Note: This page contains sample records for the topic normotensas con diabetes from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Meal Planning for People with Diabetes, 2nd Edition = Planificacion de Comidas para Personas con Diabetes, 2 Edicion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet provides information about diabetes and meal planning particularly designed for migrant individuals. The first section defines diabetes, explains different types of diabetes, lists results of uncontrolled diabetes, and describes the goals and components of a diabetic meal plan. The second section explains the exchange system of…

National Migrant Resource Program, Inc., Austin, TX.

2

Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... and risk factors are different for each type: Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it is ... high blood sugar have no symptoms. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop over a short period. People may be ...

3

Diabetes mellitus tipo 2 y calidad de vida relacionada con la salud: resultados del Estudio Hortega  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate which health-related quality of life (HRQOL) aspects are affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and influence of glycemic control and associated cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF). Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in the health coverage area of our hospital. Following a multiphase sampling a final sample of 495 people, representative of the general population,

F. J. Mena Martín; J. C. Martín Escudero; F. Simal Blanco; J. Bellido Casado; J. L. Carretero Ares

2006-01-01

4

Tratamiento de la diabetes mellitus tipo 1 con implante pancreático de células madre adultas autólogas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and objectiveType 1 diabetes results from the autoimmune destruction of ? cells in the pancreas. Several studies have discussed the ability of adult stem cells to differentiate and function effectively. The aim of this study was to attain fasting glycemia of <100mg\\/dl, or any glycemic value of <200mg\\/dl at any time in the course of the day, and a

Alejandro Daniel Mesples; Basilio Pretiñe; Raúl Bellomo

2007-01-01

5

DIABETES  

PubMed Central

Limited options for clinical management of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus call for a novel therapeutic paradigm. Two innovative studies support endoplasmic reticulum as an emerging target for combating both autoimmune and heritable forms of this disease.

Urano, Fumihiko

2014-01-01

6

Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

7

[Diabetes].  

PubMed

The new recommendations on the pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes have introduced two important changes. The first is to have common strategies between European and American diabetes societies. The second, which is certainly the most significant, is to develop a patient centred approach suggesting therapies that take into account the patient's preferences and use of decision support tools. The individual approach integrates six factors: the capacity and motivation of the patient to manage his illness and its treatment, the risks of hypoglycemia, the life expectancy, the presence of co-morbidities and vascular complications, as well as the financial resources of the patient and the healthcare system. Treatment guidelines for cardiovascular risk reduction in diabetic remains the last point to develop. PMID:23409644

Ruiz, J

2013-01-16

8

Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This booklet summarizes what health professionals know about type 2 diabetes what it is, who is at risk for it, how it can be prevented, and how it is treated. It describes how researchers study the disease and what individuals can do to help reduce the rising number of diabetes cases now affecting millions of children and adults around the country.The Science Inside e-book series is ntended to be a bridge between the consumer health brochure and the scientific paper, the booklets in this series focus on the science that is inside of, or behind, the disease its cause, its possible cure, its treatment, promising research, and so on. These booklets are designed to appeal to people who have not had the opportunity to study the science and to understand why they may have been given some of the advice that they have been given through some of the more consumer-oriented materials.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (;)

2003-01-01

9

Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This booklet summarizes what health professionals know about type 2 diabetes what it is, who is at risk for it, how it can be prevented, and how it is treated. It describes how researchers study the disease and what individuals can do to help reduce the rising number of diabetes cases now affecting millions of children and adults around the country.The Science Inside e-book series is intended to be a bridge between the consumer health brochure and the scientific paper, the booklets in this series focus on the science that is inside of, or behind, the disease its cause, its possible cure, its treatment, promising research, and so on. These booklets are designed to appeal to people who have not had the opportunity to study the science and to understand why they may have been given some of the advice that they have been given through some of the more consumer-oriented materials.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science;)

2006-01-01

10

Guia para las Personas con Diabetes: Cuidese los Pies Durante Toda la Vida (Guide for People with Diabetes: Take Care of Your Feet for a Lifetime).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Do you want to avoid serious foot problems thatcan lead to a toe,foot,or leg amputation. Take Care of Your Feet for a Lifetime tells you how. It's all about taking good care of your feet. Foot care is very important for every person with diabetes, but esp...

2003-01-01

11

Stay at a Healthy Weight. Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes = Mantente en un Peso Saludable. Consejos Para Muchachos con Diabetes Tipo 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A healthy weight means you are not too fat or too thin. Your doctor may have said that you should not gain more weight or that you need to lose a few pounds. If you have diabetes and are overweight, you are not alone. The steps you take to manage your weight will help you feel better and may improve your blood sugar or glucose (GLOO-kos) levels.…

US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

2005-01-01

12

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Versus Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose in Children with Type 1 Diabetes- Are there Pros and Cons for Both?  

PubMed Central

Glucose monitoring is essential for modern diabetes treatment and the achievement of near-normal glycemic control. Monitoring provides the data necessary for patients to make daily management decisions related to food intake, insulin dose, and physical exercise and can enable patients to avoid potentially dangerous episodes of hypo- and hyperglycemia. Additionally, monitoring can provide health care providers with the information needed to identify glycemic patterns, educate patients, and adjust insulin. Presently, youth with type 1 diabetes can self-monitor blood glucose via home blood glucose meters or monitor glucose concentrations nearly continuously using a continuous glucose monitor. There are advantages and disadvantages to the use of either of these technologies. This review describes the two technologies and the research supporting their use in the management of youth with type 1 diabetes in order to weigh their relative costs and benefits.

Patton, Susana R.; Clements, Mark A

2013-01-01

13

Diabetes Overview  

MedlinePLUS

... a week. [ Top ] What are the scope and impact of diabetes? Diabetes is widely recognized as one ... type 2 diabetes gestational diabetes What is the impact of diabetes? It affects 23.6 million people— ...

14

Consistente asociación del polimorfismo rs7903146 en el gen TCF7L2 con mayor riesgo de diabetes en población mediterránea española  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionType 2 diabetes (T2D) can induce the expression of cell adhesion molecules (ICAM, VCAM) and cytokines (IL-6 and CRP). Possibly related to these mechanisms, the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene has been associated with T2D in distinct populations, but there are few data for the Mediterranean population. Our objective was to study the association of this gene with T2D

Paula Carrasco Espí; Jesús Rico Sanz; Carolina Ortega Azorín; José Ignacio González Arráez; Salvador Ruiz de la Fuente; Eva María Asensio Márquez; Ramón Estruch Riba; Dolores Corella Piquer

2011-01-01

15

Diagnósticos de enfermagem identificados em pessoas com diabetes tipo 2 mediante abordagem baseada no Modelo de Orem1 Nursing diagnosis identified in people with diabetes type 2 by means of an approach based on Orem's model Diagnósticos de enfermería identificados en personas con diabetes tipo 2 a través de abordaje basado en el modelo de Orem  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research aimed to describe some of the basic conditioning factors to self-care and analyze the nursing diagnosis of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association among diabetes type 2 carriers by means of an approach based on Orem's theory. Seven diabetic people took part in this study; they were evaluated during the period of May to June of 2006. The

Alyne Coelho Moreira Milhomem; Fabiane Fassini Mantelli; Graziela Aparecida; Valente Lima

16

Diabetes care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing good quality diabetes care is complex but achievable. Many aspects of the care do not require high tech medicine but, rather, good organisation. Diabetes is a costly disease, consuming 1500 pounds per diabetic patient per year versus 500 pounds on average for a non-diabetic member of the population in health service costs. Investment now in good quality diabetes care

J D Ward; M MacKinnon

1992-01-01

17

Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Diabetes can make it hard to control how much sugar (called glucose) is in your blood. There is hope! Some ... you inject. Do I need to take diabetes medicines? Some people with diabetes need to use medicines ...

18

Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

19

Diabetic Dermopathy  

MedlinePLUS

newsletter | contact Share | Diabetic Dermopathy Information for adults A A A Brown, scar-like, slightly elevated lesions on the legs are typical in long-standing diabetics. Overview Diabetic dermopathy, also known as shin spots ...

20

A new look at viruses in type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type 1 diabetes results from the destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Genetic factors are believed to be a major com- ponent for the development of type 1diabetes, but the con- cordance rate for the development of diabetes in identical twins is only about 40%, suggesting that non-genetic factors play an important role in the expression of the disease. Viruses are

Hee-Sook Jun; Ji-Won Yoon

1995-01-01

21

Diabetic Pets  

MedlinePLUS

... health or management, contact your veterinarian. In addition, diabetic pets should be monitored for long-term complications such as cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur ...

22

Diabetes Complications  

MedlinePLUS

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

23

Diabetes Insipidus  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

24

[Diabetic nephropathy].  

PubMed

The number of elderly diabetic patients who require chronic hemodialysis is progressively increasing in Japan. Thus, halting the progression of diabetic nephropathy in elderly diabetic patients is a clinically important issue. However, there is little information or evidence of this complication. Understanding the change of the kidney function with aging, the clinical characteristics and factors associated with the progression of diabetic nephropathy in this population should be useful for establishing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent this life threatening complication. PMID:24397175

Araki, Shin-Ichi

2013-11-01

25

Diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic neuropathy (DN) refers to symptoms and signs of neuropathy in a patient with diabetes in whom other causes of neuropathy have been excluded. Distal symmetrical neuropathy is the commonest accounting for 75% DN. Asymmetrical neuropathies may involve cranial nerves, thoracic or limb nerves; are of acute onset resulting from ischaemic infarction of vasa nervosa. Asymmetric neuropathies in diabetic patients

V Bansal; J Kalita; U K Misra

2006-01-01

26

Diabetic nephropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and accounts for 35% of the ESRD population in the United States. It results in considerable morbidity, mortality, and expense. The average cost of managing one diabetic patient with ESRD is approximately $50,000 a year. Over the last decade, several advances in the management of diabetic nephropathy have

Sidney M. Kobrin

1998-01-01

27

Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

Home > About Low Vision & Blindness > Vision Disorders > Diabetic Retinopathy > Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis Diagnosing Diabetic Retinopathy You've come a long way, baby. ...

28

Diabetes Risk after Gestational Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... diabetes later in life. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) showed that people at risk for type 2 ... being more active and eating healthy foods. Among DPP participants with a history of GDM, both lifestyle ...

29

[Diabetic neuopathy].  

PubMed

In view of increasing number of elderly diabetic patients and their westernized lifestyle, diabetic foot and fractures due to fall attributable to diabetic neuropathy may be common diseases which disturb patients' QOL. Since any therapeutic drugs for patients with diabetic neuropathy have not been fully accepted, much attention should be paid to intensification of self-care for foot lesion and exercise and balance training through education. Some of them may show orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis, etc. Others may complain of pain in limbs. Taken together, management for elderly diabetic patients may well be achieved through education and with symptomatic therapy. PMID:24397176

Yasuda, Hitoshi

2013-11-01

30

Diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Macular edema can occur early, especially in maturity onset diabetics. These patients will usually have blurred vision. An examination (through dilated pupil) will reveal fuzziness or hard exudates in the central retina. The ETDRS proved focal laser treatment to leaking blood vessels reduces vision loss. Proliferative retinopathy occurs after 12-15 years or more of diabetes in juvenile diabetics and any time in maturity onset diabetics. Proliferative disease may be completely asymptomatic until there is a vitreous hemorrhage or retinal detachment. The DRS showed scatter laser treatment reduces severe visual loss by at least 50% in patients with proliferative disease. If proliferative disease is not treated, it almost always causes blindness. We must shout this message to all primary care physicians and diabetics. If we are successful, we can eliminate preventable blindness in Iowa's diabetics. PMID:2254070

Folk, J C; Blodi, C F; Pulido, J S

1990-11-01

31

Types of Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, ... in children, teenagers or young adults. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin ...

32

Genetics of Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

33

Diabetic Neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polyneuropathy is one of the commonest complications of the diabetes and the commonest form of neuropathy in the developed\\u000a world. Diabetic polyneuropathy encompasses several neuropathic syndromes, the most common of which is distal symmetrical neuropathy,\\u000a the main initiating factor for foot ulceration. The epidemiology of diabetic neuropathy has recently been reviewed in reasonable\\u000a detail (1). Several clinic- (2,3) and populationbased

Solomon Tesfaye

34

Paediatric diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes does not spare any section of society, and its prevalence in the paediatric and adolescent age group is rising. This review highlights the etiological and clinical features of childhood diabetes, including secular changes in epidemiology. It discusses the aspects of non pharmacological and pharmacological therapy which are unique to the paediatric age group, and explores current use of novel therapeutic modalities. The article calls for modulation of the psychological environment of the child with diabetes, to help improve his or her quality of life, and sensitizes physicians to take proactive, affirmative action to address the special needs of children with type1 diabetes. PMID:24601207

Kalra, Sanjay

2013-09-01

35

Neonatal Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Nine distinct genetic conditions have been identified in the last 12 years causing neonatal diabetes mellitus through failure of normal pancreatic development, islet cell dysfunction or ?-cell destruction. This review will focus on the three conditions about which our understanding of the pathology – and in some cases the treatment options – has greatly increased: transient neonatal diabetes mellitus,

J. P. H. Shield

2007-01-01

36

Diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed Central

1. Diabetes mellitus is diagnosed by finding a random plasma glucose > 11 mmol/L, or a fasting plasma glucose > 8 mmol/L. The prevalence in the general population is between 1-2% rising to approximately 4-9% in the age group 65+ (Williams, 1985; Croxson et al., 1991). It is more prevalent in people from the Indian subcontinent and in Afro-Caribbeans. 2. Approximately 75% of patients can be treated without recourse to insulin. The development of non-fasting ketonuria and/or significant weight loss suggests the onset of insulin dependence. These patients should be referred for specialist advice rapidly. 3. Chronic, uncontrolled hyperglycaemia greatly increases the risk of developing diabetic eye, nerve and kidney complications. 4. Treatment and follow-up aim: to abolish symptoms, to prevent and/or treat diabetic complications, to promote self-care and self-monitoring by patients, to avoid iatrogenic problems from overtreatment, to promote optimum nutrition for these patients. 5. Advice and assessment from the following specialists need to be built into the treatment plan: dietitian, competent fundoscopist (eg optometrist, general practitioner, hospital specialist depending upon local circumstances), chiropodist, diabetes education nurse and diabetes nurse specialist. 6. All patients need appropriate education about: the nature of diabetes mellitus, the importance of good control and the early detection of complications, a healthy lifestyle, the consequences of diabetes for driving and insurance. 7. All patients with diabetes should be reviewed clinically at least once a year. Diet, understanding of diabetes, self-monitoring, metabolic control and complications should be assessed. More frequent clinical review is required in poorly controlled patients, or those with significant complications, or intercurrent illness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Hurwitz, B.; Yudkin, J.

1992-01-01

37

Gestational diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... too much amniotic fluid Have had an unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth Were overweight before your pregnancy ... 759-765. Serlin DC, Lash RW. Diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus. Am Fam Physician . 2009 ...

38

Diabetic Neuropathy  

MedlinePLUS

... parts of the body, especially your fingers, toes, hands or feet Muscle weakness and difficulty walking Cuts, sores or ... haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes, but my feet are numb and sometimes tingle. Should I be tested for ...

39

[Diabetic retinopathy].  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic pathology whose evolution affects different organs, amongst them the eye. Diabetic microangiopathy affects the retina in an early and specific way. The appearance of retinopathy is directly related to the time of evolution of the disease and metabolic control. Diabetic microangiopathy in the retina shows specific alterations such as micro-aneurysms, soft or hard exudates, intra-retinal micro-haemorrhages, beaded veins and intraretinal microvascular anomalies. These alterations in the retinal microcirculation cause two physiopathological phenomena: capillary closure with the resulting ischaemia or extravasation of intravascular content to the stroma causing edema. In this chapter we set out the classification and treatments of diabetic retinopathy, excluding macular edema, according to the different multicentric studies present in the current bibliography. PMID:19169292

Aliseda Pérez de Madrid, D; Berástegui, I

2008-01-01

40

Travelling diabetics.  

PubMed

During the past several decades, the number of both business and tourist travels has greatly increased. Among them are persons suffering from chronic diseases, including diabetics for whom travels pose the additional health-hazard. Irrespective of better education, self-control and constantly improving quality of specialistic equipment available, diabetics still are the group of patients requiring particular attention. In the case of travelling diabetics, problems may occur concerning the transport and storage of insulin, as well as control of glycaemia, all caused by irregularity of meals, variable diet, physical activity, stress, kinetosis (sea voyages), and the change of time zones. The travel may as well evoke ailments caused by the change of climate and concomitant diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea, malaria, etc. Apart from avoiding glycaemia fluctuations, important for retaining health of diabetics is the prevention of other diseases and carrying the necessary drugs. PMID:12608590

Che?mi?ska, Katarzyna; Jaremin, Bogdan

2002-01-01

41

Diabetic Retinopathy  

MedlinePLUS

... retinopathy—damage to the blood vessels in the retina. Cataract —clouding of the eye's lens. Cataracts develop ... by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. In some people with diabetic retinopathy, blood vessels ...

42

Diabetes Insipidus  

MedlinePLUS

... but not thirst and fluid intake. This fluid overload can lead to water intoxi cation, a condition ... current studies, visit www.ClinicalTrials.gov. For More Information The Diabetes Insipidus and Related Disorders Network 535 ...

43

Diabetes Insipidus  

MedlinePLUS

... but not thirst and fluid intake. This fluid overload can lead to water intoxication, a condition that ... that the product is unsatisfactory. [ Top ] For More Information The Diabetes Insipidus and Related Disorders Network 535 ...

44

Diabetic Neuropathies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic neuropathies (DN) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that include a wide range of abnormalities. They can be\\u000a focal or diffuse, proximal or distal, affecting both peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, causing morbidity with significant\\u000a impact on the quality of life of the person with diabetes, resulting in early mortality. Distal symmetric polyneuropathy,\\u000a the most common form of DN,

Aaron I. Vinik

45

Treating Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... eliminate the need for medication altogether. Back Continue Monitoring Blood Sugar Levels Treating type 2 diabetes also ... Center Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Weight and Diabetes Monitoring Blood Sugar Your Diabetes Health Care Team Type ...

46

Diabetes-Friendly Recipes  

MedlinePLUS

... nutritious treat. Nutty Chocolate Pudding with Banana Slices Dark cocoa powder intensifies the flavor of this chocolate ... 5/2012. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters • Understand Your Risk for Diabetes • Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring ...

47

Low proliferation capacity of lymphocytes from alloxan-diabetic rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proliferation capacity of lymphocytes obtained from mesenteric lymph nodes of control and alloxan-diabetic (40 mg\\/kg) rats in response to concanavalin A (ConA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimuli was examined. Proliferation response of lymphocytes from diabetic rats was significantly reduced under Con A (43%) and LPS (46%) stimulation as compared with the control group. Insulin (166 ?M) promoted a marked increase

Rosemari Otton; Carla R. O Carvalho; José R Mendonça; Rui Curi

2002-01-01

48

Parents of Diabetic Children and Medical Compliance - Dissertation Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research began with a specific focus on the quality of daily care of children with diabetes. Treatment of diabetes in children primarily takes place at home under parental supervision rather than in a hospital, clinic, or medical office. Research con...

K. W. Johnson

1980-01-01

49

Diabetic nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic renal disease and a major cause of cardiovascular mortality. Diabetic nephropathy has been categorized into stages: microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. The cut-off values of micro- and macroalbuminuria are arbitrary and their values have been questioned. Subjects in the upper-normal range of albuminuria seem to be at high risk of progression to micro- or macroalbuminuria and they also had a higher blood pressure than normoalbuminuric subjects in the lower normoalbuminuria range. Diabetic nephropathy screening is made by measuring albumin in spot urine. If abnormal, it should be confirmed in two out three samples collected in a three to six-months interval. Additionally, it is recommended that glomerular filtration rate be routinely estimated for appropriate screening of nephropathy, because some patients present a decreased glomerular filtration rate when urine albumin values are in the normal range. The two main risk factors for diabetic nephropathy are hyperglycemia and arterial hypertension, but the genetic susceptibility in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is of great importance. Other risk factors are smoking, dyslipidemia, proteinuria, glomerular hyperfiltration and dietary factors. Nephropathy is pathologically characterized in individuals with type 1 diabetes by thickening of glomerular and tubular basal membranes, with progressive mesangial expansion (diffuse or nodular) leading to progressive reduction of glomerular filtration surface. Concurrent interstitial morphological alterations and hyalinization of afferent and efferent glomerular arterioles also occur. Podocytes abnormalities also appear to be involved in the glomerulosclerosis process. In patients with type 2 diabetes, renal lesions are heterogeneous and more complex than in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Treatment of diabetic nephropathy is based on a multiple risk factor approach, and the goal is retarding the development or progression of the disease and to decrease the subject's increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control, treating hypertension (<130/80 mmHg) and dyslipidemia (LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl), using drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, are effective strategies for preventing the development of microalbuminuria, delaying the progression to more advanced stages of nephropathy and reducing cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes.

Zelmanovitz, Themis; Gerchman, Fernando; Balthazar, Amely PS; Thomazelli, Fulvio CS; Matos, Jorge D; Canani, Luis H

2009-01-01

50

[Diabetes emergencies].  

PubMed

Diabetes-associated emergencies are frequent and include hyperglycemic states, such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) as well as hypoglycemia (hypoglycemic coma) and metabolic disturbances that are unrelated to pathological blood glucose aberrations (lactic acidosis). Knowledge of the respective risk situations, key signs and symptoms as well as early detection, special aspects of intensive care treatment and procedures for the prevention of these diabetes emergency cases is a must not only for the duty doctor in intensive care but also for diabetologists, internists and family doctors in the outpatient situation. The basic facts on these issues are presented in this continuing medical education (CME) article in a didactically clear form. PMID:24820043

Scherbaum, W A; Scherbaum, C R

2014-05-01

51

[Diabetics travelling].  

PubMed

As anyone else, diabetic patients are confronted to professional or private travels. This article is meant to gather some practical recommendations to allow patients to travel safely. All travels must be thoroughly prepared and diabetes must stabilised at best before departure. To avoid severe hypoglycaemias and ketosis are the medical objectives. It is therefore essential that patients take with them their injection material and a sufficient carbohydrate back up. The prevention of diarrheas and vomiting, as well as the adaptation of treatment to jet-lag and all kind of physical activity are necessary to have a nice travel. Some specific aspects of travelling by car, boat or plane are discussed. PMID:15962625

Aebi, A; Golay, A

2005-05-11

52

Breastfeeding and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As diabetes becomes more prevalent in younger women, diabetes and maternal-child health issues such as breastfeeding coexist\\u000a with increasing frequency in clinical practice. Women with diabetes of any kind including type 1 diabetes (DM1), type 2 diabetes\\u000a (DM2) or gestational diabetes (GDM) should be strongly encouraged to breastfeed because of the maternal and pediatric benefits\\u000a specific to obesity and diabetes

Julie Scott Taylor; Melissa Nothnagle; Susanna R. Magee

53

Diabetes insipidus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes insipidus is a heterogeneous condition characterized by polyuria and polydipsia caused by a lack of secretion of vasopressin, its physiological suppression following excessive water intake, or kidney resistance to its action. In many patients, it is caused by the destruction or degeneration of the neurons that originate in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. Known causes of

Mohamad Maghnie

2003-01-01

54

Diabetes and Insulin  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin and it becomes resistant to insulin’s effects. It occurs in adults and elderly patients, ... 2 diabetes later in life, however. and Diabetes Insulin What Is DIabetes? Diabetes is a disease in ...

55

Tuberculosis and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

TUBERCULOSIS & DIABETES COLLABORATIVE FRAMEWORK FOR CARE AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND DIABETES © WHO Sept 2011 For more information: ... increase by 50% by 2030 THE LINKS BETWEEN TUBERCULOSIS AND DIABETES • People with a weak immune system, ...

56

Diabetes and nerve damage  

MedlinePLUS

Nerve damage that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. This condition is a complicaiton ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by ... level . This condition is more likely when blood sugar level ...

57

"Stop Diabetes Now!"  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

58

Diabetes Care and Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The major goals of this continuing project are the establishment of a telemedicine system for comprehensive diabetes management and the assessment of diabetic retinopathy that provides increased access for diabetic patients to appropriate care, that centr...

D. Birkmire-Peters D. S. Vincent J. Humphry K. Parisi

2007-01-01

59

Treatments for Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... y la diabetes Ofrece información general sobre la nutrición, incluyendo cuánto, cuándo y cómo debe comer un ... diabetes es una compilación de la serie sobre nutrición titulada Tengo Diabetes, en particular, los títulos Qué, ...

60

Staying Healthy with Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... for people with diabetes to get an annual flu shot? Diabetes can make the immune system more vulnerable ... yourself from getting the flu by getting a flu shot every year. Everyone with diabetes—even pregnant women— ...

61

Diabetic cardiomyopathy.  

PubMed

Although the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy is poorly understood, recent evidence implicates perturbations in cardiac energy metabolism. Whereas mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation is the chief energy source for the normal postnatal mammalian heart, the relative contribution of glucose utilization pathways is significant, allowing the plasticity necessary for steady ATP production in the context of diverse physiologic and dietary conditions. Because of the importance of insulin in the regulation of myocardial metabolism, chronic insulin deficiency or resistance results in a marked reduction in cardiac glucose utilization such that the heart relies almost exclusively on fatty acids to generate energy. High rates of fatty acid utilization in the diabetic heart could lead to functional derangements related to accumulation of lipid intermediates, excessive oxygen consumption.... Chronic derangements in myocardial cell metabolism, as well as impairment of various intracellular signalling pathways, may therefore have maladaptive consequences, including functional abnormalities. PMID:15106750

Feuvray, D

2004-03-01

62

Diabetic Encephalopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes and its treatment are associated with functional and structural disturbances in the brain. Acute disturbances are\\u000a related to acute hypoglycemia or severe hyperglycemia and stroke. These acute metabolic and vascular insults to the brain\\u000a are well known and beyond the scope of this chapter, which will focus on changes in cerebral function and structure that develop\\u000a more insidiously. These

Geert Jan Biessels

63

Diabetes Diagnosis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this inquiry-based lesson, students learn about diabetes mellitus and explore techniques for diagnosing and monitoring the disease. Students must propose a plan for testing two different case study patients, then carry out their plan using artificial samples from each patient. This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiological SocietyÃÂs 1999 Frontiers in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org.

Ms. Marcy Hotchkiss (Landsdowne High School)

1999-12-01

64

The diabetic foot  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foot ulceration in diabetes is common. Foot problems remain the commonest cause of hospital admission amongst patients with diabetes in Western countries. The lifetime risk of a patient with diabetes developing an ulcer is 25%, and up to 85% of all lower limb amputations in diabetes are preceded by foot ulcers. As many as 50% of older patients with type

Andrew J M Boulton

65

The Cost of Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetics must choose how much effort to devote to health care. Technological innovation and product differentiation have lowered the price of diabetic compliance. New diabetic cohorts should be healthier than previous cohorts. This paper uses the 1976 and 1989 cross-sections of the National Health Interview Surveys to explore trends in Diabetic health and labor force participation.

Matthew Kahn

1995-01-01

66

Weight and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... in a person's diabetes management plan. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes If a person has type 1 diabetes but hasn't been treated yet, he or she often loses weight. In type 1 diabetes, the body can't use glucose (pronounced: GLOO- ...

67

Neuroprotection in Diabetic Encephalopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing evidence has shown that diabetes may be associated with learning and memory deficits in humans. These cognitive disorders, called ‘diabetic encephalopathy’, can impair the daily performance of diabetic individuals. In recent years, some neuroprotective measures have been proposed to prevent diabetic neuropathology. This review attempts to show a summary of different experimental measures that have been described to improve

Seyyed Amirhossein Fazeli

2009-01-01

68

Diabetes and Cardiac Dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Type 2 diabetes is associated with a marked increase in cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes some of the experimental\\u000a evidence supporting the existence of a diabetic cardiomyopathy, defined as ventricular dysfunction in the absence of coronary\\u000a artery disease, in three rodent models of type 2 diabetes produced by leptin receptor mutations: diabetic db\\/db mice, diabetic ZDF fa\\/fa rats, and corpulent]CK:LA-cp\\/cp

David L. Severson; Ellen Aasum; Darrell D. Belke; Terje S. Larsen; Lisa M. Semeniuk; Yakhin Shimoni

69

[Diabetes and cardiovascular complications].  

PubMed

The prevalence of obesity and diabetes is increasing dramatically. Currently, 800,000 patients are suffering from diabetes mellitus in Austria. Chronic hyperglycemia results in micro- and macrovascular complications, which reduce life expectancy up to 8 years. Furthermore, diabetes is among the most important risk factors for premature atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The incidence of coronary artery disease in diabetics is relatively high with about 146 cases per 10,000 patient years. Apart, it could be demonstrated that the presence of diabetes mellitus worsens the prognosis after an acute coronary syndrome. Considering ischemic stroke, the situation is nearly the same, as it is known that diabetes mellitus increases the risk for ischemic stroke events up to 5 times. Beside the macrovascular complications, microvascular complications like diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy and diabetic neuropathy also play a critical role. Retinopathy can be detected in nearly every patient after a diabetes duration of 20 years. Diabetic nephropathy, which is a major complication of diabetes mellitus, accounts for 19% of end stage renal disease. Microalbuminuria, which is an early marker of diabetic nephropathy, can be found in 30% of the patients after 10 years of diabetes. Due to the severity of the diabetic complications an early intensified antidiabetic treatment is highly important for the prevention of micro- and macrovascular events. PMID:20229155

Resl, Michael; Clodi, Martin

2010-01-01

70

Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?  

MedlinePLUS

... Teens with Diabetes: What is Diabetes? Download This Publication (NDEP-63) Want this item now? Download it ... Diabetes: What is Diabetes? (Black & White) Print this Publication (NDEP-63) To print large quantities of a ...

71

[Autoimmune thyropathies in diabetics].  

PubMed

Autoimmune thyropathies are frequent in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Some recently published papers confirm similarly high prevalence of autoimmune thyropathies also in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis is the most frequent form of autoimmune thyropathies. Authors examined 79 accidentally selected diabetics (38 women and 41 men, x = 55.4 +/- 2.8). Diabetic patients were divided into three groups. 20 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus - classical form were the first group, 12 patients with LADA were the second group and 47 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus constituted the third group. Authors diagnosed chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in 8 (40 %) patients in the group of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, in 6 (50%) in the group of patients with LADA and in 20 (43%) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They didn't find out statistically more frequent prevalence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in all groups of patients with diabetes (patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, patients with LADA, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus) in comparison with control group of non-diabetic subjects. They found out statistically significant more frequent prevalence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in diabetics of woman gender and in diabetics with positive family history of thyropathies. Results of paper confirm recommendation of examining once or twice a year autoantibodies against thyroid gland and level of thyrotropin (TSH) with the aim of early finding of laboratory manifestation of thyroidal autoimmunity or developing functional disorder. PMID:16623276

Schroner, Z; Lazúrová, I; Petrovicová, J

2006-02-01

72

Approaching pre-diabetes.  

PubMed

As the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes continues to rise, the time has come to revisit our approach to pre-diabetes. Recently, much ado has been made about screening, diagnosis, pathophysiology and clinical interventions in pre-diabetes, and all for good reason as the key to reversing the diabetes epidemic likely lies therein. The somewhat controversial term "pre-diabetes" represents collective dysglycemic states intermediate between normal glucose regulation (NGR) and diabetes. Not all people with pre-diabetes will develop diabetes, but the majority will. In fact, up to 70% of those with pre-diabetes may acquire the disease over their lifetime. Furthermore, even when overt diabetes is delayed or prevented, both micro- and macrovascular disease appears more prevalent in those with pre-diabetes compared to their normoglycemic peers. Hence, there is growing consensus that NGR should be the goal for people with pre-diabetes. Nevertheless, there is much to consider in that pursuit. Herein, we provide an update on the global burden of pre-diabetes, its underlying pathophysiology and discuss clinical considerations in these individuals at high risk of developing diabetes. PMID:24342268

Perreault, Leigh; Færch, Kristine

2014-01-01

73

Diabetes Resources for Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Older Adults Text Size: S M L | About Diabetes Resources for Older Adults Diabetes occurs in people of ... issues that affect this population. Help me find resources for: Managing My Diabetes Preventing Type 2 Diabetes ...

74

National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014  

MedlinePLUS

... failure, blindness, and premature death. Types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes was previously called insulindependent diabetes mellitus or juvenile- ... age for diagnosis is in the mid-teens. Type 1 diabetes develops when the cells that produce the hormone ...

75

Diabetes in Children and Teens  

MedlinePLUS

... type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes ...

76

"Control Your Diabetes. For Life."  

MedlinePLUS

... Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call toll- ...

77

Islet Cell Hormonal Responses to Hypoglycemia After Human Islet Transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Islet transplantation can eliminate severe hypoglycemic episodes in patients with type 1 diabetes; however, whether intrahepatic islets respond appropriately to hypo- glycemia after transplantation has not been fully studied. We evaluated six islet transplant recipients, six type 1 diabetic subjects, and seven nondiabetic control subjects using a stepped hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp. Also, three islet transplant recipients and the seven con- trol

Michael R. Rickels; Mark H. Schutta; Rebecca Mueller; James F. Markmann; Clyde F. Barker; Ali Naji; Karen L. Teff

2005-01-01

78

Glycohemoglobin: A Primary Predictor of the Development or Reversal of Complications of Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major health prob- lem worldwide with long-term micro- and macrovascu- lar complications responsible for a majority of its mor- bidity and mortality. The development and progression of these complications relate strongly to glycemic con- trol. Methods: We reviewed the literature extensively for studies that relate glycemic control to the development and progression of diabetic complications.

Uma Krishnamurti; Michael W. Steffes

79

Diabetes in Navajo Youth  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To estimate the prevalence and incidence of diabetes, clinical characteristics, and risk factors for chronic complications among Navajo youth, using data collected by the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study (SEARCH study). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The SEARCH study identified all prevalent cases of diabetes in 2001 and all incident cases in 2002–2005 among Navajo youth. We estimated denominators with the user population for eligible health care facilities. Youth with diabetes also attended a research visit that included questionnaires, physical examination, blood and urine collection, and extended medical record abstraction. RESULTS—Diabetes is infrequent among Navajo youth aged <10 years. However, both prevalence and incidence of diabetes are high in older youth. Among adolescents aged 15–19 years, 1 in 359 Navajo youth had diabetes in 2001 and 1 in 2,542 developed diabetes annually. The vast majority of diabetes among Navajo youth with diabetes is type 2, although type 1 diabetes is also present, especially among younger children. Navajo youth with either diabetes type were likely to have poor glycemic control, high prevalence of unhealthy behaviors, and evidence of severely depressed mood. Youth with type 2 diabetes had more metabolic factors associated with obesity and insulin resistance (abdominal fat deposition, dyslipidemia, and higher albumin-to-creatinine ratio) than youth with type 1 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS—Our data provide evidence that diabetes is an important health problem for Navajo youth. Targeted efforts aimed at primary prevention of diabetes in Navajo youth and efforts to prevent or delay the development of chronic complications among those with diabetes are warranted.

