyma on ultrasound, chronic medical condition, abnormal blood tests including liver enzymes, fasting glucose, fasting cholesterol, high body mass index, high blood pressure, or invalid liver stiffness scan. The reference range for the 530 subjects without known liver disease was 2.3 to 5.9 kPa (mean 4.1, SD 0.89). The median liver stiffness was higher in males compared with females (4.3 vs 4.0 kPa respectively, p<0.001). There was also a decline in median Lliver stiffness in the older age group, from 4.2 kPa in those <25 years to 3.4 kPa for those >55 years (p=0.001). Conclusions The healthy reference range for liver stiffness in the Chinese population is 2.3 to 5.9 kPa. Female gender and older age group was associated with a lower median liver stiffness. PMID:24386446

  17. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... much higher than in the United States. The value of screening in the United States and other countries with much lower rates of stomach cancer is not clear. The following may help reduce your risk of stomach cancer: DO NOT smoke. Keep a ...

  18. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are absorbed in the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into ... wall of the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are ...

  19. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into simple substances. The ... the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are caused when ...

  20. Brain gray and white matter differences in healthy normal weight and obese children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare brain gray and white matter development in healthy normal weight and obese children. Twenty-four healthy 8- to 10-year-old children whose body mass index was either <75th percentile (normal weight) or >95th percentile (obese) completed an MRI examination which included T1-weighted three-d...

  1. Repeat participation among normal healthy research volunteers: professional guinea pigs in clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Tishler, Carl L; Bartholomae, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    The recent death of a normal healthy volunteer, as well as the increased use of normal volunteers as research subjects, has heightened the attention given to the participation of normal volunteers in clinical research. An overlooked sub-population of normal healthy volunteers are repeat, veteran volunteers. This essay discusses ethical and methodological issues associated with the use of repeat volunteers in research, along with existing guidelines regarding the use of repeat healthy volunteers, and concludes with recommendations for safeguarding repeat volunteers and ideas supporting centralized recruiting. PMID:14593220

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  3. Brain gray and white matter differences in healthy normal weight and obese children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare brain gray and white matter development in healthy normal weight and obese children. Twenty-four healthy 8- to 10-year-old children whose body mass index was either 95th percentile (obese) completed an MRI examination which included T1-weighted three-d...

  4. Normal Patterns of Deja Experience in a Healthy, Blind Male: Challenging Optical Pathway Delay Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Akira R.; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old healthy, blind male, MT, who experiences normal patterns of deja vu. The optical pathway delay theory of deja vu formation assumes that neuronal input from the optical pathways is necessary for the formation of the experience. Surprisingly, although the sensation of deja vu is known to be experienced by blind…

  5. Main characteristics of metabolically obese normal weight and metabolically healthy obese phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Tatiana F S; Alves, Raquel D M; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G

    2015-03-01

    In this review, the influence of fat depots on insulin resistance and the main characteristics of metabolically obese normal-weight and metabolically healthy obese phenotypes are discussed. Medline/PubMed and Science Direct were searched for articles related to the terms metabolically healthy obesity, metabolically obese normal weight, adipose tissue, and insulin resistance. Normal weight and obesity might be heterogeneous in regard to their effects. Fat distribution and lower insulin sensitivity are the main factors defining phenotypes within the same body mass index. Although these terms are interesting, controversies about them remain. Future studies exploring these phenotypes will help elucidate the roles of adiposity and/or insulin resistance in the development of metabolic alterations. PMID:26024540

  6. Normalizing Electrocardiograms of Both Healthy Persons and Cardiovascular Disease Patients for Biometric Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Miaomiao; Li, Fan; Wang, Guoqing; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2013-01-01

    Although electrocardiogram (ECG) fluctuates over time and physical activity, some of its intrinsic measurements serve well as biometric features. Considering its constant availability and difficulty in being faked, the ECG signal is becoming a promising factor for biometric authentication. The majority of the currently available algorithms only work well on healthy participants. A novel normalization and interpolation algorithm is proposed to convert an ECG signal into multiple template cycles, which are comparable between any two ECGs, no matter the sampling rates or health status. The overall accuracies reach 100% and 90.11% for healthy participants and cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients, respectively. PMID:23977063

  7. Normalizing electrocardiograms of both healthy persons and cardiovascular disease patients for biometric authentication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meixue; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Miaomiao; Li, Fan; Wang, Guoqing; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2013-01-01

    Although electrocardiogram (ECG) fluctuates over time and physical activity, some of its intrinsic measurements serve well as biometric features. Considering its constant availability and difficulty in being faked, the ECG signal is becoming a promising factor for biometric authentication. The majority of the currently available algorithms only work well on healthy participants. A novel normalization and interpolation algorithm is proposed to convert an ECG signal into multiple template cycles, which are comparable between any two ECGs, no matter the sampling rates or health status. The overall accuracies reach 100% and 90.11% for healthy participants and cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients, respectively. PMID:23977063

  8. Histopathological confirmation of similar intramucosal distribution of fluorescein in both intravenous administration and local mucosal application for probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the normal stomach

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Kouichi; Ohata, Ken; Ban, Shinichi; Ichihara, Shin; Takasugi, Rumi; Minato, Yohei; Tashima, Tomoaki; Matsuyama, Yasushi; Takita, Maiko; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) is capable of acquiring in vivo magnified cross-section images of the gastric mucosa. Intravenous injection of fluorescein sodium is used for confocal imaging. However, it is still under debate if local administration of the dye to the mucosa is also effective for confocal imaging as it is not yet clear if topical application also reveals the intramucosal distribution of fluorescein. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intramucosal distribution of fluorescein sodium after topical application and to compare the distribution to the conventional intravenous injection used for confocal imaging. pCLE of the stomach uninfected with Helicobacter pylori was performed in a healthy male employing intravenous administration and local mucosal application of fluorescein. The mucosa of the lower gastric body was biopsied 1 min and 5 min after intravenous administration or local mucosal application of fluorescein, and the distribution of fluorescein in the biopsy samples was examined histologically. Green fluorescence was already observed in the cytoplasm of fundic glandular cells in the biopsied deep mucosa 1 min after local mucosal application of fluorescein. It was also observed in the foveolar lumen and inter-foveolar lamina propria, although it was noted at only a few sites. In the tissue biopsied 5 min after the local mucosal application of fluorescein, green fluorescence was more frequently noted in the cytoplasm of fundic glandular cells than in that 1 min after the local mucosal application of fluorescein, although obvious green fluorescence was not identified in the foveolar lumen or inter-foveolar lamina propria. The distribution of intravenously administered fluorescein in the cytoplasm of fundic glandular cells was also clearly observed similarly to that after local mucosal application of fluorescein. Green fluorescence in more cells was observed in many cells 5 min after intravenous administration compared

  9. Are Prescription Stimulants "Smart Pills"? The Epidemiology and Cognitive Neuroscience of Prescription Stimulant Use by Normal Healthy Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Elizabeth; Farah, Martha J.

    2011-01-01

    Use of prescription stimulants by normal healthy individuals to enhance cognition is said to be on the rise. Who is using these medications for cognitive enhancement, and how prevalent is this practice? Do prescription stimulants in fact enhance cognition for normal healthy people? We review the epidemiological and cognitive neuroscience…

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradients in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Naokazu; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; YATSUSHIRO, Satoshi; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; ABDULLAH, Afnizanfaizal; KURODA, Kagayaki

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict not only anatomical information, but also physiological factors such as velocity and pressure gradient. Measurement of these physiological factors is necessary to understand the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) environment. In this study we quantified CSF motion in various parts of the CSF space, determined changes in the CSF environment with aging, and compared CSF pressure gradient between patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and healthy elderly volunteers. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers and six iNPH patients underwent four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) MRI. CSF motion was observed and the pressure gradient of CSF was quantified in the CSF space. In healthy volunteers, inhomogeneous CSF motion was observed whereby the pressure gradient markedly increased in the center of the skull and gradually decreased in the periphery of the skull. For example, the pressure gradient at the ventral surface of the brainstem was 6.6 times greater than that at the convexity of the cerebrum. The pressure gradient was statistically unchanged with aging. The pressure gradient of patients with iNPH was 3.2 times greater than that of healthy volunteers. The quantitative analysis of 4D-PC MRI data revealed that the pressure gradient of CSF can be used to understand the CSF environment, which is not sufficiently given by subjective impression of the anatomical image. PMID:26226976

  11. Normal range of spinal mobility for healthy young adult Turkish men.

    PubMed

    Cidem, Muharrem; Karacan, Ilhan; Uludag, Murat

    2012-08-01

    Anthropometric characteristics may vary among human populations, especially with differences in race. The aim of the present study is to find normal values of some measures (chest expansion, Schober's test and modified Schober's test) frequently used in the assessment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis, in young adult Turkish men. Initial recruitment identified 2,925 healthy male participants aged 20-30 years, and the final study sample included 1,982 of them. Participants joined the research from all cities except one in Turkey. The measurements of chest expansion, Schober's test, and modified Schober's test were performed by the same researcher using a plastic measuring tape. The mean (±standard error) values of the chest expansion, Schober's test, and modified Schober's test were 6.11 (±0.02), 5.62 (±0.02), and 7.78 (±0.02) cm, respectively. The estimated normal lower bounds for chest expansion, Schober's test, and modified Schober's test may be between 3.71-3.86 cm, 3.86-3.97 cm, and 5.46-5.60 cm, respectively, for young adult Turkish men. No correlation was found between height and spinal mobility. The normal values for spinal mobility in this sample of healthy young adult Turkish men differed from those reported for other young adult male populations (chest expansion ≥5 cm, Schober's test >5 cm, modified Schober's test >7 cm). It is thus useful to consider nationality in interpreting results of spinal mobility tests. PMID:21544633

  12. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  13. Stomach Cancer Risk Questionnaire

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine Stomach cancer is fairly rare in the US, but ... the early stages. To estimate your risk of stomach cancer and learn about ways to lower that ...

  14. Can Functional Cardiac Age be Predicted from ECG in a Normal Healthy Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd; Starc, Vito; Leban, Manja; Sinigoj, Petra; Vrhovec, Milos

    2011-01-01

    In a normal healthy population, we desired to determine the most age-dependent conventional and advanced ECG parameters. We hypothesized that changes in several ECG parameters might correlate with age and together reliably characterize the functional age of the heart. Methods: An initial study population of 313 apparently healthy subjects was ultimately reduced to 148 subjects (74 men, 84 women, in the range from 10 to 75 years of age) after exclusion criteria. In all subjects, ECG recordings (resting 5-minute 12-lead high frequency ECG) were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate up to 85 different conventional and advanced ECG parameters including beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, and signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG parameters. The prediction of functional age was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis using the best 5 univariate predictors. Results: Ignoring what were ultimately small differences between males and females, the functional age was found to be predicted (R2= 0.69, P < 0.001) from a linear combination of 5 independent variables: QRS elevation in the frontal plane (p<0.001), a new repolarization parameter QTcorr (p<0.001), mean high frequency QRS amplitude (p=0.009), the variability parameter % VLF of RRV (p=0.021) and the P-wave width (p=0.10). Here, QTcorr represents the correlation between the calculated QT and the measured QT signal. Conclusions: In apparently healthy subjects with normal conventional ECGs, functional cardiac age can be estimated by multiple linear regression analysis of mostly advanced ECG results. Because some parameters in the regression formula, such as QTcorr, high frequency QRS amplitude and P-wave width also change with disease in the same direction as with increased age, increased functional age of the heart may reflect subtle age-related pathologies in cardiac electrical function that are usually hidden on conventional ECG.

  15. Defining the Limits of Normal Conjunctival Fornix Anatomy in a Healthy South Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran J.; Ghauri, Abdul-Jabbar; Hodson, James; Edmunds, Matthew R.; Cottrell, Paul; Evans, Simon; Williams, Geraint P.; Rauz, Saaeha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quantifying the extent of conjunctival fibrosis for documentation of progression in conjunctival scarring disease is a clinical challenge. Measurement of forniceal foreshortening facilitates monitoring of these disorders. This study aims (1) to define the limits of the normal human conjunctival fornices and how these alter with age and (2) to provide normative data for upper and lower fornix depths (FDs) and fornix intercanthal distance (FICD) within a healthy South Asian, racially distinct population. Design Epidemiologic, cross-sectional study. Participants A total of 240 subjects with national origins from South Asia, with no known ocular history and normal adnexal and conjunctival examination, aged 20 to 80 years. Methods An FICD modification of a custom-designed fornix depth measurer (FDM) was validated and used for measurement of both lower and upper FDs together with FICDs in 480 healthy eyes with no ocular comorbidities. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and presented as means with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Main Outcome Measures Mean lower and upper FDs and FICD for the entire cohort, stratified according to age decade and sex. Results For this South Asian population, the overall upper and lower FDs were 15.3 mm (95% CI, 14.9–15.6) and 10.9 mm (95% CI, 10.7–11.1), respectively, with FICD defined as 32.9 mm (95% CI, 32.5–33.4) (upper) and 31.7 mm (95% CI, 31.3–32.1) (lower). With increasing age, a progressive reduction of all measured parameters (P < 0.001) was noted, with female subjects having significantly shallower fornices (upper FD, P < 0.001; lower FD, P < 0.001; upper FICD, P = 0.081; and lower FICD, P = 0.015). Conclusions This is the first study to define the limits of normal upper FD and FICDs in any population group. Our study demonstrates sex variations and progressive conjunctival shrinkage with age. Although it provides important, objective data for normal forniceal anatomy

  16. Assessment of cardiovascular response to treadmill exercise in normal healthy Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pande, Sushma S; Pande, Santosh R; Dhore, Rajendra B; Daphale, Ajay V; Parate, Vrushali R; Patel, Shishir S; Agrekar, Sushil H

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to assess the cardiovascular response to treadmill exercise test in healthy Indian adolescents. A group of 50 healthy adolescents took part in the study. Cardiovascular response was assessed by using treadmill exercise test as per Bruce protocol. Pulse rate, blood pressure and ECG were recorded before, during and after undertaking the treadmill test. Mean age and body mass index (BMI) were 18.7 +/- 0.51 yrs. and 21.4 +/- 3.44 kg/m2 respectively. Karl Pearson Correlation analysis showed highly significant negative correlation between BMI and exercise time (r = -0.598, P<0.001) and between resting DBP and Exercise Time (r = -0.424, P<0.002). While BMI and DBP showed highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.463, P<0.001). During exercise pulse and SBP rose and DBP fell. SBP rose from mean 122 to 175 (rise by 53 mm of Hg) and DBP fell from mean 78 to 65 (fall by 13 mm of Hg). One min recovery pulse was 156 indicating 22% fall from target heart rate. All the parameters returned to near resting value at 6 min recovery. In 30% students DBP showed exaggerated response i.e. rise during exercise. These students had more BMI and higher resting DBP as compared to other students, which could be the reason for exaggerated response in these participants. In ECG there were no significant ST/T changes during exercise or recovery period. This study provides normal data for small sample of healthy Indian adolescents when subjected to treadmill exercise test. PMID:23029962

  17. Oxygen saturation response to exercise in healthy pregnant women: a simple protocol and normal range

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Edward; Khwanda, Ahmad; Langford, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of oxygen saturation on excercise, using a pulse oximeter, has been advocated in the assessment of women with shortness of breath in pregnancy. However, there is currently no standard protocol for this. The aims of this study were to determine the normal range for oxygen saturation at rest and on moderate exercise in healthy women from 24 weeks gestation and to evaluate a simple, widely applicable exercise protocol in which women walked at their own pace for 100 metres then up two flights of stairs. The protocol achieved 60–85% maximum predicted heart rate in 99% of women at a median gestation of 31+3 weeks, with a wide range of Hb and BMI. There was a mean 0.3% fall in oxygen saturation on exertion but oxygen saturation did not fall below 95% in any of the women.

  18. Cognitive Deficits in Healthy Elderly Population With "Normal" Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether healthy older adults with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores above 23 exhibit cognitive impairment on neuropsychological tests. Participants completed the MMSE and a neuropsychological battery including tests of 10 domains. Results were compared to published normative data. On neuropsychological testing, participants performed well on measures of naming and recall but showed mild to moderate impairment in working memory and processing speed and marked impairment in inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Almost everyone (91%) scored at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean in at least 1 domain. The median number of domains in which individuals scored below 1 SD was 3.0 of 10.0, whereas over 21% scored below 1 SD in 5 domains or more. With the strictest of definitions for impairment, 20% of this population scored below 2.0 SDs below the norm in at least 2 domains, a necessary condition for a diagnosis of dementia. The finding that cognitive impairment, particularly in attention and executive functioning, is found in healthy older persons who perform well on the MMSE has clinical and research implications in terms of emphasizing normal variability in performance and early identification of possible impairment. PMID:26850856

  19. Normal variation in cortical osteocyte lacunar parameters in healthy young males

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yasmin; Suchorab, Jessica L; Thomas, C David L; Clement, John G; Cooper, David M L

    2014-01-01

    The most abundant cell in bone, osteocytes form an interconnected system upon which the regulation of healthy bone relies. Although the complete nature of the role of osteocytes has yet to be defined, they are generally accepted to play a part in the sensing of load and the initiation of damage repair. A previous study conducted by our group identified variation of up to 30% in osteocyte lacunar density and morphological parameters between regions of a single cross-section of human femoral shaft; that study, however, was limited to a single individual. The aim of the current study was to determine whether this pattern consistently occurs in healthy young male femora. Anterior, posterior, medial and lateral blocks were prepared from the proximal femoral shaft of seven males and synchrotron radiation micro-CT imaged. Average lacunar densities (± SD) from the anterior, posterior, medial and lateral regions were 23 394 ± 1705, 30 180 ± 4860, 35 946 ± 5990 and 29 678 ± 6081 lacunae per mm3 of bone tissue, respectively. These values were significantly different between the anterior and both the medial and posterior regions (P < 0.05). The density of the combined anterior and posterior regions was also significantly lower (P = 0.006) than the density of the combined medial and lateral regions. Although no difference was found in predominant orientation, shape differences were found; with the combined anterior-posterior regions having lacunae that were significantly more elongated and less flat than the combined medial-lateral values (P < 0.001). As expected, in this larger study, there was a dramatic difference in lacunar density between the medial and anterior region (up to ∼ 54%). The study clearly demonstrates that the high variation seen in osteocyte lacunar density as well as other lacunar parameters, noted in a number of biomechanical, age and pathology studies, are well within the range of normal variation; however, the reasons for and

  20. What is normal nasal airflow? A computational study of 22 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nasal airflow is essential for functioning of the human nose. Given individual variation in nasal anatomy, there is yet no consensus what constitutes normal nasal airflow patterns. We attempt to obtain such information that is essential to differentiate disease-related variations. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulated nasal airflow in 22 healthy subjects during resting breathing. Streamline patterns, airflow distributions, velocity profiles, pressure, wall stress, turbulence, and vortical flow characteristics under quasi-steady state were analyzed. Patency ratings, acoustically measured minimum cross-sectional area (MCA), and rhinomanometric nasal resistance (NR) were examined for potential correlations with morphological and airflow-related variables. Results Common features across subjects included: >50% total pressure-drop reached near the inferior turbinate head; wall shear stress, NR, turbulence energy, and vorticity were lower in the turbinate than in the nasal valve region. However, location of the major flow path and coronal velocity distributions varied greatly across individuals. Surprisingly, on average, more flow passed through the middle than the inferior meatus and correlated with better patency ratings (r=-0.65, p<0.01). This middle flow percentage combined with peak post-vestibule nasal heat loss and MCA accounted for >70% of the variance in subjective patency ratings and predicted patency categories with 86% success. Nasal index correlated with forming of the anterior dorsal vortex. Expected for resting breathing, the functional impact for local and total turbulence, vorticity, and helicity was limited. As validation, rhinomanometric NR significantly correlated with CFD simulations (r=0.53, p<0.01). Conclusion Significant variations of nasal airflow found among healthy subjects; Key features may have clinically relevant applications. PMID:24664528

  1. In vitro photodynamic effect of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines on melanoma skin cancer and healthy normal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Maduray, K; Odhav, B; Nyokong, T

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a medical treatment that uses an inactive dye/drug and lasers as a light source to activate the dye/drug to produce a toxic form of oxygen that destroys the cancer cells. This study aimed at investigating the cytotoxic effects of different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines in its inactive and active state (laser induced) on melanoma skin cancer cells, healthy normal skin fibroblast and keratinocyte cells. Experimentally, 3 × 10⁴ cells/ml were seeded in 24-well plates before treatment with different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines. After 2h, cells were irradiated with a light dose of 4.5 J/cm². Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24h before cell viability was measured using the CellTiter-Blue Viability Assay. Results showed that aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at high concentrations were cytotoxic to melanoma cells in the absence of laser activation. In the presence of laser activation of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a concentration of 40 μg/ml decreased cell viability of melanoma cells to 45%, fibroblasts to 78% and keratinocytes to 73%. At this photosensitizing concentration of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines the efficacy of the treatment light dose 4.5 J/cm² and the cell death mechanism induced by photoactivated aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines was evaluated. A light dose of 4.5 J/cm² was more efficient in killing a higher number of melanoma cells and a lower number of fibroblast and keratinocyte cells than the other light doses of 2.5 J/cm², 7.5 J/cm² and 10.5 J/cm². Apoptosis features such as blebbing, nucleus condensation, nucleus fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were seen in the photodynamic therapy treated melanoma skin cancer cells. This in vitro photodynamic therapy study concludes that using aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a photosensitizing concentration of 40 μg/ml in combination with a laser dose of 4.5 J/cm² was potentially lethal

  2. Effects of GUASHA on Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Volunteers under Normal Condition and Weightlifters after Weightlifting Training Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingze; Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Nakmareong, Saowanee; Silsirivanit, Atit; Wang, Yingying; Xie, Dongbei; Yang, Jinsheng; Eungpinichpong, Wichai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This paper aims at exploring the effects of GUASHA on heart rate variability between healthy volunteers under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions. Methods. Ten healthy male volunteers under normal condition and 15 male weightlifters after weightlifting training sessions were recruited into two groups. Electrocardiography was recorded before and immediately after 20-minute GUASHA. HRV was calculated in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Results. Stress index was reduced, while standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN), proportion derived by dividing the number of interval differences of successive N-N intervals greater than 50 ms, and root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) were enhanced after GUASHA therapy in the two groups. The changes in SDNN and RMSSD were higher in the healthy men group than in the weightlifters group. In addition, low frequency was decreased whereas high frequency was significantly increased in healthy men after the GUASHA session. Conclusions. GUASHA therapy facilitates the parasympathetic nervous activity and modulates the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic activities in both healthy men under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions as indicated. Although the changes of the HRV parameters were similar in both groups, the responsiveness was more pronounced in healthy men than in male weightlifters. PMID:26120346

  3. EEG Oscillatory States: Universality, Uniqueness and Specificity across Healthy-Normal, Altered and Pathological Brain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Fingelkurts, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time the dynamic repertoires and oscillatory types of local EEG states in 13 diverse conditions (examined over 9 studies) that covered healthy-normal, altered and pathological brain states were quantified within the same methodological and conceptual framework. EEG oscillatory states were assessed by the probability-classification analysis of short-term EEG spectral patterns. The results demonstrated that brain activity consists of a limited repertoire of local EEG states in any of the examined conditions. The size of the state repertoires was associated with changes in cognition and vigilance or neuropsychopathologic conditions. Additionally universal, optional and unique EEG states across 13 diverse conditions were observed. It was demonstrated also that EEG oscillations which constituted EEG states were characteristic for different groups of conditions in accordance to oscillations’ functional significance. The results suggested that (a) there is a limit in the number of local states available to the cortex and many ways in which these local states can rearrange themselves and still produce the same global state and (b) EEG individuality is determined by varying proportions of universal, optional and unique oscillatory states. The results enriched our understanding about dynamic microstructure of EEG-signal. PMID:24505292

  4. A randomized control trial of the effect of yoga on verbal aggressiveness in normal healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudheer; Nagendra, H R; Raghuram, Nagarathna

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of yoga on verbal aggressiveness in normal healthy adults. Methods: Of the 1228 persons who attended introductory lectures, 226 subjects of both sexes who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated into two groups. These 226 subjects were between the ages of 17 and 62 years and 173/226 completed the eight weeks of intervention. The Yoga (Y) group practised an integrated yoga module that included asanas, pranayama, meditation, notional correction, and devotional sessions. The control group practised mild to moderate physical exercises (PE). Both groups had supervised practices (by trained experts) for one hour daily, six days a week for eight weeks. Verbal Aggressiveness was assessed before and after eight weeks using the self-administered Verbal Aggressive Scale. Results: The baseline score of the two groups did not differ significantly (P = 0.66). There was a significant decrease in verbal aggressiveness in the yoga group (P = 0.01 paired samples t-test) with a nonsignificant increase in the PE group. ANCOVA using pre- values as covariates showed a significant difference between the groups (P = 0.013). RMANOVA for interaction between the sexes or age groups in change scores were not significant. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated that an eight week intervention of an integrated yoga module decreased verbal aggressiveness in the yoga group (in males and those below 25 years of age), with a nonsignificant increase in the PE group. PMID:21829289

  5. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  6. Surgery For Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States as they are in countries (like Japan) where stomach cancer is more common and more ... lymphadenectomy ) when a gastrectomy is done. Surgeons in Japan have had very high success rates by removing ...

