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1

todasuvida: Las personas con diabetes son ms  

E-print Network

diabetes Controlesu todasuvida: Las personas con diabetes son más propensas a padecer de enfermedades del corazón que quienes no tienen diabetes. Boletín 631 D Las personas con diabetes tienen mayor- res relacionados con la diabetes, como derrame cerebral, mala circulación en las piernas y pies e

2

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes 2013 1 Formulario de Registro para Personas con Diabetes Formulario de Registro para Personas con Diabetes 2013  

E-print Network

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes ­ 2013 1 Formulario de Registro para Personas con Diabetes Formulario de Registro para Personas con Diabetes ­ 2013 Si usted NO TIENE diabetes, por favor NO LLENE este sobre diabetes en el Condado de _______________. D. El código postal en mi casa es __ __ __ __ __. E

3

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes 2013 1 Formulario de Conclusin para Personas con Diabetes Formulario de Conclusin para Personas con Diabetes 201  

E-print Network

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes ­ 2013 1 Formulario de Conclusión para Personas con Diabetes Formulario de Conclusión para Personas con Diabetes ­ 201 Si usted NO TIENE diabetes, por favor NO LLENE este últimos cuatro números de mi número telefónico son __ __ __ __. C. Marque todas las clases sobre diabetes

4

con Diabetes Su diabetes s se puede controlar!  

E-print Network

, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture classes are taught by health professionals. Week 1: What is diabetes? Week 2: Eat healthy with diabetes without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A

5

Creencias en salud en preadolescentes con diabetes tipo 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health Beliefs in Type 1 Diabetes Teenagers. The study of health beliefs shows that it is during the adolescent period that takes place the formation of these important repertoires that will determine in part the behaviors related to health along life. The present study explore several health and disease beliefs in a sample of 70 type I diabetic teenagers (8-

Carolina Greco; Jess Gil Roales-Nieto

2007-01-01

6

Trastornos psicolgicos en la adolescencia de pacientes con diabetes Psychological problems in diabetic patients during adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present article, the authors analyze the relationship between diabetes and psychological disorders during adolescence. Although the results of the investigations are not all similar, effective preven- tion, detection and treatment, if necessary, will always help to im- prove the quality of life of individuals with diabetes. In adolescents, it is necessary to pay special attention to problems related

F. J. Hurtado Nez

7

Meal Planning for People with Diabetes, 2nd Edition = Planificacion de Comidas para Personas con Diabetes, 2 Edicion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet provides information about diabetes and meal planning particularly designed for migrant individuals. The first section defines diabetes, explains different types of diabetes, lists results of uncontrolled diabetes, and describes the goals and components of a diabetic meal plan. The second section explains the exchange system of

National Migrant Resource Program, Inc., Austin, TX.

8

Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diabetes, in a variety of forms, affects many Americans and is the 4th leading cause of death by disease in the US. Diabetes is fundamentally a disease in which the body cannot produce or effectively use a critical hormone called insulin. Untreated / unmanaged diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, loss of limbs and stroke.

Dr. Leslie Nader (MSMR)

1993-04-14

9

DIABETES  

PubMed Central

Limited options for clinical management of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus call for a novel therapeutic paradigm. Two innovative studies support endoplasmic reticulum as an emerging target for combating both autoimmune and heritable forms of this disease. PMID:24393784

Urano, Fumihiko

2014-01-01

10

Stay at a Healthy Weight. Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes = Mantente en un Peso Saludable. Consejos Para Muchachos con Diabetes Tipo 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A healthy weight means you are not too fat or too thin. Your doctor may have said that you should not gain more weight or that you need to lose a few pounds. If you have diabetes and are overweight, you are not alone. The steps you take to manage your weight will help you feel better and may improve your blood sugar or glucose (GLOO-kos) levels.

US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

2005-01-01

11

with Diabetes With Diabetes  

E-print Network

with Diabetes Dining A Program For People With Diabetes And Their Families Now is the time to take charge of your diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a common, serious, and costly disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported that diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death

12

Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Diabetes can make it hard to control how much sugar (called glucose) is in your blood. There is ... Warning Signs Diabetes Medicines Learn More about Diabetes Diabetes Tips Talk to your doctor before you change ...

13

USO Y PERCEPCIONES HACIA LAS TECNOLOGAS DE INFORMACIN Y COMUNICACIN EN PACIENTES CON DIABETES, EN UN HOSPITAL PBLICO DEL PER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is a global health problem with a growing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus in the world. Information and communication technologies (ICT) could play an important role in this group of patients. Objective. To report the use and perceptions regarding ICT in patients with diabetes. Material and methods. During August 2008, previously validated surveys were applied to patients with

Walter H. Curioso; Ernesto Gozzer; Mara Valderrama; Juan Rodrguez-Abad; Jaime E. Villena; Arturo E. Villena

14

Diabetes Insipidus  

MedlinePLUS

... Z List of Topics and Titles : Diabetes Insipidus Diabetes Insipidus On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? ... Hope through Research For More Information What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease ...

15

Actualizacin: Problemas en los pies de los pacientes con diabetes (segunda entrega): evaluacin y manejo de las infecciones Feet problems in diabetic patients (second part): evaluation and management of infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foot involvement in diabetic patients is an entity by itself. The spectrum of Its affection range from skin changes in sen- sitivity and trofism to ulcers of different magnitude, necrotic lesions and osteomyelitis, which can lead to amputations and even compromise the patient's life .In a previous issue, general aspects of diabetic foot, and management of non-infect- ed ulcers, in

Adriana Primerano

16

Diabetic Neuropathy  

MedlinePLUS

NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Is there any ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

17

Diabetes UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes UK is the operating name of the British Diabetic Association, the largest organization in the UK working for people with diabetes. The goals of the organization are funding research, advocacy, and helping people live with diabetes. The Diabetes UK Web site helps health consumers find authoritative, reliable information about the condition, the organization, research efforts, and opportunities for getting

Denise Shereff

2010-01-01

18

Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

19

Gestational diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... blood sugar (glucose) levels, you may be prescribed diabetes medicine by mouth or insulin therapy. Most women who develop gestational diabetes will not need diabetes medicines or insulin, but some will.

20

Alaska Diabetes Alaska Diabetes  

E-print Network

The plan was based on the recommendations of Alaskans from village clinics, universities, community health centers, non-profit organizations, elementary, middle, and high schools, state and municipal agencies, faithbased institutions, public health agencies, hospitals, health professional organizations, public and private health insurance agencies, peer review organizations, and Alaskans with diabetes. The Alaska Diabetes Strategic Plan establishes a unified course of action to reduce the burden (i.e., premature mortality, morbidity, and economic costs) of this disease among the 18,700 adult Alaskans already diagnosed with diabetes. The plan also addresses the prevention of diabetes in the general population through education, policy and lifestyle modifications. The rapidly increasing prevalence of this disease in Alaska calls for creative and cost-effective strategies. Implementing these strategies calls for action and cooperation by multiple partners statewide. Putting this plan into action presents a challenging opportunity to influence the health of current and future Alaskans. It is

Barbara Stillwater Rn

2005-01-01

21

Women and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Pregnancy Podcast: Diabetes and Depression American Diabetes Association Women and Diabetes Diabetes is a serious illness that ... your diabetes. This video provides tips to help women with diabetes safely use their diabetes medicines. View ...

22

What should be the antihypertensive drug of choice in diabetic patients and should we avoid drugs that increase glucose levels? Pro and Cons.  

PubMed

It has long been known that antihypertensive drugs may affect blood glucose in a differential manner. In particular new onset diabetes is significantly increased in association with the use of thiazides or beta-blockers, respectively, compared to placebo, whereas treatment with angiotensin-conversion-enzyme-inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor-blockers is associated with a lower than expected frequency, as also assessed in several meta-analyses. In line with these notions, the NAVIGATOR Trial was the first to report a significant preventive effect of an angiotensin-receptor-blocker on new onset diabetes evaluated as a primary outcome in a prospective randomized study. Hence, and in view of the fact that comparable blood pressure lowering with any of the five major classes of antihypertensive drugs, including calcium-channel-blockers, give comparable benefits in reducing cardiovascular complications, unless there are specific indications or contraindications for an individual drug, caution should be exercised, therefore, to use beta-blockers or thiazides as first-line drugs for blood pressure lowering indications in subjects at high risk to develop diabetes, especially in patients with so called metabolic syndrome. The potential of glycemic worsening in overt diabetic patients with thiazides or beta-blockers has less well been studied systematically, yet paradigmatically in UKPDS evaluating a randomized comparison of a beta-blocker with an angiotensin-conversion-enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor. Not only was there HbA1c worsening with beta-blocker use which required additional blood glucose lowering therapy, but also significantly more weight gain which still was detectable at the 20?year follow-up. On the other hand, the overall cardiovascular outcomes were comparable in the two treatment groups irrespective whether therapy was based on the beta blocker atenolol or the ACE-inhibitor captopril. Awareness of these facts and highly individualized therapy seem to be the way forward. PMID:23280868

Standl, Eberhard; Erbach, Michael; Schnell, Oliver

2012-12-01

23

Diabetes Travel Tips Video  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Resources > Diabetes Travel Tips Video Diabetes Travel Tips Video Diabetes doesnt keep David from traveling. But ... Subtitle Diabetes Travel Tips Transcript Diabetes Travel Tips Video (MP4) Keywords: self-management , behavior change , National Diabetes ...

24

Diabetes Complications  

MedlinePLUS

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

25

Diabetes Insipidus  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

26

Carbohydrates and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Manage a Serious Allergic Reaction Quiz: Baseball Injuries Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > Teens > Diabetes Center > Diabetes & Nutrition > Carbohydrates and Diabetes Print A A A Text Size ...

27

Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic  

MedlinePLUS

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus ... be removed and returned to the blood. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) occurs when the kidney tubules do ...

28

Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic nephropathy is a complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) that can be prevented or slowed by medical and nutritional\\u000a interventions. Glycemic control coupled with the management of hypertension and dyslipidemia can alter the progression of\\u000a chronic kidney disease (CKD) in stages 1 through 4. Careful management of carbohydrate (CHO) intake is essential to diabetes\\u000a meal planning, emphasizing how much and

Joni J. Pagenkemper

29

Diabetic Neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polyneuropathy is one of the commonest complications of the diabetes and the commonest form of neuropathy in the developed\\u000a world. Diabetic polyneuropathy encompasses several neuropathic syndromes, the most common of which is distal symmetrical neuropathy,\\u000a the main initiating factor for foot ulceration. The epidemiology of diabetic neuropathy has recently been reviewed in reasonable\\u000a detail (1). Several clinic- (2,3) and populationbased

Solomon Tesfaye

30

Gestational Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Before the availability of insulin in the early 1920s, pregnant women with diabetes faced very high maternal and perinatal\\u000a mortality rates. Pregnancy was therefore not recommended in patients with diabetes. Today, with the advent of insulin, these\\u000a mortality rate increases have been virtually eliminated, so that pregnancy should no longer be discouraged in a young woman\\u000a with diabetes.

Jorge A. Arzac

31

Staying Healthy with Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... help people with diabetes stay healthy? Research studies in the United States and other countries have shown that controlling blood ... Diabetes Issues Rate of Increase Type 2 Diabetes in the United States CDC Study Gestational Diabetes Diabetes in the United ...

32

Diabetes Fact Sheet  

MedlinePLUS

... Alaska Natives Pregnancy What is diabetes? What is pre-diabetes? What are the different types of diabetes? Who ... with birth defects. Return to top What is pre-diabetes? Pre-diabetes means your blood glucose is higher ...

33

Paediatric diabetes.  

PubMed

Diabetes does not spare any section of society, and its prevalence in the paediatric and adolescent age group is rising. This review highlights the etiological and clinical features of childhood diabetes, including secular changes in epidemiology. It discusses the aspects of non pharmacological and pharmacological therapy which are unique to the paediatric age group, and explores current use of novel therapeutic modalities. The article calls for modulation of the psychological environment of the child with diabetes, to help improve his or her quality of life, and sensitizes physicians to take proactive, affirmative action to address the special needs of children with type1 diabetes. PMID:24601207

Kalra, Sanjay

2013-09-01

34

Cardiogenic diabetes.  

PubMed

It has been well established since the Framingham studies that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for heart failure. Several recent reports suggested that the reverse is also true, and heart failure may also predispose to diabetes. We reviewed the literature and summarized the evidence of a higher incidence of new-onset diabetes in heart failure. Because a high rate of insulin resistance in heart failure is a known phenomenon, a higher incidence of diabetes in heart failure is intuitive. Although the facts confirming such connection is surprisingly scarce, we felt it was important to collect, analyze, and summarize the evidence. PMID:24174218

Guglin, Maya; Villafranca, Arnaldo; Morrison, Anthony

2014-09-01

35

Diabetes Education Program INTRODUCTION TO DIABETES  

E-print Network

/feet #12;HOW IS DIABETES CONTROLLED? To "control" diabetes means to keep your blood sugar as close of diabetes. Eating a well balanced diet will improve blood sugar and weight control. Our diabetes educators your blood sugar in a very short amount of time with a simple finger prick. Your doctor or diabetes

Oliver, Douglas L.

36

Immunizations - diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some diseases. When you have diabetes, you need to ... for Disease Control and Prevention. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged ...

37

Diabetic Neuropathy  

MedlinePLUS

... levels damage the blood vessels and nerves. That's why people who don't control (or can't control) their blood sugar very ... neuropathy treated? There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy. Treatment focuses on slowing the development ...

38

Genetics Home Reference: Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... related transient neonatal diabetes mellitus Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy Friedreich ataxia maternally inherited diabetes and deafness permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus Tangier disease thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome type 1 diabetes Wolfram syndrome You may ...

39

Diabetic Heart Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Diabetic Heart Disease? The term "diabetic heart disease" (DHD) refers ... Kidney Diseases' Introduction to Diabetes Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD ...

40

Air Travel and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Page Text Size: A A A Listen Air Travel and Diabetes We continue to advocate for the ... particular concern to people with diabetes. Explore: Air Travel and Diabetes Fact Sheet: Air Travel and Diabetes ...

41

Diabetes and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

42

Types of Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... of developing type 2 diabetes. Treatment includes taking diabetes medicines, making wise food choices, exercising regularly, taking aspirin ... and cholesterol, and use of oral or injected insulin. Gestational Diabetes Some women develop gestational diabetes during the late ...

43

Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Disorders > Diabetic Retinopathy > Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis Diagnosing Diabetic Retinopathy You've come a long ... no better than 50/50. Today, the same diagnosis gives you a 90% chance of saving your ...

44

Diabetes and nerve damage  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy ... care provider if you develop any symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. ... et al. Evidence-based guideline: Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy: report of the American Academy of Neurology, the ...

45

Diabetic nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic renal disease and a major cause of cardiovascular mortality. Diabetic nephropathy has been categorized into stages: microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. The cut-off values of micro- and macroalbuminuria are arbitrary and their values have been questioned. Subjects in the upper-normal range of albuminuria seem to be at high risk of progression to micro- or macroalbuminuria and they also had a higher blood pressure than normoalbuminuric subjects in the lower normoalbuminuria range. Diabetic nephropathy screening is made by measuring albumin in spot urine. If abnormal, it should be confirmed in two out three samples collected in a three to six-months interval. Additionally, it is recommended that glomerular filtration rate be routinely estimated for appropriate screening of nephropathy, because some patients present a decreased glomerular filtration rate when urine albumin values are in the normal range. The two main risk factors for diabetic nephropathy are hyperglycemia and arterial hypertension, but the genetic susceptibility in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is of great importance. Other risk factors are smoking, dyslipidemia, proteinuria, glomerular hyperfiltration and dietary factors. Nephropathy is pathologically characterized in individuals with type 1 diabetes by thickening of glomerular and tubular basal membranes, with progressive mesangial expansion (diffuse or nodular) leading to progressive reduction of glomerular filtration surface. Concurrent interstitial morphological alterations and hyalinization of afferent and efferent glomerular arterioles also occur. Podocytes abnormalities also appear to be involved in the glomerulosclerosis process. In patients with type 2 diabetes, renal lesions are heterogeneous and more complex than in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Treatment of diabetic nephropathy is based on a multiple risk factor approach, and the goal is retarding the development or progression of the disease and to decrease the subject's increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control, treating hypertension (<130/80 mmHg) and dyslipidemia (LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl), using drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, are effective strategies for preventing the development of microalbuminuria, delaying the progression to more advanced stages of nephropathy and reducing cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes. PMID:19825147

Zelmanovitz, Themis; Gerchman, Fernando; Balthazar, Amely PS; Thomazelli, Fulvio CS; Matos, Jorge D; Canani, Luis H

2009-01-01

46

Kidney Disease and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 31,2013 One of the more common long-term complications of diabetes is diabetic renal disease (" ... content was last reviewed on 7/5/2012. Diabetes Home About Diabetes Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

47

Diabetic Neuropathy (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes mellitus Patient information: Diabetic neuropathy (Beyond the Basics) Author Eva L Feldman, MD, ... MD, PhD Find Print Contents of this article DIABETIC NEUROPATHY OVERVIEW DIABETIC NEUROPATHY RISK FACTORS DIABETIC NEUROPATHY SYMPTOMS ...

48

[Diabetics travelling].  

PubMed

As anyone else, diabetic patients are confronted to professional or private travels. This article is meant to gather some practical recommendations to allow patients to travel safely. All travels must be thoroughly prepared and diabetes must stabilised at best before departure. To avoid severe hypoglycaemias and ketosis are the medical objectives. It is therefore essential that patients take with them their injection material and a sufficient carbohydrate back up. The prevention of diarrheas and vomiting, as well as the adaptation of treatment to jet-lag and all kind of physical activity are necessary to have a nice travel. Some specific aspects of travelling by car, boat or plane are discussed. PMID:15962625

Aebi, A; Golay, A

2005-05-11

49

Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience  

E-print Network

Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience Phar 6226/Nurs 5011 Spring the opportunity to learn in-depth knowledge of diabetes mellitus through active, hands-on learning experience of living with diabetes, in which they will give "insulin" injections and check blood glucoses

Thomas, David D.

50

Diabetes Reunion Celebrating Sensibly with Diabetes  

E-print Network

with diabetes may enjoy a small dessert. We also learned that we can reduce the sugar in certain recipes1 Lesson 4: Diabetes Reunion Celebrating Sensibly with Diabetes T oday is our final lesson on Cooking Well with Diabetes. In this lesson, we will focus on four key points, reviewing the concepts

51

Diabetes and Heart Disease  

MedlinePLUS

MENU Return to Web version Diabetes | Diabetes and Heart Disease What does diabetes have to do with heart disease? People who ... the weight you need to. Remember: Diabetes and heart disease are related. Diabetes, being overweight and having high blood pressure are ...

52

Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?  

MedlinePLUS

... Teens > What is Diabetes? Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What is Diabetes? Download This Publication (NDEP-63) Want this item ... life. Last reviewed: 11/01/2012 What is diabetes? Diabetes means that your blood glucose , also called ...

53

Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?  

MedlinePLUS

... life. Q * To learn more about diabetes American Diabetes Association 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383) www.diabetes.org/wizdom Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International 1-800-223-1138 www. ...

54

Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics Research Resources Order About Us Espaol National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse Publications Tools and Resources E-News ... List of Topics and Titles : Diabetes Prevention Program Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) On this page: DPP Study ...

55

Diabetes Health Concerns  

MedlinePLUS

... necessary screening tests. Top of Page How can diabetes affect cardiovascular health? Cardiovascular disease is the leading ... triglyceride, weight, and blood pressure problems related to diabetes? People with type 2 diabetes have high rates ...

56

Introduction to Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics Research Resources Order About Us Espaol National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse Publications Tools and Resources E-News ... Topics and Titles : Introduction to Diabetes Introduction to Diabetes Prediabetes Am I at Risk for Type 2 ...

57

Diabetic Nerve Problems  

MedlinePLUS

... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

58

Help Teens Manage Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Training (CST) as a part of routine diabetes management. Its aim is to improve diabetic teens' coping and communication skills, healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to ...

59

Diabetic Encephalopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes and its treatment are associated with functional and structural disturbances in the brain. Acute disturbances are\\u000a related to acute hypoglycemia or severe hyperglycemia and stroke. These acute metabolic and vascular insults to the brain\\u000a are well known and beyond the scope of this chapter, which will focus on changes in cerebral function and structure that develop\\u000a more insidiously. These

Geert Jan Biessels

60

Diabetes Diagnosis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this inquiry-based lesson, students learn about diabetes mellitus and explore techniques for diagnosing and monitoring the disease. Students must propose a plan for testing two different case study patients, then carry out their plan using artificial samples from each patient. This teaching resource was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiological Societys 1999 Frontiers in Physiology Program. For more information on this program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org.

Ms. Marcy Hotchkiss (Landsdowne High School)

1999-12-01

61

Healthy Eating with Diabetes Video  

MedlinePLUS

... Eating with Diabetes Video Healthy Eating with Diabetes Video Making changes in the way you eat can ... Eating with Diabetes Transcript Healthy Eating with Diabetes Video (MP4) Keywords: self-management , healthy eating , National Diabetes ...

62

Diabetes - Eye Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... diabetes helps prevent and delay these eye diseases. Management of diabetes consists of the following: Controlling the blood sugar level Eating healthy Exercising Keeping good hygiene Learning about ...

63

Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted relative hazard ratios for overall mortality. The proportional subdistribution hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.26 95% CI 1.06-1.48), especially among those who took insulin or had longer duration of diabetes. However, diabetes was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality, regardless of type of treatment and duration of diabetes, despite the significant association of diabetes with unfavorable tumor characteristics. Our large prospective cohort study provides additional evidence that pre-existing diabetes increases risk of total mortality among women with breast cancer. The increased total mortality associated with diabetes was mainly driven by increased risk of dying from diseases other than breast cancer. Thus, the continuum of care for breast cancer patients with diabetes should include careful attention to CVD risk factors and other non-cancer conditions. PMID:25261292

Luo, Juhua; Virnig, Beth; Hendryx, Michael; Wen, Sijin; Chelebowski, Rowan; Chen, Chu; Rohan, Tomas; Tinker, Lesley; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lessin, Lawrence; Margolis, Karen

2014-11-01

64

Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

2010-01-01

65

Oral Diabetes Drugs (Treating Type 2 Diabetes)  

MedlinePLUS

If You Have Type 2 Diabetes When you have diabetes, you have too much glucose, or sugar, in your blood. Th is can cause serious health problems, ... as heart disease, stroke, and blindness. People with diabetes who do not lower their blood sugar usually ...

66

Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 31,2013 The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between ... content was last reviewed on 7/5/2012. Diabetes Home About Diabetes Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

67

Orthopaedics and diabetes.  

PubMed

With about 12% of orthopaedic patients being diabetic and a large proportion of them being obese as well, orthopaedic surgeons are commonly involved in managing diabetic patients in both outpatient and inpatient setting. This review summarizes current concepts in diabetes management including specific orthopaedic issues and future directions of diabetes management. PMID:24350506

Kurup, Harish; Thomas, Manoj

2013-10-01

68

Diabetes in pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is the most common medical condition to complicate pregnancy and includes pregestational type 1 and type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes, defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. Risks for the fetus include malformation, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, neonatal death, macrosomia and intrauterine growth retardation. Risks for the mother include severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, progression of eye or renal

Rosemary Temple

2006-01-01

69

Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Fifteen patients with maturity onset type diabetes, all of whom had received insulin for periods of one to thirty-five years, were admitted to hospital and insulin treatment was discontinued. Within 24 to 48 hours each patient was given an intravenous tolbutamide test, following which all were given either diet therapy alone or diet therapy plus oral agents. If significant hyperglycemia or ketonemia resulted, insulin therapy was reinstituted. Approximately 50 percent (8 of 15) of the patients showed improvement in fasting blood sugar levels following discontinuation of insulin. It was not possible to distinguish the insulin independent from the insulin dependent group using such criteria as age, sex, degree of overweight, insulin dosage, duration of diabetes or duration of insulin therapy. However, using the intravenous tolbutamide test it was possible to differentiate between the two groups. Those who did not require insulin responded to intravenous tolbutamide with a glucose decrease greater than 10 percent from the initial value. The insulin dependent group had either no glucose decrease or a rise in blood glucose following intravenous administration of tolbutamide. PMID:4839480

Mahler, Richard J.

1974-01-01

70

Irradiated lymphocytes do not adoptively transfer diabetes or prevent spontaneous disease in the BB/W rat  

SciTech Connect

Diabetes in the BB/W rat is autoimmune in origin, and lymphocytes from acutely diabetic animals activated by concanavalin A (con A) induce the disease in adoptive recipients. We report that irradiation of these cells prevents adoptive transfer of diabetes. Through 60 days of age, diabetes occurred in none of 47 BB/W rats given irradiated con A cells, but in 21 of 36 (58%) given nonirradiated cells. Between 60 and 130 days of age, however, spontaneous diabetes occurred in 18 of 34 untreated control rats (53%) and 16 of 32 rats (50%) given two injections of irradiated con A activated spleen cells. We conclude that irradiation prevents adoptive transfer of BB/W rat diabetes and that irradiated con A activated lymphocytes from acutely diabetic rats do not protect against spontaneous disease in susceptible recipients.

Mordes, J.P.; Handler, E.S.; Like, A.A.; Nakano, K.; Rossini, A.A.

1986-06-01

71

Diabetes and Cardiac Dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Type 2 diabetes is associated with a marked increase in cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes some of the experimental\\u000a evidence supporting the existence of a diabetic cardiomyopathy, defined as ventricular dysfunction in the absence of coronary\\u000a artery disease, in three rodent models of type 2 diabetes produced by leptin receptor mutations: diabetic db\\/db mice, diabetic ZDF fa\\/fa rats, and corpulent]CK:LA-cp\\/cp

David L. Severson; Ellen Aasum; Darrell D. Belke; Terje S. Larsen; Lisa M. Semeniuk; Yakhin Shimoni

72

[Diabetes and cardiovascular complications].  

PubMed

The prevalence of obesity and diabetes is increasing dramatically. Currently, 800,000 patients are suffering from diabetes mellitus in Austria. Chronic hyperglycemia results in micro- and macrovascular complications, which reduce life expectancy up to 8 years. Furthermore, diabetes is among the most important risk factors for premature atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The incidence of coronary artery disease in diabetics is relatively high with about 146 cases per 10,000 patient years. Apart, it could be demonstrated that the presence of diabetes mellitus worsens the prognosis after an acute coronary syndrome. Considering ischemic stroke, the situation is nearly the same, as it is known that diabetes mellitus increases the risk for ischemic stroke events up to 5 times. Beside the macrovascular complications, microvascular complications like diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy and diabetic neuropathy also play a critical role. Retinopathy can be detected in nearly every patient after a diabetes duration of 20 years. Diabetic nephropathy, which is a major complication of diabetes mellitus, accounts for 19% of end stage renal disease. Microalbuminuria, which is an early marker of diabetic nephropathy, can be found in 30% of the patients after 10 years of diabetes. Due to the severity of the diabetic complications an early intensified antidiabetic treatment is highly important for the prevention of micro- and macrovascular events. PMID:20229155

Resl, Michael; Clodi, Martin

2010-01-01

73

Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... and Type 2 Diabetes Your chance of getting type 2 diabeteswhich used to be called adult-onset diabetes ... steps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by reaching and maintaining a healthy weight, moving ...

74

"Control Your Diabetes. For Life."  

MedlinePLUS

... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo. ...

75

Arizona Diabetes Strategic Plan  

E-print Network

Diabetes is a serious and costly disease in Arizona. The number of people with diabetes in Arizona grows each year. In fact, since 1990 the prevalence of diabetes in Arizona has doubled from 4 percent to 8.5 percent in 2006. We know that type 2 diabetes, which is the most common type of diabetes, can be prevented and that people with diabetes can live healthy and long lives with the proper care. Through education, increasing access to care, and other public health strategies, we have a great opportunity to work with our partners in Arizona to reduce the burden of diabetes on individuals, families, and communities. The Arizona Diabetes Strategic Plan is the first plan in Arizona to address diabetes from a public health perspective for the entire State. It uses public health strategies to address opportunities for improvements in healthcare systems, the diabetes workforce, community partnerships, and local and organizational policies. We have great hope that by working together with partners throughout Arizona that we will be able to reduce the prevalence rate of diabetes and improve the lives of people living with diabetes in Arizona. We are proud to be a part of the Arizona Diabetes Coalition. Sincerely,

unknown authors

76

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?  

MedlinePLUS

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > Kids > Diabetes Center > What's Diabetes? > Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Print ... if they don't get treatment. Continue Type 1 Diabetes The two major types of diabetes are ...

77

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?  

MedlinePLUS

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > Parents > Diabetes Center > Diabetes Basics > Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Print ... number of health problems. Continue What Is Type 1 Diabetes? There are two major types of diabetes: ...

78

Introduction to Type 2 Diabetes (Revised).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: What is Type 2 Diabetes; The Cycle of Type 2 Diabetes; Tupe 1 vs Type 2; Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in American Indians; Diagnosing Diabetes; Diagnostic Criteria for Diabetes Mellitus, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Gestational Diabetes; ...

B. Drabant, K. Acton, B. Tolbert

1996-01-01

79

Indian Health Service Complications Series, Diabetes Curriculum.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: High Blood Pressure and Diabetes; Periodontal Disease and Diabetes; Your Heart and Blood Vessels; Diabetes and Nerve Damage (Neuropathy); Diabetes and Your Kidneys (Nephropathy); Diabetes and Your Eyes (Retinopathy); Diabetes and Sexual Health f...

1997-01-01

80

Improving paediatric diabetes care.  

PubMed

The authors review the management of paediatric patients in diabetic ketoacidosis. Paying particular attention to the pathophysiology of the illness and nursing documentation, they have developed a new diabetic ketoacidosis flow chart to improve nursing care. PMID:10687641

Harrop, M; Thornton, H; Woodhall, C; Ratcliff, J

81

Diabetes and exercise  

MedlinePLUS

... Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ... Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

82

Diabetes: Oral Effects  

MedlinePLUS

... Dry mouth (xerostomia) can increase your risk of tooth decay (cavities). Saliva normally washes away sugars and bits ... not clear whether diabetics have more or less tooth decay than non-diabetics. Brush twice a day and ...

83

I Have Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... information and resources. This effective, yet practical, educational promotional tool is a terrific... How to Help a ... Resources Diabetes Resources for Older Adults - Webpage and Promotional Tools Visit the Diabetes Resources for Older Adults ...

84

Diabetes and Dietary Supplements  

MedlinePLUS

... conditions. More information about eating and diabetes . Physical Activity The NDEP recommends that people with diabetes set ... et al. Effect of chromium supplementation on glucose metabolism and lipids: a systematic review of randomized controlled ...

85

Diabetes and kidney disease  

MedlinePLUS

Kidney disease or kidney damage that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. This condition is ... who have more severe and long-term (chronic) kidney disease may have symptoms such as: Fatigue most of ...

86

Diabetes Type 1  

MedlinePLUS

... blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin ... eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young ...

87

Diabetes - foot ulcers  

MedlinePLUS

... Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Saunders; 2011:chap ... Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

88

Diabetes - keeping active  

MedlinePLUS

... Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ... Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

89

Diabetes - tests and checkups  

MedlinePLUS

... Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ... Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

90

Adrenomedullin and diabetes  

PubMed Central

Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone widely expressed in different tissues, especially in the vasculature. Apart from its vasodilatatory and hypotensive effect, it plays multiple roles in the regulation of hormonal secretion, glucose metabolism and inflammatory response. ADM regulates insulin balance and may participate in the development of diabetes. The plasma level of ADM is increased in people with diabetes, while in healthy individuals the plasma ADM concentration remains low. Plasma ADM levels are further increased in patients with diabetic complications. In type 1 diabetes, plasma ADM level is correlated with renal failure and retinopathy, while in type 2 diabetes its level is linked with a wider range of complications. The elevation of ADM level in diabetes may be due to hyperinsulinemia, oxidative stress and endothelial injury. At the same time, a rise in plasma ADM level can trigger the onset of diabetes. Strategies to reduce ADM level should be explored so as to reduce diabetic complications. PMID:24936257

Wong, Hoi Kin; Tang, Fai; Cheung, Tsang Tommy; Cheung, Bernard Man Yung

2014-01-01

91

Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... diabetes. Low activity level, poor diet, and excess body weight around the waist increase your chance of getting ... prevent type 2 diabetes by keeping a healthy body weight and an active lifestyle.

92

National Diabetes Education Program  

MedlinePLUS

... a healthy life. Health Care Professionals, Businesses & Schools Managing diabetes effectively is complex and requires a team approach. Partners & Community Organizations You can make a difference in diabetes prevention ...

93

Medical Vanguard Diabetes Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medical Vanguard Diabetes Management Project was designed to deploy an Internet based diabetes management system, MyCare Team, into a number of existing diverse clinical environments and evaluate how such a stand-alone clinical information system can ...

S. K. Mun

2006-01-01

94

Diabetes food pyramid (image)  

MedlinePLUS

The Diabetes Food Pyramid divides food into six groups, which vary in size to show relative amounts of servings for each group. ... Pyramid released by the USDA. In the Diabetes Food Pyramid, the groups are based on protein content and ...

95

Diabetes Research Institute Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

... Diabetes Divorce August 2010 issue Eating Disorders Video: Eating Disorders Testing for Ketones I hate diabetes! April 2010 issue Team Parenting Reducing Conflict Kellie's Summer Tips Annual Report Social Media Facebook: Weekly Research Posts Archive Video and Image ...

