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Sample records for northwestern venezuelan andes

  1. Evidence from the northwestern Venezuelan Andes for extraterrestrial impact: The black mat enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Kalm, V.; Krinsley, D. H.; Tricart, P.; Schwartz, S.; Dohm, J.; Kim, K. J.; Kapran, B.; Milner, M. W.; Beukens, R.; Boccia, S.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Hart, K. M.; Kelleher, B.

    2010-03-01

    A carbon-rich black layer encrusted on a sandy pebbly bed of outwash in the northern Venezuelan Andes, previously considered the result of an alpine grass fire, is now recognized as a 'black mat' candidate correlative with Clovis Age sites in North America, falling within the range of 'black mat' dated sites (~ 12.9 ka cal BP). As such, the bed at site MUM7B, which dates to < 11.8 ka 14C years BP (raw dates) and appears to be contemporaneous with the Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event, marks a possibly much more extensive occurrence than previously identified. No fossils (megafauna) or tool assemblages were observed at this newly identified candidate site (3800 a.m.s.l.), as in the case of the North American sites. Here, evidence is presented for an extraterrestrial impact event at ~ 12.9 ka. The impact-related Andean bed, located ~ 20 cm above 13.7-13.3 ka cal BP alluvial and glaciolacustrine deposits, falls within the sediment characteristics and age range of 'black mat' dated sites (~ 12.9 ka cal BP) in North America. Site sediment characteristics include: carbon, glassy spherules, magnetic microspherules, carbon mat 'welded' onto coarse granular material, occasional presence of platinum group metals (Rh and Ru), planar deformation features (pdfs) in fine silt-size fragmental grains of quartz, as well as orthoclase, and monazite (with an abundance of Rare Earth Elements—REEs). If the candidate site is 'black mat', correlative with the 'black mat' sites of North America, such an extensive occurrence may support the hypothesized airburst/impact over the Laurentide Glacier, which led to a reversal of Allerød warming and the onset of YD cooling and readvance of glaciers. While this finding does not confirm such, it merits further investigation, which includes the reconnaissance for additional sites in South America. Furthermore, if confirmed, such an extensive occurrence may corroborate an impact origin.

  2. Sedimentological evidence for early uplift (Oligocene) of the Venezuelan Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Higgs, R. )

    1993-02-01

    The ongoing Andean orogeny is generally believed to have started in Miocene time. However, sedimentological studies of a Cenozoic clastic section in the northwestern foothills of the Venezuelan Andes (Rio Chama) yield two lines of evidence that uplift was already underway in the Oligocene. (1) Thick Oligocene shales (Leon Formation; 300m) are dark gray and bioturbated. Pyrite is absent and the fauna is restricted to benthonic forms (R. Pittelli), suggesting deposition in a brackish lake rather than the sea. The shales occur throughout the plains northwest of the Andes. Such a large, long-lived lake implies isolation form the sea, suggesting that the Andes were already high in the Oligocene, forming a topographically confined basin similar to the modern Lake Maracaibo. Like modern Lake Maracaibo, there was a tenuous connection with the sea, allowing marine incursions whenever eustatic sea level was high enough, as shown by horizons with marine fossils at other localities. (2) The overlying Oligocene-Miocene succession which caps the Rio Chama section (Caracol Member, Chama Formation; basal Betijoque Formation) includes fluvial channel sands with pebbles which can be matched to Cretaceous cherts of the adjacent Andes (Ftanita de Tachira). The first pebbles appear in the Caracol Member (Oligocene). They are thus regarded as the initial Andean molasse deposits and their deposition has continued to the present day.

  3. [Description of the seismological network of the Venezuelan Andes].

    PubMed

    Guada, Carlos; Morandi, María; Silva, José

    2003-01-01

    Western Venezuela shows a broad zone characterized by a moderate seismicity level, which has been the scenery of various historic earthquakes of destructive character. The beginning of the seismic instrumentation in the area dates from 1969, nevertheless it was 10 years later when the seismological network of the Venezuelan Andes (REDSAV) was permanently installed in order to characterize the regional earthquake activity. The REDSAV is an array of 10 remote seismic stations that sends the seismic signals by analog telemetry to the central station, located in the city of Mérida, where the digitalization, automatic event detection in real time and the analysis and off-line processing of the seismic information is carried out. During the last 10 years important advances have been taken place in terms of its operativity, which includes a dynamic web site (http://lgula.ciens.ula.ve) with a catalog of western Venezuela earthquakes, where the user can visualize the seismograms, the P and S wave arrival time, the polarities and epicentral maps; moreover, it is possible to select events applying temporal, spatial and magnitute criteria. In this paper the technical characteristic of the equipment are described and the advances registered in the last years referring to the automatic acquisition system, processing of the information and seismologic catalog of the REDSAV, whose systematic use during a decade has permitted to gather the biggest information base of related with the seismicity of the south-western Venezuela. PMID:15916173

  4. Linked basin sedimentation and orogenic uplift: The Neogene Barinas basin sediments derived from the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erikson, Johan P.; Kelley, Shari A.; Osmolovsky, Peter; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    2012-11-01

    The Venezuelan Andes are an asymmetric, doubly vergent orogen that is flanked on its southeastern side by the Barinas basin. Analyses of sedimentary facies, sandstone petrography, apatite fission-tracks, and magnetostratigraphy were completed on a 1750-m section of the syn-orogenic Neogene Parángula and Río Yuca formations in the Barinas side foothills of the Venezuelan Andes. Our sedimentary facies analyses record a progression of sedimentary environments from floodplain and floodplain channel deposits through the 560-m thick Parángula Formation transitioning to distal alluvial fan deposits in the lower Río Yuca Formation and finally to an alternation of distal alluvial fan and two, ˜100-m thick organic-rich lacustrine deposits in the upper third of the section. Major- and minor-mineral petrographic analysis reveals unroofing of the Venezuelan Andes, with quartz arenite composition low in the section succeeded by metamorphic and igneous clasts and potassium feldspar appearing near the base of the Río Yuca Formation. Apatite fission-track (AFT) analysis of sandstones and pebbles generated ages of 11.2 ± 1.3 - 13.8 ± 2.0 Ma over ˜1100 m of stratigraphic section. Thermal modeling of the detrital AFT and vitrinite data from the lower Río Yuca Formation indicates exhumation of the source area was occurring by 12-13 Ma, surface exposure at 10-9 Ma, maximum burial by 4-2 Ma and exhumation of the sedimentary package starting 3-2 Ma. Accumulation of the Río Yuca Formation is contemporaneous with a basinward migration of the deformation front. Regional considerations indicate that the Venezuelan Andes evolved from a primarily singly vergent orogen to its current double vergence over the interval of Neogene-Quaternary sedimentation.

  5. Investigations on vertical crustal movements in the Venezuelan Andes by gravimetric methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drewes, H.

    1978-01-01

    A precise gravimetric network has been installed in the Venezuelan Andes to study eventual gravity changes due to vertical tectonic movements. The design and the measurements of the network are described and the accuracy is estimated. In the center of the region a local gravity network has been reobserved three times. The detected variations are discussed. In order to obtain a genuine statement as far as possible about the significance of observed gravity changes, requirements for the procedure of monitoring precise gravity networks are pointed out.

  6. Two new, brachypterous Limnellia species from the Venezuelan Andes (Diptera: Ephydridae).

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel N R; Savaris, Marcoandre; Marinoni, Luciane; Mathis, Wayne N

    2016-01-01

    Two new, brachypterous species of Limnellia are described from specimens collected in the Venezuelan Andes: L. vounitis (Trujillo: Bocon, La Cristalina (Andes; 09°14.7'N, 70°19.1'W; 2500 m)) and L. flavifrontis (Mérida: Mérida, Sierra Nevada National Park (Laguna Negra; 8°47.1'N; 70°48.4'W; 3300 m)). To facilitate identification of these unusual species, we have included a diagnosis of the tribe Scatellini and of the genus Limnellia and have also provided an annotated key to the South American genera of this tribe. The descriptions are supplemented with illustrations, photographs, and scanning electron micrographs of external structures and structures of the male terminalia. PMID:27470858

  7. Petroleum systems of the northwestern Tachira Depression, Venezuelan Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Ostos, M.; Callejon, A.; Vivan, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    The tectonic evolution and sedimentation of the Tachira Depression was controlled by Paleozoic crustal scale discontinuities, partly or fully inverted during the pre-Andean (Paleocene) and Andean (Neogene) deformations. Outcrop samples were analyzed for source rock evaluation. La Luna, Los Cuervos and Carbonera formations are excellent potential oil sources. However, La Luna and Los Cuervos were the oil-generating units according to ID-modelling (BasinMod), defining La Luna-K/T(!) and Los Cuervos-K/T(!) systems. La Luna contains good to excellent oil prone kerogen type I-II, while Los Cuervos contains gas-oil prone type II-III. Oil seeps, expelled at the peak of oil generation stage (0.85-0.90 %R{sub o}), were derived from marine sources and genetically correlated to La Luna. No correlation of seeps with Los Cuervos was found. Although it exists to the southeast (Burgua depression). Potential clastic and carbonatic Cretaceous (K) and Tertiary (T) reservoirs and regional seals of the Colon and Leon Formations are widespread in the depression. Modelling results indicate that migration started during the Middle Miocene, related to the Andean tectonic loading. The subsequent migration took place northward, to be finally stopped against the Capacho and Bocono fault systems.

  8. Trench investigation along the Merida section of the Bocono fault (central Venezuelan Andes), Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audemard, F.; Pantosti, D.; Machette, M.; Costa, C.; Okumura, K.; Cowan, H.; Diederix, H.; Ferrer, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Bocono fault is a major NE-SW-trending, dextral fault that extends for about 500 km along the backbone of the Venezuelan Andes. Several large historical earthquakes in this region have been attributed to the Bocono fault, and some of these have been recently associated with specific parts through paleoseismologic investigations. A new trench study has been performed, 60 km to the northeast of Merida in the central Venezuelan Andes, where the fault forms a releasing bend, comprising two conspicuous late Holocene fault strands that are about 1 km apart. The southern and northern strands carry about 70% and 30% (respectively) of the 7-10 mm/yr net slip rate measured in this sector, which is based on a 40 vs. 85-100 m right-lateral offset of the Late Pleistocene Los Zerpa moraines. A trench excavated on the northern strand of the fault (near Morros de los Hoyos, slightly northeast of Apartaderos) across a twin shutter ridge and related sag pond exposed two main fault zones cutting Late Pleistocene alluvial and Holocene peat deposits. Each zone forms a shutter ridge with peat deposits ponded against the uplifted block. The paleoearthquake reconstruction derived from this trench allow us to propose the occurrence of at least 6-8 earthquakes in the past 9000 yr, yielding a maximum average recurrence interval of about 1100-1500 yr. Based on the northern strands average slip rate (2.6 mm/yr), such as earthquake sequence should have accommodated about 23 m of slip since 9 ka, suggesting that the maximum slip per event ranges between 3 and 4 m. No direct evidence for the large 1812 earthquake has been found in the trench, although this earthquake may have ruptured this section of the fault. Further paleoseismic studies will investigate the possibility that this event occurred in the Bocono fault, but ruptured mainly its southern strand in this region.

