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Sample records for normal human trigeminal

  1. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. ); Murray, R.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO )

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  2. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  3. Human olfactory lateralization requires trigeminal activation.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Schulz, Max; Blumrich, Anna; Hummel, Cornelia; Gerber, Johannes; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rats are able to lateralize odors. This ability involves specialized neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex which are able to process the left, right and bilateral presentation of stimuli. However, it is not clear whether this function is preserved in humans. Humans are in general not able to differentiate whether a selective olfactory stimulant has been applied to the left or right nostril; however exceptions have been reported. Following a screening of 152 individuals with an olfactory lateralization test, we identified 19 who could lateralize odors above chance level. 15 of these "lateralizers" underwent olfactory fMRI scanning in a block design and were compared to 15 controls matched for age and sex distribution. As a result, both groups showed comparable activation of olfactory eloquent brain areas. However, subjects with lateralization ability had a significantly enhanced activation of cerebral trigeminal processing areas (somatosensory cortex, intraparietal sulcus). In contrast to controls, lateralizers furthermore exhibited no suppression in the area of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus. An exploratory study with an olfactory change detection paradigm furthermore showed that lateralizers oriented faster towards changes in the olfactory environment. Taken together, our study suggests that the trigeminal system is activated to a higher degree by the odorous stimuli in the group of "lateralizers". We conclude that humans are not able to lateralize odors based on the olfactory input alone, but vary in the degree to which the trigeminal system is recruited. PMID:24825502

  4. Histopathological effects of radiosurgery on a human trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alhindi, Hindi; Alhebshi, Adnan; Albloushi, Monirah; Baeesa, Saleh; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiosurgery is a well-established treatment modality for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The exact mechanism of pain relief after radiosurgery is not clearly understood. Histopathology examination of the trigeminal nerve in humans after radiosurgery is rarely performed and has produced controversial results. Case Description: We report on a 45-year-old female who received radiosurgery treatment for trigeminal neuralgia by Cyberknife. A 6-mm portion of the cisternal segment of trigeminal nerve received a dose of 60 Gy. The clinical benefit started 10 days after therapy and continued for 8 months prior to a recurrence of her previous symptoms associated with mild background pain. She underwent microvascular decompression and partial sensory root sectioning. Atrophied trigeminal nerve rootlets were grossly noted intraoperatively under surgical microscope associated with changes in trigeminal nerve color to gray. A biopsy from the inferolateral surface of the nerve proximal to the midcisternal segment showed histological changes in the form of fibrosis and axonal degeneration. Conclusion: This case study supports the evidence of histological damage of the trigeminal nerve fibers after radiosurgery therapy. Whether or not the presence and degree of nerve damage correlate with the degree of clinical benefit and side effects are not revealed by this study and need to be explored in future studies. PMID:24605252

  5. Human mastication modulated by experimental trigeminal and extra-trigeminal painful stimuli.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Bjerring, P; Bak, P; Hjorth, T; Troest, T

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the modulation of human deliberately unilateral mastication by trigeminal and extra-trigeminal standardized painful stimuli. Series with 15 s of gum-chewing before induction of pain, during pain and after pain were quantitatively assessed by jaw-closing muscle electromyography (EMG) and kinematics of the lower jaw. Four different painful stimuli were used: cold stimulation of the frontal region, cold stimulation of the dominant hand, capsaicin stimulation of the hard palate, and pressure pain stimulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Intensity and quality of perceived pain were rated on visual analogue scales (VAS) and McGill's Pain Questionnaires (MPQ). Analysis of the data showed that frontal cold stimulation was the least painful test and was associated with the fewest changes in masticatory function. Cold stimulation of the hand and palatal capsaicin stimulation caused significant increases in peak amplitudes of EMG bursts from all jaw-closing muscles and faster jaw movements whereas TMJ pressure pain produced significantly lower peak EMG amplitudes. The present results suggest that nociceptive input from different tissues and even extra-trigeminal regions may modulate trigeminal motor function in selective ways. Thus, clinical observations of changes in masticatory function may not always be due to pain in the orofacial region and therefore do not necessitate orofacial treatment. PMID:8971646

  6. Evoked taste thresholds in a normal population and the application of electrogustometry to trigeminal nerve disease.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R; Ferguson, M M; Strang, R; Turner, J W; Bone, I

    1987-01-01

    No standardised method for taste threshold measurement is available and therefore comparison between clinical studies is difficult. An electrogustometer was evaluated in normal subjects. No sex difference in taste threshold was noted; however, there was a significant elevation in detection threshold with age and smoking. Electrogustometric values both in patients before and after surgery for trigeminal neuralgia and in patients with trigeminal sensory neuropathy were determined. Many patients with trigeminal nerve disorders had abnormal electrogustometric detection thresholds suggesting that there is possibly an accessory taste pathway through the trigeminal nerve, although in some individuals the site of lesion may be in the brain stem. Electrogustometry is a convenient method for clinically assessing taste. Images PMID:3819752

  7. Endogenous angiotensinergic system in neurons of rat and human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Imboden, Hans; Patil, Jaspal; Nussberger, Juerg; Nicoud, Françoise; Hess, Benno; Ahmed, Nermin; Schaffner, Thomas; Wellner, Maren; Müller, Dominik; Inagami, Tadashi; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Pavel, Jaroslav; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the role of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the sensory system and especially in the trigeminal ganglia, we studied the expression of angiotensinogen (Ang-N)-, renin-, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)- and cathepsin D-mRNA, and the presence of Ang II and substance P in the rat and human trigeminal ganglia. The rat trigeminal ganglia expressed substantial amounts of Ang-N- and ACE mRNA as determined by quantitative real time PCR. Renin mRNA was untraceable in rat samples. Cathepsin D was detected in the rat trigeminal ganglia indicating the possibility of existence of pathways alternative to renin for Ang I formation. In situ hybridization in rat trigeminal ganglia revealed expression of Ang-N mRNA in the cytoplasm of numerous neurons. By using immunocytochemistry, a number of neurons and their processes in both the rat and human trigeminal ganglia were stained for Ang II. Post in situ hybridization immunocytochemistry reveals that in the rat trigeminal ganglia some, but not all Ang-N mRNA-positive neurons marked for Ang II. In some neurons Substance P was found colocalized with Ang II. Angiotensins from rat trigeminal ganglia were quantitated by radioimmunoassay with and without prior separation by high performance liquid chromatography. Immunoreactive angiotensin II (ir-Ang II) was consistently present and the sum of true Ang II (1-8) octapeptide and its specifically measured metabolites were found to account for it. Radioimmunological and immunocytochemical evidence of ir-Ang II in neuronal tissue is compatible with Ang II as a neurotransmitter. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II could be produced locally in the neurons of rat trigeminal ganglia. The localization and colocalization of neuronal Ang II with Substance P in the trigeminal ganglia neurons may be the basis for a participation and function of Ang II in the regulation of nociception and migraine pathology. PMID:19323983

  8. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NINDS NINDS Trigeminal Neuralgia Information Page Synonym(s): Tic Douloureux Condensed from Trigeminal Neuralgia Fact Sheet Table ... is Trigeminal Neuralgia? Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), also called tic douloureux , is a chronic pain condition that causes ...

  9. Cytoarchitectonic study of the trigeminal ganglion in humans

    PubMed Central

    KRASTEV, DIMO STOYANOV; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglion (TG), a cluster of pseudounipolar neurons, is located in the trigeminal impression of the temporal pyramid. It is covered by a sheath of the dura mater and arachnoid and is near the rear end of the cavernous sinus. The peripheral processes of the pseudounipolar cells are involved in the formation of the first and second branch and the sensory part of the third branch of the fifth cranial nerve, and the central ones form the sensory root of the nerve, which penetrates at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle, aside from the pons, and terminate in the sensory nuclei of the trigeminal complex. We found that the primary sensory neurons involved in sensory innervation of the orofacial complex are a diverse group. Although they possess the general structure of pseudounipolar neurons, there are significant differences among them, seen in varying intensities of staining. Based on our investigations we classified the neurons into 7 groups, i.e. large, subdivided into light and dark, medium, also light and dark, and small light and dark, and, moreover, neurons with an irregular shape of their perikarya. Further research by applying various immunohistochemical methods will clarify whether differences in the morphological patterns of the neurons are associated with differences in the neurochemical composition of various neuronal types. PMID:26527926

  10. Differential activation of the human trigeminal nuclear complex by noxious and non-noxious orofacial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nash, Paul G; Macefield, Vaughan G; Klineberg, Iven J; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2009-11-01

    There is good evidence from animal studies for segregation in the processing of non-nociceptive and nociceptive information within the trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. However, it remains unknown whether a similar segregation occurs in humans, and a recent tract tracing study suggests that this segregation may not exist. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define and compare activity patterns of the trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex during non-noxious and noxious cutaneous and non-noxious and noxious muscle orofacial stimulation in humans. We found that during cutaneous pain, signal intensity increased within the entire rostrocaudal extent of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SpV), encompassing the ipsilateral oralis (SpVo), interpolaris (SpVi) and caudalis (SpVc) subdivisions. In contrast, muscle pain did not activate SpVi, but instead activated a discrete region of the ipsilateral SpVo and SpVc. Further, muscle noxious stimulation activated a region of the ipsilateral lateral pons in the region of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp). Innocuous orofacial stimulation (lip brushing) also evoked a significant increase in signal intensity in the ipsilateral Vp; however, non-noxious muscle stimulation showed no increase in signal in this area. The data reveal that orofacial cutaneous and muscle nociceptive information and innocuous cutaneous stimulation are differentially represented within the trigeminal nuclear complex. It is well established that cutaneous and muscle noxious stimuli evoke different perceptual, behavioural and cardiovascular changes. We speculate that the differential activation evoked by cutaneous and muscle noxious stimuli within the trigeminal sensory complex may contribute to the neural basis for these differences. PMID:19492300

  11. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trigeminal neuralgia is more common in patients with multiple sclerosis. Cause The cause of trigeminal neuralgia is not ... five percent of patients with trigeminal neuralgia have multiple sclerosis. Patients with TN and multiple sclerosis are generally ...

  12. The neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function-an ALE meta-analysis of human functional brain imaging data.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jessica; Kopietz, Rainer; Frasnelli, Johannes; Wiesmann, Martin; Hummel, Thomas; Lundström, Johan N

    2010-03-01

    Almost every odor we encounter in daily life has the capacity to produce a trigeminal sensation. Surprisingly, few functional imaging studies exploring human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function exist, and results are to some degree inconsistent. We utilized activation likelihood estimation (ALE), a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis tool, to analyze functional imaging data (fMRI/PET) following intranasal trigeminal stimulation with carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a stimulus known to exclusively activate the trigeminal system. Meta-analysis tools are able to identify activations common across studies, thereby enabling activation mapping with higher certainty. Activation foci of nine studies utilizing trigeminal stimulation were included in the meta-analysis. We found significant ALE scores, thus indicating consistent activation across studies, in the brainstem, ventrolateral posterior thalamic nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, precentral gyrus, as well as in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices-a network known for the processing of intranasal nociceptive stimuli. Significant ALE values were also observed in the piriform cortex, insula, and the orbitofrontal cortex, areas known to process chemosensory stimuli, and in association cortices. Additionally, the trigeminal ALE statistics were directly compared with ALE statistics originating from olfactory stimulation, demonstrating considerable overlap in activation. In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis map the human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal stimulation with high statistical certainty and demonstrate that the cortical areas recruited during the processing of intranasal CO(2) stimuli include those outside traditional trigeminal areas. Moreover, through illustrations of the considerable overlap between brain areas that process trigeminal and olfactory information; these results demonstrate the interconnectivity of flavor processing. PMID:19913573

  13. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Schöbel, Nicole; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, which are (potentially) involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs) with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues. PMID:26070209

  14. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  15. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... trigeminal neuralgia: Balloon compression works by injuring the insulation on nerves that are involved with the sensation ... glycerol injection bathes the ganglion and damages the insulation of trigeminal nerve fibers. This form of rhizotomy ...

  16. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a type of chronic pain that affects your face. It causes extreme, sudden ... is probably a blood vessel pressing on the trigeminal nerve, one of the largest nerves in the ...

  17. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the nasal mucosa with subsequent central inhibitory effects (such as conditioned pain modulation). In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of intranasal CO2 on a human model of craniofacial pain elicited by nasal application of capsaicin. Methods In a first experiment, 48 healthy volunteers without previous craniofacial pain received intranasal capsaicin to provoke trigeminal pain elicited by activation of TRVP1 positive nociceptive neurons. Then, CO2 or air was insufflated alternatingly into the nasal cavity at a flow rate of 1 l/min for 60 sec each. In the subsequent experiment, all participants were randomized into 2 groups of 24 each and received either continuous nasal insufflation of CO2 or placebo for 18:40 min after nociceptive stimulation with intranasal capsaicin. In both experiments, pain was rated on a numerical rating scale every 60 sec. Results Contrary to previous animal studies, the effects of CO2 on experimental trigeminal pain were only marginal. In the first experiment, CO2 reduced pain ratings only minimally by 5.3% compared to air if given alternatingly with significant results for the main factor GROUP (F1,47 = 4.438; p = 0.041) and the interaction term TIME*GROUP (F2.6,121.2 = 3.3; p = 0.029) in the repeated-measures ANOVA. However, these effects were abrogated after continuous insufflation of CO2 or placebo with no significant changes for the main factors or the interaction term. Conclusions Although mild modulatory effects of low

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a nerve disorder that causes a stabbing or electric-shock-like pain in parts ... The pain of trigeminal neuralgia comes from the trigeminal nerve. This nerve carries the feelings of touch and pain from the face, eyes, ...

  19. Gene therapy for trigeminal pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzabazis, Alexander Z.; Klukinov, Michael; Feliciano, David P.; Wilson, Steven P.; Yeomans, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a single direct injection of viral vector encoding for encephalin to induce a widespread expression of the transgene and potential analgesic effect in trigeminal behavioral pain models in mice. After direct injection of HSV-1 based vectors encoding for human preproenkephalin (SHPE) or the lacZ reporter gene (SHZ.1, control virus) into the trigeminal ganglia in mice, we performed an orofacial formalin test and assessed the cumulative nociceptive behavior at different time points after injection of the viral vectors. We observed an analgesic effect on nociceptive behavior that lasted up to 8 weeks after a single injection of SHPE into the trigeminal ganglia. Control virus injected animals showed nociceptive behavior similar to naïve mice. The analgesic effect of SHPE injection was reversed/attenuated by subcutaneous naloxone injections, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. SHPE injected mice also showed normalization in withdrawal latencies upon thermal noxious stimulation of inflamed ears after subdermal complete Freund’s adjuvans injection indicating widespread expression of the transgene. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of trigeminal ganglia showed expression of human preproenkephalin after SHPE injection. Direct injection of viral vectors proved to be useful for exploring the distinct pathophysiology of the trigeminal system and could also be an interesting addition to the pain therapists’ armamentarium. PMID:24572785

  20. Evaluation of Trigeminal Sensitivity to Ammonia in Asthmatics and Healthy Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Maja; Diamond, Jeanmarie; Schuster, Benno; Dalton, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthmatics often report the triggering or exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to airborne irritants, which in some cases may result from stimulation of irritant receptors in the upper airways inducing reflexive broncho-constriction. Ammonia (NH3) is a common constituent of commercially available household products, and in high concentration has the potential to elicit sensory irritation in the eyes and upper respiratory tract of humans. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the irritation potential of ammonia in asthmatics and healthy volunteers and to determine whether differences in nasal or ocular irritant sensitivity to ammonia between these two groups could account for the exacerbation of symptoms reported by asthmatics following exposure to an irritant. Methods 25 healthy and 15 mild/moderate persistent asthmatic volunteers, with reported sensitivity to household cleaning products, were evaluated for their sensitivity to the ocular and nasal irritancy of NH3. Lung function was evaluated at baseline and multiple time points following exposure. Results Irritation thresholds did not differ between asthmatics and healthy controls, nor did ratings of odor intensity, annoyance and irritancy following exposure to NH3 concentrations at and above the irritant threshold for longer periods of time (30 sec).Importantly, no changes in lung function occurred following exposure to NH3 for any individuals in either group. Conclusion Despite heightened symptom reports to environmental irritants among asthmatics, the ocular and nasal trigeminal system of mild-moderate asthmatics does not appear to be more sensitive or more reactive than that of non-asthmatics, nor does short duration exposure to ammonia at irritant levels induce changes in lung function. At least in brief exposures, the basis for some asthmatics to experience adverse responses to volatile compounds in everyday life may arise from factors other than trigeminally

  1. Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Hyperalgesia and Sensitization in the Human Trigeminal Nociceptive Pathway: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Eric; Pendse, Gautam; Morris, Susie; Strassman, Andrew; Aiello-Lammens, Matthew; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to differentiate the processing of nociceptive information, matched for pain intensity, from capsaicin-induced hyperalgesic vs. control skin at multiple levels in the trigeminal nociceptive pathway. Using an event-related fMRI approach, 12 male subjects underwent three functional scans beginning 1 hour after topical application of capsaicin to a defined location on the maxillary skin, when pain from capsaicin application had completely subsided. Brush and two levels of painful heat (low - Thermal-1 and high - Thermal-2) were applied to the site of capsaicin application and to the mirror image region on the opposite side. Temperatures for each side were set to evoke perceptually-matched pain (mean temperatures [capsaicin/control]: Thermal-1=38.4/42.8°C; Thermal-2=44.9/47.8°C). We found differences in activation patterns following stimuli to treated and untreated sides in sensory circuits across all stimulus conditions. Across the trigeminal nociceptive pathway, Thermal-2 stimulation of hyperalgesic skin evoked greater activation in trigeminal ganglion and nucleus, thalamus, and somatosensory cortex than the control side. Thus, trigeminal nociceptive regions showed increased activation in the context of perceptually equal pain levels. Beyond these regions, contrast analyses of capsaicin vs. control skin stimulation indicated significant changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and amygdala. The involvement of these emotion-related regions suggests that they may be highly sensitive to context, such as prior experience (application of capsaicin) and the specific pain mechanism (hyperalgesic vs. normal skin). PMID:17407825

  2. Trigeminal nerve stimulation modulates brainstem more than cortical excitability in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Mercante, B; Pilurzi, G; Ginatempo, F; Manca, A; Follesa, P; Tolu, E; Deriu, F

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sites in the central nervous system (CNS) have been hypothesized to explain the beneficial effects of transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several disorders. This work investigated the acute effects of TNS on the excitability of brainstem and intracortical circuits, as well as on sensorimotor integration processes at cortical level in physiological conditions. Brainstem excitability was evaluated in seventeen healthy subjects measuring the R1 and R2 areas of the blink reflex (BR) and its recovery cycle, with cortical excitability and sensorimotor integration assessed by probing short-interval (SICI) and long-interval (LICI) intracortical inhibition, with short-interval (SICF), intracortical facilitation (ICF), short-latency (SAI) and long-latency (LAI) inhibition measuring motor potentials evoked in the first dorsal interosseous muscle by TMS of the contralateral motor cortex. Neurophysiological parameters were assessed, in seventeen healthy subjects, before and after cyclic 20-min TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. After TNS, the area of the R2 was significantly reduced (p = 0.018). By contrast, R1 area and R2 recovery cycle were unaffected. Similarly, SICI, ICF, LICI, SICF, SAI and LAI appeared unaltered after TNS. These data suggest that, in normal subjects, TNS mainly acts on brainstem polysynaptic circuits mediating the R2 component of the BR and plays a minor role in modifying the activity of higher-level structures involved in the R2 recovery cycle and in modulation of cortical excitability. A further investigation of a chronic TNS-induced effect may disclose a higher potential for TNS in producing measurable after effects on its CNS targets. PMID:26259748

  3. Trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Jensen, Troels S.; Scholz, Joachim; Sindou, Marc; Svensson, Peter; Zakrzewska, Joanna M.; Nurmikko, Turo

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an exemplary condition of neuropathic facial pain. However, formally classifying TN as neuropathic pain based on the grading system of the International Association for the Study of Pain is complicated by the requirement of objective signs confirming an underlying lesion or disease of the somatosensory system. The latest version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders created similar difficulties by abandoning the term symptomatic TN for manifestations caused by major neurologic disease, such as tumors or multiple sclerosis. These diagnostic challenges hinder the triage of TN patients for therapy and clinical trials, and hamper the design of treatment guidelines. In response to these shortcomings, we have developed a classification of TN that aligns with the nosology of other neurologic disorders and neuropathic pain. We propose 3 diagnostic categories. Classical TN requires demonstration of morphologic changes in the trigeminal nerve root from vascular compression. Secondary TN is due to an identifiable underlying neurologic disease. TN of unknown etiology is labeled idiopathic. Diagnostic certainty is graded possible when pain paroxysms occur in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve branches. Triggered paroxysms permit the designation of clinically established TN and probable neuropathic pain. Imaging and neurophysiologic tests that establish the etiology of classical or secondary TN determine definite neuropathic pain. PMID:27306631

  4. Trigeminal dysfunction in patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Hanner, P; Badr, G; Rosenhall, U; Edström, S

    1986-01-01

    The trigeminal function was investigated in 30 consecutive patients with acute unilateral peripheral facial palsy. The patients were tested with electrophysiological methods within 5 weeks after onset of the disease. Trigeminus-evoked potential test (TEP) disclosed trigeminal dysfunction in 47%, while the blink reflex test (BR) showed trigeminal pathology in 60% of the patients. A topographical analysis of the trigeminal system showed that 24% of the patients had BR patterns that were consistent with brainstem involvement. In 2 cases (7%), TEP was pathological though the BR test proved normal. These findings suggest a more central trigeminal affection and may demonstrate multifocal lesions. This was further underlined by the investigation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) which indicated brainstem involvement in 28%. It is concluded that acute facial palsy is frequently a symptom of a central nervous affection. PMID:3705951

  5. Evidence of ancillary trigeminal innervation of levator palpebrae in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lehman, A M; Dong, C C; Harries, A M; Patel, A; Honey, C R; Patel, M S