96

Gene therapy for diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and the World Health Organization expects that the number of diabetic patients\\u000a will increase to 300 million by the year 2025. Intensive glycemic control with insulin therapy to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic\\u000a patients can reduce the risk of diabetic complications, but also increase the incidence of hypoglycemia. Many studies have\\u000a shown

Hirofumi Noguchi

97

Diabetic Wound Care  

MedlinePLUS

What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that occurs in approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes and ... the foot. Of those who develop a foot ulcer, 6 percent will be hospitalized due to infection ...

98

[Obesity and diabetes].  

PubMed

This paper discuses issues of obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. It tries to demonstrate a common cause of both these signs of metabolic syndrome. It notices the relationship of obesity and diabetes and summarises possibilities, successes, and goals in treatment of obesity in diabetics. PMID:15040163

Olsovsk, J

2003-12-01

99

the Student with Diabetes  

E-print Network

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed AGuide for School Personnel Updated Edition 2010 U for Disease Control and Prevention #12;ii www.YourDiabetesInfo.org Supporting Organizations This guide was produced by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a federally sponsored partnership

Rau, Don C.

100

Diabetes Type 2  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

101

The Student with Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since nearly one million students suffer from diabetes, most teachers are likely to have a diabetic child in class at some time. Though most diabetic children are not likely to require an insulin injection during the day, it is necessary that every teacher be aware of the occasional problems which might arise. (JN)

Wentworth, Samuel M.; Hoover, Joan

1981-01-01

102

Diabetes home monitoring project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective is to study the feasibility of remotely monitoring people with diabetes using low-cost technology. Using a personal computer, randomly chosen people with type I diabetes transmit their diabetes related data to their physician at Georgetown University Medical Center on a weekly basis where he analyzes it and contacts the patient every week to make safe adjustments to diet,

A. Alaoui; S. Clement; N. Khanafer; J. Collman; B. Levine; S. K. Mun

1998-01-01

103

Year in Diabetes 2012: The Diabetes Tsunami  

PubMed Central

Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association/European Association of the Study of Diabetes and The Endocrine Society encourage individualized care for each patient with diabetes, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Recent data suggest that restoration of normal glucose metabolism in people with prediabetes may delay progression to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, several large clinical trials have underscored the limitations of current treatment options once T2DM has developed, particularly in obese children with the disease. Prospects for reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes also appear limited, although recent clinical trials indicate that immunotherapy can delay the loss of ?-cell function, suggesting potential benefits if treatment is initiated earlier. Research demonstrating a role for the central nervous system in the development of obesity and T2DM, the identification of a new hormone that simulates some of the benefits of exercise, and the development of new ?-cell imaging techniques may provide novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers of early diabetes detection for optimization of interventions. Today's message is that a diabetes tsunami is imminent, and the only way to minimize the damage is to create an early warning system and improve interventions to protect those in its path. PMID:23185035

Jastreboff, A. M.

2012-01-01

104

Zuni Diabetes Project.  

PubMed Central

Widespread type II diabetes among North American Indians and certain other populations is a relatively recent medical phenomenon. Increased prevalence of diabetes appears to be related to sudden cultural shifts toward sedentary lifestyle and increased caloric intake. These changes, super-imposed on a genetic predisposition to diabetes, pose a community health threat to the Zuni and similar populations. Regular aerobic exercise is clearly beneficial to most type II diabetics. The key public health issue is how to establish community participation in effective aerobic activity. The Zuni Diabetes Project, fully described here, serves as a model in this respect. PMID:3086921

Leonard, B; Leonard, C; Wilson, R

1986-01-01

105

National Diabetes Fact Sheet  

E-print Network

> 18.4% of all people in this age group have diabetes. Age 20 years or older: 15.6 million. 8.2% of all people in this age group have diabetes. Under age 20: 123,000. 0.16% of all people in this age group have diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes by sex in people 20 years or older* Men: 7.5 million. 8.2% of all men have diabetes. Women: 8.1 million. 8.2% of all women have diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes by race/ethnicity in people 20 years or older* Non-Hispanic whites: 11.3 million. 7.8% of all non-Hispanic whites have diabetes. Non-Hispanic blacks: 2.3 million. 10.8% of all non-Hispanic blacks have diabetes. On average, non-Hispanic blacks are 1.7 times as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites of similar age. Mexican Americans: 1.2 million. 10.6% of all Mexican Americans have diabetes. On average, Mexican Am

Department Of Health; Undiagnosed Million People

106

Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes  

E-print Network

Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes Support Group 2014 Our support group is dedicated to adults of all ages (16 years and older) with type 1 diabetes. Each month most our time Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center will also present a short diabetes-related topic to get the discussion

Chapman, Michael S.

107

Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes  

E-print Network

Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes Support Group Our support group is dedicated to adults of all ages (16 years and older) with type 1 diabetes. Each month most our time Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center will also present a short diabetes-related topic to get the discussion

Chapman, Michael S.

108

Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes Support Group  

E-print Network

Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes Support Group Our support group is dedicated to adults of all ages (16 years and older) with type 1 diabetes. Each month most our time will be for sharing and a professional from our diabetes center will present a short diabetes-related topic

Chapman, Michael S.

109

Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with diabetes mellitus have a greater morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease than patients without diabetes. Concomitant hypertension and diabetes are associated with even greater risk of coronary disease, atherosclerotic and peripheral vascular disease, and congestive heart failure. In addition, an independent left ventricular dysfunction (diabetic cardiomyopathy) exists in patients with diabetes that may manifest itself initially as abnormalities

Steven J. Lavine

1999-01-01

110

Diabetes mellitus and cardiac function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Coronary atherosclerosis is enhanced in diabetics, whereas myocardial infarction represents 20% of deaths of diabetic subjects. Furthermore, re-infarction and heart failure are more common in the diabetics. Diabetic cardiomyopathy is characterized by an early diastolic dysfunction and a later systolic one, with intracellular retention of calcium

Mahmoud A. Mahgoub; Anwar S. Abd-Elfattah

1998-01-01

111

Protect Your Heart Against Diabetes  

E-print Network

sugar) to build up in your blood. Diabetes is a serious disease. Why is diabetes dangerous? DiabetesProtect Your Heart Against Diabetes Healthy Hearts, Healthy Homes #12;Read other booklets at www.nhlbi.nih.gov. #12;Protect Your Heart Against Diabetes Delicious Heart Healthy Latino Recipes

Bandettini, Peter A.

112

Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

Li, Donghui

2011-01-01

113

Diabetes Mellitus 1.-Qu es la Diabetes Mellitus?  

E-print Network

Diabetes Mellitus 1.- ¿Qué es la Diabetes Mellitus? La diabetes mellitus es un trastorno metabólico necesaria para desarrollar cualquier tipo de trabajo. La causa de la diabetes es una anomalía en la glucosuria 3.- ¿Cómo se detecta la Diabetes? El estudio de diabetes se realiza mediante la medición de la

Escolano, Francisco

114

Genitourinary infection in diabetes  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is known to increase the risk of infection and the commonest amongst them are the ones involving the genitourinary tract. The infections in a diabetic patient are unique in that they are recurrent, more severe, requiring hospitalization, and also have higher mortality than nondiabetics. Some infections are exclusively found in diabetics like the emphysematous pyelonephritis while others have their natural history complicated due to hyperglycemia. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may lead to albuminuria and urinary tract infection and may need to be treated in diabetics. Not just this certain organisms have a predilection for the genitourinary tract of the diabetic patient. All of the above makes the diabetic patient vulnerable to infections and therefore early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is mandatory. PMID:24251228

Julka, Sandeep

2013-01-01

115

Diabetic retinopathy - An update  

PubMed Central

Management of diabetes should involve both systemic and ocular aspects. Control of hyperglycemia, hypertension and dyslipidemia are of major role in the management of diabetic retinopathy. In the ocular part; laser treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment of diabetic macular edema (focal/grid), severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (panretinal photocoagulation). There is a strong support to combination therapy. Using one or two intravitreal injections such as anti-VEGF and or steroid to reduce central macular thickness followed by focal or grid laser to give a sustained response may offer an alternative to treatment in diabetic macular edema. Anti-VEGF were found to be effective as an adjunct therapy in proliferative diabetic retinopathy patient who is going to have vitrectomy for vitreous hemorrhage with neovascularization, panretinal photocoagulation, and other ocular surgery such as cases with neovascular glaucoma and cataract with refractory macular edema. PMID:23960911

Alghadyan, Abdulrahman A.

2011-01-01

116

Diabetes and depression.  

PubMed

Diabetes and depression occur together approximately twice as frequently as would be predicted by chance alone. Comorbid diabetes and depression are a major clinical challenge as the outcomes of both conditions are worsened by the other. Although the psychological burden of diabetes may contribute to depression, this explanation does not fully explain the relationship between these 2 conditions. Both conditions may be driven by shared underlying biological and behavioral mechanisms, such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, inflammation, sleep disturbance, inactive lifestyle, poor dietary habits, and environmental and cultural risk factors. Depression is frequently missed in people with diabetes despite effective screening tools being available. Both psychological interventions and antidepressants are effective in treating depressive symptoms in people with diabetes but have mixed effects on glycemic control. Clear care pathways involving a multidisciplinary team are needed to obtain optimal medical and psychiatric outcomes for people with comorbid diabetes and depression. PMID:24743941

Holt, Richard I G; de Groot, Mary; Golden, Sherita Hill

2014-06-01

117

Diabetic Retinopathy and VEGF  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading vascular-associated cause of blindness throughout the world. Its treatment requires a multidisciplinary interventional approach at both systemic and local levels. Current management includes laser photocoagulation, intravitreal steroids, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment along with systemic blood sugar control. Anti-VEGF therapies, which are less destructive and safer than laser treatments, are being explored as primary therapy for the management of vision-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy such as diabetic macular edema (DME). This review provides comprehensive information related to VEGF and describes its role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, and in addition, examines the mechanisms of action for different antiangiogenic agents in relation to the management of this disease. Medline (Pubmed) searches were carried out with keywords VEGF, diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes without any year limitation to review relevant manuscripts used for this article. PMID:23459241

Gupta, N; Mansoor, S; Sharma, A; Sapkal, A; Sheth, J; Falatoonzadeh, P; Kuppermann, BD; Kenney, MC

2013-01-01

118

Family Health History and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Health History and Diabetes Family Health History and Diabetes En espaol Family health history is an important ... Four Questions You Should Ask Your Family About Diabetes & Family Health History Knowing your family health history ...

119

Diabetes Control: Why It's Important  

MedlinePLUS

... Works Main Page The Pink Locker Society Diabetes Control: Why It's Important KidsHealth > Kids > Diabetes Center > Medication ... Causes Blood Sugar Levels to Be Out of Control? Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing ...

120

Silymarin and diabetic nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Nephropathy is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus and drug induced toxicity. Nephrotoxicity is mostly related to oxidative stress and nowadays much attention has been made towards the possible kidney protective properties of medicinal plants. Studies revealed, silymarin is useful for diabetic nephropathy. The combination of metformin, silymarin and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers may have additive kidney protective property to prevent or slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

Rafieian-Kopaie, Mahmoud; Nasri, Hamid

2012-01-01

121

Nutritional Management of Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is a cornerstone of treatment for the estimated 20.8 million people with diabetes in the United\\u000a States. MNT is a more intensive and focused comprehensive nutrition therapy service that relies heavily on follow-up and provides\\u000a repeated reinforcement to help change behavior. The long-term goal of medical nutrition therapy in diabetes is to prevent\\u000a and\\/or delay diabetes

Norica Tomuta; Nichola Davis; Carmen Isasi; Vlad Tomuta; Judith Wylie-Rosett

122

The Heart in Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Since the introduction of insulin, heart disease has become a major impediment to survival in persons with diabetes mellitus. Coronary disease has increased severity and accelerated development in diabetic persons compared with an age- and sex-matched nondiabetic population. A peculiar vulnerability of women to the influence of diabetes with loss of premenopausal coronary disease protection has been found. The symptomatology of coronary events may differ and coronary care data show a higher incidence of sudden death in diabetic patients who have a myocardial infarction than in their non-diabetic counterparts. Insulin may play a role in the myocardial adjustment to an ischemic insult by enhancing glucose intake and suppressing lipolysis and ketogenesis. Carbohydrate intolerance in dogs, rhesus monkeys and humans appears associated with similar histologic and compositional changes in the myocardium. Abnormalities in diastolic ventricular function not attributable to large- or small-vessel coronary disease have been found in the diabetic subjects of each species. Studies in humans who have diabetes have assessed single pressure-volume relationships and more exacting measures of ventricular compliance are needed. Abnormalities of myocardial function in patients with diabetes have been found using echo and radionuclide techniques. Many of these findings need to be correlated with invasive data or confirmed in larger populations. Autonomic dysfunction is common in diabetic persons and may imply an associated poor prognosis. Reflex abnormalities in parasympathetic function are most prevalent and occur before sympathetic dysfunction. PMID:6372249

Kereiakes, Dean J.; Naughton, James L.; Brundage, Bruce; Schiller, Nelson B.

1984-01-01

123

Iron and Diabetes Risk  

PubMed Central

Iron overload is a risk factor for diabetes. The link between iron and diabetes was first recognized in pathologic conditionshereditary hemochromatosis and thalassemiabut high levels of dietary iron also impart diabetes risk. Iron plays a direct and causal role in diabetes pathogenesis mediated both by ?-cell failure and insulin resistance. Iron is also a factor in the regulation of metabolism in most tissues involved in fuel homeostasis, with the adipocyte in particular serving an iron-sensing role. The underlying molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are numerous and incompletely understood, but include oxidant stress and modulation of adipokines and intracellular signal transduction pathways. PMID:23473030

Simcox, Judith A.; McClain, Donald A.

2013-01-01

124

Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer  

E-print Network

Abstract: Diabetes and cancer are frequent diseases with important impact on human health all the world. Last epidemiologic studies suggests that patients with diabetes are at significantly higher risk for many forms of cancer. Type 2 diabetes and cancer share many risk factors. Increased insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and reactive oxygen species can rol play in carcinogenesis. The systemic chronical inflammation which can result in a protumorigenic conditions. Hyperinsulinemia increases the risk of cancer in healthy people and it can partly explain obesity-cancer risk. The other point of view very important and difficult issue the medical treatment and dietary of diabetic patients with cancer.

Hatice Yilmaz; Tugba Karadeniz; Muammer Karadeniz

125

Discrimination (Based on Diabetes)  

MedlinePLUS

... ending this discrimination through our legal advocacy program. Commercial Driver's License Information on special rules that apply to commercial drivers with diabetes. The Steve Bieringer Award The ...

126

Globalization of Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the normal-weight metabolically obese phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority. PMID:21617109

2011-01-01

127

[A diabetic visceral neuropathy].  

PubMed

The article concentrates on an issue of a diabetic autonomous neuropathy (DAN) in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). It points out etiopathogenesis of diabetic polyneuropathy. It presents autonomous neuropathy in an overview where it also in more detail discusses this issue in the GIT. It highlights clinical picture and possible diagnostic and therapeutic ways of affecting individual parts of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:15305631

Olsovsk, J

2004-05-01

128

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physiology in Medicine review article. This articles describes how a patient gets diabetes insipidus, the effects of this disease on a patient, and the therapy to control this disease. This article also describes vasopressin, aquaporins, and the Bartter system, and their relationships with diabetes insipidus.

MD Jeff M Sands (Emory Univ Sch Med Dept Med, Renal Div); MD Daniel G. Bichet (University of Montreal Dept of Medicine)

2006-02-13

129

Dyslipidemia and Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major microvascular complications of diabetes. In developed countries, it is the most common cause of preventable blindness in diabetic adults. Dyslipidemia, a major systemic disorder, is one of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of suffering from dyslipidemia concurrently. The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and traditional/nontraditional lipid markers, possible mechanisms involving lipid metabolism and diabetic retinopathy, and the effect of lipid-lowering therapies on diabetic retinopathy. For traditional lipid markers, evidence is available that total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with the presence of hard exudates in patients with DR. The study of nontraditional lipid markers is advancing only in recently years. The severity of DR is inversely associated with apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), whereas ApoB and the ApoB-to-ApoA1 ratio are positively associated with DR. The role of lipid-lowering medication is to work as adjunctive therapy for better control of diabetes-related complications including DR. PMID:24380088

Chang, Yo-Chen; Wu, Wen-Chuan

2013-01-01

130

Diabetes, leukoencephalopathy and rage.  

PubMed

Longstanding diabetes mellitus damages kidney, retina, peripheral nerve and blood vessels, but brain is not usually considered a primary target. We describe direct involvement of the brain, particularly white matter, in long-term (9 months) experimental diabetes of mice, not previously modeled, correlating magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with quantitative histological assessment. Leukoencephalopathy and cerebral atrophy, resembling that encountered in diabetic humans, developed in diabetic mice and was accompanied by time-related development of cognitive changes in behavioural testing. Increased RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products) expression, a mediator of widespread diabetic complications, increased dramatically at sites of white matter damage in regions of myelination. RAGE expression was also elevated within neurons, astrocytes and microglia in grey matter and within oligodendrocytes in white matter. RAGE null diabetic mice had significantly less neurodegenerative changes when compared to wild-type diabetic mice. Our findings identify a robust and novel model of cerebral, particularly white matter, involvement with diabetes associated with abnormal RAGE signaling. PMID:16815028

Toth, Cory; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Tuor, Ursula I; Francis, George; Foniok, Tadeusz; Brussee, Valentine; Kaur, Jaspreet; Yan, Shi Fang; Martinez, Jose A; Barber, Philip A; Buchan, Alastair; Zochodne, Douglas W

2006-08-01

131

Gestational Diabetes and Testing  

MedlinePLUS

... a healthy baby. You can! Journal of Midwifery & Womens Health www.jmwh.org 135 2006 by the American ... E S FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT GESTATIONAL DIABETES National Womens Health Information Center Diabetes http://www.4woman.gov/faq/ ...

132

Stem cells and diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder affecting 25% of the population. Transplantation of isolated islets of Langerhans from donor pancreata could be a cure for diabetes; however, such an approach is limited by the scarcity of the transplantation material and the long-term side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. These problems may be overcome by using a renewable source of cells, such

G Bern; T Len-Quinto; R Enseat-Waser; E Montanya; F Martn; B Soria

2001-01-01

133

Diabetic foot infections.  

PubMed

Diabetic foot infection, defined as soft tissue or bone infection below the malleoli, is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus leading to hospitalization and the most frequent cause of nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Diabetic foot infections are diagnosed clinically based on the presence of at least two classic findings of inflammation or purulence. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial. The most common pathogens are aerobic gram-positive cocci, mainly Staphylococcus species. Osteomyelitis is a serious complication of diabetic foot infection that increases the likelihood of surgical intervention. Treatment is based on the extent and severity of the infection and comorbid conditions. Mild infections are treated with oral antibiotics, wound care, and pressure off-loading in the outpatient setting. Selected patients with moderate infections and all patients with severe infections should be hospitalized, given intravenous antibiotics, and evaluated for possible surgical intervention. Peripheral arterial disease is present in up to 40% of patients with diabetic foot infections, making evaluation of the vascular supply critical. All patients with diabetes should undergo a systematic foot examination at least once a year, and more frequently if risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers exist. Preventive measures include patient education on proper foot care, glycemic and blood pressure control, smoking cessation, use of prescription footwear, intensive care from a podiatrist, and evaluation for surgical interventions as indicated. PMID:23939696

Gemechu, Fassil W; Seemant, Fnu; Curley, Catherine A

2013-08-01

134

Diabetic nephropathy and inflammation  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Besides, diabetic nephropathy is associated with cardiovascular disease, and increases mortality of diabetic patients. Several factors are involved in the pathophysiology of DN, including metabolic and hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. In recent years, new pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease have been elucidated; accumulated data have emphasized the critical role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Expression of cell adhesion molecules, growth factors, chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines are increased in the renal tissues of diabetic patients, and serum and urinary levels of cytokines and cell adhesion molecules, correlated with albuminuria. In this paper we review the role of inflammation in the development of diabetic nephropathy, discussing some of the major inflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, including the role of adipokines, and take part in other mediators of inflammation, as adhesion molecules. PMID:24936261

Duran-Salgado, Montserrat B; Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F

2014-01-01

135

Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate

Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

2009-01-01

136

Race/Ethnic Difference in Diabetes and Diabetic Complications  

PubMed Central

Health disparities in diabetes and its complications and co-morbidities exist globally. A recent Endocrine Society Scientific Statement described the Health Disparities in several endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize that statement and provide novel updates on race/ethnic differences in children and adults with type 1 diabetes, children with type 2 diabetes and in Latino subpopulations. We also review race/ethnic differences in the epidemiology of diabetes, prediabetes, and diabetes complications and mortality in the United States and globally. Finally we discuss biological, behavioral, social, environmental, and health system contributors to diabetes disparities in order to identify areas for future preventive interventions. PMID:24037313

Spanakis, Elias K.; Golden, Sherita Hill

2013-01-01

137

Comorbid Diabetes and COPD  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To identify if there is a dose-dependent risk of diabetes complications in patients treated with corticosteroids who have both diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A retrospective study of administrative claims data from the Australian Government Department of Veterans Affairs, from 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2008, of diabetes patients newly initiated on metformin or sulfonylurea. COPD was identified by dispensings of tiotropium or ipratropium in the 6 months preceding study entry. Total corticosteroid use (inhaled and systemic) in the 12 months after study entry was determined. The outcome was time to hospitalization for a diabetes-related complication. Competing risks and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were conducted with adjustment for a number of covariates. RESULTS A total of 18,226 subjects with diabetes were identified, of which 5.9% had COPD. Of those with COPD, 67.2% were dispensed corticosteroids in the 12 months from study entry. Stratification by dose of corticosteroids demonstrated a 94% increased likelihood of hospitalization for a diabetes complication for those who received a total defined daily dose (DDD) of corticosteroids ?0.83/day (subhazard ratio 1.94 [95% CI 1.143.28], P = 0.014), by comparison with those who did not receive a corticosteroid. Lower doses of corticosteroid (<0.83 DDD/day) were not associated with an increased risk of diabetes-related hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS In patients with diabetes and COPD, an increased risk of diabetes-related hospitalizations was only evident with use of high doses of corticosteroids. This highlights the need for constant revision of corticosteroid dose in those with diabetes and COPD, to ensure that the minimally effective dose is used, together with review of appropriate response to therapy. PMID:23735725

Caughey, Gillian E.; Preiss, Adrian K.; Vitry, Agnes I.; Gilbert, Andrew L.; Roughead, Elizabeth E.

2013-01-01

138

Juvenile diabetes mellitus in Ethiopians.  

PubMed

The clinical features seen in 27 Ethiopian juvenile diabetics, which were similar to those of juvenile diabetics elsewhere, are summarized in this first published report from an African country of childhood diabetes. Control was difficult and admission to hospital frequent because of poverty, uncontrolled diets and irregular supplies of insulin. This group of childhood diabetics represents 9.8% of patients attending a diabetic clinic in Addis Ababa. Survey of the published information on diabetes mellitus in African populations reveals that most series do contain several children and a significant number of teenagers. It is concluded that juvenile diabetes mellitus is not rare in African countries. PMID:395728

Lester, F T

1979-01-01

139

The economics of diabetes prevention.  

PubMed

In the United States, the costs associated with diabetes mellitus are increasing. Although people with diabetes comprise less than 6% of the US population, approximately 1 in 5 health care dollars is spent caring for people with diabetes. Healthy lifestyle interventions for the general population and intensive lifestyle and medication interventions for high-risk individuals present opportunities for diabetes prevention. This article describes the costs associated with glucose intolerance and diabetes, the effect of glucose intolerance and diabetes on the quality of life, and the cost-effectiveness of screening and primary prevention interventions for diabetes prevention. PMID:21281839

Herman, William H

2011-03-01

140

Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is the most common medical complication of pregnancy and it carries a significant risk to the foetus and the mother. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity remain common compared with the offspring of non diabetic pregnancies. Diabetic mothers are at risk of progression of microvascular diabetic complications as well as early pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, polyhydramnios and premature labour. Glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is critical and the benefit may result in a viable, healthy off spring. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) which manifests for the first time during pregnancy is common and on the increase, its proper management will reduce the risk of neonatal macrosomia and hypoglycaemia. Post-partum evaluation of glucose tolerance and appropriate counselling in women with GDM may help decrease the high risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in the longterm. This article will briefly review the changes in the carbohydrate metabolism that characterise normal pregnancy and will focus on a practical approach to the care of patients with pre-existing diabetes as well as GDM. PMID:21526019

Abourawi, Fathi I

2006-01-01

141

[Type 2 diabetes complications].  

PubMed

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

Schlienger, Jean-Louis

2013-05-01

142

[Diabetes and heart].  

PubMed

Diabetics are subjects to a high cardiovascular risk. This concept is now accepted by all and has been demonstrated in clinical practice by the constantly increasing number of diabetic cardiac patients and cardiac diabetics. The many therapeutic trials carried out on the prevention of cardiovascular complications in diabetics have made it possible to define therapeutic goals. HbA1c must be less than 6.5%. Target blood pressure values are 130/80 mmHg or even 125/75 in the case of renal insufficiency. If conventional treatments have proven efficacy against stroke and coronary events, only molecules which modulate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system provide additional nephroprotection in diabetics. However, single-agent therapy is seldom sufficient to achieve glycaemic or blood pressure targets. Diabetic dyslipidemia also requires attentive management, usually by a statin, with a target LDL cholesterol < 1 g/l at the onset of microalbuminuria. All these measures should make it possible to obtain a significant reduction in the cardiovascular risk of diabetic patients. PMID:17378135

Catargi, Bogdan

2006-01-01

143

Diabetes in South Asians.  

PubMed

Economic, dietary and other lifestyle transitions have been occurring rapidly in most South Asian countries, making their populations more vulnerable to developing Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Recent data show an increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in urban areas as well as in semi-urban and rural areas, inclusive of people belonging to middle and low socio-economic strata. Prime determinants for Type 2 diabetes in South Asians include physical inactivity, imbalanced diets, abdominal obesity, excess hepatic fat and, possibly, adverse perinatal and early life nutrition and intra-country migration. It is reported that Type 2 diabetes affects South Asians a decade earlier and some complications, for example nephropathy, are more prevalent and progressive than in other races. Further, prevalence of pre-diabetes is high, and so is conversion to diabetes, while more than 50% of those who are affected remain undiagnosed. Attitudes, cultural differences and religious and social beliefs pose barriers in effective prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes in South Asians. Inadequate resources, insufficient healthcare budgets, lack of medical reimbursement and socio-economic factors contribute to the cost of diabetes management. The challenge is to develop new translational strategies, which are pragmatic, cost-effective and scalable and can be adopted by the South Asian countries with limited resources. The key areas that need focus are: generation of awareness, prioritizing health care for vulnerable subgroups (children, women, pregnant women and the underprivileged), screening of high-risk groups, maximum coverage of the population with essential medicines, and strengthening primary care. An effective national diabetes control programme in each South Asian country should be formulated, with these issues in mind. PMID:24975549

Misra, A; Ramchandran, A; Jayawardena, R; Shrivastava, U; Snehalatha, C

2014-10-01

144

Gestational diabetes: diagnosis and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose:To review the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes.Epidemiology:In the United States, approximately 2 to 5% of all pregnant women have gestational diabetes. Those women with a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, Asian or native American race, Latina ethnicity or obesity are at higher risk for developing gestational diabetes.Conclusion:Women with gestational diabetes who are treated appropriately can achieve

Y W Cheng; A B Caughey

2008-01-01

145

Predictive factors of diabetic complications: a possible link between family history of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was assessment of predictive factors of diabetic retinopathy. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed by recruiting 1228 type 2 diabetic patients from a diabetes referral clinic over a six-month period (from July to December, 2012). Diabetes risk factors, complications, laboratory results have been recorded. Results Of the 1228 diabetic patients (54% women, mean age 58.48??9.94years), prevalence of diabetes retinopathy was 26.6%. There were significant associations between retinopathy and family history of diabetes (p = 0.04), hypertension (p?=?0.0001), diabetic duration (p?=?0.0001), poor glycemic control (p?=?0.0001) and age of onset of diabetes (p?=?0.0001). However, no significant associations were found between retinopathy with dyslipidemia and obesity. In logistic regression model, poor glycemic control (p = 0.014), hypertension (p?=?0.0001), duration of diabetes (p?=?0.0001) and family history of diabetes (p = 0.012) independently predicted retinopathy after adjustment for age and sex. Conclusions Diabetic complications are resulting from an interaction from genes and environmental factors. A family history of diabetes is pointing toward a possible genetic and epigenetic basis for diabetic retinopathy. Our findings suggest the role of epigenetic modifications and metabolic memory in diabetic retinopathy in subjects with family history of diabetes. PMID:24860795

2014-01-01

146

Uroradiology of diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is a prevalent disorder, well controlled in many persons with prolongation of life. Several radiologic manifestations are sufficiently specific to suggest a diagnosis in the unidentified patient, but even more important is an awareness of the sometimes life-threatening complications of diabetes which can be diagnosed from uroradiologic studies. We review the following urinary tract manifestations and complications of diabetes: pyelonephritis, perinephric abscess, renal papillary necrosis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungus infections, calcification of the vas deferens, seminal vesicle, and intrarenal branches of the renal artery, neuropathic bladder, and renal failure. PMID:973301

Ellenbogen, P H; Talner, L B

1976-10-01

147

Advances in diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of long-term diabetes mellitus (DM). Over the last 2 decades lot of work has been on early diagnosis of DR and screening programs have been designed to help the masses. Large numbers of clinical studies have been done for patients of diabetes and DR wherein the role of blood sugar control, metabolic control, role of oral medicines for DR, role of imaging, fluorescein angiography, and retinal photocoagulation has been studied. Newer treatment modalities are being devised and studied for better patient care. We discuss these issues in our review highlight and newer advances over the last few years. PMID:25364670

Agarwal, Prakashchand; Jindal, Ankita; Saini, V K; Jindal, Sushil

2014-11-01

148

If I Had - Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... In the Spotlight If I Had... Universities and Hospitals By Disease or Symptom View QuickTime Video Talk ... with Dr. James Meigs, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital) If I Had - Diabetes - Dr. David M. Nathan, ...

149

Diabetic Eye Problems  

MedlinePLUS

... too high. Over time, this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It ... light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly. ...

150

Diabetes Interactive Atlas  

PubMed Central

The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is a recently released Web-based collection of maps that allows users to view geographic patterns and examine trends in diabetes and its risk factors over time across the United States and within states. The atlas provides maps, tables, graphs, and motion charts that depict national, state, and county data. Large amounts of data can be viewed in various ways simultaneously. In this article, we describe the design and technical issues for developing the atlas and provide an overview of the atlas maps and graphs. The Diabetes Interactive Atlas improves visualization of geographic patterns, highlights observation of trends, and demonstrates the concomitant geographic and temporal growth of diabetes and obesity. PMID:24503340

Burrows, Nilka R.; Geiss, Linda S.

2014-01-01

151

Causes of Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... of the herbicide Agent Orange, used during the Vietnam Warmay be linked to the development of ... diabetes to the list of conditions for which Vietnam veterans are eligible for disability compensation. Also, a ...

152

Diabetes in African Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Moving towards prevention of Type 2 Diabetes This music CD helps African Americans incorporate more physical activity ... move more. Three songs from the popular Movimiento music CD also are included. This CD also contains ...

153

Diabetes Movie (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Are Reading Getting Kids Ready for School Backpack Safety Ebola: What to Know Vaccines Your Child ... Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering it to the trillions of cells ...

154

Personalized diabetes management  

E-print Network

In this thesis, we present a system to make personalized lifestyle and health decisions for diabetes management, as well as for general health and diet management. In particular, we address the following components of the ...

O'Hair, Allison Kelly

2013-01-01

155

Diabetes Interactive Atlas  

MedlinePLUS

... leisure-time physical inactivity at national, state, and county levels. County-Level Data Estimates of Diabetes and its Risk Factors Maps & Motion Charts All States County Rankings Is Your County Above or Below Average? ...

156

Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis  

MedlinePLUS

... be unusually tired. Checking for High Blood Sugar Levels As part of the diabetes management plan, you'll need to check your child's blood sugar levels daily with a blood glucose meter . Doing so ...

157

Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker. PMID:15689635

2005-01-01

158

Diabetes - retinal conditions  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes may affect the retina by causing the formation of whitish patches called exudates. Other indications may include tiny enlargements of the blood vessels resulting in microaneurysms and hemorrhages.

159

Medicines for Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... a kid also eats healthy and exercises regularly. Glucagon Insulin and other diabetes medicines help to keep ... has really low blood sugar might need a glucagon shot. Glucagon (say: GLOO-kuh-gon) is a ...

160

Diabetes and Diet  

MedlinePLUS

... Intolerances Autism Cancer Celiac Disease Diabetes Digestive Health Eating Disorders Fertility and Reproductive Health Heart and Cardiovascular HIV/ ... range of topics including careers in dietetics, healthy eating, the Academy ... benefits, media interviewing skills and the professional role of the ...

161

Pre-Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... good" cholesterol) High triglycerides High blood pressure A history of gestational diabetes Being African-American, American Indian, Asian-American, Pacific Islander or Hispanic American/Latino If ...