  9. Low temperature resistance in saplings and ramets of Polylepis sericea in the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rada, Fermín; García-Núñez, Carlos; Rangel, Sairo

    2009-09-01

    The frequent occurrence of all year-round below zero temperatures in tropical high mountains constitutes a most stressful climatic factor that plants have to confront. Polylepis forests are found well above the continuous forest line and are distributed throughout the Andean range. These trees require particular traits to overcome functional limitations imposed on them at such altitudes. Considering seedling and sapling stages as filter phases in stressful environments, some functional aspects of the regeneration of Polylepis sericea, a species associated to rock outcrops in the Venezuelan Andes, were studied. We characterized microclimatic conditions within a forest, in a forest gap and surrounding open páramo and determined low temperature resistance mechanisms in seedlings, saplings and ramets. Conditions in the forest understory were more stable compared to the forest gaps and open surrounding páramo. Minimum temperatures close to the ground were 3.6 °C lower in the open páramo compared to the forest understory. Maximum temperatures were 9.0 °C higher in the open páramo. Ice nucleation and injury temperatures occurred between -6 and -8 °C for both ramets and saplings, an evidence of frost avoidance to low nighttime temperatures. In this particular forest, this resistance ability is determinant in their island-like distribution in very specific less severe temperature habitats.

  10. Palynological signal of the Younger Dryas in the tropical Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, Valentí; Stansell, Nathan D.; Montoya, Encarni; Bezada, Maximiliano; Abbott, Mark B.

    2010-11-01

    The occurrence, or not, of the Younger Dryas cold reversal in the tropical Andes remains a controversial topic. This study reports a clear signal for this event in the Venezuelan Andes, employing high-resolution palynological analysis of a well-dated sediment core from Laguna de Los Anteojos, situated around 3900 m elevation, within grass páramo vegetation. The lake is surrounded by some Polylepis forests which are close to their upper distribution limit. The section of the core discussed here is 150-cm long and dated between about 14.68 and 9.35 cal kyr BP, using a polynomial age-depth model based on six AMS radiocarbon dates. Between 12.86 and 11.65 cal kyr BP, an abrupt shift occurred in the pollen assemblage, manifested by a decline of Podocarpus, Polylepis and Huperzia, combined with an increase in Poaceae and Asteraceae. The aquatic pteridophyte Isoëtes also decreased and disappeard, and the algae remains show their minimum values. Pollen assemblages from the Younger Dryas interval show maximum dissimilarity values compared with today's pollen assemblage, and are more similar to modern analogs from superpáramo vegetation, growing at elevations 400-500 m higher. A lowering of vegetation zones of this magnitude corresponds to a temperature decline of between 2.5 and 3.8 °C. During this colder interval lake levels may have been lower, suggesting a decrease in available moisture. The vegetation shift documented in Anteojos record between 12.86 and 11.65 cal kyr BP is comparable to the El Abra Stadial in the Colombian Andes but it differs in magnitude. The Anteojos shift is better dated and coincides with the Younger Dryas chron as recorded in the Cariaco Basin sea surface temperature reconstructions and records of continental runoff, as well as in the oxygen isotope measurements from the Greenland ice cores. When compared to other proxies of quasi-immediate response to climate, the time lag for the response of vegetation to climate is found to be negligible

  11. Comparison of the chemical composition of Valeriana parviflora essential oils collected in the Venezuelan Andes in two different seasons.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Sammy; Rondón, María; Rojas, Janne; Morales, Antonio; Rojas-Fermin, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of the aerial parts of Valerianaparviflora (Trevir) BM Vadillo, an endemic species of the Venezuelan Andes, collected from the same location in two different seasons (dry and rainy) of the year, were analyzed by GC/MS. The essential oil obtained during the dry season showed linalool (11.9%), eugenol (8.9%), p-menth-l-en-9-al (8.7%) and α-terpineol (7.7%) as main components, while the oil obtained from the rainy season collection showed o-xylol (16.2%), 3-methyl isovaleric acid (10.6%) and geranial (9.5%) as major compounds. Some of the differences in the composition of these oils might be due to the climatic conditions at the time of harvesting. PMID:25973503

  12. A new species of Cryptotis (Mammalia, Eulipotyphla, Soricidae) from the Sierra de Perijá, Venezuelan-Colombian Andes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quiroga-Carmona, Marcial; Woodman, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The Sierra de Perijá is the northern extension of the Cordillera Oriental of the Andes and includes part of the border between Colombia and Venezuela. The population of small-eared shrews (Mammalia, Eulipotyphla, Soricidae, Cryptotis) inhabiting the Sierra de Perijá previously was known from only a single skull from an individual collected in Colombia in 1989. This specimen had been referred to alternatively as C. thomasi and C. meridensis, but more precise definition of the known Colombian and Venezuelan species of Cryptotis has since excluded the Sierra de Perijá population from any named species. The recent collection of a specimen from the Venezuelan slope of Sierra de Perijá, prompted us to re-evaluate the taxonomic status of this population and determine its relationship with other Andean shrews. Our examination of the available specimens revealed that they possess a unique suite of morphological and morphometrical characters, and we describe the Sierra de Perijá population as a new species in the South American C. thomasi species group. Recognition of this new species adds to our knowledge of this genus in South America and to the biodiversity of the Sierra de Perijá.

  13. Trench investigation along the Mérida section of the Boconó fault (central Venezuelan Andes), Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck; Pantosti, Daniela; Machette, Michael; Costa, Carlos; Okumura, Koji; Cowan, Hugh; Diederix, Hans; Ferrer, Carlos; participants of the South American Field Workshop on Paleoseismology

    1999-07-01

    The Boconó fault is a major NE-SW-trending, dextral fault that extends for about 500 km along the backbone of the Venezuelan Andes. Several large historical earthquakes in this region have been attributed to the Boconó fault, and some of these have been recently associated with specific parts through paleoseismologic investigations. A new trench study has been performed, 60 km to the northeast of Mérida in the central Venezuelan Andes, where the fault forms a releasing bend, comprising two conspicuous late Holocene fault strands that are about 1 km apart. The southern and northern strands carry about 70% and 30% (respectively) of the 7-10 mm/yr net slip rate measured in this sector, which is based on a 40 vs. 85-100 m right-lateral offset of the Late Pleistocene Los Zerpa moraines. A trench excavated on the northern strand of the fault (near Morros de los Hoyos, slightly northeast of Apartaderos) across a twin shutter ridge and related sag pond exposed two main fault zones cutting Late Pleistocene alluvial and Holocene peat deposits. Each zone forms a shutter ridge with peat deposits ponded against the uplifted block. The paleoearthquake reconstruction derived from this trench allows us to propose the occurrence of at least 6-8 earthquakes in the past 9000 yr, yielding a maximum average recurrence interval of about 1100-1500 yr. Based on the northern strands average slip rate (2.6 mm/yr), such an earthquake sequence should have accommodated about 23 m of slip since 9 ka, suggesting that the maximum slip per event ranges between 3 and 4 m. No direct evidence for the large 1812 earthquake has been found in the trench, although this earthquake may have ruptured this section of the fault. Further paleoseismic studies will investigate the possibility that this event occurred on the Boconó fault, but ruptured mainly its southern strand in this region.

  14. Recent trends in human migrations: the case of the Venezuelan Andes.

    PubMed

    Suarez, M M; Torrealba, R

    1982-01-01

    Changes in world capitalism caused prices of traditional raw materials to fall and new energy demands to arise at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century. The Andean countries witnessed the fall in the value of their exports and began to receive large flows of foreign investment in mining and industry. Consequently, urban economies were strengthened and demographic patterns were changed. This led to the internal migrations and to a process of social change. These consequences are summarized from relevant studies focusing on Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. Since the 1960s a compendium of information has become available which highlights the causes of the migration, migration patterns, the composition of migratory movements, and the mechanisms that the migrant uses to establish himself/herself in the city. Preston (1969) distinguished 2 migratory patterns in Ecuador: rural to urban, with migratory flows from the rural areas to urban centers and new industrial cities that experienced development and high demand for unskilled labor at comparatively high wages: and rural to rural, based on the movement of population from depressed rural areas to other areas in which programs for colonization or commercial agriculture have been promoted. In a study of Colombia, McGreevey (1968) identifies the lack of cultivatable land, rural violence in certain departments, and other economic and family causes as the principal factors that induced migrations to the cities. The study emphasizes that the predominant model of movement relates to "fill in" migration. The spatial mobility of the Venezuelan Andean population was initially outlined in a voluminous report on economic and social problems of the region (1954). The study indicates that during the intercensal period 1941-50 cities grew much more rapidly than rural "municipos" and that the drive to find employment and earn a living were the most important motives in the movement of peasants to the cities. All of the

  15. Metre-scale cyclicity in Permian ramp carbonates of equatorial Pangea (Venezuelan Andes): Implications for sedimentation under tropical Pangea conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laya, Juan Carlos; Tucker, Maurice E.; Perez-Huerta, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    Palmarito strata in the mid-Permian of the Venezuelan Andes show three different types of metre-scale cycle: Type A cycles are mixed clastic-carbonate, shallowing-upward peritidal cycles. The upper boundaries of the cycles are exposure surfaces with calcrete. This kind of cycle shows a significant degree of randomness in its thickness pattern and this is attributed to an autocyclic origin through tidal-flat progradation, and variations in carbonate productivity and clastic input to the depositional area. Type B cycles consist entirely of shallow subtidal facies with a shallowing-upward arrangement and an alternation between heterozoan and photozoan assemblages. Type C cycles were deposited in a middle to outer ramp setting and are characterized by a heterozoan assemblage and shallowing-upward trends that includes spiculitic wackestone-packstone passing up into neomorphic bioclastic wackestone or bioclastic crinoidal-bryozoan wackestone-packstone. All cycles are interpreted as 4th-5th order (104 to 105 years duration) and some can be linked to Milankovitch orbital rhythms, notably short eccentricity (~ 100,000 years). Overall, the origin of the Palmarito cycles was a complex combination of autocyclic and allocyclic controls; however, the evidence suggests that cycles in the lower part of the succession were dominated more by autocyclic processes whereas those in the upper part were more the result of allocyclic controls. Climate-driven processes, such as migration of the intertropical convergence one and the waxing and waning of polar ice-caps, had significant effects on deposition of the Palmarito succession and the cycles therein, controlling the clastic sediment supply, nutrient availability and thus carbonate production, and sea-level change, and these factors determined the vertical stacking pattern of the cycles.