  7. Occurrence of Bifidobacteriaceae in human hypochlorhydria stomach

    PubMed Central

    Mattarelli, Paola; Brandi, Giovanni; Calabrese, Carlo; Fornari, Fabio; Prati, Gian Maria; Biavati, Bruno; Sgorbati, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background The human stomach, when healthy, is not a suitable host for microorganisms, but in pathological conditions such as gastritis, when gastric acid secretion is impaired, microbial overgrowth can be observed. Apart from Helicobacter pylori, the composition of microbiota, resident or exogenously introduced during neutral/high pH conditions, has not been investigated thoroughly. Thus, it is possible that Bifidobacteriaceae, important autochthonous and beneficial bacteria of human gastrointestinal microbiota, could over-colonize the stomach of hypochlorhydria patients suffering from autoimmune atrophic gastritis (AAG) or omeprazole-treated (OME) gastritis. This prompted us to characterize the Bifidobacteriaceae in such patients’ gastric microbiota and to study its abnormal colonization. Methods Samples of gastric juices, and antrum and corpus mucosa from 23 hypochlorhydria patients (13 AAG and 10 OME) and from 10 control volunteers with base-line normochlorhydria, were cultivated in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) and selective Bifidobacterium-Tryptone-Phytone-Yeast extract (Bif-TPY) media. The isolates were characterized by the fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase (F6PPK) test, electrophoresis of cellular proteins, the fermentation test, guanine-cytosine% DNA content, and DNA–DNA hybridization. Negative F6PPK isolates were characterized by order-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results A total of 125 isolates, assigned to the Bifidobacteriaceae family on the basis of their morphology, were obtained from AAG and OME patients, but not from normal subjects. Of these isolates, 55 were assigned to the Bifidobacteriaceae family on the basis of their fructose-6-phosphoketolase (PPK) activity, PPK being the key taxonomic enzyme of this family. The remaining 70 isolates, which were PPK-negative, were attributed to the Actinomycetales order following specific primer PCR analysis. We observed a significantly higher abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae (Bifidobacterium

  8. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  9. Are prescription stimulants "smart pills"? The epidemiology and cognitive neuroscience of prescription stimulant use by normal healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Elizabeth; Farah, Martha J

    2011-09-01

    Use of prescription stimulants by normal healthy individuals to enhance cognition is said to be on the rise. Who is using these medications for cognitive enhancement, and how prevalent is this practice? Do prescription stimulants in fact enhance cognition for normal healthy people? We review the epidemiological and cognitive neuroscience literatures in search of answers to these questions. Epidemiological issues addressed include the prevalence of nonmedical stimulant use, user demographics, methods by which users obtain prescription stimulants, and motivations for use. Cognitive neuroscience issues addressed include the effects of prescription stimulants on learning and executive function, as well as the task and individual variables associated with these effects. Little is known about the prevalence of prescription stimulant use for cognitive enhancement outside of student populations. Among college students, estimates of use vary widely but, taken together, suggest that the practice is commonplace. The cognitive effects of stimulants on normal healthy people cannot yet be characterized definitively, despite the volume of research that has been carried out on these issues. Published evidence suggests that declarative memory can be improved by stimulants, with some evidence consistent with enhanced consolidation of memories. Effects on the executive functions of working memory and cognitive control are less reliable but have been found for at least some individuals on some tasks. In closing, we enumerate the many outstanding questions that remain to be addressed by future research and also identify obstacles facing this research. PMID:21859174

  10. Energy content of stools in normal healthy controls and patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J L; Wootton, S A; Bond, S A; Jackson, A A

    1991-01-01

    Stool energy losses and the sources of energy within the stool were determined in 20 healthy controls and 20 patients with cystic fibrosis while on their habitual pancreatic enzyme replacement treatment. Stool energy losses were equivalent to 3.5% of gross energy intake in healthy children (range 1.3-5.8%). Despite a comparable gross energy intake, stool energy losses were three times greater in patients with cystic fibrosis than controls averaging 10.6% of gross energy intake (range 4.9-19.7%). Stool lipid could account for only 29% and 41% of the energy within the stool in controls and patients with cystic fibrosis respectively and was poorly related to stool energy. Approximately 30% of the energy within the stool could be attributable to colonic bacteria in both the healthy children and patients with cystic fibrosis. These results suggest that stool energy losses in healthy children are relatively modest but that even when patients with cystic fibrosis are symptomatically well controlled on pancreatic enzyme replacement, raised stool energy losses may continue to contribute towards an energy deficit sufficient to limit growth in cystic fibrosis. As the energy content per gram wet weight remains relatively constant (8 kJ/g), stool energy losses may be estimated from simple measurements of stool wet weight. PMID:2031608

  11. Mild Memory Impairment in Healthy Older Adults Is Distinct from Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargin, J. Weaver; Maruff, P.; Collie, A.; Masters, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mild memory impairment was detected in 28% of a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults using the delayed recall trial of a word list learning task. Statistical analysis revealed that individuals with memory impairment also demonstrated relative deficits on other measures of memory, and tests of executive function, processing speed and…

  12. SPM-based count normalization provides excellent discrimination of mild Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment from healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Hammers, Alexander; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Scheurich, Armin; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Peters, Jürgen; Bartenstein, Peter; Lieb, Klaus; Schreckenberger, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Statistical comparisons of [(18)F]FDG PET scans between healthy subjects and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) usually require normalization of regional tracer uptake via ROIs defined using additional software. Here, we validate a simple SPM-based method for count normalization. FDG PET scans of 21 mild, 15 very mild AD, 11 aMCI patients and 15 age-matched controls were analyzed. First, we obtained relative increases in the whole patient sample compared to controls (i.e. areas relatively preserved in patients) with proportional scaling to the cerebral global mean (CGM). Next, average absolute counts within the cluster with the highest t-value were extracted. Statistical comparisons of controls versus three patients groups were then performed using count normalization to CGM, sensorimotor cortex (SMC) as standard, and to the cluster-derived counts. Compared to controls, relative metabolism in aMCI patients was reduced by 15%, 20%, and 23% after normalization to CGM, SMC, and cluster-derived counts, respectively, and 11%, 21%, and 25% in mild AD patients. Logistic regression analyses based on normalized values extracted from AD-typical regions showed that the metabolic values obtained using CGM, SMC, and cluster normalization correctly classified 81%, 89% and 92% of aMCI and controls; classification accuracies for AD groups (very mild and mild) were 91%, 97%, and 100%. The proposed algorithm of fully SPM-based count normalization allows for a substantial increase of statistical power in detecting very early AD-associated hypometabolism, and very high accuracy in discriminating mild AD and aMCI from healthy aging. PMID:18691659

  13. When patients portray their conduct as normal and healthy: an interactional challenge for thorough substance use history taking.

    PubMed

    Denvir, Paul M

    2012-11-01

    Researchers and medical practitioners have argued that routine substance use histories are performed less frequently and less thoroughly than they should be. Previous research has identified a range of structural, attitudinal, and socio-cultural barriers that help to explain this pattern. Using conversation analytic (CA) methods, this paper complements previous work by exploring a potential interactional barrier to thorough substance use history taking in the USA. In response to routine substance use queries (e.g. "Do you drink alcohol?"), patients often do more than just providing information. They also convey normative stances toward their conduct, essentially making a case for how it should be understood by the physician. One stance that patients may take is that their conduct is normal and healthy. This paper describes three interactional practices that patients used to enact such a stance: 1) employing marked lexical, intonational, or interactional features when indicating no use of a substance; 2) volunteering normalizing details about the type, quantity, frequency, or circumstances of substance use; 3) providing minimizing characterizations of substance use. The paper explores some reasons why physicians treated these as appropriate and sufficient responses and did not seek additional details even when the information provided was quite superficial. Two social functions of patients' "normal/healthy" stances are discussed: 1) redirecting the physician's history taking to other topics and 2) presenting oneself as a health-conscious patient. "Normal/healthy" stances can represent an expression of patient agency, but can also present a dilemma for physicians, who must balance a concern for thoroughness with a concern for rapport. Recommendations for navigating this dilemma are discussed. PMID:22884752

  14. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of stomach cancer. Some studies show that eating fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C and beta carotene may lower the risk ... take can prevent cancer. These may include eating fruits and vegetables, exercising, ... vitamins, minerals, or food supplements. New ways to prevent ...

  15. Reaffirming normal: the high risk of pathologizing healthy adults when interpreting the MMPI-2-RF.

    PubMed

    Odland, Anthony P; Lammy, Andrew B; Perle, Jonathan G; Martin, Phillip K; Grote, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to determine the proportion of the normal population expected to have scale elevations on the MMPI-2-RF when multiple scores are interpreted. Results showed that when all 40 MMPI-2-RF scales are simultaneously considered, approximately 70% of normal adults are likely to have at least one scale elevation at or above 65 T, and as many as 20% will have five or more elevated scales. When the Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales are under consideration, 34% of normal adults have at least one elevated score. Interpretation of the Specific Problem Scales and Personality Psychopathology Five Scales--Revised also yielded higher than expected rates of significant scores, with as many as one in four normal adults possibly being miscategorized as having features of a personality disorder by the latter scales. These findings are consistent with the growing literature on rates of apparently abnormal scores in the normal population due to multiple score interpretation. Findings are discussed in relation to clinical assessment, as well as in response to recent work suggesting that the MMPI-2-RF's multiscale composition does not contribute to high rates of elevated scores. PMID:25643047

  16. Motility Disorders of the Stomach

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stomach Delayed Gastric Emptying (Gastroparesis) Rapid Gastric Emptying (Dumping Syndrome) Functional Dyspepsia Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) The ... the Stomach Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome CVS in Adults Dumping Syndrome Functional Dyspepsia Gastroparesis Disorders of the Small ...

  17. Sonographic Assessment of the Normal Dimensions of Liver, Spleen, and Kidney in Healthy Children at Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Thapa, N B; Shah, S; Pradhan, A; Rijal, K; Pradhan, A; Basnet, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography is one of the most common imaging modality to measure dimensions of visceral organs in children. However, the normal limit of size of visceral organs according to age and body habitus has not been specified in the standard textbooks. This might result in under detection of organomegaly in pediatrics population. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the normal range of dimensions for the liver, spleen, and kidney in healthy children. Method This is prospective cross-sectional, hospital-based study done at Tertiary-care teaching hospital. Participants included 272 pediatric subjects (152 male and 120 female) with normal physical or sonographic findings who were examined because of problems unrelated to the measured organs. The subjects were one month to 15 year (180 months) old. All measured organs were sonographically normal. Relationships of the dimensions of these organs with sex, age, body weight and height were investigated. Limits of normal dimensions of these organs were defined. Result Normal length of liver, kidneys and spleen were obtained sonographically for 272 children (152 male [55.9%] and 120 female [44.1%]) in the age group from 1 months to 15 (180 months) years. The mean age was 45.78 months (SD, 44.73). The measured dimensions of all these organs showed highest correlation with height and age so the descriptive analysis of the organ dimensions (mean, minimum, and maximum values, SD and 5th and 95th percentiles) were expressed in 10 age groups along with height range of the included children. The mean length of right kidney was shorter than the left kidney length, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001). Conclusion This study provides practical and comprehensive guide to the normal visceral organ dimension in pediatric population. The normal range limit of the liver, spleen, and kidney determined in this study could be used as a reference in daily practice in local radiology clinics

  18. P300 EVENT RELATED POTENTIAL IN NORMAL HEALTHY CONTROLS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, R.; Trivedi, J.K.; Singh, R.; Singh, Y.; Chakravorty, P.

    2000-01-01

    P300 event related potential was recorded in 115 healthy controls with a mean age of35.9±14.81 years and a male : female ratio of 72 : 43. There was significant difference in the P300 latency in < 40 years as compared to ≥ 40 years group (p< 0.001). There was no significant difference between males and females. There was a strong positive correlation between age and P300 latency (p< 0.001). The regression equation for P300 latency was Y=287.9+1.492x with an SEE of 20.2 (where Y is the P300 latency in ms, x is the age in years, SEE is the standard error of estimate). There was a negative correlation between age and P300 amplitude which was significant in ≥ 40 years age group while in > 40 years age group it was not significant. PMID:21407977

  19. Lactate: Brain Fuel in Human Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison with Normal Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil A.; Horning, Michael A.; McArthur, David L.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul; Brooks, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the hypothesis that lactate shuttling helps support the nutritive needs of injured brains. To that end, we utilized dual isotope tracer [6,6-2H2]glucose, that is, D2-glucose, and [3-13C]lactate techniques involving arm vein tracer infusion along with simultaneous cerebral (arterial [art] and jugular bulb [JB]) blood sampling. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with nonpenetrating brain injuries (n=12) were entered into the study following consent of patients' legal representatives. Written and informed consent was obtained from control volunteers (n=6). Patients were studied 5.7±2.2 (mean±SD) days post-injury; during periods when arterial glucose concentration tended to be higher in TBI patients. As in previous investigations, the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgluc, i.e., net glucose uptake) was significantly suppressed following TBI (p<0.001). However, lactate fractional extraction, an index of cerebral lactate uptake related to systemic lactate supply, approximated 11% in both healthy control subjects and TBI patients. Further, neither the CMR for lactate (CMRlac, i.e., net lactate release), nor the tracer-measured cerebral lactate uptake differed between healthy controls and TBI patients. The percentages of lactate tracer taken up and released as 13CO2 into the JB accounted for 92% and 91% for control and TBI conditions, respectively, suggesting that most cerebral lactate uptake was oxidized following TBI. Comparisons of isotopic enrichments of lactate oxidation from infused [3-13C]lactate tracer and 13C-glucose produced during hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis (GNG) showed that 75–80% of 13CO2 released into the JB was from lactate and that the remainder was from the oxidation of glucose secondarily labeled from lactate. Hence, either directly as lactate uptake, or indirectly via GNG, peripheral lactate production accounted for ∼70% of carbohydrate (direct lactate uptake+uptake of glucose from lactate) consumed by the

  20. Proposed Use of Thickener According to Fluid Intake on Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Studies: Preliminary Study in Normal Healthy Persons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Park, Hee Seon; Kim, Jae Sin; Jang, Ki Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics and changes in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing according to fluid viscosity in normal healthy persons, to help determine fluid intake methods in more detail than the use of standardized fluid. Methods This was a prospective observational study involving 10 normal healthy adults. While the participants sequentially took in fluids with 10 different viscosities changes in the pharyngeal phase of the swallowing process were monitored using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS). Twenty parameters of the pharyngeal phase, including epiglottis contact, laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal constriction, and upper esophageal sphincter opening, were determined and compared. Results No significant viscosity-based changes in epiglottis contact, laryngeal elevation, or upper esophageal sphincter-opening duration of the pharyngeal phase were observed. However, pharyngeal transit time and time from the start of the pharyngeal phase to peak pharyngeal constriction were significantly delayed upon intake of fluid with viscosities of 150.0 centipoise (cP) and 200.0 cP. Conclusion VFSS analysis of fluid intake may require the use of fluids of various concentrations to determine a suitable viscosity of thickener mixture for each subject. PMID:27152269

  1. C-type virus particles in placenta of normal healthy Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, L; Schidlovsky, G; Feldman, D; Dreyfuss, Y; Moore, L A

    1975-01-01

    C-type virus particles were found on electron-microscopic examination in placentas from two out of four young healthy Sprague-Dawley rats. One of these specimens contained virus particles budding from the plasma membranes of cells in the junctional zone of the placenta, i.e., the region where the fetal and maternal cell layers meet. In the other placenta, immature and mature C-type virus particles were found among cell debris also in the junctional region. This observation adds another species of animals to those recently reported, such as rhesus and baboon monkeys, as well as humans, in which C-type virus particles were found in the placenta. The presence of C-type viicant in view of the fact that a considerable number of these animals develop spontaneously a variety of malignant tumors, occasionally also leukemia and malignant lymphomas; however, none of these spontaneous tumors reveals the presence of virus particles on electron-microscopic examination. The nature of virus particles detected in rat placenta remains to be determined. As a working hypothesis, it is possible to assume that they may represent the passage of latent, presumably oncogenic, viruses transmitted "vertically" from parents to offspring. In the course of this passage some of them may be formed, emerging temporarily from their latency, before losing their identity and being again incorporated into the cell genetic components. Images PMID:171659

  2. Development and Decline of Memory Functions in Normal, Pathological and Healthy Successful Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sanfratello, L.; Adair, J. C.; Knoefel, J. E.; Caprihan, A.; Stephen, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Many neuroimaging studies of age-related memory decline interpret resultant differences in brain activation patterns in the elderly as reflecting a type of compensatory response or regression to a simpler state of brain organization. Here we review a series of our own studies which lead us to an alternative interpretation, and highlights a couple of potential confounds in the aging literature that may act to increase the variability of results within age groups and across laboratories. From our perspective, level of cognitive functioning achieved by a group of elderly is largely determined by the health of individuals within this group. Individuals with a history of hypertension, for example, are likely to have multiple white matter insults which compromise cognitive functioning, independent of aging processes. The health of the elderly group has not been well-documented in most previous studies and elderly participants are rarely excluded, or placed into a separate group, due to health-related problems. In addition, recent results show that white matter tracts within the frontal and temporal lobes, regions critical for higher cognitive functions, continue to mature well into the 4th decade of life. This suggests that a young age group may not be the best control group for understanding aging effects on the brain since development is ongoing within this age range. Therefore, we have added a middle-age group to our studies in order to better understand normal development across the lifespan as well as effects of pathology on cognitive functioning in the aging brain. PMID:21452018

  3. Variability of normal vocal fold dynamics for different vocal loading in one healthy subject investigated by phonovibrograms.

    PubMed

    Doellinger, Michael; Lohscheller, Joerg; McWhorter, Andrew; Kunduk, Melda

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the potential of high-speed digital imaging technique (HSI) and the phonovibrogram (PVG) analysis in normal vocal fold dynamics by studying the effects of continuous voice use (vocal loading) during the workday. One healthy subject was recorded at sustained phonation 13 times within 2 consecutive days in the morning before and in the afternoon after vocal loading, respectively. Vocal fold dynamics were extracted and visualized by PVGs. The characteristic PVG patterns were extracted representing vocal fold vibration types. The parameter values were then analyzed by statistics regarding vocal load, left-right PVG asymmetries, anterior-posterior PVG asymmetries, and opening-closing differences. For the first time, the direct impact of vocal load could be determined by analyzing vocal fold dynamics. For same vocal loading conditions, equal dynamical behavior of the vocal folds were confirmed. Comparison of recordings performed in the morning with the recordings after work revealed significant changes in vibration behavior, indicating impact of occurring vocal load. Left-right asymmetries in vocal fold dynamics were found confirming earlier assumptions. Different dynamics between opening and closing procedure as well as for anterior and posterior parts were found. Constant voice usage stresses the vocal folds even in healthy subjects and can be detected by applying the PVG technique. Furthermore, left-right PVG asymmetries do occur in healthy voice to a certain extent. HSI in combination with PVG analysis seems to be a promising tool for investigation of vocal fold fatigue and pathologies resulting in small forms of dynamical changes. PMID:18313896

  4. Arrhythmias Seen in Baseline 24-Hour Holter ECG Recordings in Healthy Normal Volunteers During Phase 1 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Pooja; Karnad, Dilip R; Rohekar, Prashant; Kerkar, Vaibhav; Lokhandwala, Yash Y; Kothari, Snehal

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory agencies encourage sponsors to submit 24-hour ambulatory ECG data for assessing cardiac safety of new drugs, and some arrhythmias, hitherto considered rare, have been observed in some early-phase studies. Interpretation of these observations is difficult given the dearth of published data on the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias seen during 24-hour continuous ECG monitoring in healthy volunteers (HV) from clinical trials. We analyzed drug-free ambulatory ECG recordings from 1273 HV (1000 males, 273 females; age 18-65 years) from 22 phase 1 studies that were analyzed in a core ECG laboratory; all subjects had normal screening ECGs. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as supraventricular premature complexes were observed in 60.8% of healthy volunteers, supraventricular tachycardia in 2.2%, and atrial fibrillation in 0.1%. Ventricular arrhythmias included premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) in 43.4%, >200 PVCs per 24 hours in 3.3%, multifocal PVCs in 5.3%, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 0.7%, and accelerated idioventricular rhythm in 0.3%. Bradyarrhythmias included sinus pause >3 seconds in 0.3%, and second-degree AV block in 2.4%. Complete heart block and torsades de pointes were not seen in any subject. Based on the observed incidence, we estimated the maximum number of healthy subjects in whom these arrhythmias may be seen as a matter of chance in studies with smaller sample sizes if the study drug has no arrhythmogenic effect. Our results and these estimates could help interpret whether cardiac arrhythmias observed in early-phase studies are due to chance or possibly are a drug effect. PMID:26626443

  5. A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults123

    PubMed Central

    Stote, Kim S; Baer, David J; Spears, Karen; Paul, David R; Harris, G Keith; Rumpler, William V; Strycula, Pilar; Najjar, Samer S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ingram, Donald K; Longo, Dan L; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of 3 meals/d is the most common pattern of eating in industrialized countries, a scientific rationale for this meal frequency with respect to optimal health is lacking. A diet with less meal frequency can improve the health and extend the lifespan of laboratory animals, but its effect on humans has never been tested. Objective A pilot study was conducted to establish the effects of a reduced-meal-frequency diet on health indicators in healthy, normal-weight adults. Design The study was a randomized crossover design with two 8-wk treatment periods. During the treatment periods, subjects consumed all of the calories needed for weight maintenance in either 3 meals/d or 1 meal/d. Results Subjects who completed the study maintained their body weight within 2 kg of their initial weight throughout the 6-mo period. There were no significant effects of meal frequency on heart rate, body temperature, or most of the blood variables measured. However, when consuming 1 meal/d, subjects had a significant increase in hunger; a significant modification of body composition, including reductions in fat mass; significant increases in blood pressure and in total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations; and a significant decrease in concentrations of cortisol. Conclusions Normal-weight subjects are able to comply with a 1 meal/d diet. When meal frequency is decreased without a reduction in overall calorie intake, modest changes occur in body composition, some cardiovascular disease risk factors, and hematologic variables. Diurnal variations may affect outcomes. PMID:17413096

  6. Blood homocysteine and vitamin B levels are not associated with cognitive skills in healthy normally ageing subjects.

    PubMed

    Ravaglia, G; Forti, P; Maioli, F; Zanardi, V; Dalmonte, E; Grossi, G; Cucinotta, D; Macini, P; Caldarera, M

    2000-01-01

    Increased plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels are a known risk factor for vascular disease and have been reported in association with cognitive impairment of old age. Alternatively, however, increased tHcy levels may simply be an indicator of B vitamin deficiency. We evaluated the relationship between plasma tHcy levels, serum vitamin B12 and folate levels, and the scores at a battery of neuropsychological tests in 54 healthy cognitively normal subjects aged 65 years and over. Hyperhomocysteinemia prevalence (plasma tHcy>15 micromol/L) was about 24%. In univariate analysis, vitamin B12 levels were associated with both verbal memory and visuo-spatial skills, whereas no association was found between psychometric test scores and folate levels or tHcy levels. However, none of the univariate associations of neuropsychological test scores and serum B12 vitamin levels was confirmed when adjusting for age, education and other confounding variables. In conclusion, although a relationship between homocysteine, B vitamins and poor cognitive skills in the elderly is plausible, this study does not suggests that such relationship is biologically important. PMID:11115804

  7. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  8. Dysbiotic infection in the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Iizasa, Hisashi; Ishihara, Shyunji; Richardo, Timmy; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota in human alimentary tract plays important roles for homeostatic maintenance of the body. Compositional difference of gut microbiota is tightly associated with susceptibility of many diseases, including inflammatory diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and atherosclerosis. “Dysbiosis” refers to a state of imbalance among the colonies of microorganisms within the body, which brings abnormal increase of specific minor components and decrease in the normally dominant species. Since stomach secrets strong acid for its digestive role, this organ has long been thought a sterile organ. However, the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has changed the concept. This bacterium has proven to cause gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. However, recent cross-sectional studies revealed that H. pylori carriers had a decreased risk of developing immunological diseases, such as asthma. H. pylori coinfection also suppresses inflammatory bowel diseases. This review describes human gastric microbiota by discussing its mutual interaction and pathogenic enrollment. Gastric “dysbiosis” may affect host inflammatory response and play important role for gastric pathogenesis. We will topically discuss enrollment of dysbiosis for genesis of gastric cancer as well as for disruption of immunological homeostasis affecting oncogenic resistance. PMID:26523109

  9. Dysbiotic infection in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Iizasa, Hisashi; Ishihara, Shyunji; Richardo, Timmy; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2015-10-28

    Microbiota in human alimentary tract plays important roles for homeostatic maintenance of the body. Compositional difference of gut microbiota is tightly associated with susceptibility of many diseases, including inflammatory diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and atherosclerosis. "Dysbiosis" refers to a state of imbalance among the colonies of microorganisms within the body, which brings abnormal increase of specific minor components and decrease in the normally dominant species. Since stomach secrets strong acid for its digestive role, this organ has long been thought a sterile organ. However, the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has changed the concept. This bacterium has proven to cause gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. However, recent cross-sectional studies revealed that H. pylori carriers had a decreased risk of developing immunological diseases, such as asthma. H. pylori coinfection also suppresses inflammatory bowel diseases. This review describes human gastric microbiota by discussing its mutual interaction and pathogenic enrollment. Gastric "dysbiosis" may affect host inflammatory response and play important role for gastric pathogenesis. We will topically discuss enrollment of dysbiosis for genesis of gastric cancer as well as for disruption of immunological homeostasis affecting oncogenic resistance. PMID:26523109

  10. Ultra-Deep Sequencing Reveals the microRNA Expression Pattern of the Human Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Khayat, André S.; Silva, Artur; Alencar, Dayse O.; Lobato, Jessé; Luz, Larissa; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Varuzza, Leonardo; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Santos, Sidney; Zanette, Dalila L.; Silva, Wilson A.; Burbano, Rommel; Darnet, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Background While microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in tissue differentiation and in maintaining basal physiology, little is known about the miRNA expression levels in stomach tissue. Alterations in the miRNA profile can lead to cell deregulation, which can induce neoplasia. Methodology/Principal Findings A small RNA library of stomach tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. We obtained 261,274 quality reads with perfect matches to the human miRnome, and 42% of known miRNAs were identified. Digital Gene Expression profiling (DGE) was performed based on read abundance and showed that fifteen miRNAs were highly expressed in gastric tissue. Subsequently, the expression of these miRNAs was validated in 10 healthy individuals by RT-PCR showed a significant correlation of 83.97% (P<0.05). Six miRNAs showed a low variable pattern of expression (miR-29b, miR-29c, miR-19b, miR-31, miR-148a, miR-451) and could be considered part of the expression pattern of the healthy gastric tissue. Conclusions/Significance This study aimed to validate normal miRNA profiles of human gastric tissue to establish a reference profile for healthy individuals. Determining the regulatory processes acting in the stomach will be important in the fight against gastric cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. PMID:20949028

  11. Gelatin capsule in stomach (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect the presence of intestinal parasites. A weighted gelatin capsule attached to a string is swallowed and left in place. After about 4 hours, the gelatin capsule is pulled out of the stomach by ...