162

Diabetes Interactive Atlas.  

PubMed

The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is a recently released Web-based collection of maps that allows users to view geographic patterns and examine trends in diabetes and its risk factors over time across the United States and within states. The atlas provides maps, tables, graphs, and motion charts that depict national, state, and county data. Large amounts of data can be viewed in various ways simultaneously. In this article, we describe the design and technical issues for developing the atlas and provide an overview of the atlas' maps and graphs. The Diabetes Interactive Atlas improves visualization of geographic patterns, highlights observation of trends, and demonstrates the concomitant geographic and temporal growth of diabetes and obesity. PMID:24503340

Kirtland, Karen A; Burrows, Nilka R; Geiss, Linda S

2014-01-01

163

Diabetes: Dental Tips  

MedlinePLUS

... Periodontal disease may also make it hard to control your blood glucose (blood sugar). Other problems diabetes can cause are dry mouth and a fungal infection called thrush. Dry mouth happens when you ...

164

[Diabetes mellitus and autoimmune neuropathy].  

PubMed

The term "diabetic neuropathy" refers to many varieties of neuropathies, including diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs). DPNs are categorized into generalized and focal/multifocal varieties. Diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) and diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) are typical DPNs, and their development is clearly linked to hyperglycemia and subsequent metabolic and ischemic change. On the other hand, other forms of neuropathy, including multifocal diabetic neuropathies (e.g., lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical radiculoplexus neuropathies) are thought to be associated with inflammatory or immune processes. Diabetic patients can also develop chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). CIDP in diabetic patients (DM-CIDP) should be ruled out, especially in patients with advanced DSPN. Recently, it was reported that diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathies as well as CIDP respond favorably to immunotherapy. Thus, these immune-mediated diabetic neuropathies are treatable, and should be differentiated from advanced DSPN. PMID:24523312

Deguchi, Takahisa; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Takashima, Hiroshi

2014-02-01

165

Diabetes update: population management.  

PubMed

To optimally care for diabetes patients, physicians must adopt a systematic approach to managing the entire panel. At the heart of excellent care is a multidisciplinary health care team working in a patient-centered environment. Options to supplement traditional office visits include shared medical appointments (ie, group visits), patient self-management education, and social media for patient support and education. Educating patients about diabetes is associated with more frequent recommended screening, improved objective measures, cost savings, and improved short-term quality of life, especially when behavioral goal setting is incorporated. Participation in a nurse-led diabetes management program or an outreach program is associated with reduced health care costs and increased receipt of recommended screening and testing for patients with diabetes; implementation of an electronic database or registry system also is associated with these benefits. Some studies show that these interventions are associated with improvements in A1c; however, outcomes data are limited. Formats for group visits vary. Evidence suggests that patients with diabetes who participate in a group education program have lower A1c levels, improved lipid profiles, higher quality of life scores, and improved knowledge about diabetes and problem-solving ability. PMID:23690376

Erlich, Deborah R; Slawson, David C; Shaughnessy, Allen

2013-05-01

166

Neuropeptides and diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops in 75% of patients with type 1 and 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, progressing to legal blindness in about 5%. In the recent years, considerable efforts have been put into finding treatments for this condition. It has been discovered that peptidergic mechanisms (neuropeptides and their analogues, activating a diverse array of signal transduction pathways through their multiple receptors) are potentially important for consideration in drug development strategies. A considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last three decades on human retinal neuropeptides and those elements in the pathomechanisms of diabetic retinopathy which might be related to peptidergic signal transduction. Here, human retinal neuropeptides and their receptors are reviewed, along with the theories relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy both in humans and in experimental models. By collating this information, the curative potential of certain neupeptides and their analogues/antagonists can also be discussed, along with the existing clinical treatments of diabetic retinopathy. The most promising peptidergic pathways for which treatment strategies may be developed at present are stimulation of the somatostatin-related pathway and the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide-related pathway or inhibition of angiotensinergic mechanisms. These approaches may result in the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production and neuronal apoptosis; therefore, both the optical quality of the image and the processing capability of the neural circuit in the retina may be saved. PMID:23043302

Gbriel, Robert

2013-01-01

167

Bone Quality in Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is associated with increased risk of fracture, although type 2 diabetes is characterized by normal bone mineral density (BMD). The fracture risk of type 1 diabetes increases beyond an explained by a decrease of BMD. Thus, diabetes may be associated with a reduction of bone strength that is not reflected in the measurement of BMD. Based on the present definition, both bone density and quality, which encompass the structural and material properties of bone, are important factors in the determination of bone strength. Diabetes reduces bone quality rather than BMD. Collagen cross-linking plays an important role in bone strength. Collagen cross-links can be divided into lysyl hydroxylase and lysyl oxidase-mediated enzymatic immature divalent cross-links, mature trivalent cross-links, and glycation- or oxidation-induced non-enzymatic cross-links (Advanced Glycation End-products: AGEs) such as pentosidine. These types of cross-links differ in the mechanism of formation and in function. Not only hyperglycemia, but also oxidative stress induces the reduction in enzymatic beneficial cross-links and the accumulation of disadvantageous AGEs in bone. In this review, we describe the mechanism of low bone quality in diabetes. PMID:23785354

Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

2013-01-01

168

Osteoporosis, Fractures, and Diabetes  

PubMed Central

It is well established that osteoporosis and diabetes are prevalent diseases with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of bone fractures. In type 1 diabetes, the risk is increased by ?6 times and is due to low bone mass. Despite increased bone mineral density (BMD), in patients with type 2 diabetes the risk is increased (which is about twice the risk in the general population) due to the inferior quality of bone. Bone fragility in type 2 diabetes, which is not reflected by bone mineral density, depends on bone quality deterioration rather than bone mass reduction. Thus, surrogate markers and examination methods are needed to replace the insensitivity of BMD in assessing fracture risks of T2DM patients. One of these methods can be trabecular bone score. The aim of the paper is to present the present state of scientific knowledge about the osteoporosis risk in diabetic patient. The review also discusses the possibility of problematic using the study conclusions in real clinical practice. PMID:25050121

2014-01-01

169

JAMA Patient Page: Diabetic Foot Ulcers  

MedlinePLUS

... American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE Diabetic Foot Ulcers D iabetic foot ulcers are sores or wounds on the feet that ... preventing diabetic foot ulcers. WHAT CAUSES DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS? FOR MORE INFORMATION National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse 1- ...

170

Take Charge of Your Diabetes (Nerve Damage)  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 Diabetes in the United States CDC Study Gestational Diabetes Diabetes in the United States Heart Disease and ... Must Not Be Shared Lifetime Risk for Diabetes Mellitus in the United States Screening for Type 2 ...

171

Effects of Diabetes on a Male  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 Diabetes in the United States CDC Study Gestational Diabetes Diabetes in the United States Heart Disease and ... Must Not Be Shared Lifetime Risk for Diabetes Mellitus in the United States Screening for Type 2 ...

172

Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... your body is starved of energy. What is pre-diabetes? Pre-diabetes means the amount of glucose in your blood is higher than normal. If you have pre-diabetes, you are at risk for type 2 diabetes ...

173

Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... 57 million adults aged 20 and older have pre-diabetes. This is a condition where blood glucose (sugar) ... but not high enough to be called diabetes. Pre-diabetes puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes ...

174

Determinants of diabetes knowledge in a cohort of Nigerian diabetics  

PubMed Central

Background One of the consequences of the generational paradigm shift of lifestyle from the traditional African model to a more "western" standard is a replacement of communicable diseases by non-communicable or life style related diseases like diabetes. To address this trend, diabetes education along with continuous assessment of diabetes related knowledge has been advocated. Since most of the Nigerian studies assessing knowledge of diabetes were hospital-based, we decided to evaluate the diabetes related knowledge and its sociodemographic determinants in a general population of diabetics. Methods Diabetics (n?=?184) attending the 2012 world diabetes day celebration in a Nigerian community were surveyed using a two part questionnaire. Section A elicited information on their demographics characteristics and participation in update courses, and exercise, while section B assessed knowledge of diabetes using the 14 item Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Centre's Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results We found that Nigerian diabetics had poor knowledge of diabetes, with pervasive fallacies. Majority did not have knowledge of "diabetes diet", "fatty food", "free food", effect of unsweetened fruit juice on blood glucose, treatment of hypoglycaemia, and the average duration glycosylated haemoglobin (haemoglobin A1) test measures blood glucose. Attaining tertiary education, falling under the 51-60years age group, frequent attendance at seminars/updates and satisfaction with education received, being employed by or formerly working for the government, and claiming an intermediate, or wealthy income status was associated with better knowledge of diabetes. Conclusion Nigerian diabetics' knowledge of diabetes was poor and related to age, level of education, satisfaction with education received, employment status and household wealth. PMID:24593904

2014-01-01

175

Effects of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes on Adolescents' Family Relationships, Treatment Adherence, and Metabolic Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Behavioral family systems therapy (BFST) for adolescents with diabetes has improved family relationships and communication, but effects on adherence and metabolic con- trol were weak. We evaluated a revised intervention, BFST for diabetes (BFST-D). Methods One hundred and four families were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 12 sessions of either an educational support group (ES) or a

Tim Wysocki; Michael A. Harris; Lisa M. Buckloh; Deborah Mertlich; Amanda Sobel Lochrie; Alexandra Taylor; Michelle Sadler; Nelly Mauras; Neil H. White

2006-01-01

176

Losartan in diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy has become the single most important cause of end-stage renal disease in the USA, Europe and Japan. The earliest marker of incipient diabetic nephropathy is the transition of normoalbuminuria to microalbuminuria at an albumin excretion rate of 20 microg/min. Human studies in patients both with and without diabetic kidney diseases have shown that the severity of baseline proteinuria is an important predictor of the rate of loss of renal function. Moreover, the reduction in protein excretion rate when patients with nephropathies are being treated with antihypertensive agents predicts the efficacy of subsequent renoprotection. Experimental and clinical observations provide the rationale for targeting the renin-angiotensin system as a renoprotective approach in diabetic and nondiabetic proteinuric nephropathies. Losartan (Cozaar, Merck Sharpe and Dohme) is a potent, orally active and highly specific angiotensin-type 1 receptor blocker. In addition to its antihypertensive efficacy, losartan decreases the left ventricular mass index in patients with hypertension, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume in subjects with heart failure and prevents cardiovascular morbidity and death, predominantly stroke, independent of blood pressure reduction. Short-term studies in Type 1 diabetic patients with overt nephropathy have demonstrated that losartan and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have similar beneficial effects on albumin excretion rate, blood pressure and renal hemodynamics. Losartan also lowered albumin excretion rate in microalbuminuric patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the large multicenter Reduction of End points in Noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan (RENAAL) trial has shown that blockade of angiotensin-type 1 receptor with losartan is superior to conventional antihypertensive therapy in slowing the progression of overt Type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Together, data from clinical trials demonstrate the beneficial effect of angiotensin-type 1 receptor blockers, including losartan, in the primary and secondary prevention of renal disease progression in diabetic patients. Nevertheless, it can be expected that the positive results achieved so far with this class of drugs may be further implemented by including angiotensin-type 1 receptor antagonists as a part of the multidrug approach that may hold more promise for the future of renoprotection in diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. PMID:15225108

Perico, Norberto; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

2004-07-01

177

Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes!  

E-print Network

¡Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes! ¡Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mí Diabetes! (Si, Yo Puedo/Latinos with diabetes. The curriculum is predicated on the American Diabetes Association's national standards of care and lifestyle skills to better control their diabetes. Relevance · Diabetes costs Texas more than 12 billion

178

Exercise and diabetes.  

PubMed

Diet and exercise form the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. These are especially important for people living with diabetes mellitus, as they are the most practical non-pharmacological means by which patients may significantly improve their blood glucose levels. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity (both short and long term), lowers blood sugar levels, reduces body fat and improves cardiovascular (CV) function. Because of this, exercise offers enormous benefit to patients with diabetes. Blood glucose levels can significantly drop during and after physical activities, due to the increased utilisation of glucose as a fuel during exercise and the up-regulation of glucose transport into working muscles. Therefore, patients (especially those with type 1 diabetes) must account for the effects of exercise and adjust their medications and nutrition accordingly. Improvements in real-time continuous glucose monitoring and optimisation of basal insulin dosing may offer significant benefit to preventing hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes who regularly exercise. Diverse exercise programmes and devices can also assist patients in monitoring their activities as well as motivating them to achieve their exercise goals. For patients with type 1 diabetes, questions such as how much, how long, how strenuous and what kind of exercise must be addressed in order for healthcare professionals to offer maximum benefit to their patients. Additionally, since patients with type 2 diabetes often have other significant co-morbidities such as obesity and CV disease, care providers must evaluate each patient's risk factors before designing an exercise programme. Several publications in the last year have addressed these issues and may serve as a valuable resource to provide safe and effective recommendations to patients and their healthcare providers. To be included in the Exercise and Diabetes chapter for the 2010 YEARBOOK, we reviewed leading peer-reviewed manuscripts that were published in the period July 2009 to June 2010. PubMed was used in the initial screening of articles. PMID:21323815

Zisser, H; Gong, P; Kelley, C M; Seidman, J S; Riddell, M C

2011-02-01

179

Las personas con diabetes deben lograr un balance entre los  

E-print Network

en un lado del plato y los alimentos bajos en carbohidratos al otro lado. Karen Halderson, MPH, RD bajos en carbohidratos, manteniendo cada uno en su propio lado del plato o de la mesa. Comer vegetales en diferentes lados de su plato y ver si su plato está "balanceado". Sin embargo, muchas veces

180

Diabetic ketoacidosis during gestational diabetes. A case report.  

PubMed

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an infrequent complication of gestational diabetes but results in fetal loss. It usually occurs in the later stages of pregnancy. We report two young pregnant women who were admitted because of newly diagnosed diabetes with ketoacidosis. One patient presented with intrauterine fetal demise. PMID:21632139

Pinto, Miguel E; Villena, Jaime E

2011-08-01

181

What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Diabetes What I need to know about Gestational Diabetes On this page: What is gestational diabetes? What ... Guide For More Information Acknowledgments What is gestational diabetes? Gestational * diabetes is a type of diabetes that ...

182

Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that ... as liver failure or liver cancer. How is hepatitis B spread? The hepatitis B virus is usually ...

183

[Skin disorders in diabetes mellitus].  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases in the Western industrialized countries with about 300 million affected patients worldwide. The hyperglycemic state of diabetes mellitus leads to changes in practically every cell type and organ of the human body. Skin changes are considered the most common manifestations of diabetes mellitus. As skin changes can manifest before onset of diabetes mellitus they may have a diagnostic relevance. Other changes and diseases of the skin develop during the course of diabetes mellitus and may be associated with complications in internal organs or may occur as an adverse effect of antidiabetic therapy. In particular the presence of the diabetic foot syndrome is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality of diabetes patients as well as with markedly elevated direct and indirect costs for the health care system. In this article the most common skin diseases of patients with diabetes mellitus as well as their pathophysiology and current treatment are reviewed. PMID:25262886

Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Bhm, Markus

2014-10-01

184

What is Diabetic Eye Disease?  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... United States, there are 14 million people with diabetes and while most will not lose their vision ... good deal higher among people with Type I diabetes -- the type that usually begins in childhood and ...

185

Reducing Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy  

MedlinePLUS

... In 2007, 1.5 million people in the United States were diagnosed with the disease, bringing the total to 24 million Americans living with diabetes. Risk Factors Every person who has diabetes, whether it's ...

186

Diabetes Treatments and Moral Hazard  

E-print Network

blood sugar levels and levels denoting Type 2 diabetes isType 2 diabetes diagnosis. With IFG, the fasting blood sugardiabetes incidence. 10 Improving access to devices that monitor an individuals blood sugar

Klick, Jonathan

2005-01-01

187

Diabetes, Vision Loss, and You  

MedlinePLUS

... number of important vision rehabilitation principles - organization, contrast, lighting and glare control - to help perform many diabetes- ... desk lamp for your diabetes tasks area. Overhead lighting is usually not sufficient. Position your lamp so ...

188

Living with Diabetic Heart Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

189

Fenugreek Prevents the Development of STZ-Induced Diabetic Nephropathy in a Rat Model of Diabetes  

PubMed Central

The present study aims to examine the protective effect of fenugreek and the underlying mechanism against the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. A rat model of diabetes was successfully established by direct injection of STZ and then the rats were administered an interventional treatment of fenugreek. Parameters of renal function, including blood glucose, albuminuria, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), dimethyl formamide (DMF), blood urine nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and kidney index (KI), were detected in the three groups (Con, DN, and DF). Oxidative stress was determined by the activity of antioxidase. Extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and other morphological alterations were evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and electron microscope. Quantitive (q)PCR was employed to detect the mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and protein expression was determined with western blot analysis. DN rats in the present study demonstrated a significant renal dysfunction, ECM accumulation, pathological alteration, and oxidative stress, while the symptoms were evidently reduced by fenugreek treatment. Furthermore, the upregulation of TGF-?1 and CTGF at a transcriptional and translational level in DN rats was distinctly inhibited by fenugreek. Consequently, fenugreek prevents DN development in a STZ-induced diabetic rat model. PMID:25057273

Jin, Yingli; Shi, Yan; Zou, Yinggang; Miao, Chunsheng; Sun, Bo; Li, Cai

2014-01-01

190

Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes.  

PubMed

Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes include gastroparesis, intestinal enteropathy (which can cause diarrhea, constipation, and fecal incontinence), and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with gastroparesis may present with early satiety, nausea, vomiting, bloating, postprandial fullness, or upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis of diabetic gastroparesis is made when other causes are excluded and postprandial gastric stasis is confirmed by gastric emptying scintigraphy. Whenever possible, patients should discontinue medications that exacerbate gastric dysmotility; control blood glucose levels; increase the liquid content of their diet; eat smaller meals more often; discontinue the use of tobacco products; and reduce the intake of insoluble dietary fiber, foods high in fat, and alcohol. Prokinetic agents (e.g., metoclopramide, erythromycin) may be helpful in controlling symptoms of gastroparesis. Treatment of diabetes-related constipation and diarrhea is aimed at supportive measures and symptom control. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is common in persons who are obese and who have diabetes. In persons with diabetes who have elevated hepatic transaminase levels, it is important to search for other causes of liver disease, including hepatitis and hemochromatosis. Gradual weight loss, control of blood glucose levels, and use of medications (e.g., pioglitazone, metformin) may normalize hepatic transaminase levels, but the clinical benefit of aggressively treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is unknown. Controlling blood glucose levels is important for managing most gastrointestinal complications. PMID:18619079

Shakil, Amer; Church, Robert J; Rao, Shobha S

2008-06-15

191

Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetes is now regarded as an epidemic, with the population of patients expected to rise to 380 million by 2025. Tragically, this will lead to approximately 4 million people around the world losing their sight from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in patients aged 20 to 74 years. The risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is closely associated with the type and duration of diabetes, blood glucose, blood pressure, and possibly lipids. Although landmark cross-sectional studies have confirmed the strong relationship between chronic hyperglycaemia and the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, the underlying mechanism of how hyperglycaemia causes retinal microvascular damage remains unclear. Continued research worldwide has focussed on understanding the pathogenic mechanisms with the ultimate goal to prevent DR. The aim of this paper is to introduce the multiple interconnecting biochemical pathways that have been proposed and tested as key contributors in the development of DR, namely, increased polyol pathway, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), haemodynamic changes, accelerated formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), oxidative stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and subclinical inflammation and capillary occlusion. New pharmacological therapies based on some of these underlying pathogenic mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:24563789

Tarr, Joanna M.; Kaul, Kirti; Chopra, Mohit; Kohner, Eva M.; Chibber, Rakesh

2013-01-01

192

Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Bench to Bedside  

PubMed Central

The study of diabetic cardiomyopathy (diabetic CM) is an area of significant interest given the strong association between diabetes and the risk of heart failure. Many unanswered questions remain regarding the clinical definition and pathogenesis of this metabolic cardiomyopathy. This article reviews the current understanding of diabetic CM with a particular emphasis on the unresolved issues that have limited translation of scientific discovery to patient bedside. PMID:22999244

Schilling, Joel D.; Mann, Douglas L.

2012-01-01

193

The first experimental diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryIn the history of diabetes research, surgically induced experimental diabetes is usually associated with the names of Minkowski\\u000a and von Mering on the basis of their investigations in 1889. However, temporary diabetes mellitus had already been induced\\u000a 200 years previously by Johann Conrad Brunner (16531727) in an experiment in dogs. According to present-day knowledge, this\\u000a temporary diabetes mellitus must be

Fritz S. Keck; Ernst F. Pfeiffer

1989-01-01

194

Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... hypertension) High LDL ("bad") cholesterol Family history of cardiovascular disease, stroke or PAD Previous history of coronary artery disease ( ... reduce the chances of a heart attack or stroke while enhancing quality of life. This content was last reviewed on ... Disease & Diabetes Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Kidney Disease & Diabetes ...

195

DIABETES PREVENTION TRIAL TYPE 1  

EPA Science Inventory

The Diabetes Prevention Trial--Type 1 (DPT-1) is a nationwide study to see if we can prevent or delay type 1 diabetes, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes. Nine medical centers and more than 350 clinics in the United States and Canada are taking part in the study....

196

InDependent Diabetes Trust.  

PubMed

The InDependent Diabetes Trust is a UK-based charity run by people with diabetes for others living with the condition. It was set up in 1994 as the Insulin Dependent Diabetes Trust (IDDT), a registered charity. It is run entirely by voluntary donations and does not accept funding from pharmaceutical companies. PMID:25315557

Evans, Roger

2014-10-15

197

Diabetes care decision support system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of changing in lifestyle and diet, and lacking of moderate exercise, diabetes prevalence increases rapidly. Diabetes is an incurable chronic disease, but through proper care, patients can control the disease and prevent complications. According to patient's personal need, a proper diabetes care plan requires different fields of professionals together to make up the plan. So if it is done

Jian-xun Chen; Shih-Li Su; Che-Ha Chang

2010-01-01

198

[Diabetic nephropathy: emerging treatments].  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The mainstay of treatment has been management of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and proteinuria using hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Since 2000, new therapeutic strategies began to emerge targeting the biochemical activity of glucose molecules on the renal tissue. Various substances have been studied with varying degrees of success, ranging from vitaminB to camel's milk. Silymarin reduces urinary excretion of albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, and malondialdehyde in patients with diabetic nephropathy and may be considered as a novel addition to the anti-diabetic nephropathy armamentarium. Although some results are promising, studies on a larger scale are needed to validate the utility of these molecules in the treatment of the DN. PMID:24938412

Gueutin, Victor; Gauthier, Marion; Cazenave, Maud; Izzedine, Hassane

2014-07-01

199

Gut feelings about diabetes.  

PubMed

Studies of patients going into diabetes remission after gastric bypass surgery have demonstrated the important role of the gut in glucose control. The improvement of type 2 diabetes after gastric bypass surgery occurs via weight dependent and weight independent mechanisms. The rapid improvement of glucose levels within days after the surgery, in relation to change of meal pattern, rapid nutrient transit, enhanced incretin release and improved incretin effect on insulin secretion, suggest mechanisms independent of weight loss. Alternatively, insulin sensitivity improves over time as a function of weight loss. The role of bile acids and microbiome in the metabolic improvement after bariatric surgery remains to be determined. While most patients after bariatric surgery experienced sustained weight loss and improved metabolism, small scale studies have shown weight regain and diabetes relapse, the mechanisms of which remain unknown. PMID:22386248

Laferrre, Blandine

2012-04-01

200

Glycation in diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

The kidney is an extremely complex organ with broad ranging functions in the body, including but not restricted to waste excretion, ion and water balance, maintenance of blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, generation of erythropoietin and activation of vitamin D. With diabetes, many of these integral processes are interrupted via a combination of haemodynamic and metabolic changes including increases in the accumulation of proteins modified by advanced glycation, known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Indeed, hyperglycaemia and the redox imbalances seen with diabetes are each independent accelerants for the production of AGEs, which synergistically combine in this disorder. In addition, as kidney function declines, characterised by a loss of glomerular filtration, the excretion of AGEs is decreased, possibly exacerbating renal injury by further elevating the body's tissue and circulating AGE pool. Therefore, it has become apparent that decreasing the accumulation of AGEs or interrupting their downstream effects on the kidney, are desirable therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic renal disease. PMID:20963456

Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

2012-04-01

201

Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Abstract Mitochondria are at the center of cellular energy metabolism and regulate cell life and death. The cell biological aspect of mitochondria, especially mitochondrial dynamics, has drawn much attention through implications in human pathology, including neurological disorders and metabolic diseases. Mitochondrial fission and fusion are the main processes governing the morphological plasticity and are controlled by multiple factors, including mechanochemical enzymes and accessory proteins. Emerging evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics plays an important role in metabolismsecretion coupling in pancreatic ?-cells as well as complications of diabetes. This review describes an overview of mechanistic and functional aspects of mitochondrial fission and fusion, and comments on the recent advances connecting mitochondrial dynamics with diabetes and diabetic complications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 439457. PMID:20518704

Galloway, Chad A.; Jhun, Bong Sook; Yu, Tianzheng

2011-01-01

202

Diabetes Epidemics in Korea: Reappraise Nationwide Survey of Diabetes "Diabetes in Korea 2007"  

PubMed Central

There are many studies on the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and economic burden of diabetes across the past four decades in Korea. Nonetheless, there is a dearth of nationwide study regarding diabetes encompassing all age group. Eight years ago, the Committee on the Epidemiology of Diabetes Mellitus of Korean Diabetes Association collaborated with Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service to evaluate the status of diabetes care and characteristics in diabetic patients in Korea. In 2007, the collaborative task force team published a comprehensive survey titled "Diabetes in Korea 2007." In this review, we reappraise the diabetic epidemics from the joint report and suggest further studies that are needed to be investigated in the future. PMID:23991400

Park, Ie Byung; Kim, Jaiyong; Kim, Dae Jung; Chung, Choon Hee; Oh, Jee-Young; Park, Seok Won; Lee, Juneyoung; Choi, Kyung Mook; Min, Kyung Wan; Park, Jeong Hyun; Son, Hyun Shik; Ahn, Chul Woo; Kim, Hwayoung; Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Im Bong; Choi, Injeoung

2013-01-01

203

Diabetes mellitus and exercise.  

PubMed

The study deals with the subject of exercise in diabetic patients, with particular emphasis on acute physical stress in type--I and type--II diabetics. The principal task was to define metabolic changes as they occur in the diabetic subjected to acute stress induced by exercise, in comparison with non-diabetics; metabolic changes during prolonged stress as well as during the period of rest; and finally, to propose, on the basis of authors' experimental results and detailed literature research, appropriate rules of procedure for prescriptive exercise for the individual patient. There were 120 subjects divided into 8 groups. Using primarily a bicycle ergometer, the members of the individual groups were subjected to physical stress of various intensity and duration. A detailed analysis of each subject's metabolic response was performed, involving an assessment of 35 physiological and biochemical parameters, with main focus on determining biochemical changes. The study results are presented in detail both with respect to the metabolic response to a given stress in individual groups and comparatively for individual parameters with regard to specific stress rates and groups. Significant differences were found in the metabolic responses concerning the following parameters: acid-base balance, potassium, triglycerols, glucose, cholesterol, FFA, free glycerol, lactate, uric acid. On the basis of the results of experimental measurements, the following algorithm has been designed for prescribing exercise to diabetics: appropriate motivation; determination of the type of exercise; determination of the intensity of exercise; determination of the duration of exercise; respecting related contraindications and complications. A conclusion has been made that provided all possible risks and contraindications as well as prescription guidelines are respected, exercise is to be considered one of the basic principles of diabetes management. PMID:3673832

Rybka, J

1987-01-01

204

The Diabetes Prevention Program  

PubMed Central

The Diabetes Prevention Program is a randomized clinical trial testing strategies to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals with elevated fasting plasma glucose concentrations and impaired glucose tolerance. The 27 clinical centers in the U.S. are recruiting at least 3,000 participants of both sexes, ~50% of whom are minority patients and 20% of whom are ?65 years old, to be assigned at random to one of three intervention groups: an intensive lifestyle intervention focusing on a healthy diet and exercise and two masked medication treatment groupsmetformin or placebocombined with standard diet and exercise recommendations. Participants are being recruited during a 2 2/3-year period, and all will be followed for an additional 3 1/3 to 5 years after the close of recruitment to a common closing date in 2002. The primary outcome is the development of diabetes, diagnosed by fasting or post-challenge plasma glucose concentrations meeting the 1997 American Diabetes Association criteria. The 3,000 participants will provide 90% power to detect a 33% reduction in an expected diabetes incidence rate of at least 6.5% per year in the placebo group. Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular disease and its risk factors; changes in glycemia, ?-cell function, insulin sensitivity, obesity, diet, physical activity, and health-related quality of life; and occurrence of adverse events. A fourth treatment grouptroglilazone combined with standard diet and exercise recommendationswas included initially but discontinued because of the liver toxicity of the drug. This randomized clinical trial will test the possibility of preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in individuals at high risk. PMID:10189543

2005-01-01

205

[Gestational diabetes mellitus].  

PubMed

Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes. GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birthweight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e.g. glucosuria). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria) 6-12 weeks postpartum and every 2 years in case of normal glucose tolerance (Evidence level B). All women have to be instructed about their (sevenfold increased relative) risk of type 2 diabetes at follow-up and possibilities for diabetes prevention, in particular weight management and maintenance/increase of physical activity. Monitoring of the development of the offspring and recommendation of healthy lifestyle of the children and family is recommended. PMID:23250453

Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Pollak, Arnold; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

2012-12-01

206

Diabetes foot disease: the Cinderella of Australian diabetes management?  

PubMed

Diabetes is one of the greatest public health challenges to face Australia. It is already Australia's leading cause of kidney failure, blindness (in those under 60?years) and lower limb amputation, and causes significant cardiovascular disease. Australia's diabetes amputation rate is one of the worst in the developed world, and appears to have significantly increased in the last decade, whereas some other diabetes complication rates appear to have decreased. This paper aims to compare the national burden of disease for the four major diabetes-related complications and the availability of government funding to combat these complications, in order to determine where diabetes foot disease ranks in Australia. Our review of relevant national literature indicates foot disease ranks second overall in burden of disease and last in evidenced-based government funding to combat these diabetes complications. This suggests public funding to address foot disease in Australia is disproportionately low when compared to funding dedicated to other diabetes complications. There is ample evidence that appropriate government funding of evidence-based care improves all diabetes complication outcomes and reduces overall costs. Numerous diverse Australian peak bodies have now recommended similar diabetes foot evidence-based strategies that have reduced diabetes amputation rates and associated costs in other developed nations. It would seem intuitive that "it's time" to fund these evidence-based strategies for diabetes foot disease in Australia as well. PMID:23021818

Lazzarini, Peter A; Gurr, Joel M; Rogers, Joseph R; Schox, Andrew; Bergin, Shan M

2012-01-01

207

Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot  

PubMed Central

Osteomyelitis (OM) is a common complication of diabetic foot ulcers and/or diabetic foot infections. This review article discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of OM in the diabetic foot. Clinical features that point to the possibility of OM include the presence of exposed bone in the depth of a diabetic foot ulcer. Medical imaging studies include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy. A high index of suspicion is also required to make the diagnosis of OM in the diabetic foot combined with clinical and radiological studies. PMID:25147627

Malhotra, Rishi; Chan, Claire Shu-Yi; Nather, Aziz

2014-01-01

208

Rheumatic manifestations in diabetic patients.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. For most of these affections, pathophysiologic correlations are not well established. Some of them, such as diabetic cheiroarthropathy, neuropathic arthritis, diabetic amyotrophy, diabetic muscle infraction, are considered intrinsic complications of DM. For others, like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, DM is considered a predisposing condition. In most cases, these affections cause pain and disability, affecting the quality of life of diabetic patients, but once correctly diagnosed, they often respond to the treatment, that generally requires a multidisciplinary team. This article reviews some epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these conditions. PMID:23049626

Serban, A L; Udrea, G F

2012-09-15

209

Diabetic mastopathy. A clinicopathologic review.  

PubMed

Diabetic mastopathy, an uncommon form of lymphocytic mastitis and stromal fibrosis, typically occurs in longstanding type 1 diabetes. Nineteen cases meeting predetermined histopathologic criteria for diabetic mastopathy were correlated as to clinical history and disease recurrence. Physical examination revealed palpable discrete masses or diffuse nodularity, both predominantly in the subareolar region. One nonpalpable lesion was detected incidentally during reduction mammoplasty. All cases contained lymphocytic ductitis and lobulitis with varying degrees of keloidal fibrosis, vasculitis, epithelioid fibroblasts, and lymphoid nodule formation. Single mammary lesions were found in 11 patients with type 1 diabetes, 1 with type 2 diabetes, and 3 without diabetes. Four cases were bilateral (3 patients with type 1 and 1 patient with type 2 diabetes). Six of 19 cases recurred (3 ipsilateral, 2 contralateral, and 1 bilateral). We confirm the histopathologic constellation for diabetic mastopathy. However, we question the specificity of these features because of identical findings in patients with type 2 diabetes and nondiabetic patients. We found diabetic mastopathy in men and women, as a solitary mass or bilateral disease, and recurrence in either breast, sometimes multiple. Recognition of potential recurrence is important because it might spare patients with documented diabetic mastopathy from repeated breast biopsies. PMID:10761456

Ely, K A; Tse, G; Simpson, J F; Clarfeld, R; Page, D L

2000-04-01

210

Many faces of monogenic diabetes.  

