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  1. Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  2. Meal Planning for People with Diabetes, 2nd Edition = Planificacion de Comidas para Personas con Diabetes, 2 Edicion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Migrant Resource Program, Inc., Austin, TX.

    This booklet provides information about diabetes and meal planning particularly designed for migrant individuals. The first section defines diabetes, explains different types of diabetes, lists results of uncontrolled diabetes, and describes the goals and components of a diabetic meal plan. The second section explains the exchange system of…

  3. Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    A urine analysis may show high blood sugar. But a urine test alone does not diagnose diabetes. Your health care provider ... Type 2 diabetes may be reversed with lifestyle changes, especially ... Some cases of type 2 diabetes can also be improved with weight- ...

  4. Sulfonylurea Treatment Before Genetic Testing in Neonatal Diabetes: Pros and Cons

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, David; Bell, Charles D.; Hwang, Jessica L.; Dickens, Jazzmyne T.; Sima, Daniela I.; Felipe, Dania L.; Zimmer, Carrie A.; Davis, Ajuah O.; Kotlyarevska, Kateryna; Naylor, Rochelle N.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Diabetes in neonates nearly always has a monogenic etiology. Earlier sulfonylurea therapy can improve glycemic control and potential neurodevelopmental outcomes in children with KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutations, the most common gene causes. Objective: Assess the risks and benefits of initiating sulfonylurea therapy before genetic testing results become available. Design, Setting, and Patients: Observational retrospective study of subjects with neonatal diabetes within the University of Chicago Monogenic Diabetes Registry. Main Outcome Measures: Response to sulfonylurea (determined by whether insulin could be discontinued) and treatment side effects in those treated empirically. Results: A total of 154 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes before 6 months of age. A genetic diagnosis had been determined in 118 (77%), with 73 (47%) having a mutation in KCNJ11 or ABCC8. The median time from clinical diagnosis to genetic diagnosis was 10.4 weeks (range, 1.6 to 58.2 wk). In nine probands, an empiric sulfonylurea trial was initiated within 28 days of diabetes diagnosis. A genetic cause was subsequently found in eight cases, and insulin was discontinued within 14 days of sulfonylurea initiation in all of these cases. Conclusions: Sulfonylurea therapy appears to be safe and often successful in neonatal diabetes patients before genetic testing results are available; however, larger numbers of cases must be studied. Given the potential beneficial effect on neurodevelopmental outcome, glycemic control, and the current barriers to expeditious acquisition of genetic testing, an empiric inpatient trial of sulfonylurea can be considered. However, obtaining a genetic diagnosis remains imperative to inform long-term management and prognosis. PMID:25238204

  5. Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

  6. Stay at a Healthy Weight. Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes = Mantente en un Peso Saludable. Consejos Para Muchachos con Diabetes Tipo 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A healthy weight means you are not too fat or too thin. Your doctor may have said that you should not gain more weight or that you need to lose a few pounds. If you have diabetes and are overweight, you are not alone. The steps you take to manage your weight will help you feel better and may improve your blood sugar or glucose (GLOO-kos) levels.…

  7. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic kidney disease. Grupo de Trabajo para el Documento de Consenso sobre el tratamiento de la diabetes tipo 2 en el paciente con enfermedad renal crónica].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Artola, Sara; Górriz, José Luis; Menéndez, Edelmiro

    2014-01-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly prevalent chronic diseases, which represent an important public health problem and require a multidisciplinary management. T2DM is the main cause of CKD and it also causes a significant comorbidity with regard to non-diabetic nephropathy. Patients with diabetes and kidney disease represent a special risk group as they have higher morbi-mortality as well as higher risk of hypoglycemia than diabetic individuals with a normal kidney function. Treatment of T2DM in patients with CKD is controversial because of the scarcity of available evidence. The current consensus report aims to ease the appropriate selection and dosage of antidiabetic treatments as well as the establishment of safety objectives of glycemic control in patients with CKD. PMID:24268912

  8. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes : American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  9. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetic Retinopathy What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Click for more information Can Cause Vision ... vision loss and even blindness can result. Other Diabetic Eye Diseases In addition to diabetic retinopathy, other ...

  10. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Diabetic retinopathy affects men and ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Diabetic Retinopathy (2010- ...

  11. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  12. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lpez-Revuelta, Katia; Mndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Mrquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martnez Marn, Maria Isabel; Prez Fernndez, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  13. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  14. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening problem that affects people with diabetes . It occurs when the ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 46. Westerberg DP. Diabetic ketoacidosis: evaluation and treatment. Am Fam Physician . 2013; ...

  15. Diabetic Dermopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Diabetic Dermopathy Information for adults A A A Brown, ... on the legs are typical in long-standing diabetics. Overview Diabetic dermopathy, also known as shin spots ...

  16. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  17. [Secondary diabetes].

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Takashi; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Secondary diabetes is diabetes that results as a consequence of another medication, endocrine disease or hereditary disease. Secondary diabetes is very broad and diverted category among diabetes. Clinically, pancreatic diabetes is one of the most popular secondary diabetes, which provides insulin deficiency following pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Among endocrine diseases, Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly are typical endocrine disorders causing secondary diabetes. They mainly induce insulin resistance in early stage, however, insulin deficiency is also observed in advanced stage. Steroid is the most popular drug-induced secondary diabetes. Importantly, not only oral administered steroid but also cutaneous and inhalation steroid could induce hyperglycemia. Major hereditary diabetes are MODY and mitochondrial diabetes. Concerning secondary diabetes, careful medical examination is required. PMID:26666145

  18. Monogenic Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help rule out type 1 or type 2 diabetes and identify MODY or neonatal diabetes. Blood tests Blood tests of ... neonatal diabetes for the presence or risk of diabetes. What is the treatment for MODY? Treatment depends on the type of MODY. Some ...

  19. Preventing Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Preventing Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) suggests these ...

  20. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  1. Diabetes Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  2. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... special diet. In general, when you have gestational diabetes your diet should: Be moderate in fat and protein Provide ... drinks, fruit juices, and pastries If managing your diet does not ... diabetes medicine by mouth or insulin therapy. Most women ...

  3. Diabetic Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of sugar (hyperglycemia), which can cause a diabetic coma. Symptoms of insulin shock include: Weakness, drowsiness Rapid ... in hands or feet Hunger Symptoms of diabetic coma include: Weak and rapid pulse Nausea Deep, sighing ...

  4. [Diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Bosi, E

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. Diabetes is a serious health concern. The number of cases of diabetes mellitus is estimated to grow at a rate of 50% between 2000 and 2010. There are several types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and other specific types of diabetes. Beta cell dysfunction plays a key role in the physiopathology of diabetes, even when insulin resistance, which is often present in several diabetes-related diseases, is considered among the causes of hyperglycemic type 2 diabetes. The prolonged hyperglycemia that is peculiar to all kind of diabetes has long term complications on several organs and systems. The diagnosis of diabetes is based on the evaluation of glucose plasma levels performed under fasting conditions or two hours after the oral ingestion of 75 grams of glucose. Currently, achieving and maintaining normal plasma levels of glucose are the aims of therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Particularly, the therapy for type 1 diabetes is based on the administration of insulin, whereas that of type 2 diabetes changes over the time: diet and physical activity are the first treatments; oral hypoglycemic drugs are used as a second therapeutic step; and the administration of insulin is the last therapeutic option. The principal therapeutic innovation of the past ten years is represented by the tight and flexible control of glucose plasma level obtained by using the insulin analogues produced by recombinant DNA technology. PMID:14523905

  5. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Diabetes Insipidus Page Content On this page: What is ... diagnosed? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease ...

  6. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    MedlinePLUS

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus ... be removed and returned to the blood. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) occurs when the kidney tubules do ...

  7. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... blood pressure. This is because if you have diabetic nephropathy, you likely also have high blood pressure. ...

  8. Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Izenberg, Aaron; Perkins, Bruce A; Bril, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common condition and diabetics are prone to develop a spectrum of neuropathic complications ranging from symmetric and diffuse to asymmetric and focal neuropathies that may be associated with significant morbidity. Diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common of these complications, occurring in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as in those with prediabetes and glucose intolerance. In this review, the authors discuss the wide variety of neuropathies that can present in the context of diabetes, including the clinical manifestations, diagnostic features, and approach to management. PMID:26502765

  9. [Diabetic neuopathy].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    In view of increasing number of elderly diabetic patients and their westernized lifestyle, diabetic foot and fractures due to fall attributable to diabetic neuropathy may be common diseases which disturb patients' QOL. Since any therapeutic drugs for patients with diabetic neuropathy have not been fully accepted, much attention should be paid to intensification of self-care for foot lesion and exercise and balance training through education. Some of them may show orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis, etc. Others may complain of pain in limbs. Taken together, management for elderly diabetic patients may well be achieved through education and with symptomatic therapy. PMID:24397176

  10. Diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Omar; Al-Sunni, Ahmed; Khavandi, Kaivan; Khavandi, Ali; Withers, Sarah; Greenstein, Adam; Heagerty, Anthony M.; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a distinct primary disease process, independent of coronary artery disease, which leads to heart failure in diabetic patients. Epidemiological and clinical trial data have confirmed the greater incidence and prevalence of heart failure in diabetes. Novel echocardiographic and MR (magnetic resonance) techniques have enabled a more accurate means of phenotyping diabetic cardiomyopathy. Experimental models of diabetes have provided a range of novel molecular targets for this condition, but none have been substantiated in humans. Similarly, although ultrastructural pathology of the microvessels and cardiomyocytes is well described in animal models, studies in humans are small and limited to light microscopy. With regard to treatment, recent data with thiazoledinediones has generated much controversy in terms of the cardiac safety of both these and other drugs currently in use and under development. Clinical trials are urgently required to establish the efficacy of currently available agents for heart failure, as well as novel therapies in patients specifically with diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19364331

  11. Genetics of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  12. Weight and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Weight and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Weight and Diabetes Print A ... person's diabetes management plan. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes If a person has type 1 diabetes but ...

  13. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, ... in children, teenagers or young adults. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin ...

  14. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Jiro; Kamiya, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic criteria of diabetic neuropathy that can be easily used at bedsides and have international consensus have not been established. The most important therapeutic strategy is to maintain strict glycemic control. In addition, treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor that is innovated from the viewpoint of the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy would be useful for preventing the progression of diabetic neuropathy. For painful diabetic neuropathy, pregabalin and duloxetine effectively relieve the pain, and contribute to the improvement of the quality of life. PMID:26666151

  15. Paediatric diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes does not spare any section of society, and its prevalence in the paediatric and adolescent age group is rising. This review highlights the etiological and clinical features of childhood diabetes, including secular changes in epidemiology. It discusses the aspects of non pharmacological and pharmacological therapy which are unique to the paediatric age group, and explores current use of novel therapeutic modalities. The article calls for modulation of the psychological environment of the child with diabetes, to help improve his or her quality of life, and sensitizes physicians to take proactive, affirmative action to address the special needs of children with type1 diabetes. PMID:24601207

  16. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  17. Diabetic Diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day ...

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve—the bundle of nerve fibers that connects ...

  19. Diabetic Pets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... made by a veterinarian. Because older dogs and cats are more likely to develop age-related diseases ... cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur include hind leg ...

  20. Air Travel and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen Air Travel and Diabetes We continue to advocate for the rights travelers ... to people with diabetes. Explore: Air Travel and Diabetes Fact Sheet: Air Travel and Diabetes This fact ...

  1. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 One of the more ... thereafter.) This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  2. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  3. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Page Content On this page: ... increased risk of developing diabetes. [ Top ] Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disorder ...

  4. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... survey. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  5. Depression and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Information on Diabetes Citations Reprints Depression and Diabetes Order a free hardcopy En Espaol Introduction Depression ... see the NIMH booklet on Depression . What is diabetes? Diabetes is an illness that affects the way ...

  6. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Diabetic Heart Disease? The term "diabetic heart disease" (DHD) refers ... Kidney Diseases' Introduction to Diabetes Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD ...

  7. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alternate Language URL Espaol Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What is Diabetes? Page Content What i?s diabetes? Diabetes means that ... and nerves. ^ top Are there different types of diabetes? Yes. There are three main types of diabetes . ...

  8. Diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Eberhard

    2006-12-01

    In most Western countries, diabetic nephropathy (DN) has become the single most common condition found in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This is to some extent due to better survival of diabetic patients with renal failure, but mostly due to the dramatic increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The majority of type 2 diabetic patients with renal failure suffer from nodular glomerulosclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson); but ischemic nephropathy, irreversible acute renal failure (mostly acute on chronic) and diabetes co-existing with primary renal diseases are common as well. Classical DN evolves in a sequence of stages. After a period of glomerular hyperfiltration, increased urinary albumin excretion [microalbuminuria (MA)] i.e. 30-300 mg/day or 20 - 200 microg/minute indicates the onset of overt DN. Risk factors for development of DN are positive family history, hyperglycemia in the mother during pregnancy, high blood pressure, obesity and insulin resistance. Poor glycemic control (HbAlc) and elevated systolic blood pressure (> 135 mm Hg) interact in enhancing the risk of DN. Proteinuria and smoking are major promoters of progression. The risk of onset of microalbuminuria can be reduced by lowering of blood pressure and specifically by blockade of the renin angiotensin system (RAS). In patients with established DN, the target systolic blood pressure should be <130 mm Hg and RAS blockade is obligatory. Treating all cardiovascular risk factors is a high priority. Antihypertensive management is rendered difficult by extreme volume sensitivity, pronounced activation of the RAS and autonomic neuropathy. Cardiac events are excessively frequent, glycemic control becomes difficult and autonomic diabetic neuropathy with gastroparesis and diabetic foot are additional problems. Hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis should be started relatively early. In the absence of contraindications, transplantation (renal transplantation, combined kidney/pancreas transplantation or pancreas after kidney transplantation) is the treatment of choice. PMID:17186681

  9. Diabetic dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liya; Parhofer, Klaus G

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by elevated fasting and postprandial triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, elevated LDL-cholesterol and the predominance of small dense LDL particles. These lipid changes represent the major link between diabetes and the increased cardiovascular risk of diabetic patients. The underlying pathophysiology is only partially understood. Alterations of insulin sensitive pathways, increased concentrations of free fatty acids and low grade inflammation all play a role and result in an overproduction and decreased catabolism of triglyceride rich lipoproteins of intestinal and hepatic origin. The observed changes in HDL and LDL are mostly sequence to this. Lifestyle modification and glucose control may improve the lipid profile but statin therapy mediates the biggest benefit with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction. Therefore most diabetic patients should receive statin therapy. The role of other lipid lowering drugs, such as ezetimibe, fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, niacin and bile acid sequestrants is less well defined as they are characterized by largely negative outcome trials. This review examines the pathophysiology of diabetic dyslipidemia and its relationship to cardiovascular diseases. Management approaches will also be discussed. PMID:25242435

  10. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePLUS

    Tips for Teens with Diabetes What is Diabetes? National Diabetes Education Program Learn about diabetes and how to manage it. styaoyfuyodarooiatumdrbaTecebadhhtlkeoieoecsoaii… cncdlteehams, gyr, ealauwbkncoeeedofishgayceeohch. attue, ...

  11. Diabetes Technology.

    PubMed

    Pftzner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes technology is an evolving field. The research started with the development of blood glucose meters for patient self-testing and the introduction of insulin pen injection devices. Modern devices employ new technological features, such as the use of computer simulations and mathematical algorithms, connectivity and signal transfer, and the use of modern (space research-derived) materials. With these innovations, the goal to develop an artificial pancreas by closing the loop between a continuous glucose sensor and a continuous insulin-delivering device via insulin delivery algorithms is coming closer to reality. As a consequence, interim achievements on this way result in the commercialization of innovative new diabetes technology devices, which help to facilitate the daily life of the affected people with diabetes. PMID:26824436

  12. Diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of blindness in the UK, with older people and those with worse diabetic control, hypertension, and hyperlipidaemia being most at risk. Diabetic retinopathy can cause microaneurysms, haemorrhages, exudates, changes to blood vessels, and retinal thickening. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with diabetic retinopathy? What are the effects of treatments for vitreous haemorrhage? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November March 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 29 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: peripheral retinal laser photocoagulation, focal and grid laser photocoagulation for maculopathy, corticosteroids for macular oedema, and vitrectomy for vitreous haemorrhage. PMID:19450351

  13. Diabetes - eye care

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes can harm your eyes. It can damage the small blood vessels in your retina, which is ... your eye. This condition is called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes also increases your risk of having glaucoma, cataracts, ...

  14. "Diabetes has instant consequences"

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Diabetes has instant consequences" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table ... Washington, DC Type 1 Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the third grade, Madeleine "Maddie" Kuhn doesn' ...

  15. Discrimination (Based on Diabetes)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about your rights in the workplace. School Discrimination Children with diabetes sometimes face problems in obtaining the care they ... for health care professionals, lawyers and parents of children with diabetes. Law Enforcement Diabetes needs do not stop when ...

  16. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Impetigo Head Lice Vomiting Chickenpox Helping ... Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > Parents > Diabetes Center > Watch the Movie > Diabetes Movie Print ...

  17. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor for Kidney Disease Diabetes ... of your body. Are there different types of diabetes? The most common ones are Type 1 and ...

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... to help prevent problems like these. Can preexisting diabetes cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If it’s not ...

  19. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  20. Diabetes Health Concerns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Problems From the CDC  Take Charge of Your Diabetes: Foot Problems From the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse  How diabetes affects the feet and how to prevent foot problems From Medline Plus  Interactive tutorial on foot ...

  1. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  2. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treating and managing diabetes can seem overwhelming at times. But the diabetes health care team is there for you. Your child's diabetes management plan should be easy to understand, detailed, and ...

  3. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Weight and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight and Diabetes Print A ... or type 2 diabetes. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes Undiagnosed or untreated, type 1 diabetes can make ...

  4. Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Virnig, Beth; Hendryx, Michael; Wen, Sijin; Chelebowski, Rowan; Chen, Chu; Rohan, Tomas; Tinker, Lesley; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lessin, Lawrence; Margolis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Womens Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted relative hazard ratios for overall mortality. The proportional subdistribution hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.26 95 % CI 1.061.48), especially among those who took insulin or had longer duration of diabetes. However, diabetes was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality, regardless of type of treatment and duration of diabetes, despite the significant association of diabetes with unfavorable tumor characteristics. Our large prospective cohort study provides additional evidence that pre-existing diabetes increases risk of total mortality among women with breast cancer. The increased total mortality associated with diabetes was mainly driven by increased risk of dying from diseases other than breast cancer. Thus, the continuum of care for breast cancer patients with diabetes should include careful attention to CVD risk factors and other non-cancer conditions. PMID:25261292

  5. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For More Information American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of ...

  6. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  7. Weight and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in a person's diabetes management plan. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes If a person has type 1 diabetes but hasn't been treated yet, he or she often loses weight. In type 1 diabetes, the body can't use glucose (pronounced: GLOO- ...

  8. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nentwich, Martin M; Ulbig, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of blindness in the working-age population. In the next 15 years, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected to increase significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 million people in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to be suffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence 7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people with diabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts for an increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e., exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema. PMID:25897358

  9. Diabetic cystopathy: A review.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhengyong; Tang, Ziwei; He, Changxiao; Tang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Herein we review and discuss epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies on diabetic cystopathy, a common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus with a variety of lower urinary tract symptoms, providing directions for future research. A search of published epidemiological, clinical, or preclinical trial literature was performed using the key words "diabetes", "diabetic cystopathy", "diabetic bladder dysfunction", "diabetic lower urinary tract dysfunction", "diabetic detrusor instability". The classic symptoms of diabetic cystopathy are decreased bladder sensation, increased bladder capacity, and impaired bladder emptying with resultant increased post-void residual volume. However, recent clinical evidence indicates a presence of storage symptoms, such as overactive bladder symptoms. The pathophysiology of diabetic cystopathy is multifactorial, including disturbances of the detrusor, neuron, urothelium, and urethra. Hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and polyuria play important roles in inducing voiding dysfunction in diabetic individuals. Treatment choice depends on clinical symptoms and urodynamic abnormalities. Urodynamic evaluation is the cornerstone of diagnosis and determines management strategies. Diabetes mellitus could cause a variety of lower urinary tract symptoms, leading to diabetic cystopathy with broadly varied estimates of the prevalence rates. The exact prevalence and pathogenesis of diabetic cystopathy remains to be further investigated and studied in multicenter, large-scaled, or randomized basic and clinical trials, and a validated and standardized workup needs to be made, improving diabetic cystopathy management in clinical practice. Further studies involving only female diabetics are recommended. PMID:25619174

  10. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes Undiagnosed or untreated, type 1 diabetes can make people lose weight. In type 1 diabetes, the body stops producing the hormone insulin , which ...

  11. Diabetes in Children and Teens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes ...

  12. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes Page Content On this page: What ...

  13. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > For Kids > Diabetes: ... True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's ...

  14. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  15. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call toll- ...

  16. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > For Teens > Diabetes: ... which are false. Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. False: Type 1 diabetes happens when the cells ...

  17. Healthy Eating with Diabetes Video

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... than 200 public and private organizations. Home Publications Resources Diabetes Facts Press I Have Diabetes Am I ... diabetes Corro riesgo? You are here: NDEP Home > Resources > Healthy Eating with Diabetes Video Healthy Eating with ...

  18. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > Kids > Diabetes Center > ... True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's ...

  19. Diabetes food pyramid (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The Diabetes Food Pyramid divides food into six groups, which vary in size to show relative amounts of servings for each group. ... Pyramid released by the USDA. In the Diabetes Food Pyramid, the groups are based on protein content and ...

  20. Diabetes and bone health.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Marianna; Bahtiyar, Gl; Banerji, Mary Ann; Sacerdote, Alan S

    2013-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes especially type 2 diabetes worldwide is indisputable. Diabetics suffer increased morbidity and mortality, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, not only because of vascular complications, but also because of an increased fracture incidence. Both types 1 and 2 diabetes and some medications used to treat it are associated with osteoporotic fractures. The responsible mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. In this review, we evaluate the role of glycemic control in bone health, and the effect of anti-diabetic medications such as thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, DPP-4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 agonists. In addition, we examine the possible role of insulin and metformin as anabolic agents for bone. Lastly, we identify the current and future screening tools that help evaluate bone health in diabetics and their limitations. In this way we can offer individualized treatment, to the at-risk diabetic population. PMID:23628280

  1. Diabetes - tests and checkups

    MedlinePLUS

    Routine diabetes tests ... People who take control of their own diabetes care by eating healthy foods and living an active lifestyle often have good control of their blood sugar levels. Still, regular health checkups ...

  2. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Teen Diabetes Quiz Past Issues / Winter 2008 Table of Contents ... Photo: Stockdisc See page 16 for the answers. Diabetes causes your: Blood glucose to be too low ...

  3. Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Weiss and Dr. Gary Weiss Liz Wolff Harold Doran Video Diabetes & You What is Diabetes? What is ... No. 38 NIH Grant for Transplant Immunology Harold Doran Elected to Chairman Video Living Window in PNAS ...

  4. Epidemiology of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Forouhi, Nita Gandhi; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    The disease burden related to diabetes is high and rising in every country, fuelled by the global rise in the prevalence of obesity and unhealthy lifestyles. The latest estimates show a global prevalence of 382 million people with diabetes in 2013, expected to rise to 592 million by 2035. The aetiological classification of diabetes has now been widely accepted. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the two main types, with type 2 diabetes accounting for the majority (>85%) of total diabetes prevalence. Both forms of diabetes can lead to multisystem complications of microvascular endpoints, including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular endpoints including ischaemic heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. The premature morbidity, mortality, reduced life expectancy and financial and other costs of diabetes make it an important public health condition. PMID:25568613

  5. Diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, M; Wilson, M; Foster, A

    Nurses caring for people with diabetes can have an impact on the assessment and treatment of diabetic foot problems. This article describes a simple staging system to help in this important work. PMID:11971336

  6. Tight Diabetes Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

  7. Smoking and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mhlhauser, I

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of smoking in diabetic patients is not appreciably different from that in the general population. As in non-diabetic subjects, smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor in diabetic patients. For young diabetic patients, smoking has been identified as a risk for macroproteinuric nephropathy. In respect of retinopathy, study results are more controversial. Recent studies also suggest smoking as a risk indicator for extra-articular connective tissue changes and neuropathy. Patients who already present with vascular complications, pregnant women, and women who use oral contraceptive drugs appear to run a particularly high risk by smoking. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of vascular morbidity and mortality in non-diabetic subjects. Although no comparable studies are available for diabetic populations, it should be assumed that the beneficial effects of stopping smoking are applicable to diabetic patients as well. Programmes to encourage diabetic patients to stop smoking are scarce and have not been successful. PMID:2137057

  8. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  9. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to continue to exercise and eat a healthy diet after pregnancy to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes. She should also remind her doctor to check her blood sugar every 1 to 3 years. More Information Gestational Diabetes and ...

  10. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... ways that help diabetic teens and their families manage very difficult situations better. That leads to better ...

  11. Diabetic Eye Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness ... You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your ...

  12. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... Healthy Diet Balancing Your Carbs Carbs and Blood Sugar Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means ...

  13. Pregnancy and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... health news that matters to you. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breastfeeding Diabetes and Pregnancy Diabetes Type 2 ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  14. DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major clinical trial, or research study, aimed at discovering whether either diet and exercise or the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose toleranc...

  15. Diabetes Type 2

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  16. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  17. The Student with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Samuel M.; Hoover, Joan

    1981-01-01

    Since nearly one million students suffer from diabetes, most teachers are likely to have a diabetic child in class at some time. Though most diabetic children are not likely to require an insulin injection during the day, it is necessary that every teacher be aware of the occasional problems which might arise. (JN)

  18. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... follows the instructions and advice of the diabetes health care team and diabetes management plan, which should include instructions for sick days By regularly monitoring blood sugar levels, you will know when your child's blood ... the diabetes health care team for more information and to learn how ...

  19. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  20. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A G; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  1. Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 000 nontraumatic amputations were performed in people with diabetes. Comprehensive foot care programs can reduce amputation rates by 45 ... should consider making an appointment to see a foot doctor, also called a ... common to diabetes, such as high blood glucose. Neuropathy can affect ...

  2. Year in diabetes 2012: The diabetes tsunami.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, R; Jastreboff, A M

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association/European Association of the Study of Diabetes and The Endocrine Society encourage individualized care for each patient with diabetes, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Recent data suggest that restoration of normal glucose metabolism in people with prediabetes may delay progression to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, several large clinical trials have underscored the limitations of current treatment options once T2DM has developed, particularly in obese children with the disease. Prospects for reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes also appear limited, although recent clinical trials indicate that immunotherapy can delay the loss of ?-cell function, suggesting potential benefits if treatment is initiated earlier. Research demonstrating a role for the central nervous system in the development of obesity and T2DM, the identification of a new hormone that simulates some of the benefits of exercise, and the development of new ?-cell imaging techniques may provide novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers of early diabetes detection for optimization of interventions. Today's message is that a diabetes tsunami is imminent, and the only way to minimize the damage is to create an early warning system and improve interventions to protect those in its path. PMID:23185035

  3. Year in Diabetes 2012: The Diabetes Tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Jastreboff, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association/European Association of the Study of Diabetes and The Endocrine Society encourage individualized care for each patient with diabetes, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Recent data suggest that restoration of normal glucose metabolism in people with prediabetes may delay progression to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, several large clinical trials have underscored the limitations of current treatment options once T2DM has developed, particularly in obese children with the disease. Prospects for reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes also appear limited, although recent clinical trials indicate that immunotherapy can delay the loss of β-cell function, suggesting potential benefits if treatment is initiated earlier. Research demonstrating a role for the central nervous system in the development of obesity and T2DM, the identification of a new hormone that simulates some of the benefits of exercise, and the development of new β-cell imaging techniques may provide novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers of early diabetes detection for optimization of interventions. Today's message is that a diabetes tsunami is imminent, and the only way to minimize the damage is to create an early warning system and improve interventions to protect those in its path. PMID:23185035

  4. Built environment and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pasala, Sudhir Kumar; Rao, Allam Appa; Sridhar, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus is influenced by built environment, which is, the environments that are modified by humans, including homes, schools, workplaces, highways, urban sprawls, accessibility to amenities, leisure, and pollution. Built environment contributes to diabetes through access to physical activity and through stress, by affecting the sleep cycle. With globalization, there is a possibility that western environmental models may be replicated in developing countries such as India, where the underlying genetic predisposition makes them particularly susceptible to diabetes. Here we review published information on the relationship between built environment and diabetes, so that appropriate modifications can be incorporated to reduce the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. PMID:20535308

  5. Diabetes care during Hajj.

    PubMed

    Alsafadi, Hala; Goodwin, Wendy; Syed, Ateeq

    2011-06-01

    Keeping well during Hajj is a challenge for people with diabetes. However, with proactive planning and education, it may prove to be an excellent opportunity for reviewing management and enhancing diabetes education to reduce diabetes-related short- and long-term problems. People with diabetes should have enough time to consider a management plan. It is important that healthcare professionals are well informed regarding the effects of Hajj on diabetes and are able to offer advice, guidance and change of medications as required during pre-Hajj counselling to enable patients to stay healthy. PMID:21902070

  6. Statins and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Dicklin, Mary R; Baum, Seth J

    2016-03-01

    A statin is first-line drug therapy for dyslipidemia. Clinical trial data suggest there is an increase in the incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus with statin use. The National Lipid Association (NLA) Statin Diabetes Safety Task Force concluded that the cardiovascular benefit of statin therapy outweighs the risk for developing diabetes. The NLA panel advocated following the standards of care from the American Diabetes Association for screening and diagnosis of diabetes, and emphasized the importance of lifestyle modification. This article summarizes NLA's review of the evidence, expanding it to include recent results, and outlines the clinical recommendations. PMID:26892999

  7. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia. PMID:26778684

  8. Diabetic retinopathy and other ocular findings in the diabetes control and complications trial/epidemiology of diabetes interventions and complications study.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether intensive treatment (INT) with the goal of achieving blood glucose levels as close to the nondiabetic range as safely possible reduced the risk of onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D) compared with conventional therapy (CON). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) (1982-1993) was a multicenter, controlled clinical trial comparing INT with CON for onset and progression of DR. The Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study (1994-present) is an observational follow-up of the DCCT cohort. RESULTS Of the 1,441 DCCT subjects, 726 had no DR (primary prevention cohort) and 715 had mild DR (secondary intervention cohort) at baseline. Subjects were followed for a mean of 6.5 years. INT median HbA1c was 7% compared with CON median of 9%. INT reduced the adjusted mean risk for the development of DR by 76% and slowed progression of DR by 54% compared with CON. Following DCCT, the HbA1c levels in the original INT and CON groups converged (year 8, INT 7.98%; CON 8.07%); nevertheless, the groups continued to have a durable effect of initial assigned therapy with significantly lower incidence of further DR progression in the INT group (hazard reduction 53-56%). Severe retinal outcomes and procedures to treat them were reduced by 50% in the original INT group. CONCLUSIONS INT delays the onset and slows the progression of DR. Furthermore, the early effects of metabolic control continue to accrue over many years despite subsequent comparable glycemic control (metabolic memory). These results emphasize the need for optimizing glycemic control as early as possible in patients with diabetes. PMID:24356593

  9. Diabetic atherosclerosis mouse models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenneth K; Huan, Youming

    2007-04-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) due to atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the USA, and accelerated CHD has emerged as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients in the USA and worldwide. This has highlighted the importance and urgency of studying the mechanism of diabetic atherosclerosis and exploring therapeutic options. Due to its unique advantages over other animal models, the mouse is the most used model for studying the mechanism of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis and exploring effective therapeutic approaches. In the past decade, several diabetic atherosclerosis mouse models have been established. Currently, however, there is no ideal animal model for diabetic atherosclerosis. To determine the characteristics of the models that more closely resemble human diabetic atherosclerosis disease, this review focuses on the common diabetic atherosclerosis mouse models with respect to the following issues: (1) whether the mice retain diabetic condition; (2) whether the diabetes accelerates atherosclerosis or increases atherogenic inflammation; (3) whether these factors respond to medical interventions. The discussion is aimed at identifying different diabetic mouse models and their features, in order to heighten awareness of the appropriate models that may provide useful tools for studying the mechanism of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis and evaluating therapeutic options. PMID:16979174

  10. Teleophthalmology in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been rapid strides in progress in the fields of telecommunication and medical imaging. There is growing evidence regarding use of teleophthalmology for screening of diabetic retinopathy. This article highlights some pertinent questions regarding use of telescreening for diabetic retinopathy. It deals with evidence regarding accuracy of diagnosis, patients satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. The American Telemedicine Association have given certain guidelines for teleheath practices for diabetic retinopathy. The article discusses regarding these guidelines. Finally, a working model for diabetic retinopathy screening through teleophthalmology has been described. Telescreening for diabetic retinopathy seems to be a cost-effective, accurate, and reliable method for screening for diabetic retinopathy. The American Telemedicine Association has set up guidelines for telescreening that should be adhered to provide quality screening services to people with diabetes. PMID:24876576

  11. Metabolomics in diabetes research.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Nele

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes represents one of the most important global health problems because it is associated with a large economic burden on the health systems of many countries. Whereas the diagnosis and treatment of manifest diabetes have been well investigated, the identification of novel pathways or early biomarkers indicative of metabolic alterations or insulin resistance related to the development of diabetes is still in progress. Over half of the type 2 diabetes patients show manifestations of diabetes-related diseases, which highlight the need for early screening markers of diabetes. During the last decade, the rapidly growing research field of metabolomics has introduced new insights into the pathology of diabetes as well as methods to predict disease onset and has revealed new biomarkers. Recent epidemiological studies first used metabolism to predict incident diabetes and revealed branched-chain and aromatic amino acids including isoleucine, leucine, valine, tyrosine and phenylalanine as highly significant predictors of future diabetes. This review summarises the current findings of metabolic research regarding diabetes in animal models and human investigations. PMID:22718433

  12. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Marre, M; Berrut, G; Bouhanick, B

    1993-01-01

    The association of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus is frequent: one third of patients attending a diabetic clinic. Excess hypertension frequency is marked in type II, non insulin-dependent diabetes, a condition often associated with other vascular risk factors such as obesity and lipid disorders. Insulin resistance is a common feature between type II diabetes, hypertension and other risk factors. In type I, insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is often linked to diabetic nephropathy. There is a genetic basis for diabetic nephropathy, which may share a common background with familial hypertension. Apart from possible genetic predispositions to hypertension diabetes association, chronic hyperglycaemia can lead to alteration in functional and structural properties of blood and vessels, which both contribute to elevated vascular resistance and blood pressure. From a therapeutic viewpoint, blood pressure values above 140/90 mmHg are not tolerable in diabetic subjects under 40 years of age. Due to their renal haemodynamic effects, angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitors may be of special interest to protect kidney function in diabetic subjects. PMID:8218950

  13. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  14. Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... used to be called insulin dependent or juvenile diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes some insulin but the ... to see how you are doing. Kids with type 2 diabetes may need to take insulin or pills to ...