    2014-02-01

    The cranial synkineses are a group of disorders encompassing a variety of involuntary co-contractions of the facial, masticatory, or extraocular muscles that occur during a particular volitional movement. The neuroanatomical pathways for synkineses largely remain undefined. Our studies explored a normal synkinesis long observed in the general population - that of jaw opening during efforts to open the eyelids widely. To document this phenomenon, we observed 186 consecutive participants inserting or removing contact lenses to identify jaw opening. Seeking electrophysiological evidence, in a second study we enrolled individuals undergoing vascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm, without a history of jaw-winking, ptosis, or strabismus, to record any motor responses in levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) upon stimulation of the trigeminal motor root. Stimulus was applied to the trigeminal motor root while an electrode in levator recorded the response. We found that 37 participants (20%) opened their mouth partially or fully during contact lens manipulation. In the second study, contraction of LPS with trigeminal motor stimulation was documented in two of six patients, both undergoing surgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We speculate these results might provide evidence of an endogenous synkinesis, indicating that trigeminal-derived innervation of levator could exist in a significant minority of the general population. Our observations demonstrate plasticity in the human cranial nerve innervation pattern and may have implications for treating Marcus Gunn jaw-winking. PMID:24120706

  6. Diving and exercise: the interaction of trigeminal receptors and muscle metaboreceptors on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Fernandes, Igor A; Barbosa, Thales C; Prodel, Eliza; Coote, John H; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio L; Vianna, Lauro C

    2015-03-01

    Swimming involves muscular activity and submersion, creating a conflict of autonomic reflexes elicited by the trigeminal receptors and skeletal muscle afferents. We sought to determine the autonomic cardiovascular responses to separate and concurrent stimulation of the trigeminal cutaneous receptors and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex). In eight healthy men (30 ± 2 yr) muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer), femoral artery blood flow (duplex Doppler ultrasonography), and femoral vascular conductance (femoral artery blood flow/MAP) were assessed during the following three experimental conditions: 1) facial cooling (trigeminal nerve stimulation), 2) postexercise ischemia (PEI; muscle metaboreflex activation) following isometric handgrip, and 3) trigeminal nerve stimulation with concurrent PEI. Trigeminal nerve stimulation produced significant increases in MSNA total activity (Δ347 ± 167%) and MAP (Δ21 ± 5%) and a reduction in femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-17 ± 9%). PEI also evoked significant increases in MSNA total activity (Δ234 ± 83%) and MAP (Δ36 ± 4%) and a slight nonsignificant reduction in femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-9 ± 12%). Trigeminal nerve stimulation with concurrent PEI evoked changes in MSNA total activity (Δ341 ± 96%), MAP (Δ39 ± 4%), and femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-20 ± 9%) that were similar to those evoked by either separate trigeminal nerve stimulation or separate PEI. Thus, excitatory inputs from the trigeminal nerve and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents do not summate algebraically in eliciting a MSNA and cardiovascular response but rather exhibit synaptic occlusion, suggesting a high degree of convergent inputs on output neurons. PMID:25527781

  7. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia and persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Parlato, Raffaele Stefano; De Paulis, Danilo; Cirillo, Mario; Marrone, Valeria; Cirillo, Sossio; Moraci, Aldo; Parlato, Ciro

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) associated with asymptomatic left temporal cavernoma. Our patient presented unstable blood hypertension and the pain of typical trigeminal neuralgia over the second and third divisions of the nerve in the right side of the face. The attacks were often precipitated during physical exertion. MRI and Angio-MRI revealed the persistent carotid basilar anastomosis and occasionally left parietal cavernoma. After drug treatment of blood hypertension, spontaneous recovery of neuralgia was observed and we planned surgical treatment of left temporal cavernoma. PMID:22246457

  9. NORMAL HUMAN VARIATION: REFOCUSSING THE ENHANCEMENT DEBATE

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  10. Normal human variation: refocussing the enhancement debate.

    PubMed

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-02-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  11. Dynamic mapping of normal human hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Nugent, Tom F; Herman, David H; Ordonez, Anna; Greenstein, Deanna; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Clasen, Liv; Toga, Arthur W; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory functions and emotional responses, has distinct subregions subserving different functions. Because the volume and shape of the hippocampus are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders, it is important to understand the trajectory of normal hippocampal development. We present the first dynamic maps to reveal the anatomical sequence of normal human hippocampal development. A novel hippocampal mapping technique was applied to a database of prospectively obtained brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (100 scans in 31 children and adolescents), scanned every 2 yr for 6-10 yr between ages 4 and 25. Our results establish that the structural development of the human hippocampus is remarkably heterogeneous, with significant differences between posterior (increase over time) and anterior (loss over time) subregions. These distinct developmental trajectories of hippocampal subregions may parallel differences in their functional development. PMID:16826559

  12. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  13. Immunoreactivity for Choline Acetyltransferase of Peripheral-Type (pChAT) in the Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons of the Non-Human Primate Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tsuneyuki; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Transcripts of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene reveal a number of different splice variants including ChAT of a peripheral type (pChAT). Immunohistochemical staining of the brain using an antibody against pChAT clearly revealed peripheral cholinergic neurons, but failed to detect cholinergic neurons in the central nervous system. In rodents, pChAT-immunoreactivity has been detected in cholinergic parasympathetic postganglionic and enteric ganglion neurons. In addition, pChAT has been observed in non-cholinergic neurons such as peripheral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. The common type of ChAT (cChAT) has been investigated in many parts of the brain and the spinal cord of non-human primates, but little information is available about the localization of pChAT in primate species. Here, we report the detection of pChAT immunoreactivity in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and its co-localization with Substance P (SP) and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis. Neurons positive for pChAT were observed in a rather uniform pattern in approximately half of the trigeminal neurons throughout the TG. Most pChAT-positive neurons had small or medium-sized cell bodies. Double-immunofluorescence staining showed that 85.1% of SP-positive cells and 74.0% of CGRP-positive cells exhibited pChAT immunoreactivity. Most pChAT-positive cells were part of a larger population of neurons that co-expressed SP and/or CGRP. PMID:23720604

  14. Recent advances in basic research on the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsuya; Oh, Seog Bae; Takeda, Mamoru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Sato, Tadasu; Gunjikake, Kaori K; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral tissue inflammation can alter the properties of somatic sensory pathways, causing behavioral hypersensitivity and resulting in increased responses to pain caused by noxious stimulation (hyperalgesia) and normally innocuous stimulation (allodynia). These hypersensitivities for nociception are caused by changes in the excitability of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. These changes alter sensory information processing in the neurons in the medullary trigeminal nucleus of caudalis. Increasing information is becoming available regarding trigeminal neuron-neuron/neuron-satellite glial cells (SGCs) communication. The activation of intraganglionic communication plays an important role in the creation and maintenance of trigeminal pathological pain. Therefore, in this review, we focus on the recent findings for sensory functions and pharmacological modulation of TG neurons and SGCs under normal and pathological conditions, and we discuss potential therapeutic targets in glia-neuronal interactions for the prevention of trigeminal neuropathic and inflammatory pain. PMID:27023716

  15. [Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Nicolaas A; van Dijk, J M C Marc; Wagemakers, Michiel; van der Weide, Hiske L; Beese, Uli; Metzemaekers, Jan D M

    2014-01-01

    Classic idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by sharp unilateral shooting pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It involves a diagnosis of exclusion. Initially, therapy consists of medical therapy, preferably with carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine. For patients refractory to medical therapy, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve provides the best long-term outcomes, at a relatively low complication risk. In case of surgical contraindications, there are other options: radiosurgery or a neurodestructive procedure of the trigeminal ganglion. Short-term outcomes after neurodestructive therapy are good, however effects diminish over time. Every patient with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia in whom medical therapy has failed, should be counselled at an experienced centre in which neurosurgical treatment is available. PMID:24893812

  16. Uncommon Cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Tentorial Ossification over Trigeminal Notch

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Woo; Han, Kyung Ream; Kim, Seung Ho; Jeong, Won Ho; Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Jin Wook; Kim, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ossification of the tentorium cerebelli over the trigeminal notch is rare, but it may cause compression of the trigeminal nerve, leading to trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We were unable to find any previously reported cases with radiological evaluation, although we did find one case with surgically proven ossification of the tentorium cerebelli. Here, we present a case of TN caused by tentorial ossification over the trigeminal notch depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). PMID:26380124

  17. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications. PMID:25368776

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent primitive trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Kyu; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-09-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications. PMID:25368776

  19. Trigeminal trophic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parimalam; Thomas, Jayakar

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare cause of facial ulceration, consequent to damage to the trigeminal nerve or its central sensory connections. We reporta case of TTS in a 48-year-old woman with Bell's palsy following herpes zoster infection. The patient was treated and counseled. There hasnot been any recurrence for 1 year and the patient is being followed-up. The diagnosis of TTS should be suspected when there is unilateral facial ulceration, especially involving the ala nasi associated with sensory impairment. PMID:24470665

  20. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  1. Chemosensory Information Processing between Keratinocytes and Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sondersorg, Anna Christina; Busse, Daniela; Kyereme, Jessica; Rothermel, Markus; Neufang, Gitta; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns; Conrad, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal fibers terminate within the facial mucosa and skin and transmit tactile, proprioceptive, chemical, and nociceptive sensations. Trigeminal sensations can arise from the direct stimulation of intraepithelial free nerve endings or indirectly through information transmission from adjacent cells at the peripheral innervation area. For mechanical and thermal cues, communication processes between skin cells and somatosensory neurons have already been suggested. High concentrations of most odors typically provoke trigeminal sensations in vivo but surprisingly fail to activate trigeminal neuron monocultures. This fact favors the hypothesis that epithelial cells may participate in chemodetection and subsequently transmit signals to neighboring trigeminal fibers. Keratinocytes, the major cell type of the epidermis, express various receptors that enable reactions to multiple environmental stimuli. Here, using a co-culture approach, we show for the first time that exposure to the odorant chemicals induces a chemical communication between human HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse trigeminal neurons. Moreover, a supernatant analysis of stimulated keratinocytes and subsequent blocking experiments with pyrodoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonate revealed that ATP serves as the mediating transmitter molecule released from skin cells after odor stimulation. We show that the ATP release resulting from Javanol® stimulation of keratinocytes was mediated by pannexins. Consequently, keratinocytes act as chemosensors linking the environment and the trigeminal system via ATP signaling. PMID:24790106

  2. Chemosensory Properties of the Trigeminal System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of cutaneous, including trigeminal endings, to detect chemicals is known as chemesthesis or cutaneous chemosensation. This sensory function involves the activation of nociceptor and thermoreceptor endings and has a protective or defensive function, as many of these substances are irritants or poisonous. However, humans have also developed a liking for the distinct sharpness or pungency of many foods, beverages, and spices following activation of the same sensory afferents. Our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemosensation in the trigeminal system has experienced enormous progress in the past decade, following the cloning and functional characterization of several ion channels activated by physical and chemical stimuli. This brief review attempts to summarize our current knowledge in this field, including a functional description of various sensory channels, especially TRP channels, involved in trigeminal chemosensitivy. Finally, some of these new findings are discussed in the context of the pathophysiology of trigeminal chemosensation, including pain, pruritus, migraine, cough, airway inflammation, and ophthalmic diseases. PMID:22778855

  3. Fatty acid uptake in normal human myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Meyer, W.; Stremmel, W.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Minami, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Gleichmann, U.; Meyer, H.; Koerfer, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein has been found in rat aortic endothelial cell membrane. It has been identified to be a 40-kDa protein that corresponds to a 40-kDa fatty acid binding protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids isolated from rat heart myocytes. It is proposed that this endothelial membrane fatty acid binding protein might mediate the myocardial uptake of fatty acids. For evaluation of this hypothesis in vivo, influx kinetics of tracer-labeled fatty acids was examined in 15 normal subjects by scintigraphic techniques. Variation of the plasma fatty acid concentration and plasma perfusion rate has been achieved by modulation of nutrition state and exercise conditions. The clinical results suggest that the myocardial fatty acid influx rate is saturable by increasing fatty acid plasma concentration as well as by increasing plasma flow. For analysis of these data, functional relations describing fatty acid transport from plasma into myocardial tissue in the presence and absence of an unstirred layer were developed. The fitting of these relations to experimental data indicate that the free fatty acid influx into myocardial tissue reveals the criteria of a reaction on a capillary surface in the vicinity of flowing plasma but not of a reaction in extravascular space or in an unstirred layer and that the fatty acid influx into normal myocardium is a saturable process that is characterized by the quantity corresponding to the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and the maximal velocity, Vmax, 0.24 {plus minus} 0.024 mumol/g and 0.37 {plus minus} 0.013 mumol/g(g.min), respectively. These data are compatible with a nondiffusional uptake process mediated by the initial interaction of fatty acids with the 40-kDa membrane fatty acid binding protein of cardiac endothelial cells.

  4. Trigeminal neuralgia in wind musicians.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2006-10-01

    The author reports 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia whose pain was triggered by musical performance. Use of the muscles of embouchure activated the trigger zone when playing the clarinet, saxophone, flute, piccolo, trombone, or whistling. In each case, the location of the trigger zone was perioral, regardless of which division of the trigeminal nerve emanated pain. Trigeminal neuralgia is a particularly disabling affliction when it occurs in wind musicians. PMID:17040345

  5. Dofetilide induced trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Maluli, Hayan Al

    2015-01-01

    Anti-arrhythmic medications are uncommonly used due to their pro-arrhythmic effect. However, just like any other class of medication, they can cause idiosyncratic reactions that may or may not be related to their mechanism of action. Those reactions can be severe enough to warrant discontinuation of a successful therapeutic intervention. In this case, we present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by dofetilide. PMID:26069378

  6. Dofetilide induced trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Maluli, Hayan Al

    2015-01-01

    Anti-arrhythmic medications are uncommonly used due to their pro-arrhythmic effect. However, just like any other class of medication, they can cause idiosyncratic reactions that may or may not be related to their mechanism of action. Those reactions can be severe enough to warrant discontinuation of a successful therapeutic intervention. In this case, we present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by dofetilide. PMID:26069378

  7. Fluorescence Lifetimes of Normal and Carcinomatous Human Nasopharyngeal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Li, H.; Li, B.; Chen, R.; Zheng, G.; Song, C.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of normal and carcinomatous in vitro human nasopharyngeal tissues are compared. By fitting the time-resolved emission with exponential decays, mean lifetimes were obtained. There were marked differences between the lifetimes of the carcinomatous and the normal tissues. Thus, early diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is possible. In general, comprehensive information from human tissue autofluorescence can be acquired via both time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectra.

  8. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  9. DNA amplification is rare in normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.A.; Watt, F.M.; Hudson, D.L.; Stark, G.R. ); Smith, H.S.; Hancock, M.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Three types of normal human cells were selected in tissue culture with three drugs without observing a single amplification event from a total of 5 x 10{sup 8} cells. No drug-resistant colonies were observed when normal foreskin keratinocytes were selected with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate or with hydroxyurea or when normal mammary epithelial cells were selected with methotrexate. Some slightly resistant colonies with limited potential for growth were obtained when normal diploid fibroblast cells derived from fetal lung were selected with methotrexate or hydroxyurea but careful copy-number analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase and ribonucleotide reductase genes revealed no evidence of amplification. The rarity of DNA amplification in normal human cells contrasts strongly with the situation in tumors and in established cell lines, where amplification of onogenes and of genes mediating drug resistance is frequent. The results suggest that tumors and cell lines have acquired the abnormal ability to amplify DNA with high frequency.

  10. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    PubMed

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day. PMID:24888770

  11. Decorin and biglycan of normal and pathologic human corneas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Roth, M. R.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Rodrigues, M. R.; Nirankari, V. S.; Conrad, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Corneas with scars and certain chronic pathologic conditions contain highly sulfated dermatan sulfate, but little is known of the core proteins that carry these atypical glycosaminoglycans. In this study the proteoglycan proteins attached to dermatan sulfate in normal and pathologic human corneas were examined to identify primary genes involved in the pathobiology of corneal scarring. METHODS: Proteoglycans from human corneas with chronic edema, bullous keratopathy, and keratoconus and from normal corneas were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), quantitative immunoblotting, and immunohistology with peptide antibodies to decorin and biglycan. RESULTS: Proteoglycans from pathologic corneas exhibit increased size heterogeneity and binding of the cationic dye alcian blue compared with those in normal corneas. Decorin and biglycan extracted from normal and diseased corneas exhibited similar molecular size distribution patterns. In approximately half of the pathologic corneas, the level of biglycan was elevated an average of seven times above normal, and decorin was elevated approximately three times above normal. The increases were associated with highly charged molecular forms of decorin and biglycan, indicating modification of the proteins with dermatan sulfate chains of increased sulfation. Immunostaining of corneal sections showed an abnormal stromal localization of biglycan in pathologic corneas. CONCLUSIONS: The increased dermatan sulfate associated with chronic corneal pathologic conditions results from stromal accumulation of decorin and particularly of biglycan in the affected corneas. These proteins bear dermatan sulfate chains with increased sulfation compared with normal stromal proteoglycans.

  12. RENAL SUBSTRATE EXCHANGE AND GLUCONEOGENESIS IN NORMAL POSTABSORPTIVE HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release of glucose by the kidney in postabsorptive normal humans is generally regarded as being wholly due to gluconeogenesis. Although lactate is the most important systemic gluconeogenic precursor and there is appreciable net renal lactate uptake, renal lactate gluconeogenesis has not yet been inv...

  13. Collagen polymorphism in normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1977-01-01

    Collagens in normal human liver and in alcoholic cirrhotic liver were investigated. Collagens were solubilized by limited proteolysis with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification, were fractionated into types I and III by selective precipitation with NaCl. After carboxymethyl cellulose and agarose chromatography, the resulting alpha-chains from each of the collagen types were analyzed with respect to their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions. A comparison of the results obtained from normal liver with those from the diseases organ revealed no significant differences. The isolated human liver alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) chains were digested with CNBr and the generated peptides were separated and purified by a combination of ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. The molecular weight and the amino acid and the carbohydrate compositions of each of the peptides were identical to those of the corresponding human skin peptides except for the slightly higher content of hydroxylysine in some of the peptides. The relative content of type III in relation to type I collagen in both normal anc cirrhotic liver was determined by digesting washed liver homogenates directly with CNBr and quantitating the resultant alpha1(I) and alpha 1(III) peptides after chromatographic separation. The relative quantities of these peptides indicated that normal human liver contained an average of 47% type III, with the remainder being type I. Cirrhotic liver, on the other hand, contained a significantly smaller proportion of type III, ranging from 18 to 34% in different samples, with a corresponding increase in type I. These findings indicate that although the amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of collagens deposited in cirrhotic liver are normal, the fibrotic process of alcoholic liver disease in humans is accompanied by an alteration in tissue collagen polymorphism, and suggest that the observed alterations may have pathogenetic implications. PMID:833273

  14. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  15. Neuropeptide receptors provide a signalling pathway for trigeminal modulation of olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Philipp; Genovese, Federica; Schriever, Valentin A; Hummel, Thomas; Möhrlen, Frank; Frings, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    The mammalian olfactory epithelium contains olfactory receptor neurons and trigeminal sensory endings. The former mediate odor detection, the latter the detection of irritants. The two apparently parallel chemosensory systems are in reality interdependent in various well-documented ways. Psychophysical studies have shown that virtually all odorants can act as irritants, and that most irritants have an odor. Thus, the sensory perception of odorants and irritants is based on simultaneous input from the two systems. Moreover, functional interactions between the olfactory system and the trigeminal system exist on both peripheral and central levels. Here we examine the impact of trigeminal stimulation on the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons. Using an odorant with low trigeminal potency (phenylethyl alcohol) and a non-odorous irritant (CO(2) ), we have explored this interaction in psychophysical experiments with human subjects and in electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings from rats. We have demonstrated that simultaneous activation of the trigeminal system attenuates the perception of odor intensity and distorts the EOG response. On the molecular level, we have identified a route for this cross-modal interaction. The neuropeptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), which is released from trigeminal sensory fibres upon irritant stimulation, inhibits the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons. CGRP receptors expressed by these neurons mediate this neuromodulatory effect. This study demonstrates a site of trigeminal-olfactory interaction in the periphery. It reveals a pathway for trigeminal impact on olfactory signal processing that influences odor perception. PMID:23205840

  16. Bilateral sensory deprivation of trigeminal afferent fibres on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs. The aim of this study was to determine whether bilateral local anaesthesia (LA) of the lingual nerve affects the excitability of the tongue motor cortex (MI) as measured by TMS. The effect on MEPs after bilateral LA of the lingual nerve was studied, while the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle served as a control in ten healthy participants. MEPs were measured on the right side of the tongue dorsum in four different conditions: (i) immediately prior to anaesthesia (baseline), (ii) during bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve, (iii) after anaesthesia had subjectively subsided (recovery) and (iv) 3 h after bilateral lingual block injection. MEPs were assessed using stimulus-response curves in steps of 10% of motor threshold (T). Eight stimuli were given at each stimulus level. The amplitudes of the tongue MEPs were significantly influenced by the stimulus intensity (P < 0·001) but not by condition (P = 0·186). However, post hoc tests showed that MEPS were statistically significantly higher during bilateral LA block condition compared with baseline at T + 40%, T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·028) and also compared with recovery at T + 60% (P = 0·010) as well as at 3 h after injection at T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·029). Bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve seems to be associated with a facilitation of the corticomotor pathways related to the tongue musculature. PMID:27265155

  17. Sialyltransferase activity in normal and atherosclerotic human aorta intima.

    PubMed

    Gracheva, E V; Samovilova, N N; Golovanova, N K; Il'inskaya, O P; Tararak, E M; Prokazova, N V

    2001-04-01

    Sialyltransferase activity has been determined in Golgi membrane fractions isolated from atherosclerotic and normal intima of human aorta by measuring the transfer of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) from CMP-NeuAc to asialofetuin. The asialofetuin-sialyltransferase activity was found to be twofold higher in the atherosclerotic intima than in the normal intima. The mean value of the apparent Michaelis constant (Km) for the sialylating enzyme in both tissues did not differ and was 57 microM. In contrast, the maximal velocity (Vmax) was 2-fold higher for the atherosclerotic intima than for the normal intima. These results suggest that expression of asialofetuin-sialyltransferases of the aortal intima may be increased in atherosclerosis. PMID:11403646