PubMed

Monogenic diabetes represents a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from defects in single genes. Defects are categorized primarily into two groups: disruption of ?-cell function or a reduction in the number of ?-cells. A complex network of transcription factors control pancreas formation, and a dysfunction of regulators high in the hierarchy leads to pancreatic agenesis. Dysfunction among factors further downstream might cause organ hypoplasia, absence of islets of Langerhans or a reduction in the number of ?-cells. Many transcription factors have pleiotropic effects, explaining the association of diabetes with other congenital malformations, including cerebellar agenesis and pituitary agenesis. Monogenic diabetes variants are classified conventionally according to age of onset, with neonatal diabetes occurring before the age of 6months and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) manifesting before the age of 25years. Recently, certain familial genetic defects were shown to manifest as neonatal diabetes, MODY or even adult onset diabetes. Patients with neonatal diabetes require a thorough genetic work-up in any case, and because extensive phenotypic overlap exists between monogenic, type 2, and type 1 diabetes, genetic analysis will also help improve diagnosis in these cases. Next generation sequencing will facilitate rapid screening, leading to the discovery of digenic and oligogenic diabetes variants, and helping to improve our understanding of the genetics underlying other types of diabetes. An accurate diagnosis remains important, because it might lead to a change in the treatment of affected subjects and influence long-term complications. PMID:24843749

Schwitzgebel, Valerie M

2014-03-23

211

Diabetes screening in the workplace.  

PubMed

The prevalence of diabetes has increased worldwide and the pathophysiological problems associated with diabetes increase the potential for employees' physical disabilities. These complications, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and visual impairment, negatively impact the job performance of employees and compromise workplace safety. Occupational health nurses can provide diabetes screening programs to employees and identify chronic disease risk factors early. This article describes an occupational diabetes screening program at a major corporation in Belize, Central America, defines diabetes, outlines the diabetes teaching plan, and presents the demographics of the participants and results of the screening. Cultural considerations and recommendations for future occupational diabetes screenings are proposed. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(11):444-446.]. PMID:25373027

Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta; Mullins, Rebecca; Brock, Emily

2014-11-01

212

Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management  

PubMed Central

Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

2014-01-01

213

Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in African American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was higher with higher intake of both sugar-sweetened soft drinks and fruit drinks. After adjustment for confound- ing variables including other dietary factors, the inci- dencerateratiofor2ormoresoftdrinksperdaywas1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.45). For fruit drinks, the comparable incidence rate ratio was 1.31 (95% con- fidence interval, 1.13-1.52). The association of diabetes with soft drink

Julie R. Palmer; Deborah A. Boggs; Supriya Krishnan; Frank B. Hu; Martha Singer; Lynn Rosenberg

2008-01-01

214

Management of Diabetic Gastroparesis  

PubMed Central

Symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis occur in 5% to 12% of patients with diabetes. Such a complication can affect both prognosis and management of the diabetes; therefore, practicing clinicians are challenged by the complex management of such cases. Gastroparesis is a disorder characterized by a delay in gastric emptying after a meal in the absence of a mechanical gastric outlet obstruction. This article is an evidence-based overview of current management strategies for diabetic gastroparesis. The cardinal symptoms of diabetic gastroparesis are nausea and vomiting. Gastroesophageal scintiscanning at 15-minute intervals for 4 hours after food intake is considered the gold standard for measuring gastric emptying. Retention of more than 10% of the meal after 4 hours is considered an abnormal result, for which a multidisciplinary management approach is required. Treatment should be tailored according to the severity of gastroparesis, and 25% to 68% of symptoms are controlled by prokinetic agents. Commonly prescribed prokinetics include metoclopramide, domperidone, and erythromycin. In addition, gastric electrical stimulation has been shown to improve symptoms, reduce hospitalizations, reduce the need for nutritional support, and improve quality of life in several open-label studies. PMID:21372345

Aljarallah, Badr M.

2011-01-01

215

Kidney Disease of Diabetes  

E-print Network

Kidney Disease of Diabetes National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse The Burden of Kidney Failure Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes.1 Kidney failure

Baker, Chris I.

216

Treating Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... chronic illnesses, like cancer. In addition to all of these benefits, exercise can help kids with diabetes: keep blood lipids ... t have to be athletic to reap the benefits of physical activity. Things like walking the dog, helping around the ... Problems During Exercise To help avoid problems during exercise, kids with ...

217

Adjusting to Childhood Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Insulin dependent diabetes is an incurable disease requiring complex management by the patient and/or his family. Previous research has found that there is no specific personality type associated with this or other diseases, nor do chronically ill persons exhibit characteristic behavioral or emotional problems. An attempt to identify the

Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

218

Diabetes: The Science Inside  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this book is to provide basic information about type 2 diabetes: what causes it, how it affects the body, and how it can be prevented and treated. Supported byScience Education Partnership Award (SEPA)from the National Center for Research Resources Grant # 5R25RR15601.

Healthy People Library Project;

2003-01-01

219

Diabetes Education Program HYPERGLYCEMIA  

E-print Network

Diabetes Education Program HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Glucose) Definition: Random Blood Sugars over 240-300 mg/dl Signs of High Blood Sugar Treatment · Thirst · Fatigue · Frequent urination · Drowsiness · Blurred vision · If you experience any signs of high blood sugar, check your blood sugar · If your blood

Oliver, Douglas L.

220

Diabetes Education Program HYPOGLYCEMIA  

E-print Network

Diabetes Education Program HYPOGLYCEMIA (Low Blood Glucose) Definition: Random Blood Sugar less than 70 mg/dl Signs Of Low Blood Sugar (Less than 70 mg/dl- may not have any symptoms!!) Treatment experience any signs of low blood sugar, check your blood sugar to confirm the problem is low blood sugar

Oliver, Douglas L.

221

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryThis review attempts to outline the present understanding of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The clinical features have been increasingly recognised but knowledge of the localization and morphology of the lesions and their pathogenesis remains fragmentary. A metabolic causation as postulated in somatic nerves accords best with clinical observations. Most bodily systems, particularly the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital, are involved with added

B. F. Clarke; D. J. Ewing; I. W. Campbell

1979-01-01

222

Diabetic foot osteomyelitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone infection in the diabetic foot is always a complication of a preexisting infected foot wound. Prevalence can be as high as 66%. Diagnosis can be suspected in two mains conditions: no healing (or no depth decrease) in spite of appropriate care and off-loading, and\\/or a visible or palpated bone with a metal probe. The first recommended diagnostic step is

A. Hartemann-Heurtier; E. Senneville

2008-01-01

223

Diabetes and eye disease  

MedlinePLUS

... the eye that are weak and can bleed Small scars forming on the retina and in other parts of the eye (the vitreous) ... doctor who is trained to treat diabetic eye diseases. Once your eye ... creates small burns in the retina where there are abnormal ...

224

78 FR 26641 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Kidney Diseases, Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...Workshop SUMMARY: The Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...DMICC) will hold a 2-day workshop on June...Executive Secretary of the Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...emerging opportunities for type 1 diabetes research...

2013-05-07

225

Diabetes: Biomarkers to Cures Diabetes Expertise at the UBC Life Sciences institute  

E-print Network

: R o b F r a s e r Diabetes: Biomarkers to Cures Diabetes Expertise at the UBC Life Sciences institute The Life Sciences Institute (LSI) Diabetes Research Group, with its unique complement of diabetes research programs, has

Strynadka, Natalie

226

Diabetes Report Card 2012: National and State Profile of Diabetes and Its Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 Diabetes in the United States CDC Study Gestational Diabetes Diabetes in the United States Heart Disease and ... Must Not Be Shared Lifetime Risk for Diabetes Mellitus in the United States Screening for Type 2 ...

227

Diabetes in the Americas.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is an important cause of disability and death throughout the Americas. Of the three main types (insulin-dependent, noninsulin-dependent, and malnutrition-related), virtually all cases in the Americas are either insulin-dependent (generally assessed in terms of incidence and usually occurring in subjects under 30) or noninsulin-dependent (generally assessed in terms of prevalence and usually occurring in subjects over 30). Data on noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in various parts of the Americas point to prevalences ranging from 1.4% (among the Mapuche Indians in Chile) to 14.1% (among residents of Mexico City). However, the use of different methods and standards to gather and analyze these data renders comparison of the NIDDM situations in different countries uncertain. A fair amount of comparable data on insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) have been gathered in various countries of the Region. These point to marked differences in annual incidence--ranging from 0.7 cases per 100,000 in Peru to 27 among males on Prince Edward Island, Canada--that have not been adequately explained, underlining the need for additional comparable data. Considering the seriousness of the disease, it is important to know how many people have and develop diabetes, so as to be able to take preventive and therapeutic measures and guide public health actions. Hence, further cooperation directed at effective standardization of procedures and goals is indicated. Such cooperation, which should also come to include standardized national and hemispheric diabetes programs, must be achieved in accordance with the resources available to each country. PMID:7532072

Llanos, G; Libman, I

1994-12-01

228

Complications to Avoid with Pre-Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

Complications to Avoid with Pre-diabetes Updated:Mar 8,2014 If I ignore the pre-diabetes, how could diabetes reduce the quality or length of my ... treat one of them, you treat them all. Pre-diabetes Introduction About Pre-diabetes What's the Problem? Intro ...

229

What the Teacher Should Know About Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This short manual is designed to provide the practicing teacher with basic information on diabetes, and the role (s)he plays in providing health supervision and care for the diabetic child in his/her classroom. The document consists of four pages, describing (1) components of diabetes management and symptoms of diabetes; (2) emergency diabetic

Johnston, Harriet, Ed.; Rolloff, Charlene, Ed.

230

Diabetes Metab Res Rev. Author manuscript Anti-CD38 autoantibodies in type? diabetes  

E-print Network

Diabetes Metab Res Rev. Author manuscript Page /1 12 Anti-CD38 autoantibodies in type? diabetes.mallone@inserm.fr> Abstract Human diabetes mellitus comprises two main clinical entities: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While type 1 diabetes is autoimmune in origin, type 2 diabetes is due to a decreased sensitivity to insulin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

231

Diabetes mellitus and cardiac function.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Coronary atherosclerosis is enhanced in diabetics, whereas myocardial infarction represents 20% of deaths of diabetic subjects. Furthermore, re-infarction and heart failure are more common in the diabetics. Diabetic cardiomyopathy is characterized by an early diastolic dysfunction and a later systolic one, with intracellular retention of calcium and sodium and loss of potassium. In addition, diabetes mellitus accelerates the development of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients and increases cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Treating the cardiovascular problems in diabetics must be undertaken with caution. Special consideration must be given with respect to the ionic and metabolic changes associated with diabetes. For example, although ACE inhibitors and calcium channel blockers are suitable agents, potassium channel openers cause myocardial preconditioning and decrease the infarct size in animal models, but they inhibit the insulin release after glucose administration in healthy subjects. Furthermore, potassium channel blockers abolish myocardial preconditioning and increase infarct size in animal models, but they protect the heart from the fatal arrhythmias induced by ischemia and reperfusion which may be important in diabetes. For example, diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually presents with silent ischemia and infarction. Mechanistically, parasympathetic cardiac nerve dysfunction, expressed as increased resting heart rate and decreased respiratory variation in heart rate, is more frequent than the sympathetic cardiac nerve dysfunction expressed as a decrease in the heart rate rise during standing. PMID:9546631

Mahgoub, M A; Abd-Elfattah, A S

1998-03-01

232

Reprogramming diabetic stem or progenitor cells for treating diabetic complications  

Cancer.gov

Bone marrow-derived stem or progenitor cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be effective for repairing cardiovascular disease. However, recent studies have shown that autologous cells derived from diabetic patients are not as effective as those from non-diabetic or healthy volunteers. As many cardiovascular disease patients who are candidate for cell therapy have diabetes as co-morbid condition, new measures are required to reverse their dysfunction.

233

Cognition in Type 2 Diabetes or Pre-diabetic Stages  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter addresses the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on cognitive functioning. It covers the nature and severity\\u000a of cognitive decrements in relation to diabetes and pre-diabetic stages. Possible risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms,\\u000a such as vascular risk factors, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, microvascular and macrovascular complications, depression,\\u000a genetic factors, and lifestyle, will be examined. Moreover, the chapter provides a

Esther van den Berg; Yael D. Reijmer; Geert Jan Biessels

234

Living With Diabetes: The Role of Diabetes Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Living with diabetes can be challenging. The treatment is complex with significant lifestyle demands and fearsome acute and\\u000a chronic complications. Both the disease and its treatment can impact the family as well as the person with diabetes. Many\\u000a physicians, other health care professionals, and payors recognize the importance of diabetes education in supporting people\\u000a in the efforts to realize treatment

Katie Weinger; Ashley Leighton

235

Diabetic Complications in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rat Models  

PubMed Central

We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes and its complications in obese type 2 diabetic rat models: Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat, Wistar fatty rat, Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat and Spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rat. Pancreatic changes with progression of diabetes were classified into early changes, such as islet hypertrophy and degranulation of ? cells, and degenerative changes, such as islet atrophy and fibrosis of islet with infiltration of inflammatory cells. Renal lesions in tubuli and glomeruli were observed, and nodular lesions in glomeruli were notable changes in OLETF and SDT fatty rats. Among retinal changes, folding and thickening were interesting findings in SDT fatty rats. A decrease of motor nerve conduction velocity with progression of diabetes was presented in obese diabetic rats. Other diabetic complications, osteoporosis and sexual dysfunction, were also observed. Observation of bone metabolic abnormalities, including decrease of osteogenesis and bone mineral density, and sexual dysfunction, including hypotestosteronemia and erectile dysfunction, in obese type 2 diabetic rats have been reported. PMID:24770637

Katsuda, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Takeshi; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Kemmochi, Yusuke; Sasase, Tomohiko; Tong, Bin; Shinohara, Masami; Yamada, Takahisa

2014-01-01

236

among NYS adults, by diabetes status, 2008 With Diabetes Without Diabetes  

E-print Network

Complete loss of permanent teeth is more common among New Yorkers with diabetes (15.5%) than those without diabetes (3.6%) (see Figure 1). Adults without all permanent teeth are less likely to have visited a dentist in the past year (27.8%) than adults who still have permanent teeth (76.4%)(data not shown). Among adults with teeth, 72.7 % of adults with diabetes reported visiting a dentist or dental clinic within the past year, compared to 76.8 % of adults without diabetes. Overall, the percentage of adults who have seen a dentist in the past year is below the goal of 83.0 % established by the Prevention Agenda Toward the Healthiest State (see Figure 2). Public health importance: Information for Action # 2011-8 Annual dental visits are less prevalent among adults with diabetes than among adults without diabetes in New York State. Diabetes increases both the prevalence and severity of oral complications including gum infection, gum disease, and tooth loss. 1 Because chronic periodontal inflammation has been identified as a potential risk factor for poor glycemic control, routine dental care may help prevent complications from diabetes. 2 Although adults with diabetes are at an increased need for regular dental care compared to adults without diabetes, they are not more likely to receive it. 25

unknown authors

237

[Pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications. Studies on diabetic mouse models].  

PubMed

Diabetic mouse models created via random mutagenesis or genetic modification are essential tools to unravel the mechanisms involved in the development of diabetes mellitus and associated diseases. Three diabetic mutant mouse lines derived from the Munich N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mouse mutagenesis project and one transgenic mouse line were analyzed with respect to diabetes-relevant clinical, pathomorphological and therapeutic aspects. An Ins2 mutation and two Gck mutations were identified as the cause of diabetes mellitus in the mutant lines. Heterozygous Ins2 and homozygous Gck mutants serve as model for permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and heterozygous Gck mutants develop maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2. Dominant-negative glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR(dn)) transgenic mice exhibit defective postnatal islet growth, develop PNDM and progressive diabetes-associated kidney lesions. The mutant and transgenic diabetic mouse models analyzed in the study were shown to represent valuable models to study the pathogenesis of monogenic diabetes and to establish novel treatment strategies. PMID:23052340

Herbach, N

2012-11-01

238

Stillbirth in diabetic pregnancies.  

PubMed

Pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes is associated with high perinatal morbidity and mortality. Stillbirth accounts for the majority of cases with perinatal death. Intrauterine growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, foetal hypoxia and congenital malformations may be contributing factors, but more than 50% of stillbirths are unexplained. Majority of stillbirths are characterised by suboptimal glycaemic control during pregnancy. Foetal hypoxia and cardiac dysfunction secondary to poor glycaemic control are probably the most important pathogenic factors in stillbirths among pregnant diabetic women. There is thus a need for new strategies for improving glycaemic control to near-normal levels throughout pregnancy and for preventing and treating hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Antenatal surveillance tests including ultrasound examinations of the foetal growth rate, kick counting and non-stress testing of foetal cardiac function are widely used. However, future research should establish better antenatal surveillance tests to identify the infants susceptible to stillbirth before it happens. PMID:21256813

Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Ringholm, Lene; Damm, Peter

2011-02-01

239

Diabetes: an investor's perspective.  

PubMed

Total health care expenditure in 2006 was $2.1 trillion. This figure is estimated to double within the next few years as the cost of treating diabetes and other chronic conditions continues to rise. Moreover, the baby boomer demographic is anticipated to place an enormous burden on the health care system and employer-based health insurance premiums were increased at rates as high as 10% per year in 2006.The quest to address these challenges has also created opportunities for investment, particularly in the fields of telemedicine, health care information technology, and medical technology.The author shares his business perspective, informed by years of experience as a physician and astronaut at NASA, and describes new applications of exciting technologies that deliver effective and efficient health care to diabetes patients, no matter where they may be. PMID:19885357

Harris, Bernard

2008-03-01

240

Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

MedlinePLUS

... 1 of 2 Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives Facts At-a-Glance In response to the diabetes epidemic in American Indian and Alaska Native people, Congress established the Special Diabetes Program ...

241

Genetics Home Reference: Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus  

MedlinePLUS

... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2010 What is neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus? Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a disorder of ...

242

Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Size: A A A Listen En Espaol Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes There are several ways ... mg/dl 199 mg/dl Preventing Type 2 Diabetes You will not develop type 2 diabetes automatically ...

243

Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes MedicinesAlways Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

244

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics Research Resources Order About Us Espaol National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse Publications Tools and Resources E-News ... Gestational Diabetes: What You Need to Know Gestational Diabetes: What You Need to Know On this page: ...

245

Diabetes in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Islander Americans Diabetes in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life ... the disease. PDF Version (1,036 KB) * Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders and Diabetes (from the Office on ...

246

Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life  

MedlinePLUS

... previous page Related Topics Diabetes Related Documents PDF Living with Diabetes Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications ...

247

"Don't take diabetes for granted."  

MedlinePLUS

... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Don't take diabetes for granted." Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... regularly, and take your medicines on time. Don't take diabetes for granted! Fall 2009 Issue: Volume ...

248

75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Diabetic Education  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...3) * * * (ix) Diabetes Self-Management Training...self- management of diabetes. It includes the following...self-monitoring of blood glucose, diet, and exercise; an insulin treatment plan developed specifically...accredited by the American Diabetes Association....

2010-08-06

249

Steatorrhea in diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryA case is reported of self-limited steatorrhea in a diabetic, the severity of whose metabolic disorder was evidenced by a\\u000a reversible enlargement of his liver and the acute development of neuritis. He had a temporary absence of lipolytic activity\\u000a from his duodenal fluid without evidence of primary disease of his pancreas.\\u000a \\u000a There was no diarrhea or abnormal appearance of his

Henry Field; Niels C. Klendshoj; Bryon D. Bowen

1948-01-01

250

Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved, but such intervention may be considered in the severe and progressive cases or ones associated with severe neuropathic pain.

Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

1997-01-01

251

Diabetes in Europe: an update.  

PubMed

Diabetes is among the leading causes of death in the IDF Europe Region (EUR), continues to increase in prevalence with diabetic macro- and microvascular complications resulting in increased disability and enormous healthcare costs. In 2013, the number of people with diabetes is estimated to be 56 million in EUR with an overall estimated prevalence of 8.5%. However, estimates of diabetes prevalence in 2013 vary widely in the 56 diverse countries in EUR from 2.4% in Moldova to 14.9% in Turkey. Trends in diabetes prevalence also vary between countries with stable prevalence since 2002 for many countries but a doubling of diabetes prevalence in Turkey. For 2035, a further increase of nearly 10 million people with diabetes is projected for the EUR. Prevalence of type 1 has also increased over the past 20 years in EUR and there was estimated to be 129,350 cases in children aged 0-14 years in 2013. Registries provide valid information on incidence of type 1 diabetes with more complete data available for children than for adults. There are large differences in distribution of risk factors for diabetes at the population level in EUR. Modifiable risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, smoking behaviour (including secondhand smoking), environmental pollutants, psychosocial factors and socioeconomic deprivation could be tackled to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in Europe. In addition, diabetes management is a major challenge to health services in the European countries. Improved networking practices of health professionals and other stakeholders in combination with empowerment of people with diabetes and continuous quality monitoring need to be further developed in Europe. PMID:24300019

Tamayo, T; Rosenbauer, J; Wild, S H; Spijkerman, A M W; Baan, C; Forouhi, N G; Herder, C; Rathmann, W

2014-02-01

252

LiquichekTM Diabetes Control  

E-print Network

LiquichekTM Diabetes Control Bio-Rad Laboratories D I A B E T E S / H E M O G L O B I N C O N T R O L S #12;LiquichekTM Diabetes Control Hemoglobin A1C Hemoglobin, Total A liquid human whole blood based product designed to monitor the performance of hemoglobin tests associated with diabetes

Rodriguez, Carlos

253

Childhood Diabetes: A Global Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is an evolving disease, with changing patterns seen in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A wide (over 400-fold) variation exists in worldwide incidence rates of type 1 diabetes, with the highest occurring in Finland (over 45 per 100,000 under the age of 15 years) and the lowest in parts of China. In many countries (e.g. in Europe,

Martin Silink

2002-01-01

254

Vascular Abnormalities in Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Diabetes mellitus causes a variety of changes in the vascular system, affecting both the micro-and macrovasculature. Classical\\u000a pathologies in the microvasculature are manifested as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Macrovascular diseases are observed\\u000a in the coronary arteries, large peripheral vasculature involving mostly the lower limbs, and cerebral vessels. In addition,\\u000a diabetes and insulin resistance are strongly associated with essential hypertension, and

Katherine D. Hein; George L. King

255

Diabetic nephropathy - complications and treatment.  

PubMed

Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

Lim, Andy Kh

2014-01-01

256

Genetic Control of Diabetes Progression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune diabetes in both the human and the nonobese diabetic mouse has elaborate genetics; in the latter case, the disease is influenced by at least 1520 loci. We anticipated that the genetics would be simpler in the BDC2.5 T cell receptor transgenic mouse model of diabetes, wherein many T cells express a particular diabetogenic specificity. Initiation of insulitis in this

Antonio Gonzalez; Jonathan D Katz; Marie-Genevive Mattei; Hitoshi Kikutani; Christophe Benoist; Diane Mathis

1997-01-01

257

Diabetic nephropathy - complications and treatment  

PubMed Central

Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

Lim, Andy KH

2014-01-01

258

Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

Wadwa, R. Paul

2012-01-01

259

Diabetic retinopathy in acromegaly  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Although growth hormone (GH) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR), DR is deemed to be rare in patients with GH excess. Our aim was to study its prevalence in subjects with acromegaly suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM), to analyze its characteristics, and to look for predictive factors such as age at diagnosis, GH concentration and duration, DM duration, DM control, and family background. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with acromegaly and DM (21 males, 19 females), median age = 50 years, underwent a systematic ophthalmological examination with dilated funduscopy to seek diabetic retinopathy. Results: Among this population, 05 (12.5%) had DR. It was at an early stage or background retinopathy in 3 cases and at a more advanced stage or proliferative retinopathy in 2 cases. We did not find any correlation with age at diagnosis, GH levels and duration, DM duration and family history of DM, but poor glycemic control seems to play a role although statistical analysis showed borderline significance. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that prevalence of DR in patients with acromegaly is 12.5%, and it is slight or moderate. Among studied factors, only poor glycemic control seems to be implicated in its development. PMID:24944939

Azzoug, Said; Chentli, Farida

2014-01-01

260

Heparanase and Autoimmune Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Heparanase (Hpse) is the only known mammalian endo-?-d-glucuronidase that degrades the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), found attached to the core proteins of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Hpse plays a homeostatic role in regulating the turnover of cell-associated HS and also degrades extracellular HS in basement membranes (BMs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM), where HSPGs function as a barrier to cell migration. Secreted Hpse is harnessed by leukocytes to facilitate their migration from the blood to sites of inflammation. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD) model of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes (T1D), Hpse is also used by insulitis leukocytes to solubilize the islet BM to enable intra-islet entry of leukocytes and to degrade intracellular HS, an essential component for the survival of insulin-producing islet beta cells. Treatment of pre-diabetic adult NOD mice with the Hpse inhibitor PI-88 significantly reduced the incidence of T1D by ~50% and preserved islet HS. Hpse therefore acts as a novel immune effector mechanism in T1D. Our studies have identified T1D as a Hpse-dependent disease and Hpse inhibitors as novel therapeutics for preventing T1D progression and possibly the development of T1D vascular complications. PMID:24421779

Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Ziolkowski, Andrew F.; Wu, Zuopeng; Choong, Fui Jiun; Freeman, Craig; Parish, Christopher R.

2013-01-01

261

Take Charge of Your Diabetes: Pregnancy and Women's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Yourself Having Diabetes During Pregnancy Controlling Diabetes for Womens Health Becoming Pregnant When You Have Diabetes Women with ... care team to stay healthy. Controlling Diabetes for Women's Health Some women with diabetes may have special problems, ...

262

Gallbladder function in diabetic patients  

SciTech Connect

Gallbladder emptying and filling was studied in eight diabetic and six normal control patients. None of the patients had gallstones. Cholescintigraphy was performed using (/sup 99m/Tc)disofenin, and gallbladder emptying was studied using a 45-min i.v. infusion of the octapeptide of cholecystokinin (OP-CCK) 20 ng/kg X hr. The peak filling rate was greater in diabetic than in normal subjects; however, emptying of the gallbladder in response to OP-CCK was significantly less in the diabetic subjects (51.6 +/- 10.4% compared with 77.2 +/- 4.9%). When the diabetic group was subdivided into obese and nonobese diabetics, the obese diabetics had a much lower percentage of emptying than the nonobese diabetics (30.0 +/- 10.4% compared with 73.1 +/- 9.3%). These findings suggest that obese diabetics may have impaired emptying of the gallbladder even in the absence of gallstones. The more rapid rate of gallbladder filling in obesity may indicate hypotonicity of the gallbladder. The combination of these abnormalities may predispose the obese diabetic to the development of gallstones.

Shreiner, D.P.; Sarva, R.P.; Van Thiel, D.; Yingvorapant, N.

1986-03-01

263

Childhood diabetes mellitus in Ethiopians.  

PubMed

Of 1088 consecutive Ethiopian diabetic patients registered over 9 years 80 (7.4%) were diagnosed at or before age 15 years. There were 48 girls and 32 boys, with mean age of onset of 10.1 years. Diabetes had been present 10 years or less in 62, 11 to 20 years in 15, and more than 20 years in only 2. Twenty-two were rural, 27 had poverty certificates. Twenty-three have known diabetic relatives. The original mode of presentation could not be verified in 16, 7 presented in ketoacidosis, 5 were diagnosed by a diabetic relative, and the rest presented with the rapid onset of classical symptoms. To date, 43 have been ketoacidotic at least once. No pancreatic calcification was seen in 34 abdominal radiographs. Three of 6 newly diagnosed patients tested had islet cell surface antibodies. Three cases, initially suggestive of 'tropical malnutrition diabetes', evolved into typical type 1 diabetes. Serious complicating illnesses were tuberculosis (6), bacterial endocarditis (1) and rhinocerebral mucormycosis (1). Six patients have had metabolic cataracts. Ten patients (12%) have died, 4 of ketoacidosis and 4 of diabetic nephropathy. Childhood diabetes mellitus in Ethiopians is clinically very similar to type 1 diabetes elsewhere. PMID:2951186

Lester, F T

1986-05-01

264

New Concepts in Diabetic Embryopathy  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Diabetes mellitus is responsible for nearly 10% of fetal anomalies in diabetic pregnancies. Although aggressive perinatal care and glycemic control are available in developed countries, the birth defect rate in diabetic pregnancies remains much higher than that in the general population. Major cellular activities--i.e., proliferation and apoptosis--and intracellular metabolic conditions--i.e., nitrosative, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum stress--have been demonstrated to be associated with diabetic embryopathy using animal models. Translating advances made in animal studies into clinical applications in humans will require collaborative efforts across the basic research, preclinical, and clinical communities. PMID:23702113

Reece, E. Albert

2013-01-01

265

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes  

E-print Network

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics ·WhatisDiabetes? ·Nutrition­FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement ·OneDiabetesDiet­NoLongertheSoleOption ·ManagingYourBloodGlucose ·NutritionalLabels ·DiabetesandExercise ·ForGoodMeasureatHomeandEatingOut ·DiabetesMedicines ·Preventingand

266

Diabetes, Biochemical Markers of Bone Turnover, Diabetes Control, and Bone  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is known to have late complications including micro vascular and macro vascular disease. This review focuses on another possible area of complication regarding diabetes; bone. Diabetes may affect bone via bone structure, bone density, and biochemical markers of bone turnover. The aim of the present review is to examine in vivo from humans on biochemical markers of bone turnover in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, the effect of glycemic control on bone markers and the similarities and differences of type 1- and type 2-diabetics regarding bone markers will be evaluated. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and SveMed+ with the search terms: Diabetes mellitus, Diabetes mellitus type 1, Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, Diabetes mellitus type 2, Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, Bone, Bone and Bones, Bone diseases, Bone turnover, Hemoglobin A Glycosylated, and HbA1C. After removing duplicates from this search 1,188 records were screened by title and abstract and 75 records were assessed by full text for inclusion in the review. In the end 43 records were chosen. Bone formation and resorption markers are investigated as well as bone regulating systems. T1D is found to have lower osteocalcin and CTX, while osteocalcin and tartrate-resistant acid are found to be lower in T2D, and sclerostin is increased and collagen turnover markers altered. Other bone turnover markers do not seem to be altered in T1D or T2D. A major problem is the lack of histomorphometric studies in humans linking changes in turnover markers to actual changes in bone turnover and further research is needed to strengthen this link. PMID:23482417

Starup-Linde, Jakob

2012-01-01

267

PREVENZIONE PRIMARIA DELLE MALATTIE CARDIOVASCOLARI IN PERSONE AFFETTE DA DIABETE MELLITO: LINEE GUIDE REDATTE DA PARTE DI AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION E AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

AHA (American Heart Association) e ADA (American Diabetes Association) hanno pubblicato entrambe le linee guida per la prevenzione delle m alattie cardiovascolari: L'ADA ha prodotto specific he raccomandazioni per ognuno dei fattori di rischio c ardiovascolare nei pazienti diabetici; e l'AHA ha pubblicato linee guida per la prevenzione primaria e secondaria da estendere anche ai soggetti con dia bete. Questa

John B. Buse; Henry N. Ginsberg; George L. Bakris; Nathaniel G. Clark; Fernando Costa; Robert Eckel; Vivian Fonseca; Hertzel C. Gerstein; Scott Grundy; Richard W. Nesto; Michael P. Pignone; Jorge Plutzky; Daniel Porte; Rita Redberg; Kimberly F. Stitzel; Neil J. Stone

268

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.  