  16. Leaf gas exchange in Espeletia schultzii Wedd, a giant caulescent rosette species, along an altitudinal gradient in the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rada, Fermin; Azocar, Aura; Gonzalez, Juan; Briceño, Benito

    1998-02-01

    Gas exchange studies along low altitudinal gradients (0-2 500 metres above sea level) suggest an increase in plant CO 2 assimilation with increasing altitude. The question arises however, will this hold true for higher altitudinal ranges? The purpose of this work was to characterize carbon and water relationships in Espeletia schultzii along an extreme altitudinal gradient. Gas exchange characteristics under field conditions during wet and dry seasons were documented for Espeletia schultzii, a giant caulescent rosette species, along an altitudinal gradient (2 950, 3 550 and 4 200 m) in the Venezuelan Andes. Significant differences in CO 2 assimilation rates between seasons were found for all studied sites. Low assimilation rates obtained during the dry season were a consequence of: low leaf conductances to counteract low leaf water potentials and/or high vapour pressure differences between leaf and air, and to high leaf temperatures measured during the dry season. Important differences in A/P i curve parameters were obtained between wet and dry seasons. A decrease in A max was observed for the two lower populations, while a similar value was obtained for both wet and dry seasons at the higher altitude. A decrease in the relation P i/P a and an increase in stomatal limitation and leaf temperature were measured from wet to dry season. There was a differentiation in CO 2 assimilation with increasing altitude. At 2 950 m, maximum rates were above 5 μmol · m -2 · s -1, at 3 550 m 3 μmol · m -2 · s -1, while at 4 200 m maximum CO 2 assimilation rate was below 3 μmol ·m -2 · s -1. This decrease may be explained by: an increase in leaf pubescence, lower leaf conductances and/or lower leaf nitrogen content at higher altitude.

  17. A soil chronosequence in Late Glacial and Neoglacial moraines, Humboldt Glacier, northwestern Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Kalm, V.; Kapran, B.; Milner, M. W.; Hancock, R. G. V.

    2009-08-01

    Late Glacial and Neoglacial (Little Ice Age) deposits on the Humboldt Massif were analyzed for relative-age dating parameters, including geomorphic and weathering characteristics, geochemical and soil properties. The soil chronosequence, formed in chemically uniform parent materials, provides an important database to study soil evolution in a tropical alpine environment. Extractable and total Fe and Al concentrations, examined to assess their use in relative-age determination, and as paleoenvironmental indicators, provide an important measure of the accumulation and downward profile movement over time of organically-bound Al, ferrihydrite and other crystalline forms (hematite and goethite) of extractable Fe. Ferrihydrite is particularly useful in determining former perched water levels in soils with relation to paleoclimate. The ratios of most Fe extracts are time dependent. The Fe d/Fe t ratio, within statistical limits, shows a slow increase from LIA (Little Ice Age) to Late Glacial soils, which closely correlates with other alpine soil studies in the middle latitudes and other tropical alpine locales. Values of Al d (dithionite) and Al o (oxalate extractable) generally do not correlate with time; however, Al p (pyrophosphate extractable) measured against Al t (total) provides insight on the downward translocation over time of organically-bound Al. Low leaching rates in this chronosequence are further supported by clay mineralogy trends and the geochemical data.

  18. Tectonic, volcanic, and climatic geomorphology study of the Sierras Pampeanas Andes, northwestern Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, A. L.; Strecker, M. R.; Fielding, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed analysis of Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) data extends current research in the Sierras Pampeanas and the Puna of northwestern Argentina to the determination - by the digital analysis of mountain-front sinuousity - of the relative age and amount of fault movement along mountain fronts of the late-Cenozoic Sierras Pampeanas basement blocks; the determination of the age and history of the boundary across the Andes at about 27 S latitude between continuing volcanism to the north and inactive volcanism to the south; and the determination of the age and extent of Pleistocene glaciation in the High Sierras, as well as the comparative importance of climatic change and tectonic movements in shaping the landscape. The integration of these studies into other ongoing geology projects contributes to the understanding of landform development in this active tectonic environment and helps distinguish between climatic and tectonic effects on landforms.

  19. [Chemical composition of fresh bee pollen collected in the Misintá páramo from the Venezuelan Andes].

    PubMed

    Vit, Patricia; Santiago, B

    2008-12-01

    Venezuelan bee pollen has not been characterized, and marketing is not regulated. Pollen is consumed for apitherapeutical purposes for its nutritional and medicinal properties. This product of the hive is the most popular after honey; therefore it is necessary to characterize and to value it to initiate a database to support the proposal of a norm for bee pollen quality control. Samples of bee pollen collected by bees in the Misintá páramo of Mérida state were characterized accoridng to the chemical composition (moisture, ash, fat, pH, proteins) of four color fractions (yellow, orange, ochre, green). Yellow pollen was the most frequent fraction, with 2.18 g ash/100 g, 5.37 g ether extract/100 g, 14.88 g moisture/100 g, and 37.32 g proteins/100 g. PMID:19368304

  20. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Max C.; Rincón, Ascanio D.; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U–Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal–vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary. PMID:26064540

  1. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes.

    PubMed

    Langer, Max C; Rincón, Ascanio D; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W M

    2014-10-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U-Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal-vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. PMID:26064540

  2. Petroleum systems at the triple point between the Merida Andes, the eastern cordillera of Colombia and the Guayana shield: The petroleum geology of the Colombian-Venezuelan Border

    SciTech Connect

    Chigne, N.; Loureiro, D.; Rojas, L.

    1996-08-01

    The sinistral Bramon-Bucaramanga shear zone, in conjunction with the southeastern vergent Falla Borde Llanero and the northwestern vergent frontal thrust of the Merida Andes, defines a complex area where tectonic transport shows crustal scale shift. Palinspastic restorations have been used as a base for the identification and reconstruction of the evolving petroleum systems, showing that several of the discontinuities within this collage served as barriers for major oil accumulations. The main oil generating unit of the region is a 200-m-thick sequence of Cenomanian-Turonian rocks representing a variety of facies, from siliciclastic mudstones to finely laminated limestones. Sequence stratigraphy at well-log scale combined with seismic profiles has helped to identify and map the most important reservoir-seal couples within Late Cretaceous and late Eocene-Early Miocene megasequences. One- and two-dimensional modelling of kerogen maturation suggest a major phase of oil expulsion during Early Miocene. Loading of the source rock below Upper Miocene to Holocene thrust and/or coeval foredeep sediments has developed a petroleum system that is active today. Oil migrated toward the local highs from active kitchens located to the west-southwest.

  3. Dynamics and Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Northwestern Andes: Subduction Segments, Moho Depth, and Possible Relationships to Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Becker, T. W.; Porritt, R. W.; Cardona, A.; Poveda, E.; Posada, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northwestern South American plate shows a complex tectonic setting whose causes and relationship to mantle structure are still debated. We combine different techniques to elucidate some of the links between slabs and surface deformation in Colombia. Crustal structure beneath the Northern Andes was inferred from receiver functions where we find thicknesses of nearly 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera and underneath the southern volcanic area of the Central Cordillera. We infer that such crustal thickening resulted from shortening, magmatic addition, and accretion-subduction. Analyses of relative teleseismic travel time delays and estimates of residual surface topography based on our new crustal model suggest that there are at least two subduction segments underneath the area. The Caribbean slab lies at a low angle beneath northernmost Colombia and steepens beneath the Eastern Cordillera. Such steepening is indicated by negative travel time relative residuals in the area of the Bucaramanga Nest, implying a cold anomaly in the upper mantle, and by positive residual topography just off the east of this area, perhaps generated by slab-associated return flow. Results for the western Andes and the Pacific coastal plains are consistent with "normal" subduction of the Nazca plate: travel time relative residuals there are predominantly positive, and the residual topography shows an W-E gradient, going from positive at the Pacific coastline to negative at the Magdalena Valley, which separates the eastern cordillera from the rest of the Colombian Andean system. Azimuthal analysis of relative travel time residuals further suggests the presence of seismically slow materials beneath the central part of the Eastern Cordillera. Azimuthal anisotropy from SKS splitting in that region indicates that seismically fast orientations do not follow plate convergence, different from what we find for the western Colombian Andes and the Caribbean and Pacific coastal plains

  4. Cenozoic foreland basin system in the central Andes of northwestern Argentina: Implications for Andean geodynamics and modes of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.; Horton, B. K.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Cenozoic strata in the central Andes of northwestern Argentina record the development and migration of a regional foreland basin system analogous to the modern Chaco-Paraná alluvial plain. Paleocene-lower Eocene fluvial and lacustrine deposits are overlain by middle-upper Eocene hypermature paleosols or an erosional disconformity representing 10-15 Myr. This `supersol/disconformity' zone is traceable over a 200,000 km2 area in the Andean thrust belt, and is overlain by 2-6 km of upward coarsening, eastward thinning, upper Eocene through lower Miocene fluvial and eolian deposits. Middle Miocene-Pliocene fluvial, lacustrine, and alluvial fan deposits occupy local depocenters with contractional growth structures. Paleocurrent and petrographic data demonstrate westerly provenance of quartzolithic and feldspatholithic sediments. Detrital zircon ages from Cenozoic sandstones cluster at 470-491, 522-544, 555-994, and 1024-1096 Ma. Proterozoic-Mesozoic clastic and igneous rocks in the Puna and Cordillera Oriental yield similar age clusters, and served as sources of the zircons in the Cenozoic deposits. Arc-derived zircons become prominent in Oligo-Miocene deposits and provide new chronostratigraphic constraints. Sediment accumulation rate increased from ˜20 m/Myr during Paleocene-Eocene time to 200-600 m/Myr during the middle to late Miocene. The new data suggest that a flexural foreland basin formed during Paleocene time and migrated at least 600 km eastward at an unsteady pace dictated by periods of abrupt eastward propagation of the orogenic strain front. Despite differences in deformation style between Bolivia and northwestern Argentina, lithosphere in these two regions flexed similarly in response to eastward encroachment of a comparable orogenic load beginning during late Paleocene time.

  5. Tectonostratigraphic reconstruction Cretaceous volcano-sedimentary in the northwestern Andes: from extensional tectonics to arc accretion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, S.; Patino, A. M.; Cardona, A.; Mejia, D.; Leon, S.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Valencia, V.; Parra, M.; Hincapie, S.

    2014-12-01

    Active continental margins characterized by continuous convergence experienced overimposed tectonic configurations that allowed the formation of volcanic arcs, back arc basins, transtensional divergent tectonics or the accretion of exotic volcanic terranes. Such record, particularly the extensional phases, can be partially destroyed and obscure by multiple deformational events, the accretion of exotic terranes and strike slip fragmentation along the margin. The tectonic evolution of the northern Andes during the Mesozoic is the result of post Pangea extension followed by the installation of a long-lived Jurassic volcanic arc (209 - 136 ma) that apparently stops between 136 Ma and 110 Ma. The Quebradagrande Complex has been define as a single Lower Cretaceous volcano-sedimentary unit exposed in the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes that growth after the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous magmatic hiatus. The origin of this unit have been related either to an oceanic volcanic arc or a marginal basin environment. The existence of such contrasting models reflect the regional perspective followed in published studies and the paucity of detail analysis of the volcano-sedimentary sequences.We integrate multiple approaches including structural mapping, stratigraphy, geochemistry, U-Pb provenance and geochronology to improve the understanding of this unit and track the earlier phases of accumulation that are mask on the overimposed tectonic history. Our preliminary results suggest the existence of different volcano-sedimentary units that accumulated between 100 Ma and 82 Ma.The older Lower Cretaceous sequences was deposited over Triassic metamorphic continental crust and include a upward basin deepening record characterized by thick fan delta conglomerates, followed by distal turbidites and a syn-sedimentary volcanic record at 100 ma. The other sequence include a 85 - 82 Ma fringing arc that was also formed close to the continental margin or

  6. Rodent community structure and Andes virus infection in sylvan and peridomestic habitats in northwestern Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Piudo, Luciana; Monteverde, Martin J; Walker, R Susan; Douglass, Richard J