  18. Autophagy in Normal and Abnormal Early Human Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Terraneo, Laura; Virgili, Eleonora; Martinelli, Carla; Doi, Patrizia; Samaja, Michele; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy is an inducible catabolic process by which cells degrade and recycle materials to survive stress, starvation, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to evaluate autophagy at the fetal-maternal interface, to assess autophagy involvement during the early phase of human gestation, and to explore autophagic modification in case of early abnormal pregnancy outcome. Specimens were collected from first-trimester normal gestations undergoing legal termination of pregnancy and first-trimester sporadic spontaneous miscarriages. Autophagy was studied in villous and decidual samples by transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. Autophagy markers were found in cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, extravillous trophoblast, and decidual stromal cells. Autophagy is physiologically involved in early normal gestation. Compared with normal pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage presents an increase in autophagy expression in villous specimens due to an increment in concentration of autophagic vacuole in syncytiotrophoblast, suggesting a cytoprotective mechanism of the cells to respond to microenvironmental challenge. PMID:25544676

  19. Mechanical properties of normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dale L; Kersh, Mariana E; Walsh, Nicole C; Ackland, David C; de Steiger, Richard N; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-08-01

    Isotropic hyperelastic models have been used to determine the material properties of normal human cartilage, but there remains an incomplete understanding of how these properties may be altered by osteoarthritis. The aims of this study were to (1) measure the material constants of normal and osteoarthritic human knee cartilage using isotropic hyperelastic models; (2) determine whether the material constants correlate with histological measures of structure and/or cartilage tissue damage; and (3) quantify the abilities of two common isotropic hyperelastic material models, the neo-Hookean and Yeoh models, to describe articular cartilage contact force, area, and pressure. Small osteochondral specimens of normal and osteoarthritic condition were retrieved from human cadaveric knees and from the knees of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and tested in unconfined compression at loading rates and large strains representative of weight-bearing activity. Articular surface contact area and lateral deformation were measured concurrently and specimen-specific finite element models then were used to determine the hyperelastic material constants. Structural parameters were measured using histological techniques while the severity of cartilage damage was quantified using the OARSI grading scale. The hyperelastic material constants correlated significantly with OARSI grade, indicating that the mechanical properties of cartilage for large strains change with tissue damage. The measurements of contact area described anisotropy of the tissue constituting the superficial zone. The Yeoh model described contact force and pressure more accurately than the neo-Hookean model, whereas both models under-predicted contact area and poorly described the anisotropy of cartilage within the superficial zone. These results identify the limits by which isotropic hyperelastic material models may be used to describe cartilage contact variables. This study provides novel data for the

  20. Mutagenic effects of alpha particles in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Carpenter, S.; Hanks, T.

    1992-12-31

    Alpha-irradiation to the bronchial airways from inhaled radon progeny increases the risk of developing lung cancer. The molecular mechanism of radon-induced lung cancer is not clear, but one of the most important genetic effects of ionizing radiation is the induction of gene mutation. Mutations, especially those associated with visible chromosome abnormalities in humans, have been associated with cancer. Therefore, our objective is to use a well-defined model system to determine the mutagenic potential of alpha particles in normal human skin cells and to define this action at the molecular level. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with alpha particles (3.59 MeV, LET 115 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}) emitted from the decay of {sup 238}Pu. Mutagenicity was determined at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. Results from this study indicate that beta particles were more efficient in mutation induction than gamma rays. Based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, the RBE for mutation is about 8 for alpha particles. HPRT-deficient mutants which are resistant to 6-thioguanine have been isolated and analyzed by the Southern blot technique. To date, we have characterized 69 gamma-ray-induced and 195 alpha-particle-induced HPRT-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that more than 50% of all gamma-ray-induced mutants have band patterns identical to that observed for the normal structural HPRT gene, whereas the remaining mutants (45%) contain either a rearrangement, partial deletion, or total deletion of the HPRT gene. In contrast, only 30% of alpha-particle-induced human HPRT mutants contain a normal Southern blot pattern, and about 50% indicate total deletion of the HPRT gene. Our results support the notion that high-LET radiation produces more unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage than do gamma rays.

  1. The Role of Imaging for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Segmental Approach to High-Resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Seeburg, Daniel P; Northcutt, Benjamin; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution MRI affords exquisite anatomic detail and allows radiologists to scrutinize the entire course of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve [CN] V). This article focuses first on the normal MRI appearance of the course of CN V and how best to image each segment. Special attention is then devoted to the role of MRI in presurgical evaluation of patients with neurovascular conflict and in identifying secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia, including multiple sclerosis. Fundamental concepts in postsurgical imaging after neurovascular decompression are also addressed. Finally, how imaging has been used to better understand the etiology of trigeminal neuralgia is discussed. PMID:27324998

  2. Historical characterization of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Eboli, Paula; Stone, James L; Aydin, Sabri; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2009-06-01

    TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA IS a well known clinical entity characterized by agonizing, paroxysmal, and lancinating facial pain, often triggered by movements of the mouth or eating. Historical reviews of facial pain have attempted to describe this severe pain over the past 2.5 millennia. The ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates, Aretaeus, and Galen, described kephalalgias, but their accounts were vague and did not clearly correspond with what we now term trigeminal neuralgia. The first adequate description of trigeminal neuralgia was given in 1671, followed by a fuller description by physician John Locke in 1677. André described the convulsive-like condition in 1756, and named it tic douloureux; in 1773, Fothergill described it as "a painful affection of the face;" and in 1779, John Hunter more clearly characterized the entity as a form of "nervous disorder" with reference to pain of the teeth, gums, or tongue where the disease "does not reside." One hundred fifty years later, the neurological surgeon Walter Dandy equated neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve with trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:19487899

  3. Low Density Lipoprotein transport in the normal human aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Soulis, JV; Dimitrakopoulou, M; Giannoglou, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background: To understand the genesis and progression of atherosclerosis is essential to elucidate the blood flow and the transport of molecules in the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this computational study is to elucidate the relationship between low wall shear stress (WSS) - high site concentration of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and atherosclerotic sites in the normal human aortic arch under physiological flow and mass transport conditions. Methods: The numerical simulation couples the flow equations with the transport equation applying realistic boundary conditions at the wall in terms of blood-side concentration. The blood is considered to be non-Newtonian fluid obeying to the power law. Suitable mass transport conditions are specified at the wall. Results: Aortic arch walls are exposed to cholesterolemic environment although the applied mass and flow conditions refer to normal human geometry and normal mass-flow conditions. The luminal surface LDL concentration varies inversely with the WSS. Regions of high LDL luminal surface concentration do not necessarily co-locate to the sites of lowest WSS. Concave sides of the aortic arch exhibit, relatively to the convex sides, elevated concentration of the LDL. The area averaged normalized LDL concentration over the entire normal aortic arch is 1.267. The daughter aortic arch vessels exhibit, relatively to the main aorta, elevated LDL concentrations. Conclusions: The near wall paths of the velocities might be the most important factor for the elevated LDL concentration at areas located either at the vicinity of bifurcations regions or at high curvature regions. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 221-225. PMID:25694755

  4. Same Same but Different. Different Trigeminal Chemoreceptors Share the Same Central Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Kowalczyk, Ksenia; Frasnelli, Johannes; Hoche, Elisabeth; Unger, Ewald; Mueller, Christian A.; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Trattnig, Siegfried; Schöpf, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type. PMID:25775237

  5. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

    PubMed

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Kowalczyk, Ksenia; Frasnelli, Johannes; Hoche, Elisabeth; Unger, Ewald; Mueller, Christian A; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Trattnig, Siegfried; Schöpf, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type. PMID:25775237

  6. Uroplakin Gene Expression by Normal and Neoplastic Human Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lobban, E. Dawn; Smith, Barbara A.; Hall, Geoffrey D.; Harnden, Patricia; Roberts, Paul; Selby, Peter J.; Trejdosiewicz, Ludwik K.; Southgate, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  7. Uroplakin gene expression by normal and neoplastic human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Lobban, E D; Smith, B A; Hall, G D; Harnden, P; Roberts, P; Selby, P J; Trejdosiewicz, L K; Southgate, J

    1998-12-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  8. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  9. Human factors of flight-deck checklists: The normal checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Although the aircraft checklist has long been regarded as the foundation of pilot standardization and cockpit safety, it has escaped the scrutiny of the human factors profession. The improper use, or the non-use, of the normal checklist by flight crews is often cited as the probable cause or at least a contributing factor to aircraft accidents. An attempt is made to analyze the normal checklist, its functions, format, design, length, usage, and the limitations of the humans who must interact with it. The development of the checklist from the certification of a new model to its delivery and use by the customer are discussed. The influence of the government, particularly the FAA Principle Operations Inspector, the manufacturer's philosophy, the airline's culture, and the end user, the pilot, influence the ultimate design and usage of this device. The effects of airline mergers and acquisitions on checklist usage and design are noted. In addition, the interaction between production pressures and checklist usage and checklist management are addressed. Finally, a list of design guidelines for normal checklists is provided.

  10. Evaluation of surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Keng, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a type of facial pain that is difficult to treat. The pain can be excruciating and debilitating. The wide range of treatments currently used for trigeminal neuralgia is ample evidence that there is no simple answer to how it should be managed. This review will evaluate the current surgical procedures used for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. A critical analysis of the evidence-based studies to date was done to evaluate and compare the efficacy of the different surgical procedures. Arguments for and against the use of surgery for trigeminal neuralgia are presented. In addition, the surgical procedures were compared with other treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:14959906

  11. Hemodynamic aspects of normal human feto-placental (umbilical) circulation.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ganesh; Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Flo, Kari; Räsänen, Juha; Odibo, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the changes in normal circulatory dynamics that occur during the course of pregnancy is essential for improving our knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with feto-placental diseases. The umbilical circulation is the lifeline of the fetus, and it is accessible for noninvasive assessment. However, not all hemodynamic parameters can be reliably measured in utero using currently available technology. Experimental animal studies have been crucial in validating major concepts related to feto-placental circulatory physiology, but caution is required in directly translating the findings of such studies into humans due to species differences. Furthermore, it is important to establish normal reference ranges and take into account gestational age associated changes while interpreting the results of clinical investigation. Therefore, it is necessary to critically evaluate, synthesize and summarize the knowledge available from the studies performed on human pregnancies to be able to appropriately apply them in clinical practice. This narrative review is an attempt to present contemporary concepts on hemodynamics of feto-placental circulation based on human studies. PMID:27130575

  12. Thyroxine monodeiodination in normal human kidney tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boye, N

    1986-08-01

    The present study deals with thyroxine monodeiodination in normal human kidney. To allow for comparison with previous reports, the present methods are similar to those used by others in rat tissue studies. The microsomal cell fraction of normal human kidney tissue was obtained by differential ultracentrifugation. The microsomes were incubated under various conditions and the deiodination products assayed with radioimmunoassay. A type I 5'-monodeiodinase was demonstrated, pH optimum around 6.5. Competitive inhibition was observed of T3 generation from T4 by rT3 with a Km of 3.0 microM and a Ki of 4 microM. Vmax was 26.1 pmol/min/mg protein. Likewise rT3 was generated from added T4, but it was rapidly degraded, while T3 was relatively stable as is the case in rat tissue preparations. Propylthiouracil inhibited 5'-deiodination in a dose dependent fashion with complete abolishment of deiodination at propylthiouracil concentration of 10(-4) M. Ipodate inhibited the reaction with complete inhibition at 10(-2) M. The data demonstrate that a human kidney particulate cell-fraction contained considerable amounts of T4 deiodinases, very similar to the type I deiodinase of various rat tissue, although the handling of rT3 and the inhibitory action of this iodothyronine on T4 to T3 conversion seem to be slightly different in the two species. PMID:3751464

  13. Optical Properties of Human Cancer and Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Christopher; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of human oral and ovarian cancer and normal cells. Specifically, we have measured the absolute optical extinction for both whole cells and intra-cellular material in aqueous suspension. Measurements were conducted over a wavelength range of 250 to 1000nm with 1 nm resolution using Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS). This provides both the absolute extinction of materials under study and, with Mie inversion, the absolute number of particles of a given diameter as a function of diameter in the range of 1 to 3000 nm. Our preliminary studies show significant differences in both the extinction and particle size distributions associated with cancer versus normal cells, which appear to be correlated with differences in the particle size distribution in the range of ~ 50 to 250 nm.

  14. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  15. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  16. [Clinical aspects of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Laurent, B; Keravel, Y; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Primary trigeminal neuralgia, termed "classical" in the international nomenclature, is an epilepsy-like disease. Diagnosis is easy when the disorder typical in presentation, based on clinical features and responsiveness to anticonvulsants. However, diagnosis can be difficult when atypical and/or in the long-duration forms. Furthermore, trigeminal neuralgia - even if typical in its clinical aspects - may be caused by a specific lesion and reveal a pathology. In other words, it may be symptomatic (secondary). Imaging, especially MRI, is of prime importance in identifying the cause and guiding the appropriate treatment. PMID:19328503

  17. Resolution of trigeminal neuralgia by coil embolization of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Davis, Brandon J; Khan, Imad S; Ghiassi, Mayshan; Ghiassi, Mahan; Singer, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare anastomosis between the carotid artery and basilar artery. While most PTAs are asymptomatic, lateral variants can occasionally compress the trigeminal nerve and precipitate trigeminal neuralgia. Aneurysms of the PTA are exceptionally rare in the literature and have not previously been associated with trigeminal neuralgia. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA causing trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent coil embolization of the aneurysm which relieved her symptoms. We propose embolization as a viable therapeutic option for the resolution of trigeminal neuralgia when the condition is secondary to irritation by the high velocity pulsatile flow of an aneurysm. PMID:23625680

  18. Resolution of trigeminal neuralgia by coil embolization of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Davis, Brandon J; Khan, Imad S; Ghiassi, Mayshan; Ghiassi, Mahan; Singer, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare anastomosis between the carotid artery and basilar artery. While most PTAs are asymptomatic, lateral variants can occasionally compress the trigeminal nerve and precipitate trigeminal neuralgia. Aneurysms of the PTA are exceptionally rare in the literature and have not previously been associated with trigeminal neuralgia. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA causing trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent coil embolization of the aneurysm which relieved her symptoms. We propose embolization as a viable therapeutic option for the resolution of trigeminal neuralgia when the condition is secondary to irritation by the high velocity pulsatile flow of an aneurysm. PMID:23625680

  19. Resolution of trigeminal neuralgia by coil embolization of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Davis, Brandon J; Khan, Imad S; Ghiassi, Mayshan; Ghiassi, Mahan; Singer, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    The persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare anastomosis between the carotid artery and basilar artery. While most PTAs are asymptomatic, lateral variants can occasionally compress the trigeminal nerve and precipitate trigeminal neuralgia. Aneurysms of the PTA are exceptionally rare in the literature and have not previously been associated with trigeminal neuralgia. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA causing trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent coil embolization of the aneurysm which relieved her symptoms. We propose embolization as a viable therapeutic option for the resolution of trigeminal neuralgia when the condition is secondary to irritation by the high velocity pulsatile flow of an aneurysm. PMID:24610143

  20. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S; Dipersio, John F; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  1. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  2. Elastic Modulus Determination of Normal and Glaucomatous Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Last, Julie A.; Pan, Tingrui; Ding, Yuzhe; Reilly, Christopher M.; Keller, Kate; Acott, Ted S.; Fautsch, Michael P.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Russell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a risk factor for glaucoma. The principal outflow pathway for aqueous humor in the human eye is through the trabecular meshwork (HTM) and Schlemm's canal (SC). The junction between the HTM and SC is thought to have a significant role in the regulation of IOP. A possible mechanism for the increased resistance to flow in glaucomatous eyes is an increase in stiffness (increased elastic modulus) of the HTM. In this study, the stiffness of the HTM in normal and glaucomatous tissue was compared, and a mathematical model was developed to predict the impact of changes in stiffness of the juxtacanalicular layer of HTM on flow dynamics through this region. Methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the elastic modulus of normal and glaucomatous HTM. According to these results, a model was developed that simulated the juxtacanalicular layer of the HTM as a flexible membrane with embedded pores. Results. The mean elastic modulus increased substantially in the glaucomatous HTM (mean = 80.8 kPa) compared with that in the normal HTM (mean = 4.0 kPa). Regional variation was identified across the glaucomatous HTM, possibly corresponding to the disease state. Mathematical modeling suggested an increased flow resistance with increasing HTM modulus. Conclusions. The data indicate that the stiffness of glaucomatous HTM is significantly increased compared with that of normal HTM. Modeling exercises support substantial impairment in outflow facility with increased HTM stiffness. Alterations in the biophysical attributes of the HTM may participate directly in the onset and progression of glaucoma. PMID:21220561

  3. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  4. Gene Profile Identifies Zinc Transporters Differentially Expressed in Normal Human Organs and Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Cui, X.; Yao, W.; Yu, X.; Cen, P.; Hodges, S.E.; Fisher, W.E.; Brunicardi, F.C.; Chen, C.; Yao, Q.; Li, M.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23331012

  5. MRI as an essential diagnostic approach for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Kedarnath, N S; Shruthi, R

    2015-03-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a well recognised disorder frequently reported to the dentist. The diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is primarily based on history and clinical criteria. The clinical findings do not differentiate idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia from symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. We describe a case of cliviopetrosal meningioma presenting as trigeminal neuralgia and discuss the importance of magnetic resonance imaging as an essential diagnostic approach when trigeminal neuralgia occurs concurrently with a brain tumour. PMID:25848159

  6. Exploration of the normal human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinzhi; Ryu, Soyoung; Gharib, Sina A.; Goodlett, David R.; Schnapp, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    We obtained insight into normal lung function by proteome analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from six normal human subjects using a “Lyse-N-Go’ shotgun proteomic protocol. Intra-sample variation was calculated using three different label-free methods, (i) protein sequence coverage; (ii) peptide spectral counts and (iii) peptide single-ion current areas (PICA), which generates protein expression data by summation of the area under the curve for a given peptide single-ion current trace and then adding values for all peptides from that same parent protein. PICA gave the least intra-subject variability and was used to calculate differences in protein expression between the six subjects. We observed an average threefold inter-sample variability, which affects analysis of changes in protein expression that occur in different diseases. We detected 167 unique proteins with >100 proteins detected in each of the six individual BAL samples, 42 of which were common to all six subjects. Gene ontology analysis demonstrated enrichment of several biological processes in the lung, reflecting its expected role in gas exchange and host defense as an immune organ. The same biological processes were enriched compared to either plasma or total genome proteome, suggesting an active enrichment of plasma proteins in the lung rather than passive capillary leak. PMID:21136857

  7. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Normal Human Temporal Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-02-01

    We present the first simultaneous sound pressure measurements in scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea in human cadaveric temporal bones. Micro-scale fiberoptic pressure sensors enabled the study of differential sound pressure at the cochlear base. This differential pressure is the input to the cochlear partition, driving cochlear waves and auditory transduction. Results showed that: pressure of scala vestibuli was much greater than scala tympani except at low and high frequencies where scala tympani pressure affects the input to the cochlea; the differential pressure proved to be an excellent measure of normal ossicular transduction of sound (shown to decrease 30-50 dB with ossicular disarticulation, whereas the individual scala pressures were significantly affected by non-ossicular conduction of sound at high frequencies); the middle-ear gain and differential pressure were generally bandpass in frequency dependence; and the middle-ear delay in the human was over twice that of the gerbil. Concurrent stapes velocity measurements allowed determination of the differential impedance across the partition and round-window impedance. The differential impedance was generally resistive, while the round-window impedance was consistent with a compliance in conjunction with distributed inertia and damping. Our techniques can be used to study inner-ear conductive pathologies (e.g., semicircular dehiscence), as well as non-ossicular cochlear stimulation (e.g., round-window stimulation) - situations that cannot be completely quantified by measurements of stapes velocity or scala-vestibuli pressure by themselves.