PubMed

Autonomic neuropathy, once considered to be the Cinderella of diabetes complications, has come of age. The autonomic nervous system innervates the entire human body, and is involved in the regulation of every single organ in the body. Thus, perturbations in autonomic function account for everything from abnormalities in pupillary function to gastroparesis, intestinal dysmotility, diabetic diarrhea, genitourinary dysfunction, amongst others. "Know autonomic function and one knows the whole of medicine!" It is now becoming apparent that before the advent of severe pathological damage to the autonomic nervous system there may be an imbalance between the two major arms, namely the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the heart and blood vessels, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) has been linked to resting tachycardia, postural hypotension, orthostatic bradycardia and orthostatic tachycardia (POTTS), exercise intolerance, decreased hypoxia-induced respiratory drive, loss of baroreceptor sensitivity, enhanced intraoperative or perioperative cardiovascular lability, increased incidence of asymptomatic ischemia, myocardial infarction, and decreased rate of survival after myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. Autonomic dysfunction can affect daily activities of individuals with diabetes and may invoke potentially life-threatening outcomes. Intensification of glycemic control in the presence of autonomic dysfunction (more so if combined with peripheral neuropathy) increases the likelihood of sudden death and is a caveat for aggressive glycemic control. Advances in technology, built on decades of research and clinical testing, now make it possible to objectively identify early stages of CAN with the use of careful measurement of time and frequency domain analyses of autonomic function. Fifteen studies using different end points report prevalence rates of 1% to 90%. CAN may be present at diagnosis, and prevalence increases with age, duration of diabetes, obesity, smoking, and poor glycemic control. CAN also cosegregates with distal symmetric polyneuropathy, microangiopathy, and macroangiopathy. It now appears that autonomic imbalance may precede the development of the inflammatory cascade in type 2 diabetes and there is a role for central loss of dopaminergic restraint on sympathetic overactivity. Restoration of dopaminergic tone suppresses the sympathetic dominance and reduces cardiovascular events and mortality by close to 50%. Cinderella's slipper can now be worn! PMID:24095132

Vinik, Aaron I; Erbas, Tomris

2013-01-01

269

Informal Caregiving for Diabetes and Diabetic Complications Among Elderly Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Little is known regarding the amount of time spent by unpaid caregivers providing help to elderly individuals for disabilities associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). We sought to obtain nationally representative estimates of the time, and associated cost, of informal caregiving provided to the elderly with diabetes, and to determine the complications of DM that contribute most significantly to the

Kenneth M. Langa; Sandeep Vijan; Rodney A. Hayward; Michael E. Chernew; Caroline S. Blaum; Mohammed U. Kabeto; David R. Weir; Steven J. Katz; Robert J. Willis; Mark Fendrick

2001-01-01

270

Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in the presence of intensive glycemic control. Substantial clinical and experimental evidence suggest that both diabetes and insulin resistance cause a combination of endothelial dysfunctions, which may diminish the anti-atherogenic role of the vascular endothelium. Both insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction appear to precede the development of overt hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, in patients with diabetes or insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction may be a critical early target for preventing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Microalbuminuria is now considered to be an atherosclerotic risk factor and predicts future cardiovascular disease risk in diabetic patients, in elderly patients, as well as in the general population. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature cardiovascular mortality for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as for patients with essential hypertension. A complete biochemical understanding of the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia causes vascular functional and structural changes associated with the diabetic milieu still eludes us. In recent years, the numerous biochemical and metabolic pathways postulated to have a causal role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease have been distilled into several unifying hypotheses. The role of chronic hyperglycemia in the development of diabetic microvascular complications and in neuropathy has been clearly established. However, the biochemical or cellular links between elevated blood glucose levels, and the vascular lesions remain incompletely understood. A number of trials have demonstrated that statins therapy as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors is associated with improvements in endothelial function in diabetes. Although antioxidants provide short-term improvement of endothelial function in humans, all studies of the effectiveness of preventive antioxidant therapy have been disappointing. Control of hyperglycemia thus remains the best way to improve endothelial function and to prevent atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular complications of diabetes. In the present review we provide the up to date details on this subject. PMID:18200806

Hadi, Hadi AR; Suwaidi, Jassim Al

2007-01-01

271

Motor vehicle driving among diabetics taking insulin and non-diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To determine whether rates of road traffic accidents were higher in diabetics treated with insulin than in non-diabetic subjects. DESIGN--Controlled, five year retrospective survey. SETTING--Diabetic, dermatology, and gastroenterology outpatient clinics. PATIENTS--596 Diabetics treated with insulin (354 drivers) aged 18-65 attending two clinics and 476 non-diabetic outpatients (302 drivers). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Rates of accidents in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. RESULTS--A self

A. B. Stevens; M. Roberts; R. McKane; A. B. Atkinson; P. M. Bell; J. R. Hayes

1989-01-01

272

Diabetes Research: A Perspective From the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases  

PubMed Central

This is the third in a series of articles, invited by the editors of Diabetes, that describes the research programs and aims of organizations committed to funding and fostering diabetes-related research. The first piece, contributed by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, appeared in the January 2012 issue of Diabetes. The second piece that describes the American Diabetes Associations research program appeared in the June 2012 issues of Diabetes and Diabetes Care. PMID:23349536

Fradkin, Judith E.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

2013-01-01

273

Diabetic Nephropathy: The Proteinuria Hypothesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Proteinuria, nearly a universal finding in progressive kidney disease, has been the subject of frequent recent analyses in the renal literature. Proteinuria is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy: microalbuminuria is the principal early predictor for progression of diabetic glomerulopathy, and proteinuria may be viewed as a measure of the severity and promoter of progression of nephropathy. Methods: This article

Mark E. Williams

2005-01-01

274

Morgan: A Case of Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case teaches about the causes and effects of Type 2 diabetes by working through the various options available to a young Native American woman suffering from the disease. The case can be used in a variety of settings, including nutrition classrooms, herbal drug courses, physiology courses, medical schools, nursing schools, pharmacy schools, diabetes workshops, and even weight loss clinics.

Rubin, Lisa M.; Herreid, Clyde F.

2002-01-01

275

Genomics: Drugs, diabetes and cancer  

PubMed Central

Summary Variation in a genomic region that contains the cancer-a ssociated gene ATM affects a patients response to the diabetes drug metformin. Two experts discuss the implications for understanding diabetes and the link to cancer. PMID:21331030

Birnbaum, Morris J.; Shaw, Reuben J.

2014-01-01

276

Psychosocial Predictors of Diabetes Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate whether a perception of responsibility for disease onset and self-blame might influence disease management in people with diabetes. Methods: Our survey assessed perceived responsibility for disease onset, self-blame, anger, social support, and disease management in a sample of 46 individuals with diabetes. Results: As

DePalma, Mary T.; Rollison, Julia; Camporese, Matthew

2011-01-01

277

Diabetic retinopathy: an historical assessment.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and is a significant cause of new-onset blindness. Diabetic macular changes in the form of yellowish spots and full or partial thickness extravasations through the retina were observed for the first time by Eduard Jger. In 1855, he published "Beitrge zur Pathologie des Auges" where he included his fundus paintings. Jaeger's findings were controversial until 1872, when Edward Nettleship published his seminal paper on "Oedema or cystic disease of the retina", providing the first histopathological proof of "cystoid degeneration of the macula" in patients with diabetes. In 1876, Wilhelm Manz described the proliferative changes occurring in diabetic retinopathy and the importance of tractional retinal detachments and vitreous haemorrhages. However, it was not until 1943 that the work of Arthur James Ballantyne provided evidence that diabetic retinopathy represents a unique form of vascular disease. A number of multi-centred clinical trials during the last ten years have contributed substantially to the understanding of the natural history of diabetic retinopathy and have established the value of intensive glycaemic control in reducing both the risk of onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:16728388

Kalantzis, George; Angelou, Michael; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie

2006-01-01

278

Spices and type 2 diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The paper is a review of current research on phytochemicals and how they may alleviate type 2 diabetes by improving insulin activity in the body. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Literature searches were conducted to find a link between common household spices and type 2 diabetes. Only common household spices were researched so that any link found between spices and type

Abigail Kelble

2005-01-01

279

Diabetes and Your Eyesight (Glaucoma)  

MedlinePLUS

... Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of sight-threatening eye problems that people with diabetes may develop. Glaucoma ... if these new blood vessels grow on the iris (the colored part of the eye), closing off the fluid flow in the eye ...

280

Insulin dependent diabetes in thalassaemia.  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus was observed in 29 of 448 patients with thalassaemia major attending seven Italian centres. Twelve patients, at onset of clinical diabetes, presented with an asymptomatic glycosuria, 13 with ketosis, and four with ketoacidosis. All were diagnosed after 1979, at a mean age of 17 years. Mean age at diagnosis of diabetes was lower in patients born in the last two decades. In these patients transfusions were started at a younger age and pre-transfusion haemoglobin concentration, serum ferritin concentration, incidence of liver disease, and the presence of a family history of diabetes were higher than in patients born previously. Although 27 (93%) cases had iron chelating treatment the mean serum ferritin concentration was 5600 micrograms/l; 25 (92%) of these patients had signs of liver impairment. The determination of C peptide in 10 patients showed a wide variation in pancreatic beta cell function, and insulin requirements ranged between 0.15 and 1.72 U/kg body weight. Metabolic control was generally poor. The onset of diabetes mellitus was followed in most patients by the appearance of other endocrine or cardiac complications, or both. Fourteen patients died within three years of presenting with overt diabetes. Haemosiderosis, liver infections, and genetic factors seemed to be crucial in diabetes development. Thalassaemic patients developing clinical diabetes mellitus are at high risk for other complications and should be strictly monitored, especially for thyroid impairment. PMID:3348650

De Sanctis, V; Zurlo, M G; Senesi, E; Boffa, C; Cavallo, L; Di Gregorio, F

1988-01-01

281

Insulin dependent diabetes in Asians.  

PubMed Central

Type 1 diabetes is said to be extremely rare in children in India, where diabetes treated with insulin may be due to chronic pancreatic disease or malnutrition. To see whether typical type 1 diabetes occurred in Asian children in the United Kingdom, all known Asian children with diabetes in industrial West Yorkshire were ascertained. A total of 17 such children were studied; of these, seven were from three multiplex families and two fathers from these families had diabetes. All children were ketosis prone and developed diabetes while resident in the UK. There were significant increases in HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 and increases in HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR3/DR4, while HLA-B15 was absent. Islet cell antibodies, either IgG or complement fixing, were present in four of 18 subjects tested, all of whom had disease of short duration. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes in Asian children aged 15 years or less in West Yorkshire was 36/100,000, assuming complete ascertainment. It is concluded that typical type 1 diabetes may occur in Asian children and this condition may be more common in families who have migrated to the UK. PMID:3494431

Bodansky, H J; Beverley, D W; Gelsthorpe, K; Saunders, A; Bottazzo, G F; Haigh, D

1987-01-01

282

TRICARE; diabetic education. Final rule.  

PubMed

The Department of Defense is publishing this final rule to clarify TRICARE coverage for diabetic education. This rule introduces new definitions and addresses revisions or omissions in policy or procedure inadvertently missed in previous regulatory changes pertaining to diabetic education. PMID:20695037

2010-08-01

283

Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

2013-01-01

284

Medical Vanguard Diabetes Management Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medical Vanguard Diabetes Management Project was designed to deploy an Internet based diabetes management system, MyCareTeam, into a number of existing diverse clinical environments and evaluate how such a stand-alone clinical information system can b...

S. K. Mun

2005-01-01

285

[Prevention of diabetic foot].  

PubMed

Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia, lipid disorders (treatment with fenofibrate reduces the incidence of DF amputations (EBM-Ib/A), hypertension, hyperuricemia, neuropathy, and angiopathy (surgical reconstructive bypass) or endovascular (percutaneous transluminar angioplasty). In the low-risk group of PwDM, no particular results can be achieved, in contrast to the high-risk groups of PwDM where patient and professional education has shown significant achievement (EBM-IV/C). In secondary prevention of DF, it is necessary to perform patient and professional education how to avoid most of external influences for DE Patient education should include all topics from primary prevention, danger of neural analgesia (no cooling or warming the foot), careful selection of shoes, daily observation of foot, early detection all foot changes or small wounds, daily hygiene of foot skin, which has to be clean and moist, regular self measurements of skin temperature between the two feet (EBM-Ib/A), prevention of self treatment of foot deformities, changing wrong habits (walking footless), medical consultation for even small foot changes (EBM-Ib/A) and consultation by multidisciplinary team (EBM-IIb/B). Tertiary DF prevention includes ulcer treatment, prevention of amputation and level of amputation. In spite of the primary and secondary prevention measures, DF ulcers develop very often. Because of different etiologic reasons as well as different principles of treatment which are at the same time prevention of the level of amputation, the approach to PwDF has to be multidisciplinary. A high place in the treatment of DF ulcers, especially neuropathic ulcers, have the off-loading principles (EBM-Ib/A), even instead of surgical treatment (EBM-Ib/A). Necrectomy, taking samples for analysis from the deep of ulcer, together with x-ray diagnostics (in particular NMR), the size of the changes can be detected, together with appropriate antibiotic use and indication for major surgical treatment. The patient has to be instructed to the involved DF with off-loading (EBM-IIb/A). Negative pressure wound therapy can accelerate th

Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljaci? Crkvenci?, Neva

2013-10-01

286

Diabetes mellitus classification.  

PubMed

The right classification for diabetes mellitus (DM) allows a more adequate treatment and comprises four categories: type 1 DM, type 2 DM, other types, and gestational diabetes. In some cases, there might be a superposition of situations, especially with regard to the DM that initiates in the young adult or is initially presented with diabetic ketoacidosis intermediately to type 1 and 2 DM. Thus, additions to the classic classification system have been proposed as assessing the presence of autoimmunity (antibody) and b cell function (C-peptide) to precisely define the subtypes. The aim of this literature review was to analyze these diagnostic indexes` performance in the DM classification and to describe subtypes with details. The antibodies against pancreas confirm autoimmunity, and the antibody against insulin is more accurate before 5 years old, while the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase is more accurate after 20 years old, a test which remains positive for a longer period. The measurement of C-peptide evaluates the pancreatic insulin reserve, and the most largely used methods of stimulation are the measurement after meals or after intravenous glucagon. C-peptide values < 1.5 ng/ml define a patient with absent pancreatic function and, above this value, patients with preserved function. When the presence of antibodies (A+) directed to the pancreas is combined to its insulin secretion capability (?+), it is possible to subdivide DM`s classification in type 1A (A+?-) and 1B (A+?-); and type 2A (A+?+) and 2B (A-?+), which allows a more precise classification and treatment besides opening horizons for the understanding of DM pathogenesis. PMID:20857049

Maraschin, Jorge de Faria; Murussi, Ndia; Witter, Vanessa; Silveiro, Sandra Pinho

2010-08-01

287

Diabetes mellitus and electrolyte disorders  

PubMed Central

Diabetic patients frequently develop a constellation of electrolyte disorders. These disturbances are particularly common in decompensated diabetics, especially in the context of diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. These patients are markedly potassium-, magnesium- and phosphate-depleted. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is linked to both hypo- and hyper-natremia reflecting the coexistence of hyperglycemia-related mechanisms, which tend to change serum sodium to opposite directions. The most important causal factor of chronic hyperkalemia in diabetic individuals is the syndrome of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism. Impaired renal function, potassium-sparing drugs, hypertonicity and insulin deficiency are also involved in the development of hyperkalemia. This article provides an overview of the electrolyte disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. This insight should pave the way for pathophysiology-directed therapy, thus contributing to the avoidance of the several deleterious effects associated with electrolyte disorders and their treatment.

Liamis, George; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses

2014-01-01

288

Caffeine, diabetes, cognition, and dementia.  

PubMed

People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the impact of T2DM on cognition is addressed. Finally, the potential for caffeine to modulate the risk of cognitive decline in the context of diabetes is explored. The conclusion is that, although epidemiological studies indicate that coffee/caffeine consumption is associated with a decreased risk of T2DM and possibly also with a decreased dementia risk, we can at present not be certain that these associations are causal. For now, recommendations for coffee consumption in individuals with T2DM or pre-diabetic stages are therefore difficult to establish, but it should be acknowledged that caffeine does appear to have several properties that warrant further investigations in this field. PMID:20182038

Biessels, Geert Jan

2010-01-01

289

Diabetes mellitus and electrolyte disorders.  

PubMed

Diabetic patients frequently develop a constellation of electrolyte disorders. These disturbances are particularly common in decompensated diabetics, especially in the context of diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. These patients are markedly potassium-, magnesium- and phosphate-depleted. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is linked to both hypo- and hyper-natremia reflecting the coexistence of hyperglycemia-related mechanisms, which tend to change serum sodium to opposite directions. The most important causal factor of chronic hyperkalemia in diabetic individuals is the syndrome of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism. Impaired renal function, potassium-sparing drugs, hypertonicity and insulin deficiency are also involved in the development of hyperkalemia. This article provides an overview of the electrolyte disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. This insight should pave the way for pathophysiology-directed therapy, thus contributing to the avoidance of the several deleterious effects associated with electrolyte disorders and their treatment. PMID:25325058

Liamis, George; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses

2014-10-16

290

Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.  

PubMed

Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with dietitians and podiatrists. PMID:22282737

O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

2012-03-01

291

The Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes Support Group  

E-print Network

The Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Type 1 Diabetes Support Group Our support group is dedicated to adults of all ages (16 years and older) with type 1 diabetes. Each month most our time will be for sharing and a professional from our diabetes center will present a short diabetes-related topic

Chapman, Michael S.

292

Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of your diabetes and  

E-print Network

1 Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of your diabetes and prevent some of the serious problems diabetes can cause. The more you know, the better you can manage your diabetes. Share this booklet with your family and friends so they will understand more about diabetes. Also make sure to ask

Rau, Don C.

293

Diabetes Care. Author manuscript Hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes, and depressive symptoms: the British  

E-print Network

Diabetes Care. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes, and depressive symptoms calixte cavalier 34093 MONTPELLIER CEDEX 5,FR Steno Diabetes Center9 Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte suggestion that impaired fasting glucose may protect against depression, whereas a diagnosis of diabetes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

Tips for Teens with Diabetes: Dealing with the Ups and Downs of Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... and Downs of Diabetes Tips for Teens with Diabetes: Dealing With the Ups and Downs of Diabetes Download This Publication (NDEP-81) Want this item now? Download it here: Tips for Teens with Diabetes: Dealing With the Ups and Downs of Diabetes ( ...

295

What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that causes you to have high blood sugar.  

E-print Network

What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that causes you to have high blood sugar. DIABETES IS HIGH BLOOD SUGAR We all have sugar in our blood. When you have diabetes you have too much sugar in your blood muscles can then use sugar for fuel. Insulin keeps blood sugar in balance. #12; If you have diabetes

296

For People with Diabetes. Seven Principles for Controlling Your Diabetes for Life.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Principle 1: Learn as Much as You Can About Diabetes; Principle 2: Get Regular Care for Your Diabetes; Principle 3: Learn How to Control Your Diabetes; Principle 4: Take Care of Your Diabetes ABCs; Principle 5: Monitor Your Diabetes ABCs; Princi...

2004-01-01

297

Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young  

MedlinePLUS

... mellitus: from understudy to center stage. Current Opinion in Pediatrics . 2005;17:512-518. Vaxillaire M, Froguel P. Genetic basis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America . 2006;35:371-384. [ Top ] National Diabetes Information ...

298

Osteoporosis-associated fracture and diabetes.  

PubMed

Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus are chronic diseases with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased fracture risk. Fracture as a complication of diabetes must be considered when evaluating and treating patients with diabetes. PMID:24582100

Kurra, Salila; Fink, Dorothy A; Siris, Ethel S

2014-03-01

299

Dietary Changes for Persons with Diabetes  

E-print Network

D. Dietary Changes for Persons with Diabetes #12;Reference Guide HANDOUT Working with Persons Who Have Diabetes Follow these guidelines to work with consumers who request nutrition information on preventing or treating diabetes. Without Written Prescriptions If a client with diabetes seeks assistance

300

Genetics Home Reference: Type 1 diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... 1 diabetes is generally considered to be an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system attacks the body's ... gov - Linking patients to medical research OMIM - Genetic disorder catalog (22 ... autoimmune diabetes diabetes mellitus, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus type ...

301

Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida  

MedlinePLUS

Adequate treatment of pre-diabetes and diabetes can add years to the life of people with Spina Bifida, and are worth the effort What ... comes on slowly, and may initially appear as pre-diabetes, also called metabolic syndrome. What is Pre-diabetes? ...

302

Diabetes Mellitus: Does it Affect Bone?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both diabetes and fractures affect a large proportion of older adults. Recent cohort studies indicate that diabetes itself is associated with increased risk of fracture of the hip, proximal humerus, and foot. Observational studies and animal models suggest that decreased bone strength in diabetes may contribute to fracture risk but this remains a controversial issue. Type 1 diabetes is associated

A. V. Schwartz

2003-01-01

303

Role of Leukocytes in Diabetic Microcirculatory Disturbances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various rheological abnormalities of the blood have been widely reported in diabetes. However, it remains unclear which one affects blood flow at the level of microcirculation, an important site in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. To differentiate which blood component leads to microcirculatory disturbances in diabetes, we studied the hemorheological properties of diabetic patients using an array flow analyzer that

Kazuaki Miyamoto; Yuichiro Ogura; Seiji Kenmochi; Yoshihito Honda

1997-01-01

304

Diabetic Nephropathy: A Frontier for Personalized Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic nephropathy (DNP) develops after latency periods that may vary by several years in approximately one third of patients with diabetes. This diabetic complication is a complex disorder whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to ESRD. Despite rapid research progress, robust predictors to assess prospectively with high precision the risk for DNP in individuals with diabetes

Katalin Susztak; Erwin P. Bottinger

2006-01-01

305

Multidisciplinary Approach to Managing Diabetic Patient Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Revised criteria by the American Diabetes Association defined diabetes as serum glucose greater than 126mg\\/dl. This revision was expected to increase the number of individuals diagnosed with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to use a multidisciplinary approach to determine the impact on the Healthcare system of the increased number of individuals diagnosed with diabetes and to determine compliance

P. P. Jones; C. Plank; S. Morse

1999-01-01

306

The Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center  

E-print Network

with diabetes. This team works with patients to formulate a more holistic treatment plan, including supportThe Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center Investing in the future of diabetes care and support for our region #12;Diabetes: A Growing Public Health Challenge · Today more than 21 million Americans have

Chapman, Michael S.

307

[Patophysiology of diabetic retinopathy].  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the affection of the retina in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The basic causative factor is prolonged hyperglycaemia. DR is microangiopathy, ie impairment of retinal capillaries. Pathophysiology of DR is very complex and there are involved in many factors. The first and most fundamental factor is the failure blood-retinal barrier (BRB). The major mechanism causing malfunction of BRB are advanced glycation end-products (AGE). In the failure of the inner BRB are involved losses of endothelial cells in capillaries, together with the losses of pericytes. A very important role in the failure of BRB plays too increased adhesivity of leukocytes. Further important role play also AGE and their receptor RAGE. They stimulate cascade of pathological processes damaging BRB. The second important factors in the pathophysiology of DR are vasoactive factors. The most important is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), further than protein kinase C (PKC), histamine, angiotensin II, matrix metaloproteinases. The third important factor in the pathophysiology of DR is the vitreoretinal interface. There plays important role detachment of posterior vitreous, cortical vitreous, internal limiting membrane. PMID:23713183

Kolr, P

2013-03-01

308

Shift work and diabetes - A systematic review.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, which has an increasing trend all over the world. Type 2 diabetes constitutes 90% of all diabetes. It is associated with weight gain and insulin resistance. Research during recent years has suggested that shift work could be a risk factor of type 2 diabetes. Since shift work is becoming more common, it could contribute to the increasing trend of diabetes. In this systematic review, we have studied the potential association between shift work and type 2 diabetes. We have also reviewed studies on control of diabetes in relation to shift work. PMID:25290038

Knutsson, Anders; Kempe, Anders

2014-12-01

309

Diagnosing and Treating Diabetic Foot Infections Diyabetik Ayak ?nfeksiyonlarinin Tani ve Tedavisi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Persons with diabetes often develop foot wounds, which frequent- ly become infected. Infections typically involve soft tissues at fi rst, but can spread to underlying bone. These infections cause con- siderable morbidity and are often the proximate cause of lower extremity amputation. Many studies in the past few years have improved knowledge of the most appropriate ways to diagnose and

Benjamin A. Lipsky

310

MANTENIMIENTO CON PILATES FUNDAMENTACIN  

E-print Network

MANTENIMIENTO CON PILATES FUNDAMENTACI?N Esta disciplina pretende fusionar la gimnasia de mantenimiento con los beneficios que conlleva el método Pilates. Para ello vamos a definir el método Pilates como un sistema de entrenamiento físico y mental creado a principios del siglo XX por Joseph Pilates

Escolano, Francisco

311

Management of ischemic diabetic foot.  

PubMed

Diabetic foot pathology represent the more disabling complication of diabetes. More the 1 million of diabetes patients undergo a lower limb amputation per year; 85% of these amputation are preceded by un ulcer that can be avoided by a prevention program. Critical limb ischemia (CLI), the only independent cause of major amputation in diabetic population, can be correctly treated when an early diagnosis is made. Both endoluminal and surgical revascularization procedures can be applied in diabetes with high rate of success when performed by skilled operator. Infection of diabetic foot, in particular in patients suffering from peripheral artery disease (PVD), may rapidly evolves in severe local or systemic infection putting the patient at high risk of major amputation or death. Together with an early diagnosis of infection and ischemia it is mandatory to apply a correct medical and surgical treatment protocol with the aim to control infection and to improve blood perfusion to the foot. In case of infection surgical procedure should be applied first while revascularization procedure will follow soonest. Antibiotic therapy should be chosen considering different local biological pattern and different type of infection. Reconstructive surgery, the last step in treatment of any diabetic foot lesion, must obtain a functional residual foot or a stump that will allow the patient to go back walking soonest with residual good walking capacity. PMID:24126511

Caravaggi, C; Ferraresi, R; Bassetti, M; Sganzaroli, A B; Galenda, P; Fattori, S; De Prisco, R; Simonetti, D; Bona, F

2013-12-01

312

DIABETES MELLITUS COMO FACTOR DE RIESGO DE DEMENCIA EN LA POBLACI?N ADULTA MAYOR MEXICANA  

PubMed Central

Introduccion La diabetes mellitus y las demencias constituyen dos problemas crecientes de salud entre la poblacin adulta mayor del mundo y en particular de los paises en desarrollo. Hacen falta estudios longitudinales sobre el papel de la diabetes como factor de riesgo para demencia. Objetivo Determinar el riesgo de demencia en sujetos Mexicanos con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Materiales y Metodos Los sujetos diabticos libres de demencia pertenecientes al Estudio Nacional de Salud y Envejecimiento en Mxico fueron evaluados a los dos aos de la lnea de base. Se estudi el papel de los factores sociodemogrficos, de otras comorbilidades y del tipo de tratamiento en la conversin a demencia. Resultados Durante la lnea de base 749 sujetos (13.8%) tuvieron diabetes. El riesgo de desarrollar demencia en estos individuos fue el doble (RR, 2.08 IC 95%, 1.592.73). Se encontr un riesgo mayor en individuos de 80 aos y ms (RR 2.44 IC 95%, 1.464.08), en los hombres (RR, 2.25 IC 95%, 1.463.49) y en sujetos con nivel educativo menor de 7 aos. El estar bajo tratamiento con insulina increment el riesgo de demencia (RR, 2.83, IC 95%, 1.585.06). Las otras comorbilidades que aumentaron el riesgo de demencia en los pacientes diabticos fueron la hipertensin (RR, 2.75, IC 95%, 1.864.06) y la depresin (RR, 3.78, 95% IC 2.376.04). Conclusin Los sujetos con diabetes mellitus tienen un riesgo mayor de desarrollar demencia, La baja escolaridad y otras comorbilidades altamente prevalentes en la poblacin Mexicana contribuyen a la asociacin diabetes-demencia. PMID:21948010

Silvia, Mejia-Arango; Clemente, y Zuniga-Gil

2012-01-01

313

Diabetic retinopathy: an Indian perspective.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) can be defined as damage to microvascular system in the retina due to prolonged hyperglycaemia. The prevalence of DR in the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology (CURES) Eye Study in south India was 17.6 per cent, significantly lower than age-matched western counterparts. However, due to the large number of diabetic subjects, DR is likely to pose a public health burden in India. CURES Eye study showed that the major systemic risk factors for onset and progression of DR are duration of diabetes, degree of glycaemic control and hyperlipidaemia. Hypertension did not play a major role in this cross-sectional analysis. The role of oxidative stress, atherosclerotic end points and genetic factors in susceptibility to DR has been studied. It was found that DR was associated with increased intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness in type 2 Indian diabetic subjects suggesting that common pathogenic mechanisms might predispose to diabetic microangiopathy. Curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric, has been shown to inhibit proliferation of retinal endothelial cells in vivo. Visual disability from DR is largely preventable if managed with timely intervention by laser. It has been clearly demonstrated that in type 2 south Indian diabetic patients with proliferative DR who underwent Pan retinal photocoagulation, 73 per cent eyes with good visual acuity (6/9) at baseline maintained the same vision at 1 yr follow up. There is evidence that DR begins to develop years before the clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Our earlier study demonstrated that DR is present in 7 per cent of newly diagnosed subjects, hence routine retinal screening for DR even at the time of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes may help in optimized laser therapy. Annual retinal examination and early detection of DR can considerably reduce the risk of visual loss in diabetic individuals. PMID:17496357

Rema, M; Pradeepa, R

2007-03-01

314

Births Rate of Maternal Diabetes 1  

E-print Network

System (APORS) with one or more birth defects are significantly more likely to have diabetic mothers than other Illinois newborns (p diabetes.] The birth certificate also contains a field that indicates whether the mother had diabetes during pregnancy, but does not distinguish between gestational vs. pre-existing diabetes. Table 1. The rate (per 10,000 live births) of maternal diabetes among different populations of Illinois children, 1994-1998

unknown authors

315

76 FR 9587 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...communication, and collaboration on diabetes among government entities...discuss current and future diabetes programs in DMICC member organizations...DMICC meeting will discuss ``Diabetes: A1c/Questions/ Diagnosis.'' Any member of the...

2011-02-18

316

[Ear diseases and diabetes mellitus].  

PubMed

In the literature there is very little information about the importance of diabetes mellitus for ear diseases. Therefore, this article gives an overview about contact points between endocrinological and otological problems in patients with diseases of the ear and pre-existing diabetes mellitus. In particular the focus is on the impact of diabetes mellitus on patients with external otitis, malignant external otitis, otitis media, sudden sensorineural hearing loss and slowly progressive hearing loss. Diseases, such as osteomyelitis of the lateral skull base, sudden and slowly progressive hearing loss are also discussed in detail. PMID:25370360

Avetisyan, N; Lautermann, J

2014-11-01

317

Imaging of diabetic foot infections.  

PubMed

Complications from diabetic foot infections are a leading cause of nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations. Nearly 85% of these amputations result from an infected foot ulcer. Osteomyelitis is present in approximately 20% of diabetic foot infections. It is imperative that clinicians make quick and successful diagnoses of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) because a delay in treatment may lead to worsening outcomes. Imaging studies, such as plain films, bone scans, musculoskeletal ultrasound, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans, aid in the diagnosis. However, there are several mimickers of DFO, which present problems to making a correct diagnosis. PMID:24296017

Fridman, Robert; Bar-David, Tzvi; Kamen, Stewart; Staron, Ronald B; Leung, David K; Rasiej, Michael J

2014-01-01

318

[Diabetic Foot Syndrome and Diabetic Neuropathic Osteoarthropathy (DNOAP)].  

PubMed

A diabetic foot or Charcot foot diagnosed in time can reduce a lot of problems for the patient, lessen high medical expense, and last but not least prevent an amputation. Good treatment options of the diabetic foot result from new technologies in wound management, angioplastic vessel improvement and optimised orthopaedic aids. Nevertheless it stays a challenging issue for practitioners and medical and health care as well as hospital owners to master this problem which will be even growing in the long run. This article intends to raise the awareness for the diabetic foot and the neuropathic osteoarthropathy, and furthermore illustrate diagnostic steps and offer therapeutic options. After distinguishing the diabetic foot from the Charcot foot a selective therapy for each entity has to be initiated. An interdisciplinary approach of specialists in dermatology, radiology, orthopaedic and internal medicine, plastic surgery and orthopaedic shoemaking is essential for a good therapeutic monitoring in order to avoid the amputation of the lower leg. PMID:25313707

Hofstaetter, S G; Trieb, K

2014-10-01

319

Long-term lifestyle intervention lowers the incidence of stroke in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: a nationwide multicentre randomised controlled trial (the Japan Diabetes Complications Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims\\/hypothesisThe aim of the study was to clarify whether a therapeutic intervention focused on lifestyle modification affected the incidence\\u000a of vascular complications in patients with established diabetes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MethodsA total of 2,033 eligible Japanese men and women aged 4070years with type 2 diabetes from 59 institutes were randomised\\u000a to a conventional treatment group (CON), which continued to receive the usual care,

H. Sone; S. Tanaka; S. Iimuro; K. Oida; Y. Yamasaki; S. Oikawa; S. Ishibashi; S. Katayama; H. Yamashita; H. Ito; Y. Yoshimura; Y. Ohashi; Y. Akanuma; N. Yamada

2010-01-01

320

Enzymatic vitrectomy for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema  

PubMed Central

The aim of this paper is to determine the role of enzymatic vitrectomy performed by intravitreal injection of autologous plasmin enzyme (APE) in the management of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME). Diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or DME and evident posterior hyaloid adherence to the retinal surface were included. All cases were treated with an initial intravitreal injection of APE and reevaluated one month later, measuring changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), macular thickness and the status of the posterior hyaloid. A second APE injection was performed in cases with no evident posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) after the initial treatment. Sixty-three eyes were included in the present review. A complete PVD appeared in 38% of cases (24 eyes) after one injection of plasmin and the total increased to 51% (32 eyes) after the second injection, separated at least by one month. The central macular thickness improved in all cases (100%) and BCVA in 89%. Finally, in 50% of eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, a high reduction of new vessels regression was observed. Enzymatic vitrectomy could be considered a good therapeutic alternative in diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. PMID:24379923

Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; Udaondo, Patricia; Millan, Jose Maria; Arevalo, J Fernando

2013-01-01

321

Bariatric surgery and diabetes.  