Dabelea, Dana; DeGroat, Joquetta; Sorrelman, Carmelita; Glass, Martia; Percy, Christopher A.; Avery, Charlene; Hu, Diana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Beyer, Jennifer; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Testaverde, Lisa; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Hamman, Richard F.

2009-01-01

80

[Diabetic chorea].  

PubMed

Diabetic chorea is characterized by acute hemichorea, as observed on striatal T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and is associated with hyperglycemia. Acute involuntary movements begin with the onset of hyperglycemia. This condition produces characteristic MR images, which are the key diagnostic feature. Contralateral T1 MRI hyperdensities have been observed in virtually all cases and are used as a diagnostic measure. In some cases, smaller, less dense lesions are seen on the ipsilateral side. The putamen is always involved, whereas the caudate and globus pallidus are involved occasionally. This lesion is usually well delineated and does not follow vascular distribution. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient show restricted diffusion on the corresponding side of the putamen. Increased susceptibility (hypodensity) is observed using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Perhaps the most parsimonious explanation for the imaging results is that they represent gemistocytes. Pathological studies have confirmed the presence of gemistocytes, and these findings are consistent with T1, T2, DWI, and SWI MRI sequence findings. The zinic-laden metallothionein protein in the gemistocytes is the primary reason for the diagnostic imaging findings. The first avenue of treatment is to address the underlying hyperglycemia. As the hyperglycemia decreases, the chorea improves over the subsequent days or weeks, in most cases. If the chorea is uncomfortable, disabling, or persistent, symptomatic therapy (e.g., administration of haloperidol, a dopamine antagonist) should be initiated. PMID:24523310

Takamatsu, Kazuhiro

2014-02-01

81

Improving paediatric diabetes care.  

PubMed

The authors review the management of paediatric patients in diabetic ketoacidosis. Paying particular attention to the pathophysiology of the illness and nursing documentation, they have developed a new diabetic ketoacidosis flow chart to improve nursing care. PMID:10687641

Harrop, M; Thornton, H; Woodhall, C; Ratcliff, J

82

Diabetic Retinopathy Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS) was a multicenter clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of photocoagulation, (argon laser and xenon arc) in the treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. This randomized, controlled study involved 1,758 patien...

1981-01-01

83

Diabetic Retinopathy Study Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS) was a multicenter clinical trail to evaluate the efficacy of photocoagulation, (argon laser and xenon arc) in the treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. This randomized, controlled study involved 1,758 patien...

1983-01-01

84

Diabetes - Eye Complications  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... can be prevented or delayed through good diabetes management. When they occur, these diseases can be treated ... as retinopathy, cataract, and glaucoma. Prevention through successful management of diabetes helps prevent and delay these eye ...

85

Diabetes Travel Tips Video  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health , the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , and more than 200 public and private organizations. Home Publications Resources Diabetes Facts Press I Have Diabetes Am ...

86

If I Had - Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Than Known Risk Factors for Predicting Type 2 Diabetes (Interview with Dr. James Meigs, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital) If I Had - Diabetes - Dr. David M. Nathan, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital; ...

87

American Diabetes Association  

MedlinePLUS

... Yourself Fundraising Close Invest in a cure for diabetes. Every monthly donation of $9 can lead to ... tips, recipes and more! Women Riding to Stop Diabetes ® ! Get together with friends for a weekend at ...

88

Screening for Gestational Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Gestational Diabetes. This ... services, but these potential harms are small. The Final Recommendations on Screening Women for Gestational Diabetes: What ...

89

"Diabetes is beatable!"  

MedlinePLUS

... For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Diabetes is beatable!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Photo: Jeremy Williamson Jeremy Williamson, 33 Augusta, Ga. Type 1 Jeremy Williamson was diagnosed with type ...

90

Adrenomedullin and diabetes  

PubMed Central

Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone widely expressed in different tissues, especially in the vasculature. Apart from its vasodilatatory and hypotensive effect, it plays multiple roles in the regulation of hormonal secretion, glucose metabolism and inflammatory response. ADM regulates insulin balance and may participate in the development of diabetes. The plasma level of ADM is increased in people with diabetes, while in healthy individuals the plasma ADM concentration remains low. Plasma ADM levels are further increased in patients with diabetic complications. In type 1 diabetes, plasma ADM level is correlated with renal failure and retinopathy, while in type 2 diabetes its level is linked with a wider range of complications. The elevation of ADM level in diabetes may be due to hyperinsulinemia, oxidative stress and endothelial injury. At the same time, a rise in plasma ADM level can trigger the onset of diabetes. Strategies to reduce ADM level should be explored so as to reduce diabetic complications.

Wong, Hoi Kin; Tang, Fai; Cheung, Tsang Tommy; Cheung, Bernard Man Yung

2014-01-01

91

Diabetic Eye Problems  

MedlinePLUS

... this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause ... surgery, with follow-up care. Two other eye problems can happen to people with diabetes. A cataract ...

92

Diabetic Ulcer (Neurogenic Ulcer)  

MedlinePLUS

... that you can see down to the bone. Diabetic foot ulcers commonly occur on the pressure points of ... that your doctor may prescribe. Trusted Links MedlinePlus: Diabetic Foot References Levin ME: Pathogenesis and general management of ...

93

Tight Diabetes Control  

MedlinePLUS

... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

94

Diabetes, Type 1  

MedlinePLUS

... developed diabetic retinopathy within 25 years of diagnosis. Blindness from diabetic retinopathy was responsible for about 12 percent of new cases of blindness between the ages of 45 and 74. Studies ...

95

Diabetes and bone health.  

PubMed

The increasing prevalence of diabetes especially type 2 diabetes worldwide is indisputable. Diabetics suffer increased morbidity and mortality, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, not only because of vascular complications, but also because of an increased fracture incidence. Both types 1 and 2 diabetes and some medications used to treat it are associated with osteoporotic fractures. The responsible mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. In this review, we evaluate the role of glycemic control in bone health, and the effect of anti-diabetic medications such as thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, DPP-4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 agonists. In addition, we examine the possible role of insulin and metformin as anabolic agents for bone. Lastly, we identify the current and future screening tools that help evaluate bone health in diabetics and their limitations. In this way we can offer individualized treatment, to the at-risk diabetic population. PMID:23628280

Antonopoulou, Marianna; Bahtiyar, Gül; Banerji, Mary Ann; Sacerdote, Alan S

2013-11-01

96

Microperimetry in diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy has an enormous impact on visual function, even before permanent visual acuity loss. Moreover, adequate functional tests are mandatory to diagnose and follow diabetic patients treated for diabetic macular edema (DME). More precisely, the visual function safety profile of any therapy for DME should be accurately investigated. Microperimetry offers the possibility to obtain an exact fundus-related quantification of retinal sensitivity, and it is changing the current approach to the functional investigation of diabetic retinopathy.

Midena, Edoardo; Vujosevic, Stela

2011-01-01

97

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent and costly complication of type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine the\\u000a impact of diabetes on CVD. Shedding some light on the diabetes\\/CVD relationship are epidemiologic studies, which focused on\\u000a Native Americans, who collectively experienced little or no diabetes or CVD in the past, but experience both conditions in\\u000a epidemic proportions today.

Barbara V. Howard; Michelle F. Magee

2000-01-01

98

[Insulin therapy of diabetes].  

PubMed

Hyperglycemia contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Thus, reaching treatment targets with regard to control of glycemia is a central goal in the therapy of diabetic patients. The present article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the practical use of insulin according to current scientific evidence and clinical studies. PMID:23250454

Lechleitner, Monika; Roden, Michael; Weitgasser, Raimund; Ludvik, Bernhard; Fasching, Peter; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schernthaner, Guntram; Prager, Rudolf; Wascher, Thomas C

2012-12-01

99

Dietary survey of diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of 168 diabetic children from Tyneside and Teeside aimed to record what the children actually ate and to compare this with both their prescribed diet and current recommendations. The amounts of energy consumed were similar to those expected of non-diabetic children, but the components of the diabetic children's diets were different, consisting of more fat and fibre, but

A F Hackett; S Court; C McCowen; J M Parkin

1986-01-01

100

The Cost of Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetics must choose how much effort to devote to health care. Technological innovation and product differentiation have lowered the price of diabetic compliance. It is now easier to frequently test blood and to adjust insulin levels. The quality of sugar free food substitutes have greatly improved. New diabetic cohorts should be healthier than previous cohorts. This paper uses the 1976

Matthew E. Kahn

1994-01-01

101

Anemia and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

World Health Organization statistics identify 150 million people with diabetes mellitus worldwide and suggest that this figure may double by 2025. In countries with a western lifestyle, the number of patients admitted for renal replacement therapy with diabetes as a co-morbid condition has increased significantly up to three to four times in a period of 10 years. Diabetes and renal

G. Deray; A. Heurtier; A. Grimaldi; V. Launay Vacher; C. Isnard Bagnis

2004-01-01

102

Diabetes in Pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of present practices in the assessment and treatment of diabetes during pregnancy is presented, including preconception\\u000a counseling, insulin therapy, nutrition and exercise therapy of patients with pre-existing diabetes, care of patients with\\u000a gestational diabetes, and post-partum care for infants and mothers of both conditions.

Elizabeth S. Halprin

103

Diabetes Type 2  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

104

Diabetes Type 1  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

105

The Student with Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since nearly one million students suffer from diabetes, most teachers are likely to have a diabetic child in class at some time. Though most diabetic children are not likely to require an insulin injection during the day, it is necessary that every teacher be aware of the occasional problems which might arise. (JN)

Wentworth, Samuel M.; Hoover, Joan

1981-01-01

106

Gestational Diabetes and Future Risk of Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background In this study of women with gestational diabetes we attempted to (a) Determine the magnitude of the long term risk of progression to diabetes and (b) Identify factors that predict the development of diabetes. Methods All women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK from 1995 to 2003 were included in this observational cohort study and followed up till 2009. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose ? 7.0 mmol/L, random/two-hour glucose following 75 gram oral glucose test (OGTT) ? 11.1 mmol/L or HbA1c ? 7.0%. Results The risk of developing diabetes was 6.9% at five years and 21.1% at ten years following the initial diagnosis of GDM. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels in the oral glucose tolerance test during pregnancy were associated with future risk of diabetes. There was no association with age, gestational age at diagnosis of GDM, numbers of previous and subsequent pregnancies. Conclusion Risk of progression to diabetes in a UK based cohort of women with GDM is estimated. Women with fasting antenatal glucose ? 7.0 mmol/L and/or an antenatal two-hour glucose ? 11.1 mmol/L are at higher risk and need close follow up.

Sivaraman, Subash Chander; Vinnamala, Sudheer; Jenkins, David

2013-01-01

107

Genetics of Type 1 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a By the American Diabetes Association Classification, Type 1A Diabetes is the immune-mediated form of diabetes, while Type\\u000a 1B represents nonimmune-mediated forms of diabetes with beta-cell destruction leading to absolute insulin deficiency (1 ?).\\u000a There are additional forms of insulin-dependent diabetes with defined etiologies (“Other Specific Types of Diabetes:” genetic,\\u000a hormonal, and environmental). Finally, type 2 diabetes is, overall, the most

Aaron Michels; Joy Jeffrey; George S. Eisenbarth

108

Built environment and diabetes.  

PubMed

Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, 'the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution.' Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. PMID:20535308

Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G R

2010-04-01

109

Built environment and diabetes  

PubMed Central

Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, ‘the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution.’ Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus.

Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G. R.

2010-01-01

110

Burns in diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

CONTEXT AND AIMS: Diabetic burn patients comprise a significant population in burn centers. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics of diabetic burn patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data were collected on 94 diabetic burn patients between March 20, 2000 and March 20, 2006. Of 3062 burns patients, 94 (3.1%) had diabetes; these patients were compared with 2968 nondiabetic patients with burns. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical analysis software SPSS 10.05. Differences between the two groups were evaluated using Student's t-test and the chi square test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: The major mechanism of injury for the diabetic patients was scalding and flame burns, as was also the case in the nondiabetic burn patients. The diabetic burn patients were significantly older, with a lower percentage of total burn surface area (TBSA) than the nondiabetic burn population. There was significant difference between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients in terms of frequency of infection. No difference in mortality rate between diabetic and nondiabetic burn patients was observed. The most common organism in diabetic and nondiabetic burn patients was methicillin-resistant staphylococcus. Increasing %TBSA burn and the presence of inhalation injury are significantly associated with increased mortality following burn injury. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetics have a higher propensity for infection. Education for diabetic patients must include caution about potential burn mishaps and the complications that may ensue from burns.

Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser; Khalili, Nasim

2008-01-01

111

The Diabetic Foot  

PubMed Central

The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the principles of good foot care. If time for teaching is limited, this task must be delegated to a podiatrist or a diabetes nurse educator in a diabetes day centre. It is the physician's responsibility to confirm foot care by personal inspection of the feet of all diabetic patients at every visit.

Hunt, J.A.

1990-01-01

112

Diabetes mellitus and stroke.  

PubMed

The aim of this article was to describe (i) the epidemiology and outcomes of stroke relating to diabetes; (ii) the pathophysiology of diabetes as a risk factor for stroke; (iii) the management of acute stroke in patients with diabetes; (iv) the evidence of primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with diabetes; and (v) the risk of new-onset diabetes using older antihypertensive agents. The combination of diabetes and stroke disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence from large clinical trials performed in patients with diabetes supports the need for aggressive and early intervention to target patients' cardiovascular (CV) risks in order to prevent the onset, recurrence and progression of acute stroke. Identification of at-risk patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome has also allowed the delivery of early and effective intervention to reduce stroke risks, while active treatment during the acute phase of stroke will reduce long-term neurological and functional deficits. While the ongoing debate on the risk benefits of different antihypertensive, lipid-lowering and antiplatelet agents should not detract clinicians from pursuing aggressive CV risk reduction, the application of evidence-based medicine specifically in patients with diabetes will facilitate the use of appropriate agents to improve clinical outcomes. The overall management of patients with diabetes and acute stroke or at risk of secondary stroke should also include multifactorial intervention that not only targets patient's CV risk but also includes behavioural, lifestyle and, where appropriate, surgical intervention. PMID:16409428

Idris, I; Thomson, G A; Sharma, J C

2006-01-01

113

Brazilin augments cellular immunity in multiple low dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) induced type I diabetic mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brazilin, an active principle ofCaesalprenia sappan, was examined for its immunopotentiating effects in multiple low dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) induced type diabetic mice.\\u000a Brazilin was intraperitoneally administered for 5 consecutive days to MLD-STZ induced type I diabetic mice. Delayed type hypersensitivity,\\u000a Con A-induced proliferation of splenocytes and mixed lymphocyte reaction, which had been decreased in diabetic mice, were\\u000a significantly recovered by

Kyoung-Mee Yang; Sun-Duck Jeon; Dhong-Soo So; Chang-Kiu Moon

2000-01-01

114

Surgery for diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Surgery for diabetic retinopathy addresses late secondary complications of a primary microvascular disease. Since surgery is not a causative therapy, the functional outcome of surgery depends on the degree of retinal ischemia and may be disappointing even in technically and anatomically successfully operated eyes. Typical indications for vitrectomy are vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment, combined tractional rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and tractive macular edema. More recently diffuse diabetic macular edema has been shown to improve after removal of an attached vitreous in several cases. Neovascular glaucoma requires aggressive surgical intervention to salvage the eye. Cataract surgery is commonly performed in eyes with diabetic retinopathy. It may however deteriorate diabetic eye disease. Vitreous surgery also has a potential for severe complications in diabetic eyes which can be ameliorated but not eliminated by proper surgical strategies and techniques. The decision for an intervention in diabetic eyes always requires a careful weighing of risks and benefits of surgery. PMID:17380064

Helbig, Horst

2007-01-01

115

Epigenetics of diabetic complications  

PubMed Central

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are complex diseases associated with multiple complications, and both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in these pathologies. While numerous studies have provided a wealth of knowledge regarding the genetics of diabetes, the mechanistic pathways leading to diabetes and its complications remain only partly understood. Studying the role of epigenetics in diabetic complications can provide valuable new insights to clarify the interplay between genes and the environment. DNA methylation and histone modifications in nuclear chromatin can generate epigenetic information as another layer of gene transcriptional regulation sensitive to environmental signals. Recent evidence shows that key biochemical pathways and epigenetic chromatin histone methylation patterns are altered in target cells under diabetic conditions and might also be involved in the metabolic memory phenomenon noted in clinical trials and animal studies. New therapeutic targets and treatment options could be uncovered from an in-depth study of the epigenetic mechanisms that might perpetuate diabetic complications despite glycemic control.

Villeneuve, Louisa M; Natarajan, Rama

2013-01-01

116

Diabetes and depression.  

PubMed

Diabetes and depression occur together approximately twice as frequently as would be predicted by chance alone. Comorbid diabetes and depression are a major clinical challenge as the outcomes of both conditions are worsened by the other. Although the psychological burden of diabetes may contribute to depression, this explanation does not fully explain the relationship between these 2 conditions. Both conditions may be driven by shared underlying biological and behavioral mechanisms, such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, inflammation, sleep disturbance, inactive lifestyle, poor dietary habits, and environmental and cultural risk factors. Depression is frequently missed in people with diabetes despite effective screening tools being available. Both psychological interventions and antidepressants are effective in treating depressive symptoms in people with diabetes but have mixed effects on glycemic control. Clear care pathways involving a multidisciplinary team are needed to obtain optimal medical and psychiatric outcomes for people with comorbid diabetes and depression. PMID:24743941

Holt, Richard I G; de Groot, Mary; Golden, Sherita Hill

2014-06-01

117

Diabetic Retinopathy and VEGF  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading vascular-associated cause of blindness throughout the world. Its treatment requires a multidisciplinary interventional approach at both systemic and local levels. Current management includes laser photocoagulation, intravitreal steroids, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment along with systemic blood sugar control. Anti-VEGF therapies, which are less destructive and safer than laser treatments, are being explored as primary therapy for the management of vision-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy such as diabetic macular edema (DME). This review provides comprehensive information related to VEGF and describes its role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, and in addition, examines the mechanisms of action for different antiangiogenic agents in relation to the management of this disease. Medline (Pubmed) searches were carried out with keywords “VEGF”, “diabetic retinopathy”, and “diabetes” without any year limitation to review relevant manuscripts used for this article.

Gupta, N; Mansoor, S; Sharma, A; Sapkal, A; Sheth, J; Falatoonzadeh, P; Kuppermann, BD; Kenney, MC

2013-01-01

118

Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus (particularly type 2) and osteoporosis are two very common disorders, and both are increasing in prevalence. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus may not reach potential peak bone mass, putting them at greater fracture risk. In adults with type 2 diabetes, fracture risk is increased and is not explained by the bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, still considered the gold standard predictor of fracture. In this review, we explore potential mechanisms behind the increased fracture risk that occurs in patients with diabetes, even those with increased bone mineral density. One potential link between diabetes and bone is the osteoblast-produced factor, osteocalcin. It remains to be established whether osteocalcin reflects or affects the connection between bone and glucose metabolism. Several other potential mediators of the effects of diabetes on bone are discussed. PMID:23471742

Sealand, Robert; Razavi, Christie; Adler, Robert A

2013-06-01

119

Diabetes Control: Why It's Important  

MedlinePLUS

... Kids > Diabetes Center > Medication and Monitoring > Diabetes Control: Why It's Important Print A A A Text Size ... and prevent health problems down the road. That's why everyone might seem concerned about keeping your diabetes ...

120

Guiding Principles for Diabetes Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has developed these Guiding Principles for Diabetes Care to help the health care team manage the disease effectively. The principles outline seven essential components of quality diabetes care that form the b...

2004-01-01

121

"My biggest challenge with diabetes…"  

MedlinePLUS

... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "My biggest challenge with diabetes…" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... Ferreira, 36 Frederick, Md. Type 2 My biggest challenge managing diabetes is exercising. It used to be ...

122

Diabetes Insipidus, Central (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Tips: Baseball Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth A to Z: Diabetes Insipidus, Central KidsHealth > Parents > A to Z > ... More to Know Keep in Mind A to Z: Diabetes Insipidus, Central In central diabetes insipidus, the ...

123

Effects of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes on Adolescents' Family Relationships, Treatment Adherence, and Metabolic Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Behavioral family systems therapy (BFST) for adolescents with diabetes has improved family relationships and communication, but effects on adherence and metabolic con- trol were weak. We evaluated a revised intervention, BFST for diabetes (BFST-D). Methods One hundred and four families were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 12 sessions of either an educational support group (ES) or a

Tim Wysocki; Michael A. Harris; Lisa M. Buckloh; Deborah Mertlich; Amanda Sobel Lochrie; Alexandra Taylor; Michelle Sadler; Nelly Mauras; Neil H. White

2006-01-01

124

Diabetes and psychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

Interface of diabetes and psychiatry has fascinated both endocrinologists and mental health professionals for years. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders share a bidirectional association -- both influencing each other in multiple ways. The current article addresses different aspects of this interface. The interaction of diabetes and psychiatric disorders has been discussed with regard to aetio-pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management. In spite of a multifaceted interaction between the two the issue remains largely unstudied in India.

Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

2011-01-01

125

Pupil size in diabetes.  

PubMed Central

Sympathetic function was studied in 101 diabetic children and 102 age and sex matched control children, as part of a longitudinal study of the evolution of microvascular disease in the population of diabetic children and adolescents in Avon County. The median (range) age of the diabetic population was 13.5 (6.0-17.2) years, the duration of diabetes was 4.0 (0.4-13.9) years, and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1) was 10.9 (7.0-18.1)%. Pupillary adaptation in darkness, as an index of sympathetic neuropathy, was measured using a Polaroid portable pupillometer. Diabetic children had a significantly smaller median pupillary diameter, measured as the pupil/iris ratio and expressed as a percentage, than control children (median (range) 62.9 (50.3-72.1) v 65.9 (52.2-73.8)). Pupillary diameter was significantly related to diabetes duration (r = -0.22), HbA1 (r = -0.34), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.25), diastolic blood pressure (r = -0.49), and mean albumin/creatinine ratio on random urine samples (r = -0.26). Pupillary diameter was not related to age (r = -0.1). Eight (7.9%) diabetic and four (3.9%) control children were identified as having abnormal pupillary dilation in darkness. In comparison with the rest of the diabetic population, these diabetic children had longer diabetes duration and poorer glycaemic control. Polaroid pupillometry has demonstrated subclinical autonomic neuropathy in a population of diabetic children and adolescents. These abnormalities were related to poor metabolic control, long diabetes duration, and also to other indices of microvascular disease.

Karavanaki, K; Davies, A G; Hunt, L P; Morgan, M H; Baum, J D

1994-01-01

126

Diabetes and erectile dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many diabetic men suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED). The etiology of diabetic impotence is complex, with neurogenic, vasculogenic,\\u000a and disordered local neuroeffector regulatory mechanisms contributing to the pathology of ED. The introduction of oral phosphodiesterase-5\\u000a inhibitors has revolutionized medical therapy for ED. These drugs have become the primary initial treatment for ED, although\\u000a the medications are less efficacious in diabetic

John Gore; Jacob Rajfer

2004-01-01

127

Diabetic fibrous mastopathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic fibrous mastopathy is an uncommon self-limiting fibroinflammatory diseae of the breast that is seen predominantly in premenopausal women with long standing type I (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus. In this report, we present a 29 years old female with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus presenting with bilateral breast masses which were irregular and hypoechoic on ultrasound, gradual enhancement on MRI and diagnosed as diabetic fibrous mastopathy on histopathology. It is quite difficult to distinguish it from malignancy on mammographic and ultrasonographic features or clinical findings. Correlation of the pathological features may help to make the correct diagnosis for this disease. PMID:24717992

Gunduz, Yasemin; Tatli, Lacin; Kara, Rabia Oztas; Cakar, Gozde Cakirsoy; Akdemir, Nermin; Dilek, Fatma Hüsniye

2014-03-01

128

Gestational diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of various degrees that is first detected during pregnancy. GDM is detected through the screening of pregnant women for clinical risk factors and, among at-risk women, testing for abnormal glucose tolerance that is usually, but not invariably, mild and asymptomatic. GDM appears to result from the same broad spectrum of physiological and genetic abnormalities that characterize diabetes outside of pregnancy. Indeed, women with GDM are at high risk for having or developing diabetes when they are not pregnant. Thus, GDM provides a unique opportunity to study the early pathogenesis of diabetes and to develop interventions to prevent the disease.

Buchanan, Thomas A.; Xiang, Anny H.

2005-01-01

129

DIABETES AND VASCULAR DISEASE  

PubMed Central

Two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese, 75 million have hypertension and another 25 million have diabetes. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality and a major driver of health care costs in patients with type 2 diabetes. Observational studies suggest that insulin resistance, hypertension and hyperglycemia independently predict cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Indeed, coexisting hypertension appears to be a most powerful determinant of cardiovascular disease risk in diabetic patients. This update explores recent investigation which sheds light on our understanding of various metabolic and hemodynamic factors which promote vascular disease, as well as strategies to lessen cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes.

Sowers, James R.

2013-01-01

130

Connexins and Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Cell-to-cell interactions via gap junctional communication and connexon hemichannels are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Gap junctions are highly specialized transmembrane structures that are formed by connexon hemichannels, which are further assembled from proteins called “connexins.” In this paper, we discuss current knowledge about connexins in diabetes. We also discuss mechanisms of connexin influence and the role of individual connexins in various tissues and how these are affected in diabetes. Connexins may be a future target by both genetic and pharmacological approaches to develop treatments for the treatment of diabetes and its complications.

Wright, Josephine A.; Richards, Toby; Becker, David L.

2012-01-01

131

Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

1978-01-01

132

Diabetes Epidemics in Korea: Reappraise Nationwide Survey of Diabetes "Diabetes in Korea 2007"  

PubMed Central

There are many studies on the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and economic burden of diabetes across the past four decades in Korea. Nonetheless, there is a dearth of nationwide study regarding diabetes encompassing all age group. Eight years ago, the Committee on the Epidemiology of Diabetes Mellitus of Korean Diabetes Association collaborated with Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service to evaluate the status of diabetes care and characteristics in diabetic patients in Korea. In 2007, the collaborative task force team published a comprehensive survey titled "Diabetes in Korea 2007." In this review, we reappraise the diabetic epidemics from the joint report and suggest further studies that are needed to be investigated in the future.

Park, Ie Byung; Kim, Jaiyong; Kim, Dae Jung; Chung, Choon Hee; Oh, Jee-Young; Park, Seok Won; Lee, Juneyoung; Choi, Kyung Mook; Min, Kyung Wan; Park, Jeong Hyun; Son, Hyun Shik; Ahn, Chul Woo; Kim, Hwayoung; Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Im Bong; Choi, Injeoung

2013-01-01

133

Type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

Essential facts [Figure: see text] Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong condition that affects around three million people in the UK. It can lead to health complications such as heart disease, stroke, amputation and blindness. Care of people with diabetes takes up 10 per cent of the NHS budget. PMID:25027899

2014-07-16

134

Medical Vanguard Diabetes Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medical Vanguard Diabetes Management Project was designed to deploy an Internet based diabetes management system, MyCareTeam, into a number of existing diverse clinical environments and evaluate how such a stand-alone clinical information system can b...

S. K. Mun

2004-01-01

135

Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight experts in visual impairment respond briefly to reports that intensive monitoring of blood glucose levels by persons with diabetes can lead to a 70% reduction in the progression of detectable diabetic retinopathy. Comments are generally optimistic, though some cautions are raised. (DB)

Baker, Shelly; And Others

1993-01-01

136

Acrochordon, diabetes and associations.  

PubMed

A study of clinical profile of acrochordons was carried out in 100 patients. Their association with diabetes mellitus and other disorders was studied. Acrochordons were found to be closely associated with pseudo-acanthosis nigricans, seborrhoeic keratosis, obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:20948060

Bhargava, P; Mathur, S K; Mathur, D K; Malpani, S; Goel, S; Agarwal, U S; Bhargava, R K

1996-01-01

137

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physiology in Medicine review article. This articles describes how a patient gets diabetes insipidus, the effects of this disease on a patient, and the therapy to control this disease. This article also describes vasopressin, aquaporins, and the Bartter system, and their relationships with diabetes insipidus.

MD Jeff M Sands (Emory Univ Sch Med Dept Med, Renal Div); MD Daniel G. Bichet (University of Montreal Dept of Medicine)

2006-02-13

138

Diabetic nephropathy and inflammation  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Besides, diabetic nephropathy is associated with cardiovascular disease, and increases mortality of diabetic patients. Several factors are involved in the pathophysiology of DN, including metabolic and hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. In recent years, new pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease have been elucidated; accumulated data have emphasized the critical role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Expression of cell adhesion molecules, growth factors, chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines are increased in the renal tissues of diabetic patients, and serum and urinary levels of cytokines and cell adhesion molecules, correlated with albuminuria. In this paper we review the role of inflammation in the development of diabetic nephropathy, discussing some of the major inflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, including the role of adipokines, and take part in other mediators of inflammation, as adhesion molecules.

Duran-Salgado, Montserrat B; Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F

2014-01-01

139

Peripartum management of diabetes  

PubMed Central

The peripartum control of diabetes is very important for the well-being of the newborn as higher incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia is seen if maternal hyperglycemia happens during this period. Type of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes) also has an effect on the glucose concentration during intrapartum period. During the latent phase of labor, the metabolic demands are stable but during active labor there is increased metabolic demand and decreased insulin requirement. After delivery once the placenta is extracted, insulin resistance rapidly comes down and in patients with pre-gestational diabetes there will be a sudden drop in insulin requirement and the insulin may not be required in women with gestational diabetes, but they just need close monitoring. During breast-feeding blood glucose levels fall because of high metabolic demand and women need to take extra calories to maintain the levels and more vigilance especially in type 1 and type 2 diabetic mothers is required. The protocols used for the management of peripartum management of diabetes mostly rely on glucose and insulin infusion to maintain maternal blood sugars between 70 and 110 mg/dl. The data is mostly from retrospective studies and few randomized control trials done mainly in type 1 diabetes patients. The review summarizes guidelines, which are used for peripartum management of blood glucose.

Kalra, Pramila; Anakal, Manjunath

2013-01-01

140

Diabetes and macrovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Macrovascular events, including stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), occur earlier than in nondiabetics and the underlying pathologies are often more diffuse and severe. Diabetic arteriopathy, which encompasses endothelial dysfunction, hypercoagulability, changes in blood flow, and platelet abnormalities, contributes to the early

Aaron Vinik; Mark Flemmer

2002-01-01

141

Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Is an Ophthalmologist? Your Eyes & the Sun Eye Health News Consumer Alerts Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Tweet The best treatment for diabetic retinopathy is to prevent it. Strict control of your blood sugar will significantly reduce the long-term risk of vision loss. Treatment usually won't cure ...

142

Diabetes in Sports  

PubMed Central

Context: Exercise is recommended for individuals with diabetes mellitus, and several facets of the disease must be considered when managing the diabetic athlete. The purpose of this article is to review diabetes care in the context of sports participation. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database, as well as manual review of reference lists of identified sources. Results: Diabetics should be evaluated for complications of long-standing disease before beginning an exercise program, and exercise should be modified appropriately if complications are present. Athletes who use insulin or oral insulin secretogogues are at risk for exercise-induced immediate or delayed hypoglycemia. Diabetics are advised to engage in a combination of regular aerobic and resistance exercise. Insulin-dependent diabetics should supplement carbohydrate before and after exercise, as well as during exercise for events lasting longer than 1 hour. Adjustment of insulin dosing based on planned exercise intensity is another strategy to prevent hypoglycemia. Insulin-dependent athletes should monitor blood sugar closely before, during, and after exercise. Significant hyperglycemia before exercise should preclude exercise because the stress of exercise can paradoxically exacerbate hyperglycemia and lead to ketoacidosis. Athletes should be aware of hypoglycemia symptoms and have rapidly absorbable glucose available in case of hypoglycemia. Conclusion: Exercise is an important component of diabetes treatment, and most people with diabetes can safely participate in sports at recreational and elite levels with attention to appropriate precautions.

Shugart, Christine; Jackson, Jonathan; Fields, Karl B.

2010-01-01

143

Acute Stroke and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes and hyperglycaemia are each over-represented amongst patients with acute stroke. Hyperglycaemia is associated with poor stroke outcome. Symptomatic intracranial haemorrhagic transformation is commoner in diabetes and hyperglycaemia but the treatment effect of thrombolysis appears not to be influenced by blood sugar level. Evidence from general patients treated in intensive care units suggests that intensive control of hyperglycaemia may improve

Kennedy R. Lees; Matthew R. Walters

2005-01-01

144

Pycnogenol ® for diabetic retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic retinopathy represents a serious health threat to a rapidly growing numberof patients with diabetes mellitus. The retinal microangiopathy is characterised byvascular lesions with exudate deposits and haemorrhages causing vision loss.Pycnogenol®, a standardised extract of the bark of the French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), is known to increase capillary resistance. Pycnogenol® has been tested for treatment and prevention of retinopathy

Frank Schönlau; Peter Rohdewald

2001-01-01

145

18. Painful Diabetic Polyneuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the industrialized world, polyneuropathy induced by diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent forms of neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy can result from a direct toxic effect of glucose on nerve cells. Additionally, the damage of the nerve structures (central and peripheral) is accompanied by a microvascular dysfunction, which damages the vasa nervorum. More than 80% of the patients

Wouter Pluijms; Frank Huygen; Jianguo Cheng; Nagy Mekhail; Maarten van Kleef; Jan Van Zundert; Robert van Dongen

2011-01-01

146

Treatment of Diabetic Dyslipidemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk for coronary artery disease due to hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other risk factors. The diabetic dyslipidemia in these patients is characterized by moderately high levels of (1) serum cholesterol and triglycerides; (2) small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles; and (3) low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the

Abhimanyu Garg

1998-01-01

147

Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among Omani diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIMSTo study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in a population of patients attending a diabetic clinic and to evaluate the medical risk factors underlying its development.METHODS500 randomly selected diabetic patients attending the diabetes clinic in Al Buraimi hospital were referred to the ophthalmology department where they were fully evaluated for the absence or presence of retinopathy. Any retinopathy present was

Ossama A W El Haddad; Mohammed Kamal Saad

1998-01-01

148

Diabetic dyslipidaemia in Kuwait.  