  12. Impact of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction on glucose regulation in healthy, normal weight middle-aged men and women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An unresolved issue in the field of diet and health is if and how changes in meal frequency affect energy metabolism in humans. We therefore evaluated the influence of reduced meal frequency without a reduction in energy intake on glucose metabolism in normal weight healthy male and female subjects...

  13. Enhanced expression of cytochrome P450 in stomach cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G. I.; Taylor, M. C.; Burke, M. D.; Melvin, W. T.

    1998-01-01

    The cytochromes P450 have a central role in the oxidative activation and detoxification of a wide range of xenobiotics, including many carcinogens and several anti-cancer drugs. Thus the cytochrome P450 enzyme system has important roles in both tumour development and influencing the response of tumours to chemotherapy. Stomach cancer is one of the commonest tumours of the alimentary tract and environmental factors, including dietary factors, have been implicated in the development of this tumour. This type of tumour has a poor prognosis and responds poorly to current therapies. In this study, the presence and cellular localization of several major forms of P450, CYP1A, CYP2E1 and CYP3A have been investigated in stomach cancer and compared with their expression in normal stomach. There was enhanced expression of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer with CYP1A present in 51% and CYP3A present in 28% of cases. In contrast, no P450 was identified in normal stomach. The presence of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer provides further evidence for the enhanced expression of specific forms of cytochrome P450 in tumours and may be important therapeutically for the development of anti-cancer drugs that are activated by these forms of P450. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9569036

  14. Risk of Developing Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Metabolically Unhealthy Normal-Weight and Metabolically Healthy Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Aung, KoKo; Hinojosa, Marco A.; Haffner, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) associated with obesity appears to be influenced by the coexistence of other metabolic abnormalities. Objective: We examined the risk of developing CVD and DM in metabolically healthy obese (MHO) and metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MUH-NW) individuals. Design and Setting: We analyzed prospective data of the San Antonio Heart Study, a population-based study among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites (median follow-up, 7.4 y). Participants: Incident DM and CVD were assessed in 2814 and 3700 participants aged 25 to 64 years, respectively. Main Measures: MHO was defined as obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2) with no more than one metabolic abnormality, and MUH-NW was defined as body mass index <25 kg/m2 with two or more abnormalities. Results: In logistic regression models, BMI was associated with incident DM after controlling for demographics, family history of DM, and fasting glucose (odds ratio × 1 SD, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.5–2.0]). Both MUH-NW and MHO individuals had an increased DM risk (2.5 [1.1–5.6] and 3.9 [2.0–7.4], respectively). Similarly, BMI was related to incident CVD after adjusting for demographics and Framingham risk score (1.3 [1.1–1.6]). Incident CVD was also increased in MUH-NW and MHO individuals (2.9 [1.3–6.4] and 3.9 [1.9–7.8], respectively). Results were consistent across gender and ethnic categories. Conclusion: The risk of developing DM and CVD is increased in MUH-NW and MHO individuals. Screening for obesity and other metabolic abnormalities should be routinely performed in clinical practice to institute appropriate preventive measures. PMID:24257907

  15. The stomach-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Holtmann, Gerald; Talley, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    The stomach has distinct functions in relation to the ingestion and handling of solids and liquids. These functions include storage of the food before it is gradually emptied into the duodenum, mechanical crushing of larger food particles to increase the surface area, secretion of an acidic enzyme rich gastric juice and mixing the ingested food with the gastric juice. In addition, the stomach 'senses' the composition of the gastric content and this information is passed via the vagal nerve to the lateral hypothalamus and the limbic system, most likely as palatability signals that influence eating behaviour. Other sensory qualities related to the stimulation of gastric tension receptors are satiety and fullness. Receptors that respond to macronutrient content or gastric wall tension influence appetite and meal related hormone responses. The ingestion of food - in contrast to an infusion of nutrients into the stomach - has distinct effects on the activation of specific brain regions. Brain areas such as thalamus, amygdala, putamen and praecuneus are activated by the ingestion of food. Gastric nutrient infusion evokes greater activation in the hippocampus and anterior cingulate. The brain integrates these interrelated neural and hormonal signals arising from the stomach as well as visual, olfactory and anticipatory stimuli that ultimately influence eating and other behavioural patterns. Furthermore, there is now good evidence from experimental studies that gastric afferents influence mood, and animal studies point towards the possibility that gastric dysfunction may be a risk factor for mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. The stomach is also not only colonised by Helicobacter pylori but a large array of bacteria. While there is sufficient evidence to suggest that H. pylori may alter caloric intake and mood, the role of other gastric microbiome for the brain function is unknown. To address this appropriate targeted gastric microbiome studies would be

  16. Advanced carcinoma of the stomach treated with definitive proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Kawanishi, N.; Fukutomi, H.; Osuga, T.; Iijima, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kitagawa, T. )

    1990-04-01

    We report the case of a 72-yr-old man who suffered from severe chronic emphysema with poor pulmonary function, and who had advanced cancer of the stomach. Proton beam radiotherapy was applied to the lesion, since surgery was contraindicated. The total dose to the stomach lesion was 61 Gy in 7 wk. The tumor on the stomach regressed, with flattening of the round wall of the lesion. The reactive changes of the proton beam radiotherapy, based on the histopathological examination, revealed extensive tumor necrosis and sparing of vital architecture of normal tissue around the irradiated tumor tissue. Only small clusters of vital or devitalized tumor cells with less than approximately 5% of the whole tumor tissue remained after treatment. We suggest that a high dose of radiation delivered by well-defined proton field could result in an improved therapeutic outcome without undue risk of injury to normal tissue.

  17. [Regulation factors of stomach emptying in dogs].

    PubMed

    Krejs, G J; Hegglin, J; Säuberli, H; Largiadér, F; Schmid, P; Blum, A L

    1976-03-01

    Gastric emptying of organic acids was studied in 6 healthy mongrel dogs. After chronic esophagostomies were performed according to the method of Komarov, a total of 340 test meals were instilled. Each test meal consisted of 300 ml of 6 different organic acids with decreasing molecular weight and different concentrations. After the experiments were achieved, each dog underwent a proximal gastric vagotomy according to the method of Amdrup, and experiments with citric acid were repeated. The results may be summarized as follows: multiple stepwise regression analysis of the data is consistent with a model in which gastric emptying of organic acids is regulated by 3 receptors. The receptors respond to concentration of the organic acid, the actual volume, and the type of acid. The volume receptor is located in the corpus of the stomach because the effect of volume accelerates the emptying rate after proximal gastric vagotomy while the effects of concentration and type of acid remain unchanged. PMID:1270294

  18. The influence of high-normal testosterone levels on risk-taking in healthy males in a 1-week letrozole administration study.

    PubMed

    Goudriaan, Anna E; Lapauw, Bruno; Ruige, Johannes; Feyen, Els; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Brand, Matthias; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2010-10-01

    Human studies on the relation between testosterone levels and risk-taking behaviour are scarce. Related functions, like aggression, have been related to higher testosterone levels more consistently, especially in the animal literature. Estradiol affects several neurotransmitter systems that play a role in behaviour regulation. Existing human studies on neurocognitive functions and testosterone levels have largely ignored the interrelatedness of testosterone levels and estradiol levels. Therefore, in this study, the effects of a 1-week combined testosterone and estradiol intervention on risk-taking behaviours were investigated. Twenty-one healthy men, with a normal body mass index, were treated for 7 days with an aromatase inhibitor (letrozole 2.5 mg), resulting in high-normal levels of testosterone and low-normal levels of estradiol, or with a combination of an aromatase inhibitor and estradiol (75 μg/24 h), resulting in low-normal levels of testosterone and high-normal levels of estradiol. A randomized experimenter and participant-blind controlled design was applied. Neurocognitive measures of risk-taking and reward and punishment sensitivity were assessed before starting with the medication and after 7 days of drug administration: Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), Game of Dice Task (GDT), and Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). A group by time effect was present for the BART, indicating that the high-normal testosterone group showed an increase in risk-taking on the BART, from the first drug-naive BART performance, to the second BART performance (aromatase inhibitor), whereas such an increase was not present in the low-normal testosterone/high estradiol group. No group by time interactions were present in GDT or IGT performance. These results implicate that testosterone levels in healthy men are associated with increased risk-taking under conditions of unknown probabilities, but not in conditions of known probabilities (GDT) or of strategic decision making (IGT). PMID

  19. Functional disorders of the stomach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, K. L.; Stern, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Gastroenterologists frequently encounter patients who report vague epigastric discomforts or sensations of fullness, bloating, and distention in the upper abdomen. The discomfort is neither burning in character nor severe in intensity; there is no nocturnal pain. The epigastric location of discomfort and lack of radiation may help to exclude biliary tract and pancreatic diseases. Nausea may be present, but there is little or no vomiting. After these patients ingest liquids or solid foods, the symptoms of easy filling or early satiety and increasing discomfort and nausea are almost always present. The patient may only report "indigestion," but a specific chief complaint, such as pain, discomfort, nausea, or bloating may be elicited with further inquiries. Solid foods usually provoke more symptoms than do liquids. Symptoms of early satiety, nausea, bloating, and abdominal discomfort may culminate in the vomiting of undigested food. These vague upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms have been termed "dyspepsia." When peptic diseases of the stomach are excluded, the symptom complex has been called "nonulcer" dyspepsia, a vague syndrome with symptoms attributed to stomach dysfunction. Nonulcer dyspepsia has been reviewed recently. Such symptoms, commonly attributed to a "functional" disorder, are very common in clinical practice, with an incidence of 30% of patients. In this review, we will discuss an approach to the evaluation and treatment of patients with symptoms of nausea, early satiety, bloating, and vague epigastric discomfort--dyspeptic symptoms associated with functional stomach disorders. We will review the anatomy and motility of the stomach and suggest potential neuromuscular malfunctions of the stomach that may result in epigastric symptoms. The potential role of stress and other brain-gut interactions, which may underlie these symptoms, will also be reviewed.

  20. Gradual reintroduction of oxygen reduces reperfusion injury in cat stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.A.; Wadhwa, S.S. )

    1988-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that oxygen-derived free radicals are responsible for a major portion of ischemia-reperfusion injury in the stomach. The oxygen radicals are produced during perfusion when oxygen delivery to the tissue increases. In the present study the authors investigate the effect on mucosal injury of regulating the rate of reintroduction of oxygen to the stomach after ischemia. Local gastric ischemia was achieved by reducing celiac artery pressure to 30 mmHg for 1 h. Ischemic injury was assessed by measuring the loss of {sup 51}Cr-labeled red blood cells across the gastric mucosa. Mucosal blood loss was negligible before and during the ischemia period but increased during reperfusion. When blood flow to the stomach was gradually returned to normal after ischemia, the mucosal blood loss was reduced. If the stomach was vascularly perfused with low Po{sub 2} blood for 1 h after ischemia before being returned to normal arterial perfusion, the mucosal blood loss was also reduced. When the stomach was made hypoxemic for 1 h rather than ischemic by perfusing the vasculature with low Po{sub 2} blood then reperfused with normoxic blood, there was very little mucosal bleeding. The data indicate that gastric mucosal bleeding after ischemia is reduced if the tissue is returned slowly to a normal Po{sub 2}. These findings support the concept that reperfusion injury is due largely to the production of oxygen radicals. The low level of injury produced by hypoxemia indicates that hypoxia per se makes only a minor contribution to reperfusion injury in the stomach.

  1. Comparative bioequivalence study of a new levothyroxine solution versus a reference L-thyroxine solution in normal healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Chassard, D; Kerihuel, J C; Caplain, H; Tran Quang, N; Thebault, J J

    1991-01-01

    A bioequivalence study between a new Levothyroxine solution and a reference solution was performed in 12 healthy volunteers after one single 3000 g oral administration. Administrations were done according to a cross-over schedule with a three week wash-out period. Plasma profile of Levothyroxine was determined for 72 hours, clinical tolerance being appreciated for 10 days after each administration. No statistical difference was reported for pharmacokinetic parameters and clinical tolerance was good. PMID:1820903

  2. Stomach Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Stomach Disorders URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Stomach Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  3. High intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, affects serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ingrid V; Helland, Anita; Bratlie, Marianne; Brokstad, Karl A; Rosenlund, Grethe; Sveier, Harald; Mellgren, Gunnar; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether high intake of lean or fatty fish (cod and farmed salmon, respectively) by healthy, normal-weight adults would affect risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD when compared with lean meat (chicken). More knowledge is needed concerning the potential health effects of high fish intake (>300 g/week) in normal-weight adults. In this randomised clinical trial, thirty-eight young, healthy, normal-weight participants consumed 750 g/week of lean or fatty fish or lean meat (as control) for 4 weeks at dinner according to provided recipes to ensure similar ways of preparations and choices of side dishes between the groups. Energy and macronutrient intakes at baseline and end point were similar in all groups, and there were no changes in energy and macronutrient intakes within any of the groups during the course of the study. High intake of fatty fish, but not lean fish, significantly reduced TAG and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations in fasting serum when compared with lean meat intake. When compared with lean fish intake, fatty fish intake increased serum HDL-cholesterol. No differences were observed between lean fish, fatty fish and lean meat groups regarding fasting and postprandial glucose regulation. These findings suggest that high intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, could beneficially affect serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol, which are CVD risk factors, in healthy, normal-weight adults, when compared with high intake of lean meat. PMID:27363518

  4. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Healthy Eyes Maintaining Your Vision Click for more information Taking good care of ... are qualified to perform eye exams. Aging and Vision Changes As you age, it is normal to ...

  5. Glomus tumour of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Troller, Rebekka; Soll, Christopher; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours are benign tumours typically arising from the glomus bodies and primarily found under the fingernails or toenails. These rare neoplasms account for <2% of all soft tissue tumours and are generally not found in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 40-year-old man presenting with recurrent epigastric pain and pyrosis. Endoscopy revealed a solitary tumour in the antrum of the stomach. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suspicious for a gastrointestinal stroma tumour. After CT indicated the resectability of the tumour, showing neither lymphatic nor distant metastases, a laparoscopic-assisted gastric wedge resection was performed. Surprisingly, histology revealed a glomus tumour of the stomach. PMID:27343282

  6. Acute exercise increases feeding latency in healthy normal weight young males but does not alter energy intake.

    PubMed

    King, James A; Wasse, Lucy K; Stensel, David J

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the acute influence of exercise on eating behaviour in an ecologically valid setting whereby healthy active males were permitted complete ad libitum access to food. Ten healthy males completed two, 8h trials (exercise and control) in a randomised-crossover design. In the exercise trials participants consumed a breakfast snack and then rested for 1h before undertaking a 60 min run (72% of VO(2)max) on a treadmill. Participants then rested in the laboratory for 6h during which time they were permitted complete ad libitum access to a buffet meal. The timing of meals, energy/macronutrient intake and eating frequency were assessed. Identical procedures were completed in the control trial except no exercise was performed. Exercise increased the length of time (35 min) before participants voluntarily requested to eat afterwards. Despite this, energy intake at the first meal consumed, or at subsequent eating episodes, was not influenced by exercise (total trial energy intake: control 7426 kJ, exercise 7418 kJ). Neither was there any difference in macronutrient intake or meal frequency between trials. These results confirm that food intake remains unaffected by exercise in the immediate hours after but suggest that exercise may invoke a delay before food is desired. PMID:23137828

  7. Normal values and reproducibility of the real-time index of vagal tone in healthy humans: a multi-center study

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Adam D.; Coen, Steven J.; Kano, Michiko; Weltens, Nathalie; Ly, Huynh Giao; Botha, Claude; Paine, Peter A.; Oudenhove, Lukas Van; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-01-01

    Background The parasympathetic nervous system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome. Within the field, cardiometric parameters of parasympathetic/vagal tone are most commonly derived from time, or frequency, domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), yet it has limited temporal resolution. Cardiac vagal tone (CVT) is a non-invasive beat-to-beat measure of brainstem efferent vagal activity that overcomes many of the temporal limitations of HRV parameters. However, its normal values and reproducibility in healthy subjects are not fully described. The aim of this study was to address these knowledge gaps. Methods 200 healthy subjects (106 males, median age 28 years, range 18-59 years) were evaluated across three study centers. After attachment of CVT recording equipment, 20 min of data (resting/no stimulation) was acquired. 30 subjects, selected at random, were restudied after 1 year. Results The mean CVT was 9.5±4.16 linear vagal scale (LVS). Thus, the normal range (mean±2 standard deviations) for CVT based on this data was 1.9-17.8 LVS. CVT correlated negatively with heart rate (r=-0.6, P=0.001). CVT reproducibility over 1 year, as indexed by an intra-class correlational coefficient of 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.64-0.91), was good. Conclusions In healthy subjects, the normal range for CVT should be considered to be 1.9-17.8 LVS and is reproducible over 1 year. Future research utilizing CVT should refer to these values although further study is warranted in patient groups. PMID:25330916

  8. The relationship between physical activity level and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in healthy, normal-weight 3- to 6-year-old children and their parents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Carol; Cantell, Marja; Crawford, Susan; Dewey, Deborah; Pacaud, Danièle

    2016-08-01

    To determine if physical activity is linked to cardiovascular biomarkers in preschool children at risk, we need information on these biomarkers in healthy normal-weight children. In this population, multi-level modelling analyses found no correlation between accelerometer recorded physical activity and fasting lipids, adiponectin, or insulin sensitivity. Exploratory analyses found positive correlations between adiponectin and time spent in light physical activity, and between triglyceride and time spent in sedentary behaviour; these findings need to be confirmed in longitudinal prospective studies. PMID:27458687

  9. Stomach

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  10. Normal Laboratory Reference Intervals among Healthy Adults Screened for a HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Clinical Trial in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Segolodi, Tebogo M.; Henderson, Faith L.; Rose, Charles E.; Turner, Kyle T.; Zeh, Clement; Fonjungo, Peter N.; Niska, Richard; Hart, Clyde; Paxton, Lynn A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Accurate clinical laboratory reference values derived from a local or regional population base are required to correctly interpret laboratory results. In Botswana, most reference intervals used to date are not standardized across clinical laboratories and are based on values derived from populations in the United States or Western Europe. Methods We measured 14 hematologic and biochemical parameters of healthy young adults screened for participation in the Botswana HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Study using tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) (TDF2 Study). Reference intervals were calculated using standard methods, stratified by gender, and compared with the site-derived reference values used for the TDF2 study (BOTUSA ranges), the Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Grading Table for Adverse Events, the Botswana public health laboratories, and other regional references. Results Out of 2533 screened participants, 1786 met eligibility criteria for participation in study and were included in the analysis. Our reference values were comparable to those of the Botswana public health system except for amylase, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), phosphate, total and direct bilirubin. Compared to our reference values, BOTUSA reference ranges would have classified participants as out of range for some analytes, with amylase (50.8%) and creatinine (32.0%) producing the highest out of range values. Applying the DAIDS toxicity grading system to the values would have resulted in 45 and 18 participants as having severe or life threatening values for amylase and hemoglobin, respectively. Conclusion Our reference values illustrate the differences in hematological and biochemical analyte ranges between African and Western populations. Thus, the use of western-derived reference laboratory values to screen a group of Batswana adults resulted in many healthy people being classified as having out-of-range blood analytes. The need to establish accurate local or regional

  11. Large D-Dimer Fluctuation in Normal Pregnancy: A Longitudinal Cohort Study of 4,117 Samples from 714 Healthy Danish Women

    PubMed Central

    Hedengran, Katrine K.; Andersen, Malene R.; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. D-dimer levels increase throughout pregnancy, hampering the usefulness of the conventional threshold for dismissing thromboembolism. This study investigates the biological fluctuation of D-dimer in normal pregnancy. Methods. A total of 801 healthy women with expected normal pregnancies were recruited. D-dimer was repeatedly measured during pregnancy, at active labor, and on the first and second postpartum days. Percentiles for each gestational week were calculated. Each individual D-dimer was normalized by transformation into percentiles for the relevant gestational age or delivery group. The range in percentage points during the pregnancy and the delivery was calculated, and reference intervals were calculated for each pregnancy trimester, during vaginal delivery and scheduled and emergency cesarean section, and for the first and second day postpartum. Results. D-dimer increased during pregnancy; the maximal fluctuation was approximately 20 percentile points in approximately half of the women. In one out of ten women, the D-dimer values fluctuated by more than 50 percentile points. Conclusions. Due to the biological variation in D-dimer within each individual woman during normal pregnancy, repeated D-dimer measurements are of no clinical use in the evaluation of thromboembolic events during pregnancy. PMID:27190521

  12. Intrinsic Brain Activity of Cognitively Normal Older Persons Resembles More That of Patients Both with and at Risk for Alzheimer's Disease Than That of Healthy Younger Persons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Tonch, Annika; Plant, Claudia; Zherdin, Andrew; Ortner, Marion; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Grimmer, Timo; Wohlschäger, Afra; Riedl, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent findings suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ)-pathology might start 20–30 years before first cognitive symptoms arise. To account for age as most relevant risk factor for sporadic AD, it has been hypothesized that lifespan intrinsic (i.e., ongoing) activity of hetero-modal brain areas with highest levels of functional connectivity triggers Aβ-pathology. This model induces the simple question whether in older persons without any cognitive symptoms intrinsic activity of hetero-modal areas is more similar to that of symptomatic patients with AD or to that of younger healthy persons. We hypothesize that due to advanced age and therefore potential impact of pre-clinical AD, intrinsic activity of older persons resembles more that of patients than that of younger controls. We tested this hypothesis in younger (ca. 25 years) and older healthy persons (ca. 70 years) and patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD-dementia (ca. 70 years) by the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, distinct measures of intrinsic brain activity, and different hierarchical clustering approaches. Independently of applied methods and involved areas, healthy older persons' intrinsic brain activity was consistently more alike that of patients than that of younger controls. Our result provides evidence for larger similarity in intrinsic brain activity between healthy older persons and patients with or at-risk for AD than between older and younger ones, suggesting a significant proportion of pre-clinical AD cases in the group of cognitively normal older people. The observed link of aging and AD with intrinsic brain activity supports the view that lifespan intrinsic activity may contribute critically to the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24689864

  13. Effects of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects' dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  14. Effects of Indoor Horseback Riding and Virtual Reality Exercises on the Dynamic Balance Ability of Normal Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects’ dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  15. Pulsatile intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration averts fasting-induced hypogonadotropism and hypoandrogenemia in healthy, normal weight men.