PubMed

Obesity is a relatively new and serious world-wide epidemic. Obesity is a stronger predictor in mortality than either poverty or smoking, and obesity is also now more prevalent than malnutrition. The prevalence of obesity continues to increase, ironically, the rate of increase of obesity is highest amongst the morbidly obesity. Obesity is the result of many factors resulting in concert, including poor dietary habits, reduced physical activity and genetic predisposition. With the rapid increase in obesity there has been a pronounced increase in obesity-related metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and many others. These co-morbidities are responsible for more than 2.5 million deaths, worldwide. The loss of life expectancy due to obesity is profound. In comparison to a normal weight individual Caucasian, a 25-year-old morbidly obese man has a 22% reduction in the expected remaining life span, representing an approximate loss of 12 years of life. PMID:23565385

Collier, Andrew

2012-12-01

322

Medication Nonadherence in Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To examine the longitudinal effects of medication nonadherence (MNA) on key costs and estimate potential savings from increased adherence using a novel methodology that accounts for shared correlation among cost categories. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Veterans with type 2 diabetes (740,195) were followed from January 2002 until death, loss to follow-up, or December 2006. A novel multivariate, generalized, linear, mixed modeling approach was used to assess the differential effect of MNA, defined as medication possession ratio (MPR) ?0.8 on healthcare costs. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess potential cost savings at different MNA levels using the Consumer Price Index to adjust estimates to 2012 dollar value. RESULTS Mean MPR for the full sample over 5 years was 0.78, with a mean of 0.93 for the adherent group and 0.58 for the MNA group. In fully adjusted models, all annual cost categories increased ?3% per year (P = 0.001) during the 5-year study time period. MNA was associated with a 37% lower pharmacy cost, 7% lower outpatient cost, and 41% higher inpatient cost. Based on sensitivity analyses, improving adherence in the MNA group would result in annual estimated cost savings ranging from ?$661 million (MPR <0.6 vs. ?0.6) to ?$1.16 billion (MPR <1 vs. 1). Maximal incremental annual savings would occur by raising MPR from <0.8 to ?0.8 ($204,530,778) among MNA subjects. CONCLUSIONS Aggressive strategies and policies are needed to achieve optimal medication adherence in diabetes. Such approaches may further the so-called triple aim of achieving better health, better quality care, and lower cost. PMID:22912429

Egede, Leonard E.; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Dismuke, Clara E.; Lynch, Cheryl P.; Axon, R. Neal; Zhao, Yumin; Mauldin, Patrick D.

2012-01-01

323

Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D scale) and the problem areas in diabetes (PAID) questionnaire were used to assess depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress in 1200 newly diagnosed male adult patients with type 2 diabetes before and after a two-week diabetes education by professionally trained nurses. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the factors related to depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results: The incidence of depression in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes was 28%, and the rate of diabetes-specific emotional distress was 65.5%. High education levels, low income were correlated to depression in individuals with diabetes. After two weeks of diabetes education, the incidence of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress decreased significantly to 20.5% (P < 0.05) and 11% (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of depression, especially diabetes-specific emotional distress, was relatively high in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. The depression state could be improved by diabetes education. PMID:24353709

Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

2013-01-01

324

Health Promotion in diabetes care : Studies on adult type 1 diabetes patients.  

E-print Network

??Introduction: A landmark report has shown that improving glycaemic control among type 1 diabetes patients markedly reduces diabetes-related complications. In clinical practice, however, many patients (more)

Amsberg, Susanne

2008-01-01

325

Cognitive Interventions for Older Diabetics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older diabetic adults should receive memory training to improve their compliance with medication taking. The intervention should include comprehensible medical instructions, assistance with remembering the nutritional values of food, and higher order skills for disease management. (SK)

Black, Sheila; Scogin, Forrest

1998-01-01

326

Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ... and the carbs in food. Back Continue Balancing Carbohydrates In addition to serving a balanced diet of ...

327

Diabetes in Hispanics/Latinos  

MedlinePLUS

... Your Life/ Movimiento Por Su Vida This lively music CD helps Hispanics and Latinos incorporate more movement ... can help prevent and manage diabetes. Use this music CD to encourage individuals or groups to exercise. ...

328

Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... blood at a health care providers office or commercial facility and sending the sample to a lab ... 2010;33:676682. Recommendations for Testing Pregnant Women for Diabetes Time of testing ACOG ADA At ...

329

Second Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Second Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting on October 31 - November 2, 2002 at the Atlanta Hyatt Regency Hotel was co-sponsored by the Technologies for Metabolic Monitoring Joint Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NASA, Juvenile Diabe...

D. C. Klonoff

2000-01-01

330

Diabetes Insipidus, Central (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: Hormones Endocrine System Immune System Kidneys and Urinary Tract Diabetes Center ...

331

Living with Type 1 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy ... the Experts Common diabetes questions answered by doctors, nurses, nutritionists, and more. GET ANSWERS We Can Help - ...

332

Multifocal electroretinogram in diabetic subjects  

PubMed Central

Purpose To identify local retinal abnormalities and evaluate the nature and extent of retinal dysfunction in diabetics using full field electroretinogram (ERG) and multifocal ERG (MF-ERG) and to determine the correlation between features of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and MF-ERG. Methods Twenty-eight normal subjects (Control Group; 56 eyes) and 37 patients (72 eyes) with diabetes mellitus (DM Group) were evaluated. In the DM Group, 17 eyes had no retinopathy (grade 1), 18 eyes had early non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) (grade 3), 16 eyes had late NPDR (grade 4), 21 eyes had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (grade 5). Full field ERG and MF-ERG, were used to assess the effects of diabetic retinopathy on retinal function. OCT and fluorescein angiography were used to assess and compare morphological changes with functional changes in diabetes mellitus. Results In diabetic patients without retinopathy (17 eyes), the amplitudes of the second order component of MF-ERG were reduced and implicit times were delayed, while only implicit times of first order component of MF-ERG were delayed but the amplitudes of first order component were normal. In diabetic patients with retinopathy (55 eyes), the overall amplitudes were reduced and peak implicit time increased in the first order component and second order component. OCT of the DM Group showed the fovea of eyes with edema were thicker than the Normal Group. The fovea of eyes with cystoid macular edema (CME) were significantly thicker than the fovea of eyes with diffuse swelling. The implicit times of MF-ERG were directly correlated with foveal thickness. Conclusion MF-ERG reveals local retinal dysfunction in diabetic patients. MF-ERG offers the advantage of topographic mapping of retinal dysfunction. The magnitude of delay of MF-ERG implicit time reflects the degree of local clinical abnormalities in eyes with retinopathy. Local response delays found in eyes without retinopathy detects subclinical local retinal dysfunction in diabetics. The combination of OCT and MF-ERG may provide objective criteria for evaluation and assessment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24227968

Abdelkader, Mona

2012-01-01

333

Measuring Diabetes Self-Care  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To examine psychometric properties of the Self-Care Inventory-revised (SCI-R), a self-report measure of perceived adherence to diabetes self-care recommendations, among adults with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used three data sets of adult type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients to examine psychometric properties of the SCI-R. Principal component and factor analyses examined whether a general factor or common factors were present. Associations with measures of theoretically related concepts were examined to assess SCI-R concurrent and convergent validity. Internal reliability coefficients were calculated. Responsiveness was assessed using paired t tests, effect size, and Guyatt's statistic for type 1 patients who completed psychoeducation. RESULTS Principal component and factor analyses identified a general factor but no consistent common factors. Internal consistency of the SCI-R was ? = 0.87. Correlation with a measure of frequency of diabetes self-care behaviors was r = 0.63, providing evidence for SCI-R concurrent validity. The SCI-R correlated with diabetes-related distress (r = ?0.36), self-esteem (r = 0.25), self-efficacy (r = 0.47), depression (r = ?0.22), anxiety (r = ?0.24), and HbA1c (r = ?0.37), supporting construct validity. Responsiveness analyses showed SCI-R scores improved with diabetes psychoeducation with a medium effect size of 0.62 and a Guyatt's statistic of 0.85. CONCLUSIONS The SCI-R is a brief, psychometrically sound measure of perceptions of adherence to recommended diabetes self-care behaviors of adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. PMID:15920050

Weinger, Katie; Butler, Heather A.; Welch, Garry W.; La Greca, Annette M.

2006-01-01

334

A Pathfinder for Juvenile Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organized especially for students, parents, and guardians of Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas, this pathfinder includes fiction and nonfiction books with helpful information on the research, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetes. Fiction is added for leisurely entertainment and comparison to reality. Care and self-help informational books; low-fat, high-fiber recipe books; and magazines especially for diabetics are given. It provides

Maxine Streeter

2000-01-01

335

Prostacyclin and thromboxane in diabetes.  

PubMed Central

Concentrations of the stable antiaggregatory prostacyclin metabolite 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and of the proaggregatory thromboxane A2 metabolite thromboxane B2 were measured by radioimmunoassay in plasma from 53 diabetics. In 33 of these patients the ability of platelets to produce thromboxane B2 during spontaneous clotting was also studied. Plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha concentrations were higher (p less than 0.05) in the diabetics (mean 107.7 +/- SE 7.6 ng/l) than in non-diabetic controls matched for age and sex (87.5 +/- 4.7 ng/l), and diabetics with microangiography (n = 28) and higher (p less than 0.01) concentrations (124.3 +/- 10.8 ng/l) than those without microangiography (n = 25; 89.2 +/- 9.3 ng/l). Plasma thromboxane B2 concentrations were also higher (p less than 0.01) in the diabetics (mean 218.5 +/- SE 25.3 ng/l) than in the controls (127.7 +/- 9.8 ng/l), but this increase was not related to microangiography. The ability of platelets to generate thromboxane B2 did not differ between the diabetics (181.4 +/- 16.4 microgram/l) and controls (195.8 +/- 11.8 microgram/l). Platelets of diabetics with microangiopathy or taking oral hypoglycaemic agents (n = 19), however, produced decreased amounts of thromboxane B2 during clotting. Plasma concentrations of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2 were not related to concentrations of glucose, haemoglobin A1, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, cholesterol, triglycerides, magnesium, or creatinine. These results suggest that in diabetics with microangiopathy a balance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 is shifted to dominance by prostacyclin. PMID:6794795

Ylikorkala, O; Kaila, J; Viinikka, L

1981-01-01

336

ANTICUERPOS ANTI 21 HIDROXILASA SERICOS EN PACIENTES CON ANTICUERPOS ANTIFRACCION MICROSOMAL SINDROME POLIENDOCRINO AUTOINMUNE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resumen El sndrome poliendocrino autoinmune (SPA) es la asociacin de enfermedades endocrinas autoinmu- nes con otros desrdenes autoinmunes no endocrinos. Los tipos 1, 2 y 4 presentan adrenalitis autoinmune, esto indica la presencia de autoanticuerpos, y su marcador serolgico especfico es el anti 21 hidroxilasa (a21-OH). El SPA tipo 2 es la asociacin de adrenalitis, enfermedad tiroidea y\\/o diabetes mellitus

SILVIA BOTTA; SILVANA ROVETO; DANIEL RIMOLDI

337

Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s) responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1), and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease. PMID:24286082

Kowluru, Renu A.; Santos, Julia M.; Mishra, Manish

2013-01-01

338

Eicosanoids, ?-Cell Function, and Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes into eicosanoids, which are involved in diverse diseases, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. During the last thirty years, evidence has been accumulated that suggests important functions for eicosanoids in the control of pancreatic ?-cell function and destruction. AA metabolites of the COX pathway, especially prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), appear to be significant factors to ?-cell dysfunction and destruction, participating in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Several elegant studies have contributed to the sorting out of the importance of 12-LOX eicosanoids in cytokine-mediated inflammation in pancreatic ? cells. The role of CYP eicosanoids in diabetes is yet to be explored. A recent publication has demonstrated that stabilizing the levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), CYP eicosanoids, by inhibiting or deleting soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) improves ?-cell function and reduces ?-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In this review we summarize recent findings implicating these eicosanoid pathways in diabetes and its complications. We also discuss the development of animal models with targeted gene deletion and specific enzymatic inhibitors in each pathway to identify potential targets for the treatment of diabetes and its complications. PMID:21757024

Luo, Pengcheng; Wang, Mong-Heng

2011-01-01

339

Diabetes: Models, Signals and control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diabetes and its complications impose significant economic consequences on individuals, families, health systems, and countries. The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes significant components of modeling, signal processing and control. Models: first, I will discuss the minimal (coarse) models which describe the key components of the system functionality and are capable of measuring crucial processes of glucose metabolism and insulin control in health and diabetes; then, the maximal (fine-grain) models which include comprehensively all available knowledge about system functionality and are capable to simulate the glucose-insulin system in diabetes, thus making it possible to create simulation scenarios whereby cost effective experiments can be conducted in silico to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies - in particular I will focus on the first in silico simulation model accepted by FDA as a substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. Signals: I will review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the crucial role of models to enhance the interpretation of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Control: I will review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, I will discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers.

Cobelli, C.

2010-07-01

340

Epigenetic modifications and diabetic retinopathy.  

PubMed

Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s) responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1), and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease. PMID:24286082

Kowluru, Renu A; Santos, Julia M; Mishra, Manish

2013-01-01

341

[Personalized therapy for diabetes in retrospect and prospect].  

PubMed

In recent years, the term "personalized medicine" has been increasingly mentioned in relation to the endeavours to tailor the pharmaceutical as well as regimen therapy to the needs and requirements of individual patients. The personalization of antidiabetic treatment has undergone a dramatic advancement in relation to the expansion of knowledge about diabetes. From the empirical it moved forward to the phenotypic level which made it possible to differentiate between individual types of diabetes. The pathogenetic personalization which began to be used within Type 2 diabetes in the 1960s, was based on the assumption that while insulin resistance predominates in some patients, others are mainly affected by insulin secretion deficit. Biostatistics-personalized medicine (evidence based medicine) gathered evidence based on which metformin was included in recommendations on the therapy for Type 2 diabetes as a first-line drug. Although randomized studies during the first decade of the 21st century did not prove superiority of any other treatment modality as an adjunctive therapy used with metformin, they brought with them individualization of the goals of glycemic con-trol. At present, personalization is heading towards the pharmacogenetic level that will enable in the near future individualized therapy in terms of choice of first-, second- and third-line drugs depending on the panel of key gene polymorphisms which characterize sensitivity of an individual to specific antidiabetics. Finally, the "tailor-maded therapy" should be chosen based on a synthesis of pathogenetic, biostatistic and pharmacogenetic knowledge that will reflect the translation of results of the basic biomedical research into the clinical practice.Key words: evidence based medicine - pathogenesis - personalized therapy - pharmacogenetics - type 2 diabetes. PMID:25294772

Tk?, Ivan

2014-01-01

342

Living with Diabetes: Finding the Support You Need Video  

MedlinePLUS

... Living with Diabetes: Finding the Support You Need Video If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you ... Living with Diabetes: Finding the Support You Need Video (MP4) Keywords: self-management , behavior change , National Diabetes ...

343

Diabetes in Older People - A Disease You Can Manage  

MedlinePLUS

... can do to lower your risk. What Is Diabetes? Our bodies change the food we eat into ... people with diabetes, called an endocrinologist. Types Of Diabetes There are two kinds of diabetes that can ...

344

42 CFR 410.18 - Diabetes screening tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diabetes screening tests. 410.18 Section...Other Health Services 410.18 Diabetes screening tests. (a) Definitions...the following definitions apply: Diabetes means diabetes mellitus,...

2012-10-01

345

What I Need to Know about Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics Research Resources Order About Us Espaol National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse Publications Tools and Resources E-News ... Diabetes Medicines What I need to know about Diabetes Medicines On this page: What do diabetes medicines ...

346

Diabetes and Flu: What You Need to Know and Do  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 Diabetes in the United States CDC Study Gestational Diabetes Diabetes in the United States Heart Disease and ... Must Not Be Shared Lifetime Risk for Diabetes Mellitus in the United States Screening for Type 2 ...

347

Diabetics Face Much Greater Risk of Heart Damage, Study Says  

MedlinePLUS

... new study suggest that people with diabetes and pre-diabetes may be suffering undetectable -- but potentially dangerous -- heart ... underscores the need for prevention of diabetes and pre-diabetes." The study relied on an ultra-sensitive test ...

348

Preventing Complications in Diabetes Mellitus (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... type 1 diabetes and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) in patients with type 2 diabetes, found ... randomised controlled trial (UKPDS 41). United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Group. BMJ 2000; 320:1373. GRAPHICS A1C level ...

349

Tips for Teens: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... diabetes. Are studies being done about type 2 diabetes? Yes, studies are being done to learn ways to help ... diabetes in kids and teens. The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study is finding out how many kids and teens ...

350

Long-Term Complications of Diabetes (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... complications and health problems. Back Continue Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathy) Another complication that people who have had diabetes ... develop is a type of nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy can involve nerves in many different ...

351

Clinical Features: Permanent neonatal diabetes: Neonatal diabetes is hyperglycemia that presents at 0-6 months of age  

E-print Network

and require insulin treatment throughout life. PNDM does not include autoimmune diabetes that almost never from insulin treatment to oral sulfonylureas (5, 6). Inheritance: Permanent neonatal diabetes: KCNJ111/13 Clinical Features: Permanent neonatal diabetes: Neonatal diabetes is hyperglycemia

Das, Soma

352

Parental Longevity and Diabetes Risk in the Diabetes Prevention Program  

PubMed Central

Background. Longevity clusters in families, and parental longevity may be associated with lower risk of chronic diseases in their children. It is unknown if diabetes risk is associated with parental longevity. Methods. We evaluated participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program with a parental history questionnaire at study entry. We classified them into five groups: premature death (parental death at age < 50 years), parental longevity (living to at least 80 years), and three intermediate groups (alive by age 49 but dying at age 5059, 6069, or 7079). Those with alive parents and younger than 80 years were excluded. We analyzed separately effects of paternal (n = 2,165) and maternal (n = 1,739) longevity on diabetes incidence and risk after an average follow-up of 3.2 years. Results. At baseline, more diabetes risk factors (parental history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, higher body mass index, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, and corrected insulin response) were found in participants whose parents died prematurely. Diabetes incidence was 9.5 cases/100 person-years in the 229 whose fathers died prematurely. In the 618 with paternal longevity, the rate was 6.6 cases/100 person-years (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] = 0.68 [0.490.94]). The rates were 10.7 cases/100 person-years (n = 156) and 7.3 cases/100 person-years (n = 699, hazard ratio = 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.470.95]) for those with maternal premature death or longevity, respectively. Associations with demographic and diabetes risk factors had minimal influence on the reduced risk found in those with paternal (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.521.16) and maternal (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.411.01) longevity. Conclusion. Parental longevity is associated with lower diabetes incidence in adults at high risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21852284

Crandall, Jill P.; Perreault, Leigh; Marcovina, Santica M.; Bray, George A.; Saudek, Christopher D.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Knowler, William C.

2011-01-01

353

Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2  

E-print Network

is diabetes? Diabetes is when your blood glucose*, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucoseYour Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse #12;#12;Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 #12;#12;Contents Learn about Diabetes

Rau, Don C.

354

Common crossroads in diabetes management  

PubMed Central

The prevalence and impact of type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Data suggest that effective management can reduce the risk for both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In treating patients with diabetes, physicians must be prepared not only to tailor the initial treatment to the individual and his or her disease severity but also to advance treatment as necessary and in step with disease progression. The majority of patients with diabetes are not at goal for glycated hemoglobin A1C, fasting plasma glucose, or postprandial plasma glucose levels. Although lifestyle changes based on improved diet and exercise practices are basic elements of therapy at every stage, pharmacologic therapy is usually necessary to achieve and maintain glycemic control. Oral antidiabetic agents may be effective early in the disease but, eventually, they are unable to compensate as the disease progresses. For patients unable to achieve glycemic control on 2 oral agents, current guidelines strongly urge clinicians to consider the initiation of insulin as opposed to adding a third oral agent. Recent research suggests that earlier initiation of insulin is more physiologic and may be more effective in preventing complications of diabetes. Newer, longer-lasting insulin analogs and the use of simplified treatment plans may overcome psychological resistance to insulin on the part of physicians and patients. This article summarizes the risks associated with uncontrolled fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, briefly reviews the various treatment options currently available for type 2 diabetes, presents case vignettes to illustrate crossroads encountered when advancing treatment, and offers guidance to the osteopathic physician on the selection of appropriate treatments for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:18279520

Valitutto, Michael

2008-01-01

355

Common crossroads in diabetes management.  

PubMed

The prevalence and impact of type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic proportions in the United States. Data suggest that effective management can reduce the risk for both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In treating patients with diabetes, physicians must be prepared not only to tailor the initial treatment to the individual and his or her disease severity but also to advance treatment as necessary and in step with disease progression.The majority of patients with diabetes are not at goal for glycated hemoglobin A1C, fasting plasma glucose, or postprandial plasma glucose levels. Although lifestyle changes based on improved diet and exercise practices are basic elements of therapy at every stage, pharmacologic therapy is usually necessary to achieve and maintain glycemic control. Oral antidiabetic agents may be effective early in the disease but, eventually, they are unable to compensate as the disease progresses. For patients unable to achieve glycemic control on 2 oral agents, current guidelines strongly urge clinicians to consider the initiation of insulin as opposed to adding a third oral agent. Recent research suggests that earlier initiation of insulin is more physiologic and may be more effective in preventing complications of diabetes. Newer, longer-lasting insulin analogs and the use of simplified treatment plans may overcome psychological resistance to insulin on the part of physicians and patients.This article summarizes the risks associated with uncontrolled fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, briefly reviews the various treatment options currently available for type 2 diabetes, presents case vignettes to illustrate crossroads encountered when advancing treatment, and offers guidance to the osteopathic physician on the selection of appropriate treatments for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:18279520

Valitutto, Michael

2008-01-01

356

Prevention of Gestational Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To examine the feasibility of an individualized exercise program to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in obese pregnant women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study was a pilot randomized controlled trial with obese pregnant women (intervention group, individualized exercise program [n = 25]; control group, usual care [n = 25]). Average weekly energy expenditure (MET hours per week and kilocalories per week) of exercise-specific activity was assessed during pregnancy using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Fasting glucose and insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were assessed at baseline and 20, 28, and 36 weeks' gestation. RESULTS Of the women in the intervention group, 16 of 22 (73%) achieved more than 900 kcal/week of exercise-based activity at 28 weeks compared with 8 of 19 women in the control group (42%), P = 0.047. However, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSION This intervention was feasible and prompted a modest increase in physical activity. However, we are not confident that this intervention would be sufficient to prevent GDM. PMID:20357374

Callaway, Leonie K.; Colditz, Paul B.; Byrne, Nuala M.; Lingwood, Barbara E.; Rowlands, Ingrid J.; Foxcroft, Katie; McIntyre, H. David

2010-01-01

357

Diabetes mellitus and obesity.  

PubMed

Numerous vitamins, herbs, supplements, and other agents are readily available for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Many of these products have little evidence-based medical support to prove the efficacy of these supplements. The physician must be aware that their patients are using these products and must be knowledgeable about their side effects and drug-herb interactions. Our patients have tremendous access to medical information in the lay literature and on the internet. They are using this information to gain access to various diet therapies. Numerous fad diets consisting of various combinations of protein, carbohydrate, and fat are widely publicized but not grounded in evidence. Liquid diets and supplements are readily available and widely used by the public with little long-term beneficial effects on obese patients. Other alternative methods, such as hypnotherapy, acupuncture, biofeedback, and electrogalvanic therapy, have become widely available and seem to have little adverse reaction, but whose benefits remain to be proved. The physician must recognize the widespread use of these products and work with patients and alternative practitioners to deliver comprehensive quality care. Physicians who become comfortable with these products should consider their judicious use while monitoring for side effects and drug interaction. It is hoped that with further evidence-based study many of these products and techniques will enter mainstream medicine. PMID:12391712

Roth, Alan

2002-06-01

358

76 FR 20358 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...Notice of Workshop The Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...DMICC) will hold a 2-day workshop on May...and collaboration on diabetes among government entities...emerging opportunities for type 1 diabetes research...

2011-04-12

359

Diabetes Metab . Author manuscript Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy: expected vs reported prevalence of  

E-print Network

Diabetes Metab . Author manuscript Page /1 10 Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy: expected vs due to retinopathy are amongst the most feared complications in diabetic patients. As the number of diabetic patients is predicted to increase, a corresponding increase in the number of patients affected

Boyer, Edmond

360

DIABETES/METABOLISM RESEARCH AND REVIEWS REVIEW ARTICLE Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2008; 24: 604610.  

E-print Network

DIABETES/METABOLISM RESEARCH AND REVIEWS REVIEW ARTICLE Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2008; 24: 604 Nanomedicine and its potential in diabetes research and practice John C. Pickup1* Zheng-Liang Zhi1 Faaizah Khan­100 nm. Although the science is still in its infancy, it has major potential applications in diabetes

Strathclyde, University of

361

New safety concerns over diabetes drugs Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat diabetes  

E-print Network

New safety concerns over diabetes drugs Two drugs commonly prescribed to treat diabetes double of Type II Diabetes. Prescriptions for the drugs, known as thiazolidinediones, have doubled over the last. The results are published in the August edition of the journal Diabetes Care. Congregation 2007 page 5­9 Race

Feigon, Brooke

362

DIABETES/METABOLISM RESEARCH AND REVIEWS RESEARCH ARTICLE Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2005; 21: 264270.  

E-print Network

DIABETES/METABOLISM RESEARCH AND REVIEWS RESEARCH ARTICLE Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2005; 21: 264 Design and development of a scale measuring fear of complications in type 1 diabetes Emily P. Taylor1 John R. Crawford2 Ann E. Gold3* 1 Department of Diabetes, Grampian University Hospitals Trust, Aberdeen

Crawford, John R.

363

Diabetes Care . Author manuscript Antidepressant use before and after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a  

E-print Network

Diabetes Care . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Antidepressant use before and after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a longitudinal modeling study Mika Kivim kiä 1 2 3 * , Adam G. Tab ká 4 , Debbie A University of Helsinki , FI Steno Diabetes Center10 Steno Diabetes Center , Gentofte,DK * Correspondence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. A Fact Sheet from the National Diabetes Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Type 1 diabetes in U.S. children and adolescents may be increasing and many more new cases of type 2 diabetes are being reported in young people. Standards of care for managing children with diabetes issued by the American Diabetes Association in January 2005 provide more guidance than previously given. To update primary care providers and their

National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2006

2006-01-01

365

Parenting children with diabetes: Exploring parental influence in children living with type 1 diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of parenting styles on the diabetes control of children living with type 1 diabetes, and on child and parent quality of life. Over 200 000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, usually diagnosed in children and adolescents, occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce insulin. Insulin is

Diana Sherifali

2006-01-01

366

Evaluation of the Impact of the Kuwait Diabetes Care Program on the Quality of Diabetes Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the impact of the Kuwait Diabetes Care Program on the quality of care provided for diabetic patients in the Primary Health Care setting. Materials and Methods: The Kuwait Diabetes Care Program developed, published and disseminated clinical practice guidelines, conducted training courses, standards for diabetes care, and introduced a monitoring and evaluation system. Four audits (September 1999, October

Afaf Al-Adsani; Jamila Al-Faraj; Fatma Al-Sultan; Mohamed El-Feky; Nouria Al-Mezel; Wafik Saba; Sharifa Aljassar

2008-01-01

367

IHS Introduction to Type 2 Diabetes. A Guide for Health Care Providers (Revised).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: What is Type 2 Diabetes; The Cycle of Type 2 Diabetes; Type 1 vs. Type 2 Diabetes; Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in American Indians; Diagnosing Diabetes; Diagnostic Criteria for Diabetes Mellitus, Impaired Glucose Metabolism, and Gestational...

1998-01-01

368

Classification of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema  

PubMed Central

The global incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) have reached epidemic proportions. Estimates indicate that more than 360 million people will be affected by DM by 2030. All of these individuals will be at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy (DR). It is extremely important to categorize, classify and stage the severity of DR in order to establish adequate therapy. With proper management more than 90% of cases of visual loss can be prevented. The purpose of the current paper is to review the classification of DR with a special emphasis on the International Clinical Disease Severity Scale for DR. This new classification is simple to use, easy to remember and based on scientific evidence. It does not require specialized examinations such as optical coherence tomography or fluorescein angiography. It is based on clinical examination and applying the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study 4:2:1 rule. PMID:24379919

Wu, Lihteh; Fernandez-Loaiza, Priscilla; Sauma, Johanna; Hernandez-Bogantes, Erick; Masis, Marisse

2013-01-01

369

[Comprehensive care for diabetic patients with diabetic foot syndrome].  

PubMed

The author presents a definition of diabetic foot syndrome and its various classifications. Presented are its epidemiology and the risk factors of its development. Management of this condition is demanding with respect to medical as well as economic resources and thus prevention is at the forefront. However, should this condition develop in a patient, specialised care becomes equally important. Care for a patient with diabetic foot syndrome is as complex as are the underlying causes of this condition. Management requires attention of a specialized team of experts, led and coordinated by a diabetologist-podiatrist. Therapy includes diabetes control, weight reduction, infection therapy, revascularisation and, alternatively, conservative treatment of lower limb ischemia, surgery, wound healing and local therapy as well as nutritional care. The author only discusses the areas of management that are not a subject to separate papers. PMID:20465109

Olsovsk, J

2010-04-01

370

Functional food and diabetes: a natural way in diabetes prevention?  

PubMed

Diabetes shows a wide range of variation in prevalence around the world and it is expected to affect 300 million by the year 2025. In a prevention framework where banning policies and educational strategies lead the interventions, functional foods (FFs) with their specific health effects could, in the future, indicate a new mode of thinking about the relationships between food and health in everyday life. Functional ingredients, such as stevioside, cinnamon, bitter melon, garlic and onion, ginseng, Gymnema sylvestre and fenugreek, have been addressed for their specific actions towards different reactions involved in diabetes development. New strategies involving the use of FF should be validated through large-scale population trials, considering validated surrogate end points to evaluate the effect of FF in prevention of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22107597

Ballali, Simonetta; Lanciai, Federico

2012-03-01

371

Managing diabetic macular edema: The leading cause of diabetes blindness  

PubMed Central

Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the leading cause of blindness in young adults in developed countries, affecting 12% of type 1 and 28% of type 2 diabetic patients. The gold standard DME treatment should be based on a good control of glycemia along with control of lipids and renal function. However, despite the systemic metabolic control values being essential for patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR), it has proven to be insufficient for DME if it appears. With these patients, additional measures are needed in order to avoid the subsequent loss of vision. While laser treatment of DME has been the only valid treatment so far, it has been inadequate in chronic cases. The introduction of new treatments, such as intravitreal corticosteroids or anti-VEGF drugs, have recently shown their safety and efficacy and together with laser photocoagulation are becoming the treatments of choice in the management of DME. PMID:21860693

Romero-Aroca, Pedro

2011-01-01

372

Type 1 Diabetes Lowered Survival in Study  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Type 1 Diabetes Lowered Survival in Study Better blood sugar ... 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Blood Sugar Diabetes Type 1 WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with ...

373

Diabetes: five keys to better care.  

PubMed

Hospitals that are pushing the envelope on diabetes care are taking a population health mangement approach that involves five critical components. This is the latest installment in our yearlong Diabetes Management series. PMID:23700756

Aston, Geri

2013-04-01

374

Diabetes - taking care of your feet  

MedlinePLUS

... Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ... Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

375

Second Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Second Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting was presented by the Diabetes Technology Society at the Cambridge, Massachusetts Hyatt Regency Hotel in April 21-22, 2006. The first day covered Continuous Glucose Monitoring and the second day covere...

D. Klonoff

2006-01-01

376

Health Tip: Breast-Feeding with Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Tip: Breast-feeding With Diabetes Potential benefits for both mom and ... Health and Human Development says potential benefits of breast-feeding, despite maternal diabetes, may include: For baby, improved ...

377

For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly  

MedlinePLUS

... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly Past Issues / Fall ... that when it comes to their own health, men have fewer checkups with a regular healthcare provider ...

378

Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... risk factors include physical inactivity and a family history of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes also is more common among American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders. Women who have had ...