  15. Diabetes and Depression

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and depression occur together approximately twice as frequently as would be predicted by chance alone. Comorbid diabetes and depression are a major clinical challenge as the outcomes of both conditions are worsened by the other. Although the psychological burden of diabetes may contribute to depression, this explanation does not fully explain the relationship between these 2 conditions. Both conditions may be driven by shared underlying biological and behavioral mechanisms, such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, inflammation, sleep disturbance, inactive lifestyle, poor dietary habits, and environmental and cultural risk factors. Depression is frequently missed in people with diabetes despite effective screening tools being available. Both psychological interventions and antidepressants are effective in treating depressive symptoms in people with diabetes but have mixed effects on glycemic control. Clear care pathways involving a multidisciplinary team are needed to obtain optimal medical and psychiatric outcomes for people with comorbid diabetes and depression. PMID:24743941

  16. Update on gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pridjian, Gabriella; Benjamin, Tara D

    2010-06-01

    As the rate of obesity increases in adolescent and adult women in the United States, practitioners of obstetrics see higher rates of gestational diabetes. Recent clinical studies suggest that women with gestational diabetes have impaired pancreatic beta-cell function and reduced beta-cell adaptation resulting in insufficient insulin secretion to maintain normal glycemia. Despite recent evidence that even mild hyperglycemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, controversies still exist in screening, management, and treatment of gestational diabetes. Initial studies regarding glyburide for treatment of gestational diabetes are promising. Overall, only about half of the women with gestational diabetes are screened in the postpartum period, an ideal time for education and intervention, to decrease incidence of glucose intolerance and progression to type 2 diabetes. PMID:20685552

  17. Preeclampsia and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weissgerber, Tracey L.; Mudd, Lanay M.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is diagnosed in women presenting with new onset hypertension accompanied by proteinuria or other signs of severe organ dysfunction in the second half of pregnancy. Preeclampsia risk is increased two to four-fold among women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The limited number of pregnant women with preexisting diabetes and difficulties associated with diagnosing preeclampsia in women with proteinuria prior to pregnancy are significant barriers to research in this high-risk population. GDM also increases preeclampsia risk, although it is unclear whether these two conditions share a common pathophysiological pathway. Non-diabetic women who have had preeclampsia are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Among women with type 1 diabetes, a history of preeclampsia is associated with an increased risk of retinopathy and nephropathy. More research examining pathophysiology, treatment and the long-term health implications of preeclampsia among women with preexisting and gestational diabetes is needed. PMID:25644816

  18. Genitourinary infection in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is known to increase the risk of infection and the commonest amongst them are the ones involving the genitourinary tract. The infections in a diabetic patient are unique in that they are recurrent, more severe, requiring hospitalization, and also have higher mortality than nondiabetics. Some infections are exclusively found in diabetics like the emphysematous pyelonephritis while others have their natural history complicated due to hyperglycemia. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may lead to albuminuria and urinary tract infection and may need to be treated in diabetics. Not just this certain organisms have a predilection for the genitourinary tract of the diabetic patient. All of the above makes the diabetic patient vulnerable to infections and therefore early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is mandatory. PMID:24251228

  19. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  20. Diabetes Insipidus, Central (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: Hormones Diabetes Center Endocrine System Immune System Kidneys and Urinary Tract Word! Hormones Diabetes Center Your Kidneys Your Endocrine System Your Immune System Definition: Hormones Diabetes Center Immune ...

  1. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  2. American Association of Diabetes Educators

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about our site? Close Home American Association of Diabetes Educators Find a Diabetes Educator MY AADE NETWORK ... your continuing education goals. Read More (?) Find a Diabetes Educator (?) Start Your Search Now (?) Program Accreditation (?) Begin ...

  3. Women and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lunt, H

    1996-12-01

    There is an increasing demand by women with diabetes for information on health issues such as pre-conception planning, contraceptive choices, hormone replacement therapy, and osteoporosis prevention. The risks and benefits of therapeutic approaches in these areas will be influenced by the presence of diabetes. Other health issues discussed in this article, which are unique to women with diabetes, include the effect of the menstrual cycle on glycaemic control and insulin requirements, and insulin omission in order to lose weight. PMID:8973881

  4. Globalization of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the “normal-weight metabolically obese” phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority. PMID:21617109

  5. Diabetes and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular Disease Fibromuscular Dysplasia High ...

  6. The Heart in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kereiakes, Dean J.; Naughton, James L.; Brundage, Bruce; Schiller, Nelson B.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of insulin, heart disease has become a major impediment to survival in persons with diabetes mellitus. Coronary disease has increased severity and accelerated development in diabetic persons compared with an age- and sex-matched nondiabetic population. A peculiar vulnerability of women to the influence of diabetes with loss of premenopausal coronary disease protection has been found. The symptomatology of coronary events may differ and coronary care data show a higher incidence of sudden death in diabetic patients who have a myocardial infarction than in their non-diabetic counterparts. Insulin may play a role in the myocardial adjustment to an ischemic insult by enhancing glucose intake and suppressing lipolysis and ketogenesis. Carbohydrate intolerance in dogs, rhesus monkeys and humans appears associated with similar histologic and compositional changes in the myocardium. Abnormalities in diastolic ventricular function not attributable to large- or small-vessel coronary disease have been found in the diabetic subjects of each species. Studies in humans who have diabetes have assessed single pressure-volume relationships and more exacting measures of ventricular compliance are needed. Abnormalities of myocardial function in patients with diabetes have been found using echo and radionuclide techniques. Many of these findings need to be correlated with invasive data or confirmed in larger populations. Autonomic dysfunction is common in diabetic persons and may imply an associated poor prognosis. Reflex abnormalities in parasympathetic function are most prevalent and occur before sympathetic dysfunction. PMID:6372249

  7. Combating the diabetes epidemic.

    PubMed

    Senemmari, Betty

    2005-06-01

    What would happen if one could develop diabetes as quickly as catching the common cold? Well of course this is not the case, but diabetes is becoming more and more common in the United States. From the period 1980 through 2002, the number of Americans diagnosed with diabetes mellitus more than doubled (from 5.8 million people to 13 million people). New evidence reveals that one in three Americans born in 2000 will develop diabetes sometime during their lifetime. Diabetes has the greatest impact on older adults, women, and particular racial and ethnic groups. One in five adults over the age of 65 has diabetes. African Americans, Hispanics, Native American Indians and Alaska Native adults are two to three times more likely than Caucasian adults to have diabetes. In addition to these statistics, an estimated 41 million United States adults aged 40-74 have prediabetes. Prediabetes is defined as blood glucose elevated more than normal, but not increased enough to be classified as that of diabetes mellitus. Fasting blood glucose levels greater than 100 mg/dl but less than 126 mg/dl is characteristic of prediabetes. These people are at great risk for developing diabetes. PMID:16035266

  8. Painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda; Goutman, Stephen A; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease [corrected]. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined. PMID:24803311

  9. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences. PMID:26195102

  10. Treatment of obese diabetics.

    PubMed

    Svacina, Stepn

    2012-01-01

    Fat accumulation is a typical phenomenon in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes. Also Type 1 diabetics are getting obese these days living in an environment with typical caloric overfeeding and low physical activity. Weight reduction is an important part of therapy in all obese diabetic patients. Orlistat is the only accessible antiobesity drug today. Weight neutral antidiabetics like metformin and DPP-4 inhibitors can be also used. Incretin analogues (exenatide and liraglutide) are also very important drugs inducing weight loss in diabetic and also in nondiabetic patients. Insulin therapy causes mostly weight gain. Long acting insulin analogues are able to induce small weight loss in Type 1 diabetes or only a small weight increase or weight loss in Type 2 diabetic patients. Procedures of bariatric surgery are very important in the treatment being able to induce remission of Type 2 diabetes. Weight reduction can be supported also using the new class of antiadiabetic drugs- SGLT inhibitors which are blocking glucose absorption in kidneys. The use of new incretine analogues injected at the interval of one to two weeks is the most important strategy for the treatment of obese Type 2 diabetic patients and perhaps also of Type 1 diabetic patients even in combination with insulin. PMID:23393696

  11. [Cardiovascular complications of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yoshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Several lines of epidemical evidence have shown that type 2 diabetes is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It has been shown that the risk of primary prevention of CVD in patients with diabetes is equal to that of the secondary prevention in general population. In this manuscript, recent reports on the cardiac tests to detect the cardiovascular lesions will be reviewed. The data suggest that MDCT is a promising test even in the patients with diabetes. Furthermore, recent evidence of the treatment of diabetes with insulin or the drugs available recently such as DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT-2 inhibitors will be reviewed. PMID:26666152

  12. Burns and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shalom, A.; Friedman, T.; Wong, L.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Diabetes is often considered a risk factor for poor wound healing and increased complication rates for plastic surgery procedures. Burn injury in diabetic patients may have implications for the length of stay and number of operations required. We therefore we examined the characteristics of diabetic patients admitted to our burn unit and the impact of their condition on their hospital course. Charts of all patients with diabetes admitted to the burn unit from 1995 to 2000 were reviewed (n = 73). Demographic data, percent body surface area burned, anatomical location of the burn, number of surgical procedures required, length and cost of stay, and outcome were noted. The control population included 150 consecutive patients without diabetes treated during the same period. Diabetic patients were older and underwent a higher number of surgical procedures, with increased length of stay and increased mortality, despite an equivalent body surface area burned. They had a higher incidence of scald burns in the lower extremities than the non-diabetic population. This work shows that diabetic patients constitute a unique group. They are significantly older, have an increased rate of surgical interventions, increased hospital stay, and significantly increased mortality compared to a control group with similar surface area burns. This group is also more likely to have scald burns in the lower extremities, mostly due to diabetic neuropathy. This work emphasizes the importance of education and prevention programmes directed towards this group of patients, in order to decrease morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. PMID:21990975

  13. Ketoacidosis in diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kilvert, J A; Nicholson, H O; Wright, A D

    1993-04-01

    A study was carried out to determine the incidence of maternal ketoacidosis in 635 insulin-treated diabetic pregnancies managed in a combined antenatal/diabetic clinic between 1971 and 1990. A total of 11 episodes occurred, representing 1.73% of diabetic pregnancies of which 9 were in the antenatal period. Overall fetal loss including spontaneous abortion was 22%, but there was only one fetal death in the seven episodes of ketoacidosis in the second and third trimesters. Ketoacidosis is an infrequent occurrence in diabetic pregnancy managed in a combined clinic and is not associated with a high fetal loss after the first trimester. PMID:8387415

  14. Animal Models of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Lizhu; Luo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of today's main causes of blindness in numerous developed countries worldwide. The underlying pathogenesis of DR is complex and not well understood, thus impeding development of specific, effective treatment modalities. Consequently, the use of animal models of DR is of critical importance for investigating the pathogenesis of and treatment for DR. While rats and mice are the most commonly used animal models of DR, the zebrafish now appears to be a promising model. Nonhuman primates and humans have similar eye structures, and both can develop spontaneous diabetes mellitus (DM). Although various traditionally used animal models of DR undergo a number of pathological changes similar to those of human DR, several human variations, e.g. retinal neovascularization, cannot yet be fully mimicked in any existing animal model of DM. Since both the animal models and the methods chosen for inducing DR have great influence on experimental results, a clear understanding of available animal models is vital for planning an experimental design. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms, methodologies and pros and cons of the most commonly used animal models of DR. PMID:25835487

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  16. Hepatic insulin gene therapy prevents diabetic enteropathy in STZ-treated CD-1 mice

    PubMed Central

    You, Shuo; Anitha, Mallappa; deSouza, Sean MD; Jia, Dingwu; Lu, Xianghua; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Olson, Darin E; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Thulé, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Depending on the population examined, from 6 to 83% of people with diabetes mellitus exhibit symptoms of altered gut motility, manifesting as dysphagia, reflux, early satiety, nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Hyperglycemia-induced cell loss within the enteric nervous system has been demonstrated in both diabetic rodents and patients with diabetes. Glycemic control is recommended to prevent diabetic gastroenteropathy but is often difficult to achieve with current treatment modalities. We asked if hepatic insulin gene therapy (HIGT) could inhibit the development of diabetic gastroenteropathy in mice. Bowel length, bowel transit, colonic muscle relaxation, and the numbers of both stimulatory and inhibitory neurons in the colonic myenteric plexus were compared in groups of diabetic mice (DM), control nondiabetic mice (Con), and diabetic mice treated with HIGT (HIGT). Delivery of a metabolically responsive insulin transgene to the liver of STZ-diabetic mice with an adeno-associated virus, sero-type 8 (AAV8) produced near-normal blood sugars for over 1 month and prevented anatomic, functional, and neurohistologic changes observed in diabetic mice. We conclude that in addition to normalizing oxidative metabolism in diabetic rodents, HIGT is sufficient to prevent the development of diabetic gastroenteropathy. PMID:26366426

  17. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes Print A A A Text Size ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  18. Diabetes in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Shugart, Christine; Jackson, Jonathan; Fields, Karl B.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Exercise is recommended for individuals with diabetes mellitus, and several facets of the disease must be considered when managing the diabetic athlete. The purpose of this article is to review diabetes care in the context of sports participation. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database, as well as manual review of reference lists of identified sources. Results: Diabetics should be evaluated for complications of long-standing disease before beginning an exercise program, and exercise should be modified appropriately if complications are present. Athletes who use insulin or oral insulin secretogogues are at risk for exercise-induced immediate or delayed hypoglycemia. Diabetics are advised to engage in a combination of regular aerobic and resistance exercise. Insulin-dependent diabetics should supplement carbohydrate before and after exercise, as well as during exercise for events lasting longer than 1 hour. Adjustment of insulin dosing based on planned exercise intensity is another strategy to prevent hypoglycemia. Insulin-dependent athletes should monitor blood sugar closely before, during, and after exercise. Significant hyperglycemia before exercise should preclude exercise because the stress of exercise can paradoxically exacerbate hyperglycemia and lead to ketoacidosis. Athletes should be aware of hypoglycemia symptoms and have rapidly absorbable glucose available in case of hypoglycemia. Conclusion: Exercise is an important component of diabetes treatment, and most people with diabetes can safely participate in sports at recreational and elite levels with attention to appropriate precautions. PMID:23015921

  19. The diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are responsible for nearly 50% of all diabetes-related hospital bed days. Approximately 10-15% of diabetic patients developed foot ulcers at some state in their life and 15% of all load in amputations are performed in patients with diabetes. There is a need to provide extensive education to both primary care physicians and the patients regarding the relationship between glucose control and complications encountered in the foot and ankle. The management of diabetic foot disease is focussed primarily on avoiding amputation of lower extremities and should be carried out through three main strategies; identification of the "at risk" foot, treatment of acutely diseased foot, and prevention of further problems. These are several obstacles in the management of DFI that include poor knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its complications, lack of appropriate podiatry services. These goals are possible only by the establishment of a dedicated team of podiatrist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon and a pedorthist. The plastic surgeons, orthopaedic surgeons & diabetes teaching nurses/educator dedicated to foot care could be a part of the team. Identifying the patients with diabetes at risk for ulceration requires feet examination, including the vascular & neurological systems, skin conditions, and foot structure. Conservative management of foot problems has dramatically reduced the risk of amputation by simple procedures, such as appropriate foot wear, cleanliness, aggressive surgical debridement, regular wound dressing by simple wet-to-dry saline guage, and ulcer management. PMID:26072202

  20. Preventing diabetic foot problems.

    PubMed

    Helfand, A E

    1984-08-01

    It has been reported that when adequate foot care has been provided for the diabetic patient, the amputation rate could be reduced by as much as 50 to 75 per cent. Patient management and rehabilitation of the patient with diabetes mellitus must consider the individual and unusual needs of patients in more than a biologic or physiologic sense. PMID:6536396

  1. National Diabetes Education Program

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Professionals Community Organizations​ ​​ HealthSense Alternate Language URL National Diabetes Education Program Page Content What's New ​ ​ It’s National ... told that your are at risk for developing diabetes or that you have prediabetes, you should know ...

  2. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catch problems early if you get regular eye exams. ... diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam every 1 to 2 years by an eye ... problems with your vision. Many can do screening exams for damage from diabetes. Once you have eye ...

  3. "Diabetes is beatable!"

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to controlling the disease. The lesson is simple: Diabetes won't kill you unless you let it! Type 2 is beatable most of the time. But Type 1, which I have, is different. You have to study to defeat itevery day. If diabetics don' ...

  4. Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Shelly; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Eight experts in visual impairment respond briefly to reports that intensive monitoring of blood glucose levels by persons with diabetes can lead to a 70% reduction in the progression of detectable diabetic retinopathy. Comments are generally optimistic, though some cautions are raised. (DB)

  5. Diabetes and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... exercise is very important for people who have diabetes. Diet and exercise work together to help your body ... American Heart Association is a good source for diets that are low in fat and cholesterol. ... Attenuating Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes by Alan J. Garber, M.D., PH.D ( ...

  6. Peripartum management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Pramila; Anakal, Manjunath

    2013-10-01

    The peripartum control of diabetes is very important for the well-being of the newborn as higher incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia is seen if maternal hyperglycemia happens during this period. Type of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes) also has an effect on the glucose concentration during intrapartum period. During the latent phase of labor, the metabolic demands are stable but during active labor there is increased metabolic demand and decreased insulin requirement. After delivery once the placenta is extracted, insulin resistance rapidly comes down and in patients with pre-gestational diabetes there will be a sudden drop in insulin requirement and the insulin may not be required in women with gestational diabetes, but they just need close monitoring. During breast-feeding blood glucose levels fall because of high metabolic demand and women need to take extra calories to maintain the levels and more vigilance especially in type 1 and type 2 diabetic mothers is required. The protocols used for the management of peripartum management of diabetes mostly rely on glucose and insulin infusion to maintain maternal blood sugars between 70 and 110 mg/dl. The data is mostly from retrospective studies and few randomized control trials done mainly in type 1 diabetes patients. The review summarizes guidelines, which are used for peripartum management of blood glucose. PMID:24251226

  7. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and approximately 14-24 percent of patients with diabetes who develop a foot ulcer will require an amputation. Foot ulceration precedes ... foot ulcer is preventable. Causes Anyone who has diabetes can develop a foot ulcer. Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, and older ...

  8. Dyslipidemia and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yo-Chen; Wu, Wen-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major microvascular complications of diabetes. In developed countries, it is the most common cause of preventable blindness in diabetic adults. Dyslipidemia, a major systemic disorder, is one of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of suffering from dyslipidemia concurrently. The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and traditional/nontraditional lipid markers, possible mechanisms involving lipid metabolism and diabetic retinopathy, and the effect of lipid-lowering therapies on diabetic retinopathy. For traditional lipid markers, evidence is available that total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with the presence of hard exudates in patients with DR. The study of nontraditional lipid markers is advancing only in recently years. The severity of DR is inversely associated with apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), whereas ApoB and the ApoB-to-ApoA1 ratio are positively associated with DR. The role of lipid-lowering medication is to work as adjunctive therapy for better control of diabetes-related complications including DR. PMID:24380088

  9. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-Consumer/ . Top Omega-3s Omega-3s supplements don’t help people with diabetes control ... possible link between eating seafood or plants with omega-3s and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. ...

  10. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  11. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... URL Español Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What is Diabetes? Page Content What is diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in your ...

  12. Diabetes and Menopause.

    PubMed

    Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie A; Park, Sung Kyun; Kim, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    During menopause, women's body composition, sex hormone profile, and metabolic profile may change dramatically. In this review, we summarize studies examining whether the menopausal transition and physiologic factors characterizing the transition are associated with increased risk of diabetes. We review the evidence for estrogen therapy and diabetes risk and studies examining the relationship between diabetes and menarche, which represents an extension of the reproductive life span at the opposite end of the age spectrum. Although studied less extensively, the presence of type 1 or type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of ovarian failure, and we review this literature. In conclusion, we note that the evidence linking menopausal sex hormone changes with increased diabetes risk is weak, although rapid changes as observed with oophorectomy may increase risk. Further studies should investigate the contradictory effects of estrogen therapy upon hepatic and glucose metabolism in mid-life women. PMID:26879303

  13. Diabetes and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Suvisaari, Jaana; Keinnen, Jaakko; Eskelinen, Saana; Mantere, Outi

    2016-02-01

    People with schizophrenia have 2- to 5-fold higher risk of type 2 diabetes than the general population. The traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes, especially obesity, poor diet, and sedentary lifestyle, are common in people with schizophrenia already early in the course of illness. People with schizophrenia also often have low socioeconomic status and income, which affects their possibilities to make healthy lifestyle choices. Antipsychotic medications increase the risk of type 2 diabetes both directly by affecting insulin sensitivity and indirectly by causing weight gain. Lifestyle modification interventions for prevention of diabetes should be an integral part of treatment of patients with schizophrenia. In the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with schizophrenia, communication and collaboration between medical care and psychiatric treatment providers are essential. PMID:26803652

  14. Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identified. However, despite broad organisational, intellectual, and fiscal investments, no means for preventing or curing type 1 diabetes exists, and, globally, the quality of diabetes management remains uneven. This Seminar discusses current progress in epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes, and prospects for an improved future for individuals with this disease. PMID:23890997

  15. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ziga-Gonzlez, S A

    1998-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy could result in severe or fatal complications to mother or the unborn product, like polyhydramnios, preeclampsia, abortion, neonatal asphyxia, macrosomia, stillbirth, and others, therefore is very important the early detection and treatment of diabetes. Gestacional Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity first recognized during pregnancy. The screening test consist of 50 g of oral glucose and a plasma glucose measurement at one hour, regardless of the time of the last meal, and this may do in all pregnancies between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. If plasma glucose level above 140 mg/dl results, a oral glucose tolerance test with 100 g must be done. This is the GDM diagnostic test. The risk factors for gestacional diabetes (older than 30 years of age, obesity, arterial hypertension, glucosury, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, family history of macrosomia) identify only 50% of pregnancies with gestacional diabetes, therefore, is necessary to screen all pregnancies who become pregnant, a strict control before pregnant is indispensable, with aim to slow congenital malformations probability and another complications. Gestacional diabetes prevalence in hispanic women in the U.S.A. is 12.3 percent. Diabetes mellitus prevalence in Mexico is about 2-6 percent. The goal of management of diabetes during pregnancy is the maintainance of fasting plasma glucose 105 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl two hours after meals. Treatment consist in diabetes education, diet with caloric needs calculation, exercise, and occasionally insulin. Is necessary the prenatal monitoring, the supervision of delivery or cesarean metabolic changes, and the postnatal monitoring of the mother and product. PMID:9679396

  16. Epidemiology, mechanisms, and management of diabetic gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence of the significant impact of gastroparesis on morbidity and mortality mandates optimized management of this condition. Gastroparesis affects nutritional state, and in diabetics it has deleterious effects on glycemic control and secondary effects on organs that increase mortality. First-line treatments include restoration of nutrition and medications (prokinetic and antiemetic). We review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, impact, natural history, time trends, and treatment of gastroparesis, focusing on diabetic gastroparesis. We discuss pros and cons of current treatment options, including metoclopramide. Second-line therapeutic approaches include surgery, venting gastrostomy or jejunostomy, and gastric electrical stimulation; most of these were developed based on results from open-label trials. New therapeutic strategies for gastroparesis include drugs that target the underlying defects, prokinetic agents such as 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists that do not appear to have cardiac or vascular effects, ghrelin agonists, approaches to pace the stomach, and stem cell therapies. PMID:20951838

  17. Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    Globally half of all diabetes mellitus is undiagnosed. We sought to determine the extent and characteristics of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in Mexican Americans residing in the United States. This disadvantaged population with 50% lifetime risk of diabetes is a microcosm of the current pandemic. We accessed baseline data between 2004 and 2014 from 2,838 adults recruited to our Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC); a two-stage randomly selected Framingham-like cohort of Mexican Americans on the US Mexico border with severe health disparities. We examined prevalence, risk factors and metabolic health in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes. Two thirds of this Mexican American population has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was 28.0%, nearly half undiagnosed, and pre-diabetes 31.6%. Mean BMI among those with diabetes was 33.5 kg/m2 compared with 29.0 kg/m2 for those without diabetes. Significant risk factors were low income and educational levels. Most with diabetes had increased waist/hip ratio. Lack of insurance and access to health services played a decisive role in failure to have diabetes diagnosed. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes had similar measures of poor metabolic health similar but generally not as severe as those with diagnosed diabetes. More than 50% of a minority Mexican American population in South Texas has diabetes or pre-diabetes and is metabolically unhealthy. Only a third of diabetes cases were diagnosed. Sustained efforts are imperative to identify, diagnose and treat individuals in underserved communities. PMID:26186342

  18. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are

  19. Diabetes screening in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta; Mullins, Rebecca; Brock, Emily

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has increased worldwide and the pathophysiological problems associated with diabetes increase the potential for employees' physical disabilities. These complications, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and visual impairment, negatively impact the job performance of employees and compromise workplace safety. Occupational health nurses can provide diabetes screening programs to employees and identify chronic disease risk factors early. This article describes an occupational diabetes screening program at a major corporation in Belize, Central America, defines diabetes, outlines the diabetes teaching plan, and presents the demographics of the participants and results of the screening. Cultural considerations and recommendations for future occupational diabetes screenings are proposed. PMID:25373027

  20. Angiogenesis in Diabetes and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Ma, Jian-xing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity continues to increase globally. Diabetic vascular complications are the main chronic diabetic complications and associated with mortality and disability. Angiogenesis is a key pathological characteristic of diabetic microvascular complications. However, there are two tissue-specific paradoxical changes in the angiogenesis in diabetic microvascular complications: an excessive uncontrolled formation of premature blood vessels in some tissues, such as the retina, and a deficiency in the formation of small blood vessels in peripheral tissues, such as the skin. This review will discuss the paradoxical phenomena of angiogenesis and its underlying mechanism in obesity, diabetes and diabetic complications. PMID:25663658

  1. Genetic Counseling for Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Stephanie A.; Maloney, Kristin L.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2014-01-01

    Most diabetes is polygenic in etiology, with (type 1 diabetes, T1DM) or without (type 2 diabetes, T2DM) an autoimmune basis. Genetic counseling for diabetes generally focuses on providing empiric risk information based on family history and/or the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on pregnancy outcome. An estimated one to five percent of diabetes is monogenic in nature, e.g., maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), with molecular testing and etiology-based treatment available. However, recent studies show that most monogenic diabetes is misdiagnosed as T1DM or T2DM. While efforts are underway to increase the rate of diagnosis in the diabetes clinic, genetic counselors and clinical geneticists are in a prime position to identify monogenic cases through targeted questions during a family history combined with working in conjunction with diabetes professionals to diagnose and assure proper treatment and familial risk assessment for individuals with monogenic diabetes. PMID:25045596

  2. Vitamin D and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    MITRI, JOANNA; PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis There has been increasing evidence suggesting that vitamin D may play an important role in modifying risk of diabetes. In this regard, Vitamin D has both direct and indirect effects, the latter via regulation of calcium effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammation. The human evidence comes primarily from many cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, most of which showed an inverse association between vitamin D status and prevalence or incidence of type 2 diabetes. The effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemia or incident type 2 diabetes has been reported in several trials with mixed results. The present article describes the biological plausibility behind the potential association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes and summarizes the current evidence supporting a relation between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes and briefly reports on the potential association between vitamin D and type 1 diabetes. PMID:24582099

  3. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism. PMID:22540046

  4. Mitochondrial metabolism and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Ki-Up; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2010-10-19

    The oversupply of calories and sedentary lifestyle has resulted in a rapid increase of diabetes prevalence worldwide. During the past two decades, lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Mitochondria are vital to most of the eukaryotic cells as they provide energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate by oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. In the present article, we will briefly review the major functions of mitochondria in regard to energy metabolism, and discuss the genetic and environmental factors causing mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. In addition, the pathophysiological role of mitochondrial dysfunction in insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are discussed. We argue that mitochondrial dysfunction could be the central defect causing the abnormal glucose metabolism in the diabetic state. A deeper understanding of the role of mitochondria in diabetes will provide us with novel insights in the pathophysiology of diabetes. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2010.00047.x, 2010). PMID:24843427

  5. Diabetes mellitus and suicide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2014-07-01

    Relationship of diabetes mellitus (DM) with metal health disorders such as depression has been explored extensively in the published literatures. However, association of diabetes mellitus with suicidal tendencies has been evaluated less extensively. The present narrative review aimed to assess the literature relating to diabetes mellitus and suicide. As a part of the review, Pubmed and Google Scholar databases were searched for English language peer reviewed published studies with keywords relating to diabetes and suicide. Additional references were identified using cross-references. The available literature suggests that suicidal ideas and attempts are more frequent in patients with diabetes mellitus than healthy or medically ill controls. Although, a few studies report evidence to the contrary. Suicide accounts for a large proportion of deaths in patients with diabetes mellitus type I (T1DM), and their mortality rate is higher than that of age matched control population. Psychological morbidity, including depression, precedes suicidal ideas and attempts; though many other factors can be hypothesized to impact and modulate this association. A common method of suicide attempt in patients with diabetes includes uses of high doses of insulin and its congeners or medications to treat the disease. Regular screening and prompt treatment of depression and suicidality is suggested for patients with DM. PMID:25143900

  6. [Diabetes mellitus and dementia].