    PubMed

    Aloi, J A; Bergendahl, M; Iranmanesh, A; Veldhuis, J D

    1997-05-01

    Fasting or severe caloric restriction in the human or experimental animal suppresses serum LH and sex steroid concentrations. In healthy men undergoing prolonged (5-day) nutrient deprivation, the daily LH secretion rate, the mass of LH secreted per burst, and the serum testosterone concentration fall markedly, with no decrease in responsiveness to a single bolus of GnRH. Here we test the hypothesis that the hypogonadotropic hypoandrogenemia accompanying fasting reflects decreased endogenous GnRH release. To this end, six healthy young men were studied on a fed day and during two 83-h fasting sessions with concurrent saline or pulsatile GnRH administration (100 ng/kg, i.v., every 90 min for 24 h) followed by a single bolus of 10 microg GnRH, i.v., to evaluate pituitary responsiveness. We employed a highly sensitive LH immunoradiometric assay, which correlates well with an in vitro Leydig cell bioassay, and deconvolution analysis to calculate in vivo LH secretory burst frequency, amplitude, duration, mass, and LH half-life. Fasting resulted in 30-50% declines in serum total and free testosterone and LH concentrations, and a 3-fold decrease in the calculated 24-h LH secretion rate (fed, 42 +/- 12; fasting, 14 +/- 1.9 U/L distribution volume x day; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.05, by ANOVA). Reduced LH secretion was accounted for by dual mechanisms, viz. a fall in both the apparent number of computer-resolved LH secretory bursts per 24 h (fed, 16 +/- 1.1; fasting, 10 +/- 1.2; P < 0.01) and the mass of LH secreted per burst (fed, 2.5 +/- 0.5; fasting, 1.5 +/- 0.1 U/L; P < 0.05). Fasting also decreased the mean value of the 24-h (nyctohemeral) rhythm in serum LH concentrations and reduced the approximate entropy (disorderliness) of LH release. Exogenous pulsatile GnRH injections prevented both the reduction in the calculated daily LH secretion rate (fed, 42 +/- 12; fasting plus GnRH, 64 +/- 16 IU/L; P = NS) and the decline in serum testosterone concentrations (fed, 556 +/- 71 ng

  16. Supplemental growth hormone increases the tumor cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells in healthy adults with normal growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Crist, D M; Kraner, J C

    1990-12-01

    Using double-blind, placebo-controlled procedures, the effects of methionyl-human growth hormone (met-hGH) on the tumor cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells were studied in seven healthy adults using a repeated measures experiment. Subjects were assigned at random to either a placebo (bacteriostatic water) treatment condition or a met-hGH (16.0 mg/wk of Protropin) treatment condition, then crossed-over to the alternative treatment. Treatments were delivered on alternate days (3 d/wk) for 6 weeks. Without bias from the met-hGH treatment, there was no evidence for GH hyposecretion as measured by the peak circulating GH response to exercise stimulation (14.1 +/- 3.1 ng/mL) or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) levels (0.82 +/- 0.09 U/mL). When compared with placebo, met-hGH induced a significant overall increase in the percent specific lysis (%SL) of K562 tumor target cells (placebo 22.2 +/- 1.7 v met-hGH 28.5 +/- 2.1 %SL; P = .008). NK activity was increased within the first week of treatment and this level was maintained throughout the remaining period of supplementation. There was a trend (P = .057) for the met-hGH-induced percent change in NK activity (NK%) to be inversely related to placebo IGF-I levels (r = -.761), while there were significant positive correlations between NK% and the met-hGH-induced percent changes in IGF-I (r = .727; P = .035), the fat-free mass (FFM)/fat mass (FM) ratio derived by hydrodensitometry (r = .792; P = .012), and the endogenous GH response to exercise (r = .469; P = .034).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2246974

  17. Urinary insulin-like growth factor-II excretion in healthy infants and children with normal and abnormal growth.

    PubMed

    Quattrin, T; Albini, C H; Sportsman, C; Shine, B J; MacGillivray, M H

    1993-10-01

    The output of urinary IGF-II was measured by RIA in 12-h overnight urine samples obtained from 22 preterm and 15 full-term infants, 40 normal children, 18 children with growth hormone (GH) deficiency, and 25 patients with idiopathic short stature. GH deficiency was defined as a peak to GH provocative tests < or = 9.9 micrograms/L during two provocative tests. The authenticity of urinary IGF-II was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance using the Student Neuman-Keuls test to detect intergroup differences at the level of p < 0.05. The preterm and full-term infants excreted significantly higher amounts of urinary IGF-II (18.4 +/- 1.7 and 5.7 +/- 1.0 pmol/kg, respectively) compared with normal children (2.4 +/- 0.25 pmol/kg; p < 0.001). The output of urinary IGF-II in preterm infants was greater than that observed in full-term infants (F = 84.7, p < 0.001). The control children excreted significantly more IGF-II (2.4 +/- 0.2 pmol/kg) than children with GH deficiency (0.9 +/- 0.1 pmol/kg) or idiopathic short stature (1.0 +/- 0.1 pmol/kg; F = 13.5; p < 0.001). Analysis of urinary IGF-II excretion based on creatinine output yielded similar results. Data on urinary IGF-I and GH previously published were correlated and compared with the excretion pattern of urinary IGF-II.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8255673

  18. Ultrasound of the stomach--the EUROSON lecture 2006.

    PubMed

    Gilja, O H

    2007-02-01

    The stomach is a fascinating organ. It has the capacity to expand its volume substantially to receive and accommodate food after a meal, normally without any conscious notice of the expansion. The aim of this paper is to show how transabdominal ultrasonography can disclose the structural and functional abnormalities of the stomach. Ultrasound of the stomach was initially performed to detect and investigate organic diseases of the gastric wall. Subsequently, different methods were developed to study functional aspects of gastric pathology. Ultrasound can be used to evaluate antral contractility, gastric emptying, transpyloric flow, gastric configuration, intragastric distribution of meals, gastric accommodation and strain measurement of the gastric wall. Advanced methods for 3D ultrasound imaging and tissue Doppler (Strain Rate Imaging) have also been developed to study diseases of the stomach. The Ultrasound Meal Accommodation Test (U-MAT) can be applied to characterise patients with organic and non-organic dyspepsia. Ultrasonography still has a great potential as a clinical method, and some day our patients may receive both diagnosis and treatment in the same session. PMID:17304411

  19. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sushma S; Makar, Karen W; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y; Lampe, Paul D; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W; Potter, John D

    2015-12-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]). PMID:26697360

  20. Age- and Gender Dependent Liver Fat Content in a Healthy Normal BMI Population as Quantified by Fat-Water Separating DIXON MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Erika J.; Fischer, Michael A.; Manoliu, Andrei; Marcon, Magda; Luechinger, Roger; Nanz, Daniel; Reiner, Caecilia S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To establish age- and sex-dependent values of magnetic resonance (MR) liver fat-signal fraction (FSF) in healthy volunteers with normal body-mass index (BMI). Methods 2-point mDIXON sequences (repetition time/echo time, 4.2msec/1.2msec, 3.1msec) at 3.0 Tesla MR were acquired in 80 healthy volunteers with normal BMI (18.2 to 25.7 kg/m2) between 20 and 62 years (10 men/10 women per decade). FSF was measured in 5 liver segments (segment II, III, VI, VII, VIII) based on mean signal intensities in regions of interest placed on mDIXON-based water and fat images. Multivariate general linear models were used to test for significant differences between BMI-corrected FSF among age subgroups. Pearson and Spearman correlations between FSF and several body measures were calculated. Results Mean FSF (%) ± standard deviations significantly differed between women (3.91 ± 1.10) and men (4.69 ± 1.38) and varied with age for women/men (p-value: 0.002/0.027): 3.05 ± 0.49/3.74 ± 0.60 (age group 20–29), 3.75 ± 0.66/4.99 ± 1.30 (30–39), 4.76 ± 1.16/5.25 ± 1.97 (40–49) and 4.09 ± 1.26/4.79 ± 0.93 (50–62). FSF differences among age subgroups were significant for women only (p = 0.003). Conclusions MR-based liver fat content is higher in men and peaks in the fifth decade for both genders. PMID:26554709

  1. Relationship of Physical Activity and Healthy Eating with Mortality and Incident Heart Failure among Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Normal Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmawgoud, Ahmed; Brown, Cynthia J.; Sui, Xuemei; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Kokkinos, Peter F.; Bittner, Vera; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Fletcher, Ross D.; Blair, Steven N.; Ahmed, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aims Normal body mass index (BMI) is associated with lower mortality and may be achieved by physical activity (PA), healthy eating (HE), or both. We examined the association of PA and HE with mortality and incident heart failure (HF) among 2040 community-dwelling older adults aged ≥ 65 years with baseline BMI 18.5 to 24.99 kg/m2 during 13 years of follow-up in Cardiovascular Health Study. Methods and results Baseline PA was defined as ≥500 weekly metabolic equivalent task-minutes (MET-minutes) and HE as ≥5 daily servings of vegetable and fruit intake. Participants were categorized into 4 groups: (1) PA−/HE− (n=384); (2) PA+/HE− (n=992); (3) PA−/HE+ (n=162); and (4) PA+/HE+ (n=502). Participants had a mean age of 74 (±6) years, mean BMI of 22.6 (±1.5) kg/m2, 61% were women, and 4% African American. Compared with PA−/HE−, age-sex-race-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all-cause mortality for PA−/HE+, PA+/HE−, and PA+/HE+ groups were 0.96 (0.76–1.21), 0.61 (0.52–0.71) and 0.62 (0.52–0.75), respectively. These associations remained unchanged after multivariable adjustment and were similar for cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortalities. Respective demographic-adjusted HRs (95% Cis) for incident HF among 1954 participants without baseline HF were 1.21 (0.81–1.81), 0.71 (0.54–0.94) and 0.71 (0.51–0.98). These later associations lost significance after multivariable-adjustment. Conclusion Among community-dwelling older adults with normal BMI, physical activity, regardless of healthy eating, was associated with lower risk of mortality and incident HF, but healthy eating had no similar protective association in this cohort.

  2. Spleen Size Is Significantly Influenced by Body Height and Sex: Establishment of Normal Values for Spleen Size at US with a Cohort of 1200 Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kai Uwe; Luxembourg, Beate; Seifried, Erhard; Bonig, Halvard

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To define height- and sex-corrected normal values for spleen length and volume determined with ultrasonography (US). Materials and Methods The authors performed a retrospective data review of stem cell donors who had provided written informed consent for stem cell donation and use of anonymized data and biologic materials for scientific and quality control purposes. Spleen length, spleen volume, and anthrophometric data were correlated in 1230 healthy volunteers to identify variables that affect spleen size. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to weight effects of various variables on spleen size. Linear regression through the 95th percentile for men and women of different height cohorts generated the formula for the upper limit of normal for spleen length and volume. For validation, the upper limit of normal was calculated for each volunteer and compared with the observed value. Formulae to calculate the additional percentiles were similarly generated and validated. A cohort of 75 volunteers was analyzed twice to assess the stability of spleen length and volume over time. Results Spleen length and volume were significantly and independently associated with sex (length: P < .001; volume: P = .012), body height (P < .001 for both), and weight (P < .001 for both), with men and taller and heavier individuals having longer and larger spleens. The spleen length of 20 of 324 women (6%) and 234 of 906 men (26%) exceeded the previously reported upper limit of normal of 12 cm. Repeat measurements indicated that spleen length (median difference, 0.10 cm; range, -1.8 to 1.7 cm) and volume (median difference, 3 cm(3); range, -106 to 142 cm(3)) were quite stable. A mobile application that performs these calculations is available for download. Conclusion The authors define height- and sex-corrected normal values for spleen length and volume for women with a body height of 155-179 cm and men with a body height of 165-199 cm and propose validated algorithms

  3. [Problems of functional study of the stomach in contemporary gastrology].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, V A

    2002-01-01

    In the assessment of the functional state of the stomach the interest to its secretory functioning has remained constant and in the center of attention of physiologists and clinicians during the past century. That is understandable. After all, the level of secretion of gastric juice enriched with the acid and pepsins defines numerous aspects in the functioning of this organ and its peptic, bactericidal and even evacuation functions. Moreover, under certain conditions active gastric juice can turn from a mediator in the normal peptic process into a solely pathogenetic factor and promote the development of a number of so-called acid-dependent diseases that have conventionally included stomach ulcer, reflux-esophagitis, postgastrectomy ulcers of the anastomosis and other more infrequent pathological states. A distinct positive reaction to the application of anti-acid preparations is common for all these diseases. At the same time, the role of HCI in their development remains comprehensible only in some aspects. PMID:12619569

  4. Age-Dependent Changes in Resting Energy Expenditure (REE): Insights from Detailed Body Composition Analysis in Normal and Overweight Healthy Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Corinna; Braun, Wiebke; Pourhassan, Maryam; Schweitzer, Lisa; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Müller, Manfred J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in organ and tissue masses may add to changes in the relationship between resting energy expenditure (REE) and fat free mass (FFM) in normal and overweight healthy Caucasians. Secondary analysis using cross-sectional data of 714 healthy normal and overweight Caucasian subjects (age 18-83 years) with comprehensive information on FFM, organ and tissue masses (as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), body density (as assessed by Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP)) and hydration (as assessed by deuterium dilution (D₂O)) and REE (as assessed by indirect calorimetry). High metabolic rate organs (HMR) summarized brain, heart, liver and kidney masses. Ratios of HMR organs and muscle mass (MM) in relation to FFM were considered. REE was calculated (REEc) using organ and tissue masses times their specific metabolic rates. REE, FFM, specific metabolic rates, the REE-FFM relationship, HOMA, CRP, and thyroid hormone levels change with age. The age-related decrease in FFM explained 59.7% of decreases in REE. Mean residuals of the REE-FFM association were positive in young adults but became negative in older subjects. When compared to young adults, proportions of MM to FFM decreased with age, whereas contributions of liver and heart did not differ between age groups. HOMA, TSH and inflammation (plasma CRP-levels) explained 4.2%, 2.0% and 1.4% of the variance in the REE-FFM residuals, but age and plasma T3-levels had no effects. HMR to FFM and MM to FFM ratios together added 11.8% on to the variance of REE-FFM residuals. Differences between REE and REEc increased with age, suggesting age-related changes in specific metabolic rates of organs and tissues. This bias was partly explained by plasmaT3-levels. Age-related changes in REE are explained by (i) decreases in fat free mass; (ii) a decrease in the contributions of organ and muscle masses to FFM; and (iii) decreases in specific organ and tissue metabolic rates. Age-dependent changes in the REE

  5. Age-Dependent Changes in Resting Energy Expenditure (REE): Insights from Detailed Body Composition Analysis in Normal and Overweight Healthy Caucasians

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Corinna; Braun, Wiebke; Pourhassan, Maryam; Schweitzer, Lisa; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Müller, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in organ and tissue masses may add to changes in the relationship between resting energy expenditure (REE) and fat free mass (FFM) in normal and overweight healthy Caucasians. Secondary analysis using cross-sectional data of 714 healthy normal and overweight Caucasian subjects (age 18–83 years) with comprehensive information on FFM, organ and tissue masses (as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), body density (as assessed by Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP)) and hydration (as assessed by deuterium dilution (D2O)) and REE (as assessed by indirect calorimetry). High metabolic rate organs (HMR) summarized brain, heart, liver and kidney masses. Ratios of HMR organs and muscle mass (MM) in relation to FFM were considered. REE was calculated (REEc) using organ and tissue masses times their specific metabolic rates. REE, FFM, specific metabolic rates, the REE-FFM relationship, HOMA, CRP, and thyroid hormone levels change with age. The age-related decrease in FFM explained 59.7% of decreases in REE. Mean residuals of the REE-FFM association were positive in young adults but became negative in older subjects. When compared to young adults, proportions of MM to FFM decreased with age, whereas contributions of liver and heart did not differ between age groups. HOMA, TSH and inflammation (plasma CRP-levels) explained 4.2%, 2.0% and 1.4% of the variance in the REE-FFM residuals, but age and plasma T3-levels had no effects. HMR to FFM and MM to FFM ratios together added 11.8% on to the variance of REE-FFM residuals. Differences between REE and REEc increased with age, suggesting age-related changes in specific metabolic rates of organs and tissues. This bias was partly explained by plasmaT3-levels. Age-related changes in REE are explained by (i) decreases in fat free mass; (ii) a decrease in the contributions of organ and muscle masses to FFM; and (iii) decreases in specific organ and tissue metabolic rates. Age-dependent changes in the REE

  6. A screening of skin changes, with special emphasis on neurochemical marker antibody evaluation, in patients claiming to suffer from "screen dermatitis" as compared to normal healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Han, S W

    1996-10-01

    In the present study, facial skin from so-called "screen dermatitis" patients were compared with corresponding material from normal healthy volunteers. The aim of the study was to evaluate possible markers to be used for future double-blind or blind provocation investigations. Differences were found for the biological markers calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), somatostatin (SOM), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY), protein S-100 (S-100), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). The overall impression in the blind-coded material was such that it turned out easy to blindly separate the two groups from each other. However, no single marker was 100% able to pin-point the difference, although some were quite powerful in doing so (CGRP, SOM, S-100). However, it has to be pointed out that we cannot, based upon the present results, draw any definitive conclusions about the cause of the changes observed. Whether this is due to electric or magnetic fields, a surrounding airborne chemical, humidity, heating, stress factors, or something else, still remains an open question. Blind or double-blind provocations in a controlled environment are necessary to elucidate possible underlying causes for the changes reported in this investigation. PMID:8981027

  7. Normal values of 24-hour ambulatory esophageal impedance-pH monitoring in a rural South African cohort of healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Ndebia, E J; Sammon, A M; Umapathy, E; Iputo, J E

    2016-05-01

    There are no data on 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring in African populations. The purpose of this study was to provide the normal values of esophageal impedance and pH monitoring in a rural African populations. South African healthy rural participants were recruited and underwent 24 hours of esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. The median and the 95th percentiles of the total reflux episodes were 49 and 97, respectively, of which the corresponding number of acidic, weakly acidic, and weakly alkaline reflux were 15 and 55, 17 and 51, and 8 and 36, respectively. The compositions of the total reflux were 5 and 21 for liquid, 27 and 72 for mixed, and 10 and 39 for gas reflux, respectively. The median bolus clearance was 18 seconds and the median bolus exposure was 14 minutes/24 hours. The proximal extent was 6%. The 95th percent time of esophageal exposure to acid was 8.6 in 24 hours. Female and overweight participants were associated with an increased number of reflux events. There were more reflux episodes, and of which, more were weakly alkaline compared with previous similar studies. The findings provide reference values of gastroesophageal reflux for a South African rural population. PMID:25721534

  8. Chemo Before Surgery May Help Stomach Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy given before surgery for cancer of the lower esophagus and stomach increased the number of patients surviving for five years compared to surgery alone, according to findings presented at the 2007 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

  9. Do We Know What Causes Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... into chemicals that cause mutations (changes) in the DNA of the cells in the stomach lining. This ... that can block substances that damage a cell’s DNA. During the past few years, scientists have made ...

  10. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Study of stomach motility using the relaxation of magnetic tracers.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A A; Baffa, O; Oliveira, R B

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic tracers can be observed in the interior of the human body to give information about their quantity, position and state of order. With the aim of detecting and studying the degree of disorder of these tracers after they have been previously magnetized inside the stomach, a system composed of magnetization coils and magnetic detectors was developed. Helmholtz coils of diameter 84 cm were used to magnetize the sample and the remanent magnetization (RM) was detected with two first-order gradiometric fluxgate arrays each with a 15 cm base line, sensitivity of 0.5 nT and common mode rejection (CMR) of at least 10. The system allows simultaneous measurement in the anterior and posterior projections of the stomach. Measurements of the time evolution of the RM were performed in vitro and in normal subjects after the ingestion of a test meal labelled with magnetic particles. The data were fitted with an exponential curve and the relaxation time tau was obtained. Initial studies were performed to ascertain the action of a drug that is known to affect the gastric motility, showing that the decay of the remanent magnetization was indeed due to stomach contractions. PMID:10442706

  12. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, A J; Lomax, A E; Torihashi, S; Sanders, K M; Ward, S M

    1996-01-01

    The structural relationships between interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), varicose nerve fibers, and smooth muscle cells in the gastrointestinal tract have led to the suggestion that ICC may be involved in or mediate enteric neurotransmission. We characterized the distribution of ICC in the murine stomach and found two distinct classes on the basis of morphology and immunoreactivity to antibodies against c-Kit receptors. ICC with multiple processes formed a network in the myenteric plexus region from corpus to pylorus. Spindle-shaped ICC were found within the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (IC-IM) throughout the stomach. The density of these cells was greatest in the proximal stomach. IC-IM ran along nerve fibers and were closely associated with nerve terminals and adjacent smooth muscle cells. IC-IM failed to develop in mice with mutations in c-kit. Therefore, we used W/W(V) mutants to test whether IC-IM mediate neural inputs in muscles of the gastric fundus. The distribution of inhibitory nerves in the stomachs of c-kit mutants was normal, but NO-dependent inhibitory neuro-regulation was greatly reduced. Smooth muscle tissues of W/W(V) mutants relaxed in response to exogenous sodium nitroprusside, but the membrane potential effects of sodium nitroprusside were attenuated. These data suggest that IC-IM play a critical serial role in NO-dependent neurotransmission: the cellular mechanism(s) responsible for transducing NO into electrical responses may be expressed in IC-IM. Loss of these cells causes loss of electrical responsiveness and greatly reduces responses to nitrergic nerve stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8876253

  13. Impact of Reduced Meal Frequency Without Caloric Restriction on Glucose Regulation in Healthy, Normal Weight Middle-Aged Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Olga; Martin, Bronwen; Stote, Kim S.; Golden, Erin; Maudsley, Stuart; Najjar, Samer S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ingram, Donald K.; Longo, Dan L.; Rumpler, William V.; Baer, David J.; Egan, Josephine; Mattson, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    An unresolved issue in the field of diet and health is if and how changes in meal frequency affect energy metabolism in humans. We therefore evaluated the influence of reduced meal frequency without a reduction in energy intake on glucose metabolism in normal weight healthy male and female subjects. The study was a randomized cross-over design, with 2 eight-week treatment periods (with an intervening 11 week off-diet period) in which subjects consumed all of their calories for weight maintenance distributed in either 3 meals or 1 meal per day (consumed between 17:00 and 21:00). Energy metabolism was evaluated at designated time points throughout the study by performing morning oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and measuring levels of glucose, insulin, glucagon, leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, resistin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Subjects consuming 1 meal/d exhibited higher morning fasting plasma glucose levels, greater and more sustained elevations of plasma glucose concentrations and a delayed insulin response in the OGTT compared to subjects consuming 3 meal/d. Levels of ghrelin were elevated in response to the 1 meal/d regimen. Fasting levels of insulin, leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, resistin and BDNF were not significantly affected by meal frequency. Subjects consuming a single large daily meal exhibit elevated fasting glucose levels, and impaired morning glucose tolerance associated with a delayed insulin response, during a 2 month diet period compared to those consuming 3 meals/day. The impaired glucose tolerance was reversible and was not associated with alterations in the levels of adipokines or BDNF. PMID:17998028

  14. Connectivity pattern differences bilaterally in the cerebellum posterior lobe in healthy subjects after normal sleep and sleep deprivation: a resting-state functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Yan, Zhihan; Wang, Tingyu; Yang, Xiaokai; Feng, Feng; Fan, Luping; Jiang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) differences of the bilaterial cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL) after normal sleep (NS) and after sleep deprivation (SD). Methods A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight males, eight females) underwent an fMRI scan twice at random: once following NS and the other following 24 hours’ SD, with an interval of 1 month between the two scans. The fMRI scanning included resting state and acupuncture stimulation. The special activated regions located during the acupuncture stimulation were selected as regions of interest for rsFC analysis. Results Bilateral CPLs were positively activated by acupuncture stimulation. In the NS group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral CPL, bilateral frontal lobe (BFL), left precuneus and right inferior parietal lobule, while the right CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral temporal lobe, right cerebellum anterior lobe, right CPL, left frontal lobe, left anterior cingulate, right posterior cingulate, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule. In the SD group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the left posterior cingulate gyrus bilateral CPL, left precuneus, left precentral gyrus, BFL, and the left parietal lobe, while the right CPL showed rsFC with bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral CPL, left frontal lobe and left temporal lobe. Compared with the NS group, the left CPL had increased rsFC in the SD group with the right inferior frontal gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, right thalamus, and bilateral precuneus, and decreased rsFC with the BFL, while the right CPL had increased rsFC with the left superior frontal gyrus and decreased rsFC with the left precentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, and the BFL. Conclusion Bilateral CPL are possibly involved in acupuncture stimulation in different manners, and the right CPL showed more rsFC impairment. PMID:26064046

  15. Healthy Water, Healthy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etgen, John

    2002-01-01

    Describes a hands-on activity, Hitting the Mark, which is found in the "Healthy Water, Healthy People Water Quality Educators Guide" in terms of its objectives, materials, background, procedures, activities, and assessment. (KHR)

  16. Optical absorption and scattering spectra of pathological stomach tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Lakhina, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra of biotissues in vivo and transmission and reflection coefficients for biotissues in vitro are measured over 300-800 nm. These data are used to determine the spectral absorption and scattering indices and the scattering anisotropy factor for stomach mucous membranes under normal and various pathological conditions (chronic atrophic and ulcerous defects, malignant neoplasms). The most importan tphysiological (hemodynamic and oxygenation levels) and structural-morphological (scatterer size and density) parameters are also determined. The results of a morphofunctional study correlate well with the optical properties and are consistent with data from a histomorphological analysis of the corresponding tissues.