PubMed

About 15% of the adult Kuwaiti population has type 2 diabetes and over 50% are hyperlipidaemic by current diagnostic criteria. Not surprisingly, coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in Kuwait. Reports from coronary care units in Kuwait suggest that 40-80% of the CHD patients were diabetic and 50-80% hyperlipidaemic. The pattern worldwide is similar. International guidelines have therefore consistently recognised diabetes as a major risk factor for CHD. In our Lipid Clinic population in Kuwait, about 30% are diabetic. The commonest lipid abnormalities seen in Kuwaiti diabetic patients, as elsewhere, are hypertriglyceridaemia with low HDL levels and variable LDL levels. About 75% of the subjects had either mixed hyperlipidaemia or predominant hypertriglyceridaemia. There are possibly some compositional changes in LDL in the diabetic subjects in that there were important differences in the statistical relationships between LDL and HDL and their respective apolipoproteins - apo B and apo A-1 in diabetic as compared to non-diabetic subjects. Other important observations made in diabetic subjects in Kuwait are: (i) similar serum Lp (a) levels and pattern of apo(a) polymorphism with non-diabetic subjects, with no demonstrable relationship between serum levels of Lp(a) and insulin/insulin sensitivity, although with CHD, Lp(a) levels were increased; (ii) diabetic hyperlipidaemic subjects had elevated PAI-1 levels with significant correlations between blood PAI-1 and insulin levels suggesting underlying insulin resistance (syndrome X). Various landmark trials of cholesterol-lowering therapies in the prevention of CHD have consistently demonstrated near-normalization of the increased CHD risk in diabetes. Our experience in Kuwait suggests that diabetic patients and others with mixed hyperlipidaemia benefit from tight glycaemic control, appropriate advice on diet and exercise with regular reinforcement by continuing contact with professional dietitians and regular availability of drugs where prescribed. Often, it is the regular compliance with medication that is important, rather than the specific medication used particularly where HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statin drugs) are not always available. A useful guideline for management of dyslipidaemia in diabetes is suggested. PMID:12444310

Akanji, Abayomi O

2002-01-01

149

Diabetic amyotrophy: current concepts.  

PubMed

Diabetic amyotrophy is a disabling illness that is distinct from other forms of diabetic neuropathy. It is characterized by weakness followed by wasting of pelvifemoral muscles, either unilaterally or bilaterally, with associated pain. Sensory impairment is minimal in the cutaneous distribution sharing the same root or peripheral nerve as affected musculature. Most commonly, the onset is in middle age or later, although it may occur in youth. A concomitant distal predominantly sensory neuropathy may be present. Electrodiagnostic studies are most often consistent with a neurogenic lesion attributable to a lumbosacral radiculopathy, plexopathy, or proximal crural neuropathy. The natural course of the illness is variable with gradual but often incomplete improvement. The site of the lesion and the pathogenesis of diabetic amyotrophy remain controversial. Recent studies suggest a role for immunomodulating agents in certain types of diabetic neuropathy, including diabetic amyotrophy. PMID:8987131

Sander, H W; Chokroverty, S

1996-06-01

150

Diabetes Mellitus among Centenarians  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Describe prevalence of diabetes mellitus among centenarians. DESIGN Cross-sectional, population-based. SETTING 44 counties in northern Georgia. PARTICIPANTS 244 centenarians (aged 98-108, 15.8% men, 20.5% African-American, 38.0% community-dwelling) from the Georgia Centenarian Study (2001-2009). MEASUREMENTS Nonfasting blood samples assessed HbA1c and relevant clinical parameters. Demographic, diagnosis, and diabetes complications covariates were assessed. RESULTS 12.5% of centenarians were known to have diabetes. Diabetes was more prevalent among African-Americans (27.7%) than Whites (8.6%, p=.0002). There were no differences between men (16.7%) and women (11.7%, p=.414), centenarians living in the community (10.2%) or facilities (13.9%, p=.540). Diabetes was more prevalent among overweight/obese (23.1%) than non-overweight (7.1%, p=.002) centenarians. Anemia (78.6% versus 48.3%, p=.004) and hypertension (79.3% versus 58.6%, p=.041) were more prevalent among centenarians with diabetes than without and centenarians with diabetes took more nonhypoglycemic medications(8.6 versus 7.0, p=.023). No centenarians with hemoglobin A1c < 6.5% had random serum glucose levels above 200 mg/dl. Diabetes was not associated with 12 month all-cause mortality, visual impairment, amputations, cardiovascular disease or neuropathy. 37% of centenarians reported onset before age 80 (survivors), 47% between 80 and 97 years (delayers) and 15% age 98 or older (escapers). CONCLUSION Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality, but is seen in persons who live into very old age. Aside from higher rates of anemia and use of more medications, few clinical correlates of diabetes were observed in centenarians.

Davey, Adam; Lele, Uday; Elias, Merrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy B.; Tenover, J. Lisa; Poon, Leonard W.

2011-01-01

151

[Diabetes and pregnancy].  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy could result in severe or fatal complications to mother or the unborn product, like polyhydramnios, preeclampsia, abortion, neonatal asphyxia, macrosomia, stillbirth, and others, therefore is very important the early detection and treatment of diabetes. Gestacional Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity first recognized during pregnancy. The screening test consist of 50 g of oral glucose and a plasma glucose measurement at one hour, regardless of the time of the last meal, and this may do in all pregnancies between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. If plasma glucose level above 140 mg/dl results, a oral glucose tolerance test with 100 g must be done. This is the GDM diagnostic test. The risk factors for gestacional diabetes (older than 30 years of age, obesity, arterial hypertension, glucosury, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, family history of macrosomia) identify only 50% of pregnancies with gestacional diabetes, therefore, is necessary to screen all pregnancies who become pregnant, a strict control before pregnant is indispensable, with aim to slow congenital malformations probability and another complications. Gestacional diabetes prevalence in hispanic women in the U.S.A. is 12.3 percent. Diabetes mellitus prevalence in Mexico is about 2-6 percent. The goal of management of diabetes during pregnancy is the maintainance of fasting plasma glucose 105 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl two hours after meals. Treatment consist in diabetes education, diet with caloric needs calculation, exercise, and occasionally insulin. Is necessary the prenatal monitoring, the supervision of delivery or cesarean metabolic changes, and the postnatal monitoring of the mother and product. PMID:9679396

Zúñiga-González, S A

1998-06-01

152

The genetics of diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genes play an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Putative susceptibility genes could be the key to the development of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. A combination of genetic and environmental factors is most likely the cause of Type 1 diabetes. The pathogenetic sequence leading to the selective

V. Radha; K. S. Vimaleswaran; R. Deepa; V. Mohan

2003-01-01

153

RAMADAN FASTING AND DIABETES MELLITUS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this article is to review important changes which may occur during Islamic fasting in diabetic patients and the safety of fasting during the Islamic month of Ramadan for diabetics. Despite diverse findings regarding the physiological impact of Ramadan on diabetics, researchers have not yet found, in the diabetics who fast, any pathological changes in body weight, blood

Fereidoun Azizi; Behnam Siahkolah

154

Acute renal failure in diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute renal failure in diabetic patients occurs, as a result of certain specific conditions. The most common of these are hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar ‘coma’, diabetic ketoacidosis, the use of radiocontrast media, and renal papillary necrosis. The management of diabetics with acute renal failure is essentially the same as for non-diabetic patients but may be complicated by the problems of metabolic control,

A. Grenfell

1986-01-01

155

Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... 800–860–8747. [ Top ] Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Health care providers test for gestational diabetes using the OGTT. Women may ... diabetes should be tested using standard diabetes blood tests during their first visit to the health care provider during pregnancy to see if they had ...

156

Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

Fennoy, Ilene

1989-01-01

157

Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic ?-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

Kim, Soo-Jeong

2012-01-01

158

Breastfeeding and diabetes.  

PubMed

The present review outlines the role of breastfeeding in diabetes. In the mother, breastfeeding has been suggested to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, it appears to reduce the risk of premenopausal breast cancer and ovarian cancer. In the neonate and infant, among other benefits, lactation confers protection from future both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Whether lactation protects women with gestational diabetes mellitus and their offspring from future T2DM remains to be answered. Importantly, for diabetic mothers, antidiabetic treatment itself may affect breastfeeding. There is not enough data to allow the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents. Therefore, insulin currently remains the optimal antidiabetic treatment during lactation. In conclusion, breastfeeding could be considered a modifiable risk factor for the development of diabetes and even a potential protective lifestyle measure from future cardio-metabolic and malignant diseases. Therefore, health care professionals should encourage both women with and without diabetes to breastfeed their children. PMID:21348815

Gouveri, E; Papanas, N; Hatzitolios, A I; Maltezos, E

2011-03-01

159

[Diabetes and heart].  

PubMed

Diabetics are subjects to a high cardiovascular risk. This concept is now accepted by all and has been demonstrated in clinical practice by the constantly increasing number of diabetic cardiac patients and cardiac diabetics. The many therapeutic trials carried out on the prevention of cardiovascular complications in diabetics have made it possible to define therapeutic goals. HbA1c must be less than 6.5%. Target blood pressure values are 130/80 mmHg or even 125/75 in the case of renal insufficiency. If conventional treatments have proven efficacy against stroke and coronary events, only molecules which modulate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system provide additional nephroprotection in diabetics. However, single-agent therapy is seldom sufficient to achieve glycaemic or blood pressure targets. Diabetic dyslipidemia also requires attentive management, usually by a statin, with a target LDL cholesterol < 1 g/l at the onset of microalbuminuria. All these measures should make it possible to obtain a significant reduction in the cardiovascular risk of diabetic patients. PMID:17378135

Catargi, Bogdan

2006-01-01

160

[Type 2 diabetes complications].  

PubMed

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

Schlienger, Jean-Louis

2013-05-01

161

Oxidative stress and diabetic cardiomyopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is a serious public health problem. Improvements in the treatment of noncardiac complications from diabetes have\\u000a resulted in heart disease becoming a leading cause of death in diabetic patients. Several cardiovascular pathological consequences\\u000a of diabetes such as hypertension affect the heart to varying degrees. However, hyperglycemia, as an independent risk factor,\\u000a directly causes cardiac damage and leads to diabetic

Lu Cai; Y. James Kang

2001-01-01

162

Diabetic angiopathy and angiogenic defects  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is one of the most serious health problems in the world. A major complication of diabetes is blood vessel disease, termed angiopathy, which is characterized by abnormal angiogenesis. In this review, we focus on angiogenesis abnormalities in diabetic complications and discuss its benefits and drawbacks as a therapeutic target for diabetic vascular complications. Additionally, we discuss glucose metabolism defects that are associated with abnormal angiogenesis in atypical diabetic complications such as cancer.

2012-01-01

163

Predictive factors of diabetic complications: a possible link between family history of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was assessment of predictive factors of diabetic retinopathy. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed by recruiting 1228 type 2 diabetic patients from a diabetes referral clinic over a six-month period (from July to December, 2012). Diabetes risk factors, complications, laboratory results have been recorded. Results Of the 1228 diabetic patients (54% women, mean age 58.48?±?9.94 years), prevalence of diabetes retinopathy was 26.6%. There were significant associations between retinopathy and family history of diabetes (p = 0.04), hypertension (p?=?0.0001), diabetic duration (p?=?0.0001), poor glycemic control (p?=?0.0001) and age of onset of diabetes (p?=?0.0001). However, no significant associations were found between retinopathy with dyslipidemia and obesity. In logistic regression model, poor glycemic control (p = 0.014), hypertension (p?=?0.0001), duration of diabetes (p?=?0.0001) and family history of diabetes (p = 0.012) independently predicted retinopathy after adjustment for age and sex. Conclusions Diabetic complications are resulting from an interaction from genes and environmental factors. A family history of diabetes is pointing toward a possible genetic and epigenetic basis for diabetic retinopathy. Our findings suggest the role of epigenetic modifications and metabolic memory in diabetic retinopathy in subjects with family history of diabetes.

2014-01-01

164

Uptake mechanisms for ascorbate and dehydroascorbate in lymphoblasts from diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary   In diabetic nephropathy and hypertension, a major cause of mortality is from cardiovascular disease. Since low levels of\\u000a antioxidants such as vitamin C have been associated with such complications, we have examined the uptake mechanisms for ascorbic\\u000a acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) in lymphoblasts from normal control subjects (CON), normoalbuminuric insulin-dependent\\u000a diabetic (IDDM) patients (DCON), patients with IDDM

L. L. Ng; F. C. Ngkeekwong; P. A. Quinn; J. E. Davies

1998-01-01

165

Fenugreek Prevents the Development of STZ-Induced Diabetic Nephropathy in a Rat Model of Diabetes  

PubMed Central

The present study aims to examine the protective effect of fenugreek and the underlying mechanism against the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. A rat model of diabetes was successfully established by direct injection of STZ and then the rats were administered an interventional treatment of fenugreek. Parameters of renal function, including blood glucose, albuminuria, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), dimethyl formamide (DMF), blood urine nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and kidney index (KI), were detected in the three groups (Con, DN, and DF). Oxidative stress was determined by the activity of antioxidase. Extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and other morphological alterations were evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and electron microscope. Quantitive (q)PCR was employed to detect the mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and protein expression was determined with western blot analysis. DN rats in the present study demonstrated a significant renal dysfunction, ECM accumulation, pathological alteration, and oxidative stress, while the symptoms were evidently reduced by fenugreek treatment. Furthermore, the upregulation of TGF-?1 and CTGF at a transcriptional and translational level in DN rats was distinctly inhibited by fenugreek. Consequently, fenugreek prevents DN development in a STZ-induced diabetic rat model.

Jin, Yingli; Shi, Yan; Zou, Yinggang; Miao, Chunsheng; Sun, Bo; Li, Cai

2014-01-01

166

Not all neuropathy in diabetes is of diabetic etiology: Differential diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the most common peripheral neuropathy in the developed world; however, not all patients\\u000a with diabetes and peripheral nerve disease have a peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. Several (although not all) studies\\u000a have drawn attention to the presence of other potential causes of a neuropathy in individuals with diabetes; 10% to 50% of\\u000a individuals with diabetes may

Roy Freeman

2009-01-01

167

Insulin Resistant Diabetes Mellitus.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

81 cases of insulin resistant diabetes classified into idiopathic and secondary types are presented. Identification of serum insulin antibody and antagonist is briefly presented. Based on the series and the literature data, the criteria, classification, p...

X. Zhu Z. Wang C. Qiu X. Zhong

1980-01-01

168

Medicines for Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... will stay healthy and feel good. All About Insulin The most common diabetes medicine is insulin, which ... your blood sugar how long they last Continue Insulin Table The table below shows the types of ...

169

Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pregnancy Homepage Before Pregnancy During Pregnancy Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 Gestational My Story Medications Treating for Two Preventing Infections Clean ...

170

Help Teens Manage Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... teens' coping and communication skills, healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to ... decisions about drugs and alcohol, and facing personal conflicts. Those teens who receive CST maintain better metabolic ...

171

School and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... safely and successfully at school. Working With the School Most of the things you need to care ... a healthy educational environment for your child. Diabetes, School, and the Law Certain laws protect the rights ...

172

Diabetic Vitrectomy Surgery  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... screen and open the door to informed medical care. Now let's go live to the operating room. ... check with the medical doctor that's been taking care of the patient's diabetes. Also, the only time ...

173

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse  

MedlinePLUS

... 738–4929 Email: ndic@info.niddk.nih.gov Internet: www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ® Privacy Statement | Disclaimers | Accessibility | PDF versions require the free ...

174

Diabetes in African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Moving towards prevention of Type 2 Diabetes This music CD helps African Americans incorporate more physical activity ... move more. Three songs from the popular Movimiento music CD also are included. This CD also contains ...

175

Diabetes and exercise  

MedlinePLUS

Exercise is an important part of managing your diabetes. It can help you lose weight, if you are overweight. It also helps prevent weight gain. Exercise helps lower your blood sugar without medicines . It ...

176

Diabetes Interactive Atlas.  

PubMed

The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is a recently released Web-based collection of maps that allows users to view geographic patterns and examine trends in diabetes and its risk factors over time across the United States and within states. The atlas provides maps, tables, graphs, and motion charts that depict national, state, and county data. Large amounts of data can be viewed in various ways simultaneously. In this article, we describe the design and technical issues for developing the atlas and provide an overview of the atlas' maps and graphs. The Diabetes Interactive Atlas improves visualization of geographic patterns, highlights observation of trends, and demonstrates the concomitant geographic and temporal growth of diabetes and obesity. PMID:24503340

Kirtland, Karen A; Burrows, Nilka R; Geiss, Linda S

2014-01-01

177

Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Heart Health Hormone Abuse Men's Health Pituitary Disorders Thyroid Disorders Weight and ... PhD Susan Kirk, MD What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood ...

178

Gestational Diabetes and Testing  

MedlinePLUS

... I have a condition called polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) ? I am taking a medication called Glucophage (metformin) ? ... or doctor who specializes in diabetes during pregnancy Nutrition counseling Exercise counseling Daily blood sugar testing You ...

179

Infant of diabetic mother  

MedlinePLUS

... infants may have periods of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) shortly after birth because of increased insulin levels ... diabetes should be tested for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), even if they have no symptoms. If an ...

180

Type 1 diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Stomach pain Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ) can develop quickly in people with diabetes who ... How to recognize and treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) How to recognize and treat high blood sugar ( ...

181

Diabetes and Vascular Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... In other words, pick foods rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber over those that are processed. Regular physical activity helps you manage your diabetes. Physical activity can lower your blood glucose (sugar), ...

182

What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?  

MedlinePLUS

... Blepharitis Cataracts Contact Lens-Related Infections Detached & Torn Retina Diabetic Retinopathy Dry Eye Floaters & Flashes Glaucoma Hyperopia ( ... eye disease, occurs when blood vessels in the retina change. Sometimes these vessels swell and leak fluid ...

183

Causes of Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the ... of diabetes. Environmental Factors Environmental factors, such as foods, viruses, and toxins, may play a role in ...

184

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

MedlinePLUS

... people with type 2 diabetes become dependent on dialysis treatments because of kidney failure. There is a tremendous amount you can do to decrease your risk of complications: Eat a healthy diet Get regular exercise Pay careful attention to your ...

185

Diabetes, Type 2  

MedlinePLUS

... by reducing the incidence of burdensome complications like blindness, lower limb amputations, kidney failure, and coronary heart ... advanced diabetic retinopathy can reduce their risk of blindness by 90 percent. A recent study showed a ...

186

Diabetes diet - gestational  

MedlinePLUS

... Leveno KL, Bloom SL, et al, eds. Williams Obstetrics. 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2010: ... Benjamin TD, Pridijan G. Update on gestational diabetes. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics . 2010 June;27(2):255- ...

187

[Albuminuria in diabetes mellitus].  

PubMed

A critical overview on different procedures and methods for an early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is given. Genetic markers, morphology and function of glomerula, blood pressure and the metabolic state of diabetics are especially discussed. From the risk markers available today microalbuminuria (20 to 200 micrograms/min resp. 20 to 200 mg/l) is shown to be most suitable for recognizing patients developing nephropathy. PMID:1962489

Hasslacher, C

1991-01-01

188

Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Proliferative diabetic retinopathy continues to be a major cause of blindness throughout the world. The natural history demonstrates\\u000a that its development is primarily related to progressive retinal ischemia from diabetic retinopathy. The primary complications\\u000a leading to vision loss, tractional retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage, are dependent upon the relationship between\\u000a the neovascular tissue and the vitreous. The major risk factors

Ronald P. Danis; Matthew D. Davis

189

GM3 and diabetes.  

PubMed

We demonstrated the molecular pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance focusing on the interaction between insulin receptor and GM3 ganglioside in adipocytes and propose a working hypothesis "metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes, are membrane microdomain disorders caused by aberrant expression of gangliosides". It is expected that the development of novel diagnosis of metabolic syndrome by identifying the specific ganglioside species and a therapeutic strategy "membrane microdomain ortho-signaling therapy". PMID:24399479

Inokuchi, Jin-ichi

2014-04-01

190

Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), occurs more commonly in children with\\u000a type 1 DM than type 2 DM. Hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, ketonemia, dehydration and various electrolyte abnormalities\\u000a result from a relative or absolute deficiency of insulin with or without an excess of counter-regulatory hormones. Management\\u000a requires careful replacement of fluid and electrolyte deficits, intravenous administration

Sindhu Sivanandan; Aditi Sinha; Vandana Jain; Rakesh Lodha

2011-01-01

191

Translation Research in Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The burden of diabetes is well documented. Adverse health conditions, disability, reduced quality of life, and heightened\\u000a risk of premature death characterize the progression of this disease (1–3). The considerable personal burden of diabetes is magnified by the penetration of the disease into the American population.\\u000a By the age of 60, approx 1 in 10 Caucasians, 1 in 6 Latinos,

Russell E. Glasgow; Elizabeth Bayliss; Paul A. Estabrooks

192

Euglycaemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of a series of 211 episodes of diabetic metabolic decompensation 37 had severe euglycaemic ketoacidosis (a blood sugar level of less than 300 mg\\/100 ml and a plasma bicarbonate of 10 mEq\\/1. or less). All were young insulin-dependent diabetics, only one being previously undiagnosed. Vomiting was a common factor, and in all carbohydrate reduction occurred with continued or increased daily

J. F. Munro; I. W. Campbell; A. C. McCuish; L. J. P. Duncan

1973-01-01

193

Models for Diabetes Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based models and frameworks have been introduced to support diabetes self-management education and support. This\\u000a article presents various frameworks and models and describes their use in support of diabetes education at the patient–educator,\\u000a the practice environment, and the systems\\/policy\\/environmental level. The text and tables present various models and specific\\u000a recommendations and examples for educators to use at every level. Crosscutting

Linda M. Siminerio

194

Sexual problems in diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erectile dysfunction affects over a third of diabetic men. It is caused chiefly by failure of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation of the corpus cavernosum secondary to endothelial dysfunction and autonomic neuropathy. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE 5) inhibitors are the first-line treatment and are effective in about 50–60% of men with diabetes. Alternative treatments include vacuum devices and self-injection

David Price

195

Diabetes Mellitus Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus, the most common metabolic disorder affecting the population, has many clinical and psychological implications\\u000a for the patient. The provider must address these issues comprehensively. This chapter will describe the global burden and\\u000a cost of diabetes mellitus, define its classifications and diagnosis criteria, detail its current treatment options, address\\u000a associated complications including depression, fear of hypoglycemia, and fear of

Catherine Carver; Martin Abrahamson

196

Brittle diabetes: psychopathological aspects.  

PubMed

Background. The term "brittle" is used to described an uncommon subgroup of type I diabetics whose lives are disrupted by severe glycaemic instability with repeated and prolonged hospitalization. Psychosocial problems are the major perceived underlying causes of brittle behaviour. Aim of this study is a systematic psychopathological assessement of brittleness using specific parameters of general psychopathology and personality traits following the multiaxial format (axis I and II) of the current DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. Methods. Patients comprised 21 brittle type I diabetics and a case-control group of 21 stable diabetics, matched for age, gender, years of education, and diabetes duration. General psychopathology and the DSM-IV-TR personality traits/disorders were assessed using the Syptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III). Results. The comparison for SCL-90-R parameters exclusively revealed higher scores in "Phobic Anxiety" subscale in brittle diabetics. No differences in all the other SCL-90-R primary symptom dimensions and in the three SCL-90-R global distress indices were observed between the two diabetic groups, as well as in the all MCMI-III clinical syndrome categories corresponding to DSM-IV-TR specific psychiatric disorders. However, brittle patients presented lower scores in MCMI-III compulsive personality traits and higher scores in paranoid, schizoid, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, avoidant, dependent, depressive, and passive-aggressive personality traits. Conclusions. In this study, brittle diabetics show no differencies in terms of global severity of psychopathological distress and axis I specific DSM-IV-TR diagnoses in comparison with non-brittle subjects (except for phobic anxiety). Differently, brittle diabetics are characterized from less functional and maladaptive personality features and suffer more frequently and intensively from specific pathological personality traits of all DSM-IV-TR clusters. PMID:24897966

Pelizza, Lorenzo; Bonazzi, Federica; Scaltriti, Sara; Milli, Bruna; Giuseppina, Chierici

2014-01-01

197

Insulin deficient diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Comparisons are made between the incidence, prognosis and treatment of juvenile-onset diabetes and other endocrinopathies in the young. 548 patients with insulin deficient diabetes diagnosed before 20 years of age have been reviewed. Excess mortality, especially at 35–40 years of age was found. Profiles of blood glucose and serum insulin have been studied and compared to those of normal subjects.

J. D. N. Nabarro; B. E. Mustaffa; D. V. Morris; M. J. Walport; A. B. Kurtz

1979-01-01

198

Cardiac Denervation in Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence for vagal denervation of the heart as a feature of diabetic autonomic neuropathy has been obtained by monitoring beat-to-beat variation in heart rate. Nine diabetics with autonomic neuropathy were assessed; each showed a marked reduction or absence of beat-to-beat variation in comparison with controls. Beat-to-beat variation in normal subjects is abolished by parasympathetic blockade but unaffected by sympathetic blockade.

Timothy Wheeler; P. J. Watkins

1973-01-01

199

Diabetes Screening Among Immigrants  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To examine diabetes screening, predictors of screening, and the burden of undiagnosed diabetes in the immigrant population and whether these estimates differ by ethnicity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A population-based retrospective cohort linking administrative health data to immigration files was used to follow the entire diabetes-free population aged 40 years and up in Ontario, Canada (N = 3,484,222) for 3 years (2004–2007) to determine whether individuals were screened for diabetes. Multivariate regression was used to determine predictors of having a diabetes test. RESULTS Screening rates were slightly higher in the immigrant versus the general population (76.0 and 74.4%, respectively; P < 0.001), with the highest rates in people born in South Asia, Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Immigrant seniors (age ?65 years) were screened less than nonimmigrant seniors. Percent yield of new diabetes subjects among those screened was high for certain countries of birth (South Asia, 13.0%; Mexico and Latin America, 12.1%; Caribbean, 9.5%) and low among others (Europe, Central Asia, U.S., 5.1–5.2%). The number of physician visits was the single most important predictor of screening, and many high-risk ethnic groups required numerous visits before a test was administered. The proportion of diabetes that remained undiagnosed was estimated to be 9.7% in the general population and 9.0% in immigrants. CONCLUSIONS Overall diabetes-screening rates are high in Canada’s universal health care setting, including among high-risk ethnic groups. Despite this finding, disparities in screening rates between immigrant subgroups persist and multiple physician visits are often required to achieve recommended screening levels.

Creatore, Maria I.; Booth, Gillian L.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Moineddin, Rahim; Glazier, Richard H.

2012-01-01

200

75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Diabetic Education  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...to diabetic education. DATES: Effective...Branch, TRICARE Management Activity...to diabetic education. Diabetes self-management training...successful self- management of diabetes...criteria: Education about...

2010-08-06

201

Indian Health Service Basic Series, Diabetes Curriculum.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Diabetes and American Indians; Diabetes and American Indians; Using the Health Care System; Diabetes and Your Feelings; Body Weight and Diabetes; Eat Less Food; Eat Less Sugar; Eat Less Fat; Complications; What is Home Blood Glucose Monitoring; ...

1997-01-01

202

Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

203

elation plasma levels CRP IL-6 fibrinogen stroke type neurological empowerment diabetic non-diabetic acute stroke patients 62-nd Scientific Sessions American Diabetes Association San Francisco Diabetes  

EPA Pesticide Factsheets

Did you mean elation plasma levels CRP IL-6 fibrinogen stroke type neurological empowerment diabetic non-diabetic acute stroke patients 62-nd Scientific Sessions American Diabetes Association San Francisco Diabetes ?

204

Neuropeptides and diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops in 75% of patients with type 1 and 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, progressing to legal blindness in about 5%. In the recent years, considerable efforts have been put into finding treatments for this condition. It has been discovered that peptidergic mechanisms (neuropeptides and their analogues, activating a diverse array of signal transduction pathways through their multiple receptors) are potentially important for consideration in drug development strategies. A considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last three decades on human retinal neuropeptides and those elements in the pathomechanisms of diabetic retinopathy which might be related to peptidergic signal transduction. Here, human retinal neuropeptides and their receptors are reviewed, along with the theories relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy both in humans and in experimental models. By collating this information, the curative potential of certain neupeptides and their analogues/antagonists can also be discussed, along with the existing clinical treatments of diabetic retinopathy. The most promising peptidergic pathways for which treatment strategies may be developed at present are stimulation of the somatostatin-related pathway and the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide-related pathway or inhibition of angiotensinergic mechanisms. These approaches may result in the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production and neuronal apoptosis; therefore, both the optical quality of the image and the processing capability of the neural circuit in the retina may be saved.

Gabriel, Robert

2013-01-01

205

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Summary Background: Neonatal diabetes is a rare cause of hyperglycemia, affecting 1: 500,000 births, with persistent hyperglycemia occurring in the first months of life lasting more than 2 weeks and requiring insulin. This condition in infants less than 6 months of age is considered as permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus. Case Report: A rare case of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus presented with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR; birth weight: 1460 grams; female), hyperglycemia, glycosuria, and mild dehydration, a normal Apgar score of 8 and 9 at 1 and 5 minutes, respectively. The parents, of consanguineous union, had no prior history of diabetes mellitus. Of their 4 children, the first child had a diagnosis similar to the patient (their last child). The patient was initially started on continuous infusion of insulin, and then switched to regular insulin subcutaneously, but response was sub-optimal. She was started on neutral protamine Hagedorn, following which her condition improved. She was discharged on neutral protamine Hagedorn with regular follow-up. Conclusions: In view of widespread consanguinity in Saudi Arabia it appears prudent and pertinent to suspect permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus following diagnosis of hyperglycemia in small-for-age infants, especially those with positive family history of diabetes. Close blood glucose monitoring is essential as long as hyperglycemia persists. Prolong follow-up is imperative.

Al-Matary, Abdulrahman; Hussain, Mushtaq; Nahari, Ahmed; Ali, Jaffar

2012-01-01

206

Zinc and Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Zinc (Zn) is an important nutrient that is involved in various physiological metabolisms. Zn dyshomeostasis is often associated with various pathogeneses of chronic diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and related complications. Zn is present in ocular tissue in high concentrations, particularly in the retina and choroid. Zn deficiencies have been shown to affect ocular development, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and even diabetic retinopathy. However, the mechanism by which Zn deficiency increases the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy remains unclear. In addition, due to the negative effect of Zn deficiency on the eye, Zn supplementation should prevent diabetic retinopathy; however, limited available data do not always support this notion. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to summarize these pieces of available information regarding Zn prevention of diabetic retinopathy. Current theories and possible mechanisms underlying the role of Zn in the eye-related diseases are discussed. The possible factors that affect the preventive effect of Zn supplementation on diabetic retinopathy were also discussed.

Miao, Xiao; Sun, Weixia; Miao, Lining; Fu, Yaowen; Wang, Yonggang; Su, Guanfang; Liu, Quan

2013-01-01

207

Osteoporosis, Fractures, and Diabetes  

PubMed Central

It is well established that osteoporosis and diabetes are prevalent diseases with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of bone fractures. In type 1 diabetes, the risk is increased by ?6 times and is due to low bone mass. Despite increased bone mineral density (BMD), in patients with type 2 diabetes the risk is increased (which is about twice the risk in the general population) due to the inferior quality of bone. Bone fragility in type 2 diabetes, which is not reflected by bone mineral density, depends on bone quality deterioration rather than bone mass reduction. Thus, surrogate markers and examination methods are needed to replace the insensitivity of BMD in assessing fracture risks of T2DM patients. One of these methods can be trabecular bone score. The aim of the paper is to present the present state of scientific knowledge about the osteoporosis risk in diabetic patient. The review also discusses the possibility of problematic using the study conclusions in real clinical practice.

2014-01-01

208

Diabetic corneal neuropathy.  

PubMed Central

Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3

Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

1983-01-01

209

Nam Con Son Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

1994-07-01

210

Determinants of diabetes knowledge in a cohort of Nigerian diabetics  

PubMed Central

Background One of the consequences of the generational paradigm shift of lifestyle from the traditional African model to a more "western" standard is a replacement of communicable diseases by non-communicable or life style related diseases like diabetes. To address this trend, diabetes education along with continuous assessment of diabetes related knowledge has been advocated. Since most of the Nigerian studies assessing knowledge of diabetes were hospital-based, we decided to evaluate the diabetes related knowledge and its sociodemographic determinants in a general population of diabetics. Methods Diabetics (n?=?184) attending the 2012 world diabetes day celebration in a Nigerian community were surveyed using a two part questionnaire. Section A elicited information on their demographics characteristics and participation in update courses, and exercise, while section B assessed knowledge of diabetes using the 14 item Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Centre's Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results We found that Nigerian diabetics had poor knowledge of diabetes, with pervasive fallacies. Majority did not have knowledge of "diabetes diet", "fatty food", "free food", effect of unsweetened fruit juice on blood glucose, treatment of hypoglycaemia, and the average duration glycosylated haemoglobin (haemoglobin A1) test measures blood glucose. Attaining tertiary education, falling under the 51-60 years age group, frequent attendance at seminars/updates and satisfaction with education received, being employed by or formerly working for the government, and claiming an intermediate, or wealthy income status was associated with better knowledge of diabetes. Conclusion Nigerian diabetics' knowledge of diabetes was poor and related to age, level of education, satisfaction with education received, employment status and household wealth.

2014-01-01

211

Plasma fatty acid composition and incidence of diabetes in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The results of some epidemiologic studies con- ducted by using questionnaires suggest that dietary fat composi- tion influences diabetes risk. Confirmation of this finding with use of a biomarker is warranted. Objective: We prospectively investigated the relation of plasma cholesterol ester (CE) and phospholipid (PL) fatty acid composi- tion with the incidence of diabetes mellitus. Design: In 2909 adults

Lu Wang; Aaron R Folsom; Zhi-Jie Zheng; James S Pankow

212

Losartan in diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy has become the single most important cause of end-stage renal disease in the USA, Europe and Japan. The earliest marker of incipient diabetic nephropathy is the transition of normoalbuminuria to microalbuminuria at an albumin excretion rate of 20 microg/min. Human studies in patients both with and without diabetic kidney diseases have shown that the severity of baseline proteinuria is an important predictor of the rate of loss of renal function. Moreover, the reduction in protein excretion rate when patients with nephropathies are being treated with antihypertensive agents predicts the efficacy of subsequent renoprotection. Experimental and clinical observations provide the rationale for targeting the renin-angiotensin system as a renoprotective approach in diabetic and nondiabetic proteinuric nephropathies. Losartan (Cozaar, Merck Sharpe and Dohme) is a potent, orally active and highly specific angiotensin-type 1 receptor blocker. In addition to its antihypertensive efficacy, losartan decreases the left ventricular mass index in patients with hypertension, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume in subjects with heart failure and prevents cardiovascular morbidity and death, predominantly stroke, independent of blood pressure reduction. Short-term studies in Type 1 diabetic patients with overt nephropathy have demonstrated that losartan and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have similar beneficial effects on albumin excretion rate, blood pressure and renal hemodynamics. Losartan also lowered albumin excretion rate in microalbuminuric patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the large multicenter Reduction of End points in Noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan (RENAAL) trial has shown that blockade of angiotensin-type 1 receptor with losartan is superior to conventional antihypertensive therapy in slowing the progression of overt Type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Together, data from clinical trials demonstrate the beneficial effect of angiotensin-type 1 receptor blockers, including losartan, in the primary and secondary prevention of renal disease progression in diabetic patients. Nevertheless, it can be expected that the positive results achieved so far with this class of drugs may be further implemented by including angiotensin-type 1 receptor antagonists as a part of the multidrug approach that may hold more promise for the future of renoprotection in diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. PMID:15225108

Perico, Norberto; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

2004-07-01

213

Diabetic Kidney Disease (Diabetic Nephropathy) (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... Beyond the Basics) Patient information: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics) Patient information: ... be individualized. (See "Patient information: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" .) A blood ...