  8. Orbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shantanu; Das, Debabrata; Varshney, Rahul; Nandy, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Trigeminal schwannomas are rare intracranial tumors. Here, we report a 35-year-old female presenting with an axial proptosis of right eyeball with right-sided III, IV and VI cranial nerve palsy. Her best corrected visual acuity in the right eye was perception of light absent and in the left eye was 20/20. MRI scan revealed a large right-sided heterogeneous, extra-axial middle cranial fossa mass that extended to the intraconal space of right orbit. A diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal nerve schwannoma with right orbital extension was made. Successful surgical excision of the mass with preservation of the surrounding tissues and orbital exenteration was done. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:25552864

  9. Orbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Shantanu; Das, Debabrata; Varshney, Rahul; Nandy, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Trigeminal schwannomas are rare intracranial tumors. Here, we report a 35-year-old female presenting with an axial proptosis of right eyeball with right-sided III, IV and VI cranial nerve palsy. Her best corrected visual acuity in the right eye was perception of light absent and in the left eye was 20/20. MRI scan revealed a large right-sided heterogeneous, extra-axial middle cranial fossa mass that extended to the intraconal space of right orbit. A diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal nerve schwannoma with right orbital extension was made. Successful surgical excision of the mass with preservation of the surrounding tissues and orbital exenteration was done. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:25552864

  10. Trigeminal Neuralgia and Radiofrequency Lesioning

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia is a disorder that is characterized with electrical-type shocking pain in the face and jaw. This pain may either present as sharp unbearable pain unilateral or bilaterally. There is no definite etiology for this condition. There are various treatment methods that are currently being used to relieve the pain. One of the pharmacological treatments is Carbamazepine and the most prevalent surgical treatments include Gamma Knife Surgery (GKS), Microvascular Decompression (MVD) and Radiofrequency Lesioning (RFL). Although, MVD is the most used surgical method it is not an option for all the patients due to the intensity of the procedure. RFL is used when MVD is not suitable. In this paper we present the various options in the treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia. PMID:26770820

  11. Pain. Part 7: Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Jurge, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is also known as 'tic douloureux' (in French, 'painful twitch'). It is a rare chronic facial pain syndrome, characterized by severe, brief, stabbing, 'electric shock-like 'recurrent pain attacks felt in one or more divisions of trigeminal nerve innervation areas. So intense is the elicited pain that TN has a significant effect on a sufferer's quality of life, rendering many patients unable to consider a future with the ongoing threat of recurrent pain. The aim of this article is to discuss the diagnosis and management of this disabling facial pain condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: As general medical practitioners may struggle differentiating TN from toothache, primary care dentists have an important role in excluding odontogenic cause of pain, diagnosing TN and referring patients to a facial pain clinic for further investigations and multidisciplinary team management. PMID:27188129

  12. Multimodality Management of Trigeminal Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ajay; Barnett, Samuel; Anand, Vijay; Agazzi, Siviero

    2016-08-01

    Patients presenting with trigeminal schwannomas require multimodality management by a skull base surgical team that can offer expertise in both transcranial and transnasal approaches as well as radiosurgical and microsurgical strategies. Improvement in neurologic symptoms, preservation of cranial nerve function, and control of mass effect are the primary goals of management for trigeminal schwannomas. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice but may not be possible in all cases. Radiosurgery is an option as primary management for small- to moderate-sized tumors and can be used for postoperative residuals or recurrences. Planned surgical resection followed by SRS for residual tumor is an effective option for larger trigeminal schwannomas. The endoscopic resection is an excellent approach for patients with an extradural tumor or tumors isolated to the Meckel cave. A detailed analysis of a tumor and its surroundings based on high-quality imaging can help better estimate the expected outcome from each treatment. An expert skull base team should be able to provide precise counseling for each patient's situation for selecting the best option. PMID:27441164

  13. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  14. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Rigon, Vania; Piovesan, Allison; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 41 gene expression profiles of normal human hippocampus to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 30,739 known mapped and the 16,258 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. For this aim, we used the software called TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the hippocampus with the whole brain transcriptome map to identify a typical expression pattern of this subregion compared with the whole organ. Finally, due to the fact that the hippocampus is one of the main brain region to be severely affected in trisomy 21 (the best known genetic cause of intellectual disability), a particular attention was paid to the expression of chromosome 21 (chr21) genes. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed, and analyzed using TRAM software. Among the main findings, the most over-expressed loci in the hippocampus are the expressed sequence tag cluster Hs.732685 and the member of the calmodulin gene family CALM2. The tubulin folding cofactor B (TBCB) gene is the best gene at behaving like a housekeeping gene. The hippocampus vs. the whole brain differential transcriptome map shows the over-expression of LINC00114, a long non-coding RNA mapped on chr21. The hippocampus transcriptome map was validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by "Real-Time" reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The highly significant agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome map may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to human hippocampus. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes that have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the hippocampus. PMID

  15. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  16. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  17. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Encode Volatile Chemicals Sensed by Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schöbel, Nicole; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Wetzel, Christian Horst; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual’s physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants), environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants). In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia. PMID:24205061

  18. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  19. Bilateral persistent primitive trigeminal arteries associated with trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Son, B; Yang, S; Sung, J; Lee, S

    2013-03-01

    Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses (PCVBA) include the primitive trigeminal artery (PTA), the primitive otic artery (POA), the primitive hypoglossal artery and proatlantal arteries (ProAs). The PTA is the most commonly seen of these accounting for approximately 80-85% of PCVBAs. The PTA which connects the internal carotid artery (ICA) to the basilar artery (BA) may occasionally connect to the superior or posterior inferior cerebellar arteries without interposition to the BA. It is then referred to as a persistent trigeminal artery variant (PTAV), an anomalous carotid-cerebellar anastomosis. Bilateral occurrence of PTA is extremely rare. During vertebral artery (VA) development the anterior radicular artery of segment C1 from the proatlantal artery of Padget evolves into the intradural component of the VA (V4 segment) plus a short extradural segment (distal V3 segment). Agenesis of a single anterior radicular artery of ProA results in the absence of one distal VA associated with an unremarkable contralateral VA and the BA. Absence or hypoplasia of the terminal portion of one VA is a commonly observed anatomic variant. However, absence of the terminal portions of both VAs is exceptional. A rare case of bilateral PTAs is presented with unilateral PTA and a contralateral PTAV causing trigeminal neuralgia. Furthermore, the bilateral PTAs were associated with the absence of the proximal portion of the BA in addition to the bilateral lack of a distal VA. This finding comes as a logical consequence of the developmental anatomy of the vertebrobasilar junction and is consistent with the assumed congenital nature of the anatomic variant. PMID:22113402

  20. Persistent trigeminal artery supply to an intrinsic trigeminal nerve arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Heit, Jeremy J; Feroze, Abdullah H; Chang, Steven D; Dodd, Robert L; Steinberg, Gary K

    2015-02-01

    Infratentorial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) associated with the trigeminal nerve root entry zone are a known cause of secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The treatment of both TN and AVM can be challenging, especially if the AVM is embedded within the trigeminal nerve. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely supply these intrinsic trigeminal nerve AVM. We present a 64-year-old man with TN from a right trigeminal nerve AVM supplied by a PTA variant. The patient underwent microvascular decompression and a partial resection of the AVM with relief of facial pain symptoms. His residual AVM was subsequently treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). A multimodality approach may be required for the treatment of trigeminal nerve associated PTA AVM and important anatomic patterns need to be recognized before any treatment. Herein, we report to our knowledge the third documented patient with a posterior fossa AVM supplied by a PTA and the first PTA AVM presenting as facial pain. PMID:25070632

  1. Dietary induced subclinical vitamin K deficiency in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ferland, G; Sadowski, J A; O'Brien, M E

    1993-01-01

    A subclinical vitamin K deficiency was induced in 32 healthy subjects (four groups of eight males and females) aged 20-40 and 60-80 yr residing in the Metabolic Research Unit of the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Volunteers were initially fed (4 d) a baseline-period diet containing the recommended daily allowance for vitamin K which is equivalent to 80 micrograms/d of phylloquinone (vitamin K1). During the baseline period various parameters of vitamin K nutritional status were monitored. The baseline period was followed by a 13-d depletion period during which the subjects were fed a very low vitamin K1 diet (approximately 10 micrograms/d). After depletion, the subjects entered a 16-d repletion period (four stages lasting 4 d each) during which time they were repleted with 5, 15, 25, and 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day. Vitamin K1 depletion dramatically and significantly decreased plasma vitamin K1 levels (P < 0.0001) in both elderly and young groups to values 13-18% of day 1 (elderly 0.22 nM, young 0.14 nM). Repleting the subjects with up to 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day failed, in the case of the young subjects, to bring plasma vitamin K1 levels back into the normal range. Dietary vitamin K1 restriction induced different responses in the urinary excretion of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid between the young and the elderly subjects with values decreasing significantly (P < 0.03) in the young while remaining unchanged in the elderly. The vitamin K1 depletion period had no significant effect on either prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, or Factor VII and protein C (as determined by antigenic and functional assays). By using a monoclonal antibody, decarboxy prothrombin was found to increase slightly but significantly in both groups (P < 0.05) as a consequence of the low vitamin K1 diet. This study clearly shows that a diet low in vitamin K1 can result in a functional subclinical deficiency of vitamin K

  2. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology. PMID:26388554

  3. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Trigeminal Schwannoma in a Patient Presenting with Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Kleinman, George; Murali, Raj; Wainwright, John; Tandon, Adesh

    2015-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mimicking trigeminal schwannoma. The patient, with no prior history of RCC, presented with clinical symptoms and imaging consistent with trigeminal neuralgia secondary to trigeminal schwannoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large bilobed cystic/solid mass primarily in the cerebellopontine angle cistern, with extension into the left middle cranial fossa, Meckel cave, and left cavernous sinus. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be an RCC infiltrating into the trigeminal nerve fascicles. Further imaging and investigation revealed widespread metastasis to the vertebral bodies and long bones. Metastatic RCC to the trigeminal nerve is rare. Despite the development of more effective treatment modalities, the prognosis of metastatic RCC remains poor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RCC metastasizing to the trigeminal nerve fascicles. PMID:26623243

  4. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Trigeminal Schwannoma in a Patient Presenting with Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Arthur; Kleinman, George; Murali, Raj; Wainwright, John; Tandon, Adesh

    2015-11-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mimicking trigeminal schwannoma. The patient, with no prior history of RCC, presented with clinical symptoms and imaging consistent with trigeminal neuralgia secondary to trigeminal schwannoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large bilobed cystic/solid mass primarily in the cerebellopontine angle cistern, with extension into the left middle cranial fossa, Meckel cave, and left cavernous sinus. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be an RCC infiltrating into the trigeminal nerve fascicles. Further imaging and investigation revealed widespread metastasis to the vertebral bodies and long bones. Metastatic RCC to the trigeminal nerve is rare. Despite the development of more effective treatment modalities, the prognosis of metastatic RCC remains poor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RCC metastasizing to the trigeminal nerve fascicles. PMID:26623243

  5. Diagnosis and management of trigeminal neuropathic pains.

    PubMed

    Napeñas, Joel J; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2011-07-01

    SUMMARY Trigeminal neuropathic pains have presented diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to providers. In addition, knowledge of pathophysiology, current classification systems, taxonomy and phenotyping of these conditions are incomplete. While trigeminal neuralgia is the most identifiable and studied, other conditions are being recognized and require distinct management approaches. Furthermore, other facial pain conditions such as atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome are now considered to have neuropathic elements in their etiology. This article reviews current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of neuropathic pain conditions involving the trigeminal nerve, to include: trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain (with traumatically induced neuralgia and atypical odontalgia) and burning mouth syndrome. Treatment modalities are reviewed based on current and best available evidence. Trigeminal neuralgia is managed with anticonvulsant drugs as the first line, with surgical options providing variable results. Trigeminal neuropathic pain is managed medically based on the guidelines for other neuropathic pain conditions. Burning mouth syndrome is also treated with a number of neuropathic medications, both topical and systemic. In all these conditions, patients need to be thoroughly educated about their condition, involved in its management, and be provided with supportive and adjunctive treatment resources. PMID:24645661

  6. Overview and History of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Liu, James K

    2016-07-01

    Although the symptoms associated with trigeminal neuralgia have been well documented, the root cause of this disease initially eluded most surgeons. Although early remedies were haphazard because of a lack of understanding about the condition, near the 20th century both medical and procedural therapies were established for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. These treatments include a variety of medications, chemoneurolysis, radiofrequency lesioning, percutaneous ablative procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery, and open rhizotomy and microvascular decompression. This report recounts the history of trigeminal neuralgia, from its earliest descriptions to the historical evolution of nonsurgical and surgical therapies. PMID:27324994

  7. [Update on the management of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most severe facial pain syndromes. The annual incidence varies between 4-13% and has a significant effect on patient quality of life. The initial treatment of trigeminal neuralgia is pharmacological, and although other drugs have demonstrated efficacy, albeit in more limited form, carbamazepine is the only drug with sufficient level of evidence. When medical treatment fails, surgery should be considered and can opt for open surgery or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on current available evidence. PMID:26643391

  8. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  9. Bilateral persistent trigeminal arteries with unilateral trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus fistula. A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-09-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  10. Damage initiation sites in osteoporotic and normal human cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Soicher, Matthew A; Wang, Xiang; Zauel, Roger R; Fyhrie, David P

    2011-03-01

    Using a finite element (FE) method called biomechanical stereology, Wang et al. previously reported increased microcrack formation and propagation in bone samples from patients with a history of osteoporotic fracture as compared to normal subjects. In this study, we re-analyzed the data from Wang's report to determine the microscopic differences between bone tissue from osteoporotic patients and normal subjects that caused these different patterns of bone tissue damage between the groups. The morphological features examined were the number of "voids" (or osteocyte lacunae) visible and the distance of the lacunae from the initiation of the microcracks. We found that bone samples from patients with a history of osteoporotic fracture contained significantly more lacunae than normal control specimens. We also found a significant correlation (r² = 0.483, p = 0.001) between the number of lacunae visible in the image and the number of microcracks formed. These results help to explain the differences in total microcrack number between the osteoporotic and normal subjects reported in our previous work. PMID:21081188

  11. Quantitative analysis of p53 expression in human normal and cancer tissue microarray with global normalization method

    PubMed Central

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-01-01

    Tissue microarray based immunohistochemical staining and proteomics are important tools to create and validate clinically relevant cancer biomarkers. Immunohistochemical stains using formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections for protein expression are scored manually and semi-quantitatively. Digital image analysis methods remove some of the drawbacks of manual scoring but may need other methods such as normalization to provide across the board utility. In the present study, quantitative proteomics-based global normalization method was used to evaluate its utility in the analysis of p53 protein expression in mixed human normal and cancer tissue microarray. Global normalization used the mean or median of β-actin to calculate ratios of individual core stain intensities, then log transformed the ratios, calculate a mean or median and subtracted the value from the log of ratios. In the absence of global normalization of p53 protein expression, 44% (42 of 95) of tissue cores were positive using the median of intensity values and 40% (38 of 95) using the mean of intensities as cut-off points. With global normalization, p53 positive cores changed to 20% (19 of 95) when using median of intensities and 15.8%(15 of 95) when the mean of intensities were used. In conclusion, the global normalization method helped to define positive p53 staining in the tissue microarray set used. The method used helped to define clear cut-off points and confirmed all negatively stained tissue cores. Such normalization methods should help to better define clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:21738821

  12. Comparison of human eosinophils from normals and patients with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Bass, D A; Grover, W H; Lewis, J C; Szejda, P; DeChatelet, L R; McCall, C E

    1980-12-01

    Previous studies of the biochemistry and physiology of eosinophils have relied upon cells obtained from patients with eosinophilia (EE). It is unknown whether such cells might have been activated or partially exhausted by the pathological state causing eosinophilia. We examined cell surface charge, membrane transport of deoxyglucose, activation of lyso-somal acid phosphatase, and oxidative metabolism to provide a profile to compare EE with purified normal eosinophils (NE) and normal neutrophils. Eosinophils or neutrophils were obtained in >95% purity from normal individuals and patients with eosinophilia of diverse etiologies. Cell surface charge was determined by electrophoretic mobility in micromoles per second per volt per centimeter. Normal eosinophils demonstrated a surface charge of 2.46+/-0.03. Stimulation of the cells by zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) reduced the surface charge to 1.82+/-0.02. In contrast, the charge of "resting" EE was already reduced (1.89+/-0.05) and was not altered by ZAS. Resting and stimulated neutrophils had a charge of 1.98+/-0.01 and 1.69+/-0.02, respectively. Uptake of [(3)H]2-deoxyglucose has been shown to reflect carrier-facilitated hexose transport in granulocytes. Deoxyglucose uptake by resting NE and NE stimulated by ZAS was 2.40+/-0.40 and 5.44+/-0.39 (cpm x 10(-3)/2 x 10(5) eosinophils), respectively. Resting and stimulated EE demonstrated deoxyglucose uptake of 7.55+/-0.58 and 15.3+/-0.6, respectively.Lysosomal acid phosphatase was determined by an electron microscopic cytochemical technique. In normal eosinophils and neutrophils, lysosomal acid phosphatase in mature cells is held in a latent form. Normal eosinophils demonstrated weakly positive acid phosphatase activity in 7.8+/-1.2% of the specific granules. Normal eosinophils, stimulated by opsonized staphylococci or the calcium ionophore A23187, develop rapid activation of acid phosphatase in approximately 80% of the granules throughout the cells. Resting EE were

  13. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: a review.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed; Delashaw, Johnny; Mohammed, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is the largest of the fetal carotid-basilar anastomotic arteries, and it persists for the longest embryonic period. The artery usually involutes after the development of the posterior communicating artery. The exact causes of persistence of this primitive vessel into adulthood are not completely clear. Angiographic and anatomical descriptions of the various persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) configurations and their relation to the remainder of the cerebrovascular tree and the other surrounding structures have been reported. Persistent trigeminal artery can be associated with many other vascular anomalies and disorders including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and carotid-cavernous fistulae. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and angiographic features of this persistent embryonic arterial channel is of utmost importance when making therapeutic decisions and embarking on surgical or endovascular intervention for any pertinent pathological condition. We review the embryology, angiographic features, microsurgical anatomy and associated vascular anomalies and disorders of the persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:22843453

  14. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  15. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  16. Effects of cobalt chloride on phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To explore the cellular adaptations and responses to hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and presume what roles phenotypic modulation of normal human saphenous vein SMCs would play in varicose vein of lower extremity, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, to treat normal human saphenous vein SMCs in vitro. The proliferating ability of cells exposed to serial dilutions of CoCl2 (0, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μM) at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively was detected by MTT assay. Wound healing assay was used to observe the migrating ability of cells under CoCl2 (200 μM) treatment for 8 days continuously. Hoechst 33258 stain was used to determine whether hypoxia induced by CoCl2 could cause apoptosis of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. We found that CoCl2 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the migration of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. The apparent morphous of normal human saphenous vein SMCs under chronic CoCl2 treatment was significantly changed compared to no CoCl2 treated control, but this process did not relate to cell apoptosis. To conclude, our results support the concept that the phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein SMCs could be influenced by hypoxia stimulus. Cellular structural and functional changes under chronic hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein SMCs might play important roles in the development of varicose veins of lower extremity. PMID:25663990

  17. Effects of cobalt chloride on phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To explore the cellular adaptations and responses to hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and presume what roles phenotypic modulation of normal human saphenous vein SMCs would play in varicose vein of lower extremity, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, to treat normal human saphenous vein SMCs in vitro. The proliferating ability of cells exposed to serial dilutions of CoCl2 (0, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μM) at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively was detected by MTT assay. Wound healing assay was used to observe the migrating ability of cells under CoCl2 (200 μM) treatment for 8 days continuously. Hoechst 33258 stain was used to determine whether hypoxia induced by CoCl2 could cause apoptosis of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. We found that CoCl2 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the migration of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. The apparent morphous of normal human saphenous vein SMCs under chronic CoCl2 treatment was significantly changed compared to no CoCl2 treated control, but this process did not relate to cell apoptosis. To conclude, our results support the concept that the phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein SMCs could be influenced by hypoxia stimulus. Cellular structural and functional changes under chronic hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein SMCs might play important roles in the development of varicose veins of lower extremity. PMID:25663990

  18. Perception of specific trigeminal chemosensory agonists

    PubMed Central

    Frasnelli, J; Albrecht, J; Bryant, B; Lundström, JN

    2011-01-01

    The intranasal trigeminal system is a third chemical sense in addition to olfaction and gustation. As opposed to smell and taste, we still lack knowledge on the relationship between receptor binding and perception for the trigeminal system. We therefore investigated the sensitivity of the intranasal trigeminal system towards agonists of the trigeminal receptors TRPM8 and TRPA1 by assessing subjects’ ability to identify which nostril has been stimulated in a monorhinal stimulation design. We summed the number of correct identifications resulting in a lateralization score. Stimuli were menthol (activating TRPM8 receptors), eucalyptol (TRPM8), mustard oil (TRPA1) and two mixtures thereof (menthol/eucalyptol and menthol/mustard oil). In addition, we examined the relationship between intensity and lateralization scores and investigated whether intensity evaluation and lateralization scores of the mixtures show additive effects. All stimuli were correctly lateralized significantly above chance. Across subjects the lateralization scores for single compounds activating the same receptor showed a stronger correlation than stimuli activating different receptors. Although single compounds were isointense, the mixture of menthol and eucalyptol (activating only TRPM8) was perceived as weaker and was lateralized less accurately than the mixture of menthol and mustard oil (activating both TRPM8 and TRPA1) suggesting suppression effects in the former mixture. In conclusion, sensitivity of different subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons seems to be related, but only to a certain degree. The large coherence in sensitivity between various intranasal trigeminal stimuli suggests that measuring sensitivity to one single trigeminal chemical stimulus may be sufficient to generally assess the trigeminal system’s chemosensitivity. Further, for stimuli activating the same receptor a mixture suppression effect appears to occur similar to that observed in the other chemosensory

  19. Distribution of chloride permeabilities in normal human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Raftos, J E; Bookchin, R M; Lew, V L

    1996-01-01

    1. The rate of dehydration of K+ permeabilized red cells is influenced by their Cl- permeability (PCl). In instances of pathological K+ permeabilization, cell-to-cell differences in PCl may determine which red cells dehydrate most. The present study was designed to investigate whether PCl differed significantly among red cells from a single blood sample. 2. Previously available methods measure only the mean PCl of red cell populations. We describe a 'profile migration' method in which dilute red cell suspensions in low-K+ media were permeabilized to K+ with a high concentration of valinomycin, rendering PCl the main rate-limiting factor for cell dehydration. As the cells dehydrated, samples were processed to obtain full haemolysis curves at precise times. Variations in PCl among cells would have appeared as progressive changes in the profile of their haemolysis curves, as the curves migrated towards lower tonicities. 3. Red cells from five normal volunteers showed no change in profile of the migrating haemolysis curves, suggesting that their PCl distributions were fairly uniform. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that intercell variation in PCl was less than 7.5%. 4. Results obtained with this technique were analysed using the Lew-Bookchin red cell model. The calculated PCl was within the normal range described in earlier studies. PMID:8815210

  20. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  1. A normal cumulative conception rate after human pituitary gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Healy, D L; Kovacs, G T; Pepperell, R J; Burger, H G

    1980-10-01

    Forty consecutive women were treated with human pituitary gonadotropin to induce ovulation. Thirty-seven patients (93%) ovulated and thirty (75%) conceived on at least one occasion. The cumulative conception rate for the series equaled that of the general population. Women with a past history of anorexia nervosa had the shortest average time to pregnancy. Of patients who did not conceive, four represented failures of patient selection in that they withdrew from treatment for a variety of psychiatric and social reasons, and six represented failures of treatment, not becoming pregnant despite the induction of ovulation. It is concluded that realistic goals for a contemporary human gonadotropin program include induction of ovulation in all patients and a cumulative conception rate equal to that of the general community. PMID:6252067