  17. Mechanisms for nitrite loss from the stomach.

    PubMed

    Licht, W R; Schultz, D S; Fox, J G; Tannenbaum, S R; Deen, W M

    1986-10-01

    Nitrite loss from the stomach was studied using dogs equipped with Thomas cannulas for direct access to the stomach lumen. Solutions containing sodium nitrite and non-absorbable volume marker (polyethylene glycol, PEG) were infused into the stomach, and samples were taken over 60 min to determine the concentration of 'total nitrite' (including NO2-, HNO2 and other species in equilibrium with NO2-) and rate of dilution of the stomach contents as a function of time. Changes in stomach volume were also measured. Nitrite loss was found to be very rapid, with total nitrite concentrations declining to less than half the initial levels in 10 min. The decay in total nitrite concentrations was due predominantly to gastric absorption, with small additional contributions from dilution of the stomach contents (inferred from PEG concentrations) and chemical reactions (from in vitro kinetic data). Results for initial nitrite concentrations varying over a range of 0.15-4.5 mM showed absorption to be first order in total nitrite. The permeability-area product for nitrite absorption (PA) was about 0.6 l/h, and was unaffected by the addition of 1 mM SCN- or Cl-. All of these results are consistent with nitrite absorption in the form of NO2- or HNO2. Buffering the infusate with HCO3- to increase luminal pH from approximately 2 to 7 caused a three-fold reduction in the apparent value of PA. When pentagastrin was used to stimulate acid secretion, nitrite absorption was only half as fast as when acid secretion was inhibited with cimetidine, or when no drug was given. This effect could not be explained by variations in luminal pH, and suggests that acid secretion either decreases PA or is accompanied by active secretion of nitrite. Based on these data, a mathematical model was developed to stimulate the physical and chemical factors governing nitrite concentrations in the stomach. PMID:3757171

  18. Mortality from stomach cancer in Ontario miners.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiak, R A; Ritchie, A C; Springer, J; Muller, J

    1993-01-01

    An excess of mortality from stomach cancer has been found in Ontario gold miners (observed (obs) 104, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 152, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 125-185) and no excess of stomach cancer could be detected in other miners in Ontario (obs 74, SMR 102, 95% CI 80-128). The excess of stomach cancer appeared five to 19 years after the miners began gold mining in Ontario. In that interval, similar patterns of excess mortality from stomach cancer were found in miners born in north America (obs 14, SMR 268, CI 147-450) and in miners born outside north America (obs 12, SMR 280, 95% CI 145-489). Twenty or more years after the miners began mining gold, an excess of mortality from stomach cancer was found in gold miners born outside of north American (obs 41, SMR 160, 95% CI 115-218) but not in gold miners born in north America (obs 37, SMR 113, 95% CI 80-156). The excess of stomach cancer in gold miners under the age of 60 (obs 45, SMR 167, 95% CI 122-223) seems larger than the excess in gold miners between the ages of 60 and 74 (obs 59, SMR 143, 95% CI 109-184). Exposures to arsenic, chromium, mineral fibre, diesel emissions, and aluminium powder were considered as possible explanations of the excess of stomach cancer in Ontario gold miners. Exposure to diesel emissions and aluminium powder was rejected as gold miners and uranium miners were exposed to both agents but an excess of stomach cancer was noted only in gold miners. The association between the excess of stomach cancer and the time since the miner began mining gold suggested that duration of exposure to dust in gold mines ought to be weighted according to the time since the exposure to dust occurred and that an appropriate time weighting function would be one in the interval five to 19 years after each year of exposure to dust and zero otherwise. A statistically significant association between the relative risk of mortality from stomach cancer and the time weighted duration of exposure to

  19. Uncommon mucosal metastases to the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kanthan, R; Sharanowski, K; Senger, JL; Fesser, J; Chibbar, R; Kanthan, SC

    2009-01-01

    Background Metastases to the stomach from an extra-gastric neoplasm are an unusual event, identified in less than 2% of cancer patients at autopsy. The stomach may be involved by hematogenous spread from a distant primary (most commonly breast, melanoma or lung), or by contiguous spread from an adjacent malignancy, such as the pancreas, esophagus and gallbladder. These latter sites may also involve the stomach via lymphatic or haematogenous spread. We present three cases of secondary gastric malignancy. Methods/Results The first is a 19-year-old male who received a diagnosis of testicular choriocarcinoma in September 2004. Metastatic malignancy was demonstrated in the stomach after partial gastrectomy was performed to control gastric hemorrhage. The second is a 75-year-old male, generally well, who was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the lung in September 2005. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung was demonstrated in a subsequent biopsy of "gastric polyps". The third is an 85-year-old man with no known history of malignancy who presented for evaluation of iron deficiency anemia by endoscopy in February 2006. Biopsies of the colonic and gastric mucosa demonstrated moderately differentiated invasive colonic adenocarcinoma with metastatic deposits in the stomach. Conclusion While the accurate recognition of these lesions at endoscopy is fraught with difficulty, pathological awareness of such uncommon metastases in the gastric mucosa is essential for accurate diagnosis and optimal patient management. PMID:19650900

  20. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-01-01

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1-11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines. PMID:27589719

  1. Rationale in diagnosis and screening of atrophic gastritis with stomach-specific plasma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Agréus, Lars; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Di Mario, Francesco; Leja, Marcis; Mahachai, Varocha; Yaron, Niv; Van Oijen, Martijn; Perez, Guillermo Perez; Rugge, Massimo; Ronkainen, Jukka; Salaspuro, Mikko; Sipponen, Pentti; Sugano, Kentaro; Sung, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Atrophic gastritis (AG) results most often from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. AG is the most important single risk condition for gastric cancer that often leads to an acid-free or hypochlorhydric stomach. In the present paper, we suggest a rationale for noninvasive screening of AG with stomach-specific biomarkers. Methods The paper summarizes a set of data on application of the biomarkers and describes how the test results could be interpreted in practice. Results In AG of the gastric corpus and fundus, the plasma levels of pepsinogen I and/or the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio are always low. The fasting level of gastrin-17 is high in AG limited to the corpus and fundus, but low or non-elevated if the AG occurs in both antrum and corpus. A low fasting level of G-17 is a sign of antral AG or indicates high intragastric acidity. Differentiation between antral AG and high intragastric acidity can be done by assaying the plasma G-17 before and after protein stimulation, or before and after administration of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Amidated G-17 will rise if the antral mucosa is normal in structure. H. pylori antibodies are a reliable indicator of helicobacter infection, even in patients with AG and hypochlorhydria. Conclusions Stomach-specific biomarkers provide information about the stomach health and about the function of stomach mucosa and are a noninvasive tool for diagnosis and screening of AG and acid-free stomach. PMID:22242613

  2. The denervated stomach as an esophageal substitute is a contractile organ.

    PubMed Central

    Collard, J M; Romagnoli, R; Otte, J B; Kestens, P J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the denervated stomach as an esophageal substitute is an inert conduit or a contractile organ. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The motor response of gastric transplants to deglutition suggests that the stomach pulled up to the neck acts as an inert organ. METHODS: The gastric motility of 11 healthy volunteers and 33 patients having either a gastric tube (GT) (n = 10) or their whole stomach (WS) (n = 23) as esophageal replacement was studied with perfused catheters during the fasting state, after a meal, and after intravenous administration of erythromycin lactobionate. A motility index was established for each period of recording by dividing the sum of the areas under the curves of all contractions of >9 mmHg by the time of recording. RESULTS: Over years, the denervated stomach recovers more and more motor activity, even displaying a real phase 3 motor pattern in 6 of the 10 WS patients and 1 of the 7 GT patients with >3 years of follow-up. Erythromycin lactobionate generates a phase 3-like motor pattern regardless of the length of follow-up. Extrinsic denervation of the whole stomach does not significantly modify the fasting motility index established >3 years after surgery (+17% on average, p > 0.05), but it reduces that in the fed period by an average of 62% (p = 0.0016). Tubulization of the denervated whole stomach lowers the fasting motility index by an average of 60% (p = 0.0248) and further impairs that in the fed period by an average of 67% (p = 0.0388). CONCLUSIONS: The denervated stomach as an esophageal substitute is a contractile organ that may even generate complete migrating motor complexes. Motor recovery is better in the fasting than in the fed period, and it is more marked in WS patients than in GT patients. Images Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:9445107

  3. Muscle fibre size and type distribution in thoracic and lumbar regions of erector spinae in healthy subjects without low back pain: normal values and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    MANNION, A. F.; DUMAS, G. A.; COOPER, R. G.; ESPINOSA, F. J.; FARIS, M. W.; STEVENSON, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the normal muscle fibre size and type distribution of the human erector spinae, both in thoracic and lumbar regions, in a group of 31 young healthy male (n=17) and female (n=14) volunteers. Two percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were obtained under local anaesthesia, from the belly of the left erector spinae, at the levels of the 10th thoracic and 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Samples were prepared for routine histochemistry for the identification of fibre types. Fibre size (cross-sectional area (CSA) and narrow diameter (ND)) was quantified using computerised image analysis. The mean CSA/ND for each fibre type was greater in the thoracic than the lumbar region, but there was no difference between the 2 regions either for percentage type I (i.e. percentage distribution by number), percentage type I area (i.e. relative area of the muscle occupied by type I fibres) or the ratio describing the size of the type I fibre relative to that of the type II. Men had larger fibres than women, for each fibre type and at both sampling sites. In the men, each fibre type was of a similar mean size, whereas in the women the type I fibres were considerably larger than both the type II A and type II B fibres, with no difference between the latter two. In both regions of the erector spinae there was no difference between men and women for the proportion (%) of a given fibre type, but the percentage type I fibre area was significantly higher in the women. The erector spinae display muscle fibre characteristics which are clearly very different from those of other skeletal muscles, and which, with their predominance of relatively large type I (slow twitch) fibres, befit their function as postural muscles. Differences between thoracic and lumbar fascicles of the muscle, and between the muscles of men and women, may reflect adaptive responses to differences in function. In assessing the degree of any pathological change in the muscle of patients with low back pain

  4. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions. PMID:26172167

  5. The human gastric microbiota: Is it time to rethink the pathogenesis of stomach diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Compare, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although long thought to be a sterile organ, due to its acid production, the human stomach holds a core microbiome. Aim To provide an update of findings related to gastric microbiota and its link with gastric diseases. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature. Results The development of culture-independent methods facilitated the identification of many bacteria. Five major phyla have been detected in the stomach: Firmicutes, Bacteroidites, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria. At the genera level, the healthy human stomach is dominated by Prevotella, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Rothia and Haemophilus; however, the composition of the gastric microbiota is dynamic and affected by such factors as diet, drugs and diseases. The interaction between the pre-existing gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori infection might influence an individual’s risk of gastric disease, including gastric cancer. Conclusions The maintenance of bacterial homeostasis could be essential for the stomach’s health and highlights the chance for therapeutic interventions targeting the gastric microbiota, even if gastric pH, peristalsis and the mucus layer may prevent bacteria colonization; and the definition of gastric microbiota of the healthy stomach is still an ongoing challenging task. PMID:26137299

  6. Francisella tularensis Peritonitis in Stomach Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Linus X.; Safdar, Amar

    2004-01-01

    Tularemia with peritonitis developed in a 50-year-old man soon after diagnosis of stomach cancer with metastasis. The ascites grew Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, which was identified by sequencing analysis of the 16S rDNA. The infection resolved with antimicrobial treatment. Antibodies detected 4 weeks after onset disappeared after chemotherapy-associated lymphopenia. PMID:15663872

  7. Cancer Statistics: Cancer of the Stomach

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 26,370 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 10,730 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 79,843 people living with stomach cancer in ...

  8. 9 CFR 95.19 - Animal stomachs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Animal stomachs. 95.19 Section 95.19 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF...

  9. 9 CFR 95.19 - Animal stomachs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Animal stomachs. 95.19 Section 95.19 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF...

  10. 9 CFR 95.19 - Animal stomachs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Animal stomachs. 95.19 Section 95.19 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF...

  11. 9 CFR 95.19 - Animal stomachs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Animal stomachs. 95.19 Section 95.19 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF...

  12. 9 CFR 95.19 - Animal stomachs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Animal stomachs. 95.19 Section 95.19 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SANITARY CONTROL OF...

  13. Effects of ingestion of cold and hot water on the course of thermal changes in the stomach and intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batinkov, Y. L.

    1979-01-01

    With the use of a thermocouple and mirror galvanometer, calibrated before the experiment and after each test, it was found that the normal temperature in the esophagus is 0.1-0.4 C higher than in the oral cavity, the temperature in the duodenum is somewhat less than in the stomach, but higher with cholecystitis, duodenitis or gastritis, the temperature in the normal stomach equals or is somewhat higher than in the esophagus, and that the temperature of distended stomachs frequently is lower than in the esophagus. It was found that hot water is retained in the stomach longer than cold water, and that both hot and cold water are allowed to pass into the duodenum when the water temperature becomes approximately equal to that of the surrounding organs.

  14. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  15. What's New in Stomach Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for stomach cancer What’s new in stomach cancer research and treatment? Research is ... Chemotherapy drugs and combinations Some studies are testing new ways to combine drugs already known to be ...

  16. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for stomach cancer? What should you ask your doctor about stomach cancer? As you cope with cancer ... we encourage you to talk openly with your doctor, nurse, and cancer care team. You should feel ...

  17. What Are the Key Statistics about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the frequent use of antibiotics to treat infections. Antibiotics can kill the bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ), which is thought to be a major cause of stomach cancer. For statistics on survival for stomach cancer, see ...

  18. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  19. Healthy living

    MedlinePlus

    ... on an empty stomach will speed up the effects of alcohol. Alcoholism can lead to diseases including: Diseases of ... should talk to their children about the dangerous effects of alcohol. Talk to your provider if you or someone ...

  20. Healthy living

    MedlinePlus

    ... and poor balance. Having a higher amount of body fat and drinking on an empty stomach will speed ... OBESITY Obesity is a serious health concern. Excess body fat can overwork the heart, bones, and muscles. It ...

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... compounds that have been shown to cause stomach cancer in lab animals. On the other hand, eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables appears to lower the risk of stomach cancer. (See “ Can stomach cancer be prevented ?”) Tobacco use ...

  2. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  3. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  4. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  5. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  6. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  7. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Gülçiçek, Osman Bilgin; Solmaz, Ali; Özdoğan, Kamil; Erçetin, Candaş; Yavuz, Erkan; Yiğitbaş, Hakan; Çelebi, Fatih; Altınay, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the stomach accounts for less than 1% of all gastric malignancies. Less than 100 cases were reported in the literature. Therefore, knowledge about management and prognosis of the disease is limited. Surgical approach is the basic form of treatment. In this study we confirmed a case of primary gastric squamous cell carcinoma with the aim of contribution to the literature, which is seen rare, and the diagnosis was confirmed pathologically. PMID:27528817

  8. Stomach trichobezoar (rapunzel syndrome) with iatrogenic intussusception.

    PubMed

    Yik, Y I; How, A K

    2016-04-01

    We present a rare case of stomach trichobezoar complicated with iatrogenic intussusception noted intra-operatively after failed attempt of endoscopic removal in a 13-year-old girl. At presentation, she had gastric outlet obstruction with anaemia. Endoscopy established the diagnosis of trichobezoar. Surgical removal was warranted after failed endoscopic removal. Her postoperative course was uneventful. Detailed history and careful examination disclosed trichotillomania and associated trichophagia. Psychiatric referral was sought with the intention to prevent future recurrence. PMID:27326947

  9. [Therapeutic effect of gastrozolum in stomach ulcers].

    PubMed

    Sukhareva, G V; Tsaregorodtseva, T M; Trubitsina, I E; Serova, T I; Goncharenko, L S; Dolgova, N Iu; Zarudnaia, S I; Kuz'mina, O S; Lopatina, I N; Manannikov, I V; Melik-Ogandzhanian, N B

    2003-01-01

    Gastrozolum is the proprietary name of a drug made in Saint Petersburg. Its international nonproprietary name is Omeprazole. The absorption rate is not related to food. Its pharmacotherapeutic action becomes apparent as an inhibitor of the proton pump leading to the inhibition of H+/K(+)-ATPase of the secretory membrane of parietal cells of the stomach mucous membrane and blocking of the concluding stage of hydrochloric acid secretion. The entire action leads to the decrease of the level of basal and induced secretion regardless of the nature of stimulus. As a result of this, symptoms of stomach ulcer decrease, and gastroduodenal ulcers heal faster. Penetrating into the stomach mucous membrane cells, the drug also has a cytoprotective action. The maximum blood concentration (0.6-1.5 mg/l) is found 2-3 hours after a single intake of 40 mg of the drug. It was determined that after the intake of 20 mg of Gastrozolum its action lasts for 24 hours and provides for the inhibition of both night and day secretion. The ricochet syndrome does not take place when the treatment is over. It was proved that Gastrozolum has a bactericidal action on Helicobacter pylori due to the sharp increase of stomach pH, which contributes to the realization of the effect of used components of the anti-helicobacter therapy. The experiment failed to establish any teratogenic or poisonous action on the embryos. The dosage form is a capsule containing 20 mg of Omeprazole in the form of pellets. PMID:14621606

  10. [Normal values of the major parameters of lower limb veins in Russian cosmonauts prior to flight and in healthy untrained subjects].

    PubMed

    Kotovskaya, A R; Fomina, G A; Salnikov, A V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents normal values of the major parameters of lower limb veins in cosmonauts during preparations for space flight and volunteers leading a common life. The authors report the results and discuss the causes for differences in normal leg venous parameters in these groups of subjects. Incomparability of measurements made in cosmonauts and common people is demonstrated. Changes in lower limb veins of a cosmonaut in microgravity can be evaluated only relative to his/her normal values of the major venous parameters (capacitance, compliance and filling) before flight. PMID:25958461

  11. Tuberculosis: Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ...

  12. Fluorescence spectral properties of stomach tissues with pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Lahina, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    Steady-state fluorescence and diffuse reflection spectra are measured for in vivo normal and pathological (chronic atrophic and ulcerating defects, malignant neoplasms) stomach mucous lining tissues. The degree of distortion of the fluorescence spectra is estimated taking light scattering and absorption into account. A combination of Gauss and Lorentz functions is used to decompose the fluorescence spectra. Potential groups of fluorophores are determined and indices are introduced to characterize the dynamics of their contributions to the resultant spectra as pathologies develop. Reabsorption is found to quench the fluorescence of structural proteins by as much as a factor of 3, while scattering of the light can increase the fluorescence intensity of flavin and prophyrin groups by as much as a factor of 2.

  13. Effects of coffees before and after special treatment procedure on cell membrane potentials in stomach cells.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, B L; Valente, P; Ferrer-Montiel, A; Candelario-Jalil, E; Menthe, J; Luecker, P

    2006-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most excessively used beverages worldwide, commences the risk of gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which may lead to gastric ulcers and increase the risk of gastric cancer. Many attempts have been made by the coffee industry to diminish the irritating effect on mucosa by means of altering the extraction methods concerning gerbic acids and the roasting processes. This paper describes the effect of differently produced coffees involving two brands of Darboven and two brands of other coffee roasters. The aim of this study was to prove the results of gastric potential measurements we found in literature by using human AGS gastric epithelial cells (human adenocarcinoma). All four coffee extracts tested differentially affected the membrane resting potential of AGS cells. Coffees no. 1 and no. 2 depolarized the cells, presumably by increasing the cation entry into the cytosol. In marked contrast, coffee no. 4 hyperpolarizes the cells, possibly by H(+) extrusion and/or Cl(-) influx, suggesting that this coffee might increase acidity in the stomach, which might negatively affect the stomach, especially in people with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Overall, our data suggest that different roasting methods of coffees affect the membrane potentials of AGS stomach cells, resulting in increased influx of H+ possibly resulting in decreased stomach acidity and thus reducing GER. These results are in good accordance with clinical pharmacological results from potential difference measurements in healthy volunteers we found in the literature. PMID:16894406

  14. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The equine glandular stomach is commonly affected by erosion and ulceration. The aim of this study was to assess whether bacteria, including Helicobacter, could be involved in the aetiology of gastric glandular lesions seen in horses. Results Stomach lesions, as well as normal appearing mucosa were obtained from horses slaughtered for human consumption. All samples were tested for urease activity using the Pyloritek® assay, while mucosal bacterial content was evaluated using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation. In selected sub samples, bacteria characterisation was pursued further by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal samples, clones with 99% similarities to Lactobacillus salivarius and Sarcina ventriculi were found. Escherichia like bacterium clones and Enterococcus clones were demonstrated in one focal erosion. Based on a phylogenetic tree these clones had 100% similarity to Escherichia fergusonii and Enterococcus faecium. The Enterococcus were found colonising the mucosal surface, while E. fergusonii organisms were also demonstrated intraepithelial. Conclusion Gastric Helicobacter spp. could not be verified as being involved in lesions of the glandular stomach of the horse. Since E. fergusonii has been described as an emerging pathogen in both humans and animals, the finding of this bacterium in gastric erosion warrants further clarification to whether gastric infection with this type bacterium is important for horses. PMID:20298612

  15. Normal ranges of biorbital and interorbital distances in healthy Turkish pregnancies at 19–23 weeks of gestation and correlation with craniofacial structures

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Halil Gürsoy; Artunç-Ülkümen, Burcu; Koyuncu, Faik Mümtaz; Uyar, Yıldız; Bülbül-Baytur, Yeşim

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the normal ranges for biorbital (BOD) and interorbital distances (IOD) during the second trimester in Turkish women with normal pregnancies and to assess the correlation between BOD, IOD, and other fetal craniofacial structures and biometric parameters. Material and Methods Our retrospective study comprised 1328 women with singleton normal pregnancies who had undergone ultrasonography (USG) examinations at 19–23 weeks of gestation in the second trimester screening. The measurements of BOD and IOD were obtained with the coronal section of the fetal face at the plane of orbits. Results Mean BOD was 3.4±0.33 cm, whereas mean IOD was 1.28±0.24 cm. Correlation analysis revealed that BOD was significantly correlated with IOD, transcerebellar diameter (TCD), cisterna manga (CM), nuchal fold (NF), nasal bone (NB), biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL), and gestational week. There was a significant relation between IOD and the lateral ventricle posterior horn, TCD, CM, NF, NB, BPD, HC, AC, and FL. Conclusion The reference ranges obtained in our study enabled accurate evaluation of BOD and IOD in the second trimester of normal pregnancies. USG detection of fetal orbital biometric anomalies may alert the clinician for different anomalies associated with abnormal development of eye. PMID:26401111

  16. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes. A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system. In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4–8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9–7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9–17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6–20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1–6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3–8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant. A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion. PMID:26287417

  17. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes.A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system.In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4-8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9-7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9-17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6-20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1-6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3-8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant.A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion. PMID:26287417

  18. High diversity of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius lineages and toxigenic traits in healthy pet-owning household members. Underestimating normal household contact?

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Torres, Carmen; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three unrelated pet-owning households were screened in Spain to study the Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius nasal carriage, their genetic lineages and virulence traits. Sixty-seven healthy owners and 66 healthy pets were investigated. Isolates characterization was performed and potential interspecies transmission was assessed. S. aureus was present in 51.2% of households studied while S. pseudintermedius in 30.2%. Twenty-eight owners (41.8%) carried S. aureus: one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) [t5173-ST8-SCCmecIVa] and 27 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). Three owners (4.5%) were colonized by methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MSSP). Fifteen pets (22.7%) carried S. pseudintermedius: two methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) [ST71-SCCmecII/III; ST92-SCCmecV] and 13 MSSP; in addition, 8 pets (12.1%) presented MSSA. High diversity of spa and sequence types (STs) was detected. Typical livestock-associated S. aureus lineages (CC398, CC9) were observed in humans and/or companion animals and hospital and/or community-acquired S. aureus lineages (CC45, CC121, CC5, CC8) were detected among pets. Almost 40% of S. pseudintermedius were multidrug-resistant. S. aureus isolates harboured a remarkable high number of virulence genes. The expA gene was detected in 3 S. pseudintermedius isolates. Identical strains from both owners and their pets were identified in 5 households (11.6%): (a) four MSSA (t073-ST45/CC45, t159-ST121/CC121, t209-ST109/CC9, t021-ST1654([new])/singleton) and (b) one multidrug-resistant MSSP (ST142([new])). Highly clonally diverse and toxigenic S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius are common colonizers of healthy humans and pets. The presence of these bacterial species, virulence genes, and interspecies transmission detected, points out to consider pet ownership as a risk factor to acquire, maintain and spread, potential pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23153600

  19. Comparison of stomach contents of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) from the 1981 and 1991 North Sea International Stomach Sampling Projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adlerstein, S.A.; Temming, A.; Mergardt, N.

    2002-01-01

    This study analyses data from over 20 000 haddock stomachs collected during the 1981 and 1991 Stomach Sampling Projects of the North Sea. Sampling was within the framework of the Multispecies Virtual Population Analysis (MSVPA) for fisheries stock assessment. In 1981 stomachs were collected to calculate input feeding parameters from main predators. During 1991 the sampling exercise was repeated to test stability of the parameters in the region. We investigate stability of haddock stomach content weight between years accounting for ontogenic, spatial and temporal variations within the scope of the survey resolution. Analysis using generalized linear and additive models is performed for weight of the stomach content including and excluding empty stomachs and also for proportion of stomachs without food. Results indicate that haddock stomach contents varied significantly between years, quarters and North Sea roundfish areas. Content weights were overall higher in 1981 than in 1991. In 1981 levels were high from spring to fall and in 1991 mostly in spring. During both years levels were lowest in the central North Sea and in winter. Most of the deviance in modelling the stomach weight is explained by the length of the predator. Stomachs sampled in 1981 were most frequently empty in spring and those sampled in 1991 in winter. In both years, proportions decreased with fish length except in winter when levels increased. Proportion of empty stomachs was highest in the central region of the North Sea. Most of the proportion variation is explained by quarterly fluctuation. Variation of content weight can be related to prey composition found in the stomachs. High stomach contents are generally associated with high contribution of fish prey to the total stomach content, mainly sandeels. We propose that sandeels were more vulnerable to predation in 1981 than in 1991 due to colder temperatures. ?? 2002 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Published by Elsevier

  20. Siphonophores eat fish larger than their stomachs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagès, Francesc; Madin, Laurence P.

    2010-12-01

    We report a collection of the siphonophore Halistemma cupulifera, collected at 20 meters depth during a night SCUBA dive in the Sargasso Sea. One of its stomachs (gastrozooids) contained a leptocephalus larva of the eel Ariosoma sp. folded in thirds to fit, but 8.3 cm in length fully extended. This finding shows that in situ observations can reveal previously unknown trophic interactions that may be significant in a changing world ocean where gelatinous organisms seem to increase at the expense of fish.