    2011-03-01

    Modifications of natural habitat in peridomestic rural areas could affect original rodent community composition, diversity, and evenness. In zoonoses such as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the presence of a diverse community can dilute the impact of the principal reservoir, reducing risk to humans. The goal of this study was to examine rodent community composition, abundance of Andes virus (ANDV) host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus), ANDV prevalence, and temporal variability associated with rural peridomestic settings in Patagonia, Argentina. We trapped rodents in peridomestic settings and nearby sylvan areas for 2 years. The numerically dominant species differed between peridomestic and sylvan settings. O. longicaudatus was the most abundant species in peridomestic settings (>50% of individuals). Diversity and evenness in peridomestic settings fluctuated temporally, with an abrupt decline in evenness coinciding with peaks in ANDV prevalence. The probability of finding an ANDV-positive mouse in peridomestic settings was 2.44 times greater than in sylvan habitats. Changes in rodent communities in peridomestic settings may increase the probability for human exposure to ANDV because those settings promote the presence of O. longicaudatus with high ANDV antibody prevalence. High O. longicaudatus relative abundance in an unstable community associated with peridomestic settings may favor intraspecific contact, leading to a higher probability of virus transmission. PMID:21332352

  7. Rodent Community Structure and Andes Virus Infection in Sylvan and Peridomestic Habitats in Northwestern Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Monteverde, Martin J.; Walker, R. Susan; Douglass, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Modifications of natural habitat in peridomestic rural areas could affect original rodent community composition, diversity, and evenness. In zoonoses such as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the presence of a diverse community can dilute the impact of the principal reservoir, reducing risk to humans. The goal of this study was to examine rodent community composition, abundance of Andes virus (ANDV) host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus), ANDV prevalence, and temporal variability associated with rural peridomestic settings in Patagonia, Argentina. We trapped rodents in peridomestic settings and nearby sylvan areas for 2 years. The numerically dominant species differed between peridomestic and sylvan settings. O. longicaudatus was the most abundant species in peridomestic settings (>50% of individuals). Diversity and evenness in peridomestic settings fluctuated temporally, with an abrupt decline in evenness coinciding with peaks in ANDV prevalence. The probability of finding an ANDV-positive mouse in peridomestic settings was 2.44 times greater than in sylvan habitats. Changes in rodent communities in peridomestic settings may increase the probability for human exposure to ANDV because those settings promote the presence of O. longicaudatus with high ANDV antibody prevalence. High O. longicaudatus relative abundance in an unstable community associated with peridomestic settings may favor intraspecific contact, leading to a higher probability of virus transmission. PMID:21332352

  8. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    The geodynamic evolution of the Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana in the region of the southern Central Andes is characterized by the westward progression of orogenic basin formation through time. The Ordovician basin in the northwest Argentinian Cordillera Oriental and Puna originated as an Early Ordovician back-arc basin. The contemporaneous magmatic arc of an east-dipping subduction zone was presumably located in northern Chile. In the back-arc basin, a ca. 3500 meter, fining-up volcaniclastic apron connected to the arc formed during the Arenigian. Increased subsidence in the late Arenigian allowed for the accomodation of large volumes of volcaniclastic turbidites during the Middle Ordovician. Subsidence and sedimentation were caused by the onset of collision between the para-autochthonous Arequipa Massif Terrane (AMT) and the South American margin at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. This led to eastward thrusting of the arc complex over its back-arc basin and, consequently, to its transformation into a marine foreland basin. As a result of thrusting in the west, a flexural bulge formed in the east, leading to uplift and emergence of the Cordillera Oriental shelf during the Guandacol Event at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. The basin fill was folded during the terminal collision of the AMT during the Oclóyic Orogeny (Ashgillian). The folded strata were intruded post-tectonically by the presumably Silurian granitoids of the "Faja Eruptiva de la Puna Oriental." The orogeny led to the formation of the positive area of the Arco Puneño. West of the Arco Puneño, a further marine basin developed during the Early Devonian, the eastern shelf of which occupied the area of the Cordillera Occidental, Depresión Preandina, and Precordillera. The corresponding deep marine turbidite basin was located in the region of the Cordillera de la Costa. Deposition continued until the basin fill was folded in the early Late Carboniferous Toco Orogeny. The basin

  9. Climatic and paleoclimatic forcing of erosion in the southern Central Andes and the northwestern Himalaya (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The windward flanks of the tectonically active southern Central Andes and the NW Himalaya are characterized by steep climatic, tectonic, and topographic gradients. The first windward topographic rise of these mountain ranges constitutes a significant orographic barrier resulting in high orographic rainfall causing some of the wettest places on Earth. However, the higher-elevation areas of the windward flanks of both regions become progressively drier, until arid conditions are attained in the orogen interiors (i.e., the Altiplano-Puna and Tibet plateaus). Both areas have experienced significant paleoclimatic changes with deeper penetration of moisture into the orogen and thus an orogenward shift of the climate gradient. Some of the world's largest rivers with high sediment loads emerge from these mountain belts, and understanding the relation between climate and erosion is key in predicting mass fluxes, assessing the impacts of climate variability, and long-term climate forcing of erosion on landscape evolution. Here, we quantify the impact of the climatic gradients and their spatial shifts during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. We rely on sedimentary archives, digital topography, and cosmogenic inventories of river sands (10Be) and bedrock-erosion rates (10Be and 26Al) from the Puna Plateau in NW Argentina and the interior of the western Himalaya in NW India. We make three key observations that underline the importance of present-day climatic parameters and paleoclimatic changes on the effiency of surface processes in both areas: (1) First-order spatial erosion patterns follow the climatic gradient and catchment-mean erosion rates vary by three orders of magnitude from the wet mountain fronts to the dry orogen interior. In NW Argentina, our measurements represent the fluvial transport rates and indicate very low fluvial activity in the interior of the Puna Plateau during the Late Pleistocene; (2) the spatial distribution of erosion rates can be explained by a

  10. El Niño forcing on 10Be-based surface denudation rates in the northwestern Peruvian Andes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbühl, Luca M.; Norton, Kevin P.; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kracht, Oliver; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2010-11-01

    High magnitude precipitation events provide large contributions to landscape formation and surface denudation in arid environments. Here, we quantify the precipitation-dependent geomorphic processes within the Rio Piura drainage basin located on the Western Escarpment of the northern Peruvian Andes at 5°S latitude. In this region, monsoonal easterly winds bring precipitation to the > 3000 m asl high headwaters, from where the annual amount of precipitation decreases downstream toward the Pacific coast. Denudation rates are highest in the knickzones near the headwaters, ~ 200-300 mm ky - 1 , and sediment discharge is limited by the transport capacity of the channel network. Every few years, this situation is perturbed by westerly, wind-driven heavy precipitation during El Niño events and results in supply-limited sediment discharge as indicated by bedrock channels. The detailed analysis of the stream-long profiles of two river basins within the Rio Piura catchment reveals a distinct knickzone in the transition zone between the easterly and westerly climatic influences, suggesting an En Niño forcing on the longitudinal channel profiles over at least Holocene timescales. Measured trunk stream catchment-wide denudation rates are up to ca. 300 mm ky - 1 and decrease successively downstream along the river profiles. Denudation rates of tributary rivers are ca. 200 mm ky - 1 near the plateau and show a stronger downstream decreasing trend than trunk stream rates. This suggests that the landscape is in a transient stage of local relief growth, which is driven by fluvial incision. This corroborates the results of paleoclimate studies that point towards higher El Nino frequencies during the past ca. 3000 years, leading to higher runoff and more erosion in the trunk channel compared to the hillslopes and thus growth of local relief. Downstream increases in channel gradient spatially coincide with the reaches of highest precipitation rates during El Niño events, we

  11. Microseismicity evidence for subduction of the Caribbean plate beneath the South American Plate in northwestern Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRez, Omar J.; Jaimes, Martha A.; Garciacaro, Emilio

    1997-08-01

    Over 1100 microearthquakes with body wave magnitude mb<4 have been located in western Venezuela and the southwestern Caribbean region since the installation in 1980 of the Venezuelan Seismological Array, together with 120 events of mb≥4, one of them with surface wave magnitude Ms˜6. This tectonically complex region is part of the boundary between the Caribbean and the South American plates. The main seismically active feature inland in western Venezuela is the northeast striking, 600-km long, 100-km wide, right-lateral strike-slip Boconó fault zone along the Venezuelan Andes. About 80% of the earthquakes located in the entire region in the period 1980-mid-1995 have occurred on this fault zone, at focal depths <20 km. Microearthquake activity at lower rates also occurs northwest of the Venezuelan Andes, both in the continental and Caribbean sea regions. Part of this activity takes place at depths down to ˜150 km. Northwest oriented seismicity depth profiles show the existence of a Benioff zone dipping to the southeast beneath northwestern Venezuela and northern Colombia. This indicates the presence of a northeast striking, southeast dipping subducted slab of the Caribbean plate beneath the South American plate. Hypocentral locations show that the northeastern end of this subduction occurs northwest of the Curaçao-Aruba region, in the vicinity of a northwest trending, right-lateral strike-slip fault zone that joins up with the northeastern end of the Boconó fault zone. This latter place turns out to be the western end of the east-west striking San Sebastián fault along the Venezuelan coast.

  12. Anthology of Venezuelan psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Malpica, Carlos; Portilla-Geada, Néstor de la; Téllez Pacheco, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Reception of Psychiatry in Venezuela since the 19th Century to the late 20th Century merits a historical approach. The following work proposes to research some of the very origins of Venezuelan psychiatry and its possible influence on contemporary mental health practice. Through documental research, the early works of local authors from the 19th Century through 20th Century finals: Carlos Arvelo, Lisandro Alvarado, Francisco Herrera Luque, Jose Luis Vethencourt and Jose Solanes, are subjected to study. This journey illustrates a descriptive panoramic view which allows to better comprenhend the current state of our psychiatry. In a brief introduction the most important events are described, since the arrival of Pinel's ideas, followed by the early research paperworks published and the beginnings of the academic teachings of this specialty in Venezuela and displaying the main contemporary research groups thorough the country. PMID:27249236

  13. The Eocene turbidities of the Trujillo Formation, Venezuelan Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.K.; Zambrano, E.

    1996-08-01

    The Trujillo Formation, overlying the Paleocene Cerro Verde and Valle Hondo formations, reveals a turbiditic origin in a lowstand shelf-edge and bathyal setting in two excellent road sections on the Valera-Carache road and many creek sections. The basal outcrop shows well developed fining upward (FU) sequences of proximal channel turbidite and overbank origin (abandonment phase) and minor coarsening upward (CU) sequences representing progradational pulse in overbank areas. The FU (and thinning-upward) sequence, overlying a shale, consists of: (a) basal stacked conglomeratic arenites (probably inner fan channels) with graded beds, imbricate casts and transported shells; (b) a sand/shale alternating unit (channel margin/interchannel) with flame structure, lenticular bedding, infrequent Tb-d Sequence, rippled flats, and rare Planolites; and (c) a dark shale (overbank-interchannel lows) with scarce Chondrites and Scaladtuba traces. The CU sequence consists of thickening-upward heterolithic facies overlain by lenticular stacked pebbly arenites. The upper unit exposed near Puente Gomez is a typical progradational lobe starting with a basal shale, with intraformational diastems and slumped beds, and Tb-d and Tb-e sequences in thin intercalated sandstones; a heterolithic facies with flute/groove casts, Planolites, Thalassinoides and Neonereites occurs between the shale and a thick cross-stratified sandstone at the top. This CU lobe sequence is discordantly(?) overlain by a thin wedge of massive bedded pebbly sandstones of Middle Eocene(?) Misoa Formation. Unlike the southwesterly sourced subsurface turbidites, those in this area were probably sourced from both the south and north, though locally the southern source might have been more important.