  2. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  3. Lactotransferrin immunocytochemistry in Alzheimer and normal human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, T.; Tooyama, I.; Yamada, T.; Walker, D. G.; McGeer, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Lactotransferrin (LF) expression was investigated immunocytochemically in postmortem brain tissues of normal controls and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The antibody to LF stained some neurons weakly in young adult brains, but it stained many neurons as well as the glia of all types in elderly brains. LF expression was greatly up-regulated in both neurons and glia in affected AD tissue. It was very strongly associated with such extracellular pathological entities as diffuse and consolidated amyloid deposits and extracellular neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, it was identified in a minority of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, and degenerative neurites. LF is an iron scavenger and a complement inhibitor. Up-regulation may be a defense mechanism in AD-affected brain tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8494052

  4. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  5. Inter-ocular contrast normalization in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Farshad; Heeger, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The brain combines visual information from the two eyes and forms a coherent percept, even when inputs to the eyes are different. However, it is not clear how inputs from the two eyes are combined in visual cortex. We measured fMRI responses to single gratings presented monocularly, or pairs of gratings presented monocularly or dichoptically with several combinations of contrasts. Gratings had either the same orientation or orthogonal orientations (i.e., plaids). Observers performed a demanding task at fixation to minimize top-down modulation of the stimulus-evoked responses. Dichoptic presentation of compatible gratings (same orientation) evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating only when contrast was low (<10%). A model that assumes linear summation of activity from each eye failed to explain binocular responses at 10% contrast or higher. However, a model with binocular contrast normalization, such that activity from each eye reduced the gain for the other eye, fitted the results very well. Dichoptic presentation of orthogonal gratings evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating for all contrasts. However, activity evoked by dichoptic plaids was equal to that evoked by monocular plaids. Introducing an onset asynchrony (stimulating one eye 500 ms before the other, which under attentive vision results in flash suppression) had no impact on the results; the responses to dichoptic and monocular plaids were again equal. We conclude that when attention is diverted, inter-ocular suppression in V1 can be explained by a normalization model in which the mutual suppression between orthogonal orientations does not depend on the eye of origin, nor on the onset times, and cross-orientation suppression is weaker than inter-ocular (same orientation) suppression. PMID:19757952

  6. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  7. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  8. Mineral Density Volume Gradients in Normal and Diseased Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  9. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    PubMed

    Djomehri, Sabra I; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S H; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  10. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  11. Trigeminal high-frequency stimulation produces short- and long-term modification of reflex blink gain

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael; Kaminer, Jaime; Enmore, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Reflex blinks provide a model system for investigating motor learning in normal and pathological states. We investigated whether high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve before the R2 blink component (HFS-B) decreases reflex blink gain in alert rats. As with humans (Mao JB, Evinger C. J Neurosci 21: RC151, 2001), HFS-B significantly reduced blink size in the first hour after treatment for rats. Repeated days of HFS-B treatment produced long-term depression of blink circuits. Blink gain decreased exponentially across days, indicating a long-term depression of blink circuits. Additionally, the HFS-B protocol became more effective at depressing blink amplitude across days of treatment. This depression was not habituation, because neither long- nor short-term blink changes occurred when HFS was presented after the R2. To investigate whether gain modifications produced by HFS-B involved cerebellar networks, we trained rats in a delay eyelid conditioning paradigm using HFS-B as the unconditioned stimulus and a tone as the conditioned stimulus. As HFS-B depresses blink circuits and delay conditioning enhances blink circuit activity, occlusion should occur if they share neural networks. Rats acquiring robust eyelid conditioning did not exhibit decreases in blink gain, whereas rats developing low levels of eyelid conditioning exhibited weak, short-term reductions in blink gain. These results suggested that delay eyelid conditioning and long-term HFS-B utilize some of the same cerebellar circuits. The ability of repeated HFS-B treatment to depress trigeminal blink circuit activity long term implied that it may be a useful protocol to reduce hyperexcitable blink circuits that underlie diseases like benign essential blepharospasm. PMID:24285868

  12. Functional mapping of sequence learning in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Grafton, S T; Hazeltine, E; Ivry, R

    1995-01-01

    The brain localization of motor sequence learning was studied in normal subjects with positron emission tomography. Subjects performed a serial reaction time (SRT) task by responding to a series of stimuli that occurred at four different spatial positions. The stimulus locations were either determined randomly or according to a 6-element sequence that cycled continuously. The SRT task was performed under two conditions. With attentional interference from a secondary counting task there was no development of awareness of the sequence. Learning-related increases of cerebral blood flow were located in contralateral motor effector areas including motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and putamen, consistent with the hypothesis that nondeclarative motor learning occurs in cerebral areas that control limb movements. Additional cortical sites included the rostral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. The SRT learning task was then repeated with a new sequence and no attentional interference. In this condition, 7 of 12 subjects developed awareness of the sequence. Learning-related blood flow increases were present in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right premotor cortex, right ventral putamen, and biparieto-occipital cortex. The right dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal areas have been previously implicated in spatial working memory and right prefrontal cortex is also implicated in retrieval tasks of verbal episodic memory. Awareness of the sequence at the end of learning was associated with greater activity in bilateral parietal, superior temporal, and right premotor cortex. Motor learning can take place in different cerebral areas, contingent on the attentional demands of the task. PMID:23961907

  13. Expression of K+ channels in normal and cancerous human breast.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Marie; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Sevestre, Henri; Merviel, Philippe; El Hiani, Yassine; Robbe, Micheline; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-08-01

    Potassium (K+) channels contribute to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis and are also involved in tumor generation and malignant growth. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we investigated the expression of four K+ channels GIRK1 (G-Protein Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel 1), Ca2+-activated K channel (K Ca 1.1), voltage activated K+ channels (KV 1.1 and KV 1.3) and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 in normal and cancerous breast tissues and compared their expression with clinicopathological data. GIRK1 was overexpressed in carcinomatous tissues. In contrast, K V 1.1 and K V 1.3 were less expressed in cancerous tissue. The expression of Bcl-2 was similar in both tissues. As to the clinicopathological data, a correlation between K Ca 1.1 channel and estrogen receptor (ER) expression was observed. GIRK1 was overexpressed in breast carcinoma suggesting its involvement in proliferation and oncogenesis and its possible use as a putative pharmaceutical target. The correlation between K Ca 1.1 channel and ER suggests the involvement of this channel in proliferation. The loss of expression of the two channels K V 1.1 and K V 1.3 may correspond to their role in apoptosis. PMID:18498071

  14. Levodopa: faster and better word learning in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Stefan; Breitenstein, Caterina; Bushuven, Stefan; Wailke, Stefanie; Kamping, Sandra; Flöel, Agnes; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Ringelstein, E Bernd

    2004-07-01

    Dopamine is a potent modulator of learning and has been implicated in the encoding of stimulus salience. Repetition, however, as required for the acquisition and reacquisition of sensorimotor or cognitive skills (e.g., in aphasia therapy), decreases salience. We here tested whether increasing brain levels of dopamine during repetitive training improves learning success. Forty healthy humans took 100mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa or placebo daily for 5 days in a randomized double-blind and parallel-group design. Ninety minutes later on each day, subjects were trained on an artificial vocabulary using a high-frequency repetitive approach. Levodopa significantly enhanced the speed, overall success, and long-term retention of novel word learning in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate new ways to potentiate learning in a variety of domains if conventional training alone fails. PMID:15236398

  15. Nonlinear time series analysis of normal and pathological human walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Cusumano, Joseph P.

    2000-12-01

    Characterizing locomotor dynamics is essential for understanding the neuromuscular control of locomotion. In particular, quantifying dynamic stability during walking is important for assessing people who have a greater risk of falling. However, traditional biomechanical methods of defining stability have not quantified the resistance of the neuromuscular system to perturbations, suggesting that more precise definitions are required. For the present study, average maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents were estimated to quantify the local dynamic stability of human walking kinematics. Local scaling exponents, defined as the local slopes of the correlation sum curves, were also calculated to quantify the local scaling structure of each embedded time series. Comparisons were made between overground and motorized treadmill walking in young healthy subjects and between diabetic neuropathic (NP) patients and healthy controls (CO) during overground walking. A modification of the method of surrogate data was developed to examine the stochastic nature of the fluctuations overlying the nominally periodic patterns in these data sets. Results demonstrated that having subjects walk on a motorized treadmill artificially stabilized their natural locomotor kinematics by small but statistically significant amounts. Furthermore, a paradox previously present in the biomechanical literature that resulted from mistakenly equating variability with dynamic stability was resolved. By slowing their self-selected walking speeds, NP patients adopted more locally stable gait patterns, even though they simultaneously exhibited greater kinematic variability than CO subjects. Additionally, the loss of peripheral sensation in NP patients was associated with statistically significant differences in the local scaling structure of their walking kinematics at those length scales where it was anticipated that sensory feedback would play the greatest role. Lastly, stride-to-stride fluctuations in the

  16. Malignant epithelioid schwannoma affecting the trigeminal nerve of a dog.

    PubMed

    Pumarola, M; Añor, S; Borràs, D; Ferrer, I

    1996-07-01

    A malignant epithelioid schwannoma was diagnosed affecting the trigeminal nerve of an 11-year-old dog. Neurologic abnormalities included an altered mental status, ataxia, left head tilt, postural reaction deficits of all four limbs, a pronounced left masticatory muscle atrophy, and absent left facial sensation. Histologically, a densely arranged epithelioid population with a very high mitotic index was surrounded by a spindle-shaped cell proliferation characteristic of schwannomas. Both cell populations stained positively for vimentin, but only spindle cells were occassionally positive for S-100 protein. The histologic and immunohistochemical features of this tumor were consistent with those found in human epithelioid schwannomas. PMID:8817843

  17. Proteomic analysis of a podocyte vesicle-enriched fraction from human normal and pathological urine samples.

    PubMed

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Pernin, Agnès; Hainard, Alexandre; Bigeire, Caty; Burgess, Jennifer A; Zimmermann-Ivol, Catherine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Schifferli, Jürg A; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Moll, Solange

    2008-07-01

    Podocytes (glomerular visceral epithelial cells) release vesicles into urine. Podocyte vesicle-enriched fractions from normal and pathological human urine samples were prepared for proteomic analysis. An immunoadsorption method was applied and enrichment of podocyte vesicles was assessed. We identified 76 unique proteins. One protein, serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON-1), was newly identified in normal human urine sample. We confirmed this result and showed PON-1 expression in normal human kidney. These results demonstrated the potential for using the urine samples enriched in podocyte vesicles as a starting material in studies aimed at discovery of biomarkers for diseases. PMID:21136901

  18. Immunohistochemical studies of neurochemical markers in normal human buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hilliges, M; Hellman, M; Ahlström, U; Johansson, O

    1994-04-01

    The content of various substances, such as regulatory peptides, hormones and structural proteins, was investigated in normal buccal mucosa using indirect immunofluorescence. Thin nerve fibres, which from a morphological point of view were most probably sensory, showed immunoreactivity for substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide K (NPK) and neurokinin A (NKA). Also galanin (GAL), gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone (gamma-MSH) and somatostatin (SOM) stained thin fibres were found in the propria, which were, however, few in number and the gamma-MSH staining was weak. CGRP, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactive nerve fibres were observed in close connection to blood vessels. SOM positive cells with processes were found, mostly scattered, in the connective tissue. A population of cells within the epithelium also showed somatostatin immunoreactivity. Protein S-100 (S-100) stained distinct populations of cells at two separate locations. In the propria, cells with one or two slender processes were seen, being mostly single but sometimes forming groups. In the epithelium, dendritic cells with many processes with or without 'spines' were observed, mainly located to the basal layer of the lamina epithelialis. Single nerve fibres and nerve bundles were also stained. Neurofilament (NF) positive fibres, singly and in bundles, as well as endorgan-like structures were seen. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) both stained the same structures, namely single fibres, nerve bundles, nerves surrounding vessels and innervating muscles and glands (if present in the section), as well as Merkel cells. Also with these two markers endorgan-like structures were seen. No clear innervation of the epithelium could be observed with the markers used. No methionine-enkephalin (ENK) or synaptophysin (SYN) immunoreactive material was found. PMID:7523335

  19. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S.; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed. PMID:26511743

  20. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicell-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Viral Infectivity and Oxidative Stress and Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex threedimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6].

  1. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  2. Effects of digoxin on muscle reflexes in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christophe; Lheureux, Olivier; Beloka, Sofia; Adamopoulos, Dionysios; Naeije, Robert; van de Borne, Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Blockade of the skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump by digoxin could result in a more marked hyperkaliema during a forearm exercise, which in turn could stimulate the mechano- and metaboreceptors. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, and cross-over-design study, we measured mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), ventilation (V(E)), oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), venous plasma potassium and lactic acid during dynamic handgrip exercises, and local circulatory arrest in 11 healthy subjects. Digoxin enhanced MBP during exercise but not during the post-handgrip ischemia and had no effect on HR, V(E), SpO(2), and MSNA. Venous plasma potassium and lactic acid were also not affected by digoxin-induced skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blockade. We conclude that digoxin increased MBP during dynamic exercise in healthy humans, independently of changes in potassium and lactic acid. A modest direct sensitization of the muscle mechanoreceptors is unlikely and other mechanisms, independent of muscle reflexes and related to the inotropic effects of digoxin, might be implicated. PMID:19701647

  3. [Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Debono, B; Sol, J-C; Ménégalli, D; Mertens, P; Redon, A; Muracciole, X

    2012-06-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia is defined as brief paroxysms of pain limited to the facial distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Drug therapy is considered to be the first-line of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Unfortunately, medical treatment does not always provide satisfactory pain relief for 25% of the patients. Moreover, the relief provided by drug therapy generally decreases over time, and increased dosages of these medications are limited because of side effects. In this case, patients can be offered several surgical approaches, such as percutaneous techniques (thermocoagulation, microcompression, glycerol injection) or microvascular decompression in the cerebello-pontine angle (Gardner-Jannetta's technique). In this indication, stereotactic radiosurgery, driven by teams using Gamma Knife(®), has shown promising efficacy and tolerance to allow this treatment being truly part of trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Technological progresses now allow performing radiosurgery with ballistic and dosimetric processes optimized with stereotactic radiosurgery dedicated linear accelerators. This procedure supports frame implantation to guarantee targeting accuracy in accordance of elevated dose distribution. This article on trigeminal neuralgia treatment will review the different medical and surgical therapeutic options and specify the contemporary place of stereotactic radiosurgery in the light of its clinical results and tolerance aspects. PMID:22682396

  4. Mapping of corticotropic cells in the normal human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, J; Guigard, M P; Fonlupt, P; Souchier, C; Girod, C

    1996-05-01

    We accomplished the first mapping of corticotropic cells in the whole human adult pituitary. Corticotropic cells were identified by immunocytochemistry (ICC) and quantified by image analysis on 12 pituitaries obtained from people who had died suddenly. An overall view of each pituitary was given by 15-21 sections (mean 18 sections) at 300-micron intervals on six slides. Each section was systematically treated by indirect immunoperoxidase using an anti-ACTH[17-39] polyclonal antiserum. All the measures were done with a x 6.3 objective lens, each field (0. 5 mm2) being considered as the unit area. The mean pituitary density (surface of labeled cells/total surface) of corticotropic cells (9.5 +/- 3.0% per 0. 5 mm2) is significantly higher in men (11.5 +/- 5.1%) than in women (7.0 +/- 1.3%). This difference is due to an inverse relationship between the corticotropic cell density and the weight of the pituitary, which is higher in women than in men. The mean diameter of corticotropic cells is 14.9 micron and their total number per pituitary is approximately 10(7) cells. We confirmed that the spatial distribution of corticotropic cells is nonuniform: they are mainly distributed in the anteromedian part of the anterior lobe. In addition, our results demonstrated that the inferior part of the pituitary contained three times more corticotropic cells than the superior part (mean density 18.0% vs 6.0%) and the anterior part twice as many as the posterior part (mean density 12.3% vs 6.8%). On the horizontal plane, the pituitary was divided into eight zones, in which the mean of area was 2.5-21.0%. The maximal cell density may reach 40-60%. The use of this map should help the pathologist to recognize if there is corticotropic hyperplasia in a small pituitary fragment surgically removed from a patient with Cushing's disease. On the basis of this study, we put forward some criteria for diagnosing corticotropic hyperplasia. PMID:8627004

  5. INTERACTION BETWEEN NORMAL HUMAN DIPLOID CELLS AND CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS/MUTAGENS 'IN VITRO'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the present studies were to develop sensitive, reproducible methods for detecting mutations in normal human fibroblast cells and to demonstrate dose-related mutagenesis by known and potential carcinogens. The authors have modified conventional test procedures fo...

  6. Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF)-1 promotes melanogenesis in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Jun; Kim, Misun; Kim, Hyeran; Park, Sun Yi; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Kang, Hee Young

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays a role in the differentiation as well as the development of melanocytes. Using a microarray analysis, hyperpigmentary skin of melasma expressed high levels of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) compared with perilesional normal skin. In this study, the expression and functional roles of WIF-1 on melanocytes were investigated. WIF-1 was expressed both in the melanocytes of normal human skin and in cultured melanocytes. The upregulation of WIF-1 on cultured normal human melanocytes significantly induced expressions of MITF and tyrosinase, which were associated with increased melanin content and tyrosinase activity. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of WIF-1, WIF-1 siRNA reduced melanogenesis in the cells. Moreover, WIF-1 increases pigmentation in melanocytes co-cultured with WIF-1-overexpressed fibroblasts and of organ-cultured human skin. These findings suggest that melanocytes express WIF-1 constitutively in vivo and in vitro and that WIF-1 promotes melanogenesis in normal human melanocytes. PMID:24131586

  7. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  8. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  9. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  10. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony T.; Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R.

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  11. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  12. Persistent trigeminal artery causing "double" neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Angelo Maurizio; Merlo, Paola; Rognone, Felice; Noce, Monica; Rognone, Elisa; Bono, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with right VI nerve palsy and homolateral atypical trigeminal neuralgia; standard neuroradiological investigation of orbital/retroorbital regions and intracranial arteries excluded the most commonly demonstrable underlying causes while brain magnetic resonance (T1-weighted fat suppression; T2-weighted thin-section) and magnetic resonance angiography disclosed the evidence of "double" neurovascular conflict because of persistent trigeminal artery with aneurysmal dilation. A role of this almost rare vascular condition in causing painful ophthalmoplegia is discussed. PMID:19267790

  13. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  14. A Novel Generalized Normal Distribution for Human Longevity and other Negatively Skewed Data

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Henry T.; Allison, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Negatively skewed data arise occasionally in statistical practice; perhaps the most familiar example is the distribution of human longevity. Although other generalizations of the normal distribution exist, we demonstrate a new alternative that apparently fits human longevity data better. We propose an alternative approach of a normal distribution whose scale parameter is conditioned on attained age. This approach is consistent with previous findings that longevity conditioned on survival to the modal age behaves like a normal distribution. We derive such a distribution and demonstrate its accuracy in modeling human longevity data from life tables. The new distribution is characterized by 1. An intuitively straightforward genesis; 2. Closed forms for the pdf, cdf, mode, quantile, and hazard functions; and 3. Accessibility to non-statisticians, based on its close relationship to the normal distribution. PMID:22623974

  15. Numbness over the distribution of trigeminal nerve--trigeminal trophic syndrome or viral neuritis: a diagnostic dilemma!

    PubMed

    Patil, Pankaj; Chandan, Sanjay; Singh, Vikram; Gadre, Kiran; Halli, Rajshekhar; Gadre, Pushkar

    2013-07-01

    Numbness and ulceration of the face, particularly erosion of ala of the nose, sometimes occur after sensory denervation in the territory of the divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The incidence is uncertain and usually follows surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. Such condition is known as trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS), although some authors believe it to be a special form of dermatitis artefacta. Trigeminal trophic syndrome most commonly affects adults, after iatrogenic, vascular, viral, or neoplastic damage to the trigeminal nerve. We present a rare case of TTS in a 32-year-old woman who was referred to us with progressive numbness in the right upper and lower lip region. PMID:23851893

  16. Trigeminal perineural spread of head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartiromo, F; Cirillo, L; Caranci, F; Elefante, A; D'Amico, A; Tortora, F; Brunetti, A; Cirillo, S

    2007-02-28

    Perineural tumor spread (PNS) of head and neck malignancies is a well-known form of metastatic disease in which a lesion can migrate away from the primary site along the endoneurium or perineurium. MR imaging is considered the primary method for evaluating patients with symptoms related to the trigeminal nerve in most clinical settings. Both CT and MR imaging can detect perineural spread, but MRI is the modality of choice because of its capability to detect direct signs (nerve enlargement and enhancement) and indirect signs (neuropathic muscular atrophy, obliteration of fat planes). In addition, MRI is more sensitive because of its superior soft-tissue contrast, its multiplanar capability and decreased artifacts from dental hardware. Fat suppression images after contrast injection are mandatory to better detect nerve enhancement. CT is useful in detecting foraminal enlargement or more destructive bone patterns. Nerve function can be perserved until later in the course of the disease: patients with perineural spread demonstrated at radiologic or pathologic examination may have normal or nonspecific nerve function at clinical examination (patients are misdiagnosed with Bell's palsy or trigeminal neuralgia). Hence MRI assessment of perineural tumor location and extension is important. PMID:24299600

  17. [Trigeminal-cavernous fistula. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Santos Franco, Jorge; Sánchez Olivera, Carlos; Saavedra Andrade, Rafael; Sandoval Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Persistent primitive trigeminal artery is a rare anatomical variant resulting from the absence of obliteration of the embryonic trigeminal artery. The shunt between the persistent primitive trigeminal artery and the cavernous sinus is called trigeminal-cavernous fistula. We report the case of a woman with a trigeminal-cavernous fistula secondary to head trauma who was treated by transarterial embolization. PMID:24108341

  18. Abnormal trigeminal nerve microstructure and brain white matter in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    DeSouza, Danielle D; Hodaie, Mojgan; Davis, Karen D

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is classically associated with neurovascular compression (NVC) of the trigeminal nerve at the root entry zone (REZ), but NVC-induced structural alterations are not always apparent on conventional imaging. Previous studies report lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in the affected trigeminal nerves of TN patients using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, it is not known if TN patients have trigeminal nerve abnormalities of mean, radial, or axial diffusivity (MD, RD, AD - metrics linked to neuroinflammation and edema) or brain white matter (WM) abnormalities. DTI scans in 18 right-sided TN patients and 18 healthy controls were retrospectively analyzed to extract FA, RD, AD, and MD from the trigeminal nerve REZ, and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess brain WM. In patients, the affected trigeminal nerve had lower FA, and higher RD, AD, and MD was found bilaterally compared to controls. Group TBSS (P<0.05, corrected) showed patients had lower FA and increased RD, MD, and AD in brain WM connecting areas involved in the sensory and cognitive-affective dimensions of pain, attention, and motor functions, including the corpus callosum, cingulum, posterior corona radiata, and superior longitudinal fasciculus. These data indicate that TN patients have abnormal tissue microstructure in their affected trigeminal nerves, and as a possible consequence, WM microstructural alterations in the brain. These findings suggest that trigeminal nerve structural abnormalities occur in TN, even if not apparent on gross imaging. Furthermore, MD and RD findings suggest that neuroinflammation and edema may contribute to TN pathophysiology. PMID:23999058

  19. [Orofacial pain - Trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy: Common features and differences].