214

Prognosis in diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of long term antihypertensive treatment on prognosis in diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN--Prospective study of all insulin dependent diabetic patients aged under 50 with onset of diabetes before the age of 31 who developed diabetic nephropathy between 1974 and 1978 at Steno Memorial Hospital. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--Forty five patients (20 women) with a mean age of 30 (SD 7) years and a mean duration of diabetes of 18 (7) years at onset of persistent proteinuria were followed until death or for at least 10 years. INTERVENTIONS--Antihypertensive treatment was started a median of three (0-13) years after onset of nephropathy. Four patients (9%) received no treatment, and 9 (20%), 13 (29%), and 19 (42%) were treated with one, two, or three drugs, respectively. The median follow up was 12 (4-15) years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Arterial blood pressure and death. RESULTS--Mean blood pressure at start of antihypertensive treatment was 148/95 (15/50) mm Hg. Systolic blood pressure remained almost unchanged (slope -0.01 (95% confidence interval -0.39 to 0.37) mm Hg a year) while diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly (0.87 (0.65 to 1.10) mm Hg a year) during antihypertensive treatment. The cumulative death rate was 18% (8 to 32%) 10 years after onset of nephropathy, in contrast to previous reports of 50% to 77% 10 years after onset of nephropathy. As in previous studies, uraemia was the main cause of death (9 patients; 64%). CONCLUSIONS--The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy has improved during the past decade largely because of effective antihypertensive treatment.

Parving, H. H.; Hommel, E.

1989-01-01

215

Diabetic parturient - Anaesthetic implications  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy induces progressive changes in maternal carbohydrate metabolism. As pregnancy advances insulin resistance and diabetogenic stress due to placental hormones necessitate compensatory increase in insulin secretion. When this compensation is inadequate gestational diabetes develops. ‘Gestational diabetes mellitus’ (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance with onset or recognition during pregnancy. Women diagnosed to have GDM are at increased risk of future diabetes predominantly type 2 DM as are their children. Thus GDM offers an important opportunity for the development, testing and implementation of clinical strategies for diabetes prevention. Timely action taken now in screening all pregnant women for glucose intolerance, achieving euglycaemia in them and ensuring adequate nutrition may prevent in all probability, the vicious cycle of transmitting glucose intolerance from one generation to another. Given that diabetic mothers have proportionately larger babies it is likely that vaginal delivery will be more difficult than in the normal population, with a higher rate of instrumentally assisted delivery, episiotomy and conversion to urgent caesarean section. So an indwelling epidural catheter is a better choice for labour analgesia as well to use, should a caesarean delivery become necessary. Diabetes in pregnancy has potential serious adverse effects for both the mother and the neonate. Standardized multidisciplinary care including anaesthetists should be carried out obsessively throughout pregnancy. Diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder of pregnancy. In pregnancy, it has considerable cost and care demands and is associated with increased risks to the health of the mother and the outcome of the pregnancy. However, with careful and appropriate screening, multidisciplinary management and a motivated patient these risks can be minimized.

Pani, Nibedita; Mishra, Shakti Bedanta; Rath, Shovan Kumar

2010-01-01

216

Concurrent Bell's palsy and diabetes mellitus: a diabetic mononeuropathy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a series of 126 patients with Bell's palsy, chemical or overt diabetes mellitus was found in 39% of the cases. A high frequency of disturbances of taste was found in the patients who had no diabetes (83%), as compared to only 14% of diabetic patients whose taste was affected (p less than 0 .001). Thus, the usual site of

P Pecket; A Schattner

1982-01-01

217

Comparing knowledge of diabetes mellitus among rural and urban diabetics  

PubMed Central

A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the awareness of diabetes mellitus among rural and urban diabetics. After analyzing the awareness level of both populations, the urban diabetics were found to be more educated about diabetes. A 25-question survey was used to judge the awareness level of diabetes mellitus. A total of 240 diabetics were surveyed, 120 each from rural and urban areas. The mean awareness among the rural population was 13 (SD± 2) correct answers out of a possible 25. Similarly, in the case of the urban diabetics the mean awareness was 18 (SD± 2) correct answers. The survey was conducted on randomly chosen diabetics belonging to Lahore and Faisalabad, (urban areas), as well as Habibabad, Haveli Koranga and Baba Kanwal (rural areas). The results emphasize the interrelation between demography and awareness of diabetes mellitus. The rural diabetics are far less knowledgeable about diabetes mellitus, its management and its complications. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve the awareness level of diabetes mellitus in rural areas. Doing so will give rise to a healthier workforce and a lessened economic burden on Pakistan.

Sabri, Ahmad Ayaz; Qayyum, Muhammad Ahad; Saigol, Naif Usman; Zafar, Khurram; Aslam, Fawad

2007-01-01

218

Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness: a new diabetes subtype  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Diabetes mellitus is a common disease with many forms of clinical expression. In addition, the development of diabetic complications is not only dependent on glycaemic control but also on individual factors which may be related to genetic heterogeneity. At present, multiple genetic factors are being recognized as contributing to the development of diabetes or possibly modulating its clinical expression. The

J. A. Maassen; T. Kadowaki

1996-01-01

219

What Causes Diabetic Heart Disease?  

MedlinePLUS

... metabolic syndrome and how metabolic risk factors interact. Insulin Resistance in People Who Have Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance means that the body can' ...

220

Living with Type 1 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Do This Living with type 1 diabetes is tough but with proper care can be a footnote ... the Association Get Balance® Rewards points for healthy choices. Living W/ Diabetes: Don’t Forget Sunscreen This ...

221

Healthy Eating with Diabetes Video  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health , the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , and more than 200 public and private organizations. Home Publications Resources Diabetes Facts Press I Have Diabetes Am ...

222

What is Diabetic Eye Disease?  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... United States, there are 14 million people with diabetes and while most will not lose their vision ... good deal higher among people with Type I diabetes -- the type that usually begins in childhood and ...

223

Family Health History and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Family Helpful Resources Small Steps. Big Rewards. Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Information for ... for more information: Small Steps. Big Rewards. Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes (NDEP-60) ...

224

Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results ... as liver failure or liver cancer. How is hepatitis B spread? The hepatitis B virus is usually spread ...

225

Hypoxia in Diabetic Kidneys  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is now a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In addition, DN accounts for the increased mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and then patients without DN achieve long-term survival compatible with general population. Hypoxia represents an early event in the development and progression of DN, and hypoxia-inducible factor- (HIF-) 1 mediates the metabolic responses to renal hypoxia. Diabetes induces the “fraternal twins” of hypoxia, that is, pseudohypoxia and hypoxia. The kidneys are susceptible to hyperoxia because they accept 20% of the cardiac output. Therefore, the kidneys have specific vasculature to avoid hyperoxia, that is, AV oxygen shunting. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) sirtuins are seven mammalian proteins, SIRTs 1–7, which are known to modulate longevity and metabolism. Recent studies demonstrated that some isoforms of sirtuins inhibit the activation of HIF by deacetylation or noncatalyzing effects. The kidneys, which have a vascular system that protects them against hyperoxia, unfortunately experience extraordinary hypernutrition today. Then, an unexpected overload of glucose augments the oxygen consumption, which ironically results in hypoxia. This review highlights the primary role of HIF in diabetic kidneys for the metabolic adaptation to diabetes-induced hypoxia.

Takiyama, Yumi; Haneda, Masakazu

2014-01-01

226

Diabetic retinopathy and pregnancy.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy have reciprocal influences between them, therefore diabetes mellitus may complicate the course of pregnancy as well as pregnancy can worsen the performance of diabetes especially at the fundus oculi. Several factors seem to play a role in retinal neovascularization. Actually it's not possible to understand the mechanisms underlying this progression. Moreover chronic hyperglycemia leads to several events such as: the activation of aldose reductase metabolic pathway, the activation of the diacylglycerol-protein kinase C, the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins with formation of advanced glycation endproducts and the increase of hexosamines pathway. Although every structure of the eye can be affected by diabetes, retinal tissue, with all its vessels, is particularly susceptible. Pregnancy may promote the onset of diabetic retinopathy, in about 10 % of cases, as well as contribute to its worsening when already present. The proliferative retinopathy must always be treated; treatment should be earlier in pregnant women compared to non-pregnant women. Pregnancy can also cause macular edema; it spontaneously regresses during the postpartum and therefore does not require immediate treatment. In summary, collaboration between the various specialists is primary to ensure the best outcomes for both mother's health and sight, and fetus' health. PMID:24482250

Pescosolido, Nicola; Campagna, Orazio; Barbato, Andrea

2014-08-01

227

Treating the obese diabetic.  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes and obesity are intimately linked; reduction of bodyweight improves glycemic control, mortality and morbidity. Treating obesity in the diabetic is hampered as some diabetic treatments lead to weight gain. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective antiobesity treatment and causes long-term remission of diabetes in many patients. However, surgery has a high cost and is associated with a significant risk of complications, and in practical terms only limited numbers can undergo this therapy. The choice of pharmacological agents suitable for treatment of diabetes and obesity is currently limited. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists improve glycemia and induce a modest weight loss, but there are doubts over their long-term safety. New drugs such as lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate are being approved for obesity and have modest, salutary effects on glycemia, but again long-term safety is unclear. This article will also examine some future avenues for development, including gut hormone analogues that promise to combine powerful weight reduction with beneficial effects on glucose metabolism. PMID:23473594

Kenkre, Julia; Tan, Tricia; Bloom, Stephen

2013-03-01

228

Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is now regarded as an epidemic, with the population of patients expected to rise to 380 million by 2025. Tragically, this will lead to approximately 4 million people around the world losing their sight from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in patients aged 20 to 74 years. The risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is closely associated with the type and duration of diabetes, blood glucose, blood pressure, and possibly lipids. Although landmark cross-sectional studies have confirmed the strong relationship between chronic hyperglycaemia and the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, the underlying mechanism of how hyperglycaemia causes retinal microvascular damage remains unclear. Continued research worldwide has focussed on understanding the pathogenic mechanisms with the ultimate goal to prevent DR. The aim of this paper is to introduce the multiple interconnecting biochemical pathways that have been proposed and tested as key contributors in the development of DR, namely, increased polyol pathway, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), haemodynamic changes, accelerated formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), oxidative stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and subclinical inflammation and capillary occlusion. New pharmacological therapies based on some of these underlying pathogenic mechanisms are also discussed.

Tarr, Joanna M.; Kaul, Kirti; Chopra, Mohit; Kohner, Eva M.; Chibber, Rakesh

2013-01-01

229

Epigenetic changes in diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes is a multifactorial disease with numerous pathways influencing its progression and recent observations suggest that the complexity of the disease cannot be entirely accounted for by genetic predisposition. A compelling argument for an epigenetic component is rapidly emerging. Epigenetic processes at the chromatin template significantly sensitize transcriptional and phenotypic outcomes to environmental signaling information including metabolic state, nutritional requirements and history. Epigenetic mechanisms impact gene expression that could predispose individuals to the diabetic phenotype during intrauterine and early postnatal development, as well as throughout adult life. Furthermore, epigenetic changes could account for the accelerated rates of chronic and persistent microvascular and macrovascular complications associated with diabetes. Epidemiological and experimental animal studies identified poor glycemic control as a major contributor to the development of diabetic complications and highlight the requirement for early intervention. Early exposure to hyperglycemia can drive the development of complications that manifest late in the progression of the disease and persist despite improved glycemic control, indicating a memory of the metabolic insult. Understanding the molecular events that underlie these transcriptional changes will significantly contribute to novel therapeutic interventions to prevent, reverse or retard the deleterious effects of the diabetic milieu. PMID:23398084

Keating, S T; El-Osta, A

2013-07-01

230

Health and Diabetes Self-efficacy: A Study of Diabetic and Non-diabetic Free Clinic Patients and Family Members.  

PubMed

Free clinics across the country provide free or reduced fee healthcare to individuals who lack access to primary care and are socio-economically disadvantaged. This study examined perceived health status among diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members of the patients. Diabetes self-efficacy among diabetic free clinic patients was also investigated with the goal of developing appropriate diabetes health education programs to promote diabetes self-management. English or Spanish speaking patients and family members (N = 365) aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Physical and mental health and diabetes self-efficacy were measured using standardized instruments. Diabetic free clinic patients reported poorer physical and mental health and higher levels of dysfunction compared to non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members. Having a family history of diabetes and using emergency room or urgent care services were significant factors that affected health and dysfunction among diabetic and non-diabetes free clinic patients and family members. Diabetic free clinic patients need to receive services not only for diabetes, but also for overall health and dysfunction issues. Diabetes educational programs for free clinic patients should include a component to increase diabetes empowerment as well as the knowledge of treatment and management of diabetes. Non-diabetic patients and family members who have a family history of diabetes should also participate in diabetes education. Family members of free clinic patients need help to support a diabetic family member or with diabetes prevention. PMID:24496670

Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Myers, Kyl; Nourian, Maziar M; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

2014-08-01

231

Encephalopathies: the emerging diabetic complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic encephalopathies are now accepted complications of diabetes. They appear to differ in type 1 and type 2 diabetes\\u000a as to underlying mechanisms and the nature of resulting cognitive deficits. The increased incidence of Alzheimer’s disease\\u000a in type 2 diabetes is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia, and commonly accompanying attributes\\u000a such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and obesity. The relevance

Anders A. F. Sima

2010-01-01

232

Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide. The World Health Organisation has estimated that there will be around 300 million diabetics by 2025. The largest increase will occur in Asia. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing due to a combination of factors: increasing lifespan, sedentary lifestyle, excessive intake of high energy foods, increasing prevalence of overweight\\/obese people. The

Leslie C. Lai

2002-01-01

233

Contrast sensitivity in diabetic pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

• Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between the changes in contrast sensitivity and retinopathy throughout pregnancy in diabetic women with mild background diabetic retinopathy. • Methods: Contrast sensitivity (Vistech 6500 Contrast Test System) was measured in 22 type I diabetic women with mild background retinopathy [0–16 microaneurysms (MAs)\\/eye and occasional small intraretinal hemorrhages] and 10 healthy pregnant women at the

Timo Hellstedt; Risto Kaaja; Kari Teramo; Ekka Immonen

1997-01-01

234

DIABETES PREVENTION TRIAL TYPE 1  

EPA Science Inventory

The Diabetes Prevention Trial--Type 1 (DPT-1) is a nationwide study to see if we can prevent or delay type 1 diabetes, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes. Nine medical centers and more than 350 clinics in the United States and Canada are taking part in the study....

235

Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diabetes is a prevalent disease in the United States. The emergence of Type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents within the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities brings increased public health and quality of life concerns. In this article, the authors describe an initiative titled "Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools K-12…

Helgeson, Lars; Francis, Carolee Dodge

2006-01-01

236

Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Studies have found that diabetes and thyroid disorders tend to coexist in patients. Both conditions involve a dysfunction of the endocrine system. Thyroid disorders can have a major impact on glucose control, and untreated thyroid disorders affect the management of diabetes in patients. Consequently, a systematic approach to thyroid testing in patients with diabetes is recommended.

Hage, Mirella; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

2011-01-01

237

Common crossroads in diabetes management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence and impact of type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Data suggest that effective management can reduce the risk for both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In treating patients with diabetes, physicians must be prepared not only to tailor the initial treatment to the individual and his or her disease severity but also

Michael Valitutto

2008-01-01

238

Diabetic Youths and Their Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a need for a comprehensive program to fill the gap in services for children with diabetes and their families, the Diabetic Youth and Family Program of Wichita, Kansas is directing efforts to deal effectively and creatively with children's diabetic problems. (CS)

Smith, Melva

1974-01-01

239

Vascular complications in diabetic pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until now, vascular complications in diabetic pregnancy are mainly related to hyperglycemia caused by type 1 diabetes (Type 1 DM). Progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) occurs at least temporarily during pregnancy and postpartum. There is a short-term increase in the level of retinopathy during pregnancy that persisted into the first year postpartum. Nephropathy is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia,

R. Kaaja

2011-01-01

240

Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important.

Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

2012-01-01

241

Genomic imprinting in diabetes  

PubMed Central

Genomic imprinting refers to a class of transmissible genetic effects in which the expression of the phenotype in the offspring depends on the parental origin of the transmitted allele. The DNA from one parent may be epigenetically modified so that only a single allele of the imprinted gene is expressed in the offspring. Although imprinting has an important role in the regulation of growth and development through its role in regulating gene expression, its contribution to susceptibility to common complex disorders is not well understood. We summarize current views on the role of imprinting in diabetes and in particular chromosome 6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, the best known example of an imprinted genetic disorder that leads to diabetes.

2010-01-01

242

Genetics of diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a polygenic disorder. Twin studies and familial aggregation studies have documented clear familial clustering. Heritability has been estimated to be as high as 27 % for any DR and 52 % for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced form of the disease. Linkage analyses, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) performed to date have not identified any widely reproducible risk loci for DR. Combined analysis of the data from multiple GWAS is emerging as an important next step to explain the unaccounted heritability. Key factors to future discovery of the genetic underpinnings of DR are precise DR ascertainment, a focus on the more heritable disease forms such as PDR, stringent selection of control participants with regards to duration of diabetes, and methods that allow combination of existing datasets from different ethnicities to achieve sufficient sample sizes to detect variants with modest effect sizes. PMID:24952107

Cho, Heeyoon; Sobrin, Lucia

2014-08-01

243

[Diabetic nephropathy: Emerging treatments].  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The mainstay of treatment has been management of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and proteinuria using hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Since 2000, new therapeutic strategies began to emerge targeting the biochemical activity of glucose molecules on the renal tissue. Various substances have been studied with varying degrees of success, ranging from vitamin B to camel's milk. Silymarin reduces urinary excretion of albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, and malondialdehyde in patients with diabetic nephropathy and may be considered as a novel addition to the anti-diabetic nephropathy armamentarium. Although some results are promising, studies on a larger scale are needed to validate the utility of these molecules in the treatment of the DN. PMID:24938412

Gueutin, Victor; Gauthier, Marion; Cazenave, Maud; Izzedine, Hassane

2014-07-01

244

Thiazolidinediones may not reduce diabetes incidence in type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

Thiazolidinediones improve glycemic control by reducing insulin resistance. Some studies have demonstrated that troglitazone had a preventative effect on diabetes in NOD (non-obese diabetic) mice. One of the mechanisms proposed for the prevention of diabetes by thiazolidinediones is an effect on T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (Th1/Th2) balance. In this article, we attempted to clarify whether pioglitazone is also effective in preventing diabetes as compared to metformin, which has no immunological effect. Female NOD mice were administered pioglitazone or metformin orally, and the insulitis score, cytokines secreted from splenocytes, cytokine expression levels in the pancreas, and the incidence of diabetes after acceleration by cyclophosphamide were analyzed. We could not find any advantage of pioglitazone in preventing Th1 skewing and the development of diabetes over metformin. Therefore, further research should take place before the application of thiazolidinediones to human slowly progressive insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM) patients. PMID:17130580

Shigihara, Toshikatsu; Okubo, Yoshiaki; Kanazawa, Yasuhiko; Oikawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Akira

2006-10-01

245

Metabolic profiling in diabetes.  

PubMed

Metabolic profiling, or metabolomics, has developed into a mature science in recent years. It has major applications in the study of metabolic disorders. This review addresses issues relevant to the choice of the metabolomics platform, study design and data analysis in diabetes research, and presents recent advances using metabolomics in the identification of markers for altered metabolic pathways, biomarker discovery, challenge studies, metabolic markers of drug efficacy and off-target effects. The role of genetic variance and intermediate metabolic phenotypes and its relevance to diabetes research is also addressed. PMID:24868111

Suhre, Karsten

2014-06-01

246

Diabetic and endocrine emergencies  

PubMed Central

Endocrine emergencies constitute only a small percentage of the emergency workload of general doctors, comprising about 1.5% of all hospital admission in England in 2004–5. Most of these are diabetes related with the remaining conditions totalling a few hundred cases at most. Hence any individual doctor might not have sufficient exposure to be confident in their management. This review discusses the management of diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state, hypoglycaemia, hypercalcaemia, thyroid storm, myxoedema coma, acute adrenal insufficiency, phaeochromocytoma hypertensive crisis and pituitary apoplexy in the adult population.

Kearney, T; Dang, C

2007-01-01

247

[Gestational diabetes mellitus].  

PubMed

Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes. GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birthweight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e.g. glucosuria). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria) 6-12 weeks postpartum and every 2 years in case of normal glucose tolerance (Evidence level B). All women have to be instructed about their (sevenfold increased relative) risk of type 2 diabetes at follow-up and possibilities for diabetes prevention, in particular weight management and maintenance/increase of physical activity. Monitoring of the development of the offspring and recommendation of healthy lifestyle of the children and family is recommended. PMID:23250453

Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Pollak, Arnold; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

2012-12-01

248

Antioxidants and diabetes  

PubMed Central

Hyperglycemia promotes auto-oxidation of glucose to form free radicals. The generation of free radicals beyond the scavenging abilities of endogenous antioxidant defenses results in macro- and microvascular dysfunction. Antioxidants such as N-acetylcysteine, vitamin C and ?-lipoic acid are effective in reducing diabetic complications, indicating that it may be beneficial either by ingestion of natural antioxidants or through dietary supplementation. However, while antioxidants are proving essential tools in the investigation of oxidant stress-related diabetic pathologies and despite the obvious potential merit of a replacement style therapy, the safety and efficacy of antioxidant supplementation in any future treatment, remains to be established

Bajaj, Sarita; Khan, Afreen

2012-01-01

249

Fenugreek attenuation of diabetic nephropathy in alloxan-diabetic rats: attenuation of diabetic nephropathy in rats.  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. To prevent the development of this disease and to improve advanced kidney injury, effective therapies directed toward the key molecular target are required. In this paper, the efficacy of fenugreek to restore the kidney function of diabetic rats via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities has been studied. Novel data showing the efficacy of fenugreek to attenuate progression of diabetic nephropathy and production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rats compared with a diabetic untreated group were obtained. Rats were classified into five groups; control, diabetic untreated, and three diabetic groups treated with fenugreek, rosiglitazone, and metformin. Treatment with fenugreek has been continued for 12 weeks. Fenugreek was found to significantly reduce the high levels of glucose, urea, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and IL-6 in serum compared with the diabetic untreated group. In addition, levels of malondialdehyde and IL-6 in the kidney homogenate were significantly reduced as a result of the fenugreek treatment compared with the diabetic untreated group. Moreover, concentration of GSH and the activity of both superoxide dismutase and catalase were considerably increased in the diabetic treated groups compared with the diabetic untreated group. Furthermore, glomerular mesangial expansion was reduced in the treated animal groups. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of fenugreek against diabetic nephropathy, explain its antioxidative/anti-inflammatory properties and provide a direction for future research. PMID:22237966

Sayed, Ahmed Amir Radwan; Khalifa, Mahmoud; Abd el-Latif, Fathy Fahim

2012-06-01

250

Controlling diabetes, controlling diabetics: moral language in the management of diabetes type 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contemporary management of diabetes places heavy emphasis on control, particularly control of blood sugars and of food consumption. Interviews with people living with diabetes type 2 show how identity and social relationships are negotiated through what is often a contradictory language of control, surveillance, discipline and responsibility. People frequently discuss diabetes-related behaviour in terms that position themselves or others as

Dorothy Broom; Andrea Whittaker

2004-01-01

251

[Chronic liver diseases and diabetes].  

PubMed

The presence of chronic liver diseases may drastically limit the use of anti-diabetic drugs. Chronic liver diseases increase insulin resistance, and in some risk groups promote the development of diabetes. Therefore, antidiabetic treatment should be adapted to the severity of liver disease. However, diabetes, notably when associated with obesity and dyslipidemia, participates in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and to steato-hepatitis that may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Other relations between diabetes and chronic liver disease will be discussed in this article. Finally, the indications and limits of each anti-diabetic therapy group will be discussed according to the degree of liver damage. PMID:25004772

Jaafar, Jaafar; de Kalbermatten, Bénédicte; Philippe, Jacques; Scheen, André; Jornayvaz, François R

2014-06-01

252

Neurotrophic keratopathy and diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is frequently associated with microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy. Neurotrophic keratopathy occurs in response to a neuropathy of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. Rarely has diabetic neurotrophic keratopathy been described. This paper discusses the ophthalmic histories of three patients who presented with diabetic neurotrophic keratopathy. In one patient the corneal ulceration was the sole presenting feature of his diabetes. We discuss the need for increased vigilance in the ophthalmic community for suspecting diabetes in patients with unexplained corneal epithelial disease. PMID:16215544

Lockwood, A; Hope-Ross, M; Chell, P

2006-07-01

253

Rheumatic manifestations in diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. For most of these affections, pathophysiologic correlations are not well established. Some of them, such as diabetic cheiroarthropathy, neuropathic arthritis, diabetic amyotrophy, diabetic muscle infraction, are considered intrinsic complications of DM. For others, like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, DM is considered a predisposing condition. In most cases, these affections cause pain and disability, affecting the quality of life of diabetic patients, but once correctly diagnosed, they often respond to the treatment, that generally requires a multidisciplinary team. This article reviews some epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these conditions.

Serban, AL; Udrea, GF

2012-01-01

254

Maternal obesity exacerbates insulitis and type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.  

PubMed

Accompanying the dramatic increase in maternal obesity, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children is also rapidly increasing. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of maternal obesity on the incidence of T1D in offspring using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a common model for TID. Four-week-old female NOD mice were fed either a control diet (10% energy from fat, CON) or a high-fat diet (60% energy from fat) for 8 weeks before mating. Mice were maintained in their respective diets during pregnancy and lactation. All offspring mice were fed the CON to 16 weeks. Female offspring (16-week-old) born to obese dams showed more severe islet lymphocyte infiltration (major manifestation of insulitis) (P<0.01), concomitant with elevated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65 signaling (P<0.01) and tumor necrosis factor alpha protein level (P<0.05) in the pancreas. In addition, maternal obesity resulted in impaired (P<0.05) glucose tolerance and lower (P<0.05) serum insulin levels in offspring. In conclusion, maternal obesity resulted in exacerbated insulitis and inflammation in the pancreas of NOD offspring mice, providing a possible explanation for the increased incidence of T1D in children. PMID:24692565

Wang, Hui; Xue, Yansong; Wang, Baolin; Zhao, Junxing; Yan, Xu; Huang, Yan; Du, Min; Zhu, Mei-Jun

2014-07-01

255

Impulse Control, Diabetes-Specific Self-Efficacy, and Diabetes Management Among Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objective?To explore the relationships among impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management behaviors among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods?A total of 204 high school seniors (M = 18.25 years, SD = .45, 55.9% females) with type 1 diabetes self-reported on impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management behaviors during the past 3 months. Mediation and path analyses were used to address aims. Results?Greater impulse control was associated with better diabetes management among these emerging adults. In addition, diabetes-specific self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between impulse control and diabetes management. Conclusions?Impulse control and diabetes-specific self-efficacy may be important in the management of type 1 diabetes among emerging adults. Diabetes-specific self-efficacy may play an important role in successful diabetes management among youth with lower impulse control.

Hanna, Kathleen M.; Slaven, James E.; Weaver, Michael T.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2013-01-01

256

Mouse Models of Diabetic Nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Despite its prevalence, identification of specific factors that cause or predict diabetic nephropathy has been delayed in part by lack of reliable animal models that mimic the disease in humans. The Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (AMDCC) was created 8 years ago by the National Institutes of Health to develop and characterize models of diabetic nephropathy and other complications. This interim report details the progress made toward that goal, specifically in the development and testing of murine models. Updates are provided on validation criteria for early and advanced diabetic nephropathy, phenotyping methods, the effect of background strain on nephropathy, current best models of diabetic nephropathy, negative models and views of future directions. AMDCC investigators and other investigators in the field have yet to validate a complete murine model of human diabetic kidney disease. Nonetheless, the critical analysis of existing murine models substantially enhances our understanding of this disease process.

Brosius, Frank C.; Alpers, Charles E.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Gurley, Susan B.; Harris, Raymond C.; Kakoki, Masao; Kretzler, Matthias; Leiter, Edward H.; Levi, Moshe; McIndoe, Richard A.; Sharma, Kumar; Smithies, Oliver; Susztak, Katalin; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Takamune

2014-01-01

257

Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management  

PubMed Central

Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets.

Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

2014-01-01

258

Mouse models of diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of ESRD worldwide. Despite its prevalence, a lack of reliable animal models that mimic human disease has delayed the identification of specific factors that cause or predict diabetic nephropathy. The Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (AMDCC) was created in 2001 by the National Institutes of Health to develop and characterize models of diabetic nephropathy and other complications. This interim report and our online supplement detail the progress made toward that goal, specifically in the development and testing of murine models. Updates are provided on validation criteria for early and advanced diabetic nephropathy, phenotyping methods, the effect of background strain on nephropathy, current best models of diabetic nephropathy, negative models, and views of future directions. AMDCC investigators and other investigators in the field have yet to validate a complete murine model of human diabetic kidney disease. Nonetheless, the critical analysis of existing murine models substantially enhances our understanding of this disease process. PMID:19729434

Brosius, Frank C; Alpers, Charles E; Bottinger, Erwin P; Breyer, Matthew D; Coffman, Thomas M; Gurley, Susan B; Harris, Raymond C; Kakoki, Masao; Kretzler, Matthias; Leiter, Edward H; Levi, Moshe; McIndoe, Richard A; Sharma, Kumar; Smithies, Oliver; Susztak, Katalin; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Takamune

2009-12-01

259

Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene in two families with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) is a rare X-linked disorder in which the renal collecting duct is unresponsive to arginine vasopressin, and thus, the urine is consistently hypotonic to plasma. As a result, affected individuals are unable to con- centrate urine and suffer from episodes of severe dehydration and hypernatremia. Recently, the as- sociation between arginine vasopressin V2 receptor gene

Eliezer J. Holtzman; Lee F. Kolakowski; Ossie Geifman-Holtzman; David G. O'Brien; Majid Rasoulpour; Ann P. Guillot; Dennis A. Ausiello

1995-01-01

260

Diabetes in Hispanic American Youth  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To report the 2001 prevalence and 2002–2005 incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Hispanic American youth and to describe the demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of these youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, a population-based multicenter observational study of youth aged 0–19 years with physician-diagnosed diabetes, were used to estimate the prevalence and incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Information obtained by questionnaire, physical examination, and blood and urine collection was analyzed to describe the characteristics of youth who completed a study visit. RESULTS—Among Hispanic American youth, type 1 diabetes was more prevalent than type 2 diabetes, including in youth aged 10–19 years. There were no significant sex differences in type 1 or type 2 diabetes prevalence. The incidence of type 2 diabetes for female subjects aged 10–14 years was twice that of male subjects (P < 0.005), while among youth aged 15–19 years the incidence of type 2 diabetes exceeded that of type 1 diabetes for female subjects (P < 0.05) but not for male subjects. Poor glycemic control, defined as A1C ?9.5%, as well as high LDL cholesterol and triglycerides were common among youth aged ?15 years with either type of diabetes. Forty-four percent of youth with type 1 diabetes were overweight or obese. CONCLUSIONS—Factors such as poor glycemic control, elevated lipids, and a high prevalence of overweight and obesity may put Hispanic youth with type 1 and type 2 diabetes at risk for future diabetes-related complications.

Lawrence, Jean M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Reynolds, Kristi; Beyer, Jennifer; Pettitt, David J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Hamman, Richard F.

2009-01-01

261

Diabetes and Inflammation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last 50 years health care systems throughout the world have faced a new epidemic dual disease: cardiovascular disease (CVD)-diabetes mellitus. Nowadays, CVD is the leading cause of death in all western countries, and 60% of deaths for ischemic heart disease and stroke occur in developing countries with fixing resources. The striking association between CAD, stroke, peripheral artery disease

Francesco Cosentino; Gabriele Egidy Assenza

2004-01-01

262

The neuropathic diabetic foot  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, and result in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are likely to be of neuropathic origin and, therefore, are eminently preventable. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet: education and frequent follow-up

Andrew JM Boulton; Haris M Rathur

2007-01-01

263

Periodontal disease and diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes is considered to be a genetically and environmentally based chronic metabolic and vascular syndrome caused by a partial or total insulin deficiency with alteration in the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins culminating with different manifestations in different organisms. In humans hyperglycemia is the main consequence of defects in the secretion and/or action of insulin, and its deregulation can produce secondary lesions in various organs, especially kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels and immune systems. Periodontal disease is an entity of localized infection that involves tooth-supporting tissues. The first clinical manifestation of periodontal disease is the appearance of periodontal pockets, which offer a favorable niche for bacterial colonization. The etiology of periodontal disease is multifactorial, being caused by interactions between multiple micro-organisms (necessary but not sufficient primary etiologic factors), a host with some degree of susceptibility and environmental factors. According to current scientific evidence, there is a symbiotic relationship between diabetes and periodontitis, such that diabetes is associated with an increased incidence and progression of periodontitis, and periodontal infection is associated with poor glycaemic control in diabetes due to poor immune systems. Hence, for a good periodontal control it is necessary to treat both periodontal disease and glycaemic control. PMID:23393673

Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Arias-Herrera, Santiago; Criado-Cámara, Elena; Bascones-Ilundáin, Jaime; Bascones-Ilundáin, Cristina

2012-01-01

264

Diabetes: The Science Inside  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this book is to provide basic information about type 2 diabetes: what causes it, how it affects the body, and how it can be prevented and treated. Supported byScience Education Partnership Award (SEPA)from the National Center for Research Resources Grant # 5R25RR15601.

Healthy People Library Project;

2003-01-01

265

Sexual problems in diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common and distressing problem. The prevalence increases with age in diabetes and affects about 30–50% men overall. Penile erection occurs as a result of engorgement of the erectile tissue following vascular smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum mediated by nitric oxide (NO) which is derived from both parasympathetic nerve terminals and the vascular endothelium.

David Price

2006-01-01

266

Vegetarian Diets and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large body of evidence suggests that vegetarian and plant-based diets provide exceptional health benefits, including a reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer, and increased longevity. Vegetarian diets are typically lower in fat, particularly saturated fat, and higher in dietary fiber. They are also likely to include more whole grains, legumes, nuts, and soy

Kate Marsh; Jennie Brand-Miller

2011-01-01

267

Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.  