    PubMed

    Kopf, D

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, particularly type2 diabetes, is a risk factor for dementia and this holds true for incident vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrovascular complications of diabetes and chronic mild inflammation in insulin resistant states partly account for this increased risk. In addition, cellular resistance to the trophic effects of insulin on neurons and glial cells favor the accumulation of toxic metabolic products, such as amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau). Weight loss frequently precedes overt cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This results in an increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes in stable diabetic patients who are on suitably adjusted doses of oral insulin or insulinotropic antidiabetic drugs. In turn, hypoglycemic episodes may induce further damage in the vulnerable brains of type2 diabetes patients. Patients with unexplained weight loss, hypoglycemic episodes and subjective memory complaints must be screened for dementia. Once dementia has been diagnosed the goals of diabetes management must be reevaluated as prevention of hypoglycemia becomes more important than tight metabolic control. As weight loss accelerates the rate of cognitive decline, nutritional goals must aim at stabilizing body weight. There is no available evidence on whether drug treatment of diabetes in middle-aged persons can help to prevent dementia; however, physical exercise, mental activity and higher education have preventive effects on the risk of dementia in later life. In addition, nutritional recommendations that are effective in preventing cardiovascular events have also been shown to reduce the risk of dementia. PMID:25894243

  7. Breastfeeding and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gouveri, E; Papanas, N; Hatzitolios, A I; Maltezos, E

    2011-03-01

    The present review outlines the role of breastfeeding in diabetes. In the mother, breastfeeding has been suggested to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, it appears to reduce the risk of premenopausal breast cancer and ovarian cancer. In the neonate and infant, among other benefits, lactation confers protection from future both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Whether lactation protects women with gestational diabetes mellitus and their offspring from future T2DM remains to be answered. Importantly, for diabetic mothers, antidiabetic treatment itself may affect breastfeeding. There is not enough data to allow the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents. Therefore, insulin currently remains the optimal antidiabetic treatment during lactation. In conclusion, breastfeeding could be considered a modifiable risk factor for the development of diabetes and even a potential protective lifestyle measure from future cardio-metabolic and malignant diseases. Therefore, health care professionals should encourage both women with and without diabetes to breastfeed their children. PMID:21348815

  8. Diabetes mellitus and thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Scott, A R; Bennett, T; Macdonald, I A

    1987-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is accompanied by a variety of alterations in metabolic, cardiovascular, and neuronal function. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the ways in which these pathophysiological aspects of diabetes may impair thermoregulatory function. The influence of diabetic neuropathy and vasculopathy on the control of peripheral blood flow is reviewed and the additional effects of changing levels of blood glucose and insulin are discussed. Both hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis are associated with hypothermia, but the reasons for this in ketoacidosis are not clear. Impairment of heat conservation may contribute to and could be a consequence of autonomic neuropathy. The final section of the paper describes a study of our own in which metabolic stability was maintained by infusing insulin intravenously before and during the determination of the thermoregulatory responses to acute cold stress. Under these conditions, there was impairment of reflex vasoconstriction in the limbs of diabetics with neuropathy. This failure to reduce heat loss resulted in half the diabetics with neuropathy shivering in response to moderate cooling, which in some subjects was accompanied by a fall in core temperature. Diabetics without neuropathy and nondiabetics neither shivered nor dropped core temperature. PMID:3304596

  9. Diabetes Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E.; Cargill, Algernon; Huang, Elbert S.

    2008-01-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of the diabetes epidemic; they have higher prevalence rates, worse diabetes control, and higher rates of complications. This article reviews the effectiveness of health care interventions at improving health outcomes and/or reducing diabetes health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities with diabetes. Forty-two studies met inclusion criteria. On average, these health care interventions improved the quality of care for racial/ethnic minorities, improved health outcomes (such as diabetes control and reduced diabetes complications), and possibly reduced health disparities in quality of care. There is evidence supporting the use of interventions that target patients (primarily through culturally tailored programs), providers (especially through one-on-one feedback and education), and health systems (particularly with nurse case managers and nurse clinicians). More research is needed in the areas of racial/ethnic minorities other than African Americans and Latinos, health disparity reductions, long-term diabetes-related outcomes, and the sustainability of health care interventions over time. PMID:17881626

  10. Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally, particularly in Asia. According to the 2013 Diabetes Atlas, an estimated 366 million people are affected by diabetes worldwide; 36% of those affected live in the Western Pacific region, with a significant proportion in East Asia. The reasons for this marked increase in the prevalence of diabetes can be extrapolated from several distinct features of the Asian region. First, the two most populated countries, China and India, are located in Asia. Second, Asians have experienced extremely rapid economic growth, including rapid changes in dietary patterns, during the past decades. As a result, Asians tend to have more visceral fat within the same body mass index range compared with Westerners. In addition, increased insulin resistance relative to reduced insulin secretory function is another important feature of Asian individuals with diabetes. Young age of disease onset is also a distinctive characteristic of these patients. Moreover, changing dietary patterns, such as increased consumption of white rice and processed red meat, contributes to the deteriorated lifestyle of this region. Recent studies suggest a distinctive responsiveness to novel anti-diabetic agents in Asia; however, further research and efforts to reverse the increasing prevalence of diabetes are needed worldwide. PMID:26435131

  11. Innate immunity in diabetes and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system includes several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs). These receptors detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in the extracellular and intracellular space. Intracellular NLRs constitute inflammasomes, which activate and release caspase-1, IL-1?, and IL-18 thereby initiating an inflammatory response. Systemic and local low-grade inflammation and release of proinflammatory cytokines are implicated in the development and progression of diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. TLR2, TLR4, and the NLRP3 inflammasome can induce the production of various proinflammatory cytokines and are critically involved in inflammatory responses in pancreatic islets, and in adipose, liver and kidney tissues. This Review describes how innate immune system-driven inflammatory processes can lead to apoptosis, tissue fibrosis, and organ dysfunction resulting in insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and renal failure. We propose that careful targeting of TLR2, TLR4, and NLRP3 signalling pathways could be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26568190

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Type 1 diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help with understanding type 1 diabetes? autoimmune ; bacteria ; chronic ; coma ; complication ; diabetes ; diabetes mellitus ; end-stage renal disease ; ESRD ; gene ; glucose ; haplotype ; high blood sugar ; HLA ; ...

  13. Advances in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prakashchand; Jindal, Ankita; Saini, V.K.; Jindal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of long-term diabetes mellitus (DM). Over the last 2 decades lot of work has been on early diagnosis of DR and screening programs have been designed to help the masses. Large numbers of clinical studies have been done for patients of diabetes and DR wherein the role of blood sugar control, metabolic control, role of oral medicines for DR, role of imaging, fluorescein angiography, and retinal photocoagulation has been studied. Newer treatment modalities are being devised and studied for better patient care. We discuss these issues in our review highlight and newer advances over the last few years. PMID:25364670

  14. Advances in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Prakashchand; Jindal, Ankita; Saini, V K; Jindal, Sushil

    2014-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of long-term diabetes mellitus (DM). Over the last 2 decades lot of work has been on early diagnosis of DR and screening programs have been designed to help the masses. Large numbers of clinical studies have been done for patients of diabetes and DR wherein the role of blood sugar control, metabolic control, role of oral medicines for DR, role of imaging, fluorescein angiography, and retinal photocoagulation has been studied. Newer treatment modalities are being devised and studied for better patient care. We discuss these issues in our review highlight and newer advances over the last few years. PMID:25364670

  15. Photoreceptors in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Timothy S; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Although photoreceptors account for most of the mass and metabolic activity of the retina, their role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy has been largely overlooked. Recent studies suggest that photoreceptors might play a critical role in the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries, and thus can no longer be ignored. The present review summarizes diabetes-induced alterations in photoreceptor structure and function, and provides a rationale for further study of a role of photoreceptors in the pathogenesis of the retinopathy. PMID:26221514

  16. Multiple Myeloma and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Zeinab A.; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematologic cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditions in a patient forms a major challenge for physicians. PMID:22363889

  17. Multiple myeloma and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Issa, Zeinab A; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematologic cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditions in a patient forms a major challenge for physicians. PMID:22363889

  18. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  19. Diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamalakannan, D; Baskar, V; Barton, D M; Abdu, T A M

    2003-08-01

    The occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy compromises both the fetus and the mother. It usually occurs in the later stages of pregnancy and is also seen in newly presenting type 1 diabetes patients. Despite improvement in its incidence rates and outcomes over the years, it still remains a major clinical problem since it tends to occur at lower blood glucose levels and more rapidly than in non-pregnant patients often causing delay in the diagnosis. This article illustrates a typical case of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and reviews the literature to provide an insight into its pathophysiology and management. PMID:12954957

  20. Gestational diabetes (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... During your pregnancy, hormonal changes can cause the body to be less sensitive to the effect of insulin. These changes can lead to high blood sugar and diabetes. High blood sugar levels in pregnancy ...

  1. Glycemic Index and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fundraising & Local Events Matching Gift Fundraising Events Donate Stocks Give by Phone 1-800-DIABETES (800-342- ... Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks About Us Who We Are Careers Contact Us ...

  2. American Diabetes Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fundraising & Local Events Matching Gift Fundraising Events Donate Stocks Give by Phone 1-800-DIABETES (800-342- ... Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks About Us Who We Are Careers Contact Us ...

  3. Type 1 diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... diabetes management, including: How to recognize and treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) How to recognize and treat high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) How to plan meals, including carbohydrate (carb) counting How to give insulin How to check ...

  4. Minimizing Hypoglycemia in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia caused by treatment with a sulfonylurea, a glinide, or insulin coupled with compromised defenses against the resulting falling plasma glucose concentrations is a problem for many people with diabetes. It is often recurrent, causes significant morbidity and occasional mortality, limits maintenance of euglycemia, and impairs physiological and behavioral defenses against subsequent hypoglycemia. Minimizing hypoglycemia includes acknowledging the problem; considering each risk factor; and applying the principles of intensive glycemic therapy, including drug selection and selective application of diabetes treatment technologies. For diabetes health-care providers treating most people with diabetes who are at risk for or are suffering from iatrogenic hypoglycemia, these principles include selecting appropriate individualized glycemic goals and providing structured patient education to reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia. This is typically combined with short-term scrupulous avoidance of hypoglycemia, which often will reverse impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. Clearly, the risk of hypoglycemia is modifiable. PMID:26207052

  5. Screening for Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Task Force recommends screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in asymptomatic pregnant women after 24 weeks of ... balance of benefits and harms of screening for GDM before 24 weeks of gestation. I Statement Notes ...

  6. I Have Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NDEP's 15th Anniversary Diabetes HealthSense Expand Promotional Tools Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... Loved One Health Care Professionals Submit a Resource? Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  7. EASD Diabetes Technology Meeting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The first diabetes technology meeting organized by the European Diabetes Association covers the range from regulatory aspects, patient safety, about registries to clinical studies. After an intensive discussion about the evidence required for registration and reimbursement on new medical devices and in vitro diagnostics it becomes clear that more and better clinical trials will be required in the future. This was also highlighted by representatives of the American Diabetes Association. The 2 associations will be active in this field of research by a joint committee. This meeting is intended not to become a large-scale meeting focused on education but to provide a platform for an open discussion of experts involved in all areas that are relevant to achieve a meaningful usage of diabetes technology. PMID:24876444

  8. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePLUS

    ... member who has diabetes They are American Indian, Alaska Native, African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, or ... chance of getting type 2 diabetes—American Indians, Alaska Natives, African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asian Americans, and ...

  9. Living With Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NDEP's 15th Anniversary Diabetes HealthSense Expand Promotional Tools Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... Loved One Health Care Professionals Submit a Resource​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  10. Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after physical activity or exercise . MEDICATIONS TO TREAT DIABETES If diet and exercise do not help keep your blood ... weight, their body's own insulin and a healthy diet can control their blood sugar level.

  11. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For additional copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    KidsHealth from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & ... this movie to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC ...

  13. Diabetes and eye disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... brain. Diabetic retinopathy is a main cause of blindness in Americans 20 to 74 years old. People ... pressure in the eye that can lead to blindness Macular edema -- blurry vision due to fluid leaking ...

  14. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease ...

  15. Diabetes risk factors (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of older Americans and an increasing trend toward obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Without proper management of diabetes, long-term health risks such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure ...

  16. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker. PMID:15689635

  17. Diabetes and mental health.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Chris; Doherty, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly common health problem, and accounts for one-tenth of NHS spending, chiefly managing avoidable complications. Approximately one-third of people with diabetes have psychological and/or social problems which impede their ability to self-manage their diabetes. Identifying certain indicators which suggest high risk of co-morbid mental health problems will allow these to be identified and treated early. Ensuring that any mental health problems are treated and social needs are met, will be valuable in improving the individuals health. Addressing the psychiatric and psychological barriers to good glucose control can help to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications, on both the individual and the wider health service. PMID:25468856

  18. Medicines for Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kid stay healthy and feel good. All About Insulin The most common diabetes medicine is insulin, which ... lower blood sugar how long they last continue Insulin Table The table below shows the types of ...

  19. [Diabetes and Ramadan].

    PubMed

    Ahdi, M; Malki, F; van Oosten, W; Gerdes, V E A; Meesters, E W

    2008-08-23

    In the Netherlands the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is high among people originating from Suriname (especially Hindustans), Turkey and Morocco. The majority of these patients has an Islamic background and, consequently, participates actively in Ramadan fasting. Ramadan fasting, especially among patients with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes patients with vascular complications, is associated with multiple risks. Therefore, Ramadan fasting should be discouraged to these high-risk groups. Muslims with diabetes are exempted from Ramadan fasting, when fasting may lead to harmful consequences. When a patient insists on participating in Ramadan fasting, the medication should be adapted to prevent hypoglycaemia. The patient should be seen 4 or 5 days after the start of fasting. Patients using insulin should monitor blood glucose weekly by day curve during the Ramadan. PMID:18788677

  20. Medicines for Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kid stay healthy and feel good. All About Insulin The most common diabetes medicine is insulin, which ... lower blood sugar how long they last Continue Insulin Table The table below shows the types of ...

  1. Brittle diabetes: psychopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Pelizza, Lorenzo; Bonazzi, Federica; Scaltriti, Sara; Milli, Bruna; Giuseppina, Chierici

    2014-01-01

    Background. The term "brittle" is used to described an uncommon subgroup of type I diabetics whose lives are disrupted by severe glycaemic instability with repeated and prolonged hospitalization. Psychosocial problems are the major perceived underlying causes of brittle behaviour. Aim of this study is a systematic psychopathological assessement of brittleness using specific parameters of general psychopathology and personality traits following the multiaxial format (axis I and II) of the current DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. Methods. Patients comprised 21 brittle type I diabetics and a case-control group of 21 stable diabetics, matched for age, gender, years of education, and diabetes duration. General psychopathology and the DSM-IV-TR personality traits/disorders were assessed using the Syptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III). Results. The comparison for SCL-90-R parameters exclusively revealed higher scores in "Phobic Anxiety" subscale in brittle diabetics. No differences in all the other SCL-90-R primary symptom dimensions and in the three SCL-90-R global distress indices were observed between the two diabetic groups, as well as in the all MCMI-III clinical syndrome categories corresponding to DSM-IV-TR specific psychiatric disorders. However, brittle patients presented lower scores in MCMI-III compulsive personality traits and higher scores in paranoid, schizoid, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, avoidant, dependent, depressive, and passive-aggressive personality traits. Conclusions. In this study, brittle diabetics show no differencies in terms of global severity of psychopathological distress and axis I specific DSM-IV-TR diagnoses in comparison with non-brittle subjects (except for phobic anxiety). Differently, brittle diabetics are characterized from less functional and maladaptive personality features and suffer more frequently and intensively from specific pathological personality traits of all DSM-IV-TR clusters. PMID:24897966

  2. [Early anemia in diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Judit; Kiss, István; Wittmann, István

    2005-02-27

    The number of diabetic patients with renal disease increased significantly in the last years worldwide. Anemia is an important and frequent component of diabetic nephropathy that may begin early in the course of the chronic renal disease of diabetics, and is more severe in diabetic patients with renal disease than in non - diabetic renal patients controlled for the same level of renal function. The reason for the anemia is decreased erythropoietin level caused by diminished production and, in a lesser degree, by increased excretion of erythropoietin in the urine. There is a close connection between diabetic nephropathy, anemia and cardiovascular complications. On the basis of small studies correction of anemia may decrease the progression of diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular complications. However, the result of ongoing large randomised controlled studies are required to get "evidence-based" data to prove that correction of anemia has beneficial effects on microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications, particularly cardiac disease, and on progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:15830606

  3. Where frailty meets diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perkisas, Stany; Vandewoude, Maurits

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that has an effect on multiple organ systems. Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to stressors and a limited capacity to maintain homeostasis. It is a multidimensional concept and a dynamic condition that can improve or worsen over time. Frailty is either physical or psychological or a combination of these two components. Sarcopenia, which is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, is the main attributor to the physical form of frailty. Although the pathophysiology of diabetes is commonly focused on impaired insulin secretion, overload of gluconeogenesis and insulin resistance, newer insights broaden this etiologic horizon. Immunologic factors that create a chronic state of low-grade inflammation - 'inflammaging' - have an influence on both the ageing process and diabetes. Persons with diabetes mellitus already tend to have an accelerated ageing process that places them at greater risk for developing frailty at an earlier age. The development of frailty - and sarcopenia - is multifactorial and includes nutritional, physical and hormonal elements; these elements are interlinked with those of diabetes. A lower muscle mass will lead to poorer glycaemic control through lower muscle glucose uptake. This leads to higher insulin secretion and insulin resistance, which is the stepping stone for diabetes itself. Copyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26453435

  4. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  5. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Burney, Saira; Irfan, Khadija; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Masud, Faisal

    2014-07-01

    Research suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes and several malignancies. Animal models have shown that hyperinsulinemic state underlying diabetes promotes tumor formation through stimulation of insulin-IGF-1 pathway; a possible role of inflammation is also proposed. One such link which has been under considerable study for years is that between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Although epidemiological evidence points towards a reciprocal link between the two, the cause-effect relationship still remains unclear. This link was the subject of a large German epidemiological study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract #1604), which underscored the link between diabetes and some cancers. Schmidt et al. performed a retrospective database analysis over a 12 year period and reported an increased risk of certain types of cancer in diabetic patients. The most significant association (HR 2.17) was found for pancreatic cancer. Given the high mortality of pancreatic cancer, prevention through timely screening could play an important role in improving prognosis. Older subjects with recent-onset diabetes represent a high-risk group and hence are potential targets for pancreatic cancer screening thereby enabling its early diagnosis at a curable stage. PMID:25076332

  6. Personalized Medicine: Monogenic Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goulden, Peter A; Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent

    2015-09-01

    Personalized medicine in diabetes is a topic which has gained significant momentum in recent years (Raz et al. 2013). A rapid rise in the number and combinations of diabetes therapies coupled with an unprecedented rise in diabetes prevalence rates has necessitated diabetes guidelines which emphasize the need for personalized patient-centered care (ADA 2014). There are many questions regarding the role genetics may be able to play in guiding therapy. Recent pharmacogenetic research has revealed polymorphisms that may impact patient response to metformin (Dong et al 2011) and glucagon-like-polypeptide-1 therapies (Smushkin et al. 2012). This may hold promise for helping identify patients who will better respond to specific agents and in the longer-term may help ensure a smooth journey along the therapeutic pathway. Monogenic or "single-gene" diabetes comprises nearly 2% of all cases of type 2 diabetes and provides a model for individualizing care. This review will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. PMID:26390534

  7. Proteomics and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael L; Klein, Jon B

    2007-11-01

    Proteomic methods have found broad applications in kidney disease research and more specifically in diabetic nephropathy (DN) research. Proteomic methods such as 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis have been used to gain insight into glomerular and tubular nephropathies including DN. At the protein level, differences in high-abundant proteins in DN have been shown to reflect primarily differentially posttranslationally modified plasma proteins. Higher-sensitivity proteomic methods (eg, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) have pushed the boundaries on the known urinary proteome to include more than 1,500 proteins. These same high-sensitivity methods have been applied toward profiling urinary peptides, which has resulted in methods to diagnostically screen urine to differentiate between type-2 diabetes mellitus and type-1 diabetes mellitus urine, normal versus microalbuminuria, or by angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment. Proteomic methods are being used to show response to insulin gene therapy in an animal model or alterations in the renal cortex mitochondrial proteome with the development of the diabetic phenotype. Proteomic methods continue to aid in the discovery of new mechanisms of diabetic pathology and understanding of the etiology of diabetic complications. PMID:18061845

  8. Bone Quality in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk of fracture, although type 2 diabetes is characterized by normal bone mineral density (BMD). The fracture risk of type 1 diabetes increases beyond an explained by a decrease of BMD. Thus, diabetes may be associated with a reduction of bone strength that is not reflected in the measurement of BMD. Based on the present definition, both bone density and quality, which encompass the structural and material properties of bone, are important factors in the determination of bone strength. Diabetes reduces bone quality rather than BMD. Collagen cross-linking plays an important role in bone strength. Collagen cross-links can be divided into lysyl hydroxylase and lysyl oxidase-mediated enzymatic immature divalent cross-links, mature trivalent cross-links, and glycation- or oxidation-induced non-enzymatic cross-links (Advanced Glycation End-products: AGEs) such as pentosidine. These types of cross-links differ in the mechanism of formation and in function. Not only hyperglycemia, but also oxidative stress induces the reduction in enzymatic beneficial cross-links and the accumulation of disadvantageous AGEs in bone. In this review, we describe the mechanism of low bone quality in diabetes. PMID:23785354

  9. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider If you have diabetes, how low should ...

  10. Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Fall ... your loved ones. Photos: AP The Faces of Diabetes Diabetes strikes millions of Americans, young and old, ...

  11. Diabetes Facts and Myths (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Allergy Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Diabetes Facts and Myths KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Facts ... team first. Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: Type 1 diabetes is caused by a ...

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

  13. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How the Body Works Main Page Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > Kids > Diabetes Center > What's ... What is it? Let's find out. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  14. Determinants of diabetes knowledge in a cohort of Nigerian diabetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the generational paradigm shift of lifestyle from the traditional African model to a more "western" standard is a replacement of communicable diseases by non-communicable or life style related diseases like diabetes. To address this trend, diabetes education along with continuous assessment of diabetes related knowledge has been advocated. Since most of the Nigerian studies assessing knowledge of diabetes were hospital-based, we decided to evaluate the diabetes related knowledge and its sociodemographic determinants in a general population of diabetics. Methods Diabetics (n?=?184) attending the 2012 world diabetes day celebration in a Nigerian community were surveyed using a two part questionnaire. Section A elicited information on their demographics characteristics and participation in update courses, and exercise, while section B assessed knowledge of diabetes using the 14 item Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Centre's Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results We found that Nigerian diabetics had poor knowledge of diabetes, with pervasive fallacies. Majority did not have knowledge of "diabetes diet", "fatty food", "free food", effect of unsweetened fruit juice on blood glucose, treatment of hypoglycaemia, and the average duration glycosylated haemoglobin (haemoglobin A1) test measures blood glucose. Attaining tertiary education, falling under the 51-60years age group, frequent attendance at seminars/updates and satisfaction with education received, being employed by or formerly working for the government, and claiming an intermediate, or wealthy income status was associated with better knowledge of diabetes. Conclusion Nigerian diabetics' knowledge of diabetes was poor and related to age, level of education, satisfaction with education received, employment status and household wealth. PMID:24593904

  15. Fenugreek Prevents the Development of STZ-Induced Diabetic Nephropathy in a Rat Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yingli; Shi, Yan; Zou, Yinggang; Miao, Chunsheng; Sun, Bo; Li, Cai

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the protective effect of fenugreek and the underlying mechanism against the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. A rat model of diabetes was successfully established by direct injection of STZ and then the rats were administered an interventional treatment of fenugreek. Parameters of renal function, including blood glucose, albuminuria, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), dimethyl formamide (DMF), blood urine nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr), and kidney index (KI), were detected in the three groups (Con, DN, and DF). Oxidative stress was determined by the activity of antioxidase. Extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and other morphological alterations were evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and electron microscope. Quantitive (q)PCR was employed to detect the mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and protein expression was determined with western blot analysis. DN rats in the present study demonstrated a significant renal dysfunction, ECM accumulation, pathological alteration, and oxidative stress, while the symptoms were evidently reduced by fenugreek treatment. Furthermore, the upregulation of TGF-?1 and CTGF at a transcriptional and translational level in DN rats was distinctly inhibited by fenugreek. Consequently, fenugreek prevents DN development in a STZ-induced diabetic rat model. PMID:25057273

  16. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Diabetes under Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 860–8747. [ Top ] Will I need to take diabetes medicines? If you cannot reach your target blood glucose ... eating plan and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicines you’ll take will ...

  17. Autophagy in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Choi, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Increasing prevalence of diabetes has made the need for effective treatment of DN critical, and identifying new therapeutic targets to improve clinical management. Autophagy is a highly conserved “self-eating” pathway by which cells degrade and recycle macromolecules and organelles. Autophagy serves as an essential mechanism to maintain homeostasis of glomeruli and tubules, and plays important roles in human health and diseases. Impairment of autophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of DN. Emerging body of evidence suggests that targeting the autophagic pathway to activate and restore autophagy activity may be renoprotective. Here we review current advances in our understanding of the roles of autophagy in diabetic kidney injury, focusing on studies in renal cells in culture, human kidney tissues, and experimental animal models of diabetes. We discuss the major nutrient-sensing signal pathways, and diabetes-induced altered intracellular metabolism and cellular events, including accumulation of advanced glycation end-products, increased oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, and activation of the renin angiotensin system, which modulate autophagic activity and contribute to the development of DN. We also highlight recent studies of autophagy and transforming growth factor-β in renal fibrosis, the final common response to injury that ultimately leads to end-stage kidney failure in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest the possibility that autophagy can be a therapeutic target against DN. PMID:25349246

  18. Prognosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Parving, H. H.; Hommel, E.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of long term antihypertensive treatment on prognosis in diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN--Prospective study of all insulin dependent diabetic patients aged under 50 with onset of diabetes before the age of 31 who developed diabetic nephropathy between 1974 and 1978 at Steno Memorial Hospital. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--Forty five patients (20 women) with a mean age of 30 (SD 7) years and a mean duration of diabetes of 18 (7) years at onset of persistent proteinuria were followed until death or for at least 10 years. INTERVENTIONS--Antihypertensive treatment was started a median of three (0-13) years after onset of nephropathy. Four patients (9%) received no treatment, and 9 (20%), 13 (29%), and 19 (42%) were treated with one, two, or three drugs, respectively. The median follow up was 12 (4-15) years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Arterial blood pressure and death. RESULTS--Mean blood pressure at start of antihypertensive treatment was 148/95 (15/50) mm Hg. Systolic blood pressure remained almost unchanged (slope -0.01 (95% confidence interval -0.39 to 0.37) mm Hg a year) while diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly (0.87 (0.65 to 1.10) mm Hg a year) during antihypertensive treatment. The cumulative death rate was 18% (8 to 32%) 10 years after onset of nephropathy, in contrast to previous reports of 50% to 77% 10 years after onset of nephropathy. As in previous studies, uraemia was the main cause of death (9 patients; 64%). CONCLUSIONS--The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy has improved during the past decade largely because of effective antihypertensive treatment. PMID:2504376

  19. Animal models for diabetes: Understanding the pathogenesis and finding new treatments.

    PubMed

    King, Aileen; Bowe, James

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, metabolic disease that is characterised by an inability to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. There are several different forms of diabetes, however the two most common are Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells and a subsequent lack of insulin production, whilst Type 2 diabetes is due to a combination of both insulin resistance and an inability of the beta cells to compensate adequately with increased insulin release. Animal models are increasingly being used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes as well as to identify and refine novel treatments. However, a wide range of different animal models are currently in use. The majority of these models are suited to addressing certain specific aspects of diabetes research, but may be of little use in other studies. All have pros and cons, and selecting an appropriate model for addressing a specific question is not always a trivial task and will influence the study results and their interpretation. Thus, as the number of available animal models increases it is important to consider the potential roles of these models in the many different aspects of diabetes research. This review gathers information on the currently used experimental animal models of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and evaluates their advantages and disadvantages for research purposes and details the factors that should be taken into account in their use. PMID:26432954

  20. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes makes your blood sugar higher than normal. After many years, too much sugar in the blood ... itching in your feet, legs, and other areas. Diabetes may make it harder to control your blood ...

  1. Snacking when you have diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... how to count the carbohydrates that you eat ( carb counting ) helps you plan what to eat. It ... diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/carb-counting. Available at: www.diabetes.org/food-and- ...

  2. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A Listen En Español Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Download a paper version of the ... and screenings for the whole family. More from diabetes.org Learn More: Let’s Make Every "Ahhh" Count! - ...

  3. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetic third nerve palsy; Pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy ... Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type -- is a mononeuropathy . This means that only one nerve is damaged. The condition affects the third cranial (oculomotor) ...

  4. What Causes Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... metabolic syndrome and how metabolic risk factors interact. Insulin Resistance in People Who Have Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance means that the body can' ...

  5. Family Health History and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetes > Know Your Family Health History Family Health History and Diabetes En espaol Haywood, a physical education ... story > 1 2 3 4 5 Family health history is an important risk factor for developing type ...

  6. Maternal complications in diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Gillian

    2011-02-01

    Pregnant women with diabetes have to manage both the effect of pregnancy on glucose control and its effect on pre-existing diabetic complications. Most women experience hypoglycaemia as a consequence of tightened glycaemic control and this impacts on daily living. Less commonly, diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious metabolic decompensation of diabetic control and a medical emergency, can cause foetal and maternal mortality. Microvascular complications of diabetes include retinopathy and nephropathy. Retinopathy can deteriorate during pregnancy; hence, regular routine examination is required and, if indicated, ophthalmological input. Diabetic nephropathy significantly increases the risk of obstetric complications and impacts on foetal outcomes. Pregnancy outcome is closely related to pre-pregnancy renal function. Diabetic pregnancy is contraindicated if the maternal complications of ischaemic heart disease or diabetic gastropathy are known to be present before pregnancy as there is a significant maternal mortality associated with both of these conditions. PMID:21130689

  7. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for 44% percent of new cases. Current research ... more common than type 1 (insulin-dependent diabetes), accounting for about 90 to 95 percent of the ...

  8. Pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Joanna M; Kaul, Kirti; Chopra, Mohit; Kohner, Eva M; Chibber, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is now regarded as an epidemic, with the population of patients expected to rise to 380 million by 2025. Tragically, this will lead to approximately 4 million people around the world losing their sight from diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in patients aged 20 to 74 years. The risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is closely associated with the type and duration of diabetes, blood glucose, blood pressure, and possibly lipids. Although landmark cross-sectional studies have confirmed the strong relationship between chronic hyperglycaemia and the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, the underlying mechanism of how hyperglycaemia causes retinal microvascular damage remains unclear. Continued research worldwide has focussed on understanding the pathogenic mechanisms with the ultimate goal to prevent DR. The aim of this paper is to introduce the multiple interconnecting biochemical pathways that have been proposed and tested as key contributors in the development of DR, namely, increased polyol pathway, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), haemodynamic changes, accelerated formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), oxidative stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and subclinical inflammation and capillary occlusion. New pharmacological therapies based on some of these underlying pathogenic mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:24563789

  9. Diabetes mellitus and cancer.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk; Szczepanik

    2000-10-01

    Although an association between diabetes and cancer was found over 100 years ago, the issue underwent different interpretations over the subsequent decades, and only modern, prospective, epidemiological cohort and case-control studies conducted in several countries have provided reliable evidence of an increased cancer risk in diabetic patients, mainly in those with type 2 diabetes. This risk varies according to the tumor site: it is the greatest for primary liver cancer, moderately elevated for pancreatic cancer, and relatively low for colorectal, endometrial, breast, and renal cancers. The cause of the association is not clear and remains the subject of different hypotheses. The most frequently cited reason is the potential effect of insulin. Found in high concentrations, due to insulin resistance in most patients with type 2 diabetes, this hormone is believed to express a mitogenic effect. This hypothesis needs to be confirmed in appropriately programmed prospective studies, but it may already be helpful in choosing an adequate treatment for type 2 diabetes to achieve optimal metabolic control with a simultaneous reduction in hyperinsulinemia, such as diet, physical exercise, metformin, and acarbose. PMID:11025248

  10. Musculoskeletal effects of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singla, Rajiv; Gupta, Yashdeep; Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    People with diabetes show higher prevalence of rheumatic diseases as compared to general population. Diabetes affects all components of musculoskeletal system viz. muscles, bones and connective tissue. Diabetic myonecrosis is a unique condition seen only in people with diabetes. Other diseases include amyotrophy, osteoporosis and increased fracture risk, carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis of shoulder, trigger finger and limited joint mobility.- Like all other chronic diseases, musculoskeletal diseases impact quality of life negatively. PMID:26338757

  11. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  12. Dermatitis herpetiformis and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S.; Blackwell, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    Three out of 4 patients with coexistent diabetes mellitus and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) developed severe renal failure which resulted in death in 2 of them. Diabetes mellitus and DH may coexist more frequently than would occur by chance, and such patients may run an increased risk from severe renal complications of diabetes. PMID:7383946

  13. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26912959

  14. Diabetic Youths and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melva

    1974-01-01

    In response to a need for a comprehensive program to fill the gap in services for children with diabetes and their families, the Diabetic Youth and Family Program of Wichita, Kansas is directing efforts to deal effectively and creatively with children's diabetic problems. (CS)

  15. Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars; Francis, Carolee Dodge

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes is a prevalent disease in the United States. The emergence of Type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents within the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities brings increased public health and quality of life concerns. In this article, the authors describe an initiative titled "Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools K-12

  16. Diabetic Neuropathy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes have a comprehensive foot examination once per year, and a visual examination ... in a separate topic review. (See "Patient information: Foot care in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" .) Avoid activities that can ...