  14. ASTER Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this image of the Andes along the Chile-Bolivia border, the visible and infrared data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color differences of the different materials. The scene is dominated by the Pampa Luxsar lava complex, occupying the upper right two-thirds of the scene. Lava flows are distributed around remnants of large dissected cones, the largest of which is Cerro Luxsar. On the middle left edge of the image are the Olca and Parumastrato volcanoes, which appear in blue due to a lack of vegetation (colored red in this composite). This image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (37 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It was acquired on April 7, 2000.

    The image is located at 21 degrees south latitude, 68.3 degrees west longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial

  15. Solar and Volcanic Modulation of Little Ice Age Climate in the Tropical Andes, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polissar, P. J.; Abbott, M. B.; Wolfe, A. P.; Rull, V.; Bezada, M.

    2004-12-01

    The underlying causes of late-Holocene climate variability in the tropics are incompletely understood. Here, we report a 1500-year reconstruction of climate history in the Venezuelan Andes using lake sediment records from four sites. This reconstruction is based upon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon and Pb-210 dating, sedimentology, magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry, pollen and stable isotope (C, N) measurements. In the Laguna Mucubaji watershed four distinct glacial advances occurred between 1250 and 1810 A.D. The earliest advance began during an extended period of higher global volcanic activity. The subsequent three advances were coincident with minima in solar activity (reconstructed from Be-10 and C-14 records). The Mucubají glacial activity in the Venezuelan Andes coincides with other records of Little Ice Age (LIA) glacial advances in S. America. Comparison of modern glacier equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) in Venezuela with the Mucubaji LIA glacier ELA indicates an ELA depression of at least 300 m. Both a decline in temperature and increase in precipitation are required to explain the ELA depression. The precipitation increase is supported by increased catchment erosion recorded in L. Blanca sediments. Pollen records from two sites in the Venezuelan Andes also indicate wetter and colder conditions during the LIA.

  16. Aftermath of Venezuelan flood disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    One month after several rounds of devastating floods and mudslides waterlogged parts of Venezuela in December and January, the country and government are trying to come to grips with the damage and begin reconstruction efforts. They are also trying to limit potential health risks that can arise following natural disasters. Epidemics, however, rarely occur following a disaster, according to Jean-Luc Poncelet, a doctor with the Pan American Health Organization. Between 25,000 and 50,000 people in Venezuela were killed, and about 150,000 displaced, according to local and international aid authorities. In addition,Venezuelan national authorities have declared part of the Port of La Guaira as a dangerous chemical zone because of ruptured containers of dangerous chemicals, hundreds of kilometers of the Caribbean coast have been closed to fishing and swimming because of contaminated runoff from the floods, roads remain blocked, and the lack of potable water is a key concern.

  17. Lithospheric scale model of Merida Andes, Venezuela (GIAME Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Orihuela, N. D.; Klarica, S.; Gil, E.; Levander, A.; Audemard, F. A.; Mazuera, F.; Avila, J.

    2013-05-01

    Merida Andes (MA) is one of the most important orogenic belt in Venezuela and represents the northern culmination of South America Andes. During the last 60 years, several models have been proposed to explain the shallow and deep structure, using different geological, geophysical, seismological, geochemical and petrologic concepts; nevertheless, most of them have applied local observation windows, and do not represent the major structure of MA. Therefore, a multidisciplinary research group, coordinated by FUNVISIS, in close cooperation with UCV, ULA and PDVSA, is proposed in order to get the outlined goals in the project entitled GIAME ("Geociencia Integral de los Andes de MErida") was established, which aims to generate a lithospheric scale model and the development of a temporal dynamic model for the MA. As a base for lithospheric investigations of the Merida Andes, we are proposing three wide angle seismic profiles across the orogen on three representative sites, in order to determine the inner structure and its relation with the orogen's gravimetric root. To the date, there are no seismic studies at lithospheric scale which cross MA. The wide angle seismic will be complemented with the re-processing and re-interpretation of existing reflection seismic data, which will allow to establish a relationship between MA and its associated flexural basins (Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins). Depending on the results of the VENCORP Project (VENezuelan COntinental Reflection Profiling), which might show some reliable results about crustal features and Moho reflectors along three long seismic profiles at Caribbean Moutain system, a reflection seismic profile across the central portion of MA is proposed. Additional tasks, consisting in MA quaternary deformation studies, using research methods like neotectonics and paleoseismology, georadar, numerical modeling, cinematic GPS, SAR interferometry, thermocronology, detailed studies on regional geology, flexural modeling

  18. Solar modulation of Little Ice Age climate in the tropical Andes

    PubMed Central

    Polissar, P. J.; Abbott, M. B.; Wolfe, A. P.; Bezada, M.; Rull, V.; Bradley, R. S.

    2006-01-01

    The underlying causes of late-Holocene climate variability in the tropics are incompletely understood. Here we report a 1,500-year reconstruction of climate history and glaciation in the Venezuelan Andes using lake sediments. Four glacial advances occurred between anno Domini (A.D.) 1250 and 1810, coincident with solar-activity minima. Temperature declines of −3.2 ± 1.4°C and precipitation increases of ≈20% are required to produce the observed glacial responses. These results highlight the sensitivity of high-altitude tropical regions to relatively small changes in radiative forcing, implying even greater probable responses to future anthropogenic forcing. PMID:16740660

  19. Late Quaternary deglacial history of the Mérida Andes, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansell, Nathan D.; Abbott, Mark B.; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Bezada, Maximiliano; Rull, Valentí

    2005-10-01

    Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from seven lakes and two bogs spanning the Cordillera de Mérida in the Venezuelan Andes were used to identify and date the regional history of late Pleistocene and Holocene glacial activity. Coring sites were selected at different elevations across a pronounced rain shadow from southeast (wet) to northwest (dry). Sediment lithostratigraphy and magnetic susceptibility, in conjunction with AMS radiocarbon dates on macrofossils and charcoal, were used to constrain deglaciation. The local expression of the Last Glacial Maximum occurred between 22 750 and 19 960 cal. yr BP. On the wetter southeastern side of the Cordillera de Mérida, glaciers had significantly retreated by 15 700 cal. yr BP, followed by several minor glacial advances and retreats between 14 850 and 13 830 cal. yr BP. At least one major glacial readvance occurred between 13 830 and 10 000 cal. yrBP in the wetter southeastern sector of the region. The drier northwest side of the Cordillera de Mérida records initial glacial retreat by 14240cal.yrBP. Multiple sites on both sides of the Mérida Andes record a further phase of extensive deglaciation approximately 10000cal.yrBP. However, the north-northwest facing Mucubají catchment remained partially glaciated until ca. 6000cal.yrBP. Deglacial ages from the Venezuelan Andes are consistently younger than those reported from the Southern Hemisphere Andes, suggesting an inter-hemispheric deglacial lag in the northern tropics of the order of two thousand years.

  20. Isonymy structure of four Venezuelan states.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Larralde, A; Barrai, I; Alfonzo, J C

    1993-01-01

    The isonymy structure of four Venezuelan States-Falcón, Mérida, Nueva Esparta and Yaracuy-was studied using the surnames of the Venezuelan register of electors updated in 1984. The surname distributions of 155 counties were obtained and, for each county, estimates of consanguinity due to random isonymy and Fisher's alpha were calculated. It was shown that for large sample sizes the inverse of Fisher's alpha is identical to the unbiased estimate of within-population random isonymy. A three-dimensional isometric surface plot was obtained for each State, based on the counties' random isonymy estimates. The highest estimates of random consanguinity were found in the States of Nueva Esparta and Mérida, while the lowest were found in Yaracuy. Other microdifferentiation indicators from the same data gave similar results, and an interpretation was attempted, based on the particular economic and geographic characteristics of each State. Four different genetic distances between all possible pairs of counties were calculated within States; geographic distance shows the highest correlations with random isonymy and Euclidean distance, with the exception of the State of Nueva Esparta, where there is no correlation between geographic distance and random isonymy. It was possible to group counties in clusters, from dendrograms based on Euclidean distance. Isonymy clustering was also consistent with socioeconomic and geographic characteristics of the counties. PMID:8447658

  1. Alphaviral equine encephalomyelitis (Eastern, Western and Venezuelan).

    PubMed

    Aréchiga-Ceballos, N; Aguilar-Setién, A

    2015-08-01

    Summary Alphaviral equine encephalomyelitis is a mosquito-borne infection that causes severe neurological disease and fatalities in horses and humans in the Americas. Consequently, the equine alphaviruses (Eastern, Western and Venezuelan) are of considerable concern worldwide and are notifiable to the World Organisation for Animal Health. In addition, these diseases are considered a potent potential biological weapon, emphasising the need to develop an effective vaccine. Alphaviral equine encephalomyelitis is caused by Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV), Western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV) or Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV), which are related members of the Alphavirus genus in the Togaviridae family. Although related, the three viruses are genetically and antigenically distinct. The disease is characterised by fever, anorexia, depression and clinical signs of encephalomyelitis, and may be fatal in up to 90% of cases, for both humans and horses, particularly in the case of EEE. Surviving horses develop lifelong immunity but may have permanent neuropathology. The aim of this paper is to analyse the scientific information available on the evolution of EEE, WEE and VEE, and any potential vaccines. PMID:26601451

  2. Petroleum systems of the Burgua Depression, Tachira and Apure states, Venezuelan Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Ostos, M.; Yoris, F.; Callejon, A.

    1996-08-01

    The Burgua Depression (southeast extension of the Tachira Depression) underwent a severe subsidence during the Andean orogeny. Its tectonosedimentary evolution was controlled by Paleozoic discontinuities. The sedimentary sequence contains Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous syn-rifting transgressive rocks, synDeformational Paleocene/Eocene and Neogene rocks. Deformation is diachronic from SE (Oligocene) to NW (Pleistocene). From oil-rock correlation data, Navay and Los Cuervos samples render excellent potential source rocks. The analyses indicate a marine algal-bacterial organic matter source for Navay and higher plants for Los Cuervos, which plot as moderate yield type II kerogen and low yield type II-III, respectively. Although, the samples are immature (0.50-0.55% R6), ID modelling (BasinMod) suggests that they reached maturation during the Andean orogeny. Oil seeps correlate with Navay and Los Cuervos and were expelled at the peak of oil generation (0.85-0.90% R{sub o}). These source rocks define the Navay-K/T(!) and Los Cuervos-K/T(!) petroleum systems. Potential clastic and carbonatic reservoirs were identified in surface and wells. The Guafita Formation is the regional seal, never extending northward of the Brujas High. Modelling indicates that migration started during late Pliocene and took place northward and south/southeastward of the Andean foredeep.