PubMed

Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness. PMID:24915888

O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

2014-08-01

268

Diabetes and Hispanic Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Need Help? Contact Us Email Updates OMH Content Content Index > Data/Statistics > Hispanic/Latino Profile Diabetes and Hispanic Americans ... 4 Table 17. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/nvsr61_04.pdf [PDF | 3MB] ... High Cholesterol – See Heart Disease and Hispanic Americans Cigarette ...

269

Management of diabetic hypertensives  

PubMed Central

Hypertension occurs twice as commonly in diabetics than in comparable nondiabetics. Patients with both disorders have a markedly higher risk for premature microvascular and macrovascular complications. Aggressive control of blood pressure (BP) reduces both micro- and macrovascular complications. In diabetic hypertensives, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are the first line in management of hypertension, and can be replaced by angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) if patients are intolerant of them. Recent studies suggest ARBs to be on par with ACEI in reducing both macro- and microvascular risks. Adding both these agents may have a beneficial effect on proteinuria, but no extra macrovascular risk reduction. Thiazides can also be used as first line drugs, but are better used along with ACEI/ARBs. Beta-blockers [especially if the patient has coronary artery disease] and calcium channel blockers are used as second line add-on drugs. Multidrug regimens are commonly needed in diabetic hypertensives. Achieving the target BP of <130/80 is the priority rather than the drug combination used in order to arrest and prevent the progression of macro- and microvascular complications in diabetic hypertensives.

Ganesh, Jai; Viswanathan, Vijay

2011-01-01

270

Postpartum Diabetes Screening  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine the rate of adherence to postpartum glycemic testing in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and the performance of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) versus the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in detecting postpartum glucose intolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study was a retrospective cohort of 1,006 women with GDM attending a pregnancy diabetes clinic. RESULTS Postpartum screening was completed in 438 (48%) women. Women nonadherent to testing had higher parity (1.10 vs. 0.87) and were less likely to require insulin for management of their GDM. Among women who were tested, 89 (21%) had an abnormal result, only 25 (28%) of whom were identified by FPG. Factors associated with abnormal postpartum diabetes screening include non-Caucasian ethnicity, previous GDM, higher A1C, and OGTT values during pregnancy and treatment with insulin. CONCLUSIONS The rate of postpartum diabetes screening is low, and FPG lacks sensitivity as a screening test in comparison with OGTT.

Kwong, Sarah; Mitchell, Rebecca S.; Senior, Peter A.; Chik, Constance L.

2009-01-01

271

Painful diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic painful diabetic neuropathy can cause a variety of challenges, particularly in successful treatment. The pain, which can last for years, can severely impair quality of life. Management is difficult, although the careful use of drugs can be significantly beneficial. Tricyclic and anticonvulsant drugs may be effective, with a variety of drugs available as second line agents. Newer non-drug systems

S. J. Benbow; I. A. MacFarlane

1999-01-01

272

La salud en personas con discapacidad intelectual en Espa?a: estudio europeo POMONA-II  

PubMed Central

Introducción Estudios internacionales demuestran que existe un patrón diferenciado de salud y una disparidad en la atención sanitaria entre personas con discapacidad intelectual (DI) y población general. Objetivo Obtener datos sobre el estado de salud de las personas con DI y compararlos con datos de población general. Pacientes y métodos Se utilizó el conjunto de indicadores de salud P15 en una muestra de 111 sujetos con DI. Los datos de salud encontrados se compararon según el tipo de residencia de los sujetos y se utilizó la Encuesta Nacional de Salud 2006 para comparar estos datos con los de la población general. Resultados La muestra con DI presentó 25 veces más casos de epilepsia y el doble de obesidad. Un 20% presentó dolor bucal, y existió una alta presencia de problemas sensoriales, de movilidad y psicosis. Sin embargo, encontramos una baja presencia de patologías como la diabetes, la hipertensión, la osteoartritis y la osteoporosis. También presentaron una menor participación en programas de prevención y promoción de la salud, un mayor número de ingresos hospitalarios y un uso menor de los servicios de urgencia. Conclusiones El patrón de salud de las personas con DI difiere del de la población general, y éstas realizan un uso distinto de los servicios sanitarios. Es importante el desarrollo de programas de promoción de salud y de formación profesional específicamente diseñados para la atención de personas con DI, así como la implementación de encuestas de salud que incluyan datos sobre esta población.

Martinez-Leal, Rafael; Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Gutierrez-Colosia, Mencia Ruiz; Nadal, Margarida; Novell-Alsina, Ramon; Martorell, Almudena; Gonzalez-Gordon, Rodrigo G.; Merida-Gutierrez, M. Reyes; Angel, Silvia; Milagrosa-Tejonero, Luisa; Rodriguez, Alicia; Garcia-Gutierrez, Juan C.; Perez-Vicente, Amado; Garcia-Ibanez, Jose; Aguilera-Ines, Francisco

2011-01-01

273

What the Teacher Should Know About Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This short manual is designed to provide the practicing teacher with basic information on diabetes, and the role (s)he plays in providing health supervision and care for the diabetic child in his/her classroom. The document consists of four pages, describing (1) components of diabetes management and symptoms of diabetes; (2) emergency diabetic

Johnston, Harriet, Ed.; Rolloff, Charlene, Ed.

274

The spontaneously diabetic Torii rat with gastroenteropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rat was recently recognized as a new animal model of non-obese type 2 diabetes. As the severe diabetic ocular complications seen in SDT rats already have been investigated, we examined another common diabetic complication, gastroenteropathy. Male SDT rats developed diabetes at 20 weeks and diarrhea at 28 weeks of age. Gastrointestinal motility was evaluated at

Kotaro Yamada; Masaya Hosokawa; Shimpei Fujimoto; Kazuaki Nagashima; Kazuhito Fukuda; Hideya Fujiwara; Eiichi Ogawa; Yoshihito Fujita; Naoya Ueda; Futoshi Matsuyama; Yuichiro Yamada; Yutaka Seino; Nobuya Inagaki

2007-01-01

275

PROMOTING CONTINUING EDUCATION IN DIABETES MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes knowledge among hospital nurses is sub- optimal. Studies that measured basic diabetes knowledge among nurses in a variety of clinical settings have consis- tently reported poor understanding of hemoglobin A1C, medication usage and side effects, and self-care diabetes management. Although diabetes is a common diagnosis among hospitalized patients, many nurses report they have never attended an update on diabetes

Geralyn Spollett

276

DIABETES MELLITUS COMO FACTOR DE RIESGO DE DEMENCIA EN LA POBLACI?N ADULTA MAYOR MEXICANA  

PubMed Central

Introduccion La diabetes mellitus y las demencias constituyen dos problemas crecientes de salud entre la población adulta mayor del mundo y en particular de los paises en desarrollo. Hacen falta estudios longitudinales sobre el papel de la diabetes como factor de riesgo para demencia. Objetivo Determinar el riesgo de demencia en sujetos Mexicanos con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Materiales y Metodos Los sujetos diabéticos libres de demencia pertenecientes al Estudio Nacional de Salud y Envejecimiento en México fueron evaluados a los dos años de la línea de base. Se estudió el papel de los factores sociodemográficos, de otras comorbilidades y del tipo de tratamiento en la conversión a demencia. Resultados Durante la línea de base 749 sujetos (13.8%) tuvieron diabetes. El riesgo de desarrollar demencia en estos individuos fue el doble (RR, 2.08 IC 95%, 1.59–2.73). Se encontró un riesgo mayor en individuos de 80 años y más (RR 2.44 IC 95%, 1.46–4.08), en los hombres (RR, 2.25 IC 95%, 1.46–3.49) y en sujetos con nivel educativo menor de 7 años. El estar bajo tratamiento con insulina incrementó el riesgo de demencia (RR, 2.83, IC 95%, 1.58–5.06). Las otras comorbilidades que aumentaron el riesgo de demencia en los pacientes diabéticos fueron la hipertensión (RR, 2.75, IC 95%, 1.86–4.06) y la depresión (RR, 3.78, 95% IC 2.37–6.04). Conclusión Los sujetos con diabetes mellitus tienen un riesgo mayor de desarrollar demencia, La baja escolaridad y otras comorbilidades altamente prevalentes en la población Mexicana contribuyen a la asociación diabetes-demencia.

Silvia, Mejia-Arango; Clemente, y Zuniga-Gil

2012-01-01

277

Epidemiological Issues in Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

There is currently an epidemic of diabetes in the world, principally type 2 diabetes that is linked to changing lifestyle, obesity, and increasing age of the population. Latest estimates from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) forecasts a rise from 366 million people worldwide to 552 million by 2030. Type 1 diabetes is more common in the Northern hemisphere with the highest rates in Finland and there is evidence of a rise in some central European countries, particularly in the younger children under 5 years of age. Modifiable risk factors for progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) are blood glucose, blood pressure, serum lipids, and smoking. Nonmodifiable risk factors are duration, age, genetic predisposition, and ethnicity. Other risk factors are pregnancy, microaneurysm count in an eye, microaneurysm formation rate, and the presence of any DR in the second eye. DR, macular edema (ME), and proliferative DR (PDR) develop with increased duration of diabetes and the rates are dependent on the above risk factors. In one study of type 1 diabetes, the median individual risk for the development of early retinal changes was 9.1 years of diabetes duration. Another study reported the 25 year incidence of proliferative retinopathy among population-based cohort of type 1 patients with diabetes was 42.9%. In recent years, people with diabetes have lower rates of progression than historically to PDR and severe visual loss, which may reflect better control of glucose, blood pressure, and serum lipids, and earlier diagnosis.

Scanlon, Peter H; Aldington, Stephen J; Stratton, Irene M

2013-01-01

278

Current management of diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy progresses through three distinct stages. A rational approach to management is based on an understanding of the pathophysiology of each stage. Based on the results of national multicentered clinical trials of laser photocoagulation and other treatments, advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment can now make a dramatic impact on blindness in the diabetic population: Panretinal laser photocoagulation treatment can reduce the risk of vision loss from high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy by at least 50%. Laser photocoagulation treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema can reduce the risk of vision loss by more than 50%. Vitrectomy can restore useful vision to some patients with severe diabetic retinopathy and vitreous hemorrhage with or without an accompanying traction retinal detachment. Diabetes 2000 is a new project sponsored by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the goal of which is to eliminate preventable blindness from diabetes by the year 2000. As its name implies, Diabetes 2000 will be a long-term project aimed at a specific disease--diabetic retinopathy and its complications. It will provide the latest research findings to ophthalmologists and primary care physicians as the first priority, followed by the education of patients and the general public. Recent advances and treatment guidelines for the medical and surgical treatment of diabetic eye disease will be emphasized through the continuing education of ophthalmologists, other physicians, and allied health professionals. In later phases, educational programs for diabetic persons and the public will be developed. Ultimately, improved access of diabetic patients to ophthalmologic care and a close working relationship between ophthalmologists and primary care physicians will ensure early detection of diabetic retinopathy and the timely delivery of state-of-the-art treatments. PMID:1413752

Ai, E

1992-07-01

279

Atypical diabetes in children: ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus also known as atypical or flatbush diabetes is being increasingly recognised worldwide. These patients are typically obese, middle-aged men with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. The aetiology and pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear but some initial research suggests that patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes have a unique predisposition to glucose desensitisation. These patients have negative autoantibodies typically associated with type 1 diabetes but have shown to have human leucocyte antigen (HLA) positivity. At initial presentation, there is an impairment of both insulin secretion and action. ? Cell function and insulin sensitivity can be markedly improved by initiating aggressive diabetes management to allow for discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment. These patients can be maintained on oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin therapy can be safely discontinued after few months depending on their ? cell function. PMID:23302548

Vaibhav, Atul; Mathai, Mathew; Gorman, Shaun

2013-01-01

280

The Diabetes Prevention Program  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a 27-center randomized clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of interventions that may delay or prevent development of diabetes in people at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eligibility requirements were age ?25 years, BMI ?24 kg/m2 (?22 kg/m2 for Asian-Americans), and impaired glucose tolerance plus a fasting plasma glucose of 5.3–6.9 mmol/l (or ?6.9 mmol for American Indians). Randomization of participants into the DPP over 2.7 years ended in June 1999. Baseline data for the three treatment groups—intensive lifestyle modification, standard care plus metformin, and standard care plus placebo—are presented for the 3,234 participants who have been randomized. RESULTS Of all participants, 55% were Caucasian, 20% were African-American, 16% were Hispanic, 5% were American Indian, and 4% were Asian-American. Their average age at entry was 51 ± 10.7 years (mean ± SD), and 67.7% were women. Moreover, 16% were <40 years of age, and 20% were ?60 years of age. Of the women, 48% were postmenopausal. Men and women had similar frequencies of history of hypercholesterolemia (37 and 33%, respectively) or hypertension (29 and 26%, respectively). On the basis of fasting lipid determinations, 54% of men and 40% of women fit National Cholesterol Education Program criteria for abnormal lipid profiles. More men than women were current or former cigarette smokers or had a history of coronary heart disease. Furthermore, 66% of men and 71% of women had a first-degree relative with diabetes. Overall, BMI averaged 34.0 ± 6.7 kg/m2 at baseline with 57% of the men and 73% of women having a BMI ?30 kg/m2. Average fasting plasma glucose (6.0 ± 0.5 mmol/l) and HbA1c (5.9 ± 0.5%) in men were comparable with values in women (5.9 ± 0.4 mmol/l and 5.9 ± 0.5%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS The DPP has successfully randomized a large cohort of participants with a wide distribution of age, obesity, and ethnic and racial backgrounds who are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The study will examine the effects of interventions on the development of diabetes.

2005-01-01

281

Breastfeeding and diabetes: part 1.  

PubMed

Diabetes is an increasingly common disease (Narayan et al 2003; Cowie et al 2006). The financial impact of managing this condition is rising (Hogan et al 2003). Diabetes is a syndrome with genetic and environmental influences that results in both insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production (Weyer et al 1999). Increasing evidence suggests that exclusive breastfeeding may have a significant impact on the prevention of diabetes in adult life (Young et al 2002). This paper looks at why it is important to motivate mothers with diabetes to exclusively breastfeed their babies as directed by the Department of Health (DH) (2003). Breastfeeding will have a positive impact in halting the rising diabetic trend. In addition to the physiological benefits of breastfeeding, women with diabetes report that breastfeeding helps them to fulfil their need to feel 'normal' (Riordan 2005). PMID:23243830

Finigan, Valerie

2012-11-01

282

Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?  

MedlinePLUS

... This is called high blood sugar or diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? Answer the ... 4818 NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health Document Outline Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? What is ...

283

Diabetic Eye Disease: What Do You Know?  

MedlinePLUS

... TRUE or FALSE True. Diabetic eye disease includes diabetic retinopathy—a leading cause of blindness in adults—cataract, ... for early detection and timely treatment. true false Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels ...

284

Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... A A Listen En Español Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes There are several ways to diagnose ... Diabetes! - 2014-may-bee-well-for-life.html Learn More Make a Healthy Change to Stop Diabetes! ...

285

76 FR 68617 - National Diabetes Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...health issues, people with diabetes are more likely to suffer...in young people, Type 1 diabetes inhibits the body's ability...injections, diet, and exercise. Research suggests that, unlike Type 1 diabetes, it is possible to...

2011-11-04

286

How Can Diabetic Heart Disease Be Prevented?  

MedlinePLUS

... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Diabetic Heart Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control ... lifestyle changes and medicines, go to "How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?" Rate This Content: Diabetic Heart ...

287

Molecular Mechanisms of Curcumin on Diabetes-Induced Endothelial Dysfunctions: Txnip, ICAM-1, and NOX2 Expressions  

PubMed Central

We aim to investigate the effects of curcumin on preventing diabetes-induced vascular inflammation in association with its actions on Txnip, ICAM-1, and NOX2 enzyme expressions. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (CON), diabetic (DM; streptozotocin (STZ), i.v. 55?mg/kg BW), control-treated with curcumin (CONCUR; 300?mg/kg BW), and diabetes treated with curcumin (DMCUR; 300?mg/kg BW). 12th week after STZ injection, iris blood perfusion, leukocyte adhesion, Txnip, p47phox, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined by using laser Doppler, intravital fluorescent confocal microscopy, Western Blot analysis, and TBAR assay, respectively. The iris blood perfusion of DM and DMCUR was decreased significantly compared to CON and CONCUR (P < 0.001). Plasma glucose and HbA1c of DM and DMCUR were increased significantly compared to CON and CONCUR (P < 0.001). Leukocyte adhesion, ICAM-1, p47phox expression, and MDA levels in DM were increased significantly compared to CON, CONCUR, and DMCUR (P < 0.05). Txnip expression in DM and DMCUR was significantly higher than CON and CONCUR (P < 0.05). From Pearson's analysis, the correlation between the plasma MDA level and the endothelial functions was significant. It suggested that curcumin could ameliorate diabetic vascular inflammation by decreasing ROS overproduction, reducing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, and inhibiting ICAM-1 and NOX2 expression.

Wongeakin, Natchaya; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Patumraj, Suthiluk

2014-01-01

288

Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

An explosion of work over the last decade has produced insight into the multiple hereditary causes of a nonimmunological form of diabetes diagnosed most frequently within the first 6 months of life. These studies are providing increased understanding of genes involved in the entire chain of steps that control glucose homeostasis. Neonatal diabetes is now understood to arise from mutations in genes that play critical roles in the development of the pancreas, of ?-cell apoptosis and insulin processing, as well as the regulation of insulin release. For the basic researcher, this work is providing novel tools to explore fundamental molecular and cellular processes. For the clinician, these studies underscore the need to identify the genetic cause underlying each case. It is increasingly clear that the prognosis, therapeutic approach, and genetic counseling a physician provides must be tailored to a specific gene in order to provide the best medical care.

Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Bryan, Joseph

2008-01-01

289

Prevention of type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions in our society and worldwide. Cardiovascular\\u000a disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in people with diabetes. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors\\u000a is achieved only in a minority of patients. Given the magnitude of the problem and the seriousness of diabetes complications,\\u000a prevention appears to

Samy I. McFarlane; John J. Shin; Tanja Rundek; J. Thomas Bigger

2003-01-01

290

Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter reviews a number of aspects of the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes, and the evidence relating to the major issues.\\u000a There is strong evidence for a rising epidemic of diabetes in many countries of the world, although the prevalence and incidence\\u000a of diabetes varies markedly among regions, countries within regions, and by ethnicity. Some of the increase in

Jonathan E. Shaw; Richard Sicree

291

Diabetes in Europe: an update.  

PubMed

Diabetes is among the leading causes of death in the IDF Europe Region (EUR), continues to increase in prevalence with diabetic macro- and microvascular complications resulting in increased disability and enormous healthcare costs. In 2013, the number of people with diabetes is estimated to be 56 million in EUR with an overall estimated prevalence of 8.5%. However, estimates of diabetes prevalence in 2013 vary widely in the 56 diverse countries in EUR from 2.4% in Moldova to 14.9% in Turkey. Trends in diabetes prevalence also vary between countries with stable prevalence since 2002 for many countries but a doubling of diabetes prevalence in Turkey. For 2035, a further increase of nearly 10 million people with diabetes is projected for the EUR. Prevalence of type 1 has also increased over the past 20 years in EUR and there was estimated to be 129,350 cases in children aged 0-14 years in 2013. Registries provide valid information on incidence of type 1 diabetes with more complete data available for children than for adults. There are large differences in distribution of risk factors for diabetes at the population level in EUR. Modifiable risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, smoking behaviour (including secondhand smoking), environmental pollutants, psychosocial factors and socioeconomic deprivation could be tackled to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in Europe. In addition, diabetes management is a major challenge to health services in the European countries. Improved networking practices of health professionals and other stakeholders in combination with empowerment of people with diabetes and continuous quality monitoring need to be further developed in Europe. PMID:24300019

Tamayo, T; Rosenbauer, J; Wild, S H; Spijkerman, A M W; Baan, C; Forouhi, N G; Herder, C; Rathmann, W

2014-02-01

292

The Epidemiology of Diabetic Neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peripheral neuropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes mellitus because of the debilitating symptoms it causes or\\u000a associated higher risk of other complications, in particular those involving the lower extremity. This chapter will review\\u000a the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for different types of diabetic neuropathy. There are seven major types of diabetic\\u000a neuropathy: (1) distal symmetric polyneuropathy, (2) autonomic

Stephanie Wheeler; Nalini Singh; Edward J. Boyko

293

Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk.

Wadwa, R. Paul

2012-01-01

294

Imaging of the Diabetic Foot  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foot infections are among the most common causes of hospitalization in the diabetic population, accounting for 20% of all\\u000a diabetes-related admissions. Complicated foot infections may require treatment by amputation—as many as 6–10% of all patients\\u000a with diabetes will undergo amputation for treatment of infection (1–3), accounting for 57% of nontraumatic lower extremity amputations (4–6). The scope of the problem is

Mary G. Hochman; Yvonne Cheung; David P. Brophy; J. Anthony Parker

295

Strategies to treat autoimmune diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

anti-CD3, antigen-specific treatment, autoimmune diabetes, cellular therapy, combination therapy, immune intervention, regulatory T cell, systemic immune modulation, Type 1 diabetes mellitus Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing ? cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to deficiency in glucose uptake by the cells of the body. The resulting complications and mortality call into attention the need for therapeutic

Christophe M Filippi; Matthias G von Herrath

2007-01-01

296

Childhood Diabetes: A Global Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is an evolving disease, with changing patterns seen in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A wide (over 400-fold) variation exists in worldwide incidence rates of type 1 diabetes, with the highest occurring in Finland (over 45 per 100,000 under the age of 15 years) and the lowest in parts of China. In many countries (e.g. in Europe,

Martin Silink

2002-01-01

297

Hemorheological Disorders in Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

The objective of the present study is to review hemorheological disorders in diabetes mellitus. Several key hemorheological parameters, such as whole blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and aggregation, are examined in the context of elevated blood glucose level in diabetes. The erythrocyte deformability is reduced, whereas its aggregation increases, both of which make whole blood more viscous compared to healthy individuals. The present paper explains how the increased blood viscosity adversely affects the microcirculation in diabetes, leading to microangiopathy.

Cho, Young I.; Mooney, Michael P.; Cho, Daniel J.

2008-01-01

298

Comorbid Depression and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression, the leading cause of disability in the world, is more common in patients with diabetes, and it is associated with\\u000a negative outcomes in these patients. These negative outcomes include less adherence to treatment recommendations, higher blood\\u000a glucose levels, higher rates of microvascular and macrovascular complications, lower rates of productivity at work, higher\\u000a health care costs, and higher mortality rates.

Richard R. Rubin

299

Characterization of the vitreous proteome in diabetes without diabetic retinopathy and diabetes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

An understanding of the diabetes-induced alterations in vitreous protein composition in the absence and in the presence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) may provide insights into factors and mechanisms responsible for this disease. We have performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis and comparison of vitreous samples from individuals with diabetes but without diabetic retinopathy (noDR) or with PDR and nondiabetic individuals (NDM). Using preparative one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and nano-LC/MS/MS of 17 independent vitreous samples, we identified 252 proteins from human vitreous. Fifty-six proteins were differentially abundant in noDR and PDR vitreous compared with NDM vitreous, including 32 proteins increased and 10 proteins decreased in PDR vitreous compared with NDM vitreous. Comparison of noDR and PDR groups revealed increased levels of angiotensinogen and decreased levels of calsyntenin-1, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, and neuroserpin in PDR vitreous. Biological pathway analysis revealed that vitreous contains 30 proteins associated with the kallikrein-kinin, coagulation, and complement systems. Five of them (complement C3, complement factor I, prothrombin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and antithrombin III) were increased in PDR vitreous compared with NDM vitreous. Factor XII was detected in PDR vitreous but not observed in either NDM or noDR vitreous. PDR vitreous also had increased levels of peroxiredoxin-1 and decreased levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase, compared with noDR or NDM vitreous. These data provide an in depth analysis of the human vitreous proteome and reveal protein alterations that are associated with PDR. PMID:18433156

Gao, Ben-Bo; Chen, Xiaohong; Timothy, Nigel; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Feener, Edward P

2008-06-01

300

Obesity and Diabetes Epidemics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of overweight (body mass index, BMI, between 25 and 30 kg\\/m2) and obesity (BMI of 30 kg\\/m2 or higher) is increasing rapidly worldwide, especially in developing countries and countries undergoing economic transition\\u000a to a market economy. One consequence of obesity is an increased risk of developing type II diabetes.\\u000a \\u000a Overall, there is considerable evidence that overweight and obesity

Anette Hjartåker; Hilde Langseth; Elisabete Weiderpass

301

Neurologic complications of diabetes.  

PubMed

Neuropathy as a complication of diabetes is common and presents in a wide variety of clinical scenarios. Often the work-up is one of exclusion tempered with monitoring the response of symptoms to treatment options. The collaboration of a neurologist is often crucial to determining the best course of action for the patient. This review will address proposed pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic interventions, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic. PMID:24817097

Charnogursky, Gerald A; Emanuele, Nicholas V; Emanuele, Mary Ann

2014-07-01

302

Pharmacogenetics in diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic variation can impact on efficacy and risk of adverse events to commonly used oral agents in diabetes. Metformin is\\u000a not metabolized and its mechanism of action remains debated; however, several cation transporters have been identified. Variation\\u000a in these pharmacokinetic genes might influence metformin response. Conversely, although the cytochrome P450 system has been\\u000a implicated in sulfonylurea response in some small

Ewan R. Pearson

2009-01-01

303

[Progress in diabetes].  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell failure. Pancreatic beta-cell failure plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes in Japanese subjects. Several mechanisms underlying the causes of pancreatic beta-cell failure have been reported, including decreased insulin signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In addition, the role of epigenetics in this association has recently been highlighted. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) leads to many disorders after maturation, such as obesity, glucose intolerance, and osteoporosis. IUGR also reduces pancreatic / cell mass. One of the underlying mechanisms is epigenetic modification, such as the reduction of histone acetylation and increase of methylation in the promoter region of the Pdx1 gene, which encodes an important transcription factor for pancreatic beta-cell function, leading to the reduction of Pdx1 expression levels. Numerous susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes, including KCNQ1, have been identified in humans using genome-wide analyses and other related studies. The Kcnq1 locus is an imprinting gene. Noncoding RNA Kcnq1ot1 is expressed from the Kcnq1 locus and regulates the expression of neighboring genes on the paternal allele. We found that disruption of Kcnq1 results in reduced expression of Kcnqlot1 as well as increased expression of Cdkn1c, an imprinted gene that encodes a cell cycle inhibitor only when the mutation is on the paternal allele. Furthermore, histone modification in the Cdkn1c promoter region in pancreatic islets was found to contribute to this phenomenon. These results indicate that epigenetic modification might be important for the regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and the onset of diabetes. PMID:24371999

Kido, Yoshiaki

2013-10-01

304

Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved, but such intervention may be considered in the severe and progressive cases or ones associated with severe neuropathic pain.

Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

1997-01-01

305

Diabetes in pregnancy 1985  

Microsoft Academic Search

The art of obstetrics is not a subject which is often discussed in the pages ofDiabetologia. However, as the care of the diabetic mother and her offspring is rightly an interdisciplinary responsibility between obstetrician,\\u000a diabetologist and neonatologist, it is important that each has s. close understanding of the various problems. Dr. M.I. Drury\\u000a (Dublin), speaking as an internist, raises a

D. R. Hadden

1986-01-01

306

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune diseases affect 10% or more of the North American and European populations. In organ-specific autoimmune diseases,\\u000a an organ is targeted by an aggressive immune response, which can damage and even destroy it. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM),\\u000a one such organ-specific autoimmune disease, is because of the destruction of the insulin-secreting beta cells in the islets\\u000a of Langerhans of the

Huriya Beyan; R. David G. Leslie

307

Glycation in diabetic nephropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kidney is an extremely complex organ with broad ranging functions in the body, including but not restricted to waste excretion,\\u000a ion and water balance, maintenance of blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, generation of erythropoietin and activation of\\u000a vitamin D. With diabetes, many of these integral processes are interrupted via a combination of haemodynamic and metabolic\\u000a changes including increases in the

Josephine M. Forbes; Mark E. Cooper

308

Treatments for diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of symptomatic diabetic sensory neuropathy presents a therapeutic challenge to the practicing physician. Two\\u000a approaches are outlined in this article. First, symptomatic therapies, which will not influence the natural history of painful\\u000a neuropathy, are discussed. These include, in addition to the stable glycemic control, tricyclic drugs, a number of anticonvulsant\\u000a and antiarrhythmic agents, and opioid-like medications. Topical therapies

Andrew J. M. Boulton

2001-01-01

309

Diabetic fracture healing.  

PubMed

Patients with diabetic ankle fractures consistently are at greater risk of sustaining a complication during treatment than nondiabetics.other medical comorbidities, especially Charcot neuroarthropathy and peripheral vascular disease, play distinct roles in increasing these complication rates. Many options for nonoperative and operative treatment exist, but respect for soft tissue management and attention to stable, rigid fixation with prolonged immobilization and prolonged restricted weight bearing are paramount in trying to minimize problems and yield functions. PMID:17097518

Gandhi, Ankur; Liporace, Frank; Azad, Vikrant; Mattie, James; Lin, Sheldon S

2006-12-01

310

Diabetic retinopathy in acromegaly  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Although growth hormone (GH) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR), DR is deemed to be rare in patients with GH excess. Our aim was to study its prevalence in subjects with acromegaly suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM), to analyze its characteristics, and to look for predictive factors such as age at diagnosis, GH concentration and duration, DM duration, DM control, and family background. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with acromegaly and DM (21 males, 19 females), median age = 50 years, underwent a systematic ophthalmological examination with dilated funduscopy to seek diabetic retinopathy. Results: Among this population, 05 (12.5%) had DR. It was at an early stage or background retinopathy in 3 cases and at a more advanced stage or proliferative retinopathy in 2 cases. We did not find any correlation with age at diagnosis, GH levels and duration, DM duration and family history of DM, but poor glycemic control seems to play a role although statistical analysis showed borderline significance. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that prevalence of DR in patients with acromegaly is 12.5%, and it is slight or moderate. Among studied factors, only poor glycemic control seems to be implicated in its development.

Azzoug, Said; Chentli, Farida

2014-01-01

311

Diabetic nephropathy and antioxidants  

PubMed Central

Context Oxidative stress has crucial role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Despite satisfactory results from antioxidant therapy in rodent, antioxidant therapy showed conflicting results in combat with DN in diabetic patients. Evidence Acquisitions Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar,Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results Treatment of DN in human are insufficient with rennin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, so additional agent ought to combine with this management. Meanwhile based on DN pathogenesis and evidences in experimental and human researches, the antioxidants are the best candidate. New multi-property antioxidants may be improved human DN that show high power antioxidant capacity, long half-life time, high permeability to mitochondrion, improve body antioxidants enzymes activity and anti-inflammatory effects. Conclusions Based on this review and our studies on diabetic rats, rosmarinic acid a multi-property antioxidant may be useful in DN patients, but of course, needs to be proven in clinical trials studies.

Tavafi, Majid

2013-01-01

312

[Immunological aspects of diabetes].  

PubMed

The incidence of immunological disorders seems to play a primary, significative role in the genesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Auto-immunological anti-pancreas alterations, both cell-mediated and humoral, have been detected in course of IDDM; moreover, the presence of antipancreatic antibodies seems to correlate with progressive destruction of islet cells and increased insulin deficiency. Animal models and human studies, revealing the pathologic entity of "insulitis", are consistent with an autoimmune component playing a part in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, genotypic factors may be considered: recent studies prove the association between HLA system and IDDM; specifically, HLA antigens B8 and BW15 are found in significantly higher frequencies in juvenile onset insulin-dependent diabetics. Therefore, it can be hypothesized, in the pathogenesis of the disease, an altered immune response to an additional environmental diabetogenic factor; it has been postulated, on the ground of epidemiologic and experimental studies, the interference of a viral infection, that may act as a triggering event to pancreatic cell damage with a latent period of variable duration. PMID:7207836

Cotto, A; Gatti, G; Calcamuggi, G; Marcarino, C; Emanuelli, G

1981-01-28

313

[Early onset diabetes mellitus].  

PubMed

Neonatal diabetes mellitus is a rare condition (1/90,000 to 1/260,000 live births) defined as mild-to-severe hyperglycemia within the first year of life. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus requires lifelong therapy, whereas transient form resolves early in life but may relapse later on. Two main physiopathological mechanisms may explain this disease: ? cell functional impairment or absence (pancreas agenesis or ? cells destruction). The main genetic causes of ? cells impairment are 6q24 abnormalities and mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 potassium channel (KATP channel) genes. Compared to the KATP subtype, the 6q24 subtype had specific features: developmental defects involving the heart, kidneys, or urinary tract, intrauterine growth restriction, and early diagnosis. Remission of neonatal diabetes mellitus occurred in 51% of probands at a median age of 17 weeks. Recurrence was common at pubertal age, with no difference between the 6q24 and KATP-channel groups (82% vs 86%, p=0.36, respectively). Patients with mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 genes had developmental delay with or without epilepsy but also developmental coordination disorder (particularly visual-spatial dyspraxia) or attention deficits in all of those who underwent in-depth neuropsychomotor investigations. PMID:24360362

Busiah, K; Vaivre-Douret, L; Yachi, C; Cavé, H; Polak, M

2013-12-01

314

[Diabetic nephropathy: diagnosis and therapy].  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause for renal replacement therapy in many countries. This is mainly due to an increase of renal insufficiency of type II diabetic patients. The poor situation could be improved by following measures: (a) screening of microalbuminuria for early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, (b) consequent treatment of known factors influencing the course of nephropathy such as poor metabolic control, hypertension, increased protein ingestion or smoking, (c) improved cooperation between general practitioner and specialized centers concerning treatment of diabetic patients with nephropathy. PMID:9036572

Hasslacher, C

1996-12-01

315

New Concepts in Diabetic Embryopathy  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Diabetes mellitus is responsible for nearly 10% of fetal anomalies in diabetic pregnancies. Although aggressive perinatal care and glycemic control are available in developed countries, the birth defect rate in diabetic pregnancies remains much higher than that in the general population. Major cellular activities--i.e., proliferation and apoptosis--and intracellular metabolic conditions--i.e., nitrosative, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum stress--have been demonstrated to be associated with diabetic embryopathy using animal models. Translating advances made in animal studies into clinical applications in humans will require collaborative efforts across the basic research, preclinical, and clinical communities.