  17. DIABETES PREVENTION TRIAL TYPE 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Diabetes Prevention Trial--Type 1 (DPT-1) is a nationwide study to see if we can prevent or delay type 1 diabetes, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes. Nine medical centers and more than 350 clinics in the United States and Canada are taking part in the study.

  18. [Diabetes in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Garca-Compen, Diego; Jquez-Quintana, Joel O; Gonzlez-Gonzlez, Jos A; Lavalle-Gonzlez, Fernando J; Villarreal-Prez, Jess Z; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) in liver cirrhosis is about 30%. However, DM or impaired glucose tolerance can be observed in 90% after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with normal fasting plasma glucose. Type 2 DM may produce cirrhosis, whereas DM may be a complication of cirrhosis. The latter is known as hepatogenous diabetes. Overt and subclinical DM is associated with liver complications and death in cirrhotic patients. Treating diabetes is difficult in cirrhotic patients because of the metabolic impairments due to liver disease and because the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment has not been defined. It is also unknown if glycemic control with hypoglycemic agents has any impact on the course of the liver disease. PMID:23628170

  19. Glycation in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

    2012-04-01

    The kidney is an extremely complex organ with broad ranging functions in the body, including but not restricted to waste excretion, ion and water balance, maintenance of blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, generation of erythropoietin and activation of vitamin D. With diabetes, many of these integral processes are interrupted via a combination of haemodynamic and metabolic changes including increases in the accumulation of proteins modified by advanced glycation, known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Indeed, hyperglycaemia and the redox imbalances seen with diabetes are each independent accelerants for the production of AGEs, which synergistically combine in this disorder. In addition, as kidney function declines, characterised by a loss of glomerular filtration, the excretion of AGEs is decreased, possibly exacerbating renal injury by further elevating the body's tissue and circulating AGE pool. Therefore, it has become apparent that decreasing the accumulation of AGEs or interrupting their downstream effects on the kidney, are desirable therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic renal disease. PMID:20963456

  20. [Diabetic nephropathy: emerging treatments].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Gauthier, Marion; Cazenave, Maud; Izzedine, Hassane

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The mainstay of treatment has been management of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and proteinuria using hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Since 2000, new therapeutic strategies began to emerge targeting the biochemical activity of glucose molecules on the renal tissue. Various substances have been studied with varying degrees of success, ranging from vitamin B to camel's milk. Silymarin reduces urinary excretion of albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and malondialdehyde in patients with diabetic nephropathy and may be considered as a novel addition to the anti-diabetic nephropathy armamentarium. Although some results are promising, studies on a larger scale are needed to validate the utility of these molecules in the treatment of the DN. PMID:24938412

  1. The Diabetic Foot.

    PubMed

    Laughlin; Calhoun; Mader

    1995-07-01

    Management of foot problems in the patient with diabetes mellitus requires attention to each system affected by the disease. Appropriate treatment of common clinical problems affecting the foot in diabetic patients, such as ulcerations and fractures, depends on a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Treatment of neuropathy is directed at pressure relief and prevention of deformity. Infection is addressed with antibiotics, debridement, and improvement of the vascularity and oxygenation of the tissues. Amputation should be viewed, not as evidence of treatment failure, but as a reconstructive procedure, the goal of which is to regain energy-efficient ambulation. The orthopaedic surgeon can play a critical role in the team approach to the care of the diabetic patient with foot problems. PMID:10795028

  2. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.; Jhun, Bong Sook; Yu, Tianzheng

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria are at the center of cellular energy metabolism and regulate cell life and death. The cell biological aspect of mitochondria, especially mitochondrial dynamics, has drawn much attention through implications in human pathology, including neurological disorders and metabolic diseases. Mitochondrial fission and fusion are the main processes governing the morphological plasticity and are controlled by multiple factors, including mechanochemical enzymes and accessory proteins. Emerging evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics plays an important role in metabolismsecretion coupling in pancreatic ?-cells as well as complications of diabetes. This review describes an overview of mechanistic and functional aspects of mitochondrial fission and fusion, and comments on the recent advances connecting mitochondrial dynamics with diabetes and diabetic complications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 439457. PMID:20518704

  3. Tablet and insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, A H

    1994-01-01

    There are a range of therapeutic options available for the management of type 2 diabetes in the elderly. Diet remains the mainstay of treatment although this must be realistic. If diet alone is unsuccessful then, for most patients, short-acting sulphonylurea agents are the treatment of choice. Second line agents include the biguanide, metformin, or an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. A significant proportion of type 2 diabetic patients will, however, eventually require insulin to alleviate symptoms of poor control and improve glycaemia. In this article I discuss the therapeutic options available for diabetic management in the elderly, with particular emphasis on the pros and cons of insulin treatment. PMID:7966113

  4. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  5. Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Salz, David A.; Witkin, Andre J.

    2015-01-01

    While the primary method for evaluating diabetic retinopathy involves direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy, various imaging modalities are of significant utility in the screening, evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of different presentations and manifestations of this disease. This manuscript is a review of the important imaging modalities that are used in diabetic retinopathy, including color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, B-scan ultrasonography, and optical coherence tomography. The article will provide an overview of these different imaging techniques and how they can be most effectively used in current practice. PMID:25949070

  6. The Adolescent Diabetic

    PubMed Central

    Schaffrin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Adolescent diabetics present a challange to the attending physician. This is related to the type of diabetes they have, the usual turbulence of this time of life, and their reaction to a chronic condition which imposes certain restrictions. Successful management requires a good physician/patient/family relationship with some firm setting of limits, but avoidance of insistence on control so rigid that frequent hypoglycemia results. The goals of normal growth and activity, as well as a healthy emotional adjustment, should be sought. PMID:21301511

  7. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Pollak, Arnold; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

    2012-12-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes. GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birthweight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e.g. glucosuria). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria) 6-12 weeks postpartum and every 2 years in case of normal glucose tolerance (Evidence level B). All women have to be instructed about their (sevenfold increased relative) risk of type 2 diabetes at follow-up and possibilities for diabetes prevention, in particular weight management and maintenance/increase of physical activity. Monitoring of the development of the offspring and recommendation of healthy lifestyle of the children and family is recommended. PMID:23250453

  8. Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Craig A; Nakhla, Meranda; Derraik, Jos G B; Gunn, Alistair J; Daneman, Denis; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This article examines the factors associated with DKA in children with T1DM, both at first presentation and in recurrent cases. The challenge for future research is to find effective ways to improve primary care physician and general community awareness of T1DM to reduce DKA at presentation and develop practical, cost-effective programs to reduce recurrent DKA. PMID:26210621

  9. Diabetes foot disease: the Cinderella of Australian diabetes management?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the greatest public health challenges to face Australia. It is already Australia’s leading cause of kidney failure, blindness (in those under 60 years) and lower limb amputation, and causes significant cardiovascular disease. Australia’s diabetes amputation rate is one of the worst in the developed world, and appears to have significantly increased in the last decade, whereas some other diabetes complication rates appear to have decreased. This paper aims to compare the national burden of disease for the four major diabetes-related complications and the availability of government funding to combat these complications, in order to determine where diabetes foot disease ranks in Australia. Our review of relevant national literature indicates foot disease ranks second overall in burden of disease and last in evidenced-based government funding to combat these diabetes complications. This suggests public funding to address foot disease in Australia is disproportionately low when compared to funding dedicated to other diabetes complications. There is ample evidence that appropriate government funding of evidence-based care improves all diabetes complication outcomes and reduces overall costs. Numerous diverse Australian peak bodies have now recommended similar diabetes foot evidence-based strategies that have reduced diabetes amputation rates and associated costs in other developed nations. It would seem intuitive that “it’s time” to fund these evidence-based strategies for diabetes foot disease in Australia as well. PMID:23021818

  10. Kidney disease and related findings in the diabetes control and complications trial/epidemiology of diabetes interventions and complications study.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Kidney disease manifests clinically as elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or both, and is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study tested whether intensive diabetes therapy (INT) aimed at lowering glucose concentrations as close as safely possible to the normal range reduces the risks of kidney disease and other diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the DCCT, 1,441 participants with T1D were randomly assigned to INT or conventional diabetes therapy (CON) for a mean duration of 6.5 years. Subsequently, participants have been followed for 18 years in the ongoing observational EDIC. Standardized longitudinal measurements of AER, estimated GFR, and blood pressure were made throughout the DCCT/EDIC. RESULTS During the DCCT, INT reduced the risks of incident microalbuminuria (AER ≥40 mg/24 h) and macroalbuminuria (AER ≥300 mg/24 h) by 39% (95% CI 21-52%) and 54% (29-74%), respectively. During EDIC years 1-8, participants previously assigned to DCCT INT continued to experience lower rates of incident microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, with risk reductions of 59% (39-73%) and 84% (67-92%), respectively. Beneficial effects of INT on the development of impaired GFR (sustained estimated GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and hypertension became evident during combined DCCT/EDIC follow-up, with risk reductions of 50% (18-69%) and 20% (6-21%), respectively, compared with CON. CONCLUSIONS In the DCCT/EDIC, INT resulted in clinically important, durable reductions in the risks of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, impaired GFR, and hypertension. PMID:24356594

  11. Rheumatic manifestations in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Serban, AL; Udrea, GF

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. For most of these affections, pathophysiologic correlations are not well established. Some of them, such as diabetic cheiroarthropathy, neuropathic arthritis, diabetic amyotrophy, diabetic muscle infraction, are considered intrinsic complications of DM. For others, like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, DM is considered a predisposing condition. In most cases, these affections cause pain and disability, affecting the quality of life of diabetic patients, but once correctly diagnosed, they often respond to the treatment, that generally requires a multidisciplinary team. This article reviews some epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these conditions. PMID:23049626

  12. Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rishi; Chan, Claire Shu-Yi; Nather, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis (OM) is a common complication of diabetic foot ulcers and/or diabetic foot infections. This review article discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of OM in the diabetic foot. Clinical features that point to the possibility of OM include the presence of exposed bone in the depth of a diabetic foot ulcer. Medical imaging studies include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy. A high index of suspicion is also required to make the diagnosis of OM in the diabetic foot combined with clinical and radiological studies. PMID:25147627

  13. Diabetes mellitus and oral health.

    PubMed

    Kudiyirickal, Marina George; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2015-05-01

    The oral health is influenced by systemic health, and one of the most common chronic diseases encountered in dental practice is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes can worsen oral infections and vice versa. In the literature, periodontitis and diabetes in the young to middle-aged adults have been the most widely researched area. Understanding the patho-physiology, clinical manifestations and management of different types of orofacial diseases in diabetic patients are important to the diabetologist and the dentist for the optimal care of patients with these diseases. This review explores the inter-link between diabetes and oral health. PMID:25487035

  14. [Diabetic neuropathy: new therapeutic options?].

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Manfred

    2006-11-01

    The importance of diabetic neuropathy as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and leading risk factor for the diabetic foot syndrome has become firmly established. The first line treatment comprises optimal diabetic control and intensified multifactorial treatment with normalization of blood pressure and blood lipids. In this connection, a fascinating recent discovery is the so called "metabolic memory" of an earlier near normal diabetic control over years, with a reduction of about 50% in nonfatal and fatal cardiac events and the incidence of diabetic neuropathy as a result of a former intensive therapy. PMID:17619441

  15. Diabetes Mellitus Standards of Care.

    PubMed

    Mays, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic with a high cost regarding consumption of health care resources and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. The complex nature of diabetes requires the use of evidence-based guidelines regarding diabetes management. These evidence-based guidelines are lengthy and do not readily translate into nursing care. As an integral component of the interprofessional team, the nurse must provide a thorough assessment of patients with diabetes and work to achieve individual patient treatment goals. Evaluation of patient progress toward treatment goals with regular/frequent follow-up is necessary to promote effective self-management of diabetes. PMID:26596658

  16. Preconception care in diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    Nekuei, Nafisehsadat; Kohan, Shahnaz; Kazemi, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is increasingly becoming prevalent worldwide. Pregnancy with diabetes is prone to maternal and fetal complications. Preconception care (PCC) is an important factor in alleviating gestational complications in those women who suffer from diabetes. This study seeks to gain insight into experiences of diabetic women and providers about PCC. Subjects and Methods: The present research was a qualitative research conducted on eight women with diabetes during the reproductive age and 15 health care providers of the public and private medical centers, which provide health care for women with diabetes in Isfahan (Iran), with a qualitative approach. Based on the aims of research, purposive sampling was done through semi-structuralized individual interview. Data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis method. Results: Data analysis revealed three major categories: (1) Health centers weakness in providing PCC for diabetic women, (2) lack of a comprehensive PCC plan for diabetic women and (3) diabetic women's negligence about having planned pregnancy. Conclusion: In order to improve diabetic women's health, precise training of students, health care providers and patients themselves with respect to PCCs should be taken into account. Designing diabetic PCC system is an essential factor to succeed in this trend. PMID:25767819

  17. Inflammatory Cytokines in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Donate-Correa, Javier; Martn-Nez, Ernesto; Muros-de-Fuentes, Mercedes; Mora-Fernndez, Carmen; Navarro-Gonzlez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Probably, the most paradigmatic example of diabetic complication is diabetic nephropathy, which is the largest single cause of end-stage renal disease and a medical catastrophe of worldwide dimensions. Metabolic and hemodynamic alterations have been considered as the classical factors involved in the development of renal injury in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms and the molecular events of diabetic nephropathy remain incompletely understood. Nowadays, there are convincing data that relate the diabetes inflammatory component with the development of renal disease. This review is focused on the inflammatory processes that develop diabetic nephropathy and on the new therapeutic approaches with anti-inflammatory effects for the treatment of chronic kidney disease in the setting of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25785280

  18. Management of diabetic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Eboh, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal failure (ESRF) worldwide, representing over 50% of patients on renal replacement therapy in some parts of the world. The condition is common in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, although the incidence appears to be declining, especially in type 1 diabetes. More than 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes have impaired kidney function. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and natural history of the condition have enabled us to consider earlier therapy aimed at renal preservation and reduction in cardiovascular morbidity. Microalbuminuria is now established as the earliest risk marker for nephropathy in type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. This review examines the current concepts in the pathogenesis and management of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26244141

  19. The Spectrum of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Jennifer A.; Dyck, P. James B.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with many different neuropathic syndromes, ranging from a mild sensory disturbance as can be seen in a diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy, to the debilitating pain and weakness of a diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy. The etiology of these syndromes has been extensively studied, and may vary among metabolic, compressive, and immunological bases for the different disorders, as well as mechanisms yet to be discovered. Many of these disorders of nerve appear to be separate conditions with different underlying mechanisms, and some are directly caused by diabetes mellitus, whereas others are associated with it but not caused by hyperglycemia. We discuss a number of the more common disorders of nerve found with diabetes mellitus. We discuss the symmetrical neuropathies, particularly generalized diabetic polyneuropathy, and then the focal or asymmetrical types of diabetes-associated neuropathy. PMID:18194747

  20. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  1. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  2. Diabetic retinopathy (treatment)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of blindness in the UK, with older people and those with worse diabetes control, hypertension, and hyperlipidaemia being most at risk. Diabetic retinopathy can cause microaneurysms, haemorrhages, exudates, changes to blood vessels, and retinal thickening. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with diabetic retinopathy? What are the effects of treatments for vitreous haemorrhage? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 58 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: peripheral retinal laser photocoagulation, focal and grid laser photocoagulation for maculopathy, corticosteroids for macular oedema, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, and vitrectomy for vitreous haemorrhage. PMID:21609511

  3. Diabetes and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surwit, Richard S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that the problem of effective care of diabetes mellitus presents an opportunity for the emerging field of health psychology. Discusses behavioral interventions that aid in treatment of this disease by reducing its energy mobilizing effects on the nervous system. (Author/AOS)

  4. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD).

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-02-01

    Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is an uncommon form of diabetes that occurs as a result of chronic calcific pancreatitis, in the absence of alcohol abuse. The disease is restricted to tropical regions of the world, and southern India has the highest known prevalence of FCPD. The typical patient with FCPD is a lean adolescent or young adult of either sex, presenting with history of recurrent bouts of abdominal pain and steatorrhea. Demonstration of large, discrete pancreatic calculi by plain radiographs or ultrasonography of the abdomen is diagnostic. While the exact etiology of FCPD is unknown, genetic, nutritional and inflammatory factors have been hypothesized to play a role. Diabetes in FCPD is often brittle and difficult to control; most patients require multiple doses of insulin for control of glycemia. However, in spite of high blood glucose levels, patients rarely develop ketosis. Malabsorption responds to pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Surgical removal of stones is indicated for symptomatic relief of intractable pain. While patients with FCPD develop microvascular complications as frequently as those with type 2 diabetes, macrovascular disease is uncommon. Development of pancreatic malignancy is the most dreaded complication and should be suspected in any patient who complains of weight loss, back pain or jaundice. PMID:25395047

  5. Gestational Diabetes and Testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have a mother, father, sister, or brother with diabetes ? I had sugar in my urine at the ?rst prenatal visit ? I have a condition called polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) ? I am taking a medication called Glucophage (metformin) ? I am Hispanic, African American, Native American, South ...

  6. Vitamin D and diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (t1DM and t2DM). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) eff...

  7. Diabetes mellitus in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Azzoug, Said; Mahgoun, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) frequency is a growing problem worldwide, because of long life expectancy and life style modifications. In old age (≥60–65 years old), DM is becoming an alarming public health problem in developed and even in developing countries as for some authors one from two old persons are diabetic or prediabetic and for others 8 from 10 old persons have some dysglycemia. DM complications and co-morbidities are more frequent in old diabetics compared to their young counterparts. The most frequent are cardiovascular diseases due to old age and to precocious atherosclerosis specific to DM and the most bothersome are visual and cognitive impairments, especially Alzheimer disease and other kind of dementia. Alzheimer disease seems to share the same risk factors as DM, which means insulin resistance due to lack of physical activity and eating disorders. Visual and physical handicaps, depression, and memory troubles are a barrier to care for DM treatment. For this, old diabetics are now classified into two main categories as fit and independent old people able to take any available medication, exactly as their young or middle age counterparts, and fragile or frail persons for whom physical activity, healthy diet, and medical treatment should be individualized according to the presence or lack of cognitive impairment and other co-morbidities. In the last category, the fundamental rule is “go slowly and individualize” to avoid interaction with poly medicated elder persons and fatal iatrogenic hypoglycemias in those treated with sulfonylureas or insulin. PMID:26693423

  8. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Malik

    2000-01-01

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the most common medical complication and metabolic disorder of pregnancy. This review provides an overview into the morbidity associated with GDM as well as the current methods of screening, diagnosis and management with the aim of early recognition and prevention of complications to both the mother and foetus. PMID:22844208

  9. Management of Diabetic Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Aljarallah, Badr M.

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis occur in 5% to 12% of patients with diabetes. Such a complication can affect both prognosis and management of the diabetes; therefore, practicing clinicians are challenged by the complex management of such cases. Gastroparesis is a disorder characterized by a delay in gastric emptying after a meal in the absence of a mechanical gastric outlet obstruction. This article is an evidence-based overview of current management strategies for diabetic gastroparesis. The cardinal symptoms of diabetic gastroparesis are nausea and vomiting. Gastroesophageal scintiscanning at 15-minute intervals for 4 hours after food intake is considered the gold standard for measuring gastric emptying. Retention of more than 10% of the meal after 4 hours is considered an abnormal result, for which a multidisciplinary management approach is required. Treatment should be tailored according to the severity of gastroparesis, and 25% to 68% of symptoms are controlled by prokinetic agents. Commonly prescribed prokinetics include metoclopramide, domperidone, and erythromycin. In addition, gastric electrical stimulation has been shown to improve symptoms, reduce hospitalizations, reduce the need for nutritional support, and improve quality of life in several open-label studies. PMID:21372345

  10. Causes of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trait can promote obesity and type 2 diabetes. Obesity and Physical Inactivity Physical inactivity and obesity are ... or a triglyceride level above 250 mg/dL polycystic ovary syndrome, also called PCOS prediabetes—an A1C level of ...

  11. Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness. PMID:24915888

  12. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-22

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26891794

  13. Diabetes: Dealing With Feelings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get lost in all the negative ways diabetes affects your world. If you feel like it's taking over your life, it can help to write down your strengths — and the stuff you love. Who are you? Are you a reader, a hockey player, a music lover, a math whiz, a spelling champ? Are ...

  14. Adjusting to Childhood Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    Insulin dependent diabetes is an incurable disease requiring complex management by the patient and/or his family. Previous research has found that there is no specific personality type associated with this or other diseases, nor do chronically ill persons exhibit characteristic behavioral or emotional problems. An attempt to identify the…

  15. Salt Restriction in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Peter M; Keogh, Jennifer B

    2015-09-01

    There are no long-term interventions examining the effects of salt reduction in people with diabetes, and these are urgently required. Sodium reduction is controversial as it appears that an intake below 2.5g and above 6g/day of salt is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. However, pre-existing illness leading to a lower salt intake may confound the findings. Only a few studies have prospectively collected data on the sodium intake and excretion of people with diabetes and examined hard end points. In addition, future studies need to collect more data on food intake as well as coexistent illnesses to address potential confounding. The World Health Organization recommends a reduction to less than 5g/day salt in adults. Given that the available evidence suggests that the salt intake of people with type 2 diabetes is generally well above 6g/day it seems reasonable to ensure individuals with diabetes have an intake below 6g/day. However, such recommendations need to be individualized. PMID:26194154

  16. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... which the vast majority of deaths in the developing world One in three people in the world is ... with latent TB have a lifelong risk of developing and falling sick with active ... 25+ by WHO region and World Bank Income Group, 2008 DIABETES FACTS: 350 million ...

  17. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems that may develop: Bladder or kidney infection Diabetes foot ulcers Nerve damage that hides the symptoms of ... and a heart attack Loss of a toe, foot, or leg through amputation, usually because of a bone infection that does not heal

  18. Diabetes: Insulin Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Diabetes | Insulin Therapy Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  19. Adjusting to Childhood Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    Insulin dependent diabetes is an incurable disease requiring complex management by the patient and/or his family. Previous research has found that there is no specific personality type associated with this or other diseases, nor do chronically ill persons exhibit characteristic behavioral or emotional problems. An attempt to identify the

  20. The Con Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the format of the Con Test, an Australian television game show which followed the same general rules and game play as the UK show PokerFace. At the end of each round a contestant needs to decide whether or not he or she should fold. A contestant needs to know how likely it is that he or she is in last place.

  1. Estrogens and the Diabetic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Christine; Sullivan, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Background Across all ages, the incidence and rate of progression of most nondiabetic renal diseases are markedly higher in men compared with age-matched women. These observations suggest that female sex may be renoprotective. In the setting of diabetes, however, this female protection against the development and progression of renal disease is diminished. Objective This review aimed to summarize our current understanding of sex differences in the development and progression of diabetic renal disease, and of the contribution of sex hormones, particularly estrogens, to the pathophysiology of this disease. We also attempted to answer why female sex does not protect the diabetic kidney. Methods The review employed PubMed as a search database using terms such as gender, sex, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, estrogens, sex hormones, as well as targeted searches such as gender/sex differences in diabetic renal disease. Manuscripts identified from cited references were also used. Searches were restricted to English-language articles, while no restrictions were imposed on the publication dates. Results Although the existing data regarding the sex differences in the incidence and progression of diabetic renal disease are inconclusive, the undisputed fact is that women with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit a much higher incidence of renal disease compared with nondiabetic women. It is conceivable that the loss of female sex as a renoprotective factor in diabetes may be related to the abnormal regulation of sex hormone concentrations. Both clinical and experimental data suggest that diabetes may be associated with an imbalance in estradiol concentrations. Supplementation with 17?-estradiol or administration of selective estrogen receptor modulators reduces the incidence of diabetes and attenuates the progression of diabetic renal disease. Conclusions Serum concentrations of ovarian hormones may provide a new means for predicting future risk of renal complications in diabetes. Exogenous steroid hormones may be an effective treatment for attenuating the progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:18395675

  2. 77 FR 37060 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee; Notice of Meeting The Diabetes Mellitus.... Sanford Garfield, Executive Secretary of the Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee... . Dated: June 13, 2012. Sanford Garfield, Executive Secretary, DMICC, Division of Diabetes,...

  3. 77 FR 43096 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Diabetes Mellitus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... meeting will focus on ``Diabetes, Dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease.'' Any member of the public interested... Diseases; Notice of Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee Meeting SUMMARY: The Diabetes... Coordinating Committee, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 31 Center...

  4. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy among inpatients with diabetes: the diabetic retinopathy inpatient study (DRIPS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Jessica J; Eller, Andrew W; Willard, Lauren A; Ding, Jiaxi; Johnston, Jann M; Waxman, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient diabetic population in the USA and to determine the barriers to ophthalmic examinations and treatment among this population. Research design and methods A cross-sectional analysis of 113 inpatients with diabetes mellitus admitted to an inner city community teaching hospital in Pittsburgh. Digital fundus photographs of the posterior pole were taken of each eye after pharmacological dilation. Presence, absence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema were graded on the basis of internationally accepted criteria. An investigator-administered questionnaire and review of the medical record were used to obtain data about patient demographics, clinical characteristics and barriers to ophthalmic care. The association between these data and the presence of diabetic retinopathy was tested. Results The estimated prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population was 44% (95% CI 34% to 53%). The prevalence of previously undiagnosed diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy was 25% (95% CI 17% to 33%) and 19% (95% CI 11% to 26%), respectively. Renal disease was independently associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (OR, 3.86; 95% CI 1.22 to 12.27), as well as a longer duration of diabetes (OR, 1.08 per year; 95% CI 1.014 to 1.147). Diabetic retinopathy was seen in 15 of 17 patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers or osteomyelitis. Frequently reported barriers to ophthalmic examinations included lack of transportation and physical disability. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in the inpatient population is likely significantly higher than in the general diabetic population in the USA. These patients have barriers to care that need to be addressed to make standard of care ophthalmic examinations and treatment possible in this population. PMID:26925238

  5. What the Teacher Should Know About Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Harriet, Ed.; Rolloff, Charlene, Ed.

    This short manual is designed to provide the practicing teacher with basic information on diabetes, and the role (s)he plays in providing health supervision and care for the diabetic child in his/her classroom. The document consists of four pages, describing (1) components of diabetes management and symptoms of diabetes; (2) emergency diabetic

  6. Hypoglycemia in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Philip E; Davis, Stephen N; Shamoon, Harry

    2003-06-01

    Iatrogenic hypoglycemia causes recurrent morbidity in most people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes, and it is sometimes fatal. The barrier of hypoglycemia generally precludes maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes and thus precludes full realization of euglycemia's long-term benefits. While the clinical presentation is often characteristic, particularly for the experienced individual with diabetes, the neurogenic and neuroglycopenic symptoms of hypoglycemia are nonspecific and relatively insensitive; therefore, many episodes are not recognized. Hypoglycemia can result from exogenous or endogenous insulin excess alone. However, iatrogenic hypoglycemia is typically the result of the interplay of absolute or relative insulin excess and compromised glucose counterregulation in type 1 and advanced type 2 diabetes. Decrements in insulin, increments in glucagon, and, absent the latter, increments in epinephrine stand high in the hierarchy of redundant glucose counterregulatory factors that normally prevent or rapidly correct hypoglycemia. In insulin-deficient diabetes (exogenous) insulin levels do not decrease as glucose levels fall, and the combination of deficient glucagon and epinephrine responses causes defective glucose counterregulation. Reduced sympathoadrenal responses cause hypoglycemia unawareness. The concept of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure in diabetes posits that recent antecedent hypoglycemia causes both defective glucose counterregulation and hypoglycemia unawareness. By shifting glycemic thresholds for the sympathoadrenal (including epinephrine) and the resulting neurogenic responses to lower plasma glucose concentrations, antecedent hypoglycemia leads to a vicious cycle of recurrent hypoglycemia and further impairment of glucose counterregulation. Thus, short-term avoidance of hypoglycemia reverses hypoglycemia unawareness in most affected patients. The clinical approach to minimizing hypoglycemia while improving glycemic control includes 1) addressing the issue, 2) applying the principles of aggressive glycemic therapy, including flexible and individualized drug regimens, and 3) considering the risk factors for iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The latter include factors that result in absolute or relative insulin excess: drug dose, timing, and type; patterns of food ingestion and exercise; interactions with alcohol and other drugs; and altered sensitivity to or clearance of insulin. They also include factors that are clinical surrogates of compromised glucose counterregulation: endogenous insulin deficiency; history of severe hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, or both; and aggressive glycemic therapy per se, as evidenced by lower HbA(1c) levels, lower glycemic goals, or both. In a patient with hypoglycemia unawareness (which implies recurrent hypoglycemia) a 2- to 3-week period of scrupulous avoidance of hypoglycemia is advisable. Pending the prevention and cure of diabetes or the development of methods that provide glucose-regulated insulin replacement or secretion, we need to learn to replace insulin in a much more physiological fashion, to prevent, correct, or compensate for compromised glucose counterregulation, or both if we are to achieve near-euglycemia safely in most people with diabetes. PMID:12766131

  7. Atypical diabetes in children: ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vaibhav, Atul; Mathai, Mathew; Gorman, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus also known as atypical or flatbush diabetes is being increasingly recognised worldwide. These patients are typically obese, middle-aged men with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes. The aetiology and pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear but some initial research suggests that patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes have a unique predisposition to glucose desensitisation. These patients have negative autoantibodies typically associated with type 1 diabetes but have shown to have human leucocyte antigen (HLA) positivity. At initial presentation, there is an impairment of both insulin secretion and action. ? Cell function and insulin sensitivity can be markedly improved by initiating aggressive diabetes management to allow for discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment. These patients can be maintained on oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin therapy can be safely discontinued after few months depending on their ? cell function. PMID:23302548

  8. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Positive Predictor of Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gregory E.; E. Illanes, Sebastian; Mitchell, Murray D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the relative benefits of screening for type two diabetes mellitus in women with a previous pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. Recent studies suggest that women who experience GDM are at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 10–20 years of their index pregnancy. If considered as a stand-alone indicator of the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, GDM is a poor diagnostic test. Most women do not develop GDM during pregnancy and of those that do most do not develop type 2 diabetes. There is, however, a clear need for better early detection of predisposition to disease and/or disease onset to significantly impact on this global pandemic. The putative benefits of multivariate approaches and first trimester and preconception screening to increase the sensitivity of risk assignment modalities for type 2 diabetes are proposed. PMID:22675354