  1. Morphological characteristics of the canine and feline stomach mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zahariev, P; Sapundzhiev, E; Pupaki, D; Rashev, P; Palov, A; Todorov, T

    2010-12-01

    The stomach mucosa structure in animals belonging to Order Carnivora indicates some specific characteristics in comparison with the other mammals. Between the bases of the mucosal glands and the lamina muscularis mucosae there is an additional plate which most of the morphologists have defined as lamina subglandularis. In currently used Nomina histologica this layer is indicated as stratum compactum in carnivorous stomach mucosa. The investigation aims were to study and compare canine and feline stomach tunica mucosa characteristics as well as to measure the thickness of stratum compactum and to specify some of the certain collagen types and fibronectin compounds. Conventional and differential histological and ultrastructural methods and immuno-histochemical approaches for investigation of the canine and feline stomach samples were used. The specific organization of the carnivorous stomach wall arrangement was established. In the structure of the canine stomach mucosa, no evidence of stratum compactum was observed. The presence of stratum compactum in feline stomach mucosa was ascertained and measured. Using an immunohistochemical method very high expression of collagen type IV and fibronectin, moderate positive reaction of collagen type III, and a comparatively weakest expression of collagen types I and V in the structure of stratum compactum from cat stomach mucosa was shown. The obtained results clarify the characteristics of the stomach mucosa morphology and could be used as a basis for distinguishing the stomach wall structure of the animal species belonging to Canidae and Felidae families although they are both carnivores. PMID:20825386

  2. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  3. Staying Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 > Staying Healthy Font: What is Alpha-1? Emphysema Alpha-1 Symptoms Diagnosing Alpha-1 Current Treatments ... Healthy What can people with Alpha-1-related emphysema do to stay as healthy as possible? First ...

  4. Healthy doctors, healthy communities.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Donna; Katch, Ellen; Anderson, Patricia; Furlong, Mary A

    2004-01-01

    Promoting health and eliminating disease are goals of Healthy People 2010, a national initiative for all communities. Physician-directed interventions that advance these principles are most effective when directed by clinicians who regularly participate in such healthy behaviors themselves. This pilot study describes an 8-week intervention, "Well-being for You and Your Patients," for first-year medical students to experience health behavior change. In the 2-hour sessions, students set goals for changing health behavior in 6 dimensions of wellness; report their progress; and enjoy a 30-minute change-of-pace wellness activity. The authors recommend adapting the course for medical student alumni to facilitate health behavior change with small groups of adults, school-age children, teens, and elders in churches, schools, community health centers, and other community-based organizations. Through continuing medical education and Grand Rounds, residents and physicians in practice could also be trained to implement specific behavioral change strategies. PMID:15495745

  5. Healthy pets, healthy people.

    PubMed

    Wong, S K; Feinstein, L H; Heidmann, P

    1999-08-01

    Zoonoses, diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans, can pose serious health risks to immunocompromised people. Although pets can carry zoonoses, owning and caring for animals can benefit human health. Information exists about preventing transmission of zoonoses, but not all physicians and veterinarians provide adequate and accurate information to immunocompromised pet owners. This disease prevention/health promotion project provides physicians and veterinarians with information, created specifically to share with patients and clients, about the health risks and benefits of pet ownership. Further, "Healthy Pets, Healthy People" encourages communication between veterinarians, physicians, clients, and patients and can serve as a model program for a nation-wide effort to aid health professionals in making recommendations about pet ownership for immunocompromised people. PMID:10434969

  6. The absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the stomach in relation to intragastric pH.

    PubMed

    Dotevall, G; Ekenved, G

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study on the effect of a buffered (pH 6.5) and an unbuffered (pH 2.9) solution of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on gastric pH, gastric emptying, and gastric absorption of ASA was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. Gastric pH was recorded using radiotelemetry. Gastric emptying and gastric absorption was studied with an aspiration technique and phenol red as nonabsorbable marker. Administration of the unbuffered solution to the fasting subjects resulted in a gastric pH of about 2 and absorption of ASA from the stomach was found to occur. The buffered solution of ASA increased gastric pH to above 5 and gastric absorption of ASA was found to be significantly less than after the unbuffered solution. The buffered solution was emptied from the stomach more rapidly than the unbuffered one. PMID:12558

  7. Effects of Acidity and Stress on Stomach Motility, Assessed by Biomagnetic Technique: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Fraga, T.; Sosa-Aquino, M.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Vargas-Luna, M.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.

    2004-09-01

    The human stomach is a J shaped hollowed organ that undergoes a variable luminal volume without significant pressure changes. This organ has two valves: the cardiac localized in the upper part, and the pillory on the lower part of the organ respectively. The main functions of these valves are to storage, carry, triturate and empty the lumen content. However, their activity could be affected for different agents such as chemical stimulus (alcoholic beverages) and psychological stress. In this contribution we show by the first time, the importance of biomagnetic signal technique in order to measure the human stomach peristaltic frequency in healthy subjects who were evaluated in basal conditions, and after to be submitted at the effects of: acidity caused by alcoholic beverages and psychological stress.

  8. Inflammatory fibroid polyp of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Finkenzeller, G

    1990-09-01

    Among 3,200 polyps of the stomach, we diagnosed inflammatory fibroid polyp in 143 patients (4.5%). The average age of the patients was 63.6 years (women) and 63.9 years (men), the sex ratio being 1.6 women to 1.0 men. In 77.6% of the cases, the polyp was located within the antrum, in 9.8% in the angular notch region, 1.4% in the pylorus, and 0.7% each in the fundus and cardia. The characteristic histological feature of these lesions is an eosinophil-containing, loosely structured fibrous tissue comprising an onion-skin-like arrangement of reticular fibers with spindle-shaped nuclei localized in the submucosa and the base of the mucosa. The polypous bulging mucosa was eroded in 26.8% and ulcerated in 3.5% of the cases. A comparison of the 147 cases collected from the literature with our own 143 cases revealed no differences. The rarity of inflammatory fibroid polyps in the stomach, their predominant location in the antrum, the age distribution and the observation that, after removal, these lesions do not recur, all go to suggest that the lesion is a reactive process (allergic or foreign body reaction), possibly a residual state following infestation by a parasite larva. PMID:2242737

  9. Management of acute upside-down stomach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upside-down stomach (UDS) is characterized by herniation of the entire stomach or most gastric portions into the posterior mediastinum. Symptoms may vary heavily as they are related to reflux and mechanically impaired gastric emptying. UDS is associated with a risk of incarceration and volvulus development which both might be complicated by acute gastric outlet obstruction, advanced ischemia, gastric bleeding and perforation. Case presentation A 32-year-old male presented with acute intolerant epigastralgia and anterior chest pain associated with acute onset of nausea and vomiting. He reported on a previous surgical intervention due to a hiatal hernia. Chest radiography and computer tomography showed an incarcerated UDS. After immediate esophago-gastroscopy, urgent laparoscopic reduction, repair with a 360° floppy Nissen fundoplication and insertion of a gradually absorbable GORE® BIO-A®-mesh was performed. Conclusion Given the high risk of life-threatening complications of an incarcerated UDS as ischemia, gastric perforation or severe bleeding, emergent surgery is indicated. In stable patients with acute presentation of large paraesophageal hernia or UDS exhibiting acute mechanical gastric outlet obstruction, after esophago-gastroscopy laparoscopic reduction and hernia repair followed by an anti-reflux procedure is suggested. However, in cases of unstable patients open repair is the surgical method of choice. Here, we present an exceptionally challenging case of a young patient with a giant recurrent hiatal hernia becoming clinically manifest in an incarcerated UDS. PMID:24228771

  10. Endoscopic knot tying: In vitro assessment in a porcine stomach model

    PubMed Central

    Ciocirlan, Mihai; Ionescu, Mirela Elena; Diculescu, Mircea Mihai

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if surgical knotting performed via endoscopy is an effective closure method for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery. METHODS: The proposed method was tested on an in vitro pig stomach model using standard endoscopy suite materials. A single use laparoscopy trocar (Versaport Plus manufactured by Tyco Healthcare) was fixed onto a plastic rectangular box in a horizontal position. A fresh pig stomach was tightly attached via its esophageal end to the trocar opening on the inner side of the box. The stomach cavity was closed at the duodenal end with Kocher forceps. A standard upper gastrointestinal endoscope fitted at its tip with a transparent plastic cap was introduced into the stomach through the outer trocar opening, so that the passage of the surgical trocar would mimic the passage of an esophagus. The stomach was subsequently inflated, followed by irrigation and washing. A neutral electrode of an electrocautery unit was placed inside the plastic box, underneath the pig stomach. The stomach’s outer surface was kept moist using normal saline in order to maintain the natural elasticity and to ensure good contact with the electrode. RESULTS: The submucosal space on the anterior face of the stomach was accessed using the technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection. First, a site on the anterior face of the stomach was chosen, near the angle. Then, saline was injected into the submucosa with a standard endoscopic needle, so as to create a 20 mm diameter elevation. A linear 15 mm vertical incision was created at its center using a Dual Knife (KD650U manufactured by Olympus). This incision was used to access the submucosal space, and about 10 mm was dissected on both sides of the incision. The endoscope was then pushed through to the outside of the stomach after dilating a small puncture made by the Dual Knife in the muscularis propria, which simulated the peritoneoscopy procedure. Then, a 0.025” guidewire (Jagwire/450 cm manufactured

  11. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  12. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  13. Label-free identification of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.; Wei, J.; Zheng, Z.; Ye, J.; Zeng, S.

    2014-06-01

    The early diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the stomach together with effective therapeutic interventions is crucial to reducing the mortality-rates of the patients associated with gastric cancer. However, it is challenging during conventional white-light endoscopy, and histological analysis remains the ‘gold standard’ for the final diagnosis. Here, we describe a label-free imaging method, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), for the identification of IM in the stomach. It was found that multiphoton imaging provides cellular and subcellular details to the identification of IM from normal gastric tissues. In particular, there is significant difference in the population density of goblet cells between normal and IM gastric tissues, providing substantial potential to become a quantitative intrinsic marker for in vivo clinical diagnosis of early gastric lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the potential of MPM for the identification of IM.

  14. Effects of red blood cell lysing solutions on the detection of peripheral basophils of healthy normals and SLE patients by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Ye, Ling; Deng, Zhenzhen; Li, Lu; Liu, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four widely used red blood cell lysing solutions on counting and measurement of activation marker of peripheral basophils in normals and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by flow cytometry. Our results showed that the light scatter properties including FS and SS value of leukocytes in whole blood were preserved when whole blood samples were lysed in RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution, while were affected when lysed in distilled water or ACK. By counting basophils, RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution were almost the same level, while were significantly lower when lysed in distilled water or ACK. The expressions of CD203c on peripheral basophils of SLE patients were significantly higher than those of normals. Comparing the data of CD203c expression obtained demonstrated that there were no significant differences among them, while FACS Lysing Solution treatment leads to a slightly lower staining intensity of CD203c. We provide a solid description that the widely used red blood cell lysing reagents may influence the light scatter properties of leukocytes, the accuracy of quantity of absolute number of the existence of basophil subsets and the quantity of staining intensity of cell-activated marker CD203c fluorescence when measured by flow cytometry. PMID:24593031

  15. Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Remnant Stomach after Subtotal Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Dong Hee; Park, Seulkee; You, Ji Young; Han, Joon Kil; Kim, Seong Hwan; Lee, Ho Jung

    2016-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the stomach is a very rare disease. However, the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of gastric SCC are controversial and remain to be elucidated. Herein, we report a case of primary gastric SCC of the remnant stomach after subtotal gastrectomy. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to epigastric discomfort and dizziness. He had undergone subtotal gastrectomy 40 years previously for gastric ulcer perforation. Endoscopy revealed a normal esophagus and a large mass in the remnant stomach. Abdominal computed tomography revealed enhanced wall thickening of the anastomotic site and suspected metachronous gastric cancer. Endoscopic biopsy revealed SCC. Total gastrectomy was performed with Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy. A 10-cm tumor was located at the remnant stomach just proximal to the previous area of anastomosis. Pathologic examination showed well-differentiated SCC extended into the subserosa without lymph node involvement (T3N0M0). The patient received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with 6 cycles of 5-FU and cisplatin regimen, and he is still alive at the 54-month follow-up. According to the treatment principles of gastric cancer, early detection and radical surgical resection can improve the prognosis. PMID:27433399

  16. High-resolution manometry findings in patients with an intrathoracic stomach.

    PubMed

    Martinelo, Vanderlei; Mardiros Herbella, Fernando Augusto; Patti, Marco G

    2015-04-01

    Intrathoracic stomach is a rare finding. The real value of the high-resolution manometry (HRM) in the preoperative evaluation of these patients has not yet being fully tested. This study aims to evaluate: 1) the HRM pattern of patients with an intrathoracic stomach; and 2) HRM findings as predictors for prosthetic reinforcement of the hiatus. We reviewed 33 patients (27 women, mean age 66 years) with an intrathoracic stomach who underwent HRM. Fifteen patients did the HRM as part of preoperative workup and were operated on in our institution. All patients were submitted to a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. HRM results show that the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was transposed in all patients. Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in 21 (63%) patients. The length of the hernia was 4 ± 2 cm (range, 1 to 9 cm). LES oscillation was observed in 23 (69%) patients with a mean of 1 ± 0.4 cm (range, 0.4 to 2 cm). Hiatal mesh reinforcement was necessary in five (33%) of the operated patients. HRM findings did not predict hiatal mesh reinforcement. Our results show that: 1) HRM has a poor sensibility for hiatal hernia diagnosis; 2) half of the patients with an intrathoracic stomach have a normal HRM; and 3) HRM does not predict mesh hiatal hernia repair. PMID:25831180

  17. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 2C9 activity in normal, healthy, adult Western Indian population by both phenotyping and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Swar, Balkrishna D.; Bendkhale, Shital R.; Rupawala, Abbas; Sridharan, Kannan; Gogtay, Nithya J.; Thatte, Urmila M.; Kshirsagar, Nilima A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) is a member of cytochrome P450 (CYP) family that accounts for nearly 18% of the total CYP protein content in the human liver microsomes and catalyzes almost 15–20% of the drugs. Considering the paucity of data on the polymorphisms of CYP2C9 in Western Indian population, the present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of CYP2C9 polymorphisms (*1, *2 and *3) and correlate it with the activity using flurbiprofen (FLB) as a probe drug. Materials and Methods: A 100 mg FLB capsule was administered to 298 healthy adult participants. Venous blood samples were analyzed at 2 h postdose for the estimation of FLB and 4-hydroxy FLB. Metabolic ratio (MR) was calculated to determine the extent of poor metabolizer (PM) and rapid metabolizer status using probit plot. Genotyping of CYP2C9 polymorphism was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results: Of the total 298 participants, phenotype was assessable in 288 and genotype was performed in 289 participants. The median (range) MR of the study population was 6.6 (1.65–66.05). Five participants were found to be PMs by phenotype. Of the total 289 participants, 209 (72.3%) (66.7, 77.2) had CYP2C9*1/*1, 25 (8.7%) (5.8, 12.7) with CYP2C9*1/*2, 55 (19%) (14.8, 24.1) had CYP2C9*1/*3, 3 (1%) (0.3, 3.3) had CYP2C9*2/*3 genotype. A significant association between phenotype and genotype was observed. Conclusion: To conclude, the present study found significant association of CYP2C9 activity by both phenotype and genotype and these findings have to be corroborated in different kinds of patients. PMID:27298492

  18. The Risk of Heart Failure and Cardiometabolic Complications in Obesity May Be Masked by an Apparent Healthy Status of Normal Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shuchita; Mishra, Manish; Jadhav, Ashok; Gerger, Courtney; Lee, Paul; Weber, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Although many obese individuals are normoglycemic and asymptomatic of cardiometabolic complications, this apparent healthy state may be a misnomer. Since heart failure is a major cause of mortality in obesity, we investigated the effects of heme-oxygenase (HO) on heart failure and cardiometabolic complications in obese normoglycemic Zucker-fatty rats (ZFs). Treatment with the HO-inducer, hemin, reduced markers of heart failure, such as osteopontin and osteoprotegerin, abated left-ventricular (LV) hypertrophy/fibrosis, extracellular matrix/profibrotic proteins including collagen IV, fibronectin, TGF-β1, and reduced cardiac lesions. Furthermore, hemin suppressed inflammation by abating macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1 alpha, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β but enhanced adiponectin, atrial-natriuretic peptide (ANP), HO activity, insulin sensitivity, and glucose metabolism. Correspondingly, hemin improved several hemodynamic/echocardiographic parameters including LV-diastolic wall thickness, LV-systolic wall thickness, mean-arterial pressure, arterial-systolic pressure, arterial-diastolic pressure, LV-developed pressure, +dP/dt, and cardiac output. Contrarily, the HO-inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin nullified the hemin effect, exacerbating inflammatory/oxidative insults and aggravated insulin resistance (HOMA-index). We conclude that perturbations in insulin signaling and cardiac function may be forerunners to overt hyperglycemia and heart failure in obesity. Importantly, hemin improves cardiac function by suppressing markers of heart failure, LV hypertrophy, cardiac lesions, extracellular matrix/profibrotic proteins, and inflammatory/oxidative mediators, while concomitantly enhancing the HO-adiponectin-ANP axis. PMID:24454978

  19. [Late deficiency states in patients with a surgically treated stomach].

    PubMed

    Popova, D; Daskalov, M; Kostadinova, I

    1988-01-01

    37 patients with partial stomach resection because of peptic ulcer, performed 5 to 28 years before, were studied. In 29 patients the serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. In 19 patients several hematologic indices--hemoglobin, serum iron, erythrocyte morphology, proteinogram--were determined, too. The mean serum vit. B12 level was significantly lower than that of the control group of healthy persons. In 1/3 of these patients the low serum vit. B12 level was accompanied by manifested neurologic complications-myelopathy and polyneuropathy. The mean folic acid level was also low but statistically insignificantly and in patients the value was subnormal. In half of the patients a low degree hypochromic anemia was found. The role of vit. B12 deficiency in the pathogenesis of the neurologic manifestations is discussed and the determination of vit. B12 and folic acid levels is recommended in patients who had undergone gastric resection, especially after 5 years following the resection. PMID:3414095

  20. Apelin cells in the rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Susaki, Etsuko; Wang, Guiyun; Cao, Gan; Wang, Hui-Quin; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2005-07-15

    Apelin is a recently discovered peptide that is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin is produced in the central nervous system, heart, lung, mammary gland and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of this study was to identify by immunohistochemistry (IHC) cell types in the rat stomach that produce apelin peptide. IHC revealed abundant apelin-positive cells, primarily in the neck and upper base regions of the gastric glands in the mucosal epithelium. Apelin is not detected in the muscle layer. Apelin-positive cells were identified as mucous neck, parietal cells, and chief cells. Apelin is also identified in gastric epithelial cells that produce chromogranin A (CGA), a marker of enteroendocrine cells. The findings that apelin is expressed in gastric exocrine and endocrine cells agrees with and extends other data showing that apelin peptide is measurable in the gut lumen and in the systemic circulation by immunoassay. PMID:15927696

  1. Morphometric Evaluation of Interrenal Gland and Kidney Macrophages Aggregates in Normal Healthy Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and after Bacterial Challenge with Yersinia ruckeri

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Michela; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Leotta, Roberto; Cecchini, Stefano; Prearo, Marino; Abramo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage aggregates (MA) occur in various organs of fish as discrete aggregations of pigmented macrophages. The study presented herein investigates the quantitative modifications from normal anatomical condition, of interrenal gland (IG) and kidney MA in six treatment groups of adult rainbow trout submitted to either specific or aspecific immune stimulation and subsequently challenged with Yersinia ruckeri. Routinely stained tissue sections from both IG and kidney were analysed. The percentage of tissues occupied by MA and the MA density (number/mm2) were calculated on at least 10 randomly selected nonoverlapping fields taken from each tissue section. MA morphometric findings from challenged fish were compared to those from a control group. Results showed that fish from control group displayed a statistically significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of tissue occupied by MA and MA density. Among different treatment groups, anti-Yersinia ruckeri immunized fish, which did not show clinical signs of disease after bacterial challenge, displayed higher values of morphometric parameters compared with symptomatic fish from other groups. Our study demonstrates that the quantification of the area occupied by MA might be an efficient parameter to evaluate the general condition of a salmonid population since it positively correlates with the health status and negatively with stress factor such as the acute bacterial infection. PMID:24719776

  2. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  3. Rupture of embolised coeliac artery pseudoaneurysm into the stomach: is coil embolisation an effective treatment for coeliac anastomotic pseudoaneurysm?

    PubMed

    Onohara, T; Okadome, K; Mii, S; Yasumori, K; Muto, Y; Sugimachi, K

    1992-05-01

    An elderly woman with an anastomotic pseudoaneurysm of the coeliac artery, after previous treatment of a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm, was treated by stainless steel coil embolisation. One year later, the embolised pseudoaneurysm ruptured into the stomach and total gastrectomy and aneurysmorraphy was necessary. She is leading a normal life 6 months later. PMID:1592138

  4. [Effect of polypeptides isolated from cattle abomasum on stomach regenerative processes in rats].

    PubMed

    Chernukha, I M; Bogatyrev, A N; Dydykin, A S; Aslanova, M A; Fedulova, L V

    2014-01-01

    The effect of polypeptides isolated from cattle abomasum on regenerative processes of rat stomach upon simulating stomach mucosal damage caused by aspirin was studied. Experimental research was carried out on male Wistar rats with initial body weight of 230±20 g. The duration of the experiment was 22 days. The rats were divided into 4 equal groups (n=11). The first (control) group-consisted of the intact animals; animals from experimental groups 2-4 were intragastrically administered acetylsalicylic acid from the 1st to the 7th day for simulating stomach mucosal damage caused by aspirin (300 mg/100 g body weight). From day 8 to day 22, the animals were intragastrically adminitered the tested samples in the quantity of 2 ml per animal according tothe scheme: the 2nd group - distilled water, the 3d group - native abomasum extract; the 4 th group - thermally treated abomasum extract. Abomasum extract was obtained by extraction with 0,87% aqueous sodium chloride crushed abomasum and represented a liquid of cream color with protein mass content of 1,3 g/100 g of the product with high content of glutamic acid (15,5 g/100 g protein) and B-group vitamins. Electrophoretic analysis of the extract revealed several high molecular weight fractions in the range of 72 to 55 kDa. The bands with molecular masses 52, 43, 40, 37, 34, 26, 17 kDa were most pronounced; the intensive bands in the area 12 kDa and in the range lower than 10 kDa were revealed. The results of the conducted study show that the abomasum extracts both in the native and thermally treated form exert therapeutic action on animal with stomach mucosal damage caused by aspirin, have good antiulcer and gastroprotective activities upon stomach mucosa exposure to chemical damaging agents. The analysis of the hematological indices of the animals from the 3rd and 4th groups, which received the test samples after simulation, revealed the normalization of leukocyte, lymphocyte, granulocyte and monocyte content. This

  5. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs Training and Jobs Home > Healthy Eyes Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? ... seeing your best. Read more. What are common vision problems? Some of the most common vision problems ...

  6. Detection of expressed IL-32 in human stomach cancer using ELISA and immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun-Hee; Kang, Jeongwoo; Kim, Ki-Hong; Cho, Min-Chul; Lee, Sojung; Kim, Hee-Jong; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Eun-Jin; Park, Dong-Ki; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Choi, Yang Kyu; Kim, Jin Man; Hong, Jin Tae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2008-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 is a recently identified proinflammatory cytokine that is one of the IL-18 inducible genes, and plays an important role in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We produced antibodies against IL-32 and studied the expression of IL-32 in human stomach cancer. We detected IL-32 secreted from K-562 cells that werw stably transfected with IL-32 and in the sera of stomach cancer patients, by a sandwich ELISA using a monoclonal antibody KU32-52 and a polyclonal antibody. In order to optimize a sandwich immunoassay, recombinant IL-32alpha was added, followed by the addition of a biotinylated KU32-52 into microtiter plate wells precoated with a goat anti-IL-32 antibody. The bound biotinylated KU32-52 was probed with a streptavidin conjugated to HRP. This sandwich ELISA was highly specific and had a minimal detection limit of 80 pg/ml (mean+/-SD of zero calibrator) and measuring up to 3,000 pg/ml. This ELISA showed no cross-reaction with other cytokines such as hIL-1alpha, hIL-1beta, hIL-2, hIL-6, hIL-8, hIL-10, hIL-18, and hTNF-alpha. Intra-assay coefficients of variation were 18.5% to 4.6% (n=10), and inter-assay coefficients were 23% to 9% (n=10). The average IL-32 level in the sera of 16 stomach cancer patients (189 pg/ml) was higher than that of 12 healthy control men (109 pg/ml). Our results indicate that serum IL-32 level can be detected by using an established ELISA, and that this immunoassay and mAb KU32-09 specific for immunohistochemistry can be used in the detection of expressed and secreted IL- 32 in stomach cancer patients. PMID:18852519

  7. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Cancer of the Gastroesophageal Junction or Stomach

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  8. Everolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  9. [Stomach electrostimulation--new possibility for treating gastroparesis].