Reece, E. Albert

2013-01-01

316

PSYCHOSOCIAL PROFILE OF JUVENILE DIABETES  

PubMed Central

A study of the complex relationships between the patient characteristics, family and environmental influences, physician's behaviour and the demands of the disease with its management in Juvenile Diabetics was taken up at a general hospital. 90 subjects were selected for the study and grouped into three. Group A consisted of 30 Juvenile Diabetics, Group B of 30 Adult Diabetics and Group C of 30 Normal healthy adolescents. The impact of the illness was measured on the Diabetes Impact Measurement Scale (DIMS), the behavioural deviations and the parental attitudes towards child rearing on the Fallstrom's Questionnaire (FQ) and the family environment on the Family Climate Scale (FCS). Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using DSM-IV criteria. Group A & B were compared on the DIMS and Group A & C on FQ & FCS. Adult diabetics had a greater impact of diabetes. Juvenile diabetics had significantly higher frequency of behavioural deviations as compared to controls. Also there was a higher number of responses on questions indicating an overprotecting attitude amongst parents of juvenile diabetics. There was an increased incidence of psychiatric morbidity in juvenile diabetics as compared to normal adolescents irrespective of the family environment. The results are discussed in relation to current literature.

Dass, Jyoti; Dhavale, H.S.; Rathi, Anup

1999-01-01

317

Help Prevent Diabetes with Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animated video segment adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, featuring American Indian characters, explains how children can help prevent diabetes through regular physical activity.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2011-07-01

318

Diabetes: Treatment of gestational diabetes reduces obstetric morbidity.  

PubMed

Should women with gestational diabetes mellitus be treated to minimize both fetal and maternal complications? Although unanswered questions remain about the long-term benefits, the findings of a large, multicenter,randomized controlled trial suggest that treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus decreases perinatal complications. PMID:20098447

Zera, Chloe A; Seely, Ellen W

2010-02-01

319

Diabetic Mastopathy: An Uncommon Complication of Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Whilst most consequences of diabetes mellitus are well recognized, breast-related complications remain obscure. The term diabetic mastopathy (DMP) attempts to describe the breast-related consequences of diabetes. Methods. We report the clinicopathologic findings in a patient with DMP and review the literature on this uncommon entity. Results. A 33-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes had excision biopsy of a 2?cm breast lump. Histopathologic evaluation revealed classic features of DMP: parenchymal fibrosis; keloid-like hyalinization of interlobular stroma; adipose tissue entrapment; lobular compression; dense chronic inflammatory cell infiltration; and lymphoid follicle formation. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware of DMP as a differential for breast disease in women with uncontrolled diabetes.

Kirby, R. X.; Mitchell, D. I.; Williams, N. P.; Cornwall, D. A.; Cawich, S. O.

2013-01-01

320

Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among Omani diabetics  

PubMed Central

AIMS—To study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in a population of patients attending a diabetic clinic and to evaluate the medical risk factors underlying its development.?METHODS—500 randomly selected diabetic patients attending the diabetes clinic in Al Buraimi hospital were referred to the ophthalmology department where they were fully evaluated for the absence or presence of retinopathy. Any retinopathy present was graded as mild non-proliferative retinopathy (NPR), moderate-severe NPR, and proliferative retinopathy. Several risk factors were then evaluated in order to delineate those related to occurrence of retinopathy in general as well as to the different grades of retinopathy in particular.?RESULTS—Diabetic retinopathy was detected in 212 patients (42.4%), with mild NPR present in 128 patient (25.6% of the total population), moderate-severe NPR in 20 patients (4%), and proliferative diabetic retinopathy present in 64 patients (12.8%). Factors significantly related to occurrence of retinopathy were age of the patient, duration of diabetes, presence of ischaemic heart disease, presence of hypertension, a high fasting capillary glucose level as well as elevated serum levels of urea, creatinine, cholesterol, and triglycerides. After adjustment for covariates, it was found that duration of diabetes was the only risk factor associated with mild NPR, while high diastolic blood pressure and high levels of serum creatinine, cholesterol, and triglycerides were significantly associated with the occurrence of proliferative retinopathy.?CONCLUSIONS—In addition to glycaemic control, lowering of blood lipids as well as diastolic blood pressure (in hypertensive patients) may be effective in lowering the incidence of retinopathy in compromised patients.?? Keywords: diabetic retinopathy; Oman; diabetics

Haddad, O.; Saad, M. K.

1998-01-01

321

CUTANEOUS DISORDERS IN 500 DIABETIC PATIENTS ATTENDING DIABETIC CLINIC  

PubMed Central

Background: The metabolic complications and pathologic changes that occur in diabetes mellitus (DM) influence the occurrence of various dermatoses. Aim: To study the impact of control of diabetes on the pattern of cutaneous disorders. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of patients attending diabetic clinic in a tertiary care hospital. A total of 500 consecutive patients were studied. Detailed history, clinical examination and relevant investigations were done to diagnose diabetic complications and cutaneous disorders. Dermatoses with or without known pathogenesis were correlated with age, gender, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), duration of diabetes, and complications of DM. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student “t” test and Chi-square test with 5% confidence interval (P value 0.05). Results: Majority of patients had well-controlled (FPG<130 mg/ml, 60%) type 2 DM (98.8%). No statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the patients with or without DM specific cutaneous disorders was noticed with reference to age and gender distribution, duration of DM and FPG. Signs of insulin resistance, acrochordon (26.2%), and acanthosis nigricans (5%) were common, followed by fungal (13.8%) and bacterial (6.8%) infections. Eruptive xanthoma (0.6%), diabetic foot (0.2%), diabetic bulla (0.4%), diabetic dermopathy (0.2%), generalized granuloma annulare (0.2%), and insulin reactions (6.2%) and lipodystrophy (14%) were also seen. Conclusion: Well-controlled diabetes decreases the prevalence of DM-specific cutaneous disorders associated with chronic hyperglycemia. It is necessary to have a dermatologist in the diabetic clinic for early detection of potentially grave or predisposing conditions.

Ragunatha, Shivanna; Anitha, Bhaktavatsalam; Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna; Devarmani, Shashidhar S

2011-01-01

322

Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications.

Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

2010-01-01

323

Spices and type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper is a review of current research on phytochemicals and how they may alleviate type 2 diabetes by improving insulin activity in the body. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Literature searches were conducted to find a link between common household spices and type 2 diabetes. Only common household spices were researched so that any link found between spices and type

Abigail Kelble

2005-01-01

324

Diabetes, collagen, and bone quality.  

PubMed

Diabetes increases risk of fracture, although type 2 diabetes is characterized by normal or high bone mineral density (BMD) compared with the patients without diabetes. The fracture risk of type 1 diabetes as well as type 2 diabetes increases beyond an explained by a decrease of BMD. Thus, diabetes may reduce bone strength without change in BMD. Whole bone strength is determined by bone density, structure, and quality, which encompass the micro-structural and tissue material properties. Recent literature showed that diabetes reduces bone material properties rather than BMD. Collagen intermolecular cross-linking plays an important role in the expression of bone strength. Collagen cross-links can be divided into beneficial enzymatic immature divalent and mature trivalent cross-links and disadvantageous nonenzymatic cross-links (Advanced glycation end products: AGEs) induced by glycation and oxidation. The formation pathway and biological function are quite different. Not only hyperglycemia, but also oxidative stress induces the reduction in enzymatic cross-links and the formation of AGEs. In this review, we describe the mechanism of low bone quality in diabetes and the usefulness of the measurement of plasma or urinary level of AGEs for estimation of fracture risk. PMID:24623537

Saito, Mitsuru; Kida, Yoshikuni; Kato, Soki; Marumo, Keishi

2014-06-01

325

Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

2013-06-15

326

Morgan: A Case of Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case teaches about the causes and effects of Type 2 diabetes by working through the various options available to a young Native American woman suffering from the disease. The case can be used in a variety of settings, including nutrition classrooms, herbal drug courses, physiology courses, medical schools, nursing schools, pharmacy schools, diabetes workshops, and even weight loss clinics.

Rubin, Lisa M.; Herreid, Clyde F.

2002-01-01

327

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA): Treatment Guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), resulting from severe insulin deficiency, accounts for most hospitalization and is the most common cause of death, mostly due to cerebral edema, in pediatric diabetes. This article provides guidelines on management to restore perfusion, stop ongoing ketogenesis, correct electrolyte losses, and avoid hypokalemia and hypoglycemia and the circumstances that may contribute, in some instances, to cerebral edema

Arlan L. Rosenbloom; Ragnar Hanas

1996-01-01

328

Antioxidants, diabetes and endothelial dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract While a damaged endothelium is recognised to be a key accessory to diabetic macroangiopathy, awareness is developing that impairments concerning endothelium- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent microvascular function, may contribute to several other corollaries of diabetes, such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and in vivo insulin resistance. There are now several reports describing elevations in specific oxidant stress markers in both insulin

D. W. Laight; M. J. Carrier; E. E. Anggard

2000-01-01

329

Glucose Control and Diabetic Complications  

PubMed Central

Tight glucose control is clearly beneficial in the pregnant insulin-dependent diabetic. In other areas (retinopathy, established nephropathy, and hypoglycemia) the question whether tight control of diabetes is justified remains unanswered. Preliminary evidence suggests that tight control, if begun early, can prevent clinical nephropathy and neuropathy.

Lubin, Stan

1991-01-01

330

Diabetes screening with corneal aesthesiometer.  

PubMed

Recent clinical evidence that diminished corneal sensitivity occurs far more frequently (p less than 0.003) ) among diabetics than nondiabetics, supports the addition of aesthesiometry to the routine optometric screening battery for patients at risk of diabetes. This evidence is reviewed and quantitative estimates are presented to illustrate the clinical efficacy of this screening test. PMID:1111287

Daubs, J G

1975-01-01

331

Special Diabetes Program for Indians.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Congress established the Special Diabetes Program for Indians to provide prevention and treatment services to address the growing problem of diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Since the Special Di...

2005-01-01

332

APOE polymorphism and diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies suggest the existence of a genetic susceptibility to the development of diabetic nephropathy. The apolipoprotein E gene (APOE), which is well known to have a polymorphism (?2, ?3, and ?4) in exon 4, has been considered a candidate gene susceptible to this complication, because this variation was reportedly involved in lipid metabolism. To date, numerous case-control studies in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been reported. Although the ?2 allele of the APOE polymorphism tends to be associated with an increased risk for diabetic nephropathy, the results of these case-control comparisons are conflicting. However, a family-based study (the transmission/disequilibrium test) provided strong evidence that the ?2 allele was preferentially transmitted to patients with diabetic nephropathy but not transmitted to those without it. Several prospective follow-up studies also reported an increased risk for progression to higher stages of diabetic nephropathy for the ?2 carriers. Furthermore, two recent meta-analyses reported that the ?2 allele is associated with a risk for diabetic nephropathy. Based on the results of these studies, the ?2 allele of the APOE polymorphism seems to be a genetic risk factor for diabetic nephropathy susceptibility. However, this genetic effect only accounts for a small proportion of this complication, and the mechanism remains unclear at present. Further studies are needed to explore whether genotyping of the APOE polymorphism in patients with diabetes is of value for better management in clinical practice. PMID:24026386

Araki, Shin-ichi

2014-04-01

333

Pancreatogenic Diabetes after Pancreatic Resection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The loss of pancreatic parenchyma resulting from pancreatic resection causes an extreme disruption of glucose homeostasis known as pancreatogenic diabetes. This form of glucose intolerance is different from the other forms of diabetes mellitus in that affected individuals suffer frequent episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The development of sophisticated surgical procedures, improved postoperative care, and the capacity for early diagnosis of

Hiromichi Maeda; Kazuhiro Hanazaki

2011-01-01

334

Diabetes as Experienced by Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored adolescents' perspective of their diabetic management by interviewing 12 adolescent counselors-in-training at a diabetic youth camp. Interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method; themes were further grouped into three categories: psychosocial, developmental, and clinical. A striking finding throughout the data was the…

Meldman, Linda S.

1987-01-01

335

Radical approach to diabetic nephropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Oxidative stress is increased in diabetes and in chronic kidney disease (CKD). High glucose upregulates transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and angiotensin II (Ang II) in renal cells and high glucose, TGF-?1, and Ang II all generate and signal through ROS. ROS

H B Lee; J Y Seo; M R Yu; S-T Uh; H Ha

2007-01-01

336

Reduction in the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes With the Mediterranean Diet  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To test the effects of two Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) interventions versus a low-fat diet on incidence of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a three-arm randomized trial in 418 nondiabetic subjects aged 55–80 years recruited in one center (PREDIMED-Reus, northeastern Spain) of the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea [PREDIMED] study, a large nutrition intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention in individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Participants were randomly assigned to education on a low-fat diet (control group) or to one of two MedDiets, supplemented with either free virgin olive oil (1 liter/week) or nuts (30 g/day). Diets were ad libitum, and no advice on physical activity was given. The main outcome was diabetes incidence diagnosed by the 2009 American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS After a median follow-up of 4.0 years, diabetes incidence was 10.1% (95% CI 5.1–15.1), 11.0% (5.9–16.1), and 17.9% (11.4–24.4) in the MedDiet with olive oil group, the MedDiet with nuts group, and the control group, respectively. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios of diabetes were 0.49 (0.25–0.97) and 0.48 (0.24–0.96) in the MedDiet supplemented with olive oil and nuts groups, respectively, compared with the control group. When the two MedDiet groups were pooled and compared with the control group, diabetes incidence was reduced by 52% (27–86). In all study arms, increased adherence to the MedDiet was inversely associated with diabetes incidence. Diabetes risk reduction occurred in the absence of significant changes in body weight or physical activity. CONCLUSIONS MedDiets without calorie restriction seem to be effective in the prevention of diabetes in subjects at high cardiovascular risk.

Salas-Salvado, Jordi; Bullo, Monica; Babio, Nancy; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Ibarrola-Jurado, Nuria; Basora, Josep; Estruch, Ramon; Covas, Maria Isabel; Corella, Dolores; Aros, Fernando; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Ros, Emilio

2011-01-01

337

[Prevention of diabetic foot].  

PubMed

Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia, lipid disorders (treatment with fenofibrate reduces the incidence of DF amputations (EBM-Ib/A), hypertension, hyperuricemia, neuropathy, and angiopathy (surgical reconstructive bypass) or endovascular (percutaneous transluminar angioplasty). In the low-risk group of PwDM, no particular results can be achieved, in contrast to the high-risk groups of PwDM where patient and professional education has shown significant achievement (EBM-IV/C). In secondary prevention of DF, it is necessary to perform patient and professional education how to avoid most of external influences for DE Patient education should include all topics from primary prevention, danger of neural analgesia (no cooling or warming the foot), careful selection of shoes, daily observation of foot, early detection all foot changes or small wounds, daily hygiene of foot skin, which has to be clean and moist, regular self measurements of skin temperature between the two feet (EBM-Ib/A), prevention of self treatment of foot deformities, changing wrong habits (walking footless), medical consultation for even small foot changes (EBM-Ib/A) and consultation by multidisciplinary team (EBM-IIb/B). Tertiary DF prevention includes ulcer treatment, prevention of amputation and level of amputation. In spite of the primary and secondary prevention measures, DF ulcers develop very often. Because of different etiologic reasons as well as different principles of treatment which are at the same time prevention of the level of amputation, the approach to PwDF has to be multidisciplinary. A high place in the treatment of DF ulcers, especially neuropathic ulcers, have the off-loading principles (EBM-Ib/A), even instead of surgical treatment (EBM-Ib/A). Necrectomy, taking samples for analysis from the deep of ulcer, together with x-ray diagnostics (in particular NMR), the size of the changes can be detected, together with appropriate antibiotic use and indication for major surgical treatment. The patient has to be instructed to the involved DF with off-loading (EBM-IIb/A). Negative pressure wound therapy can accelerate th

Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljaci? Crkvenci?, Neva

2013-10-01

338

Pathogenesis of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of diabetes is rising globally and, as a result, its associated complications are also rising. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a well-known complication of diabetes and the most common cause of all neuropathic pain. About one-third of all diabetes patients suffer from PDN. It has a huge effect on a person's daily life, both physically and mentally. Despite huge advances in diabetes and neurology, the exact mechanism of pain causation in PDN is still not clear. The origin of pain could be in the peripheral nerves of the central nervous system. In this review, we discuss various possible mechanisms of the pathogenesis of pain in PDN. We discuss the role of hyperglycaemia in altering the physiology of peripheral nerves. We also describe central mechanisms of pain.

Rajbhandari, Satyan

2014-01-01

339

The diabetic patient in Ramadan  

PubMed Central

During the month of Ramadan, all healthy, adult Muslims are required to fast from dawn to sunset. Fasting during Ramadan involves abstaining from food, water, beverages, smoking, oral drugs, and sexual intercourse. Although the Quran exempts chronically ill from fasting, many Muslims with diabetes still fast during Ramadan. Patients with diabetes who fast during the month of Ramadan can have acute complications. The risk of complications in fasting individuals with diabetes increases with longer periods of fasting. All patients with diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan should be prepared by undergoing a medical assessment and engaging in a structured education program to undertake the fast as safely as possible. Although some guidelines do exist, there is an overwhelming need for better designed clinical trials which could provide us with evidence-based information and guidance in the management of patients with diabetes fasting Ramadan.

Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Aljabri, Khalid S.

2014-01-01

340

Diabetic Macular Edema  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

341

For People with Diabetes. Seven Principles for Controlling Your Diabetes for Life.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Principle 1: Learn as Much as You Can About Diabetes; Principle 2: Get Regular Care for Your Diabetes; Principle 3: Learn How to Control Your Diabetes; Principle 4: Take Care of Your Diabetes ABCs; Principle 5: Monitor Your Diabetes ABCs; Princi...

2004-01-01

342

Can inaccuracy of reported parental history of diabetes explain the maternal transmission hypothesis for diabetes?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background The mode of inheritance of type 2 diabetes mellitus is still under discussion. Several studies have suggested an excess maternal transmission, however, more recent studies could not always confirm these findings. Methods We investigated the frequency of a maternal and paternal history of diabetes among diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and assessed the association between diabetes and a parental history

Barbara Thorand; Angela D Liese; Marie-Hélène Metzger; Peter Reitmeir; Andrea Schneidera; Hannelore Löwela

2001-01-01

343

Nutrition Principles and Recommendations in Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

edical nutrition therapy is an inte- gral component of diabetes man- agement and of diabetes self- management e ducation. Y et m any misconceptions exist concerning nutri- tion and diabetes. Moreover, in clinical practice, nutrition recommendations that have little or no supporting evidence have been and are still being given to persons with diabetes. Accordingly, this position statement provides evidence-based

344

Lipids and atherogenesis in diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Premature cardiovascular disease is a major burden in diabetes. Increasing cholesterol is associated with increasing vascular risk in diabetes and the absolute excess risk attributable to cholesterol is higher in diabetics than in nondiabetics. Total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol correlated with arterial endothelial dysfunction as assessed by reduced flow-mediated brachial artery dilatation in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. In

D. John Betteridge

1996-01-01

345

Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... the American Diabetes Association, have launched new educational campaigns to alert all Americans to the dangers of diabetes. The following special section covers what you need to know to protect you and your loved ones. Photos: AP The Faces of Diabetes Diabetes strikes millions ...

346

Diabetes: cost of illness in Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus places a considerable burden on patients in terms of morbidity and mortality and on society in terms of costs. Costs related to diabetes are expected to increase due to increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the health care costs attributable to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Norway

Oddvar Solli; Trond Jenssen; Ivar S Kristiansen

2010-01-01

347

Diabetes in African American Youth  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To report the prevalence and incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes among African American youth and to describe demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, a population-based, multicenter observational study of youth with clinically diagnosed diabetes aged 0–19 years, were used to estimate the prevalence for calendar year 2001 (692 cases) and incidence based on 748 African American case subjects diagnosed in 2002–2005. Characteristics of these youth were obtained during a research visit for 436 African American youth with type 1 diabetes and 212 African American youth with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS—Among African American youth aged 0–9 years, prevalence (per 1,000) of type 1 diabetes was 0.57 (95% CI 0.47–0.69) and for those aged 10–19 years 2.04 (1.85–2.26). Among African American youth aged 0–9 years, annual type 1 diabetes incidence (per 100,000) was 15.7 (13.7–17.9) and for those aged 10–19 years 15.7 (13.8–17.8). A1C was ?9.5% among 50% of youth with type 1 diabetes aged ?15 years. Across age-groups and sex, 44.7% of African American youth with type 1 diabetes were overweight or obese. Among African American youth aged 10–19 years, prevalence (per 1,000) of type 2 diabetes was 1.06 (0.93–1.22) and annual incidence (per 100,000) was 19.0 (16.9–21.3). About 60% of African American youth with type 2 diabetes had an annual household income of <$25,000. Among those aged ?15 years, 27.5% had an A1C ?9.5%, 22.5% had high blood pressure, and, across subgroups of age and sex, >90% were overweight or obese. CONCLUSIONS—Type 1 diabetes presents a serious burden among African American youth aged <10 years, and African American adolescents are impacted substantially by both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Beyer, Jennifer; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Lawrence, Jean M.; Liese, Angela D.; Liu, Lenna; Marcovina, Santica; Rodriguez, Beatriz

2009-01-01

348

Management of hypertension in patients with diabetes.  

PubMed

Mortality from cardiovascular disease is 2 to 4 times higher in patients with type 2 diabetes compared with patients with similar demographic characteristics but without diabetes. The management of hypertension in patients with diabetes is as important as glucose control in the prevention of long-term diabetes complications. This article discusses the incidence of hypertension in diabetes, the impact of hypertension on the development of long-term complications, diagnosis of hypertension in patients with diabetes, blood pressure goals, the treatment of hypertension in patients with diabetes, and antihypertension medications. PMID:23410647

Levesque, Celia M

2013-03-01

349

Multifocal electroretinography in diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.  

PubMed

In this review article, we first present a brief overview of the vascular and neural components of diabetic retinopathy. Next, the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) technique, which can map neuroretinal function noninvasively, is described. Findings in diabetic retinal disease using the mfERG are reviewed. We then describe the progress that has been made to predict the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy and edema in specific retinal locations, using quantitative models based on the mfERG. Finally, we consider the implications for the future of these predictive models. PMID:25005120

Bearse, Marcus A; Ozawa, Glen Y

2014-09-01

350

Gene therapy in diabetes  

PubMed Central

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease, whereby auto-reactive cytotoxic T cells target and destroy insulin-secreting ?-cells in pancreatic islets leading to insulin deficiency and subsequent hyperglycemia. These individuals require multiple daily insulin injections every day of their life without which they will develop life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and die. Gene therapy by viral vector and non-viral transduction may be useful techniques to treat T1D as it can be applied from many different angles; such as the suppression of autoreactive T cells to prevent islet destruction (prophylactic) or the replacement of the insulin gene (post-disease). The need for a better method for providing euglycemia arose from insufficient numbers of cadaver islets for transplantation and the immunosuppression required post-transplant. Ectopic expression of insulin or islet modification have been examined, but not perfected. This review examines the various gene transfer methods, gene therapy techniques used to date and promising novel techniques for the maintenance of euglycemia in the treatment of T1D.

Wong, Mary S; Hawthorne, Wayne J

2010-01-01

351

Diabetes and immunity to tuberculosis.  

PubMed

The dual burden of tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes has attracted much attention in the past decade as diabetes prevalence has increased dramatically in countries already afflicted with a high burden of TB. The confluence of these two major diseases presents a serious threat to global public health; at the same time it also presents an opportunity to learn more about the key elements of human immunity to TB that may be relevant to the general population. Some effects of diabetes on innate and adaptive immunity that are potentially relevant to TB defense have been identified, but have yet to be verified in humans and are unlikely to fully explain the interaction of these two disease states. This review provides an update on the clinical and epidemiological features of TB in the diabetic population and relates them to recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of TB susceptibility and other complications of diabetes. Issues that merit further investigation - such as geographic host and pathogen differences in the diabetes/TB interaction, the role of hyperglycemia-induced epigenetic reprogramming in immune dysfunction, and the impact of diabetes on lung injury and fibrosis caused by TB - are highlighted in this review. PMID:24448841

Martinez, Nuria; Kornfeld, Hardy

2014-03-01

352

Diabetic polyneuropathy. Axonal or demyelinating?  

PubMed

Diabetic polyneuropathy is the most common subgroup of diabetic neuropathy, but its nature is controversial as it might be demyelinating and/or axonal. We have tried to determine whether diabetic polyneuropathy is electrophysiologically axonal, demyelinating, or both. We have studied the sural and peroneal nerves and the electromyographies of leg muscles in 50 healthy subjects (average age 67.2 years, range 45 to 84 years), in 50 diabetic patients (average age 66.34 years, range 44 to 82 years) showing no symptoms and/or signs of polyneuropathy (DP1), and in 50 diabetic patients (average age 67.10 years, range 49 to 87 years) showing symptoms and/or signs of polyneuropathy (DP2). The amplitude (AMP) of sural and peroneal nerves in healthy and DP1 subjects was similar. Conduction velocity (CV) of sural and peroneal nerves was slower in DP1 subjects than in healthy subjects. DP2 subjects showed AMP and CV values significantly lower than those in DP1 subjects, and signs of acute and chronic denervation/reinervation were found in the leg muscles. We believe that this result indicates that diabetic patients have two types of polyneuropathies: a demyelinating disease that could appear in diabetic patients with and without symptoms of polyneuropathy, and an axonal loss that is responsible for most of the symptoms. PMID:11851006

Valls-Canals, J; Povedano, M; Montero, J; Pradas, J

2002-01-01

353

How the diabetic eye loses vision  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective is to review the most common causes of vision loss in patients with diabetes with the goal of better managing\\u000a patients with diabetic eye disease. In this review, the causes of vision loss, and the clinical evaluation and management\\u000a of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are outlined. Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased\\u000a risk

Jaime A. Davidson; Thomas A. Ciulla; Janet B. McGill; Keri A. Kles; Pamela W. Anderson

2007-01-01

354

76 FR 9587 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...communication, and collaboration on diabetes among government entities...and discuss current and future diabetes programs in DMICC member organizations...DMICC meeting will discuss ``Diabetes: A1c/Questions/ Diagnosis.'' Any...

2011-02-18

355

Bladder Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Diabetic cystopathy is a well-recognized complication of diabetes mellitus, which usually develops in middle-aged or elderly patients with long-standing and poorly controlled disease. It may have broad spectrum clinical presentations. Patients may be asymptomatic, or have a wide variety of voiding complaints from overactive bladder and urge incontinence to decreased bladder sensation and overflow incontinence. This review focuses on pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for urologic complications of diabetes and emphasizing on recent developments in our understanding of this condition. We also tried to shed some light on therapeutic modalities like behavioral, pharmacological, and surgical approaches.

Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

2010-01-01

356

Notch signaling in diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved cell-cell signaling system that controls the fate of cells during development. In this review, we will summarize the literature that notch signaling during development controls nephron number and segmentation and therefore could influence kidney disease susceptibility. We will also review the evidence that Notch is reactivated in adult-onset diabetic kidney disease where it promotes the development of nephropathy including glomerulopathy, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and possibly arteriopathy and inflammation. Finally, we will review the evidence that blockade of pathogenic Notch signaling alters the natural history of diabetic nephropathy and thus could represent a novel therapeutic approach to the management of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:22414874

Bonegio, Ramon; Susztak, Katalin

2012-05-15

357

Spontaneous abortion and diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed Central

In 58 consecutive pregnancies in insulin-dependent diabetic women, glycosylated haemoglobin levels were abnormally high in 78% at the time of booking for antenatal care. Spontaneous abortion was the outcome in 15 pregnancies, 10 occurring before the 15th week of gestation. Glycosylated haemoglobin levels were significantly higher in those women who aborted spontaneously than in women who delivered successfully (12.8 +/- 1.8% v. 11.2 +/- 2.3%, mean +/- s.d.). These results emphasise the inadequacy of diabetic control in the first trimester and lend further support to the importance of good control at this critical time in insulin-dependent diabetes.

Wright, A. D.; Nicholson, H. O.; Pollock, A.; Taylor, K. G.; Betts, S.

1983-01-01

358

Surgical management of diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Surgery for late complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy remains the cornerstone of management even in patients who have received optimal laser photocoagulation and medical therapy. With improvisation in the surgical techniques and development of micro-incision surgical techniques for vitrectomy, the indications for surgical intervention are expanding to include diabetic macular edema with a greater number of patients undergoing early intervention. This review describes the current indications, surgical techniques, adjunctive anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, surgical outcomes, and postoperative complications of pars plana vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. PMID:24339677

Gupta, Vishali; Arevalo, J Fernando

2013-01-01

359

Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations are in the midst of a Type 2 diabetes epidemic. To address this crisis, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) began funding a national initiative titled "Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools (DETS) K-12 Curriculum Project." The lesson plans are structured in the 5E learning cycle and instructional model--Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate because it supports a constructivist teaching strategy and is based on how student learning occurs.

Francis, Carolee D.; Helgeson, Lars

2006-03-01

360

Diabetic mastopathy: a case report.  

PubMed

Diabetic mastopathy (DMP) is an uncommon collection of clinical, radiological, and histological features, classically described in premenopausal women with long-term insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. This entity can mimic breast carcinoma, but, in the appropriate clinical and imaging setting, the diagnosis can be made by core biopsy, avoiding unnecessary surgeries. We report the case of a 34-year-old female, with a 12-year history of type 1 diabetes, who presented with bilateral breast lumps. Mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging could not exclude the suspicion of malignancy, and a core biopsy was performed showing the typical histologic features of DMP. The literature is briefly reviewed. PMID:23154017

Francisco, Carla; Júlio, Catarina; Fontes, Ana Luísa; Silveira Reis, Inês; Fernandes, Rosário; Valadares, Sara; Sereno, Pedro

2012-01-01

361

Imaging of diabetic foot infections.  

PubMed

Complications from diabetic foot infections are a leading cause of nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations. Nearly 85% of these amputations result from an infected foot ulcer. Osteomyelitis is present in approximately 20% of diabetic foot infections. It is imperative that clinicians make quick and successful diagnoses of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) because a delay in treatment may lead to worsening outcomes. Imaging studies, such as plain films, bone scans, musculoskeletal ultrasound, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans, aid in the diagnosis. However, there are several mimickers of DFO, which present problems to making a correct diagnosis. PMID:24296017

Fridman, Robert; Bar-David, Tzvi; Kamen, Stewart; Staron, Ronald B; Leung, David K; Rasiej, Michael J

2014-01-01

362

Breastfeeding and diabetes: Part 2.  

PubMed

In 2007 the Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health (CEMACH) made clear recommendations about the care that mothers with diabetes and their infants should receive in line with UNICEF's (2009) evidence based standards and as a response to concerns about the care of the newborn baby (CEMACH 2007). The report demonstrated suboptimal management with regards to neonatal hypoglycaemia, early feeding, lower breastfeeding rates and a higher than expected number of admissions to neonatal units for infants of diabetic mothers. This second paper shares ideas of targeted interventions that support diabetic mothers to breastfeed. PMID:23304866

Finigan, Valerie

2012-12-01

363

Genetics of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Type 2 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Identifying genes underlying complex diseases hold the promise of new drug targets, improved interventions, and the advent\\u000a of so-called “personalized medicine.” For almost 2 decades, investigators have attempted to identify genes underlying gestational\\u000a diabetes mellitus (GDM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but until recently were mostly unsuccessful. Improvements in\\u000a genetic information and technology changed the landscape of complex disease

Richard M. Watanabe; MARY HELEN BLACK; ANNY H. XIANG; HOOMAN ALLAYEE; JEAN M. LAWRENCE; THOMAS A. BUCHANAN

364

Management of diabetes and diabetes policies in Turkey  

PubMed Central

Background Diabetes and its complications are among the present and future challenges of the Turkish health care system. The objective of this paper is to discuss the current situation of diabetes and its management in Turkey with special emphasis on the changing policy environment. Methods A literature review in databases such as PUBMED was performed from 2000 to 2011. This synthesis was complemented by grey literature, personal communication and contact with national and provincial health authorities and experts in diabetes from Turkey. Results The literature review and expert consultations indicated a growing policy emphasis on diabetes. Both the public and private sectors, non-governmental organizations have initiated policy papers to shape the outlook of diabetes care in the future. This is in line with the current dynamics of the healthcare system. Conclusions Diabetes care will be high on the agenda in future. Evidence based policy-making is the key to implement the policies adopted so far and a supportive environment is needed.

2013-01-01

365

[Microalbuminuria screening in diabetics].  

PubMed

Nocturnal albumin excretion rate was measured in 133 diabetics and the results were compared with those in first morning urine and urine spontaneously voided later in the morning. Albumin concentrations greater than 20 mg/l in the first morning urine indicated a raised albumin excretion rate of 20-200 micrograms/min (sensitivity 86%, specificity 98%). Simultaneous creatinine measurement and calculation of the albumin/creatinine ratio did not increase sensitivity or specificity. An albumin concentration greater than 20 mg/l in spontaneously voided day urine pointed to a raised albumin excretion rate (sensitivity 90%, specificity 60%). These results suggest that determining the albumin concentration in the first voided morning urine is suitable as screening test for microalbuminuria. PMID:2737091

Hasslacher, C; Müller, A; Panradl, U; Wahl, P

1989-06-23

366

Do statins cause diabetes?  

PubMed

A wealth of evidence has established that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, do increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, possibly by impairing pancreatic beta cell function and decreasing peripheral insulin sensitivity. Groups at particular risk include the elderly, women, and Asians. The diabetogenic effect of statins appear directly related to statin dose and the degree of attained cholesterol lowering. Statins can cause hyperinsulinemia even in the absence of hyperglycemia and the potential mitogenic effects and implications of prolonged hyperinsulinemia are discussed. Suggestions are made as to how physicians might avert the hyperinsulinemic and diabetogenic effects of statin therapy in clinical practice, and modulate the detrimental effects of these drugs on exercise performance. Finally, long-term studies are needed to determine if the deleterious hyperinsulinemic and diabetogenic effects of statin therapy undermine the beneficial cardiovascular disease risk outcomes in various segments of the population. PMID:23456437

Goldstein, Mark R; Mascitelli, Luca

2013-06-01

367

Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.  