  3. Volatile constituents of the leaves of Munnozia senecionidis from the Venezuelan Andes.

    PubMed

    Lara, Joel; Rojas, Luis B; Usubillaga, Alfredo; Carmona, Juan

    2009-07-01

    The essential oil of Munnozia senecionidis Benth. (Asteraceae), obtained by hydrodistillation, was analyzed by GC-MS. Twenty compounds were identified, accounting for 93.9% of the oil. The most abundant components were caryophyllene oxide (19.9%), trans-nerolidol (12.1%), epi-alpha-cadinol (9.4%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.8%). PMID:19731606

  4. Experimental Study of Soil Organic Matter Loss From Cultivated Field Plots In The Venezuelan Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanger, B.; Huon, S.; Velasquez, F.; Vallès, V.; Girardin A, C.; Mariotti, A. B.

    The question of discriminating sources of organic matter in suspended particles of stream flows can be addressed by using total organic carbon (TOC) concentration and stable isotope (13C, 15N) measurements when constant fluxes of organic matter supply can be assumed. However, little is known on the dynamics of organic matter release during soil erosion and on the temporal stability of its isotopic signature. In this study, we have monitored soil organic carbon loss and water runoff using natural rainfall events on three experimental field plots with different vegetation cover (bare soil, maize and coffee fields), set up on natural slopes of a tropical mountainous watershed in NW Venezuela (09°13'32'' ­ 09°10'00''N, 70°13'49'' ­ 70°18'34''W). Runoff and soil loss are markedly superior for the bare field plot than for the coffee field plot: by a factor 15 ­ 36, respectively, for the five-month experiment, and by a factor 30 ­ 120, respectively, during a single rainfall event experiment. Since runoff and soil organic matter loss are closely linked during most of the flow (at the time scales of this study), TOC concentration in suspended matter is constant. Furthermore, stable isotope compositions reflect those of top-soil organic matter from which they originate.

  5. [Colombian migration to the Venezuelan agrarian sector: a binational context].

    PubMed

    Mora, J; Gomez, A

    1980-01-01

    The authors attempt to determine the reasons for the chronic national labor shortage in the Venezuelan agrarian sector and for the large-scale emigration of Colombians to work in Venezuelan agriculture. The income of agricultural wage earners and the conditions of labor force reproduction in Venezuela are discussed as factors contributing to the labor shortage. With reference to Colombia, the rapid growth of international commerce and the policy of limiting wages are suggested as factors which contribute to emigration PMID:12338618

  6. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Southern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, José G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Freier, Jerome E.; Cordova, Dionicio; Clements, Tamara; Moncayo, Abelardo; Kang, Wenli; Gomez-Hernandez, Carlos; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Gabriela; Ludwig, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Equine epizootics of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) occurred in the southern Mexican states of Chiapas in 1993 and Oaxaca in 1996. To assess the impact of continuing circulation of VEE virus (VEEV) on human and animal populations, serologic and viral isolation studies were conducted in 2000 to 2001 in Chiapas State. Human serosurveys and risk analyses indicated that long-term endemic transmission of VEEV occurred among villages with seroprevalence levels of 18% to 75% and that medical personnel had a high risk for VEEV exposure. Seroprevalence in wild animals suggested cotton rats as possible reservoir hosts in the region. Virus isolations from sentinel animals and genetic characterizations of these strains indicated continuing circulation of a subtype IE genotype, which was isolated from equines during the recent VEE outbreaks. These data indicate long-term enzootic and endemic VEEV circulation in the region and continued risk for disease in equines and humans. PMID:15663847

  7. Ecologic studies of Venezuelan encephalitis virus in Peru during 1970-1971.

    PubMed

    Scherer, W F; Madalengoitia, J; Flores, W; Acosta, M

    1975-04-01

    Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) virus has intermittently produced epidemics and equine epizootics on the dry Pacific coastal plain of Peru since at least the 1930's. However, evidence that the virus exists in the Amazon region of Peru to the east of the Andes mountains was not obtained until antibodies were found in human sera collected in 1965, and 10 strains of the virus were isolated in a forest near the city of Iquitos, Peru during February and March 1971. Eight strains came from mosquitoes and two from dead sentinel hamsters. Three hamsters exposed in forests near Iquitos developed VE virus antibodies suggesting that hamster-benign strains also exist there. Antibody tests of equine sera revealed no evidence that VE virus was actively cycling during the late 1950's or 1960's in southern coastal Peru, where equine epizootics had occurred in the 1930's and 1940's. In northern coastal Peru bordering Ecuador, antibodies were present in equine sera, presumably residual from the 1969 outbreak caused by subtype I virus, since neutralizing antibody titers were higher to subtype I virus than to subtypes III or IV. No VE virus was detected in this northern region during the dry season of 1970 by use of sentinel hamsters. The possibility is considered that VE epidemics and equine epizootics on the Pacific coast of Peru are caused by movements of virus in infected vertebrates traversing Andean passes or in infected vertebrates or mosquitoes carried in airplanes from the Amazon region. PMID:235838

  8. Jotï ecogony, Venezuelan Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, Egleé L.

    2013-03-01

    The current environmental crisis permeates the discourse and concerns of people all over the world. Consideration of diverse environmental ethics showing the alternative ways in which people conceptualize and relate to nature and natural resources are critical for bringing about more sustainable human behaviors. After a brief review of Western historical notions of nature, this work explores the ecogony, or causal reasons, that trigger the behavior of the Jotï, an Amerindian people of the Venezuelan Amazon, with other entities and the forest that they inhabit. The analysis presented synthesizes 15 years of transdisciplinary ethno-ecological research comprising quantitative and qualitative methods (collection of herbarium voucher specimens, floristic inventories in forest plots, structured interviews focused on plot vegetation, semi-structured interviews of life-histories, participant observation, time allocation studies, food resource accounting, focal person following observations, garden crop inventories and censuses, mapping of wild resource harvest locations, among others). Jotï pragmatic and ideological tenets generate a distinctive environmental ethics based on ecogonic nodes. Notions of interdependence, humanity and person are articulated on a daily basis through several dynamics: (1) hyper-awareness of all living things’ dependence on each other and other elements of the biophysical environment at macroscales and microscales, (2) the construction of human spiritual, conscious, physical and agentive constituents from a variety of diverse botanical and zoological species and mineral components of their homeland, and (3) an understanding of the aggregate surroundings, including a significant portion of the biotic and abiotic components, as potential subjects with awareness, creativity and moral stances. This condition of interdependence confers rights and duties on all the parts. Jotï horizontal communications with and among life-forms sustain their

  9. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA): Venezuelan Application

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Martínez, Ramfis; Hamdy, Osama; Marante, Daniel; Inés Marulanda, María; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is a necessary component of comprehensive type 2 diabetes (T2D) management, but optimal outcomes require culturally-sensitive implementation. Accordingly, international experts created an evidence-based transcultural diabetes nutrition algorithm (tDNA) to improve understanding of MNT and to foster portability of current guidelines to various dysglycemic populations worldwide. This report details the development of tDNA-Venezuelan via analysis of region-specific cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, lifestyles, anthropometrics, and resultant tDNA algorithmic modifications. Specific recommendations include: screening for prediabetes (for biochemical monitoring and lifestyle counseling); detecting obesity using Latin American cutoffs for waist circumference and Venezuelan cutoffs for BMI; prescribing MNT to people with prediabetes, T2D, or high CVD risk; specifying control goals in prediabetes and T2D; and describing regional differences in prevalence of CVD risk and lifestyle. Venezuelan deliberations involved evaluating typical food-based eating patterns, correcting improper dietary habits through adaptation of the Mediterranean diet with local foods, developing local recommendations for physical activity, avoiding stigmatizing obesity as a cosmetic problem, avoiding misuse of insulin and metformin, circumscribing bariatric surgery to appropriate indications, and using integrated health service networks to implement tDNA. Finally, further research, national surveys, and validation protocols focusing on CVD risk reduction in Venezuelan populations are necessary. PMID:24699193

  10. Brokerage, Political Opportunity, and Protest in Venezuelan Higher Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores two episodes of contention in the ongoing conflict between the Venezuelan government and the country's autonomous universities. In August 2009, Venezuela's National Assembly approved and implemented the controversial Organic Education Law. Sixteen months later, the Assembly approved the similarly polarizing Law of University…

  11. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in March-April…

  12. Molecular systematics of the neotropical scorpion genus Tityus (Buthidae): the historical biogeography and venom antigenic diversity of toxic Venezuelan species.

    PubMed

    Borges, Adolfo; Bermingham, Eldredge; Herrera, Nimiadina; Alfonzo, Marcelo J; Sanjur, Oris I

    2010-01-01

    We provide a mitochondrial DNA-based phylogenetic hypothesis for 21 Tityus species collected in Venezuela, Trinidad, Brazil and Panama, including 12 taxa known to be toxic to humans. Our phylogenetic reconstruction is based on 850 nucleotides of the combined cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S rRNA genes for most species, and centered on Venezuelan scorpions owing to the detailed taxonomic and biogeographic information available for Tityus in this region. The principal phylogenetic result was the strong support for mtDNA clades representing geographical groupings associated with the Perijá mountain range, the Mérida Andes, or the central and eastern coastal ranges in Venezuela, suggesting that vicariance has been a potent force in the diversification of local scorpions. Venezuelan Tityus species have been organized by González-Sponga into three artificial morphological groups, "androcottoides", "discrepans", and "nematochirus", based on the array of ventral carinae in metasomal segments II-IV. We also incorporated a fourth morphological group ("Tityus clathratus"), recently documented in Venezuela. Our results do not support the clustering of the species in the "androcottoides" and "discrepans" morphological groups, which include the majority of taxa of medical importance, but provided support for the "nematochirus" species group. T. clathratus was found to cluster with the Brazilian T. serrulatus and T. bahiensis. Divergence times of most clades are consistent with major events in the geological history of northern Venezuela and suggest that many Venezuelan Tityus species formed in the late Miocene and the Pliocene. In turn, we used the Tityus mtDNA phylogeny to determine the potential utility of phylogenetic systematics to predict Tityus venom antigenic reactivity by testing the recognition of T. nororientalis, T. discrepans, T. zulianus, T. perijanensis, and T. clathratus venoms by anti-T. discrepans horse antibodies. Cross-reactivity was significantly

  13. 77 FR 65574 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce that our draft comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes NWR (National Wildlife Refuge), Karl E. Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District, is available for public review and comment. The draft CCP/EA......

  14. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on October 29, 2012 ] (77 FR 65574... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final... conservation plan and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife...

  15. Tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Fielding, Eric J.; Fox, Andrew N.; Gubbels, Timothy L.

    1989-01-01

    Acquisition of nearly complete coverage of Thematic Mapper data for the central Andes between about 15 to 34 degrees S has stimulated a comprehensive and unprecedented study of the interaction of tectonics and climate in a young and actively developing major continental mountain belt. The current state of the synoptic mapping of key physiographic, tectonic, and climatic indicators of the dynamics of the mountain/climate system are briefly reviewed.