    PubMed

    Thieme, V

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system in the peripheral or central nervous system. Classical trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy are pain disorders which oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentists are confronted with in the differential diagnostics in routine daily practice. The etiopathogenesis of classical trigeminal neuralgia is attributable to pathological blood vessel-nerve contact in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone to the brain stem. The typical pain symptoms are characterized by sudden stabbing pain attacks. The pharmaceutical prophylaxis is based on the individually titrated administration of anticonvulsant drugs. The indications for interventional treatment are dependent on the course, response to drug treatment, resilience and wishes of the patient. The neuropathic mechanism of posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy originates from nerve damage, which leads to peripheral and central sensitization with lowering of the pain threshold and multiple somatosensory disorders. The prophylaxis consists of avoidance of excessive acute and long-lasting pain stimuli. Against the background of the biopsychosocial pain model, the treatment of posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy necessitates a multimodal, interdisciplinary concept. PMID:26815785

  20. Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Quan; He, Shu; Shen, Yun-Xia; Qian, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVES. A training model was designed for learners and young physicians to polish their skills in clinical practices of pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. METHODS. A head model, on both cheeks of which the deep soft tissue was replaced by stuffed organosilicone and sponge while the superficial soft tissue, skin and the trigeminal ganglion were made of organic silicon rubber for an appearance of real human being, was made from a dried skull specimen and epoxy resin. Two physicians who had experiences in puncturing foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion were selected to test the model, mainly for its appearance, X-ray permeability, handling of the puncture, and closure of the puncture sites. Four inexperienced physicians were selected afterwards to be trained combining Hartel's anterior facial approach with the new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale studied by us. RESULTS. Both appearance and texture of the model were extremely close to those of a real human. The fact that the skin, superficial soft tissue, deep muscles of the cheeks, and the trigeminal ganglion made of organic silicon rubber all had great elasticity resulted in quick closure and sealing of the puncture sites. The head model made of epoxy resin had similar X-ray permeability to a human skull specimen under fluoroscopy. The soft tissue was made of radiolucent material so that the training can be conducted with X-ray guidance. After repeated training, all the four young physicians were able to smoothly and successfully accomplish the puncture. CONCLUSION. This self-made model can substitute for cadaver specimen in training learners and young physicians on foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion puncture. It is very helpful for fast learning and mastering this interventional operation skill, and the puncture accuracy can be improved significantly with our new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale. PMID:24628215

  1. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  2. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

    PubMed

    Neetu, Soni; Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26678753

  3. Pathophysiology and Treatment Options in Trigeminal Meningoceles

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Matthias; Steinhoff, Alexander; Zühlke, Constantin J.; Schulz, Dirk; Stein, Marco; Nestler, Ulf; Christophis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal meningoceles, lateral to the maxillary nerve (V2), have seldom been reported as underlying pathology for spontaneous rhinoliquorrhea. In contrast to sphenoid meningoceles arising from a persistent lateral craniopharyngeal canal (Sternberg–Cruveilhier, medial to V2), their occurrence seems to be generated by addition of erosive processes to the constitutively thin bony shell underneath the semilunar ganglion, lateral to the round foramen (and V2). The developmental and anatomical relationships of trigeminal meningoceles to the sphenoid bone are depicted, and in a review of the literature we present the different surgical approaches employed for sealing the dura leak. In view of these techniques we discuss an unusual case of therapy-resistant rhinoliquorrhea with left-sided trigeminal meningocele involving the Meckel cave at the lateral sphenoid and reaching the superior orbital fissure and the medial orbital space. In contrast to patients who have lateral sphenoidal meningoceles with a persistent lateral craniopharyngeal canal (Sternberg–Cruveilhier), who can be treated successfully using an endoscopic transsphenoidal approach (recurrence rate 13.7%), the recurrence rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) efflux for trigeminal meningoceles lies much higher (endoscopically 66%, open craniotomy 33%). The surgical strategy thus has to be chosen individually, taking into account specific anatomical situations and eventually preceding operations. PMID:24303342

  4. [Clinical features of bilateral trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Yokosako, Suguru; Takahashi, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Asami; Yoshimura, Chika; Arai, Naoyuki; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Hagiwara, Shinji; Tani, Shigeru; Sasahara, Atsushi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2015-02-01

    Among 238 patients with bilateral trigeminal neuralgia(TN)who visited our hospital between April 2007 and June 2014, 5(2%)were surgically treated by microvascular decompression(MVD). The initial symptom was on the right side in four and on both sides in one patient. Intervals between the initial and second onset on the other side(left)were two months, and four, six, and eight years. None of the patients showed involvement of the first branch of the trigeminal nerve. The patients with bilateral TN were younger than the 154 patients with unilateral TN who were treated surgically by MVD in this period(45 vs. 65 years), and the bilateral TN patients predominantly were women(4/5 vs. 99/154). In the surgical field, the trigeminal nerve and root entry zone were compressed more by veins in the bi lateral TN patients than in the unilateral TN(4/5 vs. 60/154, respectively)patients. We could not identify any differences in MRI CISS before versus after the onset of left trigeminal neuralgia, suggesting that compression is not the sole cause of the symptom. PMID:25672553

  5. Bright light activates a trigeminal nociceptive pathway

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Tashiro, Akimasa; Chang, Zheng; Bereiter, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Bright light can cause ocular discomfort and/or pain; however, the mechanism linking luminance to trigeminal nerve activity is not known. In this study we identify a novel reflex circuit necessary for bright light to excite nociceptive neurons in superficial laminae of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc/C1). Vc/C1 neurons encoded light intensity and displayed a long delay (>10 s) for activation. Microinjection of lidocaine into the eye or trigeminal root ganglion (TRG) inhibited light responses completely, whereas topical application onto the ocular surface had no effect. These findings indicated that light-evoked Vc/C1 activity was mediated by an intraocular mechanism and transmission through the TRG. Disrupting local vasomotor activity by intraocular microinjection of the vasoconstrictive agents, norepinephrine or phenylephrine, blocked light-evoked neural activity, whereas ocular surface or intra-TRG microinjection of norepinephrine had no effect. Pupillary muscle activity did not contribute since light-evoked responses were not altered by atropine. Microinjection of lidocaine into the superior salivatory nucleus diminished light-evoked Vc/C1 activity and lacrimation suggesting that increased parasympathetic outflow was critical for light-evoked responses. The reflex circuit also required input through accessory visual pathways since both Vc/C1 activity and lacrimation were prevented by local blockade of the olivary pretectal nucleus. These findings support the hypothesis that bright light activates trigeminal nerve activity through an intraocular mechanism driven by a luminance-responsive circuit and increased parasympathetic outflow to the eye. PMID:20206444

  6. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  7. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  8. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  9. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  10. Functional brain imaging of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Moisset, Xavier; Villain, Nicolas; Ducreux, Denis; Serrie, Alain; Cunin, Gérard; Valade, Dominique; Calvino, Bernard; Bouhassira, Didier

    2011-02-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to analyze changes in brain activity associated with stimulation of the cutaneous trigger zone in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN). Fifteen consecutive patients with CTN in the second or third division of the nerve, were included in this study. The fMRI paradigm consisted of light tactile stimuli of the trigger zone and the homologous contralateral area. Stimulation of the affected side induced pain in seven patients, but was not painful in eight patients on the day of the experiment. Painful stimuli were associated with significantly increased activity in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SpV), thalamus, primary and secondary somatosensory cortices (S1, S2), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insula, premotor/motor cortex, prefrontal areas, putamen, hippocampus and brainstem. Nonpainful stimulation of the trigger zone activated all but three of these structures (SpV, brainstem and ACC). After a successful surgical treatment, activation induced by stimulation of the operated side was confined to S1 and S2. Our data demonstrate the pathological hyperexcitability of the trigeminal nociceptive system, including the second order trigeminal sensory neurons during evoked attacks of CTN. Such sensitization may depend on pain modulatory systems involving both the brainstem (i.e. periaqueductal gray and adjacent structures) and interconnected cortical structures (i.e. ACC). The fact that large portions of the classical 'pain neuromatrix' were also activated during nonpainful stimulation of the trigger zone, could reflect a state of maintained sensitization of the trigeminal nociceptive systems in CTN. PMID:20609605

  11. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  12. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  13. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  14. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia. PMID:26699486

  15. Differential gene expression in normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Diego F; Sha, Wei; Hower, Valerie; Blekherman, Greg; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Akman, Steven; Torti, Suzy V; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in breast carcinogenesis. To investigate whether normal and malignant breast epithelial cells differ in their responses to oxidative stress, we examined the global gene expression profiles of three cell types, representing cancer progression from a normal to a malignant stage, under oxidative stress. Normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), an immortalized cell line (HMLER-1), and a tumorigenic cell line (HMLER-5), were exposed to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by treatment with glucose oxidase. Functional analysis of the metabolic pathways enriched with differentially expressed genes demonstrates that normal and malignant breast epithelial cells diverge substantially in their response to oxidative stress. While normal cells exhibit the up-regulation of antioxidant mechanisms, cancer cells are unresponsive to the ROS insult. However, the gene expression response of normal HMEC cells under oxidative stress is comparable to that of the malignant cells under normal conditions, indicating that altered redox status is persistent in breast cancer cells, which makes them resistant to increased generation of ROS. This study discusses some of the possible adaptation mechanisms of breast cancer cells under persistent oxidative stress that differentiate them from the response to acute oxidative stress in normal mammary epithelial cells. PMID:21397008

  16. Secretion of Unconjugated Androgens and Estrogens by the Normal and Abnormal Human Testis before and after Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. L.; Kelch, R. P.; Jenner, M. R.; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of androgens and estrogens by normal and abnormal testes was compared by determining the concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (Δ4A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in peripheral and spermatic venous plasma samples from 14 normal men and 5 men with unilateral testicular atrophy. Four normal men and one patient with unilateral atrophy of the testis were given human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) before surgery. Plasma estrogens were determined by radioimmunoassay; plasma androgens were measured by the double-isotope dilution derivative technique. Peripheral concentrations of these steroids before and after HCG were similar in both the normal men and the patients with unilateral testicular atrophy. In normal men, the mean ±SE spermatic venous concentrations were DHEA, 73.1±11.7 ng/ml; Δ4A, 30.7±7.9 ng/ml; T, 751±114 ng/ml; E1, 306±55 pg/ml; and E2, 1298±216 pg/ml. Three of four subjects with unilateral testicular atrophy had greatly diminished spermatic venous levels of androgens and estrogens. HCG treatment increased the testicular secretion of DHEA and T fivefold, Δ4A threefold, E1 sixfold, and E2 eightfold in normal men. In the single subject with an atrophic testis who received HCG, the spermatic venous concentrations of androgens and estrogens were much less than in normal men similarly treated. We conclude that: (a) E1 is secreted by the human testis, but testicular secretion of E1 accounts for less than 5% of E1 production in normal men; (b) HCG stimulation produces increases in spermatic venous estrogens equal to or greater than the changes in androgens, including testosterone; and (c) strikingly decreased secretion of androgen and estrogen by unilateral atrophic human tests cannot be appreciated by analyses of peripheral steroid concentrations. PMID:4271572

  17. Chromatin defects in normal and malformed human ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa: a cytochemical ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; Cordeschi, G; Gabriele, A; Gianaroli, L; Properzi, G

    1996-03-01

    Cytochemical defects in chromatin were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after the staining by alcoholic phosphotungstic acid (PTA) of normal and malformed ejaculated spermatozoa from 35 male partners of infertile couples, and in six sperm samples retrieved from the caput epididymidis of men affected by obstructive azoospermia. PTA staining was also analysed in normal ejaculates of fertile men after incubation of the washed spermatozoa with dithiothreitol (DTT) to reduce disulfides to thiols, or with DTT followed by iodoacetamide, a blocking agent for thiol groups. PTA stained 63 (27-100)% of malformed heads and 25 (10-100)% of normal sperm heads (median (range) n = 35; P = 0.0001, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). The percentage of normal heads stained by PTA was negatively correlated with the percentage of heads of normal form, with condensed chromatin and a normal acrosome (Spearman r = 0.75; P = 0.0001), and positively correlated with the percentage of malformed heads after conventional TEM analysis (Spearman r 0.60; P = 0.0001). Staining with PTA in normal heads was not correlated with the presence of non-condensed chromatin in otherwise normal sperm heads evaluated by conventional TEM analysis. In spermatozoa recovered from the caput epididymidis, 15% of normal heads were stained with PTA, significantly fewer than in ejaculated sperm samples (P = 0.014). The reduction of disulfides to thiols was associated with PTA staining of all normal heads, and this was prevented by incubation with iodoacetamide. We conclude that PTA staining of the nuclei of human ejaculated spermatozoa may indicate a defect of chromatin condensation, owing to an excess of free thiol groups. The lower percentage of normal epididymal sperm heads that stained with PTA in cases of obstructive azoospermia compared with ejaculated sperm may be related to an overoxidation of thils owing to the ageing of spermatozoa. PMID:8699409

  18. Case series: non vascular considerations in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Balasundram, Sathesh; Cotrufo, Stefano; Liew, Colin

    2012-02-01

    An abnormal vascular course of the superior cerebellar artery is often cited as the cause for trigeminal neuralgia. However, among patients with TN-like symptoms, 6% to 16% are variously reported to have intracranial tumours. Aneurysms, tumours, or other lesions may impinge or irritate the trigeminal nerve along its course. Uncommonly, an area of demyelination from multiple sclerosis may be the precipitant. We would like to present a series of unusual lesions, all of which initially presented with neuralgic-like symptoms and were refractory to treatment. Collated case series with photographs and imaging are reviewed in this paper. Discussion of case presentation and management are done for evaluation. A wide range of other compressive lesions can cause trigeminal neuralgia. This paper illustrates the clinical presentation of atypical trigeminal neuralgia and emphasises the value of diagnostic imaging in trigeminal neuralgia patient. Suggested algorithm for management of trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:21210165

  19. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  20. Interleukin 4 inhibits in vitro proliferation of leukemic and normal human B cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Pandrau, D; Saeland, S; Duvert, V; Durand, I; Manel, A M; Zabot, M T; Philippe, N; Banchereau, J

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the effects of IL-4 on the proliferation and differentiation of leukemic and normal human B cell precursors (BCP). We have demonstrated that IL-4 significantly inhibited spontaneous [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) incorporation by leukemic blasts from some B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) patients (8 of 14). Furthermore, IL-4 was found to suppress the spontaneous and factor-dependent (IL-7 and IL-3) proliferation of normal BCP (CD10+ surface [s] IgM- cells) isolated from fetal bone marrow. Maximum growth inhibition of either leukemic or normal BCP was reached at low IL-4 concentrations (10 U/ml), and the effect was specifically neutralized by anti-IL-4 antibody. IL-4 was further found to induce the expression of CD20 antigen on BCP-ALL cells from a number of the cases examined (5 of 8), but in contrast to leukemic cells, IL-4 failed to induce CD20 antigen on normal BCP. Finally, IL-4 was found to induce neither the expression of cytoplasmic mu chain, nor the appearance of sIgM+ cells in cultures of normal or leukemic BCP. Our data indicate that IL-4 has the potential to inhibit cell proliferation in leukemic and normal human B lymphopoiesis but is unable to drive the transition from BCP to mature B cells. Images PMID:1385474

  1. Looking at Images with Human Figures: Comparison between Autistic and Normal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Geest, J. N.; Kemner, C.; Camfferman, G.; Verbaten, M. N.; van Engeland, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the looking behavior of 16 autistic and 14 non-autistic children toward cartoon-like scenes that included a human figure was measured quantitatively using an infrared eye-tracking device. Fixation behavior of autistic children was similar to that of their age-and IQ-matched normal peers. Results do not support the idea that autistic…

  2. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  3. PULMONARY FUNCTION IN NORMAL HUMANS WITH EXERCISE AND TEMPERATURE-HUMIDITY STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fifty-eight normal young male human subjects were exposed for 4 h to comfortable conditions or to heat stress conditions with or without exercise. Heat stress produced significant changes in forced vital capacity, and possibly significant interactions were observed in peak expira...

  4. Imaging of matrix-disorder in normal and pathological human dermis using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2009-11-01

    In dermis, collagen and elastin are important structural proteins of extracellular maxtrix. The matrix-disorder is associated with various physiologic processes, such as localized scleroderma, anetoderma, photoaging. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of nonlinear optical microscopy in imaging structural proteins in normal and pathological human dermis.

  5. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  6. SOX2+ Cell Population from Normal Human Brain White Matter Is Able to Generate Mature Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver-De La Cruz, Jorge; Carrión-Navarro, Josefa; García-Romero, Noemí; Gutiérrez-Martín, Antonio; Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Perona, Rosario; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A number of neurodegenerative diseases progress with a loss of myelin, which makes them candidate diseases for the development of cell-replacement therapies based on mobilisation or isolation of the endogenous neural/glial progenitor cells, in vitro expansion, and further implantation. Cells expressing A2B5 or PDGFRA/CNP have been isolated within the pool of glial progenitor cells in the subcortical white matter of the normal adult human brain, all of which demonstrate glial progenitor features. However, the heterogeneity and differentiation potential of this pool of cells is not yet well established. Methods We used diffusion tensor images, histopathology, and immunostaining analysis to demonstrate normal cytoarchitecture and the absence of abnormalities in human temporal lobe samples from patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. These samples were used to isolate and enrich glial progenitor cells in vitro, and later to detect such cells in vivo. Results We have identified a subpopulation of SOX2+ cells, most of them co-localising with OLIG2, in the white matter of the normal adult human brain in vivo. These cells can be isolated and enriched in vitro, where they proliferate and generate immature (O4+) and mature (MBP+) oligodendrocytes and, to a lesser extent, astrocytes (GFAP+). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the existence of a new glial progenitor cell subpopulation that expresses SOX2 in the white matter of the normal adult human brain. These cells might be of use for tissue regeneration procedures. PMID:24901457

  7. Synergistic action of photosensitizers and normal human serum in a bactericidal process. I. Effect of chlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Andrzej; Jankowski, Stanisław; Mirończyk, Agnieszka

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility of some Gram-negative strains against the bactericidal action of normal human serum (NHS) and of chlorophyll, which induces production of reactive oxygen species by light, was studied. A synergistic bactericidal activity of NHS and chlorophyll against E. coli K1 and Shigella flexneri strains was observed. PMID:15095924

  8. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Beaulieu@USherbrooke.ca

    2006-03-31

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells.

  9. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  10. [Trigeminal neuralgia in an elderly patient associated with a variant of persistent primitive trigeminal artery].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Ichiro; Motokawa, Tetsufumi; Umeno, Tetsuya; Morofuji, Yoichi; Takahata, Hideaki; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    An 86-year-old woman presented with a 10-year history of right paroxysmal facial pain. The trigger zone was the right maxilla. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and MR cisternography sourse images showed an aberrant artery originating from the right internal carotid artery anastomosed to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (AICA) of the cerebellum, and it was closed at the root entry zone of trigeminal nerve. The patient underwent microvascular decompression (MVD), and her pain resolved after the operation. Most of the offending vessels that cause trigeminal neuralgia are the superior cerebellar artery (75-80%) and AICA. Although persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common type of persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis, trigeminal neuralgia associated with PTA or a PTA variant is very rare, and particularly, a PTA variant is an uncommon, anomalous, intracranial vessel. It is necessary to inspect MR imaging scans carefully prior to MVD surgery because they are frequently associated with intracranial aneurysms. During surgery, we must be careful not to injure the perforating arteries from the PTA variant. MVD for trigeminal neuralgia in elderly patients is effective if the patients can have a tolerate general anesthesia. However, when we plan surgery for elderly patients, we must take care that it does not to lead to unexpected complications. PMID:21878704

  11. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  12. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting. PMID:25216224

  13. Trigeminal neuralgia--a presenting feature of facial leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Malaviya, G N; Girdhar, A; Husain, S; Girdhar, B K

    1993-09-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a well recognized clinical entity. However, it has not been reported to mimic leprosy or vice versa. Of the 3 cases reported here, 2 initially presented with neuralgic symptoms similar to that seen in trigeminal neuralgia and later developed borderline lesions on the face. The 3rd case demonstrated a tingling sensation along with firm and palpable supraorbital nerve (a branch of trigeminal nerve), and a very early skin lesion on the face pointed to the need to consider neuritic type leprosy before concluding the final diagnosis of a disease like trigeminal neuralgia which calls for a different therapeutic approach. PMID:8231605

  14. Differentiation of normal and transformed human fibroblasts in vitro is influenced by electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rodemann, H.P.; Bayreuther, K.; Pfleiderer, G.