  9. Diabetes: changing the fate of diabetics in the dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is very high worldwide. According to the World Health Organization in 2000 the worldwide prevalence of DM was 171,000,000. Diabetic nephropathy is a major vascular complication of DM. If DM is not treated early and adequately, many diabetic patients may reach end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to advanced irreversible diabetic nephropathy. In many countries diabetic nephropathy has become the single most frequent cause of prevalent ESRD patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). In the early era of renal replacement therapy (RRT) by means of intermittent hemodialysis the prognosis of diabetic patients undergoing MHD was extremely poor and disappointing. While the prognosis of patients suffering from diabetic ESRD and maintained by chronic intermittent dialysis has greatly improved, the rehabilitation rate and survival of these patients continue to be worse than those of non-diabetic patients. A preexisting severely compromised cardiovascular condition, vascular access problems, diabetic foot disease, interdialytic weight gain, and intradialytic hypotension explain most of the less favorable outcome. Despite improved techniques and more aggressive medical therapy in recent years, a review of the fate of diabetics in dialysis units since 1972 reveals that these patients have had significant morbidity and mortality. We still have a long way to go in order to achieve more ideal outcomes for our patients. Most of the diabetic ESRD patients are still maintained by MHD, but they can choose other modalities of RRT such as chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), kidney and kidney plus pancreas transplantation. The results of different studies and national registries on the mortality and morbidity of ESRD patients being maintained on different modalities of dialysis are conflicting. It can be concluded that the two modalities of dialysis (CAPD and MHD) are almost comparable in terms of survival. The recent suggestions for nocturnal daily hemodialysis, short daily hemodialysis, and an integrative care approach for the management of diabetics with ESRD provides better promise for these patients. PMID:17170536

  10. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  11. Diabetic complications in obese type 2 diabetic rat models.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Takeshi; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Kemmochi, Yusuke; Sasase, Tomohiko; Tong, Bin; Shinohara, Masami; Yamada, Takahisa

    2014-01-01

    We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes and its complications in obese type 2 diabetic rat models: Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat, Wistar fatty rat, Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat and Spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rat. Pancreatic changes with progression of diabetes were classified into early changes, such as islet hypertrophy and degranulation of ? cells, and degenerative changes, such as islet atrophy and fibrosis of islet with infiltration of inflammatory cells. Renal lesions in tubuli and glomeruli were observed, and nodular lesions in glomeruli were notable changes in OLETF and SDT fatty rats. Among retinal changes, folding and thickening were interesting findings in SDT fatty rats. A decrease of motor nerve conduction velocity with progression of diabetes was presented in obese diabetic rats. Other diabetic complications, osteoporosis and sexual dysfunction, were also observed. Observation of bone metabolic abnormalities, including decrease of osteogenesis and bone mineral density, and sexual dysfunction, including hypotestosteronemia and erectile dysfunction, in obese type 2 diabetic rats have been reported. PMID:24770637

  12. [Syndrome of optic nerve atrophy, diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Kolomo?skaia, M B

    1990-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a case of a familial variant of the hereditary De Lawter syndrome, optic nerve atrophy coupled with diabetes mellitus and insipidus. Double diabetes was detected in two brothers. Their uncle suffered from deaf-mutism. Diabetes mellitus was insulin-dependent, diabetes insipidus responded well to adiurekrin, pituitrin, chloropropamide; optic nerve atrophy was characterized by white discs with clearly defined borders. Apparently, the syndrome is based on several mutant genes the action of which manifests as isolated and in different combinations as well. PMID:2084933

  13. Musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Merashli, M; Chowdhury, T A; Jawad, A S M

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are increasing significantly worldwide. Whilst vascular complications of diabetes are well recognized, and account for principle mortality and morbidity from the condition, musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes are common and whilst not life threatening, are an important cause of morbidity, pain and disability. Joints affected by diabetes include peripheral joints and the axial skeleton. Charcot neuroarthropathy is an important cause of deformity and amputation associated with peripheral neuropathy. A number of fibrosing conditions of the hands and shoulder are recognized, including carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, tenosynovitis and limited joint mobility. People with diabetes are more prone to gout and osteoporosis. Management of these conditions requires early recognition and close liaison between diabetes and rheumatology specialists. PMID:26025688

  14. Cognitive Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kodl, Christopher T.; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    The deleterious effects of diabetes mellitus on the retinal, renal, cardiovascular, and peripheral nervous systems are widely acknowledged. Less attention has been given to the effect of diabetes on cognitive function. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been associated with reduced performance on numerous domains of cognitive function. The exact pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in diabetes is not completely understood, but it is likely that hyperglycemia, vascular disease, hypoglycemia, and insulin resistance play significant roles. Modalities to study the effect of diabetes on the brain have evolved over the years, including neurocognitive testing, evoked response potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging. Although much insightful research has examined cognitive dysfunction in patients with diabetes, more needs to be understood about the mechanisms and natural history of this complication in order to develop strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:18436709

  15. Non-Proteinuric Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Nicolas Roberto; Villa, Juan; Hernandez Gallego, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy patients traditionally show significant macroalbuminuria prior to the development of renal impairment. However, this clinical paradigm has recently been questioned. Epidemiological surveys confirm that chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosed by a low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is more common in diabetic patients than in the non-diabetic population but a low number of patients had levels of proteinuria above that which traditionally defines overt diabetic nephropathy (>500 mg/g). The large number of patients with low levels of proteinuria suggests that the traditional clinical paradigm of overt diabetic nephropathy is changing since it does not seem to be the underlying renal lesion in most of diabetic subjects with CKD. PMID:26371050

  16. Considering a diabetes management company.

    PubMed

    Harrington, R L

    1989-01-01

    In today's cost-conscious environment, outside management services are increasingly becoming integrated components of a hospital's overall structure and diversification strategy. Diabetes patients represent a significant percentage of hospital admission rates and market share; correspondingly, hospitals are initiating diabetes product lines to attain a leadership position in diabetes treatment. A management firm specializing in diabetes may offer significant advantages over in-house program development. A careful analysis of the company and its product will help identify a quality service that can meet both the needs of the hospital and the community it serves. Diabetes educators can play an important role in determining the need and feasibility of a managed service and in the evaluation of competing diabetes management firms. PMID:2791855

  17. Breastfeeding and diabetes: part 1.

    PubMed

    Finigan, Valerie

    2012-11-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly common disease (Narayan et al 2003; Cowie et al 2006). The financial impact of managing this condition is rising (Hogan et al 2003). Diabetes is a syndrome with genetic and environmental influences that results in both insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production (Weyer et al 1999). Increasing evidence suggests that exclusive breastfeeding may have a significant impact on the prevention of diabetes in adult life (Young et al 2002). This paper looks at why it is important to motivate mothers with diabetes to exclusively breastfeed their babies as directed by the Department of Health (DH) (2003). Breastfeeding will have a positive impact in halting the rising diabetic trend. In addition to the physiological benefits of breastfeeding, women with diabetes report that breastfeeding helps them to fulfil their need to feel 'normal' (Riordan 2005). PMID:23243830

  18. Preventing diabetic foot problems.

    PubMed

    Frazin, R

    1984-10-01

    Complications of diabetic foot disease may be prevented through regular office followup that includes inspection of the feet and patient education. Peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy are the pathophysiological factors underlying the development of ulcers and gangrene. Evaluation should include careful assessment of the neurological and vascular integrity of the legs and feet, risk factors for underlying disease and self-care abilities. When ulceration occurs, management includes bed rest, appropriate antibiotic therapy, topical care and treatment of any underlying large vessel disease. Worthwhile goals in caring for the diabetic individual's feet include: appropriate choice of shoes; good nail and skin care; excellent blood sugar control; smoking cessation; regular exercise; and maintaining normal blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels; and infection-free feet. Involving the family, the visiting nurse and/or the podiatrist may be helpful in achieving these goals. PMID:6493644

  19. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Anazawa, Sonoko

    2015-12-01

    Five years have passed since the criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were revised. Under these new criteria, prevalence of GDM has increased from 2-3% to 8-10%. This increase raises many arguments especially about cost effectiveness of managing newly diagnosed mild GDM showing only one abnormal value in 75 gOGTT. No evidence is yet to be found. But in our everyday experience, we find out few poor perinatal outcome with mild GDM mothers who are treated only with diet regimen to control their body weight. Considering later development to type 2 diabetes with these mild GDM mothers, they show no obvious difference from non GDM mothers in the retrospective study. PMID:26666146

  20. Diabetes: an investor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    Total health care expenditure in 2006 was $2.1 trillion. This figure is estimated to double within the next few years as the cost of treating diabetes and other chronic conditions continues to rise. Moreover, the baby boomer demographic is anticipated to place an enormous burden on the health care system and employer-based health insurance premiums were increased at rates as high as 10% per year in 2006.The quest to address these challenges has also created opportunities for investment, particularly in the fields of telemedicine, health care information technology, and medical technology.The author shares his business perspective, informed by years of experience as a physician and astronaut at NASA, and describes new applications of exciting technologies that deliver effective and efficient health care to diabetes patients, no matter where they may be. PMID:19885357

  1. Dietary carbohydrates for diabetics.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Angela A; Giacco, Rosalba; Costabile, Giuseppina

    2012-12-01

    The literature on the impact of dietary carbohydrates in the regulation of blood glucose levels and other metabolic abnormalities in diabetic patients over the last 3years is reviewed. We try to differentiate the metabolic effects due to the amount of carbohydrates from those due to their different types. The review comprises a part dealing with the effects of diets having low or high carbohydrate content on body weight reduction, and a part in which the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are discussed in relation to isoenergetic diets. Overall, the data accumulated in the period considered seem to confirm that the decrease in energy intake is more important than the qualitative composition of the diet to reduce body weight, but that both the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are important in modulating blood glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors in both the fasting and the postprandial phases in diabetic individuals. PMID:22847773

  2. Diabetes: An Investor's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Total health care expenditure in 2006 was $2.1 trillion. This figure is estimated to double within the next few years as the cost of treating diabetes and other chronic conditions continues to rise. Moreover, the baby boomer demographic is anticipated to place an enormous burden on the health care system and employer-based health insurance premiums were increased at rates as high as 10% per year in 2006. The quest to address these challenges has also created opportunities for investment, particularly in the fields of telemedicine, health care information technology, and medical technology. The author shares his business perspective, informed by years of experience as a physician and astronaut at NASA, and describes new applications of exciting technologies that deliver effective and efficient health care to diabetes patients, no matter where they may be. PMID:19885357

  3. Diabetes after Kidney Donation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, H. N.; Kukla, A.; Cordner, G.; Bailey, R.; Gillingham, K.; Matas, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney donors, similar to the general population, are at risk for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The course of donors who develop T2DM has not been studied. We surveyed 3777 kidney donors regarding the development of T2DM. Of the 2954 who responded, 154 developed T2DM 17.7 9.0 years after donation. The multivariable risk of development of T2DM was associated with type 1 DM in the recipient, male gender and body mass index >30 kg/m2 at time of donation. Compared to age, gender, duration after donation and body mass index (BMI)-matched non-diabetic donor controls; diabetic donors were more likely to have hypertension (70.8% vs. 36.2%, p = 0.005), proteinuria (18.8% vs. 3.9%, p < 0.0001) but had a similar serum creatinine. eGFR change after T2DM development was ?0.80 0.94 mL/min/year, ?0.70 0.86 in nondiabetic donors with similar duration after donation and ?0.61 0.76 mL/min/year in age, gender, BMI and duration after donation matched nondiabetic donor controls. These preliminary and shor-term data demonstrate that factors associated with T2DM in kidney donors are similar to those in the general population and donors screened carefully at the time of donation do not appear to have an acceleration of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:20041863

  4. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved, but such intervention may be considered in the severe and progressive cases or ones associated with severe neuropathic pain.

  5. Diagnosis of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coustan, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Previous approaches to diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have included 50 g, 75 g and 100 g glucose challenges, lasting 1-3 hours, with 1 or 2 elevations required. Thresholds were validated by their predictive value for subsequent diabetes, or were the same thresholds used in non-pregnant individuals. None were based on their prediction of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Diagnostic paradigms vary throughout the world, making comparisons impossible and severely limiting communication among investigators. The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study collected outcome data on > 23,000 pregnancies recruited prospectively in nine countries after a blinded 75 g, 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 24-28 weeks gestation. Primary outcomes (LGA, PCS, neonatal hypoglycemia, high cord C-peptide), and most secondary outcomes (e.g. preeclampsia, preterm birth, shoulder dystocia and birth injury), were significantly, directly and continuously related to each of the three plasma glucose measurements. The International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) developed recommendations for the use of a 75 g, 2-h OGTT, ? 1 elevation diagnosing GDM, with thresholds: fasting plasma glucose ? 5.1 mmol/L (92 mg/dL) , 1 h ? 10 mmol/L (180 mg/dL) and 2 h ? 8.5 mmol/L (153 mg/dL). These have generated wide discussion and are currently being considered throughout the world. They are pregnancy outcome-based; the 75 g glucose load will bring consistency to GTTs; universal adoption will lead to consistency of diagnostic criteria worldwide; studies of treatment at similarly mild levels of glycemia have demonstrated improvement in outcomes; use of a single abnormal value will obviate the confusion arising when one elevated value is encountered. The primary argument against the recommendations is that prevalence of GDM will rise to 16-18 %, increasing health care costs. Balanced against this is the world-wide epidemic of obesity, prediabetes and diabetes. PMID:25083890

  6. Pirfenidone for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kumar; Ix, Joachim H; Mathew, Anna V; Cho, Monique; Pflueger, Axel; Dunn, Stephen R; Francos, Barbara; Sharma, Shoba; Falkner, Bonita; McGowan, Tracy A; Donohue, Michael; Ramachandrarao, Satish; Xu, Ronghui; Fervenza, Fernando C; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2011-06-01

    Pirfenidone is an oral antifibrotic agent that benefits diabetic nephropathy in animal models, but whether it is effective for human diabetic nephropathy is unknown. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 77 subjects with diabetic nephropathy who had elevated albuminuria and reduced estimated GFR (eGFR) (20 to 75 ml/min per 1.73 m). The prespecified primary outcome was a change in eGFR after 1 year of therapy. We randomly assigned 26 subjects to placebo, 26 to pirfenidone at 1200 mg/d, and 25 to pirfenidone at 2400 mg/d. Among the 52 subjects who completed the study, the mean eGFR increased in the pirfenidone 1200-mg/d group (+3.3 8.5 ml/min per 1.73 m) whereas the mean eGFR decreased in the placebo group (-2.2 4.8 ml/min per 1.73 m; P = 0.026 versus pirfenidone at 1200 mg/d). The dropout rate was high (11 of 25) in the pirfenidone 2400-mg/d group, and the change in eGFR was not significantly different from placebo (-1.9 6.7 ml/min per 1.73 m). Of the 77 subjects, 4 initiated hemodialysis in the placebo group, 1 in the pirfenidone 2400-mg/d group, and none in the pirfenidone 1200-mg/d group during the study (P = 0.25). Baseline levels of plasma biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis significantly correlated with baseline eGFR but did not predict response to therapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that pirfenidone is a promising agent for individuals with overt diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21511828

  7. Diabetic neuropathy: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anu; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2014-06-01

    To conclude, diabetes is associated with a variety of chronic and acute neuropathies, the commonest form being distal symmetric polyneuropathy. Performing an annual screening through a good neurological history and clinical examination and using a sensitive screening tool can facilitate an early diagnosis. More sensitive and quantitative measures of detecting early peripheral nerve injury including skin biopsy for intra-epidermal and dermal nerve fiber density and confocal corneal microscopy, hold promise to identify neuropathy patients early in their disease course. PMID:25252500

  8. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  9. Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment and Prevention http://www.ihs.gov/medicalprograms/diabetes June 2012 Page 1 of 2 Diabetes in American Indians ... Treatment and Prevention http://www.ihs.gov/medicalprograms/diabetes June 2012 Page 2 of 2

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2010 What is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus? Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a disorder of ...

  11. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Feet Healthy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your feet healthy Page Content On ...

  12. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Mouth Healthy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dental and Craniofacial Research American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your mouth healthy Page Content On ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... definitions Reviewed July 2011 What is permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus? Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus is a type ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Type 1 diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Type 1 diabetes On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed March 2013 What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is a disorder characterized by ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2010 What is neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus? Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a disorder of ...

  16. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fund National Kidney Foundation American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your kidneys healthy Page Content On ...

  17. How Is Diabetes Treated in Children?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Is Diabetes Treated in Children? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... worse over time. back to top Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in ...

  18. A Relentless Illness—Fighting Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues A Relentless Illness— Fighting Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... the fight to control and cure type 1 diabetes. As international chairman of the Juvenile Diabetes Research ...

  19. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Child All About Food Allergies Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 2 ... in learning to live with the disease. About Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  20. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes There are several ways ... mg/dl – 199 mg/dl Preventing Type 2 Diabetes You will not develop type 2 diabetes automatically ...

  1. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Child All About Food Allergies Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 1 ... in learning to live with the disease. About Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  2. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Kids > Type 1 ... What is it? Let's find out. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  3. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 1 ... in learning to live with the disease. About Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  4. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 2 ... in learning to live with the disease. About Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  5. Diabetes and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Diabetes Diabetes and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian Americans are 20 percent less likely than non- ... from diabetes, however they have additional risk factors. Asian Americans are 20 percent more likely to be ...

  6. Learn the Facts about Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... FACTS A D bo I ut ABETIC RETINOPATHY Diabetic retinopathy occurs when diabetes damages the tiny blood ... National Eye Institute, 2014 GR A OWING ISSUE Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in ...

  7. "Don't take diabetes for granted."

    MedlinePLUS

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  8. For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Living Well with Diabetes. Simpler Diabetes Care: Estimated Average Glucose (eAG) The American Diabetes Association has ... levels over time. It is called "eAG," for estimated average glucose. Like the standard A1C blood test ...

  9. Diabetic Diet - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Amharic (amarunya) Diabetes Meal Plan Basics amarunya (Amharic) Bilingual PDF Harborview Medical Center Portions to Eat to Control Your Diabetes amarunya (Amharic) Bilingual PDF Harborview Medical Center Sick Days and Diabetes ...

  10. The Emerging Diabetes Online Community

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Sparling, Kerri M.; Hitchcock, Jeff; Oser, Tamara K.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management is complex and demanding, and isolation and burnout are common experiences. The Internet provides opportunities for people with diabetes to connect with one another to address these challenges. The aims of this paper are to introduce readers to the platforms on which Diabetes Online Community (DOC) participants interact, to discuss reasons for and risks associated with diabetes-related online activity, and to review research related to the potential impact of DOC participation on diabetes outcomes. Methods Research and online content related to diabetes online activity is reviewed, and DOC writing excerpts are used to illustrate key themes. Guidelines for meaningful participation in DOC activities for people with diabetes, families, health care providers, and industry are provided. Results Common themes around DOC participation include peer support, advocacy, self-expression, seeking and sharing diabetes information, improving approaches to diabetes data management, and humor. Potential risks include access to misinformation and threats to individuals’ privacy, though there are limited data on negative outcomes resulting from such activities. Likewise, few data are available regarding the impact of DOC involvement on glycemic outcomes, but initial research suggests a positive impact on emotional experiences, attitudes toward diabetes, and engagement in diabetes management behaviors. Conclusion The range of DOC participants, activities, and platforms is growing rapidly. The Internet provides opportunities to strengthen communication and support among individuals with diabetes, their families, health care providers, the health care industry, policy makers, and the general public. Research is needed to investigate the impact of DOC participation on self-management, quality of life, and glycemic control, and to design and evaluate strategies to maximize its positive impact. PMID:25901500

  11. Inflammation in diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Patricia M; Getino-Melián, María A; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus entails significant health problems worldwide. The pathogenesis of diabetes is multifactorial, resulting from interactions of both genetic and environmental factors that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, with metabolic and hemodynamic alterations. In this context, inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiology mechanism. New pathogenic pathways will provide targets for prevention or future treatments. This review will focus on the implications of inflammation in diabetes mellitus, with special attention to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25126391

  12. Diabetes in Europe: an update.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, T; Rosenbauer, J; Wild, S H; Spijkerman, A M W; Baan, C; Forouhi, N G; Herder, C; Rathmann, W

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes is among the leading causes of death in the IDF Europe Region (EUR), continues to increase in prevalence with diabetic macro- and microvascular complications resulting in increased disability and enormous healthcare costs. In 2013, the number of people with diabetes is estimated to be 56 million in EUR with an overall estimated prevalence of 8.5%. However, estimates of diabetes prevalence in 2013 vary widely in the 56 diverse countries in EUR from 2.4% in Moldova to 14.9% in Turkey. Trends in diabetes prevalence also vary between countries with stable prevalence since 2002 for many countries but a doubling of diabetes prevalence in Turkey. For 2035, a further increase of nearly 10 million people with diabetes is projected for the EUR. Prevalence of type 1 has also increased over the past 20 years in EUR and there was estimated to be 129,350 cases in children aged 0-14 years in 2013. Registries provide valid information on incidence of type 1 diabetes with more complete data available for children than for adults. There are large differences in distribution of risk factors for diabetes at the population level in EUR. Modifiable risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, smoking behaviour (including secondhand smoking), environmental pollutants, psychosocial factors and socioeconomic deprivation could be tackled to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in Europe. In addition, diabetes management is a major challenge to health services in the European countries. Improved networking practices of health professionals and other stakeholders in combination with empowerment of people with diabetes and continuous quality monitoring need to be further developed in Europe. PMID:24300019

  13. Calcium signalling in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2014-11-01

    Molecular cascades responsible for Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) signalling could be assembled in highly plastic toolkits that define physiological adaptation of cells to the environment and which are intimately involved in all types of cellular pathology. Control over Ca(2+) concentration in different cellular compartments is intimately linked to cell metabolism, because (i) ATP production requires low Ca(2+), (ii) Ca(2+) homeostatic systems consume ATP and (iii) Ca(2+) signals in mitochondria stimulate ATP synthesis being an essential part of excitation-metabolic coupling. The communication between the ER and mitochondria plays an important role in this metabolic fine tuning. In the insulin resistance state and diabetes this communication has been impaired leading to different disorders, for instance, diminished insulin production by pancreatic β cells, reduced heart and skeletal muscle contractility, reduced NO production by endothelial cells, increased glucose production by liver, increased lipolysis by adipose cells, reduced immune responses, reduced cognitive functions, among others. All these processes eventually trigger degenerative events resulting in overt diabetes due to reduction of pancreatic β cell mass, and different complications of diabetes, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and different cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25217232

  14. Sleep habits and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Larcher, S; Benhamou, P-Y; Pépin, J-L; Borel, A-L

    2015-09-01

    Sleep duration has been constantly decreasing over the past 50 years. Short sleep duration, sleep quality and, recently, long sleep duration have all been linked to poor health outcomes, increasing the risk of developing metabolic diseases and cardiovascular events. Beyond the duration of sleep, the timing of sleep may also have consequences. Having a tendency to go early to bed (early chronotype) compared with the habit of going to bed later (late chronotype) can interfere considerably with social schedules (school, work). Eventually, a misalignment arises in sleep timing between work days and free days that has been described as 'social jet lag'. The present review looks at how different sleep habits can interfere with diabetes, excluding sleep breathing disorders, and successively looks at the effects of sleep duration, chronotype and social jet lag on the risk of developing diabetes as well as on the metabolic control of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Finally, this review addresses the current state of knowledge of physiological mechanisms that could be linking sleep habits and metabolic health. PMID:25623152

  15. Diabetes and driving.

    PubMed

    Inkster, B; Frier, B M

    2013-09-01

    The principal safety concern for driving for people treated with insulin or insulin secretagogues is hypoglycaemia, which impairs driving performance. Other complications, such as those causing visual impairment and peripheral neuropathy, are also relevant to medical fitness to drive. Case control studies have suggested that drivers with diabetes pose a modestly increased but acceptable and measurable risk of motor vehicle accidents compared to non-diabetic drivers, but many studies are limited and of poor quality. Factors which have been shown to increase driving risk include previous episodes of severe hypoglycaemia, previous hypoglycaemia while driving, strict glycaemic control (lower HbA1c) and absence of blood glucose monitoring before driving. Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia may be counteracted by frequent blood glucose testing. The European Union Third directive on driving (2006) has necessitated changes in statutory regulations for driving licences for people with diabetes in all European States, including the UK. Stricter criteria have been introduced for Group 1 vehicle licences while those for Group 2 licences have been relaxed. Insulin-treated drivers can now apply to drive Group 2 vehicles, but in the UK must meet very strict criteria and be assessed by an independent specialist to be issued with a 1-year licence. PMID:23350766

  16. Cell transplantation for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calne, Roy

    2005-01-01

    For 30 years there has been experimental work aimed at transplanting islets for the treatment of diabetes with a view to curing the disease and preventing the secondary complications. Many technical difficulties were experienced, first in isolating the islets without damaging them, and second in finding a suitable place to inject them, but until recently the results of a vascularized pancreas transplant have been superior to islet transplantation. In 2000, the group in Edmonton, headed by Shapiro, published encouraging results using a different immunosuppression in transplanting patients earlier in the course of their disease than had been attempted previously. The results were excellent at a year and good at 2 years in patients with Type I diabetes, however there was the rather worrying attrition at five years. Nevertheless, the Edmonton observations were proof of concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes and other diseases where a specific protein synthesis was required by cell transplantation and/or genetic engineering. The recent interest in embryonic stem cells extenuated these efforts and progress is being made in defining the difficulties, which are greater than most workers would have predicted. In this review, the subject is discussed explaining where progress needs to be made in order to provide treatment that would be of value to patients. PMID:16147540

  17. Regenerative medicine in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Matveyenko, Aleksey; Vella, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes is a common multisystem disease that results in hyperglycemia due to a relative or absolute insulin deficiency. Improved glycemic control decreases the risk of development and progression of microvascular and, to a lesser extent, macrovascular complications and prevents symptomatic hyperglycemia. However, complex treatment regimens aimed at improving glycemic control are associated with an increased incidence of hypoglycemia. On paper at least, cellular therapies arising from reprogramed stem cells or other somatic cell types would provide ideal therapy for diabetes and the prevention of its complications. This hypothesis has led to intensive efforts to grow ? cells from various sources. In this review, we provide an overview of ?-cell development as well as the efforts reported to date in terms of cellular therapy for diabetes. Engineering ?-cell replacement therapy requires an understanding of how ? cells respond to other metabolites such as amino acids, free fatty acids, and ketones. Indeed, efforts thus far have been characterized by an inability of cellular replacement products to adequately respond to metabolites that normally couple the metabolic state to ?-cell function and insulin secretion. Efforts to date intended to capitalize on current knowledge of islet cell development and stimulus-secretion coupling of the ? cell are encouraging but as yet of little clinical relevance. PMID:25841258

  18. Resveratrol and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vallianou, Natalia G.; Evangelopoulos, Angelos; Kazazis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol is a stilbene compound, and a phytoalexin, synthesized by plants in response to stressful stimuli, usually caused by infection. It is abundantly present in red wine, ports and sherries, red grapes, blueberries, peanuts, itadori tea, as well as hops, pistachios, and in grape and cranberry juices. The anti-hyperglycemic effects of resveratrol seem to be the result of an increased action of the glucose transporter in the cytoplasmic membrane. Studies on rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes have demonstrated that the expression of the insulin-dependent glucose transporter, GLUT4, is increased after resveratrol ingestion. Also, resveratrol enhances adiponectin levels, which could be one of the potential mechanisms by which it improves insulin sensitivity. Another important observation is that resveratrol induces the secretion of the gut incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1. Resveratrol is also reported to activate Sir2 (silent information regulatory 2), a SIRT1 homolog, thus mimicking the benefits of calorie restriction. It produces a wide variety of effects in mammalian cells, including activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, which is involved in some of the same metabolic pathways as SIRT1, which may influence other mechanisms via the involvement of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B). In the near future, resveratrol-based therapies with either resveratrol or its analogs that have better bioavailability could be useful in the treatment of diabetes and its complications, either alone or in combination with other anti-diabetic drugs. PMID:24841877

  19. Diabetic nephropathy and antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Tavafi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Context Oxidative stress has crucial role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Despite satisfactory results from antioxidant therapy in rodent, antioxidant therapy showed conflicting results in combat with DN in diabetic patients. Evidence Acquisitions Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar,Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results Treatment of DN in human are insufficient with rennin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, so additional agent ought to combine with this management. Meanwhile based on DN pathogenesis and evidences in experimental and human researches, the antioxidants are the best candidate. New multi-property antioxidants may be improved human DN that show high power antioxidant capacity, long half-life time, high permeability to mitochondrion, improve body antioxidants enzymes activity and anti-inflammatory effects. Conclusions Based on this review and our studies on diabetic rats, rosmarinic acid a multi-property antioxidant may be useful in DN patients, but of course, needs to be proven in clinical trials studies. PMID:24475422

  20. Thermal burns in diabetic feet.

    PubMed

    Thng, P; Lim, R M; Low, B Y

    1999-05-01

    Many patients with diabetes can lead a full life without developing diabetic lesions in their feet. This is because these patients have avoided the precipitating factors of which the most important is mechanical trauma and infections. We present five cases of diabetic patients who, out of ignorance, listened to bad advice by using hot therapy to treat their peripheral neuropathy. This resulted in burns and secondary infections. All of them required large surgical debridement and prolonged costly hospital stay to treat their condition. Fortunately, none of them required amputation. This paper hopes to highlight the dangers of self treatment and medication in diabetic foot lesions. PMID:10489498

  1. New Concepts in Diabetic Embryopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reece, E. Albert

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Diabetes mellitus is responsible for nearly 10% of fetal anomalies in diabetic pregnancies. Although aggressive perinatal care and glycemic control are available in developed countries, the birth defect rate in diabetic pregnancies remains much higher than that in the general population. Major cellular activities--i.e., proliferation and apoptosis--and intracellular metabolic conditions--i.e., nitrosative, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum stress--have been demonstrated to be associated with diabetic embryopathy using animal models. Translating advances made in animal studies into clinical applications in humans will require collaborative efforts across the basic research, preclinical, and clinical communities. PMID:23702113

  2. Epidemiology, Mechanisms and Management of Diabetic Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence of the significant impact of gastroparesis on morbidity and mortality mandates optimized management of this condition. Gastroparesis affects nutritional state and, in diabetics, it also has deleterious effects on glycemic control and secondary effects on organs that lead to increased mortality. First-line treatment includes restoration of nutrition and medications (prokinetic and antiemetic). Aim To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, impact, natural history, time trends and treatment of gastroparesis with particular focus on diabetic gastroparesis. Methods The pros and cons of current treatment options including metoclopramide are discussed. Second-line approaches include surgery, venting gastrostomy or jejunostomy, and gastric electrical stimulation; most of these treatments are based on open-label treatment trials. Results/Conclusions In the future, drugs that target the underlying defects and new prokinetics such as newer 5-HT4 agonists (which appear to be devoid of cardiac or vascular effects), ghrelin agonists, new approaches to pacing the stomach, and stem cell therapies may bring more effective treatments to ameliorate the management of patients with gastroparesis. PMID:20951838

  3. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sheet Francine Kaufman, M.D., Head, Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and Janet Silverstein, M.D., Professor and Chief, Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, ... National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National ...