  16. Socialized medicine or state-ruled medicine: the Venezuelan dilemma.

    PubMed

    Morgado, P J

    1989-07-01

    The economic crisis in which Venezuela is living, caused by the fall in oil prices, has forced the government to reorganize its medical services. A central administrative organ, the National Health Service, has been created. It seeks to develop a social medicine directed at the less favored classes of the population. Notwithstanding the continuously rising costs of private medicine, which, until now, the government has permitted without restrictions, the shadow of government intervention looms ominously over private practice, where subemployment of doctors already exists, along with the growing tendencies of insurance companies to impose economic conditions. The Venezuelan Medical Federation, which, by law, groups all Venezuelan doctors, has began a battle on two main fronts: against the State intervention and against the insurance companies who hope to benefit at the expense of the already underpaid doctors. PMID:2737063

  17. Glacier Sensitivity Across the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Rupper, S.

    2010-12-01

    Most of the research on causes driving former glacial fluctuations, and the climatic signals involved, has focused on the comparisons of sequences of glacial events in separate regions of the world and their temporal-phasing relationship with terrestrial or extraterrestrial climate-forcing mechanisms. Nevertheless the climatic signals related with these glacial advances are still under debate. This impossibility to resolve these questions satisfactorily have been generally attributed to the insufficiently precise chronologies and unevenly distributed records. However, behind these ideas lies the implicit assumption that glaciers situated in different climate regimes respond uniformly to similar climatic perturbations. This ongoing research is aimed to explore the climate-glacier relationship at regional scale, through the analysis of the spatial variability of glacier sensitivity to climatic change. By applying a Surface Energy Mass Balance model (SEMB) developed by Rupper and Roe (2008) to glaciers located in different climatic regimes, we analyzed the spatial variability of mass balance changes under different baseline conditions and under different scenarios of climatic change. For the sake of this research, the analysis is being focused on the Andes, which in its 9,000 km along the western margin of South America offers an unparalleled climatic diversity. Preliminary results suggest that above some threshold of climate change (a hypothetical uniform perturbation), all the glaciers across the Andes would respond in the “same direction” (advancing or retreating). Below that threshold, glaciers located in some climatic regimes may be insensitive to the specific perturbation. On the other hand, glaciers located in different climatic regimes may exhibit a “different magnitude” of change under a uniform climatic perturbation. Thus, glaciers located in the dry Andes of Perú, Chile and Argentina are more sensitive to precipitation changes than variations in

  18. The Venezuelan School System: Some Important Features for the Definition of the Process of Educational Decentralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauregui, Luis Bravo; Blanco, Carlos Eduardo

    1994-01-01

    Reports initial results of an investigation into achievements of Venezuelan state policies since 1958. The state remains the main driving force for school development. Venezuelan education is both public and centrally organized; the central government is the highest authority in educational matters. Decentralization as a way to reform rural…

  19. Western Slope of Andes, Peru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Along the western flank of the Andes, 400 km SE of Lima Peru, erosion has carved the mountain slopes into long, narrow serpentine ridges. The gently-sloping sediments have been turned into a plate of worms wiggling their way downhill to the ocean.

    The image was acquired September 28, 2004, covers an area of 38 x 31.6 km, and is located near 14.7 degrees south latitude, 74.5 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. k0-INAA of Archaeological and Industrial Venezuelan Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, F.; Pino, F.; Sneyers, L.; Vermaecker, P.; Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Mackowiak de Antczak, Ma. M.; Antczak, A.; Greaves, E.; Palacios, D.

    2007-10-01

    Archaeological and industrial Venezuelan samples were analyzed by k0-INAA to provide new data on the provenance study of the figurines found in Los Roques Archipelago and on recycling of industrial by-products. Los Roques and Valencia Lake Basin figurines are similar. Bottom Oil Ashes have 10 times the concentration of V, Mg, Ni, Fe, Na compared to ICP-AES and TXRF results. Red Mud samples have Thnat and Unat from four to ten times higher concentrations than those recommended for building materials.

  1. By analogy with late paleozoic orogeny in the Venezuelan Andes, Maracaibo Basin is en route to a granitic event

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.; Giegengack, R.F.; Lutz, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    Postulated stages of orogeny in a continental crustal setting are:- 1. Stresses of plate convergence lead to block uplift and complementary basin subsidence. The basin fills with 12-14 km of illite-rich flysch (1km/3Ma). This about doubles the thickness of K-rich sial. 2. In situ heating of the flysch by radioactive decay provides a thermal gradient of c.35/sup 0/C/km and it is metamorphosed (pre-deformation) to greenschists facies. 3. After maximum crustal subsidence continued compression results in updoming of crust and overlying flysch. Cannibalism of flysch, cooling and mild subsidence follow; autometamorphism declines. 4. Thin deltaic-marine deposits complete basin fill over the meta-flysch. The unconformity (a span of only 5-10 Ma) is of minor import. 5. Resetting of the thermal profile of the depressed crust lags far behind that in the flysch. Parallels to the above in the Maracalbo basin fill are: -thickness (approx.11km), nature (flysch abounds), rate of deposition (c.1km/3-4Ma), thermal gradient (c.33/sup 0/C/km) and overall tesselar shape. Presence of impermeable strata in the Maracaibo Basin suggests that large-scale fluid convection is inhibited; conductive models of heat transfer can be used. Computer modeling suggests that radiogenic heat, augmented by exothermic oxidation of organic matter, and with a normal mantle heat flow will explain the autometamorphism of the flysch. Alternative orogenic models invoking pull-apart basins do not explain the great thickness of sediments and absence of volcanic activity.

  2. Gas exchange and low temperature resistance in two tropical high mountain tree species from the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A.; Rada, Fermín; Azócar, Aura; García-Núñez, Carlos; Cabrera, Hernán M.

    2000-05-01

    Temperature may determine altitudinal tree distribution in different ways: affecting survival through freezing temperatures or by a negative carbon balance produced by lower photosynthetic rates. We studied gas exchange and supercooling capacity in a timberline and a treeline species ( Podocarpus oleifolius and Espeletia neriifolia, respectively) in order to determine if their altitudinal limits are related to carbon balance, freezing temperature damage, or both. Leaf gas exchange, leaf temperature-net photosynthesis curves and leaf temperature at which ice formation occurred were measured at two sites along an altitudinal gradient. Mean CO 2 assimilation rates for E. neriifolia were 3.4 and 1.3 μmol·m -2·s -1, at 2 400 and 3 200 m, respectively. Mean night respiration was 2.2 and 0.9 μmol·m -2·s -1 for this species at 2 400 and 3 200 m, respectively. Mean assimilation rates for P. oleifolius were 3.8 and 2.2 μmol·m -2·s -1 at 2 550 and 3 200 m, respectively. Night respiration was 0.8 μmol·m -2·s -1 for both altitudes. E. neriifolia showed similar optimum temperatures for photosynthesis at both altitudes, while a decrease was observed in P. oleifolius.E. neriifolia and P. oleifolius presented supercooling capacities of -6.5 and -3.0 °C, respectively. For E. neriifolia, freezing resistance mechanisms are sufficient to reach higher altitudes; however, other environmental factors such as cloudiness may be affecting its carbon balance. P. oleifolius does not reach higher elevations because it does not have the freezing resistance mechanisms.

  3. Andes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... Peru, the northern portion of Chile, and the western part of Bolivia, which intersect near the inward "bend" in the coastline. Lake ... whose coastline forms part of the border between Peru and Bolivia, is prominently featured. At an altitude of 12,500 feet, it is said to ...

  4. Andes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... provide a striking demonstration of the power of water erosion. This image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging ... with the red filter placed over your left eye. Two main erosion formations can be seen. The one above image center is carved by the Rio ...

  5. Characterising the Venezuelan Troposphere for Radio-Astronomy Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, R.; Muñoz, A. G.; Brito, A.; Cubillán, N.

    2009-05-01

    Venezuela possesses a very useful geographical location for doing Radioastronomy. Recently, the Venezuelan Government (via FIDETEL-Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología) has aproved to the Laboratorio de Astronomía y Física Teórica (LAFT) of La Universidad del Zulia (Venezuela) the adquisition of four 3 meter diameter parabolic dishes that will be set as a radio-interferometer receiver and that can be used for certain Radioastronomy purposes. The specifications of the instrument will be treated elsewhere (Muñoz and Hernández 2007). To this aim, as ussually, the first step is to characterize the losses due to the atmosphere, and their evolution over time. In previous works (Muñoz et al. 2004, Memoires of V RIAO/VIII OPTILAS, M10-5 Modelling Tropospheric Radio-Attenuation Parameters for Venezuela, 359; Muñoz et al. 2006, CIENCIA, Vol. 14, 4, 428) we have studied some relevant electromagnetic (e-m) attenuation parameters dueto hydrometeors and absortion gases in the lower atmosphere, focused in local telecommunication applications (surface e-m trajectories). In this work we extend our results to include the cenital and quasi-cenital e-m trajectories, characterizing thus the medium losses in the 0.4-4.0 GHz spectral window for several Venezuelan locations. We report refractivity values and their gradients, tropospheric indexes, extinction coefficients and the total rain attenuation for the whole territory under study.

  6. Astrometric Positioning of the Venezuelan Satellite VeneSat-1 "PASAVEN"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, S.; Abad, C.; Hernández, R.

    2014-06-01

    By means of this document we inform regarding the collaboration between the Venezuelan institutions, Bolivarian Agency for Space Activities (ABAE) and the Astronomy Research Center (CIDA) with the purpose of using astrometry for the tracking of the Venezuelan Geostationary Satellite Venesat1 by means of optical observation. For this purpose two small astronomical observatories shall be installed on the space tracking ground stations owned by the ABAE in Venezuela and we hope that in a short term they shall be producing the expected results, and also that these observations may be extended to future Venezuelan satellites and to the determination of the geostationary space debris trajectories.