    1989-06-01

    We studied the effect of symmetric, biphasic sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (EMF) (20 Hz, 6 mT) on the differentiation of normal human skin fibroblasts (HH-8), normal human lung fibroblasts (WI38), and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts (WI38SV40) in in vitro cultures. Cells were exposed up to 21 days for 2 x 6 h per day to EMF. Normal mitotic human skin and lung fibroblasts could be induced to differentiate into postmitotic cells upon exposure to EMF. Concomitantly, the synthesis of total collagen as well as total cellular protein increased significantly by a factor of 5-13 in EMF-induced postmitotic cells. As analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, EMF-induced postmitotic cells express the same differentiation-dependent and cell type-specific marker proteins as their spontaneously arising counterparts. In SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts (cell line WI38SV40) the exposure to EMF induced the differentiation of mitotic WI38SV40 cells into postmitotic and degenerating cells in subpopulations of WI38SV40 cell cultures. Other subpopulations of WI38SV40 cells did not show any effect of EMF on cell proliferation and differentiation. These results indicate that long-term EMF exposure of fibroblasts in vitro induces the differentiation of mitotic to postmitotic cells that are characterized by differentiation-specific proteins and differentiation-dependent enhanced metabolic activities.

  15. Establishment of proliferative tetraploid cells from telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Aneuploidy is observed in the majority of human cancers and is considered to be causally related to carcinogenesis. Although malignant aneuploid cells are suggested to develop from polyploid cells formed in precancerous lesions, the mechanisms of this process remain elusive. This is partly because no experimental model is available where nontransformed polyploid human cells propagate in vitro. We previously showed that proliferative tetraploid cells can be established from normal human fibroblasts by treatment with the spindle poison demecolcine (DC). However, the limited lifespan of these cells hampered detailed analysis of a link between chromosomal instability and the oncogenic transformation of polyploid cells. Here, we report the establishment of proliferative tetraploid cells from the telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblast cell line TIG-1. Treatment of immortalized diploid cells with DC for 4 days resulted in proliferation of cells with tetraploid DNA content and near-tetraploid/tetraploid chromosome counts. Established tetraploid cells had functional TP53 despite growing at almost the same rate as diploid cells. The frequency of clonal and sporadic chromosome aberrations in tetraploid cells was higher than in diploid cells and in one experiment, gradually increased with repeated subculture. This study suggests that tetraploid cells established from telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblasts can be a valuable model for studying chromosomal instability and the oncogenic potential of polyploid cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917432

  16. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  17. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  18. Radioimmunoassay of erythropoietin: circulating levels in normal and polycythemic human beings.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J F; Ebbe, S N; Hollander, L; Cutting, H O; Miller, M E; Cronkite, E P

    1982-05-01

    Techniques are described in detail for the RIA of human Ep in unextracted plasma or serum. With 100 microliters of sample, the essay is sensitive at an Ep concentration of approximately 4 mU/ml, and when required, the sensitivity can be increased to 0.4 mU/ml, a range considerably less than the concentration observed in normal human beings. This is approximately 100 times more sensitive than existing in vivo bioassays for this hormone. Studies concerned with the validation of the Ep RIA show a high degree of correlation with the polycythemic mouse bioassay. Dilutions of a variety of human serum samples show a parallel relationship with the standard reference preparation for Ep. Validation of the RIA is further confirmed by observations of appropriate increases or decreases in circulating Ep levels in physiological and clinical conditions known to be associated with stimulation of suppression of Ep secretion. Significantly different mean serum concentrations of 17.2 mU/ml for normal male subjects and 18.8 mU/ml for normal female subjects were observed. Mean plasma Ep concentrations in patients with polycythemia vera are significantly decreased, and those of patients with secondary polycythemia are significantly increased as compared to plasma levels in normal subjects. These results demonstrate an initial practical value of the Ep RIA inthe hematology clinic, which will most certainly be expanded with its more extensive use. PMID:7069267

  19. Isolation and characterization of human malignant glioma cells from histologically normal brain.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, D L; Chicoine, M R

    1997-03-01

    Brain invasion prevents complete surgical extirpation of malignant gliomas; however, invasive cells from distant, histologically normal brain previously have not been isolated, cultured, and characterized. To evaluate invasive human malignant glioma cells, the authors established cultures from gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Three men and one woman, with a mean age of 67 years, underwent two frontal and two temporal lobectomies for tumors, which yielded specimens of both gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Each specimen was acquired a minimum of 4 cm from the gross tumor. The specimens were split: a portion was sent for neuropathological evaluation (three glioblastomas multiforme and one oligodendroglioma) and a portion was used to establish cell lines. Morphologically, the specimens of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were identical in three of the four cell culture pairs. Histochemical staining characteristics were consistent both within each pair and when compared with the specimens sent for neuropathological evaluation. Cultures demonstrated anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose and neoplastic karyotypes. Growth rates in culture were greater for histologically normal brain than for gross tumor in three of the four culture pairs. Although the observed increases in growth rates of histologically normal brain cultures do not correlate with in vivo behavior, these findings corroborate the previously reported stem cell potential of invasive glioma cells. Using the radial dish assay, no significant differences in motility between cultures of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were found. In summary, tumor cells were cultured from histologically normal brain acquired from a distance greater than 4 cm from the gross tumor, indicating the relative insensitivity of standard histopathological identification of invasive glioma cells (and hence the inadequacy of frozen-section evaluation of resection margins). Cell lines

  20. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  1. Complement Regulatory Activity of Normal Human Intraocular Fluid Is Mediated by MCP, DAF, and CD59

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecules in normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) that inhibit the functional activity of the complement system. Methods Aqueous humor and vitreous were obtained from patients with noninflammatory ocular disease at the time of surgery. Samples were incubated with normal human serum (NHS), and the mixture assayed for inhibition of the classical and alternative complement pathways using standard CH50 and AH50 hemolytic assays, respectively. Both aqueous humor and vitreous were fractionated by microconcentrators and size exclusion column chromatography. The inhibitory molecules were identified by immunoblotting as well as by studying the effect of depletion of membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and CD59 on inhibitory activity. Results Both aqueous humor and vitreous inhibited the activity of the classical pathway (CH50). Microcentrifugation revealed the major inhibitory activity resided in the fraction with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa. Chromatography on an S-100-HR column demonstrated that the most potent inhibition was associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions (≥ 19.5 kDa). In contrast to unfractionated aqueous and vitreous, fractions with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa also had an inhibitory effect on the alternative pathway activity (AH50). The complement regulatory activity in normal human intraocular fluid was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies against MCP, DAF, and CD59. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the presence of these three molecules in normal intraocular fluid. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) contains complement inhibitory factors. Furthermore, the high-molecular-weight factors appear to be the soluble forms of MCP, DAF, and CD59. PMID:11095615

  2. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  3. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  4. Native cellular fluorescence characteristics of normal and malignant epithelial cells from human larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmeswearan, Diagaradjane; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Nalini, R.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Veeraganesh, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1997-08-01

    Many applications of native fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules such as Try, Tyr, Phe, NADH and FAD are reported on both the characterization and the discrimination of malignant tissues from the normal. In the field of diagnostic oncology, extensive studies have been made to distinguish the normal from malignant condition in breast, cervix, colon and bronchus. From the studies made by Alfano and co-workers, it was found that the emission at 340 and 440 nm under UV excitation have shown statistically significant difference between normal and malignant tissues. As tissues are highly complex in nature, it is worth to known whether the changes arise from cells or from other extracellular tissue components, so as to enable us to have better understanding on the transformation mechanism of normal into malignant and to go for an improved approach in the effective optical diagnosis. In this context, the present study addresses the question of whether there are differences in the native cellular fluorescence characteristics between normal and malignant epithelial cells from human larynx. With this aim, the UV fluorescence emission spectra in the wavelength region of excitation between 270 - 310 nm and the excitation spectra for 340 nm emission were measured and analyzed. In order to quantify the altered fluorescence signal between the normal and malignant cells, different ratio parameters were introduced.

  5. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neutral Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Oxidate Stress and Damage in Multiple Hit Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpes virus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex three-dimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6]. By combining the RFs of microgravity, radiation, and viral infection we will demonstrate that living in the space environment leads to significant physiological consequences for the peripheral and subsequently the central nervous system (PNS, CNS) associated with OSaD generation and consequentially endangers long-duration and exploration-class missions.

  6. Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somaweera, Himali; Lai, Gary C.; Blackeye, Rachel; Littlejohn, Beverly; Kirksey, Justine; Aguirre, Richard M.; LaPena, Vince; Pasqua, Anna; Hintz, Mary McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) is used by many tribes throughout California to treat a variety of conditions, including colds, allergies, and pain. California mugwort is also utilized as women’s medicine. Its use is on the rise outside of Native communities, often without the guidance of a traditional healer or experienced herbalist. Because it has been shown to have antiproliferative activity against plant and animal cells, we investigated whether California mugwort extracts have an effect on normal human cells as well as estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) human breast cancer cells. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of A. douglasiana leaves were tested for cytotoxicity against unstimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC), as well as against an ER+ human breast cancer cell line (BT-474) and an ER− human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). An ethanolic leaf extract killed hPBMC, BT-474, and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values of 23.6 ± 0.3, 27 ± 5, and 37 ± 4 μg/ml, respectively. An aqueous extract killed hPBMC with an IC50 value of 60 ± 10 μg/ml, but had no effect on the two cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml. The results of this study indicate that the cytotoxicity of California mugwort extends to normal human cells, as well as cancerous cells. Therefore, until further is known about the safety of this medicine, caution should be taken when consuming extracts of California mugwort, whether as a tincture or as a tea. PMID:24073389

  7. Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase activity role in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Ferrante, M; D'Intino, M; Rega, L; Dolci, M; Trentini, P; Ciavarelli, L

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) plays an important role in pulp tissues. High levels of cGMP PDE are found in dental pulp cells. In the present study cGMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cGMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 4.74+/-0.32 nmol/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cGMP PDE activity increased almost 3 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with the normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results point to a role of cGMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857102

  8. Cyclic Amp phosphodiesterase activity in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Menna, V; Serra, E; Santoleri, F; Perfetti, G; Ciavarelli, L; Trentini, P

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) seems to be important in pulp tissues. High levels of cAMP PDE have been demonstrated to be in dental pulp cells. In the present study cAMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cAMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 12.14 +/- 3.74 nmols/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cAMP PDE activity increased almost 2.5 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of cAMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857100

  9. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  10. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  11. Expression and regulation of normal and polymorphic epithelial sodium channel by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bubien, J K; Watson, B; Khan, M A; Langloh, A L; Fuller, C M; Berdiev, B; Tousson, A; Benos, D J

    2001-03-16

    Gene expression, protein expression, and function of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels were examined in human lymphocytes from normal individuals and individuals with Liddle's disease. Using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions, expression of all three cloned epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits was detected in lymphocytes. Polyclonal antibodies to bovine alpha-ENaC bound to the plasma membrane of normal and Liddle's lymphocytes. A quantitative analysis of fluorescence-tagged ENaC antibodies indicated a 2.5-fold greater surface binding of the antibodies to Liddle's lymphocytes compared with normal lymphocytes. The relative binding intensity increased significantly (25%; p < 0.001) for both normal and Liddle's cells after treatment with 40 microM 8-CPT-cAMP. Amiloride-sensitive whole cell currents were recorded under basal and cAMP-treated conditions for both cell types. Liddle's cells had a 4.5-fold larger inward sodium conductance compared with normal cells. A specific 25% increase in the inward sodium current was observed in normal cells in response to cAMP treatment. Outside-out patches from both cell types under both treatment conditions revealed no obvious differences in the single channel conductance. The P(open) was 4.2 +/- 3.9% for patches from non-Liddle's cells, and 27.7 +/- 5.4% in patches from Liddle's lymphocytes. Biochemical purification of a protein complex, using the same antibodies used for the immunohistochemistry, yielded a functional sodium channel complex that was inhibited by amiloride when reconstituted into lipid vesicles and incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. These four independent methodologies yielded findings consistent with the hypotheses that human lymphocytes express functional, regulatable ENaC and that the mutation responsible for Liddle's disease induces excessive channel expression. PMID:11113130

  12. Polymorphism of the long-wavelength cone in normal human colour vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitz, Jay; Jacobs, Gerald H.

    1986-10-01

    Colour vision is based on the presence of multiple classes of cone each of which contains a different type of photopigment1. Colour matching tests have long revealed that the normal human has three cone types. Results from these tests have also been used to provide estimates of cone spectral sensitivities2. There are significant variations in colour matches made by individuals whose colour vision is classified as normal3-6. Some of this is due to individual differences in preretinal absorption and photopigment density, but some is also believed to arise because there is variation in the spectral positioning of the cone pigments among those who have normal colour vision. We have used a sensitive colour matching test to examine the magnitude and nature of this individual variation and here report evidence for the existence of two different long-wavelength cone mechanisms in normal humans. The different patterns of colour matches made by male and female subjects indicate these two mechanisms are inherited as an X-chromosome linked trait.

  13. Gonococci causing disseminated gonococcal infection are resistant to the bactericidal action of normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Schoolnik, G K; Buchanan, T M; Holmes, K K

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility of strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to the bactericidal action of normal human sera was determined for isolates from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection and uncomplicated gonorrhea. Serum susceptibility was correlated with penicillin susceptibility and auxotype. 38 of 39 strains (97%) of N. gonorrhoeae from Seattle patients with disseminated gonococcal infection were resistant to the complement-dependent bactericidal action of normal human sera. 36 of these were inhibited by less than or equal to mug/ml of penicillin G and required arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil for growth on chemically defined medium (Arg-Hyx-Ura- auxotype). 12 of 43 isolates from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea were also of the Arg-Hyx-Ura-auxotype, inhibited by less than or equal to 0.030 mug/ml of penicillin G, and serum resistant. Of the 31 remaining strains of other auxotypes isolated from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea, 18 (58.1%) were sensitive to normal human sera in titers ranging from 2 to 2,048. The bactericidal action of normal human sera may prevent the dissemination of serum-sensitive gonococci. However, since only a small proportion of individuals infected by serum-resistant strains develop disseminated gonococcal infection, serum resistance appears to be a necessary but not a sufficient virulence factor for dissemination. Host factors such as menstruation and pharyngeal gonococcal infection may favor the dissemination of serum-resistant strains. Since serum-resistant Arg-Hyx-Ura strains are far more frequently isolated from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection than serum-resistant strains of other auxotypes, Arg-Hyx-Ura-strains may possess other virulence factors in addition to serum resistance. PMID:825532

  14. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed. PMID:24726322

  15. Aortic arch vessel anomalies associated with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Foroughi, Amin Abolhasani

    2012-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and persistent trigeminal artery that is the most common of the four anomalous carotid-basilar anastomoses are repeatedly reported in the literature as separate entities. Herein we report a previously undescribed variant including the coexistence of persistent trigeminal artery, truncus bicaroticus and direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch. PMID:22542381

  16. Meckel's cave epidermoid with trigeminal neuralgia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kapila, A; Steinbaum, S; Chakeres, D W

    1984-12-01

    An epidermoid tumor of Meckel's cave was found in a middle-aged woman with trigeminal neuralgia. On CT the lesion had negative attenuation numbers of fat and extended from an expanded Meckel's cave through the porous trigeminus into the ambient and cerebellopontine angle cisterns. Surgical excision provided relief of the patient's trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:6501628

  17. Overexpression of wild-type or mutants forms of CEBPA alter normal human hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, O; Lan-Lan Smith, S; Griessinger, E; Reyal, Y; Vargaftig, J; Lister, T A; Fitzgibbon, J; Bonnet, D

    2012-07-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα/CEBPA) is mutated in approximately 8% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in both familial and sporadic AML and, with FLT3 and NPM1, has received most attention as a predictive marker of outcome in patients with normal karyotype disease. Mutations clustering to either the N- or C-terminal (N- and C-ter) portions of the protein have different consequences on the protein function. In familial cases, the N-ter form is inherited with patients exhibiting long latency period before the onset of overt disease, typically with the acquisition of a C-ter mutation. Despite the essential insights murine models provide the functional consequences of wild-type C/EBPα in human hematopoiesis and how different mutations are involved in AML development have received less attention. Our data underline the critical role of C/EBPα in human hematopoiesis and demonstrate that C/EBPα mutations (alone or in combination) are insufficient to convert normal human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells into leukemic-initiating cells, although individually each altered normal hematopoiesis. It provides the first insight into the effects of N- and C-ter mutations acting alone and to the combined effects of N/C double mutants. Our results mimicked closely what happens in CEBPA mutated patients. PMID:22371011

  18. Expression of 300-kilodalton intermediate filament-associated protein distinguishes human glioma cells from normal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H Y; Lieska, N; Glick, R; Shao, D; Pappas, G D

    1993-01-01

    The availability of biochemical markers to distinguish glioma cells from normal astrocytes would have enormous diagnostic value. Such markers also may be of value in studying the basic biology of human astrocytomas. The vimentin-binding, 300-kDa intermediate filament (IF)-associated protein (IFAP-300kDa) has recently been shown to be developmentally expressed in radial glia of the central nervous system of the rat. It is not detected in the normal or reactive astrocytes of the adult rat nor in neonatal rat brain astrocytes in primary culture. In the present study, double-label immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies to IFAP-300kDa and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte-specific IF structural protein) identifies this IFAP in GFAP-containing tumor cells from examples of all three major types of human astrocytomas (i.e., well-differentiated, anaplastic, and glioblastoma multiforme). Astrocytoma cells in primary cultures prepared from all three astrocytomas also express this protein. It is not detectable in normal adult brain tissue. Immunoblot analyses using the IFAP-300kDa antibody confirm the presence of a 300-kDa polypeptide in fresh astrocytoma preparations enriched for IF proteins. These results suggest the utility of IFAP-300kDa as a marker for identification of human glioma cells both in vitro and in situ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8378327

  19. Brachyury identifies a class of enteroendocrine cells in normal human intestinal crypts and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Filipe; Sammut, Stephen J.; Williams, Geraint T.; Gollins, Simon; McFarlane, Ramsay J.; Reis, Rui Manuel; Wakeman, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Normal homeostasis of adult intestinal epithelium and repair following tissue damage is maintained by a balance of stem and differentiated cells, many of which are still only poorly characterised. Enteroendocrine cells of the gut are a small population of differentiated, secretory cells that are critical for integrating nutrient sensing with metabolic responses, dispersed amongst other epithelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that sub-sets of secretory enteroendocrine cells can act as reserve stem cells. Given the link between cells with stem-like properties and cancer, it is important that we identify factors that might provide a bridge between the two. Here, we identify a sub-set of chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells that are positive for the developmental and cancer-associated transcription factor Brachyury in normal human small intestinal and colonic crypts. Whilst chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells are also Brachyury-positive in colorectal tumours, expression of Brachyury becomes more diffuse in these samples, suggesting a more widespread function in cancer. The finding of the developmental transcription factor Brachyury in normal adult human intestinal crypts may extend the functional complexity of enteroendocrine cells and serves as a platform for assessment of the molecular processes of intestinal homeostasis that underpins our understanding of human health, cancer and aging. PMID:26862851

  20. Antioxidant macromolecules in the epithelial lining fluid of the normal human lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, A M; Fells, G A; Hubbard, R C; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    We hypothesized that the alveolar structures may contain extracellular macromolecules with antioxidant properties to defend against oxidants. To evaluate this 51Cr-labeled human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) and cat lung epithelial cells (AKD) were exposed to a H2O2-generating system and alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) from healthy nonsmokers was tested for its ability to protect the lung cells from H2O2-mediated injury. The ELF provided marked antioxidant protection, with most from a H2O-soluble fraction in the 100-300-kD range. Plasma proteins with anti-H2O2 properties were in insufficient concentrations to provide the antioxidant protection observed. However, catalase, a normal intracellular antioxidant, was present in sufficient concentration to account for most of the observed anti-H2O2 properties of ELF. Depletion of ELF with an anticatalase antibody abolished the anti-H2O2 macromolecular defenses of ELF. Since catalase is not normally released by cells, a likely explanation for its presence in high concentrations in normal ELF is that it is released by lung inflammatory and parenchymal cells onto the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract during their normal turnover and collects there due to the slow turnover of ELF. It is likely that catalase in the ELF of normal individuals plays a role in protecting lung parenchymal cells against oxidants present in the extracellular milieu. Images PMID:2394842

  1. Expression of IL-10 in human normal and cancerous ovarian tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Alex; Medina, Liat; Piura, Benjamin; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    IL-10 is an 18-kd polypeptide that has been shown to be secreted by multiple cell types, including T and B cells, monocytes and some human tumors. However, which cell population is responsible for the elevated IL-10 levels in the serum and ascites of ovarian cancer patients, whether ovarian carcinoma cells produce IL-10, and how IL-10 influences the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma are issues that remain unclear. The aim of our study was to examine IL-10 production and secretion by ovarian carcinoma tissues and cells, and to determine its possible role in the cell and tumor micro-environment. The mean IL-10 protein levels expressed in normal ovarian tissue homogenates were significantly higher compared to cancerous ovarian tissue (p = 0.002). Yet, the IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.021). The IL-10 receptor mRNA expression levels of the cancerous ovarian tissue homogenates were slightly, but not significantly, higher than the normal tissues. IL-10 immunostaining revealed that in both normal and cancerous ovarian tissues, IL-10 expression could be detected mainly in epithelial cells. In normal ovarian tissues, similar levels of IL-10R were demonstrated in epithelial and stromal cells. However, in cancerous ovarian tissues, epithelial cells expressed higher levels of IL-10R than the stroma. Primary normal and cancerous ovarian cell cultures and SKOV-3 cells secreted similar amounts of IL-10 after 24 hours of incubation. Our results suggest that epithelial cells are the main source of IL-10 in the ovary. Nevertheless, the target cells for IL-10 are different in normal and cancerous ovarian cells. Thus, IL-10 and its receptor could be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:20430716

  2. Otic artery: a review of normal and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Vasović, Ljiljana; Arsić, Stojanka; Vlajković, Slobodan; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Andjelković, Zlatibor

    2010-05-01

    Three primitive arteries - the trigeminal, otic and hypoglossal take the names according to their close relation with the V, VIII and XII cranial nerves, while at the cervical level, the first segmental artery is named the primitive proatlantal intersegmental artery. When the human embryo is 4 mm long, these arteries serve as transitory anastomoses between primitive internal carotid arteries and bilateral longitudinal neural arterial plexus, which is the precursor of future basilar artery. Normal and/or abnormal morphofunctional aspects of the prenatal and postnatal forms of the otic artery are described according to the personal and literature data. Many (ab) normal arteries are also noted in differential diagnosis of the otic artery. Postnatally, individual incidence rates of the carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses have been found to be inversely related to their order of disappearance. The persistent trigeminal artery has a reported incidence from 0.06-0.6%, whereas the persistent primitive otic artery has been convincingly documented only in minor rates. Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses between the anterior and posterior cranial circulation are important to recognize during angiography for endovascular and surgical planning. Most frequently, the otic artery was an incidental finding. PMID:20424561

  3. Imaging of Keratoconic and normal human cornea with a Brillouin imaging system (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besner, Sebastien; Shao, Peng; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Pineda, Roberto; Yun, Seok-Hyun (Andy)

    2016-03-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative disorder of the eye characterized by human cornea thinning and morphological change to a more conical shape. Current diagnosis of this disease relies on topographic imaging of the cornea. Early and differential diagnosis is difficult. In keratoconus, mechanical properties are found to be compromised. A clinically available invasive technique capable of measuring the mechanical properties of the cornea is of significant importance for understanding the mechanism of keratoconus development and improve detection and intervention in keratoconus. The capability of Brillouin imaging to detect local longitudinal modulus in human cornea has been demonstrated previously. We report our non-contact, non-invasive, clinically viable Brillouin imaging system engineered to evaluate mechanical properties human cornea in vivo. The system takes advantage of a highly dispersive 2-stage virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) to detect weak Brillouin scattering signal from biological samples. With a 1.5-mW light beam from a 780-nm single-wavelength laser source, the system is able to detect Brillouin frequency shift of a single point in human cornea less than 0.3 second, at a 5μm/30μm lateral/axial resolution. Sensitivity of the system was quantified to be ~ 10 MHz. A-scans at different sample locations on a human cornea with a motorized human interface. We imaged both normal and keratoconic human corneas with this system. Whereas no significantly difference were observed outside keratocnic cones compared with normal cornea, a highly statistically significantly decrease was found in the cone regions.