PubMed

Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus. This last disease is caused by the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells in genetically predisposed individuals. Autoantibodies and T lymphocytes directed towards multiple islet autoantigens have been detected in the circulation, well before the clinical onset of the disease, in a prodromal phase during which pancreatic islet beta-cells are presumably destroyed. Among the target autoantigens, some are of protein nature but others are acidic glycolipids such as sulphatides158 and the gangliosides GT3, GD3 and especially GM2-1. This last component is specifically expressed in pancreatic islets and has been shown to represent a target of IgG autoantibodies highly associated with diabetes development in first-degree relatives of type 1 diabetic individuals. In addition, the GM2-1 ganglioside appears to be one of the antigens recognized by cytoplasmic ICA, a heterogeneous group of antibodies which specifically react with islets on pancreatic frozen sections. In conclusion, studies performed in the last decade have clearly indicated that gangliosides represent a heterogeneous class of molecules that are involved in several cellular processes that are of crucial importance in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. Interestingly, these molecules, despite their small size, have been shown to represent not only important antigens in tumour immunology but are also able to elicit a specific autoimmune response, thus representing important autoantigens in some autoimmune disorders. It is of interest that, in addition to neurological autoimmune disorders where autoimmunity to gangliosides is frequent and usually of considerable magnitude, an autoimmune response to this class of molecules has been observed in autoimmune diabetes. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9307889

Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

1997-09-01

368

Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Regulates Leukocyte Transmigration Rate in the Retina During Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial adhesion molecule that possesses semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) activity and is involved in leukocyte recruitment. Leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels is a predominant feature of experimentally induced diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, the role of VAP-1 in this process is unknown. Diabetes was induced by i.p. injection of Streptozotocin in Long–Evans rats. The specific inhibitor of VAP-1, UV-002, was administered by daily i.p. injections. The expression of VAP-1 mRNA in the retinal extracts of normal and diabetic animals was measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Firm leukocyte adhesion was quantified in retinal flatmounts after intravascular staining with concanavalin A (ConA). Leukocyte transmigration rate was quantified by in vivo acridine orange leukocyte staining (AOLS). In diabetic rats, the rate of leukocyte transmigration into the retinal tissues of live animals was significantly increased, as determined by AOLS. When diabetic animals were treated with daily injections of the VAP-1 inhibitor (0.3mg/kg), leukocyte transmigration rate was significantly reduced (P<0.05). However, firm adhesion of leukocytes in diabetic animals treated with the inhibitor did not differ significantly from vehicle-treated diabetic controls. This work provides evidence for an important role of VAP-1 in the recruitment of leukocyte to the retina in experimental DR. Our results reveal the critical contribution of VAP-1 to leukocyte transmigration, with little impact on firm leukocyte adhesion in the retinas of diabetic animals. VAP-1 inhibition might be beneficial in the treatment of DR.

Noda, Kousuke; Nakao, Shintaro; Zandi, Souska; Engelstadter, Verena; Mashima, Yukihiko; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

2009-01-01

369

Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of carbohydrates are sugars ... and the carbs in food. Back Continue Balancing Carbohydrates In addition to serving a balanced diet of ...

370

Chromatin modifications associated with diabetes.  

PubMed

Accelerated rates of vascular complications are associated with diabetes mellitus. Environmental factors including hyperglycaemia contribute to the progression of diabetic complications. Epidemiological and experimental animal studies identified poor glycaemic control as a major contributor to the development of complications. These studies suggest that early exposure to hyperglycaemia can instigate the development of complications that present later in the progression of the disease, despite improved glycaemic control. Recent experiments reveal a striking commonality associated with gene-activating hyperglycaemic events and chromatin modification. The best characterised to date are associated with the chemical changes of amino-terminal tails of histone H3. Enzymes that write specified histone tail modifications are not well understood in models of hyperglycaemia and metabolic memory as well as human diabetes. The best-characterised enzyme is the lysine specific Set7 methyltransferase. The contribution of Set7 to the aetiology of diabetic complications may extend to other transcriptional events through methylation of non-histone substrates. PMID:22639343

Keating, Samuel T; El-Osta, Assam

2012-08-01

371

Shoes and Orthotics for Diabetics  

MedlinePLUS

... Ailments of the Heel Ailments of the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Currently selected Ailments and Conditions: A ... as Charcot involvement, loss of fatty tissue, hammer toes and amputations must be accommodated. Many deformities need ...

372

Diabetes in Hispanics/Latinos  

MedlinePLUS

... Your Life/ Movimiento Por Su Vida This lively music CD helps Hispanics and Latinos incorporate more movement ... can help prevent and manage diabetes. Use this music CD to encourage individuals or groups to exercise. ...

373

Quiz for Teens with Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... have different types of diabetes A. True B. False To learn more about the different types of ... eat sugar, sweets, and desserts. A. True B. False For other healthy snack ideas, check out NDEP’s ...

374

Peptides and methods against diabetes  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

Albertini, Richard J. (Underhill Center, VT); Falta, Michael T. (Hinesburg, VT)

2000-01-01

375

Diabetes Epidemic among African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... are not getting enough physical activity o have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) o have blood vessel problems affecting the heart, ... diabetes according to age adjusted 2004-2006 national survey data WHAT IS THE LINK BETWEEN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE ...

376

Leptin, diabetes, and the brain  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is a major worldwide problem. Despite some progress in the development of new antidiabetic agents, the ability to maintain tight glycemic control in order to prevent renal, retinal, and neuropathic complications of diabetes without adverse complications still remains a challenge. Recent evidence suggests, however, that in addition to playing a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, the adiposity hormone leptin also plays an important role in the control of glucose metabolism via its actions in the brain. This review examines the role of leptin action in the central nervous system and the mechanisms whereby leptin mediates its effects to regulate glucose metabolism. These findings suggest that defects or dysfunction in leptin signaling may contribute to the etiology of diabetes and raise the possibility that either leptin or downstream targets of leptin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of diabetes.

Meek, Thomas H.; Morton, Gregory J.

2012-01-01

377

Hoe ontstaat diabetes type 2?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bij het ontstaan van diabetes type 2 spelen twee factoren een belangrijke rol: de insulineproductie is niet voldoende én het\\u000a lichaam is ongevoelig voor de kleine hoeveelheid insuline die nog wel geproduceerd wordt.

P. G. H. Janssen; M. J. P. Avendonk

378

Cognitive Interventions for Older Diabetics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older diabetic adults should receive memory training to improve their compliance with medication taking. The intervention should include comprehensible medical instructions, assistance with remembering the nutritional values of food, and higher order skills for disease management. (SK)

Black, Sheila; Scogin, Forrest

1998-01-01

379

Long term complications of diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... itching in other areas. Diabetes may make it harder to control your blood pressure and cholesterol. This ... attack, stroke, and other problems. It can become harder for blood to flow to the legs and ...

380

Association Between Maternal Diabetes in Utero and Age at Offspring's Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to examine age of diabetes diagnosis in youth who have a parent with diabetes by diabetes type and whether the parent's diabetes was diagnosed before or after the youth's birth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The cohort comprised SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study participants (diabetes diagnosis 2001–2005) with a diabetic parent. SEARCH is a multicenter survey of youth with diabetes diagnosed before age 20 years. RESULTS—Youth with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have a parent with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes (mother 39.3%; father 21.2%) than youth with type 1 diabetes (5.3 and 6.7%, respectively, P < 0.001 for each). Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed 1.68 years earlier among those exposed to diabetes in utero (n = 174) than among those whose mothers’ diabetes was diagnosed later (P = 0.018, controlled for maternal diagnosis age, paternal diabetes, sex, and race/ethnicity). Age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes for 269 youth with and without in utero exposure did not differ significantly (difference 0.96 year, P = 0.403 after adjustment). Controlled for the father's age of diagnosis, father's diabetes before the child's birth was not associated with age at diagnosis (P = 0.078 for type 1 diabetes; P = 0.140 for type 2 diabetes). CONCLUSIONS—Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed at younger ages among those exposed to hyperglycemia in utero. Among youth with type 1 diabetes, the effect of the intrauterine exposure was not significant when controlled for mother's age of diagnosis. This study helps explain why other studies have found higher age-specific rates of type 2 diabetes among offspring of women with diabetes.

Pettitt, David J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Beyer, Jennifer; Hillier, Teresa A.; Liese, Angela D.; Mayer-Davis, Beth; Loots, Beth; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Liu, Lenna; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Linder, Barbara; Dabelea, Dana

2008-01-01

381

Perceptions among women with gestational diabetes.  

PubMed

Women with gestational diabetes are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which could be prevented or delayed by lifestyle modification. Lifestyle interventions need to take into account the specific situation of women with gestational diabetes. We aimed to gain a deeper understanding of women's experiences of gestational diabetes, their diabetes risk perceptions, and their views on type 2 diabetes prevention, to inform future lifestyle interventions. We conducted a metasynthesis that included 16 qualitative studies and identified 11 themes. Factors that require consideration when developing a type 2 diabetes prevention intervention in this population include addressing the emotional impact of gestational diabetes; providing women with clear and timely information about future diabetes risk; and offering an intervention that fits with women's multiple roles as caregivers, workers, and patients, and focuses on the health of the whole family. PMID:24682021

Parsons, Judith; Ismail, Khalida; Amiel, Stephanie; Forbes, Angus

2014-04-01

382

PATTERN OF CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS IN DIABETES MELLITUS  

PubMed Central

Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: Xerosis (44%), diabetic dermopathy (36%), skin tags (32%), cutaneous infections (31%), and seborrheic keratosis (30%). Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

Goyal, Abhishek; Raina, Sujeet; Kaushal, Satinder S; Mahajan, Vikram; Sharma, Nand Lal

2010-01-01

383

Inflammatory mechanisms of diabetic complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation of inflammatory processes may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, inflammation\\u000a appears to be a major mechanism responsible for vascular damage leading to the clinically well-recognized complications of\\u000a diabetes. Inflammatory cytokine and chemokine mediators released from visceral fat contribute to atherosclerotic plaque formation\\u000a and increased risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Activation of growth

Michael D. Williams; Jerry L. Nadler

2007-01-01

384

Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Its morphologic characteristics include glomerular hypertrophy, basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolar thickening. All of these are part and parcel of microvascular complications of diabetes. A large body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress is the common denominator link for the major pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- as well as macrovascular complications of diabetes. There are a number of macromolecules that have been implicated for increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as, NAD(P)H oxidase, advanced glycation end products (AGE), defects in polyol pathway, uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and mitochondrial respiratory chain via oxidative phosphorylation. Excess amounts of ROS modulate activation of protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and various cytokines and transcription factors which eventually cause increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes with progression to fibrosis and end stage renal disease. Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) further worsens the renal injury induced by ROS in diabetic nephropathy. Buffering the generation of ROS may sound a promising therapeutic to ameliorate renal damage from diabetic nephropathy, however, various studies have demonstrated minimal reno-protection by these agents. Interruption in the RAS has yielded much better results in terms of reno-protection and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review various aspects of oxidative stress coupled with the damage induced by RAS are discussed with the anticipation to yield an impetus for designing new generation of specific antioxidants that are potentially more effective to reduce reno-vascular complications of diabetes.

Kashihara, N.; Haruna, Y.; Kondeti, V.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.

2013-01-01

385

Tibial microdissection for diabetic wounds.  

PubMed

Few data are available focusing on controlled blunt microdissection during below-the-knee interventions as sole or synchronous technique coupled to subintimal angioplasty, particularly in the management of diabetic critical-ischemic foot wounds. We present two cases of targeted recanalizations in the tibial and pedal trunks for plantar and forefoot diabetic ischemic tissue defects, following an angiosome-model for perfusion. PMID:22231535

Alexandrescu, V; Vincent, G; Ngongang, C; Ledent, G; Hubermont, G

2012-02-01

386

Oxidative stress and diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxidative stress is increased in diabetes mellitus and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the typical long-term complications of human diabetes, like neuropathy and microangiopathy. Protein glycation and glucose autoxidation can generate free radicals that can catalyze lipid peroxidation. Other potential mechanisms of oxidative stress include the reduction of anti-oxidant defense. The role of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and

J. P Kuyvenhoven; A. E Meinders

1999-01-01

387

Gene expression in diabetic nephropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common complication of diabetes types 1 and 2. One of the hallmarks of DN is the development\\u000a of mesangial expansion, which occurs through accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Altered local gene expression\\u000a of humoral factors (eg, transforming growth factor-â, connective tissue growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor) can lead to increased\\u000a production of ECM

Daniela Hohenadel; Fokko J. van der Woude

2004-01-01

388

Angiopoietin concentrations in diabetic retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/aim: Angiopoietin 1 and 2 interact with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis in animal and in vitro models. Although VEGF concentrations are elevated, there is little information regarding angiopoietin concentration in the vitreous of patients with diabetic retinopathy.Methods: Angiopoietin concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay in vitreous samples from 17 patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and

J I Patel; P G Hykin; Z J Gregor; M Boulton; I A Cree

2005-01-01

389

Vascular Permeability in Diabetic Retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A hallmark of diabetic retinopathy is increased vascular permeability. The vasculature of the retina, which normally has tight\\u000a control of the fluid and blood components that enter the retina, becomes leaky in diabetes leading to increased albumin flux\\u000a into the retina, fluid accumulation, and macular edema, and over time may progress to hemorrhaging vessels. This chapter investigates\\u000a our knowledge regarding

David A. Antonetti; Heather D. VanGuilder; Cheng Mao-Lin

390

Lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis.  

PubMed

We describe the case of a 22-year-old man with insulin-dependent diabetes, who was admitted to the emergency department with hypotension, unconsciousness and a severe combined diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and lactic acid acidosis. In the discussion, we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying lactic acidosis in DKA, and we elaborate on the prognostic value of hyperlactataemia on such occasion. PMID:24654253

Feenstra, Rieneke A; Kiewiet, Mink K P; Boerma, E Christiaan; ter Avest, Ewoud

2014-01-01

391

42 CFR 410.18 - Diabetes screening tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diabetes screening tests. 410.18 Section...Other Health Services § 410.18 Diabetes screening tests. (a) Definitions...the following definitions apply: Diabetes means diabetes mellitus,...

2010-10-01

392

42 CFR 410.18 - Diabetes screening tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diabetes screening tests. 410.18 Section...Other Health Services § 410.18 Diabetes screening tests. (a) Definitions...the following definitions apply: Diabetes means diabetes mellitus,...

2013-10-01

393

42 CFR 410.18 - Diabetes screening tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Diabetes screening tests. 410.18 Section...Other Health Services § 410.18 Diabetes screening tests. (a) Definitions...the following definitions apply: Diabetes means diabetes mellitus,...

2009-10-01

394

Therapy with GAD in diabetes.  

PubMed

The enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is of great importance for the neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and therefore of interest for treatment of pain and neurological disease. However, it is also released in pancreas although its role is not quite clear. GAD is a major auto-antigen in the process leading to type 1 diabetes with both a clear cell-mediated immune response to GAD and auto-antibodies to GAD (GADA), which can be used as a predictor of diabetes. Administration of the isoform GAD65 can prevent autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and the subsequent need for exogenous insulin replacement. In Phase I and II studies an alum-formulated vaccine (Diamyd) has shown to be safe, and in a dose-finding study in Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) patients 20-microg was given subcutaneously one month apart indicating preservation of residual insulin secretion. A double-blind randomized Phase II trial in 70 patients (10-18 years old) with recent-onset type 1 diabetes showed significant preservation of residual insulin secretion and a GAD-specific immune response, both humoral and cell-mediated, but no treatment-related adverse events. With this promising background further studies are on their way, both intervention in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients, and trials to prevent the disease. PMID:19267332

Ludvigsson, Johnny

2009-05-01

395

Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN.

Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

2007-01-01

396

Oxidative stress and diabetic complications  

PubMed Central

Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of diabetes complications, both microvascular and cardiovascular. The metabolic abnormalities of diabetes cause mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in endothelial cells of both large and small vessels, and also in the myocardium. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of five major pathways involved in the pathogenesis of complications: polyol pathway flux, increased formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), increased expression of the receptor for AGEs and its activating ligands, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, and overactivity of the hexosamine pathway. It also directly inactivates two critical antiatherosclerotic enzymes, eNOS and prostacyclin synthase. Through these pathways, increased intracellular ROS cause defective angiogenesis in response to ischemia, activate a number of pro-inflammatory pathways, and cause long-lasting epigenetic changes which drive persistent expression of proinflammatory genes after glycemia is normalized (‘hyperglycemic memory’). Atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy in type 2 diabetes are caused in part by pathway-selective insulin resistance, which increases mitochondrial ROS production from free fatty acids and by inactivation of anti-atherosclerosis enzymes by ROS. Overexpression of superoxide dismutase in transgenic diabetic mice prevents diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy. The aim of this review is to highlight advances in understanding the role of metabolite-generated ROS in the development of diabetic complications.

Giacco, Ferdinando; Brownlee, Michael

2010-01-01

397

Diabetes: Models, Signals and control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diabetes and its complications impose significant economic consequences on individuals, families, health systems, and countries. The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes significant components of modeling, signal processing and control. Models: first, I will discuss the minimal (coarse) models which describe the key components of the system functionality and are capable of measuring crucial processes of glucose metabolism and insulin control in health and diabetes; then, the maximal (fine-grain) models which include comprehensively all available knowledge about system functionality and are capable to simulate the glucose-insulin system in diabetes, thus making it possible to create simulation scenarios whereby cost effective experiments can be conducted in silico to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies - in particular I will focus on the first in silico simulation model accepted by FDA as a substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. Signals: I will review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the crucial role of models to enhance the interpretation of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Control: I will review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, I will discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers.

Cobelli, C.

2010-07-01

398

Diabetic colon preparation comparison study.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to establish an optimal colon preparation for persons with diabetes who are undergoing colonoscopies. Specifically, the aim was to compare the difference between an experimental and standard preparation. Adequacy of bowel preparation is critical for good bowel visualization. Compared with nondiabetic patients, persons with diabetes have slower gastric emptying, colonic transit, and colon evacuation. Inadequate preparations may lead to suboptimal colonoscopy resulting in overlooked pathology, repeated examinations with associated risks, and organizational inefficiencies. Using a single-blind experimental design, 198 persons with diabetes who were scheduled to receive colonoscopies were randomly assigned to either the experimental (diabetic colon preparation) or the control (standard colon preparation) group. Patients in the diabetic colon preparation group had 70% good colon preparations compared with 54% in the standard group, and this finding was significant (? = 5.14, p = 0.02). Results indicate that diabetic patients receiving 10 ounces of magnesium citrate 2 days prior to their colonoscopies followed by 10 ounces of magnesium citrate and 4-L polyethylene glycol the day prior to the procedure had cleaner colons than those receiving standard preparation of 10 ounces of magnesium citrate and 4-L polyethylene glycol the day prior to procedure. This colon preparation is safe, feasible, well-tolerated, and effective. PMID:21979399

Hayes, Ann; Buffum, Martha; Hughes, Joyce

2011-01-01

399

Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s) responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1), and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

Kowluru, Renu A.; Santos, Julia M.; Mishra, Manish

2013-01-01

400

Epigenetic modifications and diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s) responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1), and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease. PMID:24286082

Kowluru, Renu A; Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish

2013-01-01

401

Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM) on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice  

PubMed Central

HemoHIM (a new herbal preparation of three edible herbs: Angelica gigas Nakai, Cnidium officinale Makino, and Paeonia japonica Miyabe) was developed to protect immune, hematopoietic, and self-renewal tissues against radiation. This study determined whether or not HemoHIM could alter hyperglycemia and the immune response in diabetic mice. Both nondiabetic and diabetic mice were orally administered HemoHIM (100?mg/kg) once a day for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200?mg/kg, i.p.). In diabetic mice, HemoHIM effectively improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the diabetic control group as well as elevated plasma insulin levels with preservation of insulin staining in pancreatic ?-cells. HemoHIM treatment restored thymus weight, white blood cells, lymphocyte numbers, and splenic lymphocyte populations (CD4+ T and CD8+ T), which were reduced in diabetic mice, as well as IFN-? production in response to Con A stimulation. These results indicate that HemoHIM may have potential as a glucose-lowering and immunomodulatory agent by enhancing the immune function of pancreatic ?-cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

Kim, Jong-Jin; Choi, Jina; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Paik, Man-Jeong; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae-Ran; Yee, Sung-Tae

2014-01-01

402

The changing face of diabetes in America.  

PubMed

So much has changed in the field of diabetes diagnosis and management in the United States. Unhealthy lifestyle choices have hastened an epidemic of childhood obesity, causing a paradigm shift in how childhood diabetes is conceptualized. Once thought a consequence of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and genetics, diabetes with onset in adults has been found to have a variant with autoimmunity. As the lines among adult-onset, child-onset, and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus become more blurred, best practices in management and prevention become more complicated. This article highlights key points regarding 2 variants, juvenile-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and latent autoimmune diabetes of adults. PMID:24766935

Adebayo, Omoyemi; Willis, George C

2014-05-01

403

Diabetic Heart Dysfunction: Is Cell Transplantation a Potential Therapy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of long-standing diabetes mellitus leads to the development of a number of typical end organ complications. These complications include coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic neuropathy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. From an epidemiological and clinical standpoint, cardiovascular disease remains the most important complication of diabetes. Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of

Joel Price; Subodh Verma; Ren-Ke Li

2003-01-01

404

Vegfa Protects the Glomerular Microvasculature in Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) expression is increased in glomeruli in the context of diabetes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this upregulation of VEGFA protects the glomerular microvasculature in diabetes and that therefore inhibition of VEGFA will accelerate nephropathy. To determine the role of glomerular Vegfa in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, we used an inducible Cre-loxP gene-targeting system that enabled genetic deletion of Vegfa selectively from glomerular podocytes of wild-type or diabetic mice. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice using streptozotocin (STZ). We then assessed the extent of glomerular dysfunction by measuring proteinuria, glomerular pathology, and glomerular cell apoptosis. Vegfa expression increased in podocytes in the STZ model of diabetes. After 7 weeks of diabetes, diabetic mice lacking Vegfa in podocytes exhibited significantly greater proteinuria with profound glomerular scarring and increased apoptosis compared with control mice with diabetes or Vegfa deletion without diabetes. Reduced local production of glomerular Vegfa in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes promotes endothelial injury accelerating the progression of glomerular injury. These results suggest that upregulation of VEGFA in diabetic kidneys protects the microvasculature from injury and that reduction of VEGFA in diabetes may be harmful.

Sivaskandarajah, Gavasker A.; Jeansson, Marie; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Eremina, Vera; Baelde, Hans J.; Quaggin, Susan E.

2012-01-01

405

Diabetic nephropathy--the family physician's role.  

PubMed

Nearly one-half of persons with chronic kidney disease have diabetes mellitus. Diabetes accounted for 44 percent of new cases of kidney failure in 2008. Diabetic nephropathy, also called diabetic kidney disease, is associated with significant macrovascular risk, and is the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. Diabetic nephropathy usually manifests after 10 years' duration of type 1 diabetes, but may be present at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Screening for microalbuminuria should be initiated five years after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Screening for microalbuminuria with a spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio identifies the early stages of nephropathy. Positive results on two of three tests (30 to 300 mg of albumin per g of creatinine) in a six-month period meet the diagnostic criteria for diabetic nephropathy. Because diabetic nephropathy may also manifest as a decreased glomerular filtration rate or an increased serum creatinine level, these tests should be included in annual monitoring. Preventive measures include using an angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in normotensive persons. Optimizing glycemic control and using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker to control blood pressure slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy, but implementing intensive glycemic and blood pressure control is associated with more adverse outcomes. Low-protein diets may also decrease adverse renal outcomes and mortality in persons with diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22612183

Roett, Michelle A; Liegl, Sarah; Jabbarpour, Yalda

2012-05-01

406

Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.  

PubMed

Diabetic foot ulcers are a major health care problem. Complications of foot ulcers are a leading cause of hospitalization and amputation in diabetic patients. Diabetic ulcers result from neuropathy or ischemia. Neuropathy is characterized by loss of protective sensation and biomechanical abnormalities. Lack of protective sensation allows ulceration in areas of high pressure. Autonomic neuropathy causes dryness of the skin by decreased sweating and therefore vulnerability of the skin to break down. Ischemia is caused by peripheral arterial disease, not by microangiopathy. Poor arterial inflow decreases blood supply to ulcer area and is associated with reduced oxygenation, nutrition and ulcer healing. Necrotic tissue is laden with bacteria apt to grow in such an environment, which also impairs general defence mechanisms against infection. Infections often complicate existing ulcers, but are seldom the cause for ulcers. Protective footwear helps to reduce ulceration in diabetic feet at risk. Relieving pressure on the ulcer area is necessary to allow healing. Blood supply needs to be improved by revascularisation whenever compromised. Systemic antibiotics are helpful in treating acute foot infections, but not uninfected ulcers. Osteomyelitis may underlie a diabetic ulcer and is often treated by resection of the infected bone and always by antibiotics, the mode and length of treatment depending on the adequacy of the debridement. The aim of ulcer bed preparation is to convert the molecular and cellular environment of the chronic ulcer to that of an acute healing wound by debridement, irrigating and cleaning. Moist dressings maintain wound environment favorable for healing. All attempts should be done to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and treat existing ulcers by multidisciplinary teams in order to decrease amputations. Indeed, improvement in ulcer healing has been observed with primary healing rates of 65-85% in mixed series. Even when healed, diabetic foot should be regarded as a life-long condition and treated accordingly to prevent recurrence. Long-term efforts have reduced amputation 37-75% in different European countries over 10-15 years. PMID:19543189

Vuorisalo, S; Venermo, M; Lepäntalo, M

2009-06-01

407

Self testing for diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To develop a simple, economically viable, and effective means of population screening for diabetes mellitus. DESIGN--A postal request system for self testing for glycosuria with foil wrapped dipsticks. Preprandial and postprandial tests were compared with a single postprandial test. The subjects were instructed how to test, and a result card was supplied on which to record and return the result. All those recording a positive test result and 50 people recording a negative result were invited for an oral glucose tolerance test. SETTING--General practice in east Suffolk, list size 11534. PATIENTS--All subjects aged 45-70 years registered with the practice were identified by Suffolk Family Health Services Authority (n = 3057). The 73 subjects known to have diabetes from the practice's register were excluded, leaving 2984 subjects, 2363 (79.2%) of whom responded. 1167 subjects completed the single test and 1196 the two tests. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Response rate and number of patients with glycosuria. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of a single postprandial test and preprandial and postprandial tests. Number of new cases of diabetes identified and cost of screening. RESULTS--Of the patients completing the single postprandial test, 29 had a positive result, an oral glucose tolerance test showed that eight (28%) had diabetes, six (21%) impaired glucose tolerance, and 14 (48%) normal glucose tolerance. 44 of the group who tested before and after eating had a positive result; nine (20%) had diabetes, five (11%) impaired tolerance, and 26 (11%) normal tolerance. Screening cost 59p per subject and 81 pounds per case detected. Of the 17 people with previously undiagnosed diabetes, eight were asymptomatic and 11 had not visited their general practitioner in the past three months. CONCLUSIONS--A postal request system for self testing for postprandial glycosuria in people aged 45-70 is a simple and effective method of population screening for diabetes mellitus.

Davies, M; Alban-Davies, H; Cook, C; Day, J

1991-01-01

408

The diabetic foot: a review.  

PubMed

Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical ?ndings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24126512

Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

2013-12-01

409

Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. A Fact Sheet from the National Diabetes Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Type 1 diabetes in U.S. children and adolescents may be increasing and many more new cases of type 2 diabetes are being reported in young people. Standards of care for managing children with diabetes issued by the American Diabetes Association in January 2005 provide more guidance than previously given. To update primary care providers and their…

National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2006

2006-01-01

410

Alterations in the diabetic myocardial proteome coupled with increased myocardial oxidative stress underlies diabetic cardiomyopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been documented as an underlying etiology of heart failure (HF) among diabetics. Although oxidative stress has been proposed to contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy, much of the evidence lacks specificity. Furthermore, whether alterations occur at the cardiac proteome level in diabetic cardiac complications with attendant oxidative stress remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to identify cardiac protein changes in

Milton Hamblin; David B. Friedman; Salisha Hill; Richard M. Caprioli; Holly M. Smith; Michael F. Hill

2007-01-01

411

Universal versus selective gestational diabetes screening: Application of 1997 American Diabetes Association recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We sought to evaluate the impact of the 1997 American Diabetes Association gestational diabetes mellitus screening guidelines applied to a universally screened population. Study Design: A retrospective analysis of 18,504 women universally screened for gestational diabetes mellitus at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, between January 1, 1986, and December 31, 1997, was performed. Diabetic screening consisted of plasma glucose determination 1

Diana R. Danilenko-Dixon; Jo T. Van Winter; Roger L. Nelson; Paul L. Ogburn

1999-01-01

412

Diabetes screening after gestational diabetes mellitus: poor performance of fasting plasma glucose  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an established risk factor for the development of overt diabetes. Since the change in diagnostic criteria for diabetes in 1997, it is unclear whether there should be any preference for fasting or post-glucose challenge blood glucose in diagnosing diabetes after GDM. The study aimed at assessing the usefulness of both diagnostic methods in women after

K. Cypryk; L. Czupryniak; J. Wilczy?ski; A. Lewi?ski

2004-01-01

413

Prevent Diabetes Problems. Keep Your Diabetes under Control. Number 1 in a Series of 7.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: What are diabetes problems; Will I have diabetes problems; What should my blood glucose numbers be; What should my cholesterol be; What does smoking have to do with diabetes problems; What else can I do to prevent diabetes problems; Things to Ch...

2003-01-01

414

Diabetes in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans Diabetes in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans 4 Steps to Manage ... want to learn more about controlling the disease. Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders and Diabetes (from the Office ...

415

78 FR 66613 - National Diabetes Month, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...prevention and treatment. Diabetes can...including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and...or manage this disease. With diabetes...toward improved treatment and care, and...and preventing disease onset while...

2013-11-05

416

How Is Diabetes Treated in Children?  

MedlinePLUS

... back. Pump technology continues to evolve, says Alan Stevens, a mechanical engineer and FDA’s infusion pump team ... With Diabetes - - Related Consumer Updates Fighting Diabetes' Deadly Impact on Minorities Nutrition Basics Help Fight Child Obesity ...

417

Oxidative stress and antioxidant treatment in diabetes.  

PubMed

The many studies on oxidative stress, antioxidant treatment, and diabetic complications have shown that oxidative stress is increased and may accelerate the development of complications through the metabolism of excessive glucose and free fatty acids in diabetic and insulin-resistant states. However, the contribution of oxidative stress to diabetic complications may be tissue-specific, especially for microvascular disease that occurs only in diabetic patients but not in individuals with insulin resistance without diabetes, even though both groups suffer from oxidative stress. Although antioxidant treatments can show benefits in animal models of diabetes, negative evidence from large clinical trials suggests that new and more powerful antioxidants need to be studied to demonstrate whether antioxidants can be effective in treating complications. Furthermore, it appears that oxidative stress is only one factor contributing to diabetic complications; thus, antioxidant treatment would most likely be more effective if it were coupled with other treatments for diabetic complications. PMID:15753146

Scott, Joshua A; King, George L

2004-12-01

418

Third Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Third Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting was presented by the Diabetes Technology Society at the San Diego California Marriott Mission Valley Hotel on April 20-21 2007. The attendance was 378 healthcare providers and scientists. The first day...

D. D. Klonoff

2007-01-01

419

Tips for Teens with Diabetes: Be Active  

MedlinePLUS

... for Teens with Diabetes: Be Active Download This Publication (NDEP-64) Want this item now? Download it ... for Teens with Diabetes: Be Active Print this Publication (NDEP-64) To print large quantities of a ...

420

Investigation on Ocular Complication of Diabetes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A five year study on the ocular complications of diabetes compared results of eye examinations and biochemical analyses of diabetics with eye disease to nondiabetics with the same prognoses. For the same two populations, results of cataract surgery and po...

T. H. Kirmani

1976-01-01

421

Autoimmune endocrinopathy associated with diabetes insipidus  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case is described in which diabetes insipidus was associated with hypopituitarism, insulin-independent diabetes mellitus, pernicious anaemia and circulating antibodies to the thyroid gland, adrenal gland and the pancreatic islet cells.

G. L. Bhan; T. D. OBrien

1982-01-01

422

Epidemiology of Diabetes Mellitus in Japan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The clinical and epidemiological features of diabetes mellitus in Japan have been compiled and compared with data from other countries. Diabetes is basically the same in Japan as elsewhere: however, consideration of important differences has led to the fo...

W. G. Blackard Y. Omori L. R. Freedman

1964-01-01

423

Hyperglycemic Diabetic Stupor: A Spectrum of Disorders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Cases of diabetic hyperglycemic stupor are presented to illustrate the spectrum extending from diabetic ketoacidosis with minimal hyperglycemia to severe hyperglycemia without ketoacidosis. The recognition of lactic acidosis, a non-ketotic acidosis, with ...

J. W. Anderson

1968-01-01

424

Second Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Second Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting was presented by the Diabetes Technology Society at the Cambridge, Massachusetts Hyatt Regency Hotel in April 21-22, 2006. The first day covered Continuous Glucose Monitoring and the second day covere...

D. Klonoff

2006-01-01

425

JAMA Patient Page: Weight and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... known as “adult-onset” diabetes, usually develops in adulthood but can also occur in overweight children. Family history of diabetes and excess weight, especially weight carried around the middle, are strong risk factors for developing type 2 ...

426

'Walkable' Neighborhoods May Help Cut Diabetes Rates  

MedlinePLUS

... for more walking. This study also showed that neighborhoods that encouraged the most walking also had the lowest rates of obesity and diabetes. In the most walkable neighborhoods, the researchers found diabetes incidence dropped 7 percent ...

427

Middle Age, Diabetes and Brain Volume  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... MedlinePlus Pages Dementia Diabetes High Blood Pressure Seniors' Health Transcript Middle-aged men and women with diabetes or high blood pressure may face a higher risk for brain cell loss and thinking difficulties by ...

428

Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages Amharic (amarunya) Arabic (???????) Chinese - Simplified ( ... ??????? Multimedia Patient Education Institute Chinese - Simplified (????) Diabetic Foot Care English ??????? - ???? (Chinese - Simplified) PDF Chinese ...

429

Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life  

MedlinePLUS

... Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF Click here ...

430

Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

MedlinePLUS

... June 2012 Page 1 of 2 Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives Facts At-a-Glance In response to the diabetes epidemic in American Indian and Alaska Native people, Congress established the Special ...

431

Functional food and diabetes: a natural way in diabetes prevention?  

PubMed

Diabetes shows a wide range of variation in prevalence around the world and it is expected to affect 300 million by the year 2025. In a prevention framework where banning policies and educational strategies lead the interventions, functional foods (FFs) with their specific health effects could, in the future, indicate a new mode of thinking about the relationships between food and health in everyday life. Functional ingredients, such as stevioside, cinnamon, bitter melon, garlic and onion, ginseng, Gymnema sylvestre and fenugreek, have been addressed for their specific actions towards different reactions involved in diabetes development. New strategies involving the use of FF should be validated through large-scale population trials, considering validated surrogate end points to evaluate the effect of FF in prevention of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22107597

Ballali, Simonetta; Lanciai, Federico

2012-03-01

432

Vaccination against type 1 diabetes  

PubMed Central

The clinical onset of type 1 diabetes or autoimmune diabetes occurs after a prodrome of islet autoimmunity. The warning signals for the ensuing loss of pancreatic islet beta cells are autoantibodies against insulin, GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8, alone or in combinations. Autoantibodies against e.g. insulin alone have only a minor risk for type 1 diabetes. However, progression to clinical onset is increased by the induction of multiple islet autoantibodies. At the time of clinical onset, insulitis may be manifest, which seem to reduce the efficacy of immunosuppression. Autoantigen-specific immunotherapy with alum-formulated GAD65 (Diamyd®) show promise to reduce the loss of beta-cell function after the clinical onset of type 1 diabetes. The mechanisms are unclear but may involve the induction of T regulatory cells, which may suppress islet autoantigen reactivity. Past and on-going clinical trials have been safe. Future clinical trials, perhaps as combination autoantigen-specific immunotherapy may increase the efficacy to prevent the clinical onset in subjects with islet autoantibodies or preserve residual beta-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients.