379

Diabetes and Alpha Lipoic Acid  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complications. Lipoic acid quenches reactive oxygen species, chelates metal ions, and reduces the oxidized forms of other antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione. It also boosts antioxidant defense system through Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant gene expression and by modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors-regulated genes. ALA inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates AMPK in skeletal muscles, which in turn have a plethora of metabolic consequences. These diverse actions suggest that lipoic acid acts by multiple mechanisms, many of which have only been uncovered recently. In this review we briefly summarize the known biochemical properties of lipoic acid and then discussed the oxidative mechanisms implicated in diabetic complications and the mechanisms by which lipoic acid may ameliorate these reactions. The findings of some of the clinical trials in which lipoic acid administration has been tested in diabetic patients during the last 10?years are summarized. It appears that the clearest benefit of lipoic acid supplementation is in patients with diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22125537

Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

2011-01-01

380

Oxidative Stress and Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Oxygen metabolism is essential for sustaining aerobic life, and normal cellular homeostasis works on a fine balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, a cytopathic consequence of excessive production of ROS and the suppression of ROS removal by antioxidant defense system, is implicated in the development of many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes and its complications. Retinopathy, a debilitating microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of acquired blindness in developed countries. Many diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities are implicated in its development, and appear to be influenced by elevated oxidative stress; however the exact mechanism of its development remains elusive. Increased superoxide concentration is considered as a causal link between elevated glucose and the other metabolic abnormalities important in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Animal studies have shown that antioxidants have beneficial effects on the development of retinopathy, but the results from very limited clinical trials are somewhat ambiguous. Although antioxidants are being used for other chronic diseases, controlled clinical trials are warranted to investigate potential beneficial effects of antioxidants in the development of retinopathy in diabetic patients. PMID:17641741

Kowluru, Renu A.; Chan, Pooi-See

2007-01-01

381

Managing diabetes: lessons from Type 1 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Glycaemic control is a key component of the successful management of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hypoglycaemia is the limiting factor in the management of diabetes because current glucose-lowering regimens are imperfect, defences against decreasing glucose levels in Type 1 and probably Type 2 diabetes are compromised, and low glucose levels have a devastating effect on the brain. Usually, hypoglycaemia precludes the maintenance of normal glucose levels. However, attempts to circumvent the barrier of hypoglycaemia safely are worthwhile because shifting glucose levels towards the non-diabetic range reduces the long-term complications of diabetes. Patient education and empowerment, appropriate self-monitoring of blood glucose, flexible drug regimens, individualized and prudent glycaemic goals, and ongoing professional support are fundamental. Iatrogenic hypoglycaemia is the result of the interplay between excess insulin and compromised glucose counter-regulation in Type 1 and probably Type 2 diabetes. Conventional and newly recognized risk factors must be addressed. Relative or absolute excess insulin occurs when: insulin (or insulin secretagogue) doses are excessive, ill-timed or of the wrong type; the influx of exogenous glucose, endogenous glucose production or insulin clearance are decreased; and insulin-independent glucose utilization or insulin sensitivity are increased. The drug regimen, food ingestion, exercise and alcohol use are under the direct control of the patient and the healthcare provider, and regimen adjustments can be used to address insulin sensitivity and clearance. Unfortunately, these conventional risk factors explain only a minority of episodes of severe hypoglycaemia and therefore the issue of compromised glucose counter-regulation must also be addressed. It is imperative to investigate the patient history for hypoglycaemia unawareness because short-term (e.g. 2 weeks) scrupulous avoidance of hypoglycaemia can restore awareness and improve defective glucose counter-regulation. Until methods of perfect insulin replacement or release are developed, improved regimens and pharmacological methods to minimize hypoglycaemia particularly during the night can be used safely to improve overall glycaemic control. PMID:9868985

Cryer, P E

1998-01-01

382

Closed ankle fractures in the diabetic patient.  

PubMed

Systemic and local manifestations of diabetes mellitus may complicate the treatment of ankle fractures in the diabetic population. We studied 98 patients (73 non-diabetics and 25 diabetics) who were treated for closed ankle fractures by either surgical or non-surgical methods. We found that overall, the risk of infection in the diabetic population (32%) was 4 times higher than in the non-diabetic population (8%). The infection rate in the diabetic group treated surgically more than doubled that in the non-diabetic group. Four out of six diabetic patients treated with cast became infected compared to no infections in the five non-diabetics treated with a cast. Even though the diabetic foot and ankle are well studied, the medical literature is not conclusive regarding the management of ankle fractures in the diabetic patient. Diabetic patients treated conservatively had a tendency to become infected over those treated surgically. Peripherovascular disease, peripheral neuropathy and swelling and/or ecchymosis increased the risk of infection in the diabetic population. Diabetic patients with poor compliance had a tendency to become infected more than those who were compliant. We concluded that the diabetic patient who is poorly compliant with evidence of neuropathic disease, peripherovascular disease and severe swelling and ecchymosis presents the most difficult group to manage. Although these patients are poor surgical candidates, they are also the most difficult to manage and also most prone to infection and complications if treated conservatively. When faced with this difficult scenario a multidisciplinary team approach would probably yield the best possible results by early identification and intervention in these patients. PMID:10808971

Flynn, J M; Rodriguez-del Rio, F; Piz, P A

2000-04-01

383

Genetic risk factors in diabetic retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryDiabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in adults aged 30 to 65 years. However, 20% of the diabetic population does not develop significant retinopathy. To examine the influence of immune-related genetic factors on the development of diabetic retinopathy, we studied immunoglobulin allotypes in 102 subjects aged 8 to 20 years, who had had Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

L. L. Stewart; L. L. Field; S. Ross; R. G. McArthur

1993-01-01

384

Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Regulates Leukocyte Transmigration Rate in the Retina During Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial adhesion molecule that possesses semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) activity and is involved in leukocyte recruitment. Leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels is a predominant feature of experimentally induced diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, the role of VAP-1 in this process is unknown. Diabetes was induced by i.p. injection of Streptozotocin in LongEvans rats. The specific inhibitor of VAP-1, UV-002, was administered by daily i.p. injections. The expression of VAP-1 mRNA in the retinal extracts of normal and diabetic animals was measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Firm leukocyte adhesion was quantified in retinal flatmounts after intravascular staining with concanavalin A (ConA). Leukocyte transmigration rate was quantified by in vivo acridine orange leukocyte staining (AOLS). In diabetic rats, the rate of leukocyte transmigration into the retinal tissues of live animals was significantly increased, as determined by AOLS. When diabetic animals were treated with daily injections of the VAP-1 inhibitor (0.3mg/kg), leukocyte transmigration rate was significantly reduced (P<0.05). However, firm adhesion of leukocytes in diabetic animals treated with the inhibitor did not differ significantly from vehicle-treated diabetic controls. This work provides evidence for an important role of VAP-1 in the recruitment of leukocyte to the retina in experimental DR. Our results reveal the critical contribution of VAP-1 to leukocyte transmigration, with little impact on firm leukocyte adhesion in the retinas of diabetic animals. VAP-1 inhibition might be beneficial in the treatment of DR. PMID:19635478

Noda, Kousuke; Nakao, Shintaro; Zandi, Souska; Engelstadter, Verena; Mashima, Yukihiko; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

2009-01-01

385

Diabetic Muscle Infraction: An Unusual Cause of Muscle Pain in a Diabetic Patient on Hemodialysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic muscle infarction (DMI) is a rare, painful and potentially serious complication in patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and frequently misdiagnosed clinically as abscess, neoplasm, or myositis. A 36-year-old diabetic woman referred to our clinic with severe pain in the left antero-medial thigh. She had a 15-year history of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). She was complicated by diabetic

Ibrahim Sahin; Cagatay Taskapan; Hulya Taskapan; Tamer Baysal; Recep Bentli; Selda Tekes; Feridun Kosar; Iclal Gurses

2005-01-01

386

Smoking and diabetes in Chinese men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor and cause of death. Diabetes mellitus is also associated with an increased mortality and morbidity. Evidence concerning whether smoking increases the incidence of diabetes remains conflicting. Glycaemic status and smoking habits were analysed in 3718 Chinese subjects in order to assess the possible association between smoking and risk of diabetes in the Chinese

G T C Ko; J C N Chan; L W W Tsang; J A J H Critchley; C S Cockram

2001-01-01

387

Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples

Artal, Raul

1996-01-01

388

Parent Perspectives of Diabetes Management in Schools  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate parent reports of the diabetes care support their children receive in school, their concerns about diabetes management in school, and their knowledge of federal laws that protect children with diabetes. In addition, the study explores ethnic and socioeconomic status differences in diabetes management in school. Methods An ethnically heterogeneous sample of 309 parents of children with diabetes was recruited from a community-based and a university-based diabetes outpatient clinic. Parents completed a survey assessing supports their child's school provides for diabetes care, worries about diabetes care in school, and awareness of federal laws that pertain to children with diabetes. Results Many children did not have a written care plan or a nurse at school, but significantly more white children had these supports than Hispanic or black children. Most children were not allowed to check blood glucose levels or administer insulin in class. Most parents were worried about hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in school, and most were not at all or only a little confident in the school's ability to care for diabetes. Most parents were not aware of federal laws, but high-income and white parents were more likely to be aware. Conclusions According to parents in the current study, children receive inadequate diabetes management support in schools. Minority children are less likely to receive supports than white children. Parents are worried about diabetes management in school, but most do not have the knowledge of federal laws necessary to protect their children. PMID:19075081

Jacquez, Farrah; Stout, Stacey; Alvarez-Salvat, Rose; Fernandez, Michelle; Villa, Manuela; Sanchez, Janine; Eidson, Margaret; Nemery, Robin; Delamater, Alan

2010-01-01

389

Type 2 diabetes - self-care  

MedlinePLUS

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) disease. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using the insulin it ... can get too high. Over time, people with type 2 diabetes may not have enough insulin. Most people with ...

390

Anaesthetic management of the patient with diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting islet cells. Type 2 is due to insulin resistance. The prevalence is expected to double by 2030 in the UK. Patients with both types of diabetes demand control of their metabolic status, normoglycaemia, the avoidance of ketoacidosis and electrolyte disturbances. The

Peter Klepsch

2008-01-01

391

Visualizing health practice to treat diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research is about how to help diabetics reflect upon and improve their own health practice by collecting and visualizing health related information. We introduced a new type of data collection to diabetics, photography, to complement the data they usually collect, blood sugar levels. Diabetics shoot pictures of meals, exercise, work, play and anything else they feel impacts health. We

Jeana Frost; Brian Keith Smith

2002-01-01

392

What'sforLunch? Campaign Against Diabetes  

E-print Network

What'sforLunch? n 1 n What's For Lunch at cunY? Campaign Against Diabetes City University of New and diabetes. #12;n 2 n What's for Lunch at cunY? Stacy, a psychology student at Queens College, is hungry, has just been diagnosed with pre-diabetes. She is trying hard to find food that will help her to lose

Qiu, Weigang

393

Diabetes Mellitus Glucose Prediction by Linear and  

E-print Network

Diabetes Mellitus Glucose Prediction by Linear and Bayesian Ensemble Modeling Fredrik St was diagnosed with diabetes type 1. Being an engineer with a control and systems oriented curriculum I realized of diabetes glucose metabolism, and bringing new hope of technical solutions to support the management

394

Eating Disorders and Diabetes: Current Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past 20 to 25 years, a significant amount of research has been directed toward diabetes and eating disorders. Evidence from the literature suggests that subclinical eating disorders and bulimia nervosa are prevalent in patients with type 1 diabetes, while subclinical and clinical binge eating disorders are more common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Although the determination of

Karen M. Davison

2003-01-01

395

Modeling Type 1 Diabetes in NOD Mice  

E-print Network

concentration · cells in pancreas respond - Insulin released · Cells increase glucose uptake - Insulin in pancreas · Other autoimmune diseases are similar Diabetes Oct 2006 ­ p. 10/3 #12;Model Scheme for Diabetes-MHC Apoptotic cell PANCREAS LYMPH NODE Dendritic cell peptide p Cell injury Diabetes Oct 2006 ­ p. 11/3 #12

Mahaffy, Joseph M.

396

Sleep in diabetic animal modelS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes, which has been declared a major global health issue, involves the central nervous system and balancing vital functions such as cardiovascular and circadian rhythms. There is increasing evidence that the alarming prevalence of diabetes may be aggravated by endemic voluntary sleep loss. In an attempt to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of diabetes, animal

Monica Levy Andersen

2008-01-01

397

STRESS AND ADJUSTMENT IN DIABETES MELLITUS  

E-print Network

Stress and adjustment in diabetics is studied in order to know the influence of maladjustment and stress in the causation of the disease. The sample of study consists of 100 diabetics patients, 100 nonpsychosomatic and 100 normal person. Results obtained are discussed in detail. It is concluded that maladjustment and stress are important contributing factors in ' diabetes mellitus.

Sabiha Parveen; S. B. Singh

398

Management of diabetic kidney disease: Recent advances  

PubMed Central

Diabetic kidney disease, in present days, is being recognized as the commonest cause of end stage renal disease. Though there is no absolute therapy for diabetic kidney disease, decades of hard work has recognized some modifiable factors that can prevent its progression. This article is an attempt to review some recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis and management of diabetic kidney disease PMID:24251221

Agarwal, Pankaj

2013-01-01

399

Technologies, diabetes and the student body  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses qualitative methodologies to understand young people's use of technology in the management of Type 1 diabetes. The paper begins by outlining the nature of Type 1 diabetes. We provide an account of recent debates on the consumption of health-care technologies. We consider the advantages of qualitative approaches for studying young people with diabetes. Our specific focus is

Myles Balfe; Peter Jackson

2007-01-01

400

Erythropoietic stress and anemia in diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia is one of the world's most common preventable conditions, yet it is often overlooked, especially in people with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes-related chronic hyperglycemia can lead to a hypoxic environment in the renal interstitium, which results in impaired production of erythropoietin by the peritubular fibroblasts and subsequent anemia. Anemia in patients with diabetes mellitus might contribute to the pathogenesis and

Peter Winocour; Dhruv K. Singh; Ken Farrington

2009-01-01

401

Diagnosis and Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most commonly occurring major complications of diabetes. The disease may manifest in several clinical patterns: most frequently as distal symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy. Guidelines are available for the diagnosis of DPN by the primary care physician. These recommend that a review of diabetic patients, including a questionnaire and inspection and neurological examination of

Isabel Illa

1999-01-01

402

with Diabetes Dining A Program For  

E-print Network

with Diabetes Dining A Program For People With Diabetes And Their Families Pre to anyone with diabetes, and their family members or caregivers. Classes will include demonstrations on how to prepare meals that are healthy and use less fat, salt, and sugar without sacrificing taste

403

February 2014AZ1617 What is diabetes?  

E-print Network

February 2014AZ1617 What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Your body needs glucose for energy to keep you going. But having too much get into the cells of your body for energy. People with diabetes don't make enough insulin or the body

Sanderson, Mike

404

Atypical Antipsychotic Drug Use and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, there has been increased concern about the occurrence of diabetes associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic (AAP) drugs. The relationship between diabetes, schizophrenia, and antipsychotic drugs is complex and intriguing, as untreated patients with schizophrenia are known to suffer from diabetes more often than the general population. Thirty individual case reports of clozapine-, 26 cases of olanzapine- and

Jambur Ananth; Ravi Venkatesh; Karl Burgoyne; Sarath Gunatilake

2002-01-01

405

Vascular risk factors and diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Other than glycemic control, there are no treatments for diabetic neuropathy. Thus, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors for neuropathy is crucial. We studied risk factors for the development of distal symmetric neuropathy in 1172 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 31 centers participating in the European Diabetes (EURODIAB) Prospective Complications Study. methods Neuropathy was assessed at baseline (1989

Solomon Tesfaye; Nish Chaturvedi; Simon E. M. Eaton

2005-01-01

406

Medial arterial calcification and diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

X-ray examinations of the feet, knees, and hands were performed on 20 diabetics with severe neuropathy and 20 diabetics with no evidence of neuropathy but with a similar mean age and duration of diabetes. All were under 53 years old with no clinical evidence of peripheral vascular disease. Medial arterial calcification was much more common and extensive in the patients

M E Edmonds; N Morrison; P J Watkins

1982-01-01

407

Pupillary signs in diabetic autonomic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pupillary function was investigated in 36 insulin-dependent diabetics and 36 controls matched for age and sex. About half of the diabetics had evidence of peripheral somatic or autonomic neuropathy, or both. The diabetic patients had abnormally small pupil diameters in the dark and less fluctuation in pupil size (hippus) during continuous illumination than the controls. They also had reduced reflex

S E Smith; S A Smith; P M Brown; C Fox; P H Snksen

1978-01-01

408

Colonic subepithelial collagenous thickening in diabetic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the effect of intestinal subepithelial collagenous thickening on diabetic diarrhea because one of the seven patients diagnosed with collagenous colitis was diabetic. METHODS: Rectosigmoidoscopic rectal biopsies were taken from 50 diabetic patients (8 with and 42 without diarrhea), 20 nondiabetic patients with diarrhea, and 10 healthy patients. Histopathologic examinations and measurements of subepithelial

Olcay Kandemir; Cengiz Utas; mr Gnen; Tahir E. Patiroglu; mer zbakir; Fahrettin Kelestimur; Mehmet Ycesoy

1995-01-01

409

The Genetics of Diabetic Nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Up to 40% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes will develop diabetic nephropathy (DN), resulting in chronic kidney disease and potential organ failure. There is evidence for a heritable genetic susceptibility to DN, but despite intensive research efforts the causative genes remain elusive. Recently, genome-wide association studies have discovered several novel genetic variants associated with DN. The identification of such variants may potentially allow for early identification of at risk patients. Here we review the current understanding of the key molecular mechanisms and genetic architecture of DN, and discuss the merits of employing an integrative approach to incorporate datasets from multiple sources (genetics, transcriptomics, epigenetic, proteomic) in order to fully elucidate the genetic elements contributing to this serious complication of diabetes. PMID:24705265

Brennan, Eoin; McEvoy, Caitriona; Sadlier, Denise; Godson, Catherine; Martin, Finian

2013-01-01

410

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes 2014 1 Registration Form for People with Diabetes Registration Form for People with Diabetes 2014  

E-print Network

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes ­ 2014 1 Registration Form for People with Diabetes Registration Form for People with Diabetes ­ 2014 Please complete this form ONLY IF YOU HAVE DIABETES. Thank you. A numbers of my telephone number are __ __ __ __. C. I will attend diabetes education classes

411

Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes 2014 1 Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes 2014  

E-print Network

as a food is "sugar-free," a person with diabetes can eat all of that food he wants. 1. ____Yes 2Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes ­ 2014 1 Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes ­ 2014 Please complete this form ONLY IF YOU HAVE DIABETES. Thank you. A. The month

412

Trying to understand gestational diabetes  

PubMed Central

Women with normal glucose tolerance pre-gravid and developing gestational diabetes in late gestation have subclinical metabolic dysfunction prior to conception compared with women with normal glucose tolerance. Because of the 60 % decrease in insulin sensitivity with normal pregnancy, these women develop clinical hyperglycaemia/gestational diabetes in late gestation. The metabolic dysfunction includes impaired insulin response, decreased hepatic suppression of glucose production during insulin infusion and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, i.e. peripheral insulin resistance. The insulin resistance in normal glucose tolerance pregnancy is related to a decrease in the post-receptor insulin signalling cascade, specifically decreased insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation. In women with normal glucose tolerance this is reversed post-partum. In contrast, in gestational diabetes, in addition to the decrease in insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation, there is an additional decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular portion of the insulin receptor that is not related to the insulin receptor protein content. Post-partum women with gestational diabetes, who had retention of gestational weight gain, had no significant improvement in insulin sensitivity and increased inflammation expressed as increased plasma and skeletal muscle tumour necrosis factor alpha. The increased inflammation or meta-inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and during pregnancy develops in both white adipose tissue and placenta. Last gene array studies of placenta were associated with alterations in gene expression relating primarily to lipid in contrast to glucose metabolic pathways in gestational diabetes compared with Type 1 diabetes. Future studies are directed at decreasing inflammation prior to and during pregnancy using various lifestyle and nutritional interventions. PMID:24341419

Catalano, P. M.

2014-01-01

413

Entrevistas con Eduardo Pavlovsky  

E-print Network

ahora se estudia con microciruga es que cada golpe produce una microhemorragia; es decir, que no se ven a la visin normal pero cuando haces una autopsia, te das cuenta que el cerebro del boxeador tiene microhemorragias. De alguna manera los...

Giella, Miguel Á ngel

1985-10-01

414

A Boon for the Diabetic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diabetics are no longer concerned with scheduling activities around peaking insulin levels since the use of an external pump from Pacesetter Systems, Inc. used to deliver insulin continuously at a preprogrammed individually adjusted rate. The pump wearer can lead a more normal existence, even participate in sports or travel, and there is an even greater benefit. Research indicates that infusion of "short acting" insulin in tiny amounts over a long period - instead of "long- acting" insulin has helped many diabetics achieve better control of blood sugar levels, thereby minimizing the possibility of complications and, in some cases, even halting the progression of complications.

1987-01-01

415

THE TREATMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS  

PubMed Central

The treatment of diabetes mellitus continues to challenge all physicians regardless of special interest. Although there have been many advances, treatment still primarily centers around education of the patient, particularly in regard to proper balance of diet, insulin and exercise. The exact role of the new oral insulin substitutes is not yet fully established. With proper consideration of the fundamentals of treatment and team-approach, there can be life added to the years and years to the lives of our increasing diabetic population. PMID:13500216

Pote, William W. H.

1958-01-01

416

Cell Biology: Sorting Out Diabetes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Early during the development of type 2 diabetes, insulin's ability to stimulate the cellular uptake of glucose from the blood is compromised. Muscle is the main tissue responsible for this absorption, and insulin enhances glucose movement into muscle cells through the GLUT4 transporter at the cell surface. This hallmark action of insulin is conserved in vertebrates, and the molecular machinery by which it occurs is thought to be similar among mammals. On page 1192 of this issue, Vassilopoulos et al. (4) identify a key protein that mediates insulin action in humans, but not in mice, a distinction with potential implications for understanding glucose metabolism and diabetes pathophysiology.

Charisse M. Orme (Yale University School of Medicine;Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Cell Biology); Jonathan S. Bogan (Yale University School of Medicine;Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Cell Biology)

2009-05-29

417

Ranibizumab in diabetic macular edema  

PubMed Central

By 2050 the prevalence of diabetes will more than triple globally, dramatically increasing the societal and financial burden of this disease worldwide. As a consequence of this growth, it is anticipated that there will be a concurrent rise in the numbers of patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), already among the most common causes of severe vision loss worldwide. Recent available therapies for DME target the secreted cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This review focuses on the treatment of DME using the first humanized monoclonal antibody targeting VEGF that has been Food and Drug Administration-approved for the use in the eye, ranibizumab (Lucentis). PMID:24379922

Krispel, Claudia; Rodrigues, Murilo; Xin, Xiaoban; Sodhi, Akrit

2013-01-01

418

[Are ultrasonic images in diabetics different?].  

PubMed

The authors evaluated the results assembled in 5397 patients where between Jan. 1 1999 and Oct. 31 2000 sonographic examinations of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneum were made with the objective to assess whether there are any statistically significant differences of results in diabetic patients, as compared with a group without this disease. The group of patients was divided into a sub-group of 4287 patients without diabetes and a sub-group of 1100 diabetics. For statistical evaluation of the significance of differences in the incidence of the investigated parameters Fisher's exact test was used. The image of "light liver" was significantly more frequent in diabetics type 1 and 2, as compared with non-diabetics (p < 0.001). The sonographic picture, consistent with the diagnosis of cirrhosis of the liver, was at the same level of significance more frequent in non-diabetics, similarly as the incidence of haemangioma. The finding of cholecystolithiasis and the number of patients with a history of CHCE on account of cholecysolithiasis was significantly higher (p < 0.05) only in type 1 diabetics as compared with non-diabetics. The incidence of sonographic changes consistent with acalculous cholecystitis was statistically higher in both groups of diabetics (p < 0.001), as compared with non-diabetics. On examination of the pancreas only the incidence of changes consistent with acute or chronic pancreatitis was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the group of type 2 diabetics as compared with non-diabetics. Evaluation of sonographic findings of the kidneys revealed statistically significant differences only in the higher incidence of cysts in the group of type 2 diabetics as compared with type 1 diabetics and as compared with non-diabetics (p < 0.01). The impact of the presented findings and their comparison with data reported in the literature is discussed. PMID:11395878

Martnek, A; Klvana, P; Marten, P; Leskov, M; Dvorckov, J

2001-05-01

419

Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Diabetes under Control  

MedlinePLUS

... the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Baltimore, MD Jan Drass, R.N., C.D.E. For the Diabetes Research and Training Centers Albert Einstein School of Medicine Norwalk Hospital Norwalk, CT Jill Ely, R.N., C.D.E. Sam Engel, M.D. Pam Howard, A.P.R.N., ...

420

Diabetes in children. Adjusting to normal life as a diabetic.  

PubMed

Diabetes is a chronic childhood condition, presenting with raised blood sugar. The classic signs and symptoms may not be evident early on, especially in younger children, so it is important that health professionals maintain a high level of suspicion about diabetes when presented with non-specific symptoms eg. abdominal pain, lethargy, delayed wound healing, etc. When a child is first diagnosed, not only does the young person and their family have to cope with the emotional impact of diagnosis, but they also need to understand the huge amounts of information given to them. Health care practitioners provide essential support in helping them come to terms with, as well as manage, this condition. In this article we explain how diabetes is diagnosed and some of the common issues that arise in the ongoing care of the young person, with a particular emphasis on managing daily challenges. Community practitioners play a vital role in detecting symptoms early and making a referral, as well as supporting children with diabetes post-diagnosis in the community. PMID:23342705

Williams, Georgina; Paul, Siba Prosad; Hicks, Sarah

2012-12-01

421

Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets  

PubMed Central

The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in our society. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease, a process termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. This disorder is a complex diabetes-associated process characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Here, we review recently derived insights into mechanisms and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21274425

Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Wang, Zhao V.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

2010-01-01

422

Managing diabetes in nursing and care homes.  

PubMed

The England-wide Care Home Diabetes Audit, published earlier this year, revealed a lack of assessment, monitoring and specialist care for people with diabetes who live in nursing and care homes. Many homes are not systematically screening residents for diabetes nor monitoring the blood glucose levels of those with the condition. Staff education and training is patchy and patients are at risk of hypoglycaemia and diabetic foot complications. The Institute of Diabetes for Older People, which conducted the audit, has called for tighter regulation to improve care. PMID:25241436

Anderson, Pat

423

Visual evoked potentials in diabetic patients.  

PubMed

Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were assessed in 50 adult type I (insulin-dependent) and 19 type II (noninsulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus patients and in 54 controls. P100 wave latency was significantly longer in diabetic patients (P less than .001). Twenty-eight percent of diabetic patients had P100 wave latencies above the normal range. There was no correlation between P100 latency and type or duration of diabetes mellitus, quality of metabolic control, or presence of degenerative complications. The significance of VEP abnormalities in diabetes mellitus remains speculative. PMID:2702915

Algan, M; Ziegler, O; Gehin, P; Got, I; Raspiller, A; Weber, M; Genton, P; Saudax, E; Drouin, P

1989-03-01

424

Diabetes mellitus: Trends in northern India  

PubMed Central

Diabetes mellitus is becoming a global health issue with more than 80% diabetics living in developing countries. India accounts for 62.4 million diabetics (2011). Indian Council of Medical Research India Diabetes Study (ICMR-INDIAB) study showed highest weighted prevalence rate in the north India among all studied regions. Diabetes in north India has many peculiarities in all aspects from risk factors to control programmers. North Indians are becoming more prone for diabetes and dyslipidemia because rapid westernization of living style and diet due rapid migration to metropolitan cities for employment. North Indian diabetes is plagued with gender bias against females, poor quality of health services, myths, and lack of disease awareness compounded with small number of prevention and awareness programmers that too are immature to counteract the growing pandemic.

Gutch, Manish; Razi, Syed Mohd; Kumar, Sukriti; Gupta, Keshav Kumar

2014-01-01

425

Targeting sirtuins for the treatment of diabetes  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Sirtuins are a class of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, such as deacetylases, that have a wide array of biological functions. Recent studies have suggested that reduced sirtuin action is correlated with Type 2 diabetes. Both overnutrition and aging, which are two major risk factors for diabetes, lead to decreased sirtuin function and result in abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism. Therefore, restoring normal levels of sirtuin action in Type 2 diabetes may be a promising method of treating diabetes. This article reviews the biological functions of three of the seven mammalian sirtuins SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 that have demonstrated prominent metabolic roles and early potential for drug targeting. Clinical trials investigating the use of sirtuin activators for treating diabetes are already underway and show promise as alternatives to current diabetes therapies. Thus, further research into sirtuin activators is warranted and may lead to a new class of safe, effective diabetes treatments. PMID:25067957

Huynh, Frank K; Hershberger, Kathleen A; Hirschey, Matthew D

2014-01-01

426

Testicular lesions of streptozotocin diabetic rats.  

PubMed

Diabetes was induced in adult male albino rats by a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (75 mg/kg body weight). The diabetes was allowed to stabilize for at least 15 days, whereafter the testicular and seminal vesicle histology was studied at various time intervals. Reduction in testis weights and tubule diameters was significant after 2 weeks of diabetes. The changes in seminiferous tubules ranged from premature sloughing of epithelium to total cessation of spermatogenesis. The testicular histology of diabetic animals frequently greatly simulated the situation described following hypophysectomy. By subjective visual assessment the number of Leydig cells was found to be normal or reduced in all of the diabetic animals. Diabetes was also demonstrated to induce seminal vesicle atrophy, which did not show any correlation with the degree of testicular lesions. The possible etiology of testicular damage in diabetic animals is discussed. PMID:130334

Oksanen, A

1975-01-01

427

Diabetes mellitus: Trends in northern India.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus is becoming a global health issue with more than 80% diabetics living in developing countries. India accounts for 62.4 million diabetics (2011). Indian Council of Medical Research India Diabetes Study (ICMR-INDIAB) study showed highest weighted prevalence rate in the north India among all studied regions. Diabetes in north India has many peculiarities in all aspects from risk factors to control programmers. North Indians are becoming more prone for diabetes and dyslipidemia because rapid westernization of living style and diet due rapid migration to metropolitan cities for employment. North Indian diabetes is plagued with gender bias against females, poor quality of health services, myths, and lack of disease awareness compounded with small number of prevention and awareness programmers that too are immature to counteract the growing pandemic. PMID:25285295

Gutch, Manish; Razi, Syed Mohd; Kumar, Sukriti; Gupta, Keshav Kumar

2014-09-01

428

Impact of a physical activity intervention program on cognitive predictors of behaviour among adults at risk of Type 2 diabetes (ProActive randomised controlled trial)  

E-print Network

. They constitute an at-risk group as family history of diabetes and sedentary lifestyle strongly interact in pre- dicting future diabetes risk [11]. Participants had intensive biochemical, anthropometric, behavioural and psycho- logical assessment at baseline... do'). We assessed beliefs in relation to the participants' partner, children, family, and friends. Belief-based perceived behavioural con- trol consists of the perceived presence of control factors that may facilitate or impede performance...

Hardeman, Wendy; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Michie, Susan; Sutton, Stephen; ProActive Project Team

2009-03-17

429

Evolution of Metabolic and Renal Changes in the ZDF\\/Drt-fa Rat Model of Type II Diabetes1'2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of the pathophysiology of renal disease In non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have been hindered by the lack of an appropriate experimental model. We examined the natural history of metabolic and renal changes in the partially in- bred Zucker Diabetic Falfy Rat (ZDF\\/Drt-fa), a model that closely mimics the metabolic abnormalities of NIDDM. Lean nondiabetic fl#ermates served as con- trols.

Jiten P. Vora; Stephanie M. Zimsen; Donald C. Houghton; Sharon Anderson

430

Diabetes: Models, Signals, and Control  

PubMed Central

The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes a significant biomedical engineering component, with traditions of success beginning in the early 1960s. It began with modeling of the insulin-glucose system, and progressed to large-scale in silico experiments, and automated closed-loop control (artificial pancreas). Here, we follow these engineering efforts through the last, almost 50 years. We begin with the now classic minimal modeling approach and discuss a number of subsequent models, which have recently resulted in the first in silico simulation model accepted as substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. We then review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the analyses of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Finally, we review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers. We conclude with a brief discussion of the unique interactions between human physiology, behavioral events, engineering modeling and control relevant to diabetes. PMID:20936056

Cobelli, Claudio; Man, Chiara Dalla; Sparacino, Giovanni; Magni, Lalo; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Kovatchev, Boris P.

2010-01-01

431

Diabetes, aging and physical activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease affecting the regulation of insulin and glucose causing a disruption in the normal control of counterregulatory hormones and macronutrients, resulting in blood glucose accumulation. Metabolic deregulation leads to the production of noxious substances that have a particular propensity for damaging vascular and nervous structures. Physiological changes observed with aging are correlated with a

Bruce Frier; Pearl Yang; Albert W. Taylor

2006-01-01

432

Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... professional to address an eating disorder or other body image or emotional problem. By following the doctor's advice about food and exercise, your child can reach and maintain a healthy weight. ... diabetes, their bodies, and their health. If either you need help ...

433

Diabetes Education in Geriatric Populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The population in the United States, as well as all around the world, is aging rapidly. The management of the chronic diseases in this elderly population is challenging and requires a different approach when compared to younger adults. Diabetes in particular has increasing prevalence in elderly patients. Challenges and

Angela Botts; Medha Munshi

434

Gut Microbiota, Obesity and Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing epidemic of obesity is no longer restricted to developed countries. In 2005, the World Health Organization alerted that there were approximately 400 million obese adults worldwide, and approximately 20 million children worldwide were overweight. Obesity is a complex health issue with serious consequences such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and others. Behavioral, genetic and environmental factors have

Rodrigo Bibiloni; Mathieu Membrez; Chieh Jason Chou

2009-01-01

435

Charcot neuroarthropathy in diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Charcot neuroarthropathy has been recognised for over 130 years and yet it remains a major cause of morbidity for patients with diabetes mellitus and a continuing challenge for physicians. It is rare but it seems to be increasing in prevalence and this provides hope that with larger studies it will soon be possible to clarify the natural history and optimal

S. M. Rajbhandari; R. C. Jenkins; C. Davies; S. Tesfaye

2002-01-01

436

DIABETES, OBESITY AND METABOLISM INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

for other autoimmune disorders, as well as allergy and transplantation. It provides hope for #12;new-based clinical care for individuals with these disorders. We envision that the new Institute will foster are disorders that arise from abnormalities in how sugar and other nutrients are used by our bodies. Diabetes

Engman, David M.