  4. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Schaer, J. C.; Markwalder, R.; Waser, B.; Horisberger, U.; Laissue, J.

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9825475

  5. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  6. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by an anomalous posterior inferior cerebellar artery from the primitive trigeminal artery: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Koh, Jun Seok; Lee, Cheol Young

    2011-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN), caused by an aberrant posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) associated with the primitive trigeminal artery (PTA). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography clearly showed an anomalous artery directly originating from the PTA and coursing into the PICA territory at the cerebellum. During microvascular decompression (MVD), we confirmed and decompressed vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve by this anomalous, PICA-variant type of PTA. The PTA did not conflict with the trigeminal nerve, and the anomalous PICA only compressed the caudolateral part of the trigeminal nerve, without the more common compression at its root entry zone. This case is informative due not only to its very unusual angioanatomical variation but also to its helpfulness for surgeons preparing a MVD for a TN associated with such a rare vascular anomaly. PMID:21279490

  8. Antigens of human trophoblasts: A working hypothesis for their role in normal and abnormal pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W. Page; Temple, Anne; Lovins, R. E.; Smith, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the preparation and characterization of antisera to human trophoblast membranes. Rabbit antisera were raised to trophoblast microvilli prepared by differential ultracentrifugation. Antibodies to serum proteins were removed by solid-phase immunoabsorption with normal human serum, and indirect immunofluorescence experiments with cryostat sections of human placentas showed that the absorbed anti-trophoblast sera reacted with trophoblasts as well as with stromal cells and endothelium of chorionic villi. The antisera also produced membrane fluorescence when studied on viable lymphocytes and certain human cell lines. These anti-trophoblast sera were also lymphocytotoxic, and this reaction was abolished by prior absorption of the antisera with leukocytes. The leukocyte-absorbed anti-trophoblast sera retained their ability to react with trophoblasts and certain human cell lines, but no longer reacted with lymphocytes or placental stromal cells and endothelium. Two categories of trophoblast membrane antigens are thus defined: one present on trophoblasts and certain human cells lines (tentatively designated TA1), and the other on trophoblasts and lymphocytes, villous fibroblasts, and endothelium (tentatively designated TA2). A working hypothesis is proposed stating that normal pregnancy involves the generation of anti-TA2 subsequent to blastocyst implantation and entrance of trophoblasts into the maternal circulation. This involves a mechanism similar to allogeneic cell stimulation and results in antibodies that block either the recognition or cytotoxicity of TA1. Failure to mount this response allows TA1 recognition and trophoblast immunopathology. Experimental and clinical studies in support of this working hypothesis, particularly involving abortion and toxemia, are cited from published reports. Images PMID:273921

  9. Temporomandibular joint pain: A critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H.; McNulty, Amy L.; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Parekh, Puja K.; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert; Taylor, Andrea B.; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, and “therapy-refractoriness” of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background we sought to investigate pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation evoked pain behavior in mice, and that trigeminal ganglion pro-nociceptive changes are Trpv4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4−/− mice with TMJ-inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in WT mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ-inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after CFA injections, but remarkably independent of Trpv4 genotype. Intriguingly, as a result of TMJ-inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant up-regulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated ERK in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, absent in Trpv4−/− mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed a similar resistance to reduction of bite-force as Trpv4−/− mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ-inflammation, and likely functions up-stream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in-vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pro-nociceptive target in TMJ inflammation, and should be considered a target-of-interest in human TMJD. PMID:23726674

  10. The SRI24 Multi-Channel Atlas of Normal Adult Human Brain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the SRI24 atlas, a new standard reference system of normal human brain anatomy, that was created using template-free population registration of high-resolution magnetic resonance images acquired at 3T in a group of 24 normal control subjects. The atlas comprises anatomical channels (T1, T2, and proton density weighted), diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity, mean diffusion-weighted image), tissue channels (CSF probability, gray matter probability, white matter probability, tissue labels), and two cortical parcellation maps. The SRI24 atlas enables multi-channel atlas-to-subject image registration. It is uniquely versatile in that it is equally suited for the two fundamentally different atlas applications: label propagation and spatial normalization. Label propagation, herein demonstrated using DTI fiber tracking, is enabled by the increased sharpness of the SRI24 atlas compared with other available atlases. Spatial normalization, herein demonstrated using data from a young-old group comparison study, is enabled by its unbiased average population shape property. For both propagation and normalization, we also report the results of quantitative comparisons with seven other published atlases: Colin27, MNI152, ICBM452 (warp5 and air12), and LPBA40 (SPM5, FLIRT, AIR). Our results suggest that the SRI24 atlas, although based on 3T MR data, allows equally accurate spatial normalization of data acquired at 1.5T as the comparison atlases, all of which are based on 1.5T data. Furthermore, the SRI24 atlas is as suitable for label propagation as the comparison atlases and detailed enough to allow delineation of anatomical structures for this purpose directly in the atlas. PMID:20017133

  11. The SRI24 multichannel atlas of normal adult human brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-05-01

    This article describes the SRI24 atlas, a new standard reference system of normal human brain anatomy, that was created using template-free population registration of high-resolution magnetic resonance images acquired at 3T in a group of 24 normal control subjects. The atlas comprises anatomical channels (T1, T2, and proton density weighted), diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity, mean diffusion-weighted image), tissue channels (CSF probability, gray matter probability, white matter probability, tissue labels), and two cortical parcellation maps. The SRI24 atlas enables multichannel atlas-to-subject image registration. It is uniquely versatile in that it is equally suited for the two fundamentally different atlas applications: label propagation and spatial normalization. Label propagation, herein demonstrated using diffusion tensor image fiber tracking, is enabled by the increased sharpness of the SRI24 atlas compared with other available atlases. Spatial normalization, herein demonstrated using data from a young-old group comparison study, is enabled by its unbiased average population shape property. For both propagation and normalization, we also report the results of quantitative comparisons with seven other published atlases: Colin27, MNI152, ICBM452 (warp5 and air12), and LPBA40 (SPM5, FLIRT, AIR). Our results suggest that the SRI24 atlas, although based on 3T MR data, allows equally accurate spatial normalization of data acquired at 1.5T as the comparison atlases, all of which are based on 1.5T data. Furthermore, the SRI24 atlas is as suitable for label propagation as the comparison atlases and detailed enough to allow delineation of anatomical structures for this purpose directly in the atlas. PMID:20017133

  12. Human colonic crypts in culture: segregation of immunochemical markers in normal versus adenoma-derived

    PubMed Central

    Dame, Michael K; Jiang, Yan; Appelman, Henry D; Copley, Kelly D; McClintock, Shannon D; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Attili, Durga; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Brenner, Dean E; Varani, James; Turgeon, D Kim

    2014-01-01

    In order to advance a culture model of human colonic neoplasia, we developed methods for the isolation and in vitro maintenance of intact colonic crypts from normal human colon tissue and adenomas. Crypts were maintained in three-dimensional Matrigel culture with a simple, serum-free, low Ca2+ (0.15 mM) medium. Intact colonic crypts from normal human mucosa were viably maintained for 3–5 days with preservation of the in situ crypt-like architecture, presenting a distinct base and apex. Abnormal structures from adenoma tissue could be maintained through multiple passages (up to months), with expanding buds/tubules. Immunohistochemical markers for intestinal stem cells (Lgr5), growth (Ki67), differentiation (E-cadherin, cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and mucin 2 (MUC2)) and epithelial turnover (Bax, cleaved Caspase-3), paralleled the changes in function. The epithelial cells in normal crypts followed the physiological sequence of progression from proliferation to differentiation to dissolution in a spatially and temporally appropriate manner. Lgr5 expression was seen in a few basal cells of freshly isolated crypts, but was not detected after 1–3 days in culture. After 24 h in culture, crypts from normal colonic tissue continued to show strong Ki67 and MUC2 expression at the crypt base, with a gradual decrease over time such that by days 3–4 Ki67 was not expressed. The differentiation marker CK20 increased over the same period, eventually becoming intense throughout the whole crypt. In adenoma-derived structures, expression of markers for all stages of progression persisted for the entire time in culture. Lgr5 showed expression in a few select cells after months in culture. Ki67 and MUC2 were largely associated with the proliferative budding regions while CK20 was localized to the parent structure. This ex vivo culture model of normal and adenomatous crypts provides a readily accessible tool to help understand the growth and differentiation process in human colonic

  13. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  14. Regulation of Glucagon Secretion in Normal and Diabetic Human Islets by γ-Hydroxybutyrate and Glycine*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Naji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-13C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels. PMID:23266825

  15. Regulation of glucagon secretion in normal and diabetic human islets by γ-hydroxybutyrate and glycine.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Matschinsky, Franz M; Naji, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-(13)C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels. PMID:23266825

  16. Expression of gangliosides on glial and neuronal cells in normal and pathological adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Silvia; De Toni, Luca; Lovato, Laura; Tedeschi, Elisa; Gaetti, Luigi; Acler, Michele; Bonetti, Bruno

    2005-12-30

    Few studies have assessed the glycolipid phenotype of glial cells in the human central nervous system (CNS) in situ. We investigated by immunohistochemistry the expression and cellular distribution of a panel of gangliosides (GM1, GM2, acetyl-GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GD2, GD3, GT1b, GQ1b and the A2B5 antibody) in adult, human normal and pathological brain, namely multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases (OND). In normal conditions, we found diffuse expression in the white matter of most gangliosides tested, with the exception of acetyl-GM3, GT1b and GQ1b. By double immunofluorescence with phenotypic markers, GM1 and GD1b were preferentially expressed on GFAP+ astrocytes, GD1a on NG2+ oligodendrocyte precursors, A2B5 immunostained both populations, while GD2 was selectively present on mature oligodendrocytes. In the gray matter, only GM1, GD2 and A2B5 were present on neuronal cells. Interestingly, those gangliosides present on astrocytes in normal conditions were preferentially expressed on NG2+ cells in chronic MS lesions and in OND. Selective expression of GT1b upon astrocytes and NG2+ cells was instead observed in MS lesions, but not in OND. The definition of the glycolipid phenotype of CNS glial cells may be useful to identify distinct biological glial subsets and provide insights on the potential autoantigenic role of gangliosides in CNS autoimmune diseases. PMID:16313974

  17. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  18. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  19. pH-profile of cystine and glutamate transport in normal and cystinotic human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Forster, S; Lloyd, J B

    1985-04-11

    In the human recessive condition cystinosis, cystine transport has been reported to be normal in the plasma membrane but defective in the lysosome membrane. A possible explanation is that the transport systems at the two cellular sites are identical and that the defect in cystinosis affects the porter's ability to operate at the low pH of the lysosome. To test this hypothesis the uptake of 3H-labelled cystine and glutamate by normal and cystinotic human skin fibroblasts has been measured in vitro at pH 5.8, 6.5, 7.0, 7.4 and 8.0. Uptake of glutamate was more rapid than that of cystine. Uptake of cystine increased with increasing pH, but uptake of glutamate showed no marked pH-dependence. Transport in cystinotic cells was similar to that in normal cells, and similarly affected by pH. This finding is incompatible with the hypothesis proposed above. It is concluded that the cystine porters of the plasma membrane and the lysosome membrane are probably genetically distinct. PMID:2858219

  20. White matter maturation of normal human fetal brain. An in vivo diffusion tensor tractography study

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Emilie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Guye, Maxime; Denis, Daniele; Cozzone, Patrick J; Girard, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the ability to determine in vivo and in utero the transitions between the main stages of white matter (WM) maturation in normal human fetuses using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography. Biophysical characteristics of water motion are used as an indirect probe to evaluate progression of the tissue matrix organization in cortico-spinal tracts (CSTs), optic radiations (OR), and corpus callosum (CC) in 17 normal human fetuses explored between 23 and 38 weeks of gestation (GW) and selected strictly on minimal motion artifacts. Nonlinear polynomial (third order) curve fittings of normalized longitudinal and radial water diffusivities (Z-scores) as a function of age identify three different phases of maturation with specific dynamics for each WM bundle type. These phases may correspond to distinct cellular events such as axonal organization, myelination gliosis, and myelination, previously reported by other groups on post-mortem fetuses using immunostaining methods. According to the DTI parameter dynamics, we suggest that myelination (phase 3) appears early in the CSTs, followed by the OR and by the CC, respectively. DTI tractography provides access to a better understanding of fetal WM maturation. PMID:22399089

  1. A Novel Mouse Model for Neurotrophic Keratopathy: Trigeminal Nerve Stereotactic Electrolysis through the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giulio; Chauhan, Sunil K.; Ueno, Hiroki; Nallasamy, Nambi; Gandolfi, Stefano; Borges, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a mouse model of neurotrophic keratopathy by approaching the trigeminal nerve through the brain and to evaluate changes in corneal cell apoptosis and proliferation. Methods. Six- to 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice underwent trigeminal stereotactic electrolysis (TSE) to destroy the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. Clinical follow-up using biomicroscopy of the cornea was performed at days 2, 4, 5, and 7. To confirm the effectiveness of the procedure, we examined the gross nerve pathology, blink reflex, and immunohistochemistry of the corneal nerves. TUNEL-positive apoptotic and Ki-67–positive proliferating corneal cells were evaluated to detect changes from the contralateral normal eye. Results. TSE was confirmed by gross histology of the trigeminal nerve and was considered effective if the corneal blink reflex was completely abolished. TSE totally abolished the blink reflex in 70% of mice and significantly reduced it in the remaining 30%. Animals with absent blink reflex were used for subsequent experiments. In these mice, a progressive corneal degeneration developed, with thinning of the corneal epithelium and eventually perforation after 7 days. In all mice, 48 hours after TSE, corneal nerves were not recognizable histologically. Seven days after TSE, an increase in cellular apoptosis in all the corneal layers and a reduction in proliferation in basal epithelial cells were detected consistently in all mice. Conclusions. TSE was able, in most cases, to induce a disease state that reflected clinical neurotrophic keratitis without damaging the periocular structures. Moreover, corneal denervation led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of epithelial cells, formally implicating intact nerve function in regulating epithelial survival and turnover. PMID:21071731

  2. Endogenous inhibition of the trigeminally evoked neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Philbin, K; Bateman, R; Mendelowitz, D

    2010-10-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs. PMID:20719927

  3. Trigeminal trophic syndrome treated with thermoplastic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Anil M; Damian, Diona L; Moloney, Fergal J

    2011-02-01

    A 72-year-old man with a history of thrombotic CVA causing lateral medullary infarction presented with non-healing ulcers of the right side of the face of 5 months' duration. After extensive investigations, a diagnosis of trigeminal trophic syndrome was made. The ulcers progressed relentlessly despite amitriptyline and gabapentin, and he was treated with a combination of carbamazepine and thermoplastic mask occlusion of the right side of his face. Over the next 10 weeks the shallower facial ulcers began to diminish in depth and diameter, and the deeper ulcers stopped progressing. Although the patient showed early signs of healing, he died because of complications from the CVA. PMID:21332680

  4. Gamma Knife Surgery in Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amparo; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) represents a safe, effective, and relatively durable noninvasive treatment option for patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and recurrent TN. By one year's time, 75% to 90% of patients will have obtained pain relief, defined as Barrow Neurological Institute grades I to IIIB. Similar rates have been demonstrated for patients undergoing a second GKS for recurrent TN. Predictors of durability of GKS in TN include type I TN, post-GKS Barrow Neurological Institute score, and the presence of post-Gamma Knife facial numbness. PMID:27324996

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to posterior fossa tumor.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mamta; Agrawal, Vikrant; Agrawal, Rajiv; Pramod, D S R

    2010-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is by no means an uncommon entity presenting as typical or atypical pain syndrome with a standard treatment protocol consisting of medical and surgical therapies. The diagnosis of TN is mainly dependent on the characteristics of symptoms conveyed by the patient and the clinical presentation. Careful history taking, proper interpretation of the signs and symptoms and cranial nerve assessment are necessary for proper diagnosis. Here, we report a case of TN, treated for dental problems and then for neuralgia with only short-term relief. Subsequently, the patient underwent neuroimaging and was found to be having an uncommon space-occupying lesion in the posterior cranial fossa. PMID:22442556

  6. Human colon tissue in organ culture: preservation of normal and neoplastic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Mankey, Cohra; DaSilva, Marissa; Paruchuri, Tejaswi; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Varani, James

    2009-01-01

    Normal and neoplastic human colon tissue obtained at surgery was used to establish conditions for organ culture. Optimal conditions included an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% O2; tissue partially submerged with mucosa at the gas interface; and serum-free medium with 1.5 mM Ca2+ and a number of growth supplements. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features that distinguish normal and neoplastic tissue were preserved over a 2-d period. With normal tissue, this included the presence of elongated crypts with small, densely packed cells at the crypt base and mucin-containing goblet cells in the upper portion. Ki67 staining, for proliferating cells, was confined to the lower third of the crypt, while expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor was seen in the upper third and surface epithelium. E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed throughout the epithelium and confined to the cell surface. In tumor tissue, the same disorganized, abnormal glandular structures seen at time zero were present after 2 d. The majority of cells in these structures were mucin-poor, but occasional goblet cells were seen and mucin staining was present. Ki67 staining was seen throughout the abnormal epithelium and calcium-sensing receptor expression was weak and variable. E-cadherin was seen at the cell surface (similar to normal tissue), but in some places, there was diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Finally, intense cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin staining was observed in cultured neoplastic tissue. PMID:19915935

  7. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amanda H.; Joe, Christopher L.; Davoodi, Auva; Takechi, Kenichi; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive TRPA1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42°C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue. PMID:24759772

  8. Widespread expression of serum amyloid A in histologically normal human tissues. Predominant localization to the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Urieli-Shoval, S; Cohen, P; Eisenberg, S; Matzner, Y

    1998-12-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute-phase reactant whose level in the blood is elevated to 1000-fold as part of the body's responses to various injuries, including trauma, infection, inflammation, and neoplasia. As an acute-phase reactant, the liver has been considered to be the primary site of expression. However, limited extrahepatic SAA expression was described in mouse tissues and in cells of human atherosclerotic lesions. Here we describe nonradioactive in situ hybridization experiments revealing that the SAA mRNA is widely expressed in many histologically normal human tissues. Expression was localized predominantly to the epithelial components of a variety of tissues, including breast, stomach, small and large intestine, prostate, lung, pancreas, kidney, tonsil, thyroid, pituitary, placenta, skin epidermis, and brain neurons. Expression was also observed in lymphocytes, plasma cells, and endothelial cells. RT-PCR analysis of selected tissues revealed expression of the SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4 genes but not of SAA3, consistent with expression of these genes in the liver. Immunohistochemical staining revealed SAA protein expression that co-localized with SAA mRNA expression. These data indicate local production of the SAA proteins in histologically normal human extrahepatic tissues. PMID:9815279

  9. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  10. Anti-DNA autoantibody-producing hybridomas of normal human lymphoid cell origin.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, E; Block, J; Bell, D A

    1984-01-01

    Fusion of human myeloma cell line GM 4672 and tonsillar lymphoid cells from a normal donor resulted in 13 primary hybridomas, which produced IgM anti-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) antibodies, as determined in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nine of these primary hybridomas have been cloned and a total of 34 clones were obtained. Supernatants of these cloned hybridomas were tested for binding to ssDNA, native DNA, RNA, low molecular weight supernatant DNA, polydeoxyguanylate-polydeoxycitidylate, polydeoxyadenylate-thymidylate sodium salt, and cardiolipin. Supernatants from all clones but one showed polyspecificity when reacting with the antigens tested. That the clones were true hybridomas rather than transformed lymphoid cells was evidence by IgM anti-DNA antibody secretion, karyotype analysis, and HLA typing. These studies imply that immunoglobulin genes encoding for anti-DNA autoantibodies with a spectrum of nucleic acid specificities similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, exist among normal B lymphocytes. PMID:6470143