  4. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Hadi A R; Suwaidi, Jassim Al

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in the presence of intensive glycemic control. Substantial clinical and experimental evidence suggest that both diabetes and insulin resistance cause a combination of endothelial dysfunctions, which may diminish the anti-atherogenic role of the vascular endothelium. Both insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction appear to precede the development of overt hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, in patients with diabetes or insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction may be a critical early target for preventing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Microalbuminuria is now considered to be an atherosclerotic risk factor and predicts future cardiovascular disease risk in diabetic patients, in elderly patients, as well as in the general population. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature cardiovascular mortality for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as for patients with essential hypertension. A complete biochemical understanding of the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia causes vascular functional and structural changes associated with the diabetic milieu still eludes us. In recent years, the numerous biochemical and metabolic pathways postulated to have a causal role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease have been distilled into several unifying hypotheses. The role of chronic hyperglycemia in the development of diabetic microvascular complications and in neuropathy has been clearly established. However, the biochemical or cellular links between elevated blood glucose levels, and the vascular lesions remain incompletely understood. A number of trials have demonstrated that statins therapy as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors is associated with improvements in endothelial function in diabetes. Although antioxidants provide short-term improvement of endothelial function in humans, all studies of the effectiveness of preventive antioxidant therapy have been disappointing. Control of hyperglycemia thus remains the best way to improve endothelial function and to prevent atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular complications of diabetes. In the present review we provide the up to date details on this subject. PMID:18200806

  5. Diabetes Research: A Perspective From the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fradkin, Judith E.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2013-01-01

    This is the third in a series of articles, invited by the editors of Diabetes, that describes the research programs and aims of organizations committed to funding and fostering diabetes-related research. The first piece, contributed by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, appeared in the January 2012 issue of Diabetes. The second piece that describes the American Diabetes Associations research program appeared in the June 2012 issues of Diabetes and Diabetes Care. PMID:23349536

  6. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), a common and troublesome complication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), contributes to a higher risk of diabetic foot ulcer and lower limb amputation. These situations can negatively impact the quality of life of affected individuals. Despite its high prevalence and clinical importance, most diabetes mellitus patients not only do not recognize the presence of diabetic neuropathy, but also do not report their symptoms to physicians or other health care providers. Therefore, DPN is usually under diagnosed and undertreated. For early detection and appropriate intervention for DPN, a careful history, physical with neurologic examination, and prompt treatment are needed in T2DM patients. PMID:22363916

  7. CUTANEOUS DISORDERS IN 500 DIABETIC PATIENTS ATTENDING DIABETIC CLINIC

    PubMed Central

    Ragunatha, Shivanna; Anitha, Bhaktavatsalam; Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna; Devarmani, Shashidhar S

    2011-01-01

    Background: The metabolic complications and pathologic changes that occur in diabetes mellitus (DM) influence the occurrence of various dermatoses. Aim: To study the impact of control of diabetes on the pattern of cutaneous disorders. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of patients attending diabetic clinic in a tertiary care hospital. A total of 500 consecutive patients were studied. Detailed history, clinical examination and relevant investigations were done to diagnose diabetic complications and cutaneous disorders. Dermatoses with or without known pathogenesis were correlated with age, gender, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), duration of diabetes, and complications of DM. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student t test and Chi-square test with 5% confidence interval (P value 0.05). Results: Majority of patients had well-controlled (FPG<130 mg/ml, 60%) type 2 DM (98.8%). No statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the patients with or without DM specific cutaneous disorders was noticed with reference to age and gender distribution, duration of DM and FPG. Signs of insulin resistance, acrochordon (26.2%), and acanthosis nigricans (5%) were common, followed by fungal (13.8%) and bacterial (6.8%) infections. Eruptive xanthoma (0.6%), diabetic foot (0.2%), diabetic bulla (0.4%), diabetic dermopathy (0.2%), generalized granuloma annulare (0.2%), and insulin reactions (6.2%) and lipodystrophy (14%) were also seen. Conclusion: Well-controlled diabetes decreases the prevalence of DM-specific cutaneous disorders associated with chronic hyperglycemia. It is necessary to have a dermatologist in the diabetic clinic for early detection of potentially grave or predisposing conditions. PMID:21716540

  8. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  9. Epigenetic modifications and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Park, Jung Tak; Natarajan, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major complication associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Conventional therapeutic strategies are not fully efficacious in the treatment of DN, suggesting an incomplete understanding of the gene regulation mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Furthermore, evidence from clinical trials has demonstrated a metabolic memory of prior exposure to hyperglycemia that continues to persist despite subsequent glycemic control. This remains a major challenge in the treatment of DN and other vascular complications. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, nucleosomal histone modifications, and noncoding RNAs control gene expression through regulation of chromatin structure and function and post-transcriptional mechanisms without altering the underlying DNA sequence. Emerging evidence indicates that multiple factors involved in the etiology of diabetes can alter epigenetic mechanisms and regulate the susceptibility to diabetes complications. Recent studies have demonstrated the involvement of histone lysine methylation in the regulation of key fibrotic and inflammatory genes related to diabetes complications including DN. Interestingly, histone lysine methylation persisted in vascular cells even after withdrawal from the diabetic milieu, demonstrating a potential role of epigenetic modifications in metabolic memory. Rapid advances in high-throughput technologies in the fields of genomics and epigenomics can lead to the identification of genome-wide alterations in key epigenetic modifications in vascular and renal cells in diabetes. Altogether, these findings can lead to the identification of potential predictive biomarkers and development of novel epigenetic therapies for diabetes and its associated complications.

  10. [Fluorescein angiography in diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Stngu, Crina; Cristescu, Anca; Daraban, Cristina; Serghiescu, Sorina

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescein angiography plays an important role in diagnosis, classification and management of diabetic retinopathy. He paper presents angiographic aspects of some patients from "LASER OPTICS" office. An accurate and early diagnosis, and also the evaluation of laser treatment need fluorescein angiography as a useful method in the follow-up of diabetic patient. PMID:12886675

  11. Diabetes risk: antioxidants or lifestyle?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global prevalence of type-2 diabetes and its associated cardiovascular disease is increasing, possibly due to the present pandemic of obesity and overweight. It is projected that by the year 2025, more than 300 million people worldwide will have diabetes. In the United States, between the two NH...

  12. Psychosocial Predictors of Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Mary T.; Rollison, Julia; Camporese, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a perception of responsibility for disease onset and self-blame might influence disease management in people with diabetes. Methods: Our survey assessed perceived responsibility for disease onset, self-blame, anger, social support, and disease management in a sample of 46 individuals with diabetes. Results: As

  13. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  14. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  15. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Fernhall, Bo; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Rubin, Richard R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Albright, Ann L.; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes, many with this chronic disease do not become or remain regularly active. High-quality studies establishing the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes were lacking until recently, but it is now well established that participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. Structured interventions combining PA and modest weight loss have been shown to lower type 2 diabetes risk by up to 58% in high-risk populations. Most benefits of PA on diabetes management are realized through acute and chronic improvements in insulin action, accomplished with both aerobic and resistance training. The benefits of physical training are discussed, along with recommendations for varying activities, PA-associated blood glucose management, diabetes prevention, gestational diabetes mellitus, and safe and effective practices for PA with diabetes-related complications. PMID:21115758

  16. Glucose Control and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Stan

    1991-01-01

    Tight glucose control is clearly beneficial in the pregnant insulin-dependent diabetic. In other areas (retinopathy, established nephropathy, and hypoglycemia) the question whether tight control of diabetes is justified remains unanswered. Preliminary evidence suggests that tight control, if begun early, can prevent clinical nephropathy and neuropathy. PMID:21229036

  17. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  18. Psychosocial Predictors of Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, Mary T.; Rollison, Julia; Camporese, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a perception of responsibility for disease onset and self-blame might influence disease management in people with diabetes. Methods: Our survey assessed perceived responsibility for disease onset, self-blame, anger, social support, and disease management in a sample of 46 individuals with diabetes. Results: As…

  19. "My biggest challenge with diabetes"

    MedlinePLUS

    ... better to eat fewer carbohydrates when you have diabetes. So we have changed to whole-wheat pasta. We still eat rice and beans, but then the next day we'll have salads and chicken, for protein. I was surprised to be diagnosed with diabetes, and started eating everything that wasn't good ...

  20. Magnesium and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Mario; Dominguez, Ligia J

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is frequently associated with both extracellular and intracellular magnesium (Mg) deficits. A chronic latent Mg deficit or an overt clinical hypomagnesemia is common in patients with type 2 diabetes, especially in those with poorly controlled glycemic profiles. Insulin and glucose are important regulators of Mg metabolism. Intracellular Mg plays a key role in regulating insulin action, insulin-mediated-glucose-uptake and vascular tone. Reduced intracellular Mg concentrations result in a defective tyrosine-kinase activity, postreceptorial impairment in insulin action and worsening of insulin resistance in diabetic patients. A low Mg intake and an increased Mg urinary loss appear the most important mechanisms that may favor Mg depletion in patients with type 2 diabetes. Low dietary Mg intake has been related to the development of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Benefits of Mg supplementation on metabolic profiles in diabetic patients have been found in most, but not all clinical studies and larger prospective studies are needed to support the potential role of dietary Mg supplementation as a possible public health strategy in diabetes risk. The aim of this review is to revise current evidence on the mechanisms of Mg deficiency in diabetes and on the possible role of Mg supplementation in the prevention and management of the disease. PMID:26322160

  1. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration. PMID:54584

  2. Family Health History and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... History Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Your Family Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... Direction! It’s Never Too Early to Prevent Diabetes. ​​​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  3. Diabetes as Experienced by Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meldman, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Explored adolescents' perspective of their diabetic management by interviewing 12 adolescent counselors-in-training at a diabetic youth camp. Interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method; themes were further grouped into three categories: psychosocial, developmental, and clinical. A striking finding throughout the data was the

  4. Zigzagged augmentation index in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tsuneo; Sato, Takahiko; Hoshi, Hitoshi; Kato, Nobutaka; Sueyoshi, Keita; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Takane, Hiroshi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Ohno, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2009-11-01

    Although the patients with diabetic nephropathy suffered high cardiovascular risk, augmentation index (AI) in diabetic nephropathy has been poorly characterized. Cross-sectional studies were performed on 26 diabetic and 27 nondiabetic nephropathic patients. Home blood pressure was examined. In addition, blood pressure, pulse rate, and AI were measured in both supine and sitting positions. Patient backgrounds such as age, sex, sitting blood pressure, and pulse rate were similar between two groups. Circadian variations of home blood pressure were preserved in nondiabetic patients, but disappeared in diabetes. Changing from supine to sitting position induced greater decrements of systolic blood pressure (DeltaSBP -9 +/- 8 mmHg) and AI (DeltaAI -7 +/- 10) in the diabetic group than in nondiabetic patients (DeltaSBP -4 +/- 12 mmHg, DeltaAI -2 +/- 9). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that AI in a sitting position correlated positively to SBP and inversely to pulse rate. Of interest, AI in supine position related positively to age, the presence of diabetes and SBP, and inversely to pulse rate. The present data indicate autonomic dysfunction in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, our findings provide the evidence that autonomic dysfunction elicits an inadequate physiological arterial contraction in response to postural change, thereby reducing AI that results in the fall of SBP. Finally, the present results suggest that AI in supine, but not sitting position, is suited for detecting cardiovascular risk in diabetes. PMID:20001458

  5. Diabetes and stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  6. Positional cloning of diabetes genes.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Neuschl, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Several mouse strains are diabetic already at the juvenile age or develop diabetes mellitus during their life. Before these strains become diabetic, they often show several or all features of the metabolic syndrome, which is very similar to the etiology of diabetes in humans. Under the assumption that natural mutations are responsible for the development of diabetes in those mouse strains, they are valuable resources for the identification of diabetes genes and modifiers. Usually, several steps are necessary to detect the causative genes in the genome. These include the initial identification of the genomic regions contributing to the disease which is typically done by linkage mapping in an F(2) intercross or backcross population, fine mapping of the identified chromosomal interval to narrow down the target region carrying the causative genetic variation and subsequent functional and genetic characterization of the target gene or a small subset of genes. Here, we give a general overview on genetic models and the strategy for identifying diabetes genes and provide a specific protocol for the mapping and fine mapping of chromosomal regions carrying diabetes genes. PMID:22893414

  7. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small foot problems can turn into serious complications. Diabetes-related Foot and Leg Problems Infections and ulcers (sores) that ... This is a common – and serious – complication of diabetes and can lead to a loss of your foot, your leg, or your life. Corns and calluses. ...

  8. Juvenile Diabetes and Rehabilitation Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, J. Blair; Gregg, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    Severe complications of diabetes are more likely to occur with the juvenile diabetic and problems of psychosocial adjustment are recurring and difficult. Implications for the rehabilitation counselor are discussed in terms of employment considerations, the effects of complications, genetic counseling, and cooperation with other professionals.

  9. DPP4 in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Röhrborn, Diana; Wronkowitz, Nina; Eckel, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a glycoprotein of 110 kDa, which is ubiquitously expressed on the surface of a variety of cells. This exopeptidase selectively cleaves N-terminal dipeptides from a variety of substrates, including cytokines, growth factors, neuropeptides, and the incretin hormones. Expression of DPP4 is substantially dysregulated in a variety of disease states including inflammation, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Since the incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), are major regulators of post-prandial insulin secretion, inhibition of DPP4 by the gliptin family of drugs has gained considerable interest for the therapy of type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the DPP4–incretin axis and evaluate most recent findings on DPP4 inhibitors. Furthermore, DPP4 as a type II transmembrane protein is also known to be cleaved from the cell membrane involving different metalloproteases in a cell-type-specific manner. Circulating, soluble DPP4 has been identified as a new adipokine, which exerts both para- and endocrine effects. Recently, a novel receptor for soluble DPP4 has been identified, and data are accumulating that the adipokine-related effects of DPP4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, circulating DPP4 is augmented in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects, and it may represent a molecular link between obesity and vascular dysfunction. A critical evaluation of the impact of circulating DPP4 is presented, and the potential role of DPP4 inhibition at this level is also discussed. PMID:26284071

  10. DPP4 in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Röhrborn, Diana; Wronkowitz, Nina; Eckel, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a glycoprotein of 110 kDa, which is ubiquitously expressed on the surface of a variety of cells. This exopeptidase selectively cleaves N-terminal dipeptides from a variety of substrates, including cytokines, growth factors, neuropeptides, and the incretin hormones. Expression of DPP4 is substantially dysregulated in a variety of disease states including inflammation, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Since the incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), are major regulators of post-prandial insulin secretion, inhibition of DPP4 by the gliptin family of drugs has gained considerable interest for the therapy of type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the DPP4-incretin axis and evaluate most recent findings on DPP4 inhibitors. Furthermore, DPP4 as a type II transmembrane protein is also known to be cleaved from the cell membrane involving different metalloproteases in a cell-type-specific manner. Circulating, soluble DPP4 has been identified as a new adipokine, which exerts both para- and endocrine effects. Recently, a novel receptor for soluble DPP4 has been identified, and data are accumulating that the adipokine-related effects of DPP4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, circulating DPP4 is augmented in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects, and it may represent a molecular link between obesity and vascular dysfunction. A critical evaluation of the impact of circulating DPP4 is presented, and the potential role of DPP4 inhibition at this level is also discussed. PMID:26284071

  11. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  12. Contraception and the adolescent diabetic.

    PubMed

    Fennoy, I

    1989-01-01

    We believe our data suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than would be expected from the general population at a time when diabetic control is at its worse. Thus patients and their offspring are exposed to extreme morbidity. Current recommendations regarding contraception in patients with diabetes are not appropriate for the adolescent population and therefore tend to support this phenomenon rather than relieve it. Because of the peculiar physiological and developmental characteristics of this population, more medical research is necessary regarding various hormonal preparations available to determine the safest acceptable contraceptive for the adolescent diabetic. To be truly effective, these new alternatives must be presented to the patient in the context of a counseling program that (1) recognizes that this population does have an unusually high frequency of pregnancy for reasons unknown, and that (2) stresses the need for the patient to take control of the diabetes prior to becoming pregnant. PMID:2516509

  13. The diabetic patient in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Aljabri, Khalid S

    2014-04-01

    During the month of Ramadan, all healthy, adult Muslims are required to fast from dawn to sunset. Fasting during Ramadan involves abstaining from food, water, beverages, smoking, oral drugs, and sexual intercourse. Although the Quran exempts chronically ill from fasting, many Muslims with diabetes still fast during Ramadan. Patients with diabetes who fast during the month of Ramadan can have acute complications. The risk of complications in fasting individuals with diabetes increases with longer periods of fasting. All patients with diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan should be prepared by undergoing a medical assessment and engaging in a structured education program to undertake the fast as safely as possible. Although some guidelines do exist, there is an overwhelming need for better designed clinical trials which could provide us with evidence-based information and guidance in the management of patients with diabetes fasting Ramadan. PMID:24761380

  14. [Pregnancy complicated by diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kinalski, Maciej; Sledziewski, Adam; Majkowicz-M?ynarczyk, Amelia; Ku?micki, Mariusz

    2004-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team work and recommendations of diabetologist and obstetrician is the condition of success of antenatal care and consequently perinatal outcome in pregnancy complicated by diabetes. Careful insight into the metabolic, haemodynamic and vascular disturbances is the basic of contemporary surveillance in diabetic pregnancy. The authors emphasise that a diabetic pregnant woman must not only pay attention to adequate nutrition and balanced exercise, but also be aware of and cope with characteristic, momentary swings in glycemia in order to overcome them by appropriate insulin therapy. Continuous supervision for several other complications associated with diabetic pregnancy, viz. hypertension, retinopathy, thyroid dysfunction, nephropathy and the threat of in utero foetal death is justified. Briefly, rigorous measures to sustain normoglycemia and normal blood pressure, examination of the retina, thyroid and renal functions as well as foetal status evaluation are paramount in appropriate management of major common diabetic complications in pregnancy. PMID:15858241

  15. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceio; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, Jos

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  16. Monitoring glycemia in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Healy, Sara J; Dungan, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of glycemic control is a key component of the diabetes treatment plan. Patients who are not meeting targets often require more intensive monitoring, ranging from frequent self-monitored glucose to continuous glucose monitoring in order to facilitate medication and lifestyle changes. However, more intensive monitoring demands more training and a structured plan for interpretation and use of the data. Better patient and provider tools to support decision-making and progress toward an artificial pancreas may help to alleviate this burden. PMID:25456642

  17. Diabetes insipidus in children.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vandana; Ravindranath, Aathira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is one of the common disorders affecting sodium and water homeostasis, and results when ADH is either inadequately produced, or unable to negotiate its actions on the renal collecting tubules through aquaporins. The diagnostic algorithm starts with exclusion of other causes of polyuria and establishing low urine osmolality in the presence of high serum osmolality. In this paper, we have reviewed the diagnosis, etiology and management of DI in children, with special emphasis on recent advances in the field. PMID:26353165

  18. Diabetic cardiomyopathy: electromechanical cellular alterations.

    PubMed

    Casis, O; Echevarria, E

    2004-07-01

    Diabetic patients show a higher incidence of cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation and sudden death. However, although diabetic cardiomyopathy is a frequent and important complication of diabetes mellitus, its physiological basis is not completely known. The electrocardiogram of diabetic patients shows several alterations from normal patterns, most of them related to the QT interval and T wave. Recently, different alterations in cardiac ionic currents have been described in myocytes isolated from diabetic hearts, mainly a reduction in potassium repolarizing currents. Three different mechanisms could be involved in these alterations. First, direct metabolic alterations of the cardiac myocyte, such as impaired activity of protein kinases and phosphatases, intracellular pH regulation, intracellular calcium handling, and others. Second, impaired support of extra cardiac factors regulating cardiac activity, such as sympathetic regulation of heart rate and contractility. Thus, diabetic autonomic neuropathy leads to diminished noradrenaline release in cardiac ventricle in response to standing, exercise or cold stress. Besides, diabetic cardiomyopathy reduces cardiac myocyte response to acute noradrenaline exposure and finally, impairs support of different trophic factors responsible for the regulation of ionic channel expression. Thus, basal noradrenaline release in the ventricles, necessary to maintain adequate potassium channel expression, is reduced by sympathetic neuropathy. Moreover, the levels of insulin and other trophic factors required for the maintenance of adequate ionic channel expression are also altered in diabetic patients. Therefore, different physiopathological mechanisms are involved in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Thus, further research is needed in order to prevent the development of this long-term complication, and to improve the pharmacological management of diabetic patients. PMID:15320822

  19. Diabetes autoantibodies do not predict progression to diabetes in adults: the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Dabelea, D.; Ma, Y.; Knowler, W. C.; Marcovina, S.; Saudek, C. D.; Arakaki, R.; White, N. H.; Kahn, S. E.; Orchard, T. J.; Goldberg, R.; Palmer, J.; Hamman, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine if the presence of diabetes autoantibodies predicts the development of diabetes among participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program. Methods A total of 3050 participants were randomized into three treatment groups: intensive lifestyle intervention, metformin and placebo. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 autoantibodies and insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies were measured at baseline and participants were followed for 3.2 years for the development of diabetes. Results The overall prevalence of GAD autoantibodies was 4.0%, and it varied across racial/ethnic groups from 2.4% among Asian-Pacific Islanders to 7.0% among non-Hispanic black people. There were no significant differences in BMI or metabolic variables (glucose, insulin, HbA1c, estimated insulin resistance, corrected insulin response) stratified by baseline GAD antibody status. GAD autoantibody positivity did not predict diabetes overall (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98; 95% CI 0.561.73) or in any of the three treatment groups. Insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies were positive in only one participant (0.033%). Conclusions These data suggest that diabetes autoimmunity, as reflected by GAD antibodies and insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies, in middle-aged individuals at risk for diabetes is not a clinically relevant risk factor for progression to diabetes. PMID:24646311

  20. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Spaight, Caroline; Gross, Justine; Horsch, Antje; Puder, Jardena Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome study, new universal screening recommendations and cut-offs for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been proposed. In addition to the immediate perinatal risk, GDM carries an increased risk of metabolic disease in the mother and child. Maternal obesity has even been shown to be associated with increased all-cause mortality in offspring. In addition to known risk factors, excessive gestational weight gain, increased fat consumption, a low vitamin D level, psychological stress and negative mood are risk factors for GDM. Regarding therapy, the US Preventive Task Force concluded in 2013 that GDM treatment significantly reduces the risks of pre-eclampsia, macrosomia and shoulder dystocia (relative risks of 0.62, 0.5 and 0.42, respectively). Although nutrition therapy represents a cornerstone in GDM management, the results of studies are not clear regarding which types of dietary advice are the most suitable. Most physical activity interventions improve glucose control and/or reduce insulin use. Recent studies have evaluated and provided more information about treatment with metformin or glyburide. Postpartum management is essential and should focus on long-term screening and diabetes prevention strategies. PMID:26824237

  1. The impact of nuts on diabetes and diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, Jennifer C

    2005-10-01

    Nuts have many nutritional benefits: they are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, fiber, vitamin, minerals, and phytonutrients. Population studies indicate that individuals who regularly consume nuts have reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In clinical trials, nuts appear to have a neutral effect on glucose and insulin, and a beneficial effect on lipid profile. Thus, nuts can be a healthy dietary component for individuals with diabetes or those at risk for diabetes, providing overall caloric intake is regulated to maintain a healthy body weight. PMID:16188174

  2. Diabetes and diarrhea in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Azriel Mira, Sharona; Requejo Salinas, Helena; Garca Fernndez, Elena; Hawkins Carranza, Federico

    2008-05-01

    Between 5 and 10% of adults initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus.(DM) actually have adult-onset autoimmune diabetes. Given the large number of patients diagnosed with DM type 2, the entity called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) by some authors could represent half of all diabetics with type 1A diabetes. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman, with a history of brittle diabetes and irritable bowel syndrome, who was finally diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes and celiac disease. PMID:22967917

  3. [Diabetic Retinopathy and Neuropathy: New in 2015].

    PubMed

    Henzen, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    In 2014 interesting new results were published in the field of diabetic microangiopathy: (1) In tensive treatment of type 1 diabetes for a mean of 6,5 years confers a lifelong reduction of the risk of diabetic retinopathy; (2) although the rates of diabetes-related complication have declined since 1990, the burden of disease persists because the prevalence of diabetes tripled during the same time; (3) subjects with diabetic neuropathy have structural brain changes, i.e. gray matter loss, findings with possible implications for the prognosis; (4) over 80% of type 2 diabetics who consider their feet to be normal have serious foot pathology. PMID:26098239

  4. Galaxias australes con ncleo doble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, G.; Daz, R.; Carranza, G.

    Se estudia una muestra de galaxias australes con ncleo doble a partir de una bsqueda extensiva en la literatura. Se analizan las caractersticas morfolgicas, fotomtricas y espectroscpicas de la muestra. Para algunas galaxias se han realizado observaciones con el espectrgrafo multifuncin (EMF) de la Estacin Astrofsica de Bosque Alegre a partir de las cuales se determinaron parmetros cinemticos.

  5. [Tooth extraction on diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Fragiskos, F; Massoulas, G B; Vagenas, N

    1990-02-01

    Performing extractions on diabetic patients is a complicated problem, which is connected with the type of diabetes and the various complications related to this disease. The main concern is to avoid acute incidents hyper or sub-glycemic comas during the operation and to secure a smooth post- operational course, namely an undisturbed post- extracture healing. In this study, 80 diabetic patients who came for extractions to the escodental department were divided into two categories: patients suffering from diabetes type I and patients suffering from diabetes type II. On the arrival of all patients, the contents of glycose in blood and acetone in urine were measured, and depending on the respective results patients of the first category were classified into three groups and patients of the second category were classified into four groups. Along with the normal measures usually taken for diabetic patients, specific instructions were given for the groups of each category, in order to prevent hyper- or sub-glycaminate incidents, during the operation. Proper instructions were further given for those patients, who had history chronical complications from diabetes. Extractions based on th method of classifying the patients into the above mentioned categories and groups have presented no complications whatever in our study. PMID:2151826

  6. Diabetic ketoacidosis: a silent death.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zabiullah; Levine, Barry; Ripple, Mary; Fowler, David R

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from severe insulin deficiency and can be diagnosed at autopsy despite no known history of the disease. Diabetic ketoacidosis may be the initial manifestation of type 1 diabetes or may result from increased insulin requirement in type 1 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of DKA death investigated by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner that was not associated with a known history of diabetes.Cases investigated by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner during a 6-year period whose cause of death was DKA were identified using a centralized database. To determine the percentage with known history of diabetes, investigation reports were reviewed for any documentation of this history. The toxicology reports of all DKA deaths were reviewed together with histologic slides, if available, for possible microscopic changes. Concentrations of vitreous glucose, vitreous acetone, and blood acetone were used to diagnose DKA in these autopsied cases.Nearly a third of all death from DKA (32 of 92 during a 6-year period) occurred in individuals who had no known history of diabetes, emphasizing the importance of regular physicals that include a check of glucose concentration, and especially if any warning signs are present. In a case of sudden death, it is recommended that the volatile toxicology analysis at a medical examiner's office should include tests for acetone concentration, which when elevated, together with an elevated vitreous glucose, indicates DKA. PMID:22835961

  7. Metabolic Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isfort, Michael; Stevens, Sarah C.W.; Schaffer, Stephen; Jong, Chian Ju; Wold, Loren E.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined as cardiac disease independent of vascular complications during diabetes. The number of new cases of DCM is rising at epidemic rates in proportion to newly diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) throughout the world. DCM is a heart failure syndrome found in diabetic patients that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced diastolic function, with or without concurrent systolic dysfunction, occurring in the absence of hypertension and coronary artery disease. DCM and other diabetic complications are caused in part by elevations in blood glucose and lipids, characteristic of DM. Although there are pathological consequences to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, the combination of the two metabolic abnormalities potentiates the severity of diabetic complications. A natural competition exists between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the heart that is regulated by allosteric and feedback control and transcriptional modulation of key limiting enzymes. Inhibition of these glycolytic enzymes not only controls flux of substrate through the glycolytic pathway, but also leads to the diversion of glycolytic intermediate substrate through pathological pathways, which mediate the onset of diabetic complications. The present review describes the limiting steps involved in the development of these pathological pathways and the factors involved in the regulation of these limiting steps. Additionally, therapeutic options with demonstrated or postulated effects on DCM are described. PMID:23443849

  8. Heart disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Toto, Robert D

    2005-11-01

    Cardiac artery disease and heart failure are major causes for morbidity and mortality in diabetes in general and in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in particular. Hypertension and dyslipidemia are more common in diabetes and the prevalence of coronary artery disease in diabetics is two-fold to four-fold higher than in nondiabetics. In those with CKD the incidence of cardiovascular complications is nearly two-fold higher than those without CKD. Recent studies suggest that the pathophysiology of cardiac disease is complex process involving both microvascular and macrovascular disease. In addition, myocardial lipotoxicity may be a novel contributing factor particularly in type 2 diabetics. Compelling evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials indicates that treatment with drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system are cardioprotective in diabetics with microalbuminuria and early stages of kidney disease. Multiple risk factor intervention aimed at optimal blood pressure control (BP <130/<80 mmHG), lowering LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl, lowering triglyceride level to 150 mg/dl, A1C <6.5%, treatment with an ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker, administration of once daily low-dose aspirin and smoking cessation together reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetics. Novel studies including diabetics with nephropathy aimed at improving outcomes in diabetics by treatment of anemia and optimal control of dyslipidemia are now underway. These and other clinical trials should provide important new insights into improving the quality of life in diabetics and ultimately preventing cardiac disease. PMID:16298258

  9. [Epidemiology of diabetic foot problems].