    PubMed

    Sobocki, J; Thor, P J; Popiela, T; Wasowicz, P; Herman, R M

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a large range of methods of human gastric pacing. Based on our own experience and literature authors discuss a variety of pacing models, current parameters and place of stimulation. We described a new method of intragastric stimulation as a method of treatment of postoperative, pharmacotherapy resistant gastroparesis. Five patients were included in to the study (3 male and 2 female). The current parameters were as follow: square profile, amplitude 2V (2mA), frequency 6 ips.p.m., duration 3 hours. Two electrodes located on nasogastric catheter (external diameter 1.5 mm) were placed in antral region of the stomach and connected to the computer preprogrammed stimulator. Electrostimulation was accompanied by the continuous cutaneous EGG monitoring (Synectics Sweden). Excellent results were obtained in 3 patients (60%) with disappearance of symptoms, rumbling, normalization in gastric myoelectric rhythm (2-4 cpm > 85%) and with increase in amplitude (average 250%). In one patient with the gastrectasia, symptoms returned next day and stimulation had to be repeated for several days. In another one results were not satisfying. Authors conclude that gastric pacing has made tremendous progress fast developing method in last decade and in most patient is efficient for treatment postoperative gastroparesis. PMID:10909475

  10. The gastrointestinal microbiome - functional interference between stomach and intestine.

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris R; Scaldaferri, Franco; Franceschi, Francesco; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex and dynamic network with interplay between various gut mucosal cells and their defence molecules, the immune system, food particles, and the resident microbiota. This ecosystem acts as a functional unit organized as a semipermeable multi-layer system that allows the absorption of nutrients and macromolecules required for human metabolic processes and, on the other hand, protects the individual from potentially invasive microorganisms. Commensal microbiota and the host are a unique entity in a continuum along the GI tract, every change in one of these players is able to modify the whole homeostasis. In the stomach, Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogen that is widespread all over the world, infecting more than 50% of the world's population. In this scenario, H. pylori infection is associated with changes in the gastric microenvironment, which in turn affects the gastric microbiota composition, but also might trigger large intestinal microbiota changes. It is able to influence all the vital pathways of human system and also to influence microbiota composition along the GI tract. This can cause a change in the normal functions exerted by intestinal commensal microorganisms leading to a new gastrointestinal physiological balance. This review focuses and speculates on the possible interactions between gastric microorganisms and intestinal microbiota and on the consequences of this interplay in modulating gut health. PMID:25439066

  11. Spicy food and the stomach. Evaluation by videoendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Graham, D Y; Smith, J L; Opekun, A R

    1988-12-16

    We used videoendoscopy to investigate the effect of eating spicy foods on the gastric mucosa. We employed four meals: a bland meal of unpeppered steak and french fries (negative control), a bland meal with 1950 mg of aspirin (positive control), a spicy Mexican meal (30 g of jalapeño peppers), and a pepperoni pizza. Twelve subjects (eight men and four women, aged 24 to 43 years) were studied in a randomized, crossover trial with the test meal given at the noon and evening meals; each subject received all four test meals. Each study consisted of a baseline endoscopy, which was repeated approximately 12 hours after the last test meal. Gastric and duodenal damage was scored using a modification of the Lanza scale. Eleven of 12 individuals taking the bland meal plus aspirin developed multiple gastric erosions (median score, C; which equates with "severe" injury). In contrast, the median endoscopic score for the other three meals was 0. Single cases of a single erosion were present after the Mexican meals and after the pizza meals. Another experiment was done to examine the effect of spices directly on the gastric mucosa; approximately 30 g of fresh jalapeño peppers was ground in a food processor and then placed directly into the stomach. Endoscopy after 24 hours revealed no visible mucosal damage. The ingestion of highly spiced meals by normal individuals is not associated with endoscopically demonstrable gastroduodenal mucosal damage. PMID:3210286

  12. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL. PMID:24858413

  13. Occupation and stomach cancer in a cohort of Swedish men.

    PubMed

    Chow, W H; McLaughlin, J K; Malker, H S; Weiner, J A; Ericsson, J L; Stone, B J; Blot, W J

    1994-10-01

    Using the Cancer-Environment Registry of Sweden, which links the 1960 census information on employment with cancer incidence data from 1961-1979, we conducted a systematic, population-based assessment of stomach cancer incidence by industry and occupation for men in Sweden. Nearly 17,000 stomach cancer cases were diagnosed during the 19 years of follow-up. Stomach cancer incidence was elevated among miners and quarrymen, farmers and fishermen, and craftsmen and production workers. Men who held white collar jobs, including professional and technical, administrative and management, clerical, and sales jobs, had a reduction in stomach cancer incidence. Examination of specific jobs revealed generally elevated rates of stomach cancer among men who may be exposed to dusty work environments, such as quarry workers, stone cutters, circular and plane operators, construction workers, crane operators, heavy laborers, and shop and construction metal workers. These occupational associations mostly were observed for stomach cancers of noncardia origin, and no significant associations were found with cardia cancers. We had no information on dietary or other potential confounding factors and cannot make inferences about the role of occupation per se, but the current findings support those of earlier investigations and add to the evidence of a small but significant occupational role in stomach carcinogenesis. PMID:7810549

  14. Adenocarcinoma of the stomach and exposure to occupational dust

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.E.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Garabrant, D.H.; Mack, T.M.

    1988-07-01

    The authors studied 1342 cases of adenocarcinoma of the stomach identified by a population-based cancer registry in Los Angeles County, California. The cases were males aged 20-64 years first diagnosed between 1972 and 1982. To determine whether exposure to occupational dust increased the risk of developing stomach cancer, occupational titles were rated for the likelihood of exposure to various kinds of dust. Men who worked in dusty jobs had a risk for developing stomach cancer 1.3 times that of unexposed men. The association of exposure to dust with stomach cancer was stronger at higher levels of exposure. The risk was not uniform throughout the stomach: the highest risk (1.8 times that of unexposed men) was found for the antrum/pylorus. At that site, exposure to mineral dust carried the greatest risk for cancer (3.7 times the risk for unexposed men). The highest risks from dust exposure were observed in blacks. Risk was related to race, socioeconomic status, and immigrant status, but these factors did not entirely explain the association with dust exposure. The observed relation between dust exposure and stomach cancer is consistent with results of previous mortality and case-control studies of cancer in men who worked in dusty occupations. Ingested dust may be one factor in the etiology of adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

  15. How Does the Stomach Pump?---A Fluid Dynamics Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anupam; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2005-11-01

    The stomach is a pump that empties viscous liquid from a flexible bag (fundus) through a valve (pylorus) by slow squeeze of fundic muscle. In addition, peristaltic contraction waves (CW) travel periodically towards the pylorus in the lower stomach to grind/mix content. As each CW approaches the pylorus, it deepens and the pylorus momentarily closes. Since liquid empties from the pyloric region, one expects content at the farthest reaches of the stomach to empty last. To study the patterns of gastric emptying we applied the lattice Boltzmann method with moving boundary conditions coupled with a stomach geometry model parameterized using MRI. By marking fluid particles leaving the stomach over a 10 min period, we discovered that the CWs create a narrow path of emptying, or ``Magenstrasse'' (stomach road) that directs content from the farthest reaches of the stomach to the pylorus with relatively little mixing. Thus, while drug released off the Magenstrasse (MS) can take an hour or more to empty at low concentration, when released on the MS the drug empties within 10 minutes at high concentration---a discovery with potential implications to other pumping systems.

  16. Studies on the regulation of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) by acid in the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Banovcin, P; Halicka, J; Halickova, M; Duricek, M; Hyrdel, R; Tatar, M; Kollarik, M

    2016-07-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) is the major mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux, but the regulation of TLESR by stimuli in the esophagus is incompletely understood. We have recently reported that acid infusion in the esophagus substantially (by 75%) increased the number of meal-induced TLESR in healthy subjects. We concluded that the TLESR reflex triggered by gastric distention with meal was enhanced by the stimulation of esophageal nerves by acid. However, the possibilities that the acid infused into the esophagus acts after passing though lower esophageal sphincter in stomach to enhance TLESR, or that the acid directly initiates TLESR from the esophagus were not addressed. Here, we evaluated the effect of acid infusion into the proximal stomach on meal-induced TLESR (study 1) and the ability of acid infusion into the esophagus to initiate TLESR without prior meal (study 2). We analyzed TLESRs by using high-resolution manometry in healthy subjects in paired randomized studies. In study 1, we found that acid infusion into the proximal stomach did not affect TLESRs induced by standard meal. The number of meal-induced TLESRs following the acid infusion into the proximal stomach was similar to the number of meal-induced TLESRs following the control infusion. In study 2, we found that acid infusion into the esophagus without prior meal did not initiate TLESRs. We conclude that the increase in the meal-induced TLESRs by acid in the esophagus demonstrated in our previous study is not attributable to the action of acid in the stomach or to direct initiation of TLESR from the esophagus by acid. Our studies are consistent with the concept that the stimuli in the esophagus can influence TLESRs. The enhancement of TLESR by acid in the esophagus may contribute to pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux in some patients. PMID:25873206

  17. Lactobacilli isolated from the stomach of conventional mice.

    PubMed Central

    Roach, S; Savage, D C; Tannock, G W

    1977-01-01

    Twenty strains of lactobacilli isolated from the stomach of conventional mice were tested for their ability to ferment or hydrolyze substrates that may be present in the stomach habitat. The lactobacilli could be placed in four groups (A to D) depending on their ability to ferment N-acetylglucosamine, dextrin, cellobiose, gum arabic, and xylan. The majority of the isolates belonged to groups A and D. Group A strains did not resemble previously described Lactobacillus species, but group D strains were identified as L. leichmannii. A representative group A isolate colonized the surface of the nonsecretory epithelium of the stomach of gnotobiotic mice; a group D isolate did not. Images PMID:879776

  18. Gender and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in MTHFR, BHMT, SPTLC1, CRBP2, CETP, and SCARB1 Are Significant Predictors of Plasma Homocysteine Normalized by RBC Folate in Healthy Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Andrew J.; Chen, Kehui; McWade, Laura; Rincon, Gonzalo; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Holstege, Dirk M.; Owens, Janel E.; Liu, Bitao; Müller, Hans-Georg; Medrano, Juan F.; Fadel, James G.; Moshfegh, Alanna J.; Baer, David J.; Novotny, Janet A.

    2012-01-01

    Using linear regression models, we studied the main and 2-way interaction effects of the predictor variables gender, age, BMI, and 64 folate/vitamin B-12/homocysteine (Hcy)/lipid/cholesterol-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on log-transformed plasma Hcy normalized by RBC folate measurements (nHcy) in 373 healthy Caucasian adults (50% women). Variable selection was conducted by stepwise Akaike information criterion or least angle regression and both methods led to the same final model. Significant predictors (where P values were adjusted for false discovery rate) included type of blood sample [whole blood (WB) vs. plasma-depleted WB; P < 0.001] used for folate analysis, gender (P < 0.001), and SNP in genes SPTLC1 (rs11790991; P = 0.040), CRBP2 (rs2118981; P < 0.001), BHMT (rs3733890; P = 0.019), and CETP (rs5882; P = 0.017). Significant 2-way interaction effects included gender × MTHFR (rs1801131; P = 0.012), gender × CRBP2 (rs2118981; P = 0.011), and gender × SCARB1 (rs83882; P = 0.003). The relation of nHcy concentrations with the significant SNP (SPTLC1, BHMT, CETP, CRBP2, MTHFR, and SCARB1) is of interest, especially because we surveyed the main and interaction effects in healthy adults, but it is an important area for future study. As discussed, understanding Hcy and genetic regulation is important, because Hcy may be related to inflammation, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus. We conclude that gender and SNP significantly affect nHcy. PMID:22833659

  19. Frequent detection of stomach contents in accidental drowning.

    PubMed

    Kibayashi, Kazuhiko; Shimada, Ryo; Nakao, Ken-Ichiro

    2011-07-01

    We analysed forensic autopsies of 536 consecutive adults to determine the relationship between the presence of stomach contents and the manner of death. Stomach contents were identified in 27 (79.4%) of 34 accidental drownings and in 22 (43.1%) of 51 suicidal drownings (P < 0.01). Accidental drowning was the manner of death most frequently associated with the presence of stomach contents, and stomach contents were found significantly more often in this type of death than in suicidal drowning. These findings indicate that food intake is a factor possibly related to accidental drowning and suggest that fasting may be required before swimming or taking a bath to prevent accidental drowning. PMID:21905572

  20. Alcohol, Processed Meats May Raise Stomach Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158407.html Alcohol, Processed Meats May Raise Stomach Cancer Risk Excess ... 21, 2016 WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol, processed meats -- such as hot dogs, ham and ...

  1. Gut Feelings About Gastritis: When Your Stomach's Sick

    MedlinePlus

    ... I tell people H. pylori is like having termites in your stomach,” says Dr. David Graham, an ... Texas. “You usually don’t know you have termites until someone tells you, and you ignore it ...

  2. Alcohol, Processed Meats May Raise Stomach Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit increase in body mass index -- BMI, a ratio of weight to height -- causes a 23 percent ... stomach cancer, diet, physical activity and weight. The analysis included 89 studies covering 17.5 million adults, ...

  3. The healthy human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Abu-Ali, Galeb; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Humans are virtually identical in their genetic makeup, yet the small differences in our DNA give rise to tremendous phenotypic diversity across the human population. By contrast, the metagenome of the human microbiome-the total DNA content of microbes inhabiting our bodies-is quite a bit more variable, with only a third of its constituent genes found in a majority of healthy individuals. Understanding this variability in the "healthy microbiome" has thus been a major challenge in microbiome research, dating back at least to the 1960s, continuing through the Human Microbiome Project and beyond. Cataloguing the necessary and sufficient sets of microbiome features that support health, and the normal ranges of these features in healthy populations, is an essential first step to identifying and correcting microbial configurations that are implicated in disease. Toward this goal, several population-scale studies have documented the ranges and diversity of both taxonomic compositions and functional potentials normally observed in the microbiomes of healthy populations, along with possible driving factors such as geography, diet, and lifestyle. Here, we review several definitions of a 'healthy microbiome' that have emerged, the current understanding of the ranges of healthy microbial diversity, and gaps such as the characterization of molecular function and the development of ecological therapies to be addressed in the future. PMID:27122046

  4. Rare Synchronous Gastrointestinal Plasmacytomas of Colon and Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Supreet; Dang, Shyam; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) plasmacytomas, though relatively uncommon, can occur with or without multiple myeloma. The small intestine is the most commonly involved GI site, followed by stomach, colon, and esophagus. Synchronous plasmacytomas involving 2 anatomically distinct regions of gastrointestinal tract have never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a multiple myeloma patient who had acute-onset hematochezia and was found to have synchronous plasmacytomas of the colon and stomach. PMID:26203446

  5. Rupture of the stomach following mouth-to-mouth respiration

    PubMed Central

    Solowiejczyk, M.; Wapnick, S.; Koren, E.; Mandelbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    Successful repair and survival after rupture of the stomach in a patient who received mouth-to-mouth respiration is presented. We were able to find only one report in the literature where rupture of the stomach occurred following this manoeuvre—the patient did not survive. The possible aetiological factors and measures designed to avoid this complication are discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4469046

  6. Rare Synchronous Gastrointestinal Plasmacytomas of Colon and Stomach.

    PubMed

    Syal, Gaurav; Sethi, Supreet; Dang, Shyam; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) plasmacytomas, though relatively uncommon, can occur with or without multiple myeloma. The small intestine is the most commonly involved GI site, followed by stomach, colon, and esophagus. Synchronous plasmacytomas involving 2 anatomically distinct regions of gastrointestinal tract have never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a multiple myeloma patient who had acute-onset hematochezia and was found to have synchronous plasmacytomas of the colon and stomach. PMID:26203446

  7. A combination of intramural stomach and portal venous air: conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabin; Akl, Elias George

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a severe and rare form of gastritis with characteristic findings of intramural gas in the stomach. It is an acute life-threatening condition resulting from gas-producing microorganisms invading the stomach wall. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with bowel rest, hydration, and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics is imperative for an effective outcome. Surgical intervention is reserved for perforations, peritonitis, strictures, and uncontrolled disseminated sepsis. We present a case of an 82-year-old female with prior history of colon and uterine cancer on remission treated with surgeries who presented with bilious vomiting, abdominal discomfort, and nausea. She was tachycardic and had a diffusely tender abdomen with rebound on examination. Her laboratory results including blood count, serum chemistry, and coagulation studies were normal. She was diagnosed with emphysematous gastritis based on the characteristic radiographic findings of intramural stomach gas and also the presence of gas in the portal venous system. It is important to differentiate emphysematous gastritis from gastric emphysema because of the difference in management and prognosis, as emphysematous gastritis has a worse outcome and requires aggressive management. Despite an anticipated poor prognosis due to the known grave outcomes of emphysematous gastritis, our patient was successfully managed with conservative treatment. We concluded that she developed emphysematous gastritis probably secondary to immunosuppression and possible mucosal tears from multiple bouts of vomiting. She had a stable hospital course and resolution with medical management most likely due to early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. PMID:26908389

  8. Helicobacter pylori in human oral cavity and stomach.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Reischl, Udo; Behr, Anke; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Lehn, Norbert; Schmalz, Gottfried; Ruhl, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    The oral cavity has been suspected as an extra-gastroduodenal reservoir for Helicobacter pylori infection and transmission, but conflicting evidence exists regarding the occurrence of H. pylori in the mouth, independently of stomach colonization. Ninety-four gastric biopsy patients were analysed for the concurrent presence of H. pylori in the mouth and stomach. Samples were collected from different areas within the mouth and H. pylori DNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by sequencing. Helicobacter pylori-specific serology was performed, and stomach colonization was determined by culture. In addition, relevant dental and periodontal parameters, as well as general health parameters, were recorded. Helicobacter pylori was found in the stomach of 29 patients and in the oral cavity of 16 patients. In only six patients was the bacterium detected simultaneously in the stomach and mouth. Notably, the 10 patients in whom the bacterium was found solely in the mouth did not have serum antibodies to H. pylori. The occurrence of H. pylori in the mouth was found to be correlated neither to any general or oral health parameters, nor to any particular site of collection. This study shows that H. pylori can occur in the oral cavity independently of stomach colonization. PMID:18705796

  9. Diets of introduced predators using stable isotopes and stomach contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckstroth, A.M.; Miles, A.K.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a study of predation on ground-nesting birds at South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, USA, we analyzed stomach contents and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to identify commonly consumed prey. We obtained the stomach contents from 206 nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes regalis) collected in the South Bay area and Monterey County during 1995-2001 and from 68 feral cats (Felis silvestris) from the South Bay area during 2001-2002. We determined prey identity, biomass, and frequency, described seasonal diet trends, and derived an Index of Relative Importance. Avian species were the most frequent prey we found in the stomachs of red foxes from South Bay (61%), whereas small rodents were most frequent for red foxes from Monterey County (62%). Small rodents were the most frequent prey we found in feral cats (63%). Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures for foxes supported stomach content findings. However, isotope results indicated that cats received a majority of their energy from a source other than rodents and outside the natural system, which differed from the stomach content analysis. We demonstrated the utility of both stable isotope and stomach content analyses to establish a more complete understanding of predators' diets. This information aids natural resource managers in planning and evaluating future predator-removal programs and increases our understanding of the impacts of nonnative foxes and cats on native species.

  10. A novel broadband Raman endoscopy for in vivo diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kan; Bergholt, Mads S.; Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Hongzhi; Ren, Jian-lin; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    We report a novel simultaneous fingerprint (FP) and high-wavenumber (HW) fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy developed for in vivo diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the stomach under wide-field endoscopic imaging. The FP/HW Raman endoscopy technique was performed to differentiate IM from normal tissues with sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 83%. This study shows the great potential of the FP/HW Raman endoscopic technique for early diagnosis of non-neoplastic gastric disease in vivo during routine endoscopic examination.

  11. Spatial Analysis of Stomach Cancer Incidence in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Reza; Khani, Yousef; Pakzad, Iraj; Momenimovahed, Zohre; Mohammadian-Hashejani, Abdollah; Salehiniya, Hamid; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer, the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death through the world, is very common in parts of Iran. Geographic variation in the incidence of stomach cancer is due to many different factors. The aim of this study was to assess the geographical and spatial distribution of stomach cancer in Iran using data from the cancer registry program in Iran for the year 2009. The reported incidences of stomach cancer for different provinces were standardized to the world population structure. ArcGIS software was used to analyse the data. Hot spots and high risk areas were determined using spatial analysis (Getis-Ord Gi). Hot and cold spots were determined as more than or less than 2 standard deviations from the national average, respectively. A significance level of 0.10 was used for statistical judgment. In 2009, a total of 6,886 cases of stomach cancers were reported of which 4,891 were in men and 1,995 in women (standardized incidence rates of 19.2 and 10.0, respectively, per 100,000 population). The results showed that stomach cancer was concentrated mainly in northwest of the country in both men and women. In women, northwest provinces such as Ardebil, East Azerbaijan, West Azerbaijan, Gilan, and Qazvin were identified as hot spots (p<0.1). In men, all northwest provinces, Ardabil, East Azerbaijan, Gilan, Qazvin, Zanjan and Kurdistan, the incidences were higher than the national average and these were identified as hot spots (P<0.01). As stomach cancer is clustered in the northwest of the country, further epidemiological studies are needed to identify factors contributing to this concentration. PMID:27165203

  12. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Change Contrast print sign up Share Healthy Aging This category offers tips on how to stay ... with Smell Problems with Taste Skin Care and Aging Sleep and Aging Taking Medicines Talking with Your ...

  13. Healthy Sexuality

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... t be afraid to talk with a health care professional. Everyone can achieve the healthy and satisfying ... site at www.asrm.org Find a Health Care Provider Back to Top Home | About Us | Reproductive ...

  14. Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment Kids Health Kids Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be ...

  15. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  16. Exceptionally rare cause of a total stomach resection

    PubMed Central

    Snarska, Jadwiga; Jacyna, Krzysztof; Janiszewski, Jacek; Shafie, Danuta; Iwanowicz, Katarzyna; Żurada, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The first-ever case of a 54-year-old woman who overdosed on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in an attempt at suicide. Before that incident, she had not been treated for coexisting diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or depression. At the time of admission to the General Surgery Department, the patient reported pains in the epigastric region with accompanying nausea and vomiting with mucous content as well as the inability to ingest food orally. Despite parenteral and enteral feeding, the patient exhibited a drop in body mass. The histopathologic examination of a sample taken from the stomach during gastroscopy showed some non-specific necrotic and inflammatory masses with granulation. Intraoperatively, a very small, infiltrated stomach with an initial section of duodenum was identified. A total stomach resection together with the reconstruction of digestive tract continuity was performed using the Roux-Y method. Histopathologic examination of the stomach revealed a deep, chronic and exacerbated inflammatory condition with an extensive ulceration over the entire length of the stomach, reaching up to the pylorus. Additionally, numerous lymphatic glands with inflammatory reaction changes were observed. PMID:22654458

  17. Rare Helicobacter pylori Infection May Explain Low Stomach Cancer Incidence: Ecological Observations in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Mulyadi, I Ketut; Moestikaningsih; Oka, Tjok Gede; Soeripto; Triningsih, Fx Ediati; Triyono, Teguh; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Hosono, Akihiro; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence rate of stomach cancer in Bali, Indonesia, is estimated to be strikingly lower than that in Japan. We conducted an on-site ecological study to investigate the association between the stomach cancer incidence and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Recruiting 291 healthy persons (136 men and 155 women) from the general population in Bali, Indonesia, we conducted a urea breath test (UBT) to examine H. pylori infection, along with a pepsinogen test to detect chronic atrophic gastritis and urine analysis to estimate sodium and potassium excretion. UBT positivities were 9% (2-15, 95% confidence interval) for men and 7% (1-12) for women, and positive cases for H. pylori IgG antibodies were 1% (0-3) for men and 3% (0-5) for women, significantly lower than the respective values in Japan. Positive pepsinogen tests in Bali were 0% (0-0) for men and 1% (0-4) for women, also significantly lower than the Japanese figures. Computed values for daily salt excretion were 13.3±4.1 g (mean ± SD) for men and 11.1±3.1 g for women, as high as corresponding Japanese consumption values. Moreover, the estimated potassium excretion was 3.2±0.7 g for men and 2.8±0.6 g for women in Bali, significantly higher than the figures in Japan. There were no associations across genetic polymorphisms of IL-beta, TNF-alpha, and PTPN11 with UBT positivity. The low incidence of stomach cancer in Bali may thus mainly be due to the rare H. pylori infection. Namely, the bacterium infection seems to be a critical factor for gastric cancer rather than host or other environmental factors. PMID:27039823

  18. Normal faults, normal friction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Sibson, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    Debate continues as to whether normal faults may be seismically active at very low dips (δ < 30°) in the upper continental crust. An updated compilation of dip estimates (n = 25) has been prepared from focal mechanisms of shallow, intracontinental, normal-slip earthquakes (M > 5.5; slip vector raking 90° ± 30° in the fault plane) where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. The dip distribution for these moderate-to-large normal fault ruptures extends from 65° > δ > 30°, corresponding to a range, 25° < θr < 60°, for the reactivation angle between the fault and inferred vertical σ1. In a comparable data set previously obtained for reverse fault ruptures (n = 33), the active dip distribution is 10° < δ = θr < 60°. For vertical and horizontal σ1 trajectories within extensional and compressional tectonic regimes, respectively, dip-slip reactivation is thus restricted to faults oriented at θr ≤ 60° to inferred σ1. Apparent lockup at θr ≈ 60° in each dip distribution and a dominant 30° ± 5° peak in the reverse fault dip distribution, are both consistent with a friction coefficient μs ≈ 0.6, toward the bottom of Byerlee's experimental range, though localized fluid overpressuring may be needed for reactivation of less favorably oriented faults.