Larsson, Helena Elding; Lernmark, Ake

2011-01-01

433

Gut microbiota, probiotics and diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic ? cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes. PMID:24939063

Gomes, Aline Corado; Bueno, Allain Amador; de Souza, Rávila Graziany Machado; Mota, João Felipe

2014-01-01

434

Trace elements in diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus is the commonest major metabolic disease and most prevalent diseases worldwide.Its related morbidity is due to its micro and macro angiopathic complications. Aim: The aim of this study was to measure and compare the serum levels of zinc and magnesium in normal individuals and in diabetic patients. Method: Analysis of minerals was done in plasma by using a Varian Spectra AA 220 model atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Result: Our observations showed a definite lowering of serum magnesium (p<0.001) and serum zinc levels (p<0.001) were significant in diabetic group. Conclusion: The cause of diabetic hypomagnesaemia is multifactorial. An altered metabolism, a poor glycaemic control and osmotic diuresis may be contributory factors. Decreased serum zinc levels in diabetes may be caused by an increase in urinary loss. These decreased levels of trace elements cause disturbances in glucose transport across cell membrane lead to insufficient formation and secretion of insulin by pancreas which compromise in the antioxidant defense mechanisms. PMID:24179883

S, Praveeena; Pasula, Sujatha; Sameera, K

2013-09-01

435

Gut microbiota, probiotics and diabetes  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic ? cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes.

2014-01-01

436

Oxidative Stress and Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Oxygen metabolism is essential for sustaining aerobic life, and normal cellular homeostasis works on a fine balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, a cytopathic consequence of excessive production of ROS and the suppression of ROS removal by antioxidant defense system, is implicated in the development of many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes and its complications. Retinopathy, a debilitating microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of acquired blindness in developed countries. Many diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities are implicated in its development, and appear to be influenced by elevated oxidative stress; however the exact mechanism of its development remains elusive. Increased superoxide concentration is considered as a causal link between elevated glucose and the other metabolic abnormalities important in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Animal studies have shown that antioxidants have beneficial effects on the development of retinopathy, but the results from very limited clinical trials are somewhat ambiguous. Although antioxidants are being used for other chronic diseases, controlled clinical trials are warranted to investigate potential beneficial effects of antioxidants in the development of retinopathy in diabetic patients.

Kowluru, Renu A.; Chan, Pooi-See

2007-01-01

437

Diabetes and Alpha Lipoic Acid  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complications. Lipoic acid quenches reactive oxygen species, chelates metal ions, and reduces the oxidized forms of other antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione. It also boosts antioxidant defense system through Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant gene expression and by modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors-regulated genes. ALA inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates AMPK in skeletal muscles, which in turn have a plethora of metabolic consequences. These diverse actions suggest that lipoic acid acts by multiple mechanisms, many of which have only been uncovered recently. In this review we briefly summarize the known biochemical properties of lipoic acid and then discussed the oxidative mechanisms implicated in diabetic complications and the mechanisms by which lipoic acid may ameliorate these reactions. The findings of some of the clinical trials in which lipoic acid administration has been tested in diabetic patients during the last 10?years are summarized. It appears that the clearest benefit of lipoic acid supplementation is in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

2011-01-01

438

Mathematical models of diabetes progression.  

PubMed

Few attempts have been made to model mathematically the progression of type 2 diabetes. A realistic representation of the long-term physiological adaptation to developing insulin resistance is necessary for effectively designing clinical trials and evaluating diabetes prevention or disease modification therapies. Writing a good model for diabetes progression is difficult because the long time span of the disease makes experimental verification of modeling hypotheses extremely awkward. In this context, it is of primary importance that the assumptions underlying the model equations properly reflect established physiology and that the mathematical formulation of the model give rise only to physically plausible behavior of the solutions. In the present work, a model of the pancreatic islet compensation is formulated, its physiological assumptions are presented, some fundamental qualitative characteristics of its solutions are established, the numerical values assigned to its parameters are extensively discussed (also with reference to available cross-sectional epidemiologic data), and its performance over the span of a lifetime is simulated under various conditions, including worsening insulin resistance and primary replication defects. The differences with respect to two previously proposed models of diabetes progression are highlighted, and therefore, the model is proposed as a realistic, robust description of the evolution of the compensation of the glucose-insulin system in healthy and diabetic individuals. Model simulations can be run from the authors' web page. PMID:18780774

De Gaetano, Andrea; Hardy, Thomas; Beck, Benoit; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bue-Valleskey, Juliana; Pørksen, Niels

2008-12-01

439

Noninvasive Optical Screening for Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Background Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are implicated in the complications of diabetes. Advanced glycation end products also accumulate in the skin and are sensitive biomarkers for the risk of developing diabetes and related complications. Some AGEs fluoresce and can be measured noninvasively by optical spectroscopy. Methods Noninvasive screening for diabetes has been evaluated in an 18-site study involving a cohort of 2793 subjects meeting American Diabetes Association-based screening criteria. Subjects were measured with a specialized skin fluorimeter and also received traditional blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin tests. Results Retrospective results indicated that the noninvasive technology measuring dermal fluorescence is more sensitive at detecting abnormal glucose tolerance than either fasting plasma glucose or glycated hemoglobin A1C. Conclusions These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of dermal fluorescence may be an effective tool to identify individuals at risk for diabetes and its complications. The noninvasive technology yields immediate results, and since measuring dermal fluorescence requires no blood draws or patient fasting, the instrument may be well suited for opportunistic screening.

Ediger, Marwood N.; Olson, Byron P.; Maynard, John D.

2009-01-01

440

Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ?6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR). Presenting visual impairment (VI) was defined as LogMAR visual acuity?>?0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1%) English-speaking and 885 (27.9%) Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p?diabetes, higher prevalence of DR (36.0 vs. 30.6%, p?diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations.

2012-01-01

441

Gastric emptying of solid meals in diabetics.  

PubMed Central

The gastric emptying rate of an isotopically labelled solid meal was compared in 29 insulin-dependent well-controlled diabetics and 18 normal controls. The diabetics were assessed for evidence of autonomic neuropathy. No significant difference in gastric emptying rate was found between controls and diabetics with or without autonomic neuropathy. Only three diabetics had greatly delayed gastric emptying, but in one of these the test had given a normal result on an earlier occasion.

Scarpello, J H; Barber, D C; Hague, R V; Cullen, D R; Sladen, G E

1976-01-01

442

Management of diabetes with coronary artery disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Persons with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes consistently have worse clinical outcomes than those without diabetes.\\u000a Treatment of diabetes with CVD must target blood pressure, cholesterol, and glycemic targets. Control of blood pressure to\\u000a <- 130\\/80 mm Hg and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to less than 100 mg\\/dL is key to preventing and managing CVD with\\u000a diabetes. Optimal glucose control

Michelle Fischmann Magee; Adeyinka A. Taiwo; Barbara Viventi Howard

2003-01-01

443

Adenosine receptor activation ameliorates type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growing evidence indicates that adeno- sine receptors could be promising therapeutic targets in autoimmune diseases. Here we studied the role of adenosine receptors in controlling the course of type 1 diabetes. Diabetes in CD-1 mice was induced by multi- ple-low-dose-streptozotocin (MLDS) treatment and in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice by cyclophosphamide injection. The nonselective adenosine receptor agonist 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) prevented diabetes

Zoltan H. Nemeth; David Bleich; Balazs Csoka; Pal Pacher; Jon G. Mabley; Leonora Himer; E. Sylvester Vizi; Edwin A. Deitch; Csaba Szabo; Bruce N. Cronstein; Gyorgy Hasko

2007-01-01

444

Hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in type 1 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Duration-related cognitive impairment is an increasingly recognized complication of type 1 diabetes. To explore potential underlying mechanisms, we examined hippocampal abnormalities in the spontaneously type 1 diabetic BB\\/W rat. As a functional assay of cognition, the Morris water maze test showed significantly prolonged latencies in 8-month diabetic rats not present at 2 months of diabetes. These abnormalities were associated with

Zhen-Guo Li; Weixian Zhang; George Grunberger; Anders A. F Sima

2002-01-01

445

Alpha interferon administration paradoxically inhibits the development of diabetes in BB rats.  

PubMed

Alpha-interferon (IFN-alpha) is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). However, since potent inducers of IFN-alpha, viruses, have been shown to modulate immune function and autoimmunity, we investigated whether administration of recombinant IFN-alpha (rIFN-alpha) would inhibit the diabetic process in BB rats. The development of diabetes was significantly inhibited by injections of either 10(5) units or 4x10(5) units rIFN-alpha. rIFN-alpha was more effective in preventing disease when injections were initiated at an earlier age (28-30 days vs 35-40 days). Histologic examination revealed a markedly lower degree of insulitis in rIFN-alpha treated rats. The mean total peripheral WBC and differential count, T-cell subsets, peripheral blood NK cell number, splenic NK cell activity, and serum cytotoxic beta cell surface antibody levels were unaltered by rIFN-alpha administration. In vitro incubation with rIFN-alpha inhibited the Con A proliferative response of mononuclear splenocytes of BB rats but not of Sprague Dawley rats. These results document that rIFN-alpha treatment potently prevents diabetes by inhibiting the development of insulitis. This paradoxical diabetes sparing effect may have significant implications for the treatment and prevention of IDDM and towards the understanding the autoimmune process. PMID:9566771

Sobel, D O; Creswell, K; Yoon, J W; Holterman, D

1998-01-01

446

Height at diagnosis of insulin dependent diabetes in patients and their non-diabetic family members  

Microsoft Academic Search

Height at the onset of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was evaluated in 200 newly diagnosed children, 187 non-diabetic siblings, and 169 parents. Diabetic children 5-9 years of age at diagnosis were consistently taller than the national average. Non-diabetic siblings of the same age were also tall. Diabetic children aged 14 or over at diagnosis were short, while their siblings and

T J Songer; R E LaPorte; N Tajima; T J Orchard; B S Rabin; M S Eberhardt; J S Dorman; K J Cruickshanks; D E Cavender; D J Becker

1986-01-01

447

Implications of the global diabetes epidemic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dramatic increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, largely as a result of increasing obesity and sedentary lifestyle, signals an impending public health crisis for the 21 st century. Individuals with type 2 diabetes have a two to four-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease, evident even before clinical diagnosis of diabetes. Guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease

George Steiner

2006-01-01

448

Fourth Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Fourth Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting was presented by the Diabetes Technology Society at the Orlando Florida Hyatt Regency Hotel on April 11-12 2008. The first day covered Technologies for Diabetes Monitoring and the second day covered T...

D. C. Klonoff

2008-01-01

449

Gestational Diabetes: A Guide for Pregnant Women  

MedlinePLUS

... adults. Sometimes it can be treated just with diet. Diabetes pills or insulin may also be needed. Gestational diabetes— ... control my gestational diabetes by eating a healthy diet and staying active ? ... If I need medicine, can I take a pill or do I need a shot? For many ...

450

Diagnosis and Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most commonly occurring major complications of diabetes. The disease may manifest in several clinical patterns: most frequently as distal symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy. Guidelines are available for the diagnosis of DPN by the primary care physician. These recommend that a review of diabetic patients, including a questionnaire and inspection and neurological examination of

Isabel Illa

1999-01-01

451

Erythropoietic stress and anemia in diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia is one of the world's most common preventable conditions, yet it is often overlooked, especially in people with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes-related chronic hyperglycemia can lead to a hypoxic environment in the renal interstitium, which results in impaired production of erythropoietin by the peritubular fibroblasts and subsequent anemia. Anemia in patients with diabetes mellitus might contribute to the pathogenesis and

Peter Winocour; Dhruv K. Singh; Ken Farrington

2009-01-01

452

Stress and adjustment in diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Stress and adjustment in diabetics is studied in order to know the influence of maladjustment and stress in the causation of the disease. The sample of study consists of 100 diabetics patients, 100 nonpsychosomatic and 100 normal person. Results obtained are discussed in detail. It is concluded that maladjustment and stress are important contributing factors in' diabetes mellitus. PMID:21455356

Parveen, S; Singh, S B

1999-01-01

453

STRESS AND ADJUSTMENT IN DIABETES MELLITUS  

PubMed Central

Stress and adjustment in diabetics is studied in order to know the influence of maladjustment and stress in the causation of the disease. The sample of study consists of 100 diabetics patients, 100 nonpsychosomatic and 100 normal person. Results obtained are discussed in detail. It is concluded that maladjustment and stress are important contributing factors in? diabetes mellitus.

Parveen, Sabiha; Singh, S.B.

1999-01-01

454

Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this study we investigated the tolerance mechanisms of high and low avidity T cells reactive to the diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and their potential role in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. In diabetes-associated DR4 HLA hum...

G. T. Nepom

2010-01-01

455

Commentary - Making a Difference in Diabetes Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

To prevent pre-diabetes or diabetes, we must place greater emphasis on weight loss and exercise in those who are overweight or obese. Equally important, we must continually exhort patients of normal weight not to put on pounds. For the former, both drug therapy and lifestyle modification have been shown to be effective in delaying the progression to diabetes, but admittedly

Richard Kahn

2006-01-01

456

Diabetes and pregnancy: perspectives from Asia.  

PubMed

There has been a marked increase in the prevalence of diabetes in Asia over recent years. Diabetes complicating pregnancy, in particular gestational diabetes, has also increased markedly in the region. Multi-ethnic studies have highlighted the increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus among the different Asian populations. Prevalence of gestational diabetes in Asian countries varies substantially according to the screening strategy and diagnostic criteria applied, and ranges from 1% to 20%, with evidence of an increasing trend over recent years. The International Association for Diabetes in Pregnancy Study group criteria have been adopted by some Asian countries, although they present significant challenges in implementation, especially in low-resource settings. Studies on offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes have reported adverse cardiometabolic profiles and increased risk of diabetes and obesity. Gestational diabetes is likely to be a significant factor contributing to the epidemic of diabetes and other non-communicable diseases in the Asian region. In recognition of this, several large-scale prevention and intervention programmes are currently being implemented in different Asian countries in order to improve glucose control during pregnancy, as well as overall maternal health. Lessons emerging from gestational diabetes studies in Asia may help inform and provide insights on the overall burden and treatment strategies to target gestational diabetes, with the ultimate aim to reduce its adverse short- and long-term consequences. PMID:24417604

Tutino, G E; Tam, W H; Yang, X; Chan, J C N; Lao, T T H; Ma, R C W

2014-03-01

457

Management of diabetic kidney disease: Recent advances  

PubMed Central

Diabetic kidney disease, in present days, is being recognized as the commonest cause of end stage renal disease. Though there is no absolute therapy for diabetic kidney disease, decades of hard work has recognized some modifiable factors that can prevent its progression. This article is an attempt to review some recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis and management of diabetic kidney disease

Agarwal, Pankaj

2013-01-01

458

Exercise and Diabetes Type 1 Recommendations, Safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type 1 diabetic subjects without any complications and with a good control could participate in all levels of sports activities, both recreational and professional. But, there are some limitations for subjects who have chronic side effects of diabetes. A detail pre-participation physical examination is needed to find out these complications. All diabetics should be encouraged to perform suitable exercise and

Ramin Kordi; Ali Rabbani

2007-01-01

459

Salsalate for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

MedlinePLUS

Salsalate for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus The full report is titled “Salicylate (Salsalate) in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes. A Randomized Trial.” It is in the 2 ... Shoelson, for the Targeting In?ammation Using Salsalate in Type 2 Diabetes Study Team. What is the problem and what ...

460

Type 2 diabetes - self-care  

MedlinePLUS

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) disease. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using the insulin it ... can get too high. Over time, people with type 2 diabetes may not have enough insulin. Most people with ...

461

Exploring diabetes type 1-related stigma  

PubMed Central

Background: Empowerment of people with diabetes means integrating diabetes with identity. However, others’ stigmatization can influence it. Although diabetes is so prevalent among Iranians, there is little knowledge about diabetes-related stigma in Iran. The present study explored diabetes-related stigma in people living with type 1 diabetes in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: A conventional content analysis was used with in-depth interview with 26 people with and without diabetes from November 2011 to July 2012. Results: A person with type 1 diabetes was stigmatized as a miserable human (always sick and unable, death reminder, and intolerable burden), rejected marriage candidate (busy spouse, high-risk pregnant), and deprived of a normal life [prisoner of (to must), deprived of pleasure]. Although, young adults with diabetes undergo all aspects of the social diabetes-related stigma; in their opinion they were just deprived of a normal life Conclusion: It seems that in Isfahan, diabetes-related stigma is of great importance. In this way, conducting an appropriate intervention is necessary to improve the empowerment process in people with type 1 diabetes in order to reduce the stigma in the context.

Abdoli, Samereh; Abazari, Parvaneh; Mardanian, Leila

2013-01-01

462

Dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dyslipidemia is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. The characteristic features of diabetic dyslipidemia are a high plasma triglyceride concentration, low HDL cholesterol concentration and increased concentration of small dense LDL-cholesterol particles. The lipid changes associated with diabetes mellitus are attributed to increased free fatty acid flux secondary to insulin resistance. The availability of

Arshag D Mooradian

2009-01-01

463

Atypical Antipsychotic Drug Use and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, there has been increased concern about the occurrence of diabetes associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic (AAP) drugs. The relationship between diabetes, schizophrenia, and antipsychotic drugs is complex and intriguing, as untreated patients with schizophrenia are known to suffer from diabetes more often than the general population. Thirty individual case reports of clozapine-, 26 cases of olanzapine- and

Jambur Ananth; Ravi Venkatesh; Karl Burgoyne; Sarath Gunatilake

2002-01-01

464

Management of necrotizing fasciitis in diabetic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening condition in diabetic patients; its management and salvage of the patient is a formidable challenge. Diabetes mellitus is one of the serious conditions associated with necrotizing fasciitis. It is a disorder that primarily affects the microvascular circulation.We review our experience and present our approach to necrotizing fasciitis in patients with diabetes mellitus. All cases of

Ali Gürlek; Cemal F?rat; Ay?e Ersöz Öztürk; Nezih Alaybeyo?lu; Alpay Fariz; Serkan Aslan

2007-01-01

465

Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

Maalouf, Naim M.

2008-09-01

466

Gestational diabetes screening – OGTT or HAPO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Diabetes Guideline (2008) recommends more screening for gestational diabetes in the UK. With increase in obesity, more women delaying childbirth, thus entering pregnancy with co-morbidities, and more ethnic minorities (CEMACH Report 2006–2008) results is an increase in gestational diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) remains the preferred screening test, but the

C Burrell; Z Kropiwnicka; R Howard; E Casey; L Phillips

2011-01-01

467

Epigenetic phenomena linked to diabetic complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) and the complications associated with this condition are an urgent public health problem, as the incidence of diabetes mellitus is steadily increasing. Environmental factors, such as diet and exposure to hyperglycemia, contribute to the etiology of diabetes mellitus and its associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. These vascular complications are the main cause of

Luciano Pirola; Aneta Balcerczyk; Jun Okabe; Assam El-Osta

2010-01-01

468

Emerging diabetes therapies and technologies.  

PubMed

The prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally and is expected to increase to 439 million people by the year 2030. Several studies have shown that improved glycemic control measured by glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes results in a reduction of both the micro- and macrovascular complications associated with the disease. The recent introduction of new oral medications, insulin analogs (long and rapid acting), insulin pens and pumps, better SMBG meters and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) have all resulted in improvement of glycemic control. Closed-loop devices currently in development aim to integrate the CGM and pump system in order to more closely mimic the human pancreas. The other upcoming new basal insulin (Degludec), prandial insulin, other new technologies and improved oral therapies will significantly improve patient acceptance of intensive therapy, glycemic control and quality of life in patients with diabetes. PMID:22381908

Moser, Emily G; Morris, Audrey A; Garg, Satish K

2012-07-01

469

Mouse models of diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Mice provide an experimental model of unparalleled flexibility for studying mammalian diseases. Inbred strains of mice exhibit substantial differences in their susceptibility to the renal complications of diabetes. Much remains to be established regarding the course of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in mice as well as defining those strains and/or mutants that are most susceptible to renal injury from diabetes. Through the use of the unique genetic reagents available in mice (including knockouts and transgenics), the validation of a mouse model reproducing human DN should significantly facilitate the understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of DN. Establishment of an authentic mouse model of DN will undoubtedly facilitate testing of translational diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in mice before testing in humans. PMID:15563560

Breyer, Matthew D; Böttinger, Erwin; Brosius, Frank C; Coffman, Thomas M; Harris, Raymond C; Heilig, Charles W; Sharma, Kumar

2005-01-01

470

Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy  

PubMed Central

Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy.

Bassi, Roberto; Trevisani, Alessio; Tezza, Sara; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Gatti, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Farina, Antonio; Fiorina, Paolo

2012-01-01

471

Inflammation and thrombosis in diabetes.  

PubMed

Patients with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Atherothrombosis, defined as atherosclerotic lesion disruption with superimposed thrombus formation, is the most common cause of death among these patients. Following plaque rupture, adherence of platelets is followed by local activation of coagulation, the formation of a cross-linked fibrin clot and the development of an occlusive platelet rich fibrin mesh. Patients with diabetes exhibit a thrombotic risk clustering which is composed of hyper-reactive platelets, up regulation of pro-thrombotic markers and suppression of fibrinolysis. These changes are mainly mediated by the presence of insulin resistance and dysglycaemia and an increased inflammatory state which directly affects platelet function, coagulation factors and clot structure. This prothrombotic state is related to increased cardiovascular risk and may account for the reduced response to antithrombotic therapeutic approaches, underpinning the need for adequate antithrombotic therapy in patients with diabetes to reduce their cardiovascular mortality. PMID:21479339

Hess, Katharina; Grant, Peter J

2011-05-01

472

¡Truco Con Agua!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

En esta actividad los aprendices aprenderán un truco de magia donde la magia es la presión del aire. Los participantes tomarán un vaso de agua medio lleno y lo taparán con un pedazo de plástico o cartón. Sosteniendo la tarjeta contra el vaso, lo voltearán boca abajo y cuando quiten la mano debajo del vaso, ¡abracadabra! no se caerá el agua. En la tira cómica, Mateo explica a los aprendices que la presión que hace el aire en todas las direcciones es la que sostiene la tarjeta.

Science, Lawrence H.

2009-01-01

473

[Cost of the diabetic foot].  

PubMed

Among the long term complications of diabetes, leg and foot problems frequently associated with chronic nonhealing wounds constitute a heavy economic cost previously evaluated in some countries. This specific cost has not yet been calculated in France. This study represents the first "estimation" of the frequency and cost of these complications in our country. Methodological obstacles must be considered related to a large variety of clinical situations all covered by the word "diabetic foot", neurotrophic or ischemic origin, and the heterogeneity of the therapeutical approach more or less expensive. We have estimated the incidence of leg and foot problems about 50,000 to 60,000 per years, 20,000 to 25,000 requiring an inpatient treatment for a neurotrophic complication and 10,000 to 15,000 for an ischemic problem (frequently followed by a limited or a large amputation). The annual total cost, direct plus indirect, calculated on this basis should be: 3,750 millions of francs/year (about 700 millions of US $). This value must be compared to the total cost of diabetes in France 12,000 to 18,000 millions of francs/year when considering 1 to 1.5 million diabetic patients. Thus leg and foot problems appear to constitute a prominent part of the economical cost of diabetes in our country as in others developed countries. Multidisciplinary and specialized structures for the care and prevention of such complications of diabetes must be developed as new therapeutical approaches to reduce this incidence, the duration of healing and the risk of relapse. PMID:8206191

Halimi, S; Benhamou, P Y; Charras, H

1993-12-01

474

Rosuvastatin in Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients  

PubMed Central

A randomized, placebo-controlled trial in diabetic patients receiving hemodialysis showed no effect of atorvastatin on a composite cardiovascular endpoint, but analysis of the component cardiac endpoints suggested that atorvastatin may significantly reduce risk. Because the AURORA (A Study to Evaluate the Use of Rosuvastatin in Subjects on Regular Hemodialysis: An Assessment of Survival and Cardiovascular Events) trial included patients with and without diabetes, we conducted a post hoc analysis to determine whether rosuvastatin might reduce the risk of cardiac events in diabetic patients receiving hemodialysis. Among the 731 participants with diabetes, traditional risk factors such as LDL-C, smoking, and BP did not associate with cardiac events (cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction). At baseline, only age and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were independent risk factors for cardiac events. Assignment to rosuvastatin associated with a nonsignificant 16.2% reduction in risk for the AURORA trial's composite primary endpoint of cardiac death, nonfatal MI, or fatal or nonfatal stroke (HR 0.84; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.07). There was no difference in overall stroke, but the rosuvastatin group had more hemorrhagic strokes than the placebo group (12 versus two strokes, respectively; HR, 5.21; 95% CI 1.17 to 23.27). Rosuvastatin treatment significantly reduced the rates of cardiac events by 32% among patients with diabetes (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.90). In conclusion, among hemodialysis patients with diabetes mellitus, rosuvastatin might reduce the risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiac events.

Holme, Ingar; Schmieder, Roland E.; Jardine, Alan G.; Zannad, Faiez; Norby, Gudrun E.; Fellstrom, Bengt C.

2011-01-01

475

Ranibizumab in diabetic macular edema.  

PubMed

By 2050 the prevalence of diabetes will more than triple globally, dramatically increasing the societal and financial burden of this disease worldwide. As a consequence of this growth, it is anticipated that there will be a concurrent rise in the numbers of patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), already among the most common causes of severe vision loss worldwide. Recent available therapies for DME target the secreted cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This review focuses on the treatment of DME using the first humanized monoclonal antibody targeting VEGF that has been Food and Drug Administration-approved for the use in the eye, ranibizumab (Lucentis(®)). PMID:24379922

Krispel, Claudia; Rodrigues, Murilo; Xin, Xiaoban; Sodhi, Akrit

2013-12-15

476

A Boon for the Diabetic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diabetics are no longer concerned with scheduling activities around peaking insulin levels since the use of an external pump from Pacesetter Systems, Inc. used to deliver insulin continuously at a preprogrammed individually adjusted rate. The pump wearer can lead a more normal existence, even participate in sports or travel, and there is an even greater benefit. Research indicates that infusion of "short acting" insulin in tiny amounts over a long period - instead of "long- acting" insulin has helped many diabetics achieve better control of blood sugar levels, thereby minimizing the possibility of complications and, in some cases, even halting the progression of complications.

1987-01-01

477

Cell Biology: Sorting Out Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Early during the development of type 2 diabetes, insulin's ability to stimulate the cellular uptake of glucose from the blood is compromised. Muscle is the main tissue responsible for this absorption, and insulin enhances glucose movement into muscle cells through the GLUT4 transporter at the cell surface. This hallmark action of insulin is conserved in vertebrates, and the molecular machinery by which it occurs is thought to be similar among mammals. On page 1192 of this issue, Vassilopoulos et al. (4) identify a key protein that mediates insulin action in humans, but not in mice, a distinction with potential implications for understanding glucose metabolism and diabetes pathophysiology.

Charisse M. Orme (Yale University School of Medicine;Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Cell Biology); Jonathan S. Bogan (Yale University School of Medicine;Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Cell Biology)

2009-05-29

478

[Diabetes mellitus and cognitive decline].  

PubMed

From large epidemiological studies, it has been demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for cognitive decline: Compared to healthy controls, patients with diabetes perform worse on cognitive tests, they experience a pronounced cognitive decline over time and have a higher incidence of dementia. Mechanisms contributing to cognitive decline include vascular damage, negative consequences of hypo- and hyperglycemia, and various dysfunctions in insulin action, summarized as insulin resistance. Possible targets for prevention and treatment of cognitive decline have attracted scientific attention. PMID:21792530

Iglseder, Bernhard

2011-11-01

479

Effects of Acute Exercise and Chronic Exercise on the Liver Leptin-AMPK-ACC Signaling Pathway in Rats with Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Aim. To investigate the effects of acute and chronic exercise on glucose and lipid metabolism in liver of rats with type 2 diabetes caused by a high fat diet and low dose streptozotocin (STZ). Methods. Animals were classified into control (CON), diabetes (DC), diabetic chronic exercise (DCE), and diabetic acute exercise (DAE) groups. Results. Compared to CON, the leptin levels in serum and liver and ACC phosphorylation were significantly higher in DC, but the levels of liver leptin receptor, AMPK?1/2, AMPK?1, and ACC proteins expression and phosphorylation were significantly lower in DC. In addition, the levels of liver glycogen reduced significantly, and the levels of TG and FFA increased significantly in DC compared to CON. Compared to DC, the levels of liver AMPK?1/2, AMPK?2, AMPK?1, and ACC phosphorylation significantly increased in DCE and DAE. However, significant increase of the level of liver leptin receptor and glycogen as well as significant decrease of the level of TG and FFA were observed only in DEC. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that both acute and chronic exercise indirectly activated the leptin-AMPK-ACC signaling pathway and increased insulin sensitivity in the liver of type 2 diabetic rats. However, only chronic and long-term exercise improved glucose and lipid metabolism of the liver.

Cao, Shicheng; Chang, Bo; Zhao, Dalin; Gao, Haining; Wan, Yihan; Shi, Jiaojiao; Wei, Wei; Guan, Yifu

2013-01-01

480

Type 2 diabetes and diabetes riskfactors in children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long considered a disease of older adults, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is now affecting children. While the prevalence and incidence of type 2 DM are not yet established in children, the number of affected individuals continues to climb. At the same time, obesity, the primary risk factor for type 2 DM, has become epidemic, affecting all ethnic and demographic

Daniel E. Hale

2004-01-01

481

Diabetic Retinopathy: Surrogate Outcomes for Drug Development for Diabetic Retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic retinopathy remains the most frequent cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. A number of large clinical trials have validated treatment methods now considered standard. However, the disease continues to progress in approximately 50% of the eyes treated by photocoagulation. Other forms of therapy targeted at the earliest stages of retinal disease are needed. The

J. G. Cunha-Vaz

2000-01-01

482

The role of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Hypertension in diabetes mellitus has recently come under intense investigation. In type I diabetes its relation to nephropathy appears to be causal. It has been clearly demonstrated that control of hypertension retards progression of diabetic nephropathy and presumably also the occurrence of cardiovascular accidents. The relation between type II diabetes and hypertension is more complex. Hypertension may be present even in the absence of clinically overt nephropathy. This may be related to the recently postulated aetiological roles of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in blood pressure elevation. Recognition and treatment of even minor blood pressure elevation in diabetes is a challenge to the diabetologist and nephrologist alike. PMID:23275999

Ritz, E; Hasslacher, C

1990-01-01

483

Productivity and economic burden associated with diabetes.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This report assessed the cost and burden of diabetes in broad terms of economic status, underlying disability, and barriers to health care--that is, as reflected in employment, income, disability days, general health status, and access to medical care. METHODS: We used the 1990 to 1995 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey in Oklahoma to compare persons with diabetes with age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-matched respondents without diabetes. RESULTS: Persons with diabetes were significantly and substantially worse off on all economic, disability, and access measures. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with nondiabetic persons, diabetic persons have fewer resources to deal with higher levels of disability and poorer health status.

Valdmanis, V; Smith, D W; Page, M R

2001-01-01

484

Diabetic Myonecrosis: Uncommon Complications in Common Diseases  

PubMed Central

We report a case of sudden thigh pain from spontaneous quadriceps necrosis, also known as diabetic myonecrosis, in a 28-year-old patient with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare end-organ complication seen in patients with poor glycemic control and advanced chronic microvascular complications. Proposed mechanisms involve atherosclerotic microvascular occlusion, ischemia-reperfusion related injury, vasculitis with microthrombi formation, and an acquired antiphospholipid syndrome. Diabetic myonecrosis most commonly presents as sudden thigh pain with swelling and should be considered in any patient who has poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.

Sran, Manpreet; Ferguson, Nicole

2014-01-01

485

Gestational diabetes: real risks beyond the controversy.  

PubMed

Gestational diabetes has been a controversial subject in the midwifery community for many years. While the diagnosis and disease can be debated, one statistic remains without controversy: women who meet the diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes after delivery. This article discusses the importance of postpartum follow-up, whether gestational diabetes screening was completed in pregnancy or not, and what a midwife can do to lower her clients' risk of developing type 2 diabetes. PMID:24511847

Ogle, Crystal

2013-01-01

486

Cardiovascular effects of insulin sensitizers in diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetic patients have a greatly increased relative risk of cardiovascular disease compared with patients without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of insulin resistance and impaired pancreatic secretion. Thiazolidinediones are a relatively new class of compounds for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus that lower glucose levels by decreasing insulin resistance and glucose production by the liver. The cardiovascular benefits of thiazolidinediones include an increase in high-density lipoprotein, reduction in blood pressure, improvement in endothelial function, attenuation of markers of inflammation and reduction in albuminuria. Ongoing clinical trials are underway investigating the role of thiazolidinediones in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:17002258

Jawa, Ali; Fonseca, Vivian

2006-09-01

487

Mortality in older people with diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

It is universally acknowledged that diabetes mellitus is a common cause of morbidity in the elderly population but it is less well established that the mortality of people with diabetes is greater at any given age. This comprehensive literature review aims to examine the evidence in order to clarify the relationship between diabetes and mortality risk in elderly diabetic patients. Information was obtained by carrying out a MEDLINE search for relevant papers published in 1980 and onwards; a key paper on mortality in non-insulin-dependent (Type 2) diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was used as an index paper; Diabetes, Diabetologia, Diabetic Medicine, Diabete et Metabolisme, and Diabetes Care were hand searched; and, finally, other experts in the field were contacted. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each of the studies and disagreements were discussed and resolved. The studies in elderly study populations comprised mainly NIDDM. The review demonstrated that diabetes is a significant contributor to mortality and reduced life expectancy in elderly subjects. Demographic trends in our population indicate that diabetes will continue to be a challenging health problem. PMID:9272589

Sinclair, A J; Robert, I E; Croxson, S C

1997-08-01

488

Diabetes resilience: a model of risk and protection in type 1 diabetes.  

PubMed

Declining diabetes management and control are common as children progress through adolescence, yet many youths with diabetes do remarkably well. Risk factors for poor diabetes outcomes are well-researched, but fewer data describe processes that lead to positive outcomes such as engaging in effective diabetes self-management, experiencing high quality of life, and achieving in-range glycemic control. Resilience theory posits that protective processes buffer the impact of risk factors on an individual's development and functioning. We review recent conceptualizations of resilience theory in the context of type 1 diabetes management and control and present