    PubMed

    Richard, J-L; Schuldiner, S

    2008-09-01

    Since diabetes mellitus is growing at epidemic proportions worldwide, the prevalence of diabetes-related complications is bound to increase. Diabetic foot disorders, a major source of disability and morbidity, are a significant burden for the community and a true public health problem. Many epidemiological data have been published on the diabetic foot but they are difficult to interpret because of variability in the methodology and in the definitions used in these studies. Moreover, there is a lack of consistency in population characteristics (ethnicity, social level, accessibility to care) and how results are expressed. In westernized countries, two of 100 diabetic patients are estimated to suffer from a foot ulcer every year. Amputation rates vary considerably: incidence ranges from 1 per thousand in the Madrid area and in Japan to up to 20 per thousand in some Indian tribes in North America. In metropolitan France, the incidence of lower-limb amputation is approximately 2 per thousand but with marked regional differences, and in French overseas territories, the incidence rate is much higher. Nevertheless, the risk for ulceration and amputation is much higher in diabetics compared to the nondiabetic population: the lifetime risk of a diabetic individual developing an ulcer is as high as 25% and it is estimated that every 30s an amputation is performed for a diabetic somewhere in the world. As reviewed in this paper, peripheral neuropathy, arterial disease, and foot deformities are the main factors accounting for this increased risk. Age and sex as well as social and cultural status are contributing factors. Knowing these factors is essential to classify every diabetic using a risk grading system and to take preventive measures accordingly. PMID:18822247

  10. Diabetes in young: Beyond type 1

    PubMed Central

    Virmani, Anju; Kulkarni, Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    Although majority of diabetes in children is type1 diabetes, childhood type2 diabetes prevalence is rapidly increasing due to changing lifestyle. Most patients can be definitely grouped into either of the two but some present diagnostic difficulty due to overlapping and non specific clinical features and laboratory findings. MODY and several other diseases affecting the pancreas also result in childhood diabetes. Treatment of diabetes in children presents unique challenges and primary prevention is of prime importance. PMID:23565393

  11. Preoperative Evaluation of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua D; Richman, Deborah C

    2016-03-01

    There are more than 29 million people in the United States with diabetes; it is estimated that by 2050, one in 3 individuals will have the disease. At least 50% of patients with diabetes are expected to undergo surgery in their lifetime. Complications from uncontrolled diabetes can impact multiple organ systems and affect perioperative risk. In this review, the authors discuss principles in diabetes management that will assist the perioperative clinician in caring for patients with diabetes. PMID:26927745

  12. Diabetes in young: Beyond type 1.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Anju; Kulkarni, Abhishek

    2012-12-01

    Although majority of diabetes in children is type1 diabetes, childhood type2 diabetes prevalence is rapidly increasing due to changing lifestyle. Most patients can be definitely grouped into either of the two but some present diagnostic difficulty due to overlapping and non specific clinical features and laboratory findings. MODY and several other diseases affecting the pancreas also result in childhood diabetes. Treatment of diabetes in children presents unique challenges and primary prevention is of prime importance. PMID:23565393

  13. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia, lipid disorders (treatment with fenofibrate reduces the incidence of DF amputations (EBM-Ib/A), hypertension, hyperuricemia, neuropathy, and angiopathy (surgical reconstructive bypass) or endovascular (percutaneous transluminar angioplasty). In the low-risk group of PwDM, no particular results can be achieved, in contrast to the high-risk groups of PwDM where patient and professional education has shown significant achievement (EBM-IV/C). In secondary prevention of DF, it is necessary to perform patient and professional education how to avoid most of external influences for DE Patient education should include all topics from primary prevention, danger of neural analgesia (no cooling or warming the foot), careful selection of shoes, daily observation of foot, early detection all foot changes or small wounds, daily hygiene of foot skin, which has to be clean and moist, regular self measurements of skin temperature between the two feet (EBM-Ib/A), prevention of self treatment of foot deformities, changing wrong habits (walking footless), medical consultation for even small foot changes (EBM-Ib/A) and consultation by multidisciplinary team (EBM-IIb/B). Tertiary DF prevention includes ulcer treatment, prevention of amputation and level of amputation. In spite of the primary and secondary prevention measures, DF ulcers develop very often. Because of different etiologic reasons as well as different principles of treatment which are at the same time prevention of the level of amputation, the approach to PwDF has to be multidisciplinary. A high place in the treatment of DF ulcers, especially neuropathic ulcers, have the off-loading principles (EBM-Ib/A), even instead of surgical treatment (EBM-Ib/A). Necrectomy, taking samples for analysis from the deep of ulcer, together with x-ray diagnostics (in particular NMR), the size of the changes can be detected, together with appropriate antibiotic use and indication for major surgical treatment. The patient has to be instructed to the involved DF with off-loading (EBM-IIb/A). Negative pressure wound therapy can accelerate the closure of complex diabetic foot wounds (EBM- Ib/A). DF local treatment as well as ulcer covering for detritus absorption has not been EBM approved, although covering can diminish secondary infection. Skin or surrogate transplantations looks rationale but very expensive in comparison to off-loading. Randomized clinical trials do not prove usefulness of antibiotic treatment or surgical intervention in uninfected ulcer (EBM-IV/C), but the decision is left to the experienced physician. Evidence of osteomyelitis together with infected DF ulcer changes the prognosis of treatment, increasing the importance of antibiotic or surgical treatment (EBM-IIIB/B). Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen can help in wound healing, but without any influence on revascularization (EBM-Ib/A). At the end, the decision for the level of amputation has to be made. Charcot neuroarthropathy is still not clearly defined, so the randomized controlled trials are rare; thus, there are many new ways of treatment but the basics belongs to off-loading in simple changes through surgical treatment in more complex changes (EBM-IV/C)(rbn1). All available methods for detecting the level of vascularization, angioplasties, and oxymetry have to be used to decide on the minimal level of amputation. PMID:24371974

  14. Pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Doost, J Y; Vessal, K

    1975-12-01

    In 217 patients with diabetes mellitus, 32 (14.7%) had also pleuropulmonary tuberculosis confirmed by bacteriologic or histologic means. Either unilateral or bilateral lower lobe involvement was seen in 20 patients (62.5%). Of these, 75% were febrile, the response to antituberculous drugs was slower than in patients with apical lesions. Confirmation of tuberculosis was also more difficult in patients with lower lobe disease. The prevalence of tuberculosis in diabetic patients must be considered and the disease should be especially suspected in diabetic patients with lower lobe lesions. PMID:1216313

  15. Bladder Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic cystopathy is a well-recognized complication of diabetes mellitus, which usually develops in middle-aged or elderly patients with long-standing and poorly controlled disease. It may have broad spectrum clinical presentations. Patients may be asymptomatic, or have a wide variety of voiding complaints from overactive bladder and urge incontinence to decreased bladder sensation and overflow incontinence. This review focuses on pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for urologic complications of diabetes and emphasizing on recent developments in our understanding of this condition. We also tried to shed some light on therapeutic modalities like behavioral, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. PMID:21833175

  16. Red cell filterability in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Y; Mochzuki, K; Maeda, T

    1981-01-01

    A negative pressure red cell filteration technique using polycarbonate sieve (Nuclepore) was devised for the observation of red cell filterability (RCF) in diabetes. A significant increase of HbA1 was suggested to be closely correlated to the decrease of RCF. A greater decrease of RCF was observed in diabetics with advanced retinopathy. The increased 2,3-DPG of red cells has been observed in diabetes, but P50 changed much less than might be expected. Improved RCF was observed when Pentoxifylline was added into red cell suspensions. This suggests that Pentoxifylline will have a good effect on microcirculation where impared circulation is observed. PMID:6948379

  17. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN).From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters.The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors.The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  18. [A diabetes care team--role of diabetes specialists and certified diabetes educator].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K

    2001-12-01

    In recent decades, diabetes care has undergone fundamental changes that have influenced the manner in which any type of diabetic patients are managed: (i) acceptance of tight metabolic control; (ii) recognition of primary care management; (iii) focus on quality improvement: and (iv) emphasis on cost containment. Then, the role of a diabetes care team has been recognized and acted upon to a far greater extent than before. Treatment of diabetes consists of two principal components: metabolic control and intervention to prevent complications. The former is a part of the primary health care scheme in which the indication for education, as well as care and treatment, frequently depend of the data produced by patients; the latter pertaining to hospital-based care. In 2001 in Japan, the number of the diabetes specialists is about 2500, and the certified diabetes educators certified are about 4300. However, the accessibility of the patients to the specialists still remains poor. Nurses, dietitians, medical technologists, pharmacists and physical therapists are eligible to take the examination of certified diabetes educator. They must be skilled at identifying the background of patients to improve care and health through life-style modification. Education for care and treatment consists of medical and educational models. In both of these, here are specific processes of diagnosis and therapy: along with medical diagnosis and treatment, through physical and laboratory examinations, assessment of the patient for indication of a curriculum by test of knowledge, skill and attitude for adequate educational therapy is necessary. PMID:11797390

  19. Bariatric surgery and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a relatively new and serious world-wide epidemic. Obesity is a stronger predictor in mortality than either poverty or smoking, and obesity is also now more prevalent than malnutrition. The prevalence of obesity continues to increase, ironically, the rate of increase of obesity is highest amongst the morbidly obesity. Obesity is the result of many factors resulting in concert, including poor dietary habits, reduced physical activity and genetic predisposition. With the rapid increase in obesity there has been a pronounced increase in obesity-related metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and many others. These co-morbidities are responsible for more than 2.5 million deaths, worldwide. The loss of life expectancy due to obesity is profound. In comparison to a normal weight individual Caucasian, a 25-year-old morbidly obese man has a 22% reduction in the expected remaining life span, representing an approximate loss of 12 years of life. PMID:23565385

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alfadhli, Eman M

    2015-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. It is associated with maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Maintaining adequate blood glucose levels in GDM reduces morbidity for both mother and baby. There is a lack of uniform strategies for screening and diagnosing GDM globally. This review covers the latest update in the diagnosis and management of GDM. The initial treatment of GDM consists of diet and exercise. If these measures fail to achieve glycemic goals, insulin should be initiated. Insulin analogs are more physiological than human insulin, and are associated with less risk of hypoglycemia, and may provide better glycemic control. Insulin lispro, aspart, and detemir are approved to be used in pregnancy. Insulin glargine is not approved in pregnancy, but the existing studies did not show any contraindications. The use of oral hypoglycemic agents; glyburide and metformin seems to be safe and effective in pregnancy. PMID:25828275

  1. Gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. It is associated with maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Maintaining adequate blood glucose levels in GDM reduces morbidity for both mother and baby. There is a lack of uniform strategies for screening and diagnosing GDM globally. This review covers the latest update in the diagnosis and management of GDM. The initial treatment of GDM consists of diet and exercise. If these measures fail to achieve glycemic goals, insulin should be initiated. Insulin analogs are more physiological than human insulin, and are associated with less risk of hypoglycemia, and may provide better glycemic control. Insulin lispro, aspart, and detemir are approved to be used in pregnancy. Insulin glargine is not approved in pregnancy, but the existing studies did not show any contraindications. The use of oral hypoglycemic agents; glyburide and metformin seems to be safe and effective in pregnancy. PMID:25828275

  2. Protein O-GlcNAcylation in diabetes and diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfeng; Hart, Gerald W

    2014-01-01

    The post-translational modification of serine and threonine residues of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is highly ubiquitous, dynamic and inducible. Protein O-GlcNAcylation serves as a key regulator of critical biological processes including transcription, translation, proteasomal degradation, signal transduction and apoptosis. Increased O-GlcNAcylation is directly linked to insulin resistance and to hyperglycemia-induced glucose toxicity, two hallmarks of diabetes and diabetic complications. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about protein O-GlcNAcylation and nutrient metabolism, as well as discuss the commonly used tools to probe changes of O-GlcNAcylation in cultured cells and in animal models. We then focus on some key proteins modified by O-GlcNAc, which play crucial roles in the etiology and progression of diabetes and diabetic complications. Proteomic approaches are also highlighted to provide a system view of protein O-GlcNAcylation. Finally, we discuss how aberrant O-GlcNAcylation on certain proteins may be exploited to develop methods for the early diagnosis of pre-diabetes and/or diabetes. PMID:23992419

  3. The association between diabetes and postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily S; Peri, Marisa R; Gossett, Dana R

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to estimate if diabetic women were more likely to experience postpartum depression symptoms than women without diabetes. This was a prospective cohort of women who received prenatal care at a hospital-affiliated prenatal clinic serving low-income women in Chicago, Illinois. For the primary analysis, women were divided by diabetes status (i.e., no diabetes or either gestational diabetes or pre-pregnancy diabetes). Postpartum depression was defined as a positive screen on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Rates of postpartum depression were compared, stratified by diabetic status. A multivariable logistic regression was performed to control for potential confounders. A planned secondary analysis compared women with pre-pregnancy diabetes to those without pre-pre-pregnancy diabetes. Three hundred and five women consented to participate of whom 100 (30.5%) had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 33 (10.8%) had pre-pregnancy diabetes. Compared to women without any diabetes, women with diabetes (either GDM or pre-pregnancy diabetes) had similar rates of antenatal [(OR) 0.69, 95% CI) 0.44-1.08] and postpartum depression (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.33-1.66). However, postpartum depression was more common among women with pre-pregnancy diabetes (34.8%) compared to non-diabetic women (16.7%) (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.05-6.78). This association persisted even after adjusting for potential confounders (aOR 2.67, 95% CI 1.05-9.79). Gestational diabetes was not associated with increased rates of depression. However, women with pre-pregnancy diabetes are more likely to experience postpartum depression compared to women without pre-pregnancy diabetes, even after adjusting for related comorbidities. PMID:26184833

  4. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about exercising and managing your blood sugar. Low-carbohydrate diets are good for people with diabetes because they should avoid carbs. False: Carbohydrates are the body's preferred source of energy, and ...

  5. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called adult-onset diabetesis higher if you: l are over age 45, overweight or obese, or inactive l have high blood pressure or high cholesterol l have a mother, father, brother, or sister with ...

  6. Recent Advances (in Diabetes Research)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fundraising & Local Events Matching Gift Fundraising Events Donate Stocks Give by Phone 1-800-DIABETES (800-342- ... Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks About Us Who We Are Careers Contact Us ...

  7. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fundraising & Local Events Matching Gift Fundraising Events Donate Stocks Give by Phone 1-800-DIABETES (800-342- ... Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks About Us Who We Are Careers Contact Us ...

  8. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis B can be spread through sharing needles, syringes, or other injection equipment. In addition, the hepatitis ... devices or other diabetes-care equipment such as syringes or insulin pens. How infectious is the hepatitis ...

  9. Diabetes Resources for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Story Sandras Story Promotional Tools for Managing Diabetes Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... it to use as a handout or poster. Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  10. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  11. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  12. Quiz for Teens with Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Story Sandra’s Story Promotional Tools for Managing Diabetes Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... many weight loss plans from which to choose. Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  13. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov; Iversen, Ditte Smed; Moeller, Niels; Ovesen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance of clarity and consensus. If newly proposed criteria are adopted universally a significantly growing number of women will be diagnosed as having GDM, implying new therapeutic challenges to avoid foetal and maternal complications related to the hyperglycemia of gestational diabetes. This review provides an overview of clinical issues related to GDM, including the challenges of screening and diagnosis, the pathophysiology behind GDM, the treatment and prevention of GDM and the long and short term consequences of gestational diabetes for both mother and offspring. PMID:26240703

  14. New treatments for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Stroud, S; Mehta, A; Rangasamy, S

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the major cause of vision loss in middle-aged adults. Alteration of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) is the hallmark of diabetic retinopathy and, subsequently, hypoxia may result in retinal neovascularization. Tight control of systemic factors such as blood glucose, blood pressure and blood lipids is essential in the management of this disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important factors responsible for alteration of the BRB. The introduction of anti-VEGF agents has revolutionized the therapeutic strategies used in people with diabetic retinopathy, and the use of laser therapy has been modified. In the present article, we examine the clinical features and pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy and review the current status of new treatment recommendations for this disease, and also explore some possible future therapies. PMID:25160598

  15. Diabetes Resources for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Story Sandra’s Story Promotional Tools for Managing Diabetes Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... it to use as a handout or poster. Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  16. Cognitive Interventions for Older Diabetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sheila; Scogin, Forrest

    1998-01-01

    Older diabetic adults should receive memory training to improve their compliance with medication taking. The intervention should include comprehensible medical instructions, assistance with remembering the nutritional values of food, and higher order skills for disease management. (SK)

  17. [Infection complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to be suspected to be immunocompromized hosts. Many reports have pointed out that diabetic patients are susceptible to certain infections such as surgical site infections, malignant otitis externa, mucormycosis, and necrotizing fasciitis. But their etiology seems to be non-uniform, heterogenous and individualized. Above all, obesity-related infections are also increasing accompanied with the recent rising incidence of obesity. Further studies should be addressed about the relationships between infections and diabetes which include the factors of body mass index, life style, degree of diabetes complications, and poor glycemic control duration. They could live a normal life the same as healthy subjects if good glycemic control is achieved without hypoglycemia. PMID:26666157

  18. Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, and Heart Protection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... triglycerides (fats in the blood) Dyslipidemia contributes to atherosclerosis (“hardening” of the arteries), a disease in which ... People with diabetes are more likely to develop atherosclerosis, heart disease, poor circulation, and stroke than people ...

  19. Eating Out and Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... that can lead to healthy tomorrows. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Type 2 Diets Nutrition About MedlinePlus ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  20. Type 2 Diabetes and Wine

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... health news that matters to you. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Alcohol Diabetes Type 2 Diets About MedlinePlus ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  1. National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for 44% of all new cases of kidney ... by an estimated 50% to 60%. 10 General ... when the body’s immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in ...

  2. Brittle diabetes in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Benbow, S J; Walsh, A; Gill, G V

    2001-11-01

    Severely unstable, or brittle, diabetes can be disruptive to patients, carers and diabetes care teams. The peak age-group for brittle diabetes is 15-30, but there are reports of its occurrence in much older patients. To explore the characteristics and cause of brittle instability perceived by diabetologists in elderly patients we circulated a questionnaire to all UK hospital diabetic clinics for adults. 130 (56%) of 231 replied. Reports were obtained on 55 patients fulfilling our criteria for 'elderly brittle diabetes'--namely, age > or =60 years, on insulin treatment, and experiencing life-disrupting glycaemic instability of any kind associated with frequent or long admissions to hospital. Further information was obtained by a research nurse who visited the relevant clinics. The mean age of patients was 74 years (range 60-89) and 71% were female. The brittleness was classed as mixed glycaemic instability in 22 (44%), recurrent ketoacidosis in 16 (29%) and recurrent hypoglycaemia in 15 (27%). In 2 cases there was insufficient information for classification. The diabetes care team judged the brittleness to have multiple origins in two-thirds of the cases: problems with memory or behaviour were rare, and in only 4 cases was deliberate manipulation of therapy considered a possibility. 84% of the patients were living independently. In younger patients the principal manifestation of brittle diabetes is recurrent ketoacidosis. The present survey, though possibly subject to ascertainment bias, indicates that the patterns of instability and their causation may be different in elderly patients. With the growing use of insulin in the elderly, brittle diabetes is likely to be encountered increasingly often in this age-group. PMID:11691895

  3. Bone scintigraphy in diabetic osteoarthropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Eymontt, M.J.; Alavi, A.; Dalinka, M.K.; Kyle, G.C.

    1981-08-01

    Bone scans of patients with diabetic osteoarthropathy of the ankle and foot were characterized by a combination of diffuse and focal increased uptake, similar to that seen with hyperemia and reactive new bone formation. Scintigraphy showed more extensive abnormalities than radiography, with the scan abnormalities sometimes preceding the radiographic changes. The clinical and scintigraphic appearance of osteoarthropathy may improve following strict diabetic control and non-weight-bearing.

  4. Comorbid Depression and Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Maydick, Diane R; Acee, Anna M

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, 9.3% of the population, or 29.1 million people have diabetes, and depression affects 20% to 40% of these individuals. Diabetic foot ulcers are a common and serious complication of diabetes and one of the most costly. It is estimated that 2% to 3% of persons with diabetes will develop diabetic foot ulcers each year. There is an association between depression and the development of diabetic foot ulcers. The estimated costs associated with managing diabetes, depression, and diabetic foot ulcers place a substantial burden on the U.S. healthcare system and society. Patients should be screened and evaluated by professionals qualified in the diagnosis and management of depression and diabetic foot ulcers. To be effective, an interprofessional approach that includes the patient and significant others should be used. PMID:26835804

  5. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  6. Diabetic nephropathy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Blicklé, J F; Doucet, J; Krummel, T; Hannedouche, T

    2007-04-01

    Renal impairment is frequent in aged diabetic patients, notably with type 2 diabetes. It results from a multifactorial pathogeny, particularly the combined actions of hyperglycaemia, arterial hypertension and ageing. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is associated with an increased cardiovascular mortality. DN often leads to end stage renal failure (ESRF) which causes specific problems of decision and practical organization of extra-renal epuration in diabetic and aged patients. In the absence of renal biopsy, clinical signs are often insufficient to assess the diabetic origin of a nephropathy in an elderly diabetic patient. Prevention of DN is principally based on tight glycaemic and blood pressure control. The progression of renal lesions can be retarded by strict blood pressure control, notably by blocking of the renin-angiotensin system, if well tolerated in aged patients. It is absolutely necessary to avoid the worsening of renal lesions by potentially nephrotoxic products, notably non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and iodinated contrast media. At the stage of renal failure, it is important to adapt the antidiabetic treatment, and in the majority of the cases, to switch to insulin when glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is below 30 ml/mn/1.73 m2. PMID:17702098

  7. Diabetes: Models, Signals and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobelli, C.

    2010-07-01

    Diabetes and its complications impose significant economic consequences on individuals, families, health systems, and countries. The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes significant components of modeling, signal processing and control. Models: first, I will discuss the minimal (coarse) models which describe the key components of the system functionality and are capable of measuring crucial processes of glucose metabolism and insulin control in health and diabetes; then, the maximal (fine-grain) models which include comprehensively all available knowledge about system functionality and are capable to simulate the glucose-insulin system in diabetes, thus making it possible to create simulation scenarios whereby cost effective experiments can be conducted in silico to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies - in particular I will focus on the first in silico simulation model accepted by FDA as a substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. Signals: I will review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the crucial role of models to enhance the interpretation of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Control: I will review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, I will discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers.

  8. Pathologic classification of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Thijs W Cohen; Mooyaart, Antien L; Amann, Kerstin; Cohen, Arthur H; Cook, H Terence; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; de Heer, Emile; Joh, Kensuke; Nol, Laure H; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Seshan, Surya V; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bruijn, Jan A

    2010-04-01

    Although pathologic classifications exist for several renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and lupus nephritis, a uniform classification for diabetic nephropathy is lacking. Our aim, commissioned by the Research Committee of the Renal Pathology Society, was to develop a consensus classification combining type1 and type 2 diabetic nephropathies. Such a classification should discriminate lesions by various degrees of severity that would be easy to use internationally in clinical practice. We divide diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with a separate evaluation for degrees of interstitial and vascular involvement. Biopsies diagnosed as diabetic nephropathy are classified as follows: Class I, glomerular basement membrane thickening: isolated glomerular basement membrane thickening and only mild, nonspecific changes by light microscopy that do not meet the criteria of classes II through IV. Class II, mesangial expansion, mild (IIa) or severe (IIb): glomeruli classified as mild or severe mesangial expansion but without nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions) or global glomerulosclerosis in more than 50% of glomeruli. Class III, nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions): at least one glomerulus with nodular increase in mesangial matrix (Kimmelstiel-Wilson) without changes described in class IV. Class IV, advanced diabetic glomerulosclerosis: more than 50% global glomerulosclerosis with other clinical or pathologic evidence that sclerosis is attributable to diabetic nephropathy. A good interobserver reproducibility for the four classes of DN was shown (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84) in a test of this classification. PMID:20167701

  9. Oxidative stress and diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Ferdinando; Brownlee, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of diabetes complications, both microvascular and cardiovascular. The metabolic abnormalities of diabetes cause mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in endothelial cells of both large and small vessels, and also in the myocardium. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of five major pathways involved in the pathogenesis of complications: polyol pathway flux, increased formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), increased expression of the receptor for AGEs and its activating ligands, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, and overactivity of the hexosamine pathway. It also directly inactivates two critical antiatherosclerotic enzymes, eNOS and prostacyclin synthase. Through these pathways, increased intracellular ROS cause defective angiogenesis in response to ischemia, activate a number of pro-inflammatory pathways, and cause long-lasting epigenetic changes which drive persistent expression of proinflammatory genes after glycemia is normalized (hyperglycemic memory). Atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy in type 2 diabetes are caused in part by pathway-selective insulin resistance, which increases mitochondrial ROS production from free fatty acids and by inactivation of anti-atherosclerosis enzymes by ROS. Overexpression of superoxide dismutase in transgenic diabetic mice prevents diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy. The aim of this review is to highlight advances in understanding the role of metabolite-generated ROS in the development of diabetic complications. PMID:21030723

  10. Astragalus prevents diabetic rats from developing cardiomyopathy by downregulating angiotensin II type2 receptors' expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyun; Cao, Linsheng; Zeng, Qiutang

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the potential roles of astragalus and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy. Of 52 female 4-week-old Wistar rats treated with high glucose and lipid diet to induce insulin resistance, 7 treated with sodium citrate buffer (pH=4.5) served as controls (con1) and the other 45 were treated by intraperitoneal injection (ip) of STZ to induce type 2 diabetes. After 20 weeks, the maximal velocity decrease of pressure per second in left ventricle within the period of isovolumic relaxation (-dp/dtmax) was detected by inserting cannula through right carotid artery. Of the 45 rats, 24 with -dp/dtmax < or = 700 mmHg/s (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) developing diabetic cardiomyopathy were grouped as follows: 7 treated with double distilled H2O (ip) were included in control group 2 (con2); other 8 treated with AT2 agonist (CGP42112A, ip) were included in experimental group1 (exp); 9 treated with astragalus (po) constituted experimental group 2 (exp2). All injections lasted 4 weeks (qd) and the heart weight (HW) was recorded. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis index (CAI), mRNA of AT2 and Bcl-2 as well as AT2 and Bcl-2 protein values in cardiomyocytes were also measured. Our results showed that -dp/dtmax in exp1, exp2 and con2 were much lower than those in con1 (P<0.01). CAI and AT2 in both mRNA and protein in con1 were lower than those in the other three groups (P<0.01). The three parameters above were higher in exp1 but less in exp2 than those in con2, respectively (P<0.01). The three parameters and HW in exp1 were much higher than those in exp2 (P<0.01). Changes of Bcl-2 were opposite to those of AT2. Our results suggested that high expression of AT2 might accelerate the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in diabetic rats and play an important role in precipitating diabetic cardiomyopathy and astragalus protects diabetic rats from developing cardiomyopathy by downregulating AT2. PMID:15587404

  11. Can Eye Screening for Diabetic Kids Be Delayed a Bit?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... younger, and had type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Children with type 2 diabetes and those at high ... Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes in Children and Teens Diabetes Type 1 Eye Diseases About ...

  12. Diabetes in Older People - A Disease You Can Manage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Aging Diabetes In Older People—A Disease You Can Manage What Is Diabetes? Types Of Diabetes Pre- ... your diabetes in case of an emergency. Medicare Can Help Medicare will pay to help you learn ...

  13. What I Need to Know about Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... URL Español What I need to know about Diabetes Medicines Page Content On this page: What do ...

  14. Four Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Language URL Español 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life Page Content Contents Step 1: Learn ... diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types ...

  15. Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association JDRF Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... KB). Alternate Language URL Español Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Page Content Learn ...

  16. Staying Healthy On-the-Go with Diabetes Video

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... than 200 public and private organizations. Home Publications Resources Diabetes Facts Press I Have Diabetes Am I ... diabetes Corro riesgo? You are here: NDEP Home > Resources > Staying Healthy On-the-Go with Diabetes Video ...

  17. Diabetic cardiomyopathy: is resistin a culprit?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, including heart failure (HF), is the major cause of death in patients with diabetes. A contributing factor to the occurrence of HF in such patients is the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Recent evidence demonstrates that perturbations associated with adipokines secretion and signaling result in lusitropic and inotropic defects in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This perspective editorial will discuss the central role of resistin, a recently discovered adipokine, in the maladaptive cardiac phenotype seen in diabetic hearts. Given the pleiotropic effects of resistin, strategies targeting the control of resistin levels may constitute a potentially viable therapeutic utility in patients with diabetes and diabetes-induced cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26543825

  18. Electrochemistry in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Heller, Adam; Feldman, Ben

    2010-07-20

    Diabetes devastates lives and burdens society. Hypoglycemic (low glucose) episodes cause blackouts, and severe ones are life-threatening. Periods of hyperglycemia (high glucose) cause circulatory disease, stroke, amputations, blindness, kidney failure and nerve degeneration. In this Account, we describe the founding of TheraSense, now a major part of Abbott Diabetes Care, and the development of two products that have improved the lives of people with diabetes. The first, a virtually painless microcoulometer (300 nL volume), the FreeStyle blood glucose monitoring system, was approved by the FDA and became available in 2000. In 2009, this system was used in more than one billion blood assays. The second, the enzyme-wiring based, subcutaneously-implanted FreeStyle Navigator continuous glucose monitoring system, was approved by the FDA and became available in the United States in 2008. The strips of the FreeStyle blood glucose monitoring system comprise a printed parallel plate coulometer, with a 50 microm gap between two facing printed electrodes, a carbon electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The volume of blood between the facing plates is accurately controlled. The glucose is electrooxidized through catalysis by a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and an Os(2+/3+) redox mediator, which is reduced by the glucose-reduced enzyme and is electrooxidized on the carbon electrode. Initially the system used pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent GDH but now uses flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent GDH. Because the facing electrodes are separated by such a small distance, shuttling of electrons by the redox couple could interfere with the coulometric assay. However, the Os(2+/3+) redox mediator is selected to have a substantially negative formal potential, between 0.0 and -0.2 V, versus that of the facing Ag/AgCl electrode. This makes the flow of a shuttling current between the two electrodes virtually impossible because the oxidized Os(3+) complex cannot be appreciably reduced at the more positively poised Ag/AgCl electrode. The FreeStyle Navigator continuous glucose monitoring system uses a subcutaneously implanted miniature plastic sensor connected to a transmitter to measure glycemia amperometrically and sends the information to a PDA-like device every minute. The sensor consists of a narrow (0.6 mm wide) plastic substrate on which carbon-working, Ag/AgCl reference, and carbon counter electrodes are printed in a stacked geometry. The active wired enzyme sensing layer covers only about 0.1 mm(2) of the working electrode and is overlaid by a flux-limiting membrane. It resides at about 5 mm depth in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and monitors glucose concentrations over the range 20-500 mg/dL. Its core component, a miniature, disposable, amperometric glucose sensor, has an electrooxidation catalyst made from a crosslinked adduct of glucose oxidase (GOx) and a GOx wiring redox hydrogel containing a polymer-bound Os(2+/3+) complex. Because of the selectivity of the catalyst for glucose, very little current flows in the absence of glucose. That feature, either alone or in combination with other features of the sensor, facilitates the one-point calibration of the system. The sensor is implanted subcutaneously and replaced by the patient after 5 days use with minimal pain. The wearer does not feel its presence under the skin. PMID:20384299

  19. Advances in Diabetes for the Millennium: Diabetes in Women

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Lois

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus may afflict men and women equally, but the suffering associated with diabetes when it appears in a woman affects every aspect of her life. As a young child, her growth and development as well as her emotional and intellectual functioning may be impaired. In addition, her puberty may be delayed or premature, and when she is ready for childbearing, her health may preclude a successful pregnancy and/or her chances of bearing a healthy child may be poor to impossible. With the advent of insulin and treatment programs to improve glucose control, the diabetic woman now has an opportunity to lead a near-normal life. As devices have automated insulin delivery and as the use of self-blood glucose monitoring has assisted in deriving a protocol of safely normalizing blood glucose, the health of a diabetic woman now is equal to her nondiabetic sister. This review outlines the rationale of programs of normalized glycemia for diabetic women and suggests strategies to achieve success. PMID:15647708

  20. Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Regulates Leukocyte Transmigration Rate in the Retina During Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Kousuke; Nakao, Shintaro; Zandi, Souska; Engelstdter, Verena; Mashima, Yukihiko; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial adhesion molecule that possesses semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) activity and is involved in leukocyte recruitment. Leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels is a predominant feature of experimentally induced diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, the role of VAP-1 in this process is unknown. Diabetes was induced by i.p. injection of Streptozotocin in LongEvans rats. The specific inhibitor of VAP-1, UV-002, was administered by daily i.p. injections. The expression of VAP-1 mRNA in the retinal extracts of normal and diabetic animals was measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Firm leukocyte adhesion was quantified in retinal flatmounts after intravascular staining with concanavalin A (ConA). Leukocyte transmigration rate was quantified by in vivo acridine orange leukocyte staining (AOLS). In diabetic rats, the rate of leukocyte transmigration into the retinal tissues of live animals was significantly increased, as determined by AOLS. When diabetic animals were treated with daily injections of the VAP-1 inhibitor (0.3mg/kg), leukocyte transmigration rate was significantly reduced (P<0.05). However, firm adhesion of leukocytes in diabetic animals treated with the inhibitor did not differ significantly from vehicle-treated diabetic controls. This work provides evidence for an important role of VAP-1 in the recruitment of leukocyte to the retina in experimental DR. Our results reveal the critical contribution of VAP-1 to leukocyte transmigration, with little impact on firm leukocyte adhesion in the retinas of diabetic animals. VAP-1 inhibition might be beneficial in the treatment of DR. PMID:19635478

  1. Vascular adhesion protein-1 regulates leukocyte transmigration rate in the retina during diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kousuke; Nakao, Shintaro; Zandi, Souska; Engelstdter, Verena; Mashima, Yukihiko; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2009-11-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial adhesion molecule that possesses semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) activity and is involved in leukocyte recruitment. Leukocyte adhesion to retinal vessels is a predominant feature of experimentally induced diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, the role of VAP-1 in this process is unknown. Diabetes was induced by i.p. injection of Streptozotocin in Long-Evans rats. The specific inhibitor of VAP-1, UV-002, was administered by daily i.p. injections. The expression of VAP-1 mRNA in the retinal extracts of normal and diabetic animals was measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Firm leukocyte adhesion was quantified in retinal flatmounts after intravascular staining with concanavalin A (ConA). Leukocyte transmigration rate was quantified by in vivo acridine orange leukocyte staining (AOLS). In diabetic rats, the rate of leukocyte transmigration into the retinal tissues of live animals was significantly increased, as determined by AOLS. When diabetic animals were treated with daily injections of the VAP-1 inhibitor (0.3 mg/kg), leukocyte transmigration rate was significantly reduced (P < 0.05). However, firm adhesion of leukocytes in diabetic animals treated with the inhibitor did not differ significantly from vehicle-treated diabetic controls. This work provides evidence for an important role of VAP-1 in the recruitment of leukocyte to the retina in experimental DR. Our results reveal the critical contribution of VAP-1 to leukocyte transmigration, with little impact on firm leukocyte adhesion in the retinas of diabetic animals. VAP-1 inhibition might be beneficial in the treatment of DR. PMID:19635478

  2. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NEGRATO, Carlos Antonio; TARZIA, Olinda; JOVANOVI?, Lois; CHINELLATO, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. Objective: The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the english and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. Methods: This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in english and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. Results: This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Conclusions: The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes-related complications. PMID:23559105

  3. The diabetic foot: a review.

    PubMed

    Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical findings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24126512

  4. Pathology of human diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Alpers, Charles E; Fogo, Agnes B

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) develops in a subset of diabetic patients, on average about 15 years after onset of metabolic abnormalities. The earliest lesions consist of thickened glomerular basement membranes (GBM), mild mesangial expansion, and arteriolar accumulation of hyaline. Mesangiolysis and exuberant mesangial repair then develop, ultimately resulting in marked increase in mesangial matrix. Established nephropathy is characterized by mesangial expansion which may be nodular, so-called Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, hyaline in both afferent and efferent arterioles, and markedly thickened GBM by electron microscopy. Podocyte loss may be a crucial contributor to this progressive sclerosis. There is a distinct predilection of segmental sclerosis to occur at the glomerulotubular junction in type 1 diabetic patients, which can lead to disruption of outflow from the glomerulus, resulting in so-called a tubular glomeruli. A recent classification of DN may be useful for categorizing stages of development of the diabetic lesions. Diabetic injury also affects the tubulointerstitium. Tubular basement membranes thicken in parallel to GBM. Early interstitial inflammation with predominantly mononuclear cells is followed by later increased interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Lesions in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients share many similarities, with more severe vascular disease and heterogeneous lesions, perhaps reflecting older age and comorbid conditions such as hypertension, in the latter. Diabetic patients typically undergo diagnostic renal biopsies only when the clinical course is not typical for DN, and not surprisingly, a range of other lesions may then be present in addition to DN. DN also recurs or occurs de novo in the transplant, developing more quickly than in the native kidney. Efforts to develop rodent animal models that more completely capture these key features of human DN will allow advances to be made in understanding pathogenesis and targeting novel treatment. PMID:21659756