  19. Application of 5-ALA for differential diagnostics of stomach diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhotnikova, Natalja L.; Dadvany, Sergey A.; Kuszin, Michail I.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Sklyanskaya, Olga A.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Volkova, Anna I.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    2001-01-01

    59 patients with stomach diseases including gastric cancer or polyp, gastritis, esofagus disease were investigated. Before gastroscopy all patients were given 5-ALA in doses 5mg, 10mg and 20mg per 1kg of body weight orally. Fluorescence diagnostics which estimates concentration of ALA-induced PPIX in regular and alternated tissues of gastric mucosa were carried out in 2-4 hours. Using of 5-ALA has shown high diagnostic effectiveness for differential diagnostics of stomach diseases. This technique has proved 10 diagnosis of cancer and revealed 15 malignant stomach diseases including 4 cancer in situ for patients with preliminary diagnosis of gastric ulcer. It also revealed 5 patients with enhanced fluorescence for which aimed biopsy has shown high degree of inflammation process. The latter were assigned as a risk group.

  20. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species. PMID:25915857

  1. Fish stomach contents in benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage assessments.

    PubMed

    Tupinambás, T H; Pompeu, P S; Gandini, C V; Hughes, R M; Callisto, M

    2015-01-01

    The choice of sampling gears to assess benthic macroinvertebrate communities depends on environmental characteristics, study objectives, and cost effectiveness. Because of the high foraging capacity and diverse habitats and behaviors of benthophagous fishes, their stomach contents may offer a useful sampling tool in studies of benthic macroinvertebrates, especially in large, deep, fast rivers that are difficult to sample with traditional sediment sampling gear. Our objective was to compare the benthic macroinvertebrate communities sampled from sediments with those sampled from fish stomachs. We collected benthic macroinvertebrates and fish from three different habitat types (backwater, beach, riffle) in the wet season, drying season, and dry season along a single reach of the Grande River (Paraná River Basin, southeast Brazil). We sampled sediments through use of a Petersen dredge (total of 216 grabs) and used gill nets to sample fish (total of 36 samples). We analyzed the stomach contents of three commonly occurring benthophagous fish species (Eigenmannia virescens, Iheringichthys labrosus, Leporinus amblyrhynchus). Chironomids dominated in both sampling methods. Macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition and abundances from fish stomachs differed from those from sediment samples, but less so from riffles than from backwater and beach habitats. Macroinvertebrate taxa from E. virescens stomachs were more strongly correlated with sediment samples from all three habitats than were those from the other two species. The species accumulation curves and higher mean dispersion values, compared with with sediment samples suggest that E. virescens is more efficient than sediment samples and the other fish studied at collecting benthic taxa. We conclude that by analyzing the stomach contents of benthophagous fishes it is possible to assess important characteristics of benthic communities (dispersion, taxonomic composition and diversity). This is especially true for studies

  2. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-01-01

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer. PMID:23467443

  3. Stomach emptiness in fishes: Sources of variation and study design implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vinson, M.R.; Angradi, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    This study summarizes fish stomach content data from 369,000 fish from 402 species in 1,096 collections and reports on the percentage of individuals with empty stomachs. The mean percentage of individuals with empty stomachs among all species, locations, habitats, seasons, regions, and collection methods was 26.4%. Mean percentage of individuals with empty stomachs varied significantly among fish collection gear types, taxonomic orders, trophic groups, feeding behaviors, and habitats, and with species length at maturity. Most of the variation in percentage of individuals with empty stomachs was explained by species length at maturity, fish collection gear type, and two autecological factors: trophic group (piscivore percentage of individuals with empty stomachs > non-piscivore percentage of individuals with empty stomachs) and feeding habitat (water column feeder percentage of individuals with empty stomachs > benthic feeder percentage of individuals with empty stomachs). After accounting for variation with fish length, the percentage of individuals with empty stomachs did not vary with the stomach removal collection method (dissection vs. gastric lavage), feeding time (diurnal or nocturnal), or time of collection (day or night). The percentage of individuals with empty stomachs was similar between fresh and saltwater fish, but differed within finer habitat classifications and appeared to follow a general prey availability or productivity gradient: percentage of individuals with empty stomachs of open ocean collections > estuary collections, lentic > lotic, and pelagic > littoral. Gear type (active or passive) was the most influential factor affecting the occurrence of empty stomachs that can be readily controlled by researchers.

  4. Comparison of the tolerability of recombinant human hyaluronidase + normal saline and recombinant human hyaluronidase + lactated ringer's solution administered subcutaneously: A phase IV, double-blind, randomized pilot study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Dychter, Samuel S.; Ebel, David; Mead, Tonya R.; Yocum, Richard C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) (150 U) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to facilitate subcutaneous fluid administration in adults and children. Objective: This Phase IV, double-blind, randomized pilot study was designed to compare the tolerability, flow rate, and safety profile of subcutaneous infusions of normal saline (NS) and lactated Ringer's (LR) solutions following subcutaneous administration of rHuPH20. Methods: Healthy volunteers received 1 mL rHuPH20 (150 U) in each thigh, followed by simultaneous gravity-driven subcutaneous infusions of 500 mL of LR solution into 1 thigh and NS solution into the contralateral thigh. Subjects rated infusion-site discomfort in each thigh using a 100-mm (0 = no pain to 100 = most severe pain) visual analog scale (VAS) at baseline (ie, after catheter placement/ rHuPH20 injection and just prior to the start of the infusions) and at the following times: after infusion of 250 mL, after infusion of 500 mL (end of infusion), and when thigh circumference returned to within 5% of baseline. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded throughout the study. The primary tolerability end point was the maximal increase from baseline in infusion-site discomfort on the VAS. Secondary end points included infusion flow rate, change in thigh circumference, subject preference for leftversus right-thigh infusion, and safety profile measures. Results: Fifteen subjects (14 women, 1 man; mean age, 41 years [range, 20–60 years]) were included in the study. Mean (SD) maximal increase from baseline VAS pain score was significantly greater with NS solution than with LR solution (20.0 [19.4] vs 9.4 [18.3] mm, respectively; P = 0.005). Mean infusion flow rate was not significantly different between the NS and LR solutions (384.1 [118.1] vs 395.8 [132.8] mL/h). No significant differences between solutions were observed in mean maximal change in thigh circumference (5.2% [1.6%] vs 5.3% [1.5%]). All subjects expressed

  5. Healthy Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preparing Food When the person with Alzheimer’s disease lives with you: • Buy healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain products. ... When a person with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease lives alone, you can buy foods that the person doesn’t need to cook. ...

  6. Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... health. Some you cannot control, such as your genetic makeup or your age. But you can make changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and other serious diseases: Get ...

  7. Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... of healthy foods, and limit calories and saturated fat Be physically active Control your blood pressure and cholesterol Don't smoke Protect yourself from too much sun Drink alcohol in moderation, or don't drink at all Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

  8. Healthy Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Offers ten suggestions for schools and universities to help maintain a healthy indoor environment: proper flooring, sanitary washrooms, consistent maintenance, indoor air quality, preventing mold, daylighting, good acoustics, avoiding volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ergonomic furniture, and well-maintained roofs. (EV)

  9. Healthy Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy for kids to choose healthy snacks by keeping fruits and vegetables on hand and ready to eat. ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Keeping ... Award-Winning Cafeteria Recipes Garden-Fresh Lunches Go, Slow, and Whoa! A Kid's Guide ...

  10. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit stomach.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Reona; Tanimoto, Yoshimasa; Kishimoto, Miori; Shibata, Hideshi

    2016-05-01

    Gastric stasis is common in rabbits, and gastrotomy may be performed to cure this pathological condition. Detailed descriptions of the arterial supply to the stomach are essential for this surgical operation, but published descriptions are limited. Here, we investigated anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the stomach in 43 New Zealand White rabbits by injecting colored latex into arteries. We observed that the left gastric artery that arose as the second branch from the celiac artery provided 1-3 parietal and 1-3 visceral branches to the stomach, with various branching patterns depending on the case. In 34 of 43 cases, the left gastric artery ended upon entering the gastric wall at the lesser curvature, whereas in the remaining cases, the artery continued as the hepatic artery without entering the gastric wall. The right gastric artery that branched off from the gastroduodenal artery also supplied the lesser curvature sinistrally but did not anastomose with the left gastric artery. In 40 cases, the hepatic artery provided 1-4 pyloric branches. In the fundic region, the short gastric arteries arose from the splenic artery and varied in number from 2 to 6. The right and left gastroepiploic arteries anastomosed to give 2-7 branches to the greater curvature. The results showed that many variations occurred in the arteries supplying the rabbit stomach, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits. PMID:26615866

  11. Anatomical variation of arterial supply to the rabbit stomach

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAMI, Reona; TANIMOTO, Yoshimasa; KISHIMOTO, Miori; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric stasis is common in rabbits, and gastrotomy may be performed to cure this pathological condition. Detailed descriptions of the arterial supply to the stomach are essential for this surgical operation, but published descriptions are limited. Here, we investigated anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the stomach in 43 New Zealand White rabbits by injecting colored latex into arteries. We observed that the left gastric artery that arose as the second branch from the celiac artery provided 1–3 parietal and 1–3 visceral branches to the stomach, with various branching patterns depending on the case. In 34 of 43 cases, the left gastric artery ended upon entering the gastric wall at the lesser curvature, whereas in the remaining cases, the artery continued as the hepatic artery without entering the gastric wall. The right gastric artery that branched off from the gastroduodenal artery also supplied the lesser curvature sinistrally but did not anastomose with the left gastric artery. In 40 cases, the hepatic artery provided 1–4 pyloric branches. In the fundic region, the short gastric arteries arose from the splenic artery and varied in number from 2 to 6. The right and left gastroepiploic arteries anastomosed to give 2–7 branches to the greater curvature. The results showed that many variations occurred in the arteries supplying the rabbit stomach, suggesting that such variations should be considered when performing veterinary surgical treatments in rabbits. PMID:26615866

  12. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  13. Argon laser photocoagulation in the dog stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Salmon, P R; Kelly, D F; Calder, B M; Pearson, H; Weaver, B M; Read, A E

    1979-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is one of a number of methods currently under investigation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The Argon ion and Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd YAG) lasers are theoretically suitable as the beam from each may be transmitted via a flexible fibre. Argon laser photocoagulation has been shown to be effective and we have elucidated which factors determine its safety and efficacy. Studies on normal canine gastric mucosa showed that the depth of tissue damage depended chiefly on the total incident laser energy on any one spot, and that below 50 J the risk of perforation was extremely low. The energy density was much less important. The haemostatic effect depended more on the laser power. In artificial bleeding gastric ulcers in heparinised dogs the most effective level was 7--9 W, at which 22 out of 23 ulcers (96%) stopped bleeding completely, compared with one out of 12 controls. Photocoagulation was achieved in these cases with energies well within the safe limits. The procedure was effective endoscopically, and these results justify early clinical studies in man. PMID:573722

  14. Allium Vegetables and Stomach Cancer Risk in China

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Yu, Guo-Pei; Lu, Qing-Yi; Lu, Ming-Lan; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Mu, Lina; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Kurtz, Robert C; Cai, Lin; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of stomach cancer has been declining, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Potential protective effects of allium vegetables against cancer have been reported by a few epidemiologic studies in Chinese populations, but the sample sizes of these studies were relatively small. We examined the associations between allium vegetable consumption and stomach cancer in a large population-based case-control study in Shanghai (750 cases and 750 age- and gender-matched controls) and Qingdao (128 cases and 128 age- and gender-matched controls). Epidemiological data were collected by a standard questionnaire, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression in SAS. After adjusting for matching variables, education, body mass index, pack-years of smoking, alcohol drinking, salt intake, and fruit and vegetable intake, inverse relationships with dose response pattern were observed between frequency of onion intake and stomach cancer in Qingdao (P for trend=0.02) and Shanghai (P for trend=0.04) populations. In Shanghai, negative dose-response relationships were observed between monthly intake of onions (P=0.03), monthly intake of garlic stalks (P=0.04) and distal cancer (but not with cardia cancer). Negative association was also noted between intake of garlic stalks (often vs. never) and risk of stomach cancer in Qingdao (OR=0.30; 95% CI: 0.12–0.77). Our results confirm the protective effect of allium vegetables (especially garlic and onions) against stomach cancer. PMID:16236005

  15. Ameliorative effect of vanadium on oxidative stress in stomach tissue of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz-Ozden, Tugba; Kurt-Sirin, Ozlem; Tunali, Sevim; Akev, Nuriye; Can, Ayse; Yanardag, Refiye

    2014-05-01

    Between their broad spectrum of action, vanadium compounds are shown to have insulin mimetic/enhancing effects. Increasing evidence in experimental and clinical studies suggests that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and on the onset of diabetic complications. Thus, preventive therapy can alleviate the possible side effects of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of vanadyl sulfate supplementation on the antioxidant system in the stomach tissue of diabetic rats. Male Swiss albino rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control; control+vanadyl sulfate; diabetic; diabetic+vanadyl sulfate. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg body weight). Vanadyl sulfate (100 mg/kg body weight) was given daily by gavage for 60 days. At the last day of the experiment, stomach tissues were taken and homogenized to make a 10% (w/v) homogenate. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), myeloperoxidase (MPO), carbonic anhydrase (CA), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were determined in the stomach tissue. CAT, SOD, GR, GPx, GST, CA, G6PD and LDH activities were increased in diabetic rats when compared to normal rats. Vanadium treatment significantly reduced the elevated activities of GR, GPx, GST compared with the diabetic group whereas the decreases in CAT, SOD, CA, G6PD and LDH activities were insignificant. No significant change was seen for MPO activity between the groups. It was concluded that vanadium could be used for its ameliorative effect against oxidative stress in diabetes. PMID:24856383

  16. Day Care Babies Catch Stomach Bugs Earlier, but Get Fewer Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158513.html Day Care Babies Catch Stomach Bugs Earlier, But Get ... TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies in day care catch their first stomach bug earlier than ...

  17. Day Care Babies Catch Stomach Bugs Earlier, but Get Fewer Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158513.html Day Care Babies Catch Stomach Bugs Earlier, But Get ... TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies in day care catch their first stomach bug earlier than ...

  18. Nutrition deficiency increases the risk of stomach cancer mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is to determine whether exposure to malnutrition during early life is associated with increased risk of stomach cancer in later life. Methods The design protocol included analyzing the trend of gastric cancer mortality and nutrition and evaluating the association between nutrient deficiency in early life and the risk of gastric cancer by hierarchical age–period–birth cohort (APC) analysis using general log-linear Poisson models and to compare the difference between birth cohorts who were exposed to the 1959–1961 Chinese famine and those who were not exposed to the famine. Data on stomach cancer mortality from 1970 to 2009 and the dietary patterns from 1955 to 1985 which included the 1959–1961 Chinese famine period in the Zhaoyuan County population were obtained. The nutrition information was collected 15 years prior to the mortality data as based on the latest reference of disease incubation. Results APC analysis revealed that severe nutrition deficiency during early life may increase the risk of stomach cancer. Compared with the 1960–1964 birth cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in all birth cohorts from 1900 to 1959 significantly increased; compared with the 1970–1974 cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in the 1975–1979 cohort significantly increased, whereas the others had a steadily decreased risk; compared with 85–89 age group in the 2005–2009 death survey, the ORs decreased with younger age and reached significant levels for the 50–54 age group after adjusting the confounding factors. The 1930 to 1964 group (exposed to famine) had a higher mortality rate than the 1965 to 1999 group (not exposed to famine). For males, the relative risk (RR) was 2.39 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 1.51 to 3.77. For females, RR was 1.64 and 95% CI was 1.02 to 2.62. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that prolonged malnutrition during early life may increase the risk of stomach cancer

  19. Alpha-fetoprotein-producing early gastric cancer of the remnant stomach: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yutaka; Sato, Kouhei; Kodama, Masashi; Nanjyo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    A 67-year-old man initially underwent a distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0; Stage IA) in March 1995. During the follow-up period, an elevation of the serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (98.8 ng/ml) and a liver tumor (S4) were detected. A left hepatectomy was performed in December 1996. Immunohistochemically, AFP-positive cells were present in both the primary gastric tumor and metastasized liver tumor. The serum AFP level normalized immediately, but it elevated again to 22.4 ng/ml. An endoscopic examination revealed a protruding lesion in the remnant stomach. A total resection of the remnant stomach was performed in February 2005. The tumor was evaluated T1, N0, M0; Stage IA, with positive staining for AFP. The patient has survived without any sign of recurrence for more than 11 years after the first diagnosis of cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a long-term survival of AFP-producing gastric cancer with successfully resected metachronous liver metastasis and gastric remnant carcinoma. PMID:17952534

  20. Ectopic expression of guanylyl cyclase C in adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason; Schulz, Stephanie; Haaf, Janis; Kairys, John C; Waldman, Scott A

    2002-08-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), a receptor specifically expressed in cells originating from differentiated intestinal epithelium, is a marker and therapeutic target for colorectal cancer metastases. Intestinal metaplasia, in which epithelial cells assume histological and molecular characteristics of differentiated intestinal enterocytes, is a common precursor to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach. Thus, those tumors, tissues adjacent to them, and their associated regional lymph nodes were assessed for GC-C expression by reverse transcription coupled with the PCR. GC-C mRNA was detected in five of five and eight of nine esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively. Also, GC-C mRNA was detected in three of five and six of seven tissues adjacent to, but not histologically involved in, esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas, respectively, reflecting molecular changes associated with neoplastic transformation preceding histopathological changes. In contrast, three normal gastric specimens did not express GC-C. Furthermore, GC-C mRNA was detected in 1 of 1 lymph node containing tumor cells by histopathology from a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma and in 3 of 11 lymph nodes, all of which were free of tumor cells by histopathology, from a patient with a gastroesophageal junction tumor. This is the first demonstration that GC-C is ectopically expressed by primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and stomach and suggests that GC-C may be a sensitive and specific clinical marker and target for adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:12163327

  1. Effect of X-irradiation on the stomach of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Breiter, N.; Trott, K.R.; Sassy, T. )

    1989-10-01

    A model for localized 300 kV X-irradiation of the rat stomach was developed. After irradiation with single doses, three distinct gastric disorders were observed which occurred at different latency times. Acute death 2-3 weeks after irradiation was caused by an erosive and ulcerative gastritis and occurred in all animals given 28.5 Gy without diet, in 17% of the animals given 28.5 Gy plus diet, and in 13% of the animals given 23 Gy. Subacute to chronic fatal disorders 4 weeks to 7 months after irradiation were seen as stomach dilatation and gastroparesis, associated with the replacement of the normal gastric mucosa by a hyperkeratinized multilayered squamous epithelium. These disorders occurred in 40-100% of the animals after doses between 16 Gy and 28.5 Gy (+diet). An ED 50 value of 19.2 Gy (16.5-21.2 Gy, 95% confidence interval) was calculated for this gastroparesis. Late gastric obstruction exceeding 7 months after irradiation was seen in the rats because of profound changes in the gastric wall in 13-18% of the animals after doses between 23 Gy and 14 Gy. In animals surviving these three periods, an atrophic mucosa and intestinal metaplasia developed. From functional and morphohistological studies, it can be concluded that there are differences in the pathogenesis of the fatal radiation damage for each of these periods after irradiation.

  2. [Influence of cattle cord blood fraction below 5 kD on biochemical parameters of blood in experimental chronic stomach ulcer in rats].

    PubMed

    Gulevskiĭ, A K; Abakumova, E S; Moiseeva, N N; Dolgikh, O L

    2008-01-01

    Influence of cattle cord blood fraction (below 5 kD) on lipid peroxidation product content and alkaline phosphatase activity-in peripheral blood was studied on the experimental subchronic stomach ulcer model in rats. It has been shown that the fraction administrations normalize thiobarbituric-active product content and alkaline phosphatase activity in blood, which testifies to decreasing inflammatory reaction in the mucous membrane of the stomach. The fraction administrations accelerate the processes of regeneration of the mucous membrane of the stomach up to complete healing of ulcer defects. Cord blood fraction below 5 kD from cattle possesses antiulcer activity which is analogous to the actovegin activity. It has been shown by gel-penetrating chromatography that the pattern of cord blood fraction low molecular substances is different from the actovegin pattern both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:18819383

  3. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  4. Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Jeong; An, Soyeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Beom Su; Kim, Jihun

    2016-09-01

    Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET) is a highly aggressive small round cell tumor that mainly occurs in the bone or soft tissue of children or young adults but is extremely rare in the stomach. A 55-year-old man presented with melena and anemia. On endoscopy, an ulcerofungating mass was observed in the high body and total gastrectomy was performed. Histologically, the mass consisted of small round cells with scanty cytoplasm and inconspicuous nucleoli. They often formed perivascular pseudorosettes and multinucleated giant cells were frequently observed. The tumor cells strongly expressed CD99, FLI1, and chromogranin and weakly expressed synaptophysin and CD56. EWS-FLI1 fusion transcript was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. ES/PNET is frequently misdiagnosed because of its similarity with small cell carcinoma. Although gastric ES/PNET is very rare, it should be included in differential diagnoses of small round cell tumor in the stomach. PMID:27006299

  5. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas. PMID:26957034

  6. Case Report of an Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, Raffaele; Ugolini, Clara; Castagna, Maura

    2016-02-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC) is a rare but important type of extrahepatic tumor that has a morphologic similarity to hepatocellular carcinoma, with production of α-fetoprotein in high amounts and a poor prognosis. Stomach is one of the organs in which HAC has been most commonly identified. We report a case of an old man with a polypoid mass in the prepyloric region. The microscopical aspects were suggestive for an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma, but the positive immunohistochemical staining for α-fetoprotein, α-1-antitrypsin, α-1-antichymotrypsin, and Hep Par1 were crucial for the final diagnosis of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Because of the poor prognosis for this type of tumor, correct and early-stage diagnosis of HAC is essential and long-term follow-up is required. PMID:26844385

  7. Gelation of mucin: Protecting the stomach from autodigestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, Rama

    2011-03-01

    In this talk I will describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the remarkable ability of the mucus lining of the stomach for protecting the stomach from being digested by the acidic gastric juices that it secretes. These physical properties can be attributed to the presence of a high molecular weight glycoprotein found in mucus, called mucin. Rheology and other measurements show that gastric mucin forms a gel under acidic pH. A model of gelation based on the interplay of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions will be discussed. Molecular Dynamics simulation studies of folding and aggregation of mucin domains provide further support for this model. The relevance of gelation to the motion of the ulcer causing bacterium H. pylori will be discussed.

  8. The role of dietary nutrition in stomach cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak, Konrad; Duszewski, Michal; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Stomach cancer mortality still represents a significant proportion of all cancer deaths. The majority of patients with advanced cancer experience cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome with weight loss, reduced appetite, fatigue, and weakness. Neoplastic cachexia is a very common clinical manifestation of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancer and is generally assumed to be secondary to the mechanical effects of the tumor on the upper digestive tract. The main reasons are obstruction to swallowing, early satiety, nausea and vomiting. Another reason for weight loss is the co-existence of systemic inflammation. Nutritional treatment in the group of patients with gastric cancer is still used too rarely and the knowledge about it is still very limited. Nutritional support should be given for patients both in the pre- and postoperative period. Nutrition should also be used in palliative treatment in patients with unresectable stomach cancer. The main principles of nutritional support and its influence are presented in this publication. PMID:24592120

  9. Morphological features of the stomach of Malayan pangolin, Manis javanica.

    PubMed

    Nisa', C; Agungpriyono, S; Kitamura, N; Sasaki, M; Yamada, J; Sigit, K

    2010-10-01

    The morphology of the stomach of Malayan pangolin, Manis javanica was studied at macroscopic, light microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic levels. The stomach of M. javanica was C-shaped with short lesser curvature. At the oesophageal junction, the inner smooth muscle was thickened in the greater curvature side. The entire stomach was lined by a thick cornified stratified squamous epithelium, except at the duct orifices of glands and in the pyloric gland region. The wall of the fundus was thin and devoid of glands. The gastric glands consisted of mucous, oxyntic, and pyloric glands. The mucous glands were observed in the lesser curvature (Mg-L), in the greater curvature (Mg-G), and in the pyloric canal (Mg-C) respectively. The oxyntic glands were organized into gland mass, making an oval mound elevated to the gastric lumen, in the middle of the greater curvature. The oxyntic gland mass has a single common duct with opening directed to the pyloric side. This duct was surrounded by mucus gland (Mg-G). The pyloric glands were located caudal to the pylorus. There was no sphincter at the pyloric-duodenal junction. Large mucosal protuberance, the torus pyloricus was observed in the side of the lesser curvature of the pyloric canal. In the lumen of pyloric canal region, numerous spines and small pebbles were observed. The muscle layers in the wall of this region were considerably thickened. The present results on the stomach of M. javanica are thought to be closely related to the toothless and eating habits of this animal species. PMID:20645954

  10. Microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for salivary diagnostics of stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Yael; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2015-05-15

    We present a microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for saliva diagnostics with a potential application for non-invasive early diagnosis of stomach cancer. Stomach cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. The primary identified cause is infection by a gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori. These bacteria secrete the enzyme urease that converts urea into carbon dioxide (CO2) and ammonia (NH3), leading to their elevated levels in breath and body fluids. The proposed optoelectronic sensor will detect clinically relevant levels of CO2 and NH3 in saliva that can potentially be used for early diagnosis of stomach cancer. The sensor is composed of the embedded in a microfluidic device array of microwells filled with ion-exchange polymer microbeads doped with various organic dyes. The optical response of this unique highly diverse sensor is monitored over a broad spectrum, which provides a platform for cross-reactive sensitivity and allows detection of CO2 and NH3 in saliva at ppm levels. PMID:25223554