437

Importance of Depression in Diabetes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Depression doubles the likelihood of comorbid depression, which presents as major depression in 11% and subsyndromal depression in 31% of patients with the medical illness. The course of depression is chronic, and afflicted patients suffer an average of one episode annually. Depression has unique importance in diabetes because of its association

Lustman, Patrick J.; Clouse, Ray E.; Anderson, Ryan J.

438

Cereal grains, legumes and diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review examines the evidence for the role of whole grain foods and legumes in the aetiology and management of diabetes. MedLine and SilverPlatter (Nutrition and Food Science FSTA) databases were searched to identify epidemiological and experimental studies relating to the effects of whole grain foods and legumes on indicators of carbohydrate metabolism. Epidemiological studies strongly support the suggestion that

B J Venn; J I Mann

2004-01-01

439

Electrophysiological studies in diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 30 patients with diabetic neuropathy sensory potentials in the median nerve, motor conduction in the lateral popliteal and median nerves, and electromyographic findings in distal and proximal muscles were compared with the severity of symptoms and signs. All patients had abnormalities in at least one of the electrophysiological parameters. The sensory potentials were the most sensitive indicator of subclinical

Albert Lamontagne; Fritz Buchthal

1970-01-01

440

Pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy.  

PubMed

Diabetes is the leading cause of ESRD because diabetic nephropathy develops in 30 to 40% of patients. Diabetic nephropathy does not develop in the absence of hyperglycemia, even in the presence of a genetic predisposition. Multigenetic predisposition contributes in the development of diabetic nephropathy, thus supporting that many factors are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Hyperglycemia induces renal damage directly or through hemodynamic modifications. It induces activation of protein kinase C, increased production of advanced glycosylation end products, and diacylglycerol synthesis. In addition, it is responsible for hemodynamic alterations such as glomerular hyperfiltration, shear stress, and microalbuminuria. These alterations contribute to an abnormal stimulation of resident renal cells that produce more TGF-beta1. This growth factor upregulates GLUT-1, which induces an increased intracellular glucose transport and D-glucose uptake. TGF-beta1 causes augmented extracellular matrix protein deposition (collagen types I, IV, V, and VI; fibronectin, and laminin) at the glomerular level, thus inducing mesangial expansion and glomerular basement membrane thickening. However, low enzymatic degradation of extracellular matrix contributes to an excessive accumulation. Because hyperglycemia is the principal factor responsible for structural alterations at the renal level, glycemic control remains the main target of the therapy, whereas pancreas transplantation is the best approach for reducing the renal lesions. PMID:15938030

Schena, Francesco P; Gesualdo, Loreto

2005-03-01

441

?-Cell failure in type?2 diabetes.  

PubMed

Type?2 diabetic patients are insulin resistant as a result of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Nevertheless, it has been known for the past five decades that insulin response to nutrients is markedly diminished in type?2 diabetes. There is now a consensus that impaired glucose regulation cannot develop without insulin deficiency. First-phase insulin response to glucose is lost very early in the development of type?2 diabetes. Several prospective studies have shown that impaired insulin response to glucose is a predictor of future impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type?2 diabetes. Recently discovered type?2 diabetes-risk gene variants influence ?-cell function, and might represent the molecular basis for the low insulin secretion that predicts future type?2 diabetes. We believe type?2 diabetes develops on the basis of normal but 'weak'?-cells unable to cope with excessive functional demands imposed by overnutrition and insulin resistance. Several laboratories have shown a reduction in ?-cell mass in type?2 diabetes and IGT, whereas others have found modest reductions and most importantly, a large overlap between ?-cell masses of diabetic and normoglycemic subjects. Therefore, at least initially, the ?-cell dysfunction of type?2 diabetes seems more functional than structural. However, type?2 diabetes is a progressive disorder, and animal models of diabetes show ?-cell apoptosis with prolonged hyperglycemia/hyperlipemia (glucolipotoxicity). ?-Cells exposed in?vitro to glucolipotoxic conditions show endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress. ER stress mechanisms might participate in the adaptation of ?-cells to hyperglycemia, unless excessive. ?-Cells are not deficient in anti-oxidant defense, thioredoxin playing a major role. Its inhibitor, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), might be important in leading to ?-cell apoptosis and type?2 diabetes. These topics are intensively investigated and might lead to novel therapeutic approaches. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2010.00094.x, 2011). PMID:24843466

Leibowitz, Gil; Kaiser, Nurit; Cerasi, Erol

2011-04-01

442

The Con Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes the format of the Con Test, an Australian television game show which followed the same general rules and game play as the UK show PokerFace. At the end of each round a contestant needs to decide whether or not he or she should fold. A contestant needs to know how likely it is that he or she is in last place.

Fletcher, Michael

2009-01-01

443

Retinopathy in Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its association with risk factors in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients in two primary care diabetic clinics in Kuwait. Subjects and Methods: All newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients attending Ferdous and Yarmouk Health Care Diabetic Clinics in Farwaniya and Asma Health Areas, respectively, during the period of January

Homoud Al-Zuabi; Yaqoub Al-Tammar; Reem Al-Moataz; Khalid Al-Sabti; Vivek B. Wani; Fahad Hamama; Hanan Mohammad; Mai H. Al-Suwayan

2005-01-01

444

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: A Practical Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brochure addresses the problem of gestational diabetes and answers the most frequently asked questions about the disease. It begins by defining gestational diabetes and discussing its cause, then addresses such topics as: (1) how gestational diabetes differs from other types of diabetes; (2) who is at risk for developing gestational diabetes

National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

445

Providing a Safe Environment for Students with Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current diabetes regimens require more effort than ever before. The level of diabetes control students are able to maintain is affected greatly by their ability to care for their diabetes during the school day. This article reviews use of School Health Plans and Diabetes Medical Management Plans in schools. Students with diabetes, their families,

Silverstein, Janet H.; Jackson, Crystal C.; Bobo, Nichole; Kaufman, Francine R.; Butler, Sarah; Marschilok, Katie

2009-01-01

446

Protect Your Eyes Diabetes can hurt your body over time.  

E-print Network

do to prevent diabetic eye disease: · Keep your blood sugar between 90 -130 as much of the time Protect Your Eyes Diabetes can hurt your body over time. Poorly controlled diabetes can hurt your eyes. Because you have diabetes, you are at risk for developing diabetic eye disease. You may also hear

447

What I need to know about Gestational Diabetes  

E-print Network

only during pregnancy. Diabetes means your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. YourWhat I need to know about Gestational Diabetes National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse #12;#12;What I need to know about Gestational Diabetes #12;#12;Contents What is gestational diabetes

Rau, Don C.

448

Comparative aspects of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes mellitus is a common disease in cats and dogs. Its incidence is increasing, possibly due to an increase in obesity in both species. Different types of diabetes have been identified in pet animals. The classification of diabetic dogs and cats is modeled after the human classification but especially in the diabetic dogs, many aspects are different. The diabetic cat,

M Hoenig

2002-01-01

449

NATIONAL DIABETES EDUCATION PROGRAM The Link Between Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease  

E-print Network

What is the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD)? CVD is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of early death among people with diabetesabout 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people without diabetes. High blood glucose in adults with diabetes increases the risk for heart attack, stroke, angina, and coronary artery disease. 1 People with type 2 diabetes also have high rates of high blood pressure, lipid problems, and obesity, which contribute to their high rates of CVD. 2 Smoking doubles the risk of CVD in people with diabetes. What is the national response to this major health problem? The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) works in collaboration with many partner organizations to reduce illness and death from CVD in people with diabetes. NDEPs Control Your Diabetes. For Life. education campaign strives to help health care professionals and their patients control the multiple risk factors associated with CVD and diabetes. It also helps people with diabetes learn how to reduce their risk of diabetes kidney, eye, and nerve disease. The campaign focuses on comprehensive control of diabetes and urges optimal management of A1C (a measure of average blood glucose), Blood pressure, and Cholesterol. The ABC treatment goals for most people with diabetes are: A A1C (blood glucose) less than 7 percent B Blood Pressure less than 130/80 mmHg C Cholesterol LDL less than 100 mg/dl

unknown authors

450

Development of a diabetes education program based on modified AADE diabetes education curriculum  

PubMed Central

To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a diabetes education program tailored to patients with type 2 diabetes in communities and the preliminary outcomes of the intervention. Methods: Two-phase, one group, mixed-method study design was used. Modified American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) diabetes education curriculum was used as the framework for the program. Patients with diabetes participated in classes and diabetes conversation map discussion. Feasibility and acceptability of the program were evaluated by the ability to recruit and retain participants and their satisfaction with the program. Diabetes knowledge test and the summary of diabetes self-care activities (SDSCA) were used to evaluate the knowledge and behavior changes of the patients. Results: 40 patients completed the program and the attrition rate was 11.1%. All participants were very satisfied with the program. Significant improvement in diabetes knowledge and blood glucose monitoring and foot care were reported. Conclusion: The diabetes education program based on modified AADE diabetes education curriculum combined with diabetes conversation map may be effective in patients with type 2 diabetes. Practice Implications: Flexible time schedule and a control group should be designed in the future study. PMID:24753774

Zheng, Yue-Ping; Wu, Liao-Fang; Su, Zhen-Fang; Zhou, Qiu-Hong

2014-01-01

451

Ovary Cells Apoptosis in Opium-Addicted Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Rats  

PubMed Central

Background Apoptosis is a physiological mechanism of cell death and it can be triggered by a variety of internal and external stimuli. It has been indicated that some opium derivatives develop cell apoptosis. Objectives The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of opium addiction on ovary cell apoptosis in diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar rats. Materials and Methods This experimental study was done on control, control-addicted, diabetic and diabetic-addicted rats. DNA fragmentation as a biomarker of apoptosis was determined by the TUNEL assay. Results The blood glucose concentration in diabetic-addicted and diabetic rats was increased when compared to control (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between weights of control, control-addicted (non-diabetic) and diabetic-addicted groups during this study. The results of this study indicated that apoptosis in addicted and diabetic-addicted ovary cells was significantly higher than in diabetic group, and also apoptosis in addicted group was significantly more than the control rats. In addition, we found that ovary cells apoptosis of diabetic rats were significantly less than in control group. Conclusions Overall, these findings suggest that opium-addiction could play an important role in ovary cell apoptosis and could be very harmful for the reproductive system. Also, ovary cells of non-diabetic rats are more susceptible to opium-induced apoptosis than those of diabetic. PMID:24971264

Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Asiabanha, Majid; Sirati Sabet, Majid

2013-01-01

452

Association of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) with diabetes and diabetic nephropathy  

PubMed Central

Diabetes and diabetic nephropathy are complex diseases affected by genetic and environmental factors. Identification of the susceptibility genes and investigation of their roles may provide useful information for better understanding of the pathogenesis and for developing novel therapeutic approaches. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) is a cell surface glycoprotein expressed on endothelial cells and leukocytes in the immune system. The ICAM1 gene is located on chromosome 19p13 within the linkage region of diabetes. In the recent years, accumulating reports have implicated that genetic polymorphisms in the ICAM1 gene are associated with diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. Serum ICAM1 levels in diabetes patients and the icam1 gene expression in kidney tissues of diabetic animals are increased compared to the controls. Therefore, ICAM1 may play a role in the development of diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we present genomic structure, variation, and regulation of the ICAM1 gene, summarized genetic and biological studies of this gene in diabetes and diabetic nephropathy and discussed about the potential application using ICAM1 as a biomarker and target for prediction and treatment of diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23346076

Gu, Harvest F.; Ma, Jun; Gu, Karolin T.; Brismar, Kerstin

2013-01-01

453

Circulating alanine disposal in diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Alanine was selected for study as a representative circulating glucose precursor in relation to the question of the source of the excess circulating glucose in diabetes mellitus. U-14C alanine and U-14C glucose infusions were given to healthy subjects and to subjects with untreated mild maturity, severe maturity, and juvenile diabetes. Comparative studies after a 24-hour fast were made in healthy and in mildly diabetic subjects. The alanine production rate was unaltered by fasting or diabetes. The glucose production rate was unaltered by fasting but increased in diabetes in relation to the severity of the disease. The fractions of alanine-to-glucose and of glucose-from-alanine were increased by fasting. The effect of diabetes was different. The fraction of alanine-to-glucose was much less in mild maturity diabetes than in health, and it was increased only in juvenile diabetes. In all the diabetic groups the glucose-from-alanine fraction was much less than in health. In every group the change in the alanine oxidation rate was reciprocal to that in the alanine-derived glucogenesis rate. The results are consistent with the possibility that the principal source of the excess circulating glucose in diabetes is glycogen. PMID:640247

Chochinov, R H; Bowen, H F; Moorhouse, J A

1978-04-01

454

Cytotoxicity of silver dressings on diabetic fibroblasts.  

PubMed

A large number of silver-based dressings are commonly used in the management of chronic wounds that are at risk of infection, including diabetic foot ulcers. However, there are still controversies regarding the toxicity of silver dressings on wound healing. The purpose of this study was to objectively test the cytotoxicity of silver dressings on human diabetic fibroblasts. Human diabetic fibroblasts were obtained from the foot skin of four diabetic foot ulcer patients and cultured. The effect of five silver-containing dressing products (Aquacel Ag, Acticoat*Absorbent, Medifoam Ag, Biatain Ag and PolyMem Ag) and their comparable silver-free dressing products on morphology, proliferation and collagen synthesis of the cultured human diabetic fibroblasts were compared in vitro. In addition, extracts of each dressing were tested in order to examine the effect of other chemical components found in the dressings on cytotoxicity. The diabetic fibroblasts cultured with each silver-free dressing adopted the typical dendritic and fusiform shape. On the other hand, the diabetic fibroblasts did not adopt this typical morphology when treated with the different silver dressings. All silver dressings tested in the study reduced the viability of the diabetic fibroblasts and collagen synthesis by 54-70 and 48-68%, respectively, when compared to silver-free dressings. Silver dressings significantly changed the cell morphology and decreased cell proliferation and collagen synthesis of diabetic fibroblasts. Therefore, silver dressings should be used with caution when treating diabetic wounds. PMID:22533495

Zou, Shi-Bo; Yoon, Won-Young; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Cui, Zheng-Jun; Kim, Woo-Kyung

2013-06-01

455

Foot pathology in insulin dependent diabetes.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--Foot pathology is a major source of morbidity in adults with diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine if children with insulin dependent diabetes have an increased incidence of foot pathology compared with non-diabetic children. DESIGN--Questionnaire, clinical examination, and biomechanical assessment. SUBJECTS--67 diabetic children and a comparison group matched for age, sex, and social class. RESULTS--We found significantly more foot pathology in the children with diabetes (52 children) than the comparison group (28 children); with more biomechanical anomalies (58 children with diabetes, 34 comparison group); and a higher incidence of abnormal skin conditions (53 children with diabetes, 27 comparison group). Forty two children with diabetes had received foot health education compared with 27 in the comparison group, but the study revealed ignorance and misconceptions among the diabetic group, and previous contact with a podiatrist was minimal. CONCLUSIONS--The survey suggests that children with diabetes have an increased incidence of foot pathology justifying greater input of podiatric care in the hope of preventing later problems. PMID:7574860

Barnett, S J; Shield, J P; Potter, M J; Baum, J D

1995-01-01

456

Combination Therapy Accelerates Diabetic Wound Closure  

PubMed Central

Background Non-healing foot ulcers are the most common cause of non-traumatic amputation and hospitalization amongst diabetics in the developed world. Impaired wound neovascularization perpetuates a cycle of dysfunctional tissue repair and regeneration. Evidence implicates defective mobilization of marrow-derived progenitor cells (PCs) as a fundamental cause of impaired diabetic neovascularization. Currently, there are no FDA-approved therapies to address this defect. Here we report an endogenous PC strategy to improve diabetic wound neovascularization and closure through a combination therapy of AMD3100, which mobilizes marrow-derived PCs by competitively binding to the cell surface CXCR4 receptor, and PDGF-BB, which is a protein known to enhance cell growth, progenitor cell migration and angiogenesis. Methods and Results Wounded mice were assigned to 1 of 5 experimental arms (n?=?8/arm): saline treated wild-type, saline treated diabetic, AMD3100 treated diabetic, PDGF-BB treated diabetic, and AMD3100/PDGF-BB treated diabetic. Circulating PC number and wound vascularity were analyzed for each group (n?=?8/group). Cellular function was assessed in the presence of AMD3100. Using a validated preclinical model of type II diabetic wound healing, we show that AMD3100 therapy (10 mg/kg; i.p. daily) alone can rescue diabetes-specific defects in PC mobilization, but cannot restore normal wound neovascularization. Through further investigation, we demonstrate an acquired trafficking-defect within AMD3100-treated diabetic PCs that can be rescued by PDGF-BB (2 ?g; topical) supplementation within the wound environment. Finally, we determine that combination therapy restores diabetic wound neovascularization and accelerates time to wound closure by 40%. Conclusions Combination AMD3100 and PDGF-BB therapy synergistically improves BM PC mobilization and trafficking, resulting in significantly improved diabetic wound closure and neovascularization. The success of this endogenous, cell-based strategy to improve diabetic wound healing using FDA-approved therapies is inherently translatable. PMID:24651576

Allen Jr., Robert J.; Soares, Marc A.; Haberman, Ilyse D.; Szpalski, Caroline; Schachar, Jeffrey; Lin, Clarence D.; Nguyen, Phuong D.; Saadeh, Pierre B.; Warren, Stephen M.

2014-01-01

457

Diabetes City: How Urban Game Design Strategies Can Help Diabetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer Games are about to leave their electronic shells and enter the city. So-called Serious Pervasive Games (SPGs) [1] allow for hybrid - simultaneously physical and virtual - experiences, applying technologies of ubiquitous computing, communication and intelligent interfaces. They begin to focus on non-entertaining purposes. The following article a) presents game design strategies as a missing link between pervasive computing, Ambient Intelligence and users everyday life. Therefore it spurs a discussion how Pervasive Healthcare focusing on the therapy and prevention of chronic diseases can benefit from urban game design strategies. b) Moreover the article presents the development and work in progress of DiabetesCity - an educational game prototype for young diabetics.

Knll, Martin

458

Oxidative stress as a mechanism of diabetes in diabetic BB prone rats: Effect of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) isolated from flaxseed has antioxidant activity and has been shown to prevent hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis. An investigation was made of the effects of SDG on the development of diabetes in diabetic prone BioBreeding rats (BBdp rats), a model of human type I diabetes [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)] to determine if this type of diabetes is due to

Kailash Prasad

2000-01-01

459

Smart Diabetic Socks: Embedded device for diabetic foot prevention  

E-print Network

1) Objectives Most foot ulcers are the consequence of a trauma (repetitive high stress, ill-fitting footwear, or an object inside the shoe) associated to diabetes. They are often followed by amputation and shorten life expectancy. This paper describes the prototype of the Smart Diabetic Socks that has been developed in the context of the French ANR TecSan project. The objective is to prevent pressure foot ulcers for diabetic persons. 2) Material and methods A fully wireless, customizable and washable "smart sock" has been designed. It is made of a textile which fibers are knitted in a way they provide measurements of the pressure exerted under and all around the foot in real-life conditions. This device is coupled with a subject-specific Finite Element foot model that simulates the internal strains within the soft tissues of the foot. 3) Results A number of derived stress indicators can be computed based on that analysis, such as the accumulated stress dose, high internal strains or peak pressures near bony p...

Perrier, Antoine; Luboz, Vincent; Bucki, Marek; Cannard, Francis; Diot, Bruno; Colin, Denis; Rin, Delphine; Bourg, Jean-Philippe; Payan, Yohan

2014-01-01

460

Association between diabetes mellitus with metabolic syndrome and diabetic microangiopathy  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between diabetes mellitus (DM), mainly type II, with metabolic syndrome (MS) and diabetic nephropathy (DN)/diabetic retinopathy (DR). Based on the analysis of the prevalence of MS, patients with DM were divided into MS and non-MS groups according to the presence or absence of MS. The correlation between DN, DR and certain factors, including gender, age, disease duration and the presence or absence of a family history of MS, were analyzed. The prevalence of MS among the patients with DM was 62.50%. The prevalence of DN was 55.33% in the MS group and that of DR was 26.00%. DN was positively correlated with age, gender, blood pressure, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and blood uric acid. DR was positively correlated with traceable disease duration and LDL-C. In conclusion, DM occurred more frequently in concurrence with MS than without MS, and the prevalence of DN/DR in the MS group was higher than that in the non-MS group. Age, gender, blood pressure, TG, LDL-C and blood uric acid were risk factors for DN and the traceable disease duration and LDL-C were risk factors for DR. PMID:25371746

ZHANG, XIAOYAN; CUI, XIAOLI; LI, FENGHUA; WANG, SHUO; LIU, XINYU; HUI, LICHAO; SONG, NA; LI, NANNAN

2014-01-01

461

Association of diabetic retinopathy, ischemic heart disease, and albuminuria with diabetic treatment in type 2 diabetic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of type 2 diabetes has been a controversial issue. The objective of the present study was to estimate patients'\\u000a characteristics, particularly diabetes treatment, associated with retinopathy, coronary heart disease, and microalbuminuria\\u000a in an unselected population of 532 type 2 diabetic individuals from three communities. Questionnaires, clinic record review,\\u000a and physical examination were used for the assessment of the

S. Weitzman; M. Maislos; B. Bodner-Fishman; S. Rosen

1997-01-01

462

Gestational diabetes mellitus: Get, set, go From diabetes capital of the world to diabetes care capital of the world  

PubMed Central

Screening and diagnosis for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as well as interventions for its management evoke considerable controversy. There are different types of screening methods: universal or risk-based, one step or two step. Different thresholds for diagnosis of GDM have been in vogue. Previous definition and diagnostic criteria had no place for diagnosis of overt diabetes in pregnancy. Following Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study and International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recommendations, new screening and diagnostic criteria around the world seem to be gaining consensus. The present recommendation given by IADPSG for screening and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy has two discrete phases. The first is detection of women with overt diabetes not previously diagnosed or treated outside of pregnancy. Universal early testing in populations is recommended at the first prenatal visit. The second phase is a 75-g OGTT at 2428 week gestation in all women not previously found to have overt diabetes or GDM. ACHOIS and MFMU Network trails have proven benefit in treating hyperglycemias less than what is diagnostic for diabetes. DIPSI has shown the alternative way for resource-challenged communities. Efforts from all stake holders with interest in GDM are required to make the diabetes capital of the world into the diabetes care capital of the world. PMID:21897891

Magon, Navneet

2011-01-01

463

Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, has been used for the treatment of diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The applications of additional curcuminoid compounds for diabetes prevention and treatment are also included in this paper. Finally, we mention the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a super curcumin through improvement of the bioavailability to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of diabetes therapeutics. PMID:24348712

Zhang, Dong-wei; Fu, Min; Gao, Si-Hua; Liu, Jun-Li

2013-01-01

464

Mediterranean Diet and Diabetes: Prevention and Treatment  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. PMID:24714352

Georgoulis, Michael; Kontogianni, Meropi D.; Yiannakouris, Nikos

2014-01-01

465

Corneal autofluorescence in presence of diabetic retinopathy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently corneal autofluorescence has been proposed as an ocular diagnostic tool for diabetic retinopathy. The method is based on the sensible increase of the natural fluorescence of corneal tissue within specific wavelength in presence of early stage of diabetic retinopathy. The main advantages of this method are that the corneal autofluorescence has been demonstrated to be not age-related and that the cornea is readily accessible to be investigated. In this study 47 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 51 non-insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus patients aged 20 - 90 years have been considered. Patients were selected from the Eye Clinic of S. Raffaele Hospital. The modified Airlie House classification was used to grade the diabetic retinopathy. Corneal autofluorescence has been measured by using both a specifically designed instrument and the Fluorotron Master. Corneal autofluorescence mean value for each diabetic retinopathy measured by using both the instruments correlated with the retinopathy grade.

Rovati, Luigi; Docchio, Franco; Azzolini, Claudio; Van Best, Jaap A.

1998-06-01

466

Mediterranean diet and diabetes: prevention and treatment.  

PubMed

The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. PMID:24714352

Georgoulis, Michael; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Yiannakouris, Nikos

2014-04-01

467

Monogenic Diabetes: A Diagnostic Algorithm for Clinicians  

PubMed Central

Monogenic forms of beta cell diabetes account for approximately 1%2% of all cases of diabetes, yet remain underdiagnosed. Overlapping clinical features with common forms of diabetes, make diagnosis challenging. A genetic diagnosis of monogenic diabetes in many cases alters therapy, affects prognosis, enables genetic counseling, and has implications for cascade screening of extended family members. We describe those types of monogenic beta cell diabetes which are recognisable by distinct clinical features and have implications for altered management; the cost effectiveness of making a genetic diagnosis in this setting; the use of complementary diagnostic tests to increase the yield among the vast majority of patients who will have commoner types of diabetes which are summarised in a clinical algorithm; and the vital role of cascade genetic testing to enhance case finding. PMID:24705260

Carroll, Richard W.; Murphy, Rinki

2013-01-01

468

Maternal Trait Anxiety and Diabetes Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine the relationship of maternal trait anxiety with diabetes regulation among adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods Adolescents and their mothers completed surveys assessing trait anxiety, maternal involvement in diabetes care, adolescent management skills, autonomous motivations, mood state, and absenteeism due to diabetes. HbA1c readings, used to assess metabolic control, were obtained from medical records. Results Trait-anxious mothers

Linda D. Cameron; Marie J. Young; Deborah J. Wiebe

2007-01-01

469

Association of fasting insulin and C peptide with diabetic retinopathy in Latinos with type 2 diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objective Residual insulin secretion provides important protection against the development of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. The data to support this in type 2 diabetes are unclear. We therefore tested in type 2 diabetes whether markers of residual beta-cell function are associated with the development of diabetic retinopathy, an important microvascular complication of diabetes. Design Prospective, cross-sectional, family-based study. Participants 585 Latino type 2 diabetic participants, ascertained in families via a proband either with known diabetes duration of greater than 10?years and/or with diabetic retinopathy. Outcome measures Circulating levels of fasting insulin and C peptide measured and correlated to degree of diabetic retinopathy, assessed by digital fundus photography and graded using the Modified Airlie House Classification and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale (range: levels 1085). Results Fasting plasma insulin (?=?0.29; 95% CI ?0.38 to ?0.20; p<0.0001) and C peptide (?=?0.21; 95% CI ?0.30 to ?0.13; p<0.0001) concentrations in these diabetic participants were significantly correlated with retinopathy and its degree of severity. This relationship remained significant after adjusting for potential covariates including age, gender, glycosylated hemoglobin, duration of diabetes, blood pressure, and renal function. Conclusions These data suggest that residual endogenous insulin secretion is associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy and its severity in Latinos with familial type 2 diabetes. It remains to be proven whether beta-cell targeted therapies, to maintain beta-cell mass and/or function in addition to glycemic control, will further the goal of preventing diabetic microvascular disease.

Kuo, Jane Z; Guo, Xiuqing; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Weinreb, Robert N; Genter, Pauline; Hsiao, Fone-Ching; Goodarzi, Mark O; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Ipp, Eli

2014-01-01

470

Diabetes and pregnancy: time to rethink the focus on type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

With the increasing prevalence of diabetes and obesity in Australia, more women with type 2 diabetes are becoming pregnant. Our study confirms that pregnancies with type 2 diabetes have poorer outcomes and there is a strong need for further research into modification of risk factors associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, particularly in type 2 diabetes. We believe it is time to rethink the strategies to improve their outcomes. PMID:24506506

Kothari, Dharmesh; Lim, Boon H

2014-04-01

471

The Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Foundation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (NDI) "Foundation was formed to support education, research, treatment and cure for Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus." One notable NDI Foundation website service is a sizable glossary of medical terminology with definitions for such terms as apoenzyme, basal nuclei, neuroglia, valine, and many more. The website also contains numerous abstracts of related journal articles. The article references and abstracts can be located by browsing extensive lists organized by Date, Author, and Journal. In addition to abstracts, some of the article references also link to less technical Lay Translations. The Foundation has requested permission from publishers to display full-text articles, and some of these versions are currently available as well. The referenced articles span more than a decade, and have appeared in such journals as _Endocrinology_, _American Journal of Physiology_, _Journal of Biological Chemistry_, and _Nature_, to name a few. An additional website service is the Researcher Directory which lists related researchers alphabetically, as well as by Institution, and Country.

2005-11-03

472

The Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Foundation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (NDI) "Foundation was formed to support education, research, treatment and cure for Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus." One notable NDI Foundation website service is a sizable glossary of medical terminology with definitions for such terms as apoenzyme, basal nuclei, neuroglia, valine, and many more. The website also contains numerous abstracts of related journal articles. The article references and abstracts can be located by browsing extensive lists organized by Date, Author, and Journal. In addition to abstracts, some of the article references also link to less technical Lay Translations. The Foundation has requested permission from publishers to display full-text articles, and some of these versions are currently available as well. The referenced articles span more than a decade, and have appeared in such journals as _Endocrinology_, _American Journal of Physiology_, _Journal of Biological Chemistry_, and _Nature_, to name a few. An additional website service is the Researcher Directory which lists related researchers alphabetically, as well as by Institution, and Country.

473

Mobile peer support in diabetes.  

PubMed

As in other domains, there has been unprecedented growth in diabetesrelated social media in the past decade. Although there is not yet enough evidence for the clinical benefits of patient-to-patient dialogue using emergent social media, patient empowerment through easier access to information has been proven to foster healthy lifestyles, and to delay or even prevent progression of secondary illnesses. In the design of diabetes-related social media, we need access to personal health data for modelling the core disease-related characteristics of the user. We discuss design aspects of mobile peer support, including acquisition of personal health data, and design artefacts for a healthcare recommender system. We also explore mentoring models as a tool for managing the transient relationships among peers with diabetes. Intermediate results suggest acquiring health data for modelling patients' health status is feasible for implementing a personalized and mobile peer-support system. PMID:21893712

Chomutare, Taridzo; Arsand, Eirik; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

2011-01-01

474

Dissociating Fatty Liver and Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Fatty liver disease is epidemiologically associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), leading to a speculation of a reciprocal cause-effect relationship and a vicious cycle of pathology. Here, we summarize recent literature reporting dissociation of hepatosteatosis from insulin resistance, in genetic mouse models and clinical studies. We highlight rhythmic flows of metabolic intermediates between hepatic lipid synthesis and glucose production in normal circadian physiology. Blocking triglyceride (TG) secretion, subcellular lipid sequestration, lipolysis deficiency, enhanced lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis defects, or inhibition of fatty acid oxidation, all result in hepatosteatosis without causing hyperglycemia or insulin resistance, suggesting that the cause-effect relationship between hepatosteatosis and diabetes does not exist in all situations. PMID:23043895

Sun, Zheng; Lazar, Mitchell A.

2012-01-01

475

Diabetic artefacts in forensic practice.  

PubMed

A case is presented where confusion arose about skin lesions and whether they were diabetic or electrical in origin. The deceased was a known diabetic and hypertensive man. A middle-aged person in early fifties was found unconscious in the cell and judicial autopsy was performed. He was facing trial for capital punishment of being allegedly involved in drug trafficking and money laundering. He had few marks over his fingers and foot which were considered to be electric marks produced in electric torture. also had fracture of skull and ischemic necrosis of right side of cerebrum; and contrecoup lesions. Findings are documented with photographs of the lesions. The article also depicts photographs of the scene where the victim had fallen and sustained skull fracture. PMID:19329080

Murty, O P

2009-05-01

476

Nam Con Son Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

1994-07-01

477

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diet (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... lipase inhibitors for treatment of diabetes mellitus Dietary carbohydrates Effects of exercise in diabetes mellitus in adults ... in the treatment of diabetes mellitus Related Searches Carbohydrate counting Diet Exchange lists Oral hypoglycemic agents Patient ...

478

76 FR 78720 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2011-12-19

479

76 FR 71112 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2011-11-16

480

78 FR 64267 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial...requested such an exemption from the diabetes prohibition in 49 CFR...

2013-10-28

481

77 FR 40941 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-07-11

482

76 FR 40439 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2011-07-08

483

78 FR 63295 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial...requested such an exemption from the diabetes prohibition in 49 CFR...

2013-10-23

484

78 FR 1923 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2013-01-09

485

Preventing Diabetes Problems: What You Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics Research Resources Order About Us Espaol National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse Publications Tools and Resources E-News ... Diabetes Problems: What You Need to Know Preventing Diabetes Problems: What You Need to Know On this ...

486

77 FR 13686 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-03-07

487

77 FR 70530 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-11-26

488

77 FR 63411 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-10-16

489

78 FR 50486 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2013-08-19

490

76 FR 34127 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2011-06-10

491

77 FR 46149 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-08-02

492

78 FR 26419 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2013-05-06

493

Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need to Know  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics Research Resources Order About Us Espaol National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse Publications Tools and Resources E-News ... Diabetes: What You Need to Know Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need to Know On this page: ...

494

75 FR 1449 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety...prohibiting persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial...published a notice of receipt of Federal diabetes exemption applications from...

2010-01-11

495

77 FR 18302 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-03-27

496

75 FR 25919 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...applications for exemptions from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments...prohibition for persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2010-05-10

497

78 FR 20381 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2013-04-04

498

78 FR 56988 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial...requested such an exemption from the diabetes prohibition in 49 CFR...

2013-09-16

499

77 FR 52384 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...of applications for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments...against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating...

2012-08-29

500

78 FR 63285 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial...requested such an exemption from the diabetes prohibition in 49 CFR...

2013-10-23