  5. Animal Models of Diabetic Uropathy

    PubMed Central

    Daneshgari, Firouz; Leiter, Edward H.; Liu, Guiming; Reeder, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of debilitating and costly diseases with multiple serious complications. Lower urinary tract complications or Diabetic Uropathy (DU) are among the most common complications of DM, surpassing the widely recognized complications such as neuropathy and nephropathy1. DU develops in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic humans and very little is known about the natural history of these common and troublesome complications. Animal models have the potential to reveal mechanisms and aid in the development of treatment strategies. Methods We present a review of available animal models of DM relative to their use in the study of DU. Results Both large animal and small animal models of DM are available. While large animals such as dogs and swine may closely mirror the human disease in size and phenotype, the length of time between onset and development of diabetic complications and associated husbandry expenditures can make the acquisition of data from statistically valid sample sizes prohibitively expensive. In contrast small animal models (rats and mice) have much lower expenditures for larger numbers of animals, compressed observation time due to shorter lifespan and mice are readily manipulated genetically to facilitate the isolation of the effect of single genes (transgenic and knockout mice). Type 1 DM can be induced chemically using streptozotocin which is selectively toxic to pancreatic beta cells. Type 2 DM models have been developed by selective breeding for hyperglycemia with or without associated obesity. There are several well characterized and predictable animal models of DM in which the presence of DU has been demonstrated. Conclusions Diabetic Uropathy, including diabetic bladder dysfunction have been more frequently studied among small animals of type I diabetes. Recent availability of transgenic models provides a new opportunity for further studies of DU among mice models of both types I and II DM. PMID:19846143

  6. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  7. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder. PMID:26516410

  8. Diabetes and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Whitmer, Rachel A.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Dementia is a major cause of disability among older adults and is the fifth leading cause of death among older adults in the U.S. Evidence from epidemiologic studies suggest older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are 50-100% more likely to develop dementia than those without T2D. However, studies examining the effect of T2D on cognitive decline have been less definitive, and it remains to be determined whether this association reflects a causal relationship between T2D and dementia pathogenesis. There are multiple proposed mechanisms through which T2D could cause cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of insulin dysregulation and chronic hyperglycemia on both Alzheimer's disease and vascular pathology in the brain. Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies suggest that cerebral infarcts and brain atrophy are more common in older adults with T2D. Health care providers should be aware that older adults with T2D have an increased risk for development of dementia and should be attentive in looking for cognitive problems in older patients with T2D. More research is needed to elucidate the link between T2D and dementia and to identify strategies to maintain cognitive function among people with T2D. PMID:25453304

  9. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-10-25

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder. PMID:26516410

  10. Diabetes mellitus and obesity.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alan

    2002-06-01

    Numerous vitamins, herbs, supplements, and other agents are readily available for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Many of these products have little evidence-based medical support to prove the efficacy of these supplements. The physician must be aware that their patients are using these products and must be knowledgeable about their side effects and drug-herb interactions. Our patients have tremendous access to medical information in the lay literature and on the internet. They are using this information to gain access to various diet therapies. Numerous fad diets consisting of various combinations of protein, carbohydrate, and fat are widely publicized but not grounded in evidence. Liquid diets and supplements are readily available and widely used by the public with little long-term beneficial effects on obese patients. Other alternative methods, such as hypnotherapy, acupuncture, biofeedback, and electrogalvanic therapy, have become widely available and seem to have little adverse reaction, but whose benefits remain to be proved. The physician must recognize the widespread use of these products and work with patients and alternative practitioners to deliver comprehensive quality care. Physicians who become comfortable with these products should consider their judicious use while monitoring for side effects and drug interaction. It is hoped that with further evidence-based study many of these products and techniques will enter mainstream medicine. PMID:12391712

  11. Materials for Diabetes Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; York, Roger L.; Invernale, Michael A.; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the materials and methods used to fabricate closed-loop systems for type 1 diabetes therapy. Herein, we give a brief overview of current methods used for patient care and discuss two types of possible treatments and the materials used for these therapies–(i) artificial pancreases, comprised of insulin producing cells embedded in a polymeric biomaterial, and (ii) totally synthetic pancreases formulated by integrating continuous glucose monitors with controlled insulin release through degradable polymers and glucose-responsive polymer systems. Both the artificial and the completely synthetic pancreas have two major design requirements: the device must be both biocompatible and be permeable to small molecules and proteins, such as insulin. Several polymers and fabrication methods of artificial pancreases are discussed: microencapsulation, conformal coatings, and planar sheets. We also review the two components of a completely synthetic pancreas. Several types of glucose sensing systems (including materials used for electrochemical, optical, and chemical sensing platforms) are discussed, in addition to various polymer-based release systems (including ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyanhydrides, and phenylboronic acid containing hydrogels). PMID:23184741

  12. Vascular imaging in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levitt, K; Vivas, L; Courtney, B; Connelly, K A

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes is a global epidemic affecting individuals of all socioeconomic backgrounds. Despite intensive efforts, morbidity and mortality secondary to the micro- and macrovascular complications remain unacceptably high. As a result, the use of imaging modalities to determine the underlying pathophysiology, early onset of complications, and disease progression has become an integral component of the management of such individuals. Echocardiography, stress echocardiography, and nuclear imaging have been the mainstay of noninvasive cardiovascular imaging tools to detect myocardial ischemia, but newer modalities such as cardiac MRI, cardiac CT, and PET imaging provide incremental information not available with standard imaging. While vascular imaging to detect cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial disease non-invasively has traditionally used ultrasound, CT- and MRI-based techniques are increasingly being employed. In this review, we will provide an outline of recent studies utilizing non-invasive imaging techniques to assist in disease diagnosis as well as monitoring disease progression. In addition, we will review the evidence for newer modalities such as MR spectroscopy, 3D intravascular ultrasound, and optical coherence tomography that provide exquisite detail of metabolic function and coronary anatomy not available with standard imaging, but that have not yet become mainstream. PMID:24493479

  13. 76 FR 20358 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... opportunities for type 1 diabetes research supported by the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee; Notice of Workshop The Diabetes...

  14. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National

  15. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National…

  16. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. A Fact Sheet from the National Diabetes Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes in U.S. children and adolescents may be increasing and many more new cases of type 2 diabetes are being reported in young people. Standards of care for managing children with diabetes issued by the American Diabetes Association in January 2005 provide more guidance than previously given. To update primary care providers and their…

  17. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against diabetes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Anti-diabetic effects of RHSE were evaluated in both the rat insulinoma-1 cell line (INS-1) and diabetic ICR mice induced by inraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. ...

  18. Functional food and diabetes: a natural way in diabetes prevention?

    PubMed

    Ballali, Simonetta; Lanciai, Federico

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes shows a wide range of variation in prevalence around the world and it is expected to affect 300 million by the year 2025. In a prevention framework where banning policies and educational strategies lead the interventions, functional foods (FFs) with their specific health effects could, in the future, indicate a new mode of thinking about the relationships between food and health in everyday life. Functional ingredients, such as stevioside, cinnamon, bitter melon, garlic and onion, ginseng, Gymnema sylvestre and fenugreek, have been addressed for their specific actions towards different reactions involved in diabetes development. New strategies involving the use of FF should be validated through large-scale population trials, considering validated surrogate end points to evaluate the effect of FF in prevention of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:22107597

  19. Mayombian ethnic, vegetables low intake, insulin treatment, diabetic nephropathy and severe diabetic retinopathy are determinants of blindness in diabetic Africans

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Mvitu Muaka; Benjamin, Longo-Mbenza; Enoch, Cibanda Yokobo; Igor, Longo Phemba

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency and causes of blindness in diabetic Africans. METHODS The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out among known black diabetics consecutively admitted at the Teaching Hospital, University of Kinshasa, between 2005 and 2007. Examination methods included interviewer-administered structured questionnaire, eye examinations (visual acuity, tonometry, funduscopy), and fasting plasma glycaemia test. RESULTS Of the 227 patients examined, 15.9% had blindness. Univariate analyses showed significant association between female, severity of diabetic retinopathy, Mayombian ethnic group, use of insulin treatment, low intake of vegetables, diabetic nephropathy, open angle glaucoma and blindness in all diabetics. After logistic regression, only diabetic nephropathy, use of insulin treatment, macular oedema, Mayombian ethnic group and vegetables low intake were the independent risk factors of blindness in all diabetics. However, after logistic regression in the sub-group with diabetic retinopathy, only open angle glaucoma and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were the independent determinants of blindness. CONCLUSION The majority of the causes of blindness in these diabetic Africans are avoidable. It is recommended that appropriate diabetes care, nutrition education, periodic eye examination and laser photocoagulation facilities should be provided for treating diabetics in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24195057

  20. Diabetes Facts and Myths (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with the diabetes health care team. Myth: Low-carbohydrate diets are good for kids with diabetes because they should avoid carbs. Fact: Carbohydrates (carbs) are the body's preferred source of energy, ...

  1. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... well as consideration of teens emerging autonomy and independence. Diabetes presents unique issues for young people with ... of hypoglycemia with potentially disastrous consequences. Transition to Independence: Children with diabetesdepending on their age and ...

  2. Diabetes Takes a Toll on Women's Hearts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154609.html Diabetes Takes a Toll on Women's Hearts Studies find ... 15, 2015 MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes may be harder on women's hearts than it ...

  3. Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments

    MedlinePLUS

    ... products," said Gary Coody, R.Ph., national health fraud coordinator for FDA. "Failure to follow well-established ... venden ilegalmente BeSafeRx: Know Your Online Pharmacy Health Fraud Scams CDC Diabetes Public Health Resource NIH Diabetes ...

  4. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vessel problems, as well as other diabetes complications. Gum Disease People with diabetes are more likely than others to develop gum disease (also called periodontal disease) because they may ...

  5. Therapies for Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    AAN Summary of Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and THEIR FAMILIES THERAPIES FOR TREATING DIABETIC NERVE PAIN This fact sheet is provided to help you understand which therapies help diabetic nerve pain. This condition is also known as ...

  6. Researchers Dig for Cause of Dog Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_154657.html Researchers Dig for Cause of Dog Diabetes Disease looks similar to type 1 in ... new research suggests that while the disease in dogs looks similar to type 1 diabetes in people, ...

  7. Gestational Diabetes: A Guide for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sumaria de los Consumidores Aug. 25, 2010 Gestational Diabetes Related Products Future Research Needs: Prioritizing Research Needs ... Women" /> Consumer Summary Aug. 5, 2009 Gestational Diabetes: A Guide for Pregnant Women Formats Consumer Guide ( ...

  8. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tigrinya (tigrinya) Amharic (amarunya) Diabetes: Foot Care amarunya (Amharic) Bilingual PDF Harborview Medical Center Diabetes: Foot Care - Daily Foot Check amarunya (Amharic) Bilingual PDF ...

  9. At-Risk Drinking Among Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Susan E.; Engler, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a serious chronic disease, affecting an increasing number of individuals worldwide. Adherence to diabetes self-care behaviors is key to the successful management of the disease. At-risk drinking is common among diabetic patients and is associated with inferior diabetes treatment adherence and outcomes, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, individuals with diabetes who engage in at-risk drinking are also in danger of incurring the negative consequences of at-risk drinking found in the general population. Research suggests that alcohol use screening and intervention do not commonly occur during the course of primary care treatment for diabetes. While methods for reducing alcohol use in this population have been largely unexplored to date, brief interventions to reduce at-risk drinking have been well-validated in other patient populations and offer the promise to reduce at-risk drinking among diabetic patients, resulting in improved diabetes treatment adherence and outcomes. PMID:24357927

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus may be caused by mutations in several genes. About 30 percent of individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus have mutations in the KCNJ11 gene. An additional 20 percent ...

  11. Biometry of eyes in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, X.; Suheimat, Marwan; Efron, Nathan; Edwards, Katie; Pritchard, Nicola; Mathur, Ankit; Mallen, Edward A. H.; Atchison, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of a large range of biometric and optical parameters in people with type 1 diabetes. The parameters of 74 people with type 1 diabetes and an age matched control group were assessed. Most of the people with diabetes had low levels of neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy. Marginal or no significant differences were found between groups for corneal shape, corneal thickness, pupil size, and pupil decentrations. Relative to the control group, the diabetes group demonstrated smaller anterior chamber depths, more curved lenses, greater lens thickness and lower lens equivalent refractive index. While the optics of diabetic eyes make them appear as older eyes than those of people of the same age without diabetes, the differences did not increase significantly with age. Age-related changes in the optics of the eyes of people with diabetes need not be accelerated if the diabetes is well controlled. PMID:25798297

  12. Too Few Psychiatric Patients Screened for Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 155667.html Too Few Psychiatric Patients Screened for Diabetes: Study Commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications tied to greater ... WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite guidelines, diabetes screening rates are low among adults with severe ...

  13. Another Downside to Diabetes: Tooth Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_156032.html Another Downside to Diabetes: Tooth Loss Dental care often overlooked, leading to worse ... physical toll associated with type 2 diabetes includes tooth loss, a new study finds. The risk of ...

  14. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Women at high risk for diabetes with a high school education (57%) or less (47%) were less likely than ... high risk for diabetes with more than a high school education (63%) to report that they tried to lose ...

  15. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits. PMID:25825086

  16. Gut microbiota, probiotics and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a condition of multifactorial origin, involving several molecular mechanisms related to the intestinal microbiota for its development. In type 2 diabetes, receptor activation and recognition by microorganisms from the intestinal lumen may trigger inflammatory responses, inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in insulin receptor substrate-1, reducing insulin sensitivity. In type 1 diabetes, the lowered expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium favours a greater immune response that may result in destruction of pancreatic β cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and increased expression of interleukin-17, related to autoimmunity. Research in animal models and humans has hypothesized whether the administration of probiotics may improve the prognosis of diabetes through modulation of gut microbiota. We have shown in this review that a large body of evidence suggests probiotics reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins within the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability. Such effects increase insulin sensitivity and reduce autoimmune response. However, further investigations are required to clarify whether the administration of probiotics can be efficiently used for the prevention and management of diabetes. PMID:24939063

  17. Oxidative Stress and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, Renu A.; Chan, Pooi-See

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism is essential for sustaining aerobic life, and normal cellular homeostasis works on a fine balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, a cytopathic consequence of excessive production of ROS and the suppression of ROS removal by antioxidant defense system, is implicated in the development of many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes and its complications. Retinopathy, a debilitating microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of acquired blindness in developed countries. Many diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities are implicated in its development, and appear to be influenced by elevated oxidative stress; however the exact mechanism of its development remains elusive. Increased superoxide concentration is considered as a causal link between elevated glucose and the other metabolic abnormalities important in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Animal studies have shown that antioxidants have beneficial effects on the development of retinopathy, but the results from very limited clinical trials are somewhat ambiguous. Although antioxidants are being used for other chronic diseases, controlled clinical trials are warranted to investigate potential beneficial effects of antioxidants in the development of retinopathy in diabetic patients. PMID:17641741

  18. Animal models of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rees, D A; Alcolado, J C

    2005-04-01

    Animal models have been used extensively in diabetes research. Early studies used pancreatectomised dogs to confirm the central role of the pancreas in glucose homeostasis, culminating in the discovery and purification of insulin. Today, animal experimentation is contentious and subject to legal and ethical restrictions that vary throughout the world. Most experiments are carried out on rodents, although some studies are still performed on larger animals. Several toxins, including streptozotocin and alloxan, induce hyperglycaemia in rats and mice. Selective inbreeding has produced several strains of animal that are considered reasonable models of Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes and related phenotypes such as obesity and insulin resistance. Apart from their use in studying the pathogenesis of the disease and its complications, all new treatments for diabetes, including islet cell transplantation and preventative strategies, are initially investigated in animals. In recent years, molecular biological techniques have produced a large number of new animal models for the study of diabetes, including knock-in, generalized knock-out and tissue-specific knockout mice. PMID:15787657

  19. Atypical Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hüseyin; Coşar, Ramazan; Çiftçi, Özcan; Sarı, Işılay Kalan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus and can lead to death if untreated. It is a complex metabolic state characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonuria. Bonsai is one of the herbal incense products that contains synthetic cannabinoid and can be easily accessible via the internet in many countries. It cannot be detected in blood and urine studies using conventional methods. Synthetic cannabinoid abuse is associated with severe side effects, including tachycardia, high blood pressure, acidosis, excess sedation and coma. Case Report: A 17-year-old male patient was brought to the emergency department with sudden onset of dyspnoea. Laboratory investigations revealed hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonuria. He was admitted to the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. He was not considered a typical case of diabetic ketoacidosis because of the tendency to hypokalaemia, persistent tachycardia and bronchoscopic findings. We learned from his friends that he had used cannabis for a week and used bonzai on the day that he was brought to the emergency service. Conclusion: Diabetic ketoacidosis with prolonged acidosis and tendency to hypokalaemia are investigated for the consumption of synthetic cannabinoids. PMID:25759786

  20. Targeting SGK1 in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Grlach, Agnes; Vallon, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Compelling evidence is accumulating pointing to a pathophysiological role of the serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in the development and complications of diabetes. SGK1 is ubiquitously expressed with exquisitely high transcriptional volatility. Stimulators of SGK1 expression include hyperglycemia, cell shrinkage, ischemia, glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by insulin and growth factors via phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 activates ion channels (including ENaC, TRPV5, ROMK, KCNE1/KCNQ1 and CLCKa/Barttin), carriers (including NCC, NKCC, NHE3, SGLT1 and EAAT3), and the Na+/K+-ATPase. It regulates the activity of several enzymes (e.g. glycogen-synthase-kinase-3, ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, phosphomannose-mutase-2), and transcription factors (e.g. forkhead-transcription-factor FOXO3a, ?-catenin, nuclear-factor-kappa-B NF?B). A common SGK1 gene variant (~35% prevalence in Caucasians, ~10% in Africans) is associated with increased blood pressure, obesity and type 2 diabetes. In patients suffering from type 2 diabetes, SGK1 presumably contributes to fluid retention and hypertension, enhanced coagulation, and increased deposition of matrix proteins leading to tissue fibrosis such as diabetic nephropathy. Accordingly, targeting SGK1 may favourably influence occurrence and course of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19764891

  1. Mitochondrial Hormesis and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The concept that excess superoxide production from mitochondria is the driving, initial cellular response underlying diabetes complications has been held for the past decade. However, results of antioxidant-based trials have been largely negative. In the present review, the data supporting mitochondrial superoxide as a driving force for diabetic kidney, nerve, heart, and retinal complications are reexamined, and a new concept for diabetes complications—mitochondrial hormesis—is presented. In this view, production of mitochondrial superoxide can be an indicator of healthy mitochondria and physiologic oxidative phosphorylation. Recent data suggest that in response to excess glucose exposure or nutrient stress, there is a reduction of mitochondrial superoxide, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial ATP generation in several target tissues of diabetes complications. Persistent reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex activity is associated with the release of oxidants from nonmitochondrial sources and release of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines, and a manifestation of organ dysfunction. Restoration of mitochondrial function and superoxide production via activation of AMPK has now been associated with improvement in markers of renal, cardiovascular, and neuronal dysfunction with diabetes. With this Perspective, approaches that stimulate AMPK and PGC1α via exercise, caloric restriction, and medications result in stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity, restore physiologic mitochondrial superoxide production, and promote organ healing. PMID:25713188

  2. Diabetic Retinopathy and Systemic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, an oculardisease, is governed by systemic as well as local ocular factors. These include primarily chronic levels of blood glucose. Individuals with chronically elevated blood glucose levels have substantially more, and more severe, retinopathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The relationship of blood glucose to retinopathy is continuous, with no threshold although individuals with hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of chronic glycemia) <6.5%, generally develop little or no retinopathy. Blood pressure levels have been claimed to influence retinopathy development and progression, but multiple controlled clinical trials of antihypertensive agents in diabetic subjects have produced only weak evidence of benefit from blood pressure lowering on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Elevated blood lipids seem to play a role in the progression of retinopathy, and two trials of fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent that has not proved effective in preventing cardiovascular disease, have shown benefit in preventing retinopathy progression. The mechanism of this effect may not, however, be directly related to the reduction in blood lipids. Finally, there is strong, but only circumstantial, evidence for a genetic or epigenetic influence on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Despite the power of large-scale epidemiologic studies and modern molecular biological and computational techniques, the gene or genes, which predispose or protect against the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive. PMID:25949071

  3. Diabetes and Alpha Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complications. Lipoic acid quenches reactive oxygen species, chelates metal ions, and reduces the oxidized forms of other antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione. It also boosts antioxidant defense system through Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant gene expression and by modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors-regulated genes. ALA inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates AMPK in skeletal muscles, which in turn have a plethora of metabolic consequences. These diverse actions suggest that lipoic acid acts by multiple mechanisms, many of which have only been uncovered recently. In this review we briefly summarize the known biochemical properties of lipoic acid and then discussed the oxidative mechanisms implicated in diabetic complications and the mechanisms by which lipoic acid may ameliorate these reactions. The findings of some of the clinical trials in which lipoic acid administration has been tested in diabetic patients during the last 10 years are summarized. It appears that the clearest benefit of lipoic acid supplementation is in patients with diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22125537

  4. Diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors.

    PubMed

    Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, an oculardisease, is governed by systemic as well as local ocular factors. These include primarily chronic levels of blood glucose. Individuals with chronically elevated blood glucose levels have substantially more, and more severe, retinopathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The relationship of blood glucose to retinopathy is continuous, with no threshold although individuals with hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of chronic glycemia) <6.5%, generally develop little or no retinopathy. Blood pressure levels have been claimed to influence retinopathy development and progression, but multiple controlled clinical trials of antihypertensive agents in diabetic subjects have produced only weak evidence of benefit from blood pressure lowering on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Elevated blood lipids seem to play a role in the progression of retinopathy, and two trials of fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent that has not proved effective in preventing cardiovascular disease, have shown benefit in preventing retinopathy progression. The mechanism of this effect may not, however, be directly related to the reduction in blood lipids. Finally, there is strong, but only circumstantial, evidence for a genetic or epigenetic influence on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Despite the power of large-scale epidemiologic studies and modern molecular biological and computational techniques, the gene or genes, which predispose or protect against the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive. PMID:25949071

  5. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ?6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR). Presenting visual impairment (VI) was defined as LogMAR visual acuity?>?0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1%) English-speaking and 885 (27.9%) Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p?diabetes, higher prevalence of DR (36.0 vs. 30.6%, p?diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations. PMID:22974298

  6. Gastric emptying of solid meals in diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Scarpello, J H; Barber, D C; Hague, R V; Cullen, D R; Sladen, G E

    1976-01-01

    The gastric emptying rate of an isotopically labelled solid meal was compared in 29 insulin-dependent well-controlled diabetics and 18 normal controls. The diabetics were assessed for evidence of autonomic neuropathy. No significant difference in gastric emptying rate was found between controls and diabetics with or without autonomic neuropathy. Only three diabetics had greatly delayed gastric emptying, but in one of these the test had given a normal result on an earlier occasion. PMID:974530

  7. Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM) on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Jin; Choi, Jina; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Paik, Man-Jeong; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae-Ran; Yee, Sung-Tae

    2014-01-01

    HemoHIM (a new herbal preparation of three edible herbs: Angelica gigas Nakai, Cnidium officinale Makino, and Paeonia japonica Miyabe) was developed to protect immune, hematopoietic, and self-renewal tissues against radiation. This study determined whether or not HemoHIM could alter hyperglycemia and the immune response in diabetic mice. Both nondiabetic and diabetic mice were orally administered HemoHIM (100?mg/kg) once a day for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200?mg/kg, i.p.). In diabetic mice, HemoHIM effectively improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the diabetic control group as well as elevated plasma insulin levels with preservation of insulin staining in pancreatic ?-cells. HemoHIM treatment restored thymus weight, white blood cells, lymphocyte numbers, and splenic lymphocyte populations (CD4+ T and CD8+ T), which were reduced in diabetic mice, as well as IFN-? production in response to Con A stimulation. These results indicate that HemoHIM may have potential as a glucose-lowering and immunomodulatory agent by enhancing the immune function of pancreatic ?-cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice. PMID:25045390

  8. Potential impact of sitagliptin on collagen-derived dipeptides in diabetic osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Baerts, L; Glorie, L; Maho, W; Eelen, A; Verhulst, A; D'Haese, P; Covaci, A; De Meester, I

    2015-10-01

    It is known that diabetes coincides with an increased risk of osteoporosis. While a disturbed collagen metabolism is proposed as a possible cause, much remains unknown about the enzymes involved and changes in the collagen-derived dipeptides and amino acids. Therefore, we sought to study this intricate pathway and the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors. Control and streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats were treated for 12 weeks with vehicle or sitagliptin, a DPP4 inhibitor (Con/VH, Con/SG, DM/VH and DM/SG). The activities of four key enzymes involved in collagen breakdown were determined in serum (DPP4, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 and prolidase). Dipeptide (Ala-Pro, Gly-Pro, Pro-Pro and Pro-Hyp) and amino acid (Pro and Hyp) concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. We found three-fold higher MMP9 activities in DM/VH than in controls, while in DM/SG this rise was attenuated. MMP2 and prolidase did not differ in the investigated groups. Furthermore, we are the first to report on two-fold higher Ala-Pro and Pro-Pro levels in diabetes compared to controls. In contrast, Pro-Hyp concentrations were lower in diabetes (DM/VH and DM/SG). DPP4 inhibition does not seem to have a direct influence on the collagen metabolism in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats. Instead, it probably acts through its effect on osteoprotective substrates. In diabetes, increased MMP9 activities seem to favour the production of Ala-Pro and Pro-Pro containing collagen fragments. The high Pro-Hyp levels in untreated controls might have a bone-stimulating effect. Nevertheless, the biological significance of these dipeptides is not yet clear and should be further investigated. PMID:26342756

  9. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples

  10. Snapshot: Diabetes in the United States

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Group. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med 2002;346:393403. As cited in March 22, 2013, MMWR. Tuomilehto J, Lindstom J, Eriksson J, et al; Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study Group. Prevention of type 2 diabetes ...

  11. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Francine R.; Gallivan, Joanne M.; Warren-Boulton, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect about 186,000 youth under age 20. Previously considered an adult disease, type 2 diabetes is becoming increasingly common in overweight minority youth over 10 years of age. Criteria help to identify young people at risk for type 2 diabetes as well as those with the disease. Prevention or delay of type 2 requires…

  12. Diabetes Control: Why It's Important (For Kids)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... regular exercise or not making changes to your diabetes treatment plan when you exercise more or less than ... of Your Blood Sugar Medicines for Diabetes Your Diabetes Health Care Team ... purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  13. Can treating depression improve diabetic management?

    PubMed

    Acee, Anna M; Fahs, Marianne C

    2012-01-19

    Diabetes with comorbid depression increases healthcare use, expenditures, and risk for complications. This study investigated current practice patterns for diabetic management as measured by HbA1C (A1C). Results indicated significant increases in Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 and HbA1C scores among patients with diabetes who take antidepressant drugs. PMID:22217663

  14. Type 2 Diabetes and Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Naim M.

    2008-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased propensity for uric acid nephrolithiasis. In individuals with diabetes, this increased risk is due to a lower urine pH that results from obesity, dietary factors, and impaired renal ammoniagenesis. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of uric acid stone disease in patients with diabetes are hereby reviewed, and potential molecular mechanisms are proposed.

  15. Diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Stefnsson, Einar

    2009-07-01

    A variety of treatment options are available for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. They include laser photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids, and vitrectomy with or without release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of the physiological mechanisms of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and thereby decreases leakage of plasma proteins from capillaries into the tissue. In addition, vitrectomy allows faster clearance of cytokines, such as VEGF, from the retina into the vitreous cavity. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and corticosteroids reduce the effect of VEGF on capillary permeability. Starling's law explains vasogenic edema, which is controlled by osmotic and hydrostatic gradients between vessel and tissue. It explains how VEGF-induced vascular permeability causes plasma protein to leak into the tissue interstitial space, thus decreasing the osmotic pressure gradient between vessel and tissue, resulting in water accumulation, i.e. edema. This is reversed by reducing VEGF production, which is achieved with laser treatment; or by removing VEGF with antibodies or vitrectomy; or by reducing the permeability effect with steroids. At the same time, Starling's law takes into account hemodynamic changes that affect the hydrostatic gradient. High arterial blood pressure and hypoxic vasodilatation increase the hydrostatic pressure in the microcirculation, which increases water flux from vessel to tissue and induce edema. Treatment of arterial hypertension or reversal of retinal hypoxia with laser reverses this pathophysiology and reduces edema. Newton's third law explains, that vitreoretinal traction decreases hydrostatic tissue pressure in the retina, increases the pressure gradient between vessel and tissue, and stimulates water fluxes from vessel into tissue, leading to edema. Release of vitreoretinal traction reverses this mechanism and reduces edema. PMID:23960851

  16. [Management of elderly onset diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Motoshi; Nakano, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    As the percentage of elderly persons in Japan increases, so do the rates of overweight, insulin resistance, and elderly onset diabetes. Elderly onset diabetes is characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, lower HbA1c levels, and less frequent retinopathy. The treatment of elderly onset diabetes involves numerous challenges, such as cognitive impairment, depression, vision/hearing impairment, and difficulty performing activities of daily living. One of the medical treatments, glinides and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, must be taken before every meal. However, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors need to be taken only once or twice daily and are well tolerated by older adults. The target HbA1c should be individualized, and a reasonable goal for HbAlc(NGSP) in healthy adults with good functional status is 7% to 9%. PMID:24397178

  17. Diabetic Nephropathy: A National Dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Matthew D.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Fried, Linda F.; Harris, Raymond C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G.; Sedor, John R.; Susztak, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Summary The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-supported Kidney Research National Dialogue (KRND) asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve our understanding of kidney function and disease. Several high-priority objectives for diabetic nephropathy were identified in data and sample collection, hypothesis generation, hypothesis testing, and translation promotion. The lack of readily available human samples linked to comprehensive phenotypic, clinical, and demographic data remains a significant obstacle. With data and biological samples in place, several possibilities exist for using new technologies to develop hypotheses. Testing novel disease mechanisms with state-of-the-art tools should continue to be the foundation of the investigative community. Research must be translated to improve diagnosis and treatment of people. The objectives identified by the KRND provide the research community with future opportunities for improving the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23788618

  18. Mouse models of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Breyer, Matthew D; Bttinger, Erwin; Brosius, Frank C; Coffman, Thomas M; Harris, Raymond C; Heilig, Charles W; Sharma, Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Mice provide an experimental model of unparalleled flexibility for studying mammalian diseases. Inbred strains of mice exhibit substantial differences in their susceptibility to the renal complications of diabetes. Much remains to be established regarding the course of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in mice as well as defining those strains and/or mutants that are most susceptible to renal injury from diabetes. Through the use of the unique genetic reagents available in mice (including knockouts and transgenics), the validation of a mouse model reproducing human DN should significantly facilitate the understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of DN. Establishment of an authentic mouse model of DN will undoubtedly facilitate testing of translational diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in mice before testing in humans. PMID:15563560

  19. Family Interaction in Pediatric Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to type 1 diabetes is optimized in the presence of ongoing family support and supervision. Therefore, it is particularly important to understand how family interactions influence adaptation to the illness. The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature on family interaction in youth with type 1 diabetes. Recent advancements in the literature include greater specificity of types of parental involvement, attention to the role of fathers, acknowledgment of the impact of parental distress, increased use of observational methods, and awareness of the impact of culture. Continued parental involvement—particularly monitoring—in the management of diabetes care is important as children transition into adolescence, and the best outcomes are evident when this involvement occurs in a warm, collaborative manner. Parents need support in managing their own distress to maintain this type of involvement. PMID:21853415

  20. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739