  7. Dynamics, patterns and causes of fires in Northwestern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Armenteras, Dolors; Retana, Javier

    2012-01-01

    According to recent studies, two widespread droughts occurred in the Amazon basin, one during 2005 and one during 2010. The drought increased the prevalence of climate-driven fires over most of the basin. Given the importance of human-atmosphere-vegetation interactions in tropical rainforests, these events have generated concerns over the vulnerability of this area to climate change. This paper focuses on one of the wettest areas of the basin, Northwestern Amazonia, where the interactions between the climate and fires are much weaker and where little is known about the anthropogenic drivers of fires. We have assessed the response of fires to climate over a ten-year period, and analysed the socio-economic and demographic determinants of fire occurrence. The patterns of fires and climate and their linkages in Northwestern Amazonia differ from the enhanced fire response to climate variation observed in the rest of Amazonia. The highest number of recorded fires in Northwestern Amazonia occurred in 2004 and 2007, and this did not coincide with the periods of extreme drought experienced in Amazonia in 2005 and 2010. Rather, during those years, Northwestern Amazonia experienced a relatively small numbers of fire hotspots. We have shown that fire occurrence correlated well with deforestation and was determined by anthropogenic drivers, mainly small-scale agriculture, cattle ranching (i.e., pastures) and active agricultural frontiers (including illegal crops). Thus, the particular climatic conditions for air convergence and rainfall created by proximity to the Andes, coupled with the presence of one of the most active colonisation fronts in the region, make this region differently affected by the general drought-induced fire patterns experienced by the rest of the Amazon. Moreover, the results suggest that, even in this wet region, humans are able to modify the frequency of fires and impact these historically well preserved forests. PMID:22523580

  8. Dynamics, Patterns and Causes of Fires in Northwestern Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Armenteras, Dolors; Retana, Javier

    2012-01-01

    According to recent studies, two widespread droughts occurred in the Amazon basin, one during 2005 and one during 2010. The drought increased the prevalence of climate-driven fires over most of the basin. Given the importance of human-atmosphere-vegetation interactions in tropical rainforests, these events have generated concerns over the vulnerability of this area to climate change. This paper focuses on one of the wettest areas of the basin, Northwestern Amazonia, where the interactions between the climate and fires are much weaker and where little is known about the anthropogenic drivers of fires. We have assessed the response of fires to climate over a ten-year period, and analysed the socio-economic and demographic determinants of fire occurrence. The patterns of fires and climate and their linkages in Northwestern Amazonia differ from the enhanced fire response to climate variation observed in the rest of Amazonia. The highest number of recorded fires in Northwestern Amazonia occurred in 2004 and 2007, and this did not coincide with the periods of extreme drought experienced in Amazonia in 2005 and 2010. Rather, during those years, Northwestern Amazonia experienced a relatively small numbers of fire hotspots. We have shown that fire occurrence correlated well with deforestation and was determined by anthropogenic drivers, mainly small-scale agriculture, cattle ranching (i.e., pastures) and active agricultural frontiers (including illegal crops). Thus, the particular climatic conditions for air convergence and rainfall created by proximity to the Andes, coupled with the presence of one of the most active colonisation fronts in the region, make this region differently affected by the general drought-induced fire patterns experienced by the rest of the Amazon. Moreover, the results suggest that, even in this wet region, humans are able to modify the frequency of fires and impact these historically well preserved forests. PMID:22523580

  9. Active tectonics of the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, J. F.; Lamb, S. H.

    1992-04-01

    Nearly 90 mm a -1 of relative plate convergence is absorbed in the Andean plate-boundary zone. The pattern of active tectonics shows remarkable variations in the way in which the plate slip vector is partitioned into displacement and strain and the ways in which compatibility between different segments is solved. Along any traverse across the plate-boundary zone, the sum of relative velocities between points must equal the relative plate motion. We have developed a kinematic synthesis of displacement and strain partitioning in the Andes from 47°S to 5°N relevant for the last 5 Ma based upon: (1) relative plate motion deduced from oceanic circuits giving a roughly constant azimuth between 075 and 080; (2) moment tensor solutions for over 120 crustal earthquakes since 1960; (3) structural studies of deformed Plio-Pleistocene rocks; (4) topographic/geomorphic studies; (5) palaeomagnetic data; and (6) geodetic data. We recognize four neotectonic zones, with subzones and boundary transfer zones, that are partitioned in different ways. These zones are not coincident with the 'classic' zones defined by the presence or absence of a volcanic chain or differences in finite displacements and strains and tectonic form; the long-term segmentation and finite evolution of the Andes may not occur in constantly defined segments in space and time. In Segment 1 (47°-39°S), the slip vector is partitioned into roughly orthogonal Benioff Zone slip with large magnitude/large slip-surface earthquakes and both distributed dextral shear giving clockwise rotations of up to 50° and dextral slip in the curved Liquine-Ofqui Fault System giving 5°-10° of anticlockwise fore-arc rotation. In Segment 2 (39°-20°S), the slip vector is partitioned into Benioff Zone slip roughly parallel with the slip vector, Andean crustal shortening and a very small component of dextral slip, including that on the Atacama Fault System. Between 39° and 34°S, a cross-strike dextral transfer, which deflects

  10. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Mérida Andes and the Santander Massif, NW South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Mora, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    New apatite U-Pb and multiphase 40Ar/39Ar data constrain the high to medium temperature (~ 500 °C-~ 300 °C) thermal histories of igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Mérida Andes of Venezuela, and new apatite and zircon fission track data constrain the ~ 500 °C-~ 60 °C thermal histories of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic rocks of the adjacent Santander Massif of Colombia. Computed thermal history envelopes using apatite U-Pb dates and grain size information from an Early Palaeozoic granodiorite in the Mérida Andes suggest that it cooled from > 500 °C to < 350 °C between ~ 266 Ma and ~ 225 Ma. Late Permian to Triassic cooling is also recorded in Early Palaeozoic granitoids and metasedimentary rocks in the Mérida Andes by numerous new muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar plateau dates spanning 257.1 ± 1.0 Ma to 205.1 ± 0.8 Ma. This episode of cooling is not recognised in the Santander Massif, where 40Ar/39Ar data suggest that some Early Palaeozoic rocks cooled below ~ 320 °C in the Early Palaeozoic. However, most data from pre-Jurassic rocks reveal a regional heat pulse at ~ 200 Ma during the intrusion of numerous shallow granitoids, resulting in temperatures in excess of ~ 520 °C, obscuring late Palaeozoic histories. The generally accepted timing of amalgamation of Pangaea along the Ouachita-Marathon suture pre-dates Late Permian to Triassic cooling recorded in basement rocks of the Mérida Andes by > 30 Ma, and its effect on rocks preserved in north-western South America is unknown. We interpret late Permian to Triassic cooling in the Mérida Andes to be driven by exhumation. Previous studies have suggested that a short phase of shortening and anatexis is recorded at ~ 253 Ma in the Maya Block, which may have been adjacent to the basement rocks of the Mérida Andes in the Late Permian. The coeval onset of exhumation in the Mérida Andes may be a result of increased coupling in the magmatic arc, which was located along the western margin of

  11. Venezuelan Caribbean Sea under the threat of TBT.

    PubMed

    Paz-Villarraga, César Augusto; Castro, Italo B; Miloslavich, Patricia; Fillmann, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Although environmental tributyltin (TBT) contamination is considered a solved problem, imposex occurrence in Plicopurpura patula as well as butyltins (BTs) contamination in sediments and tissues were detected along 700 km of the Caribbean coastal shore. Areas under the influence of five main ports of Venezuela were covered, as well as large marinas and sites located away from expected sources. Marinas were the most contaminated areas, whilst imposex incidence and TBT levels were relatively low in areas nearby commercial harbors. Thus, it is evident that marinas have become the main source of fresh TBT to the region. This might explain why imposex incidence seems to be widely distributed along the Venezuelan coast, since leisure boats are circulating along the whole coastal region. In fact, this could be the pattern for other areas of the Caribbean Sea. PMID:25155631

  12. Industrial applications of thermal sprayed coatings in Venezuelan steelmaking industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscano, S.; Nuñez, E.; Gil, L.; Zerpa, R.

    2013-11-01

    The metal components subjected to high temperature conditions, abrasive wear, corrosion, impact, etc.; tend to present degradation of manufacturing material, causing the failure imminent of the component. One of the alternatives to minimize or eliminate such effect is the application of ceramic coatings, which are thermal insulators and exhibit high mechanical strength. Its extreme hardness, coupled with the low friction properties and chemical stability, allowing its use in a wide variety of applications. Therefore, the following paper describes the application of thermal sprayed coatings obtained by HVOF and Plasma technologies like alternative to protect the metallic equipment in different venezuelan industrial sectors, such as to operate under aggressive conditions of service, such as the steelmaking nationals industries. This study presents applications cases of ceramic-based coatings, in order to minimize the sticking of metallic material in components of reduction reactor of FINMET® and MIDREXTM process.

  13. Biological screening of plants of the Venezuelan Amazons.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, G; Hasegawa, M; Rodríguez, M; Estrada, O; Méndez, J; Castillo, A; Gonzalez-Mujica, F; Motta, N; Vásquez, J; Romero-Vecchione, E

    2001-09-01

    A total of 21 extracts derived from 17 different plant species collected in Venezuelan Amazons have been tested for the following biological activities: cardiovascular activity, brine shrimp lethality, and inhibitory effects on the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate in intact and disrupted microsomes. Eight extracts diminished rat blood pressure with or without changes in heart rate. The fruit extract of Swartzia leptopetala and the leaf and twig extract of Connarus lambertii resulted in death of experimental animals. The majority of extracts (17 extracts) showed significant toxicity against Artemia salina. Concerning the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate, better inhibitory effects were observed in intact microsomes than in disrupted ones for all the extracts, suggesting that these extracts intervene with variable potency in glucose-6-phosphate transport through the microsomal membrane. PMID:11483381

  14. Lymphoreticular and myeloid pathogenesis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Walker, D H; Harrison, A; Murphy, K; Flemister, M; Murphy, F A

    1976-08-01

    Ultrastructural, histopathologic, and virologic studies of adult hamsters infected with virulent Venezuelan equine encelphalomyelitis (VEE) virus (Subtype I-B) demonstrated precise chronologic and topographic progression of lesions and viral replication in extraneural sites. Thymus contained the earliest lesions and the highest initial and subsequent viral titers. No particular cytotropism was observed as highly efficient viral replication and severe cytonecrosis proceded. Early cortical necrosis of splenic periarteriolar lymphocytic sheath was followed by lymphoblastoid repopulation of the peripheral zone. Massive bone marrow necrosis was accompained by ultrastructural evidence of VEE viral particle production in reticulum cells, rubricytes, myeloid cells, lymphoblastoid cells, and megakaryocytes. Speed, efficiency, destructiveness, and relative sensitivity of virtually all lymphoreticular and hematopoetic cells were hallmarks of virulent VEE infection in the hamster. PMID:941983

  15. Reproductive biology of freshwater fishes from the Venezuelan floodplains.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, H Y; Cardillo, E; Poleo, G; Marcano, D

    2009-03-01

    This review describes the endocrine changes that occur during the annual reproductive cycle of Pygocentrus cariba, Pimelodus blochii, and Oxydoras sifontesi and their relationships with the environmental characteristics of Venezuelan floodplains. Most reproductive studies of teleosts have focused on changes that occur during annual cycles in temperate species but, in tropical fish, this has been examined less frequently. P. cariba, P. blochii, and O. sifontesi are seasonal breeders widely distributed along the Orinoco River. Under natural conditions they have an annual gonadal cycle closely related to changes in the annual hydrology cycle of the Orinoco River which defines two seasons on the floodplain: inundation and isolation. The reproductive cycle of these species seems to be controlled by cues from the external environment. Relevant data about gonadal maturation, for example gonadosomatic index and sexual hormones secretion, are contrasted. The role of catecholamines in neuroendocrine control of the reproductive axis is also considered in this work. PMID:18726246

  16. ANDES: An Underground Laboratory in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Claudio O.

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is an underground laboratory, proposed to be built inside the Agua Negra road tunnel that will connect Chile (IV Region) with Argentina (San Juan Province) under the Andes Mountains. The Laboratory will be 1750 meters under the rock, becoming the 3rd deepest underground laboratory of this kind in the world, and the first in the Southern Hemisphere. ANDES will be an international Laboratory, managed by a Latin American consortium. The laboratory will host experiments in Particle and Astroparticle Physics, such as Neutrino and Dark Matter searches, Seismology, Geology, Geophysics and Biology. It will also be used for the development of low background instrumentation and related services. Here we present the general features of the proposed laboratory, the current status of the proposal and some of its opportunities for science.

  17. Blastomycosis in Northwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Nine cases of blastomycosis were seen at the Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital in northwestern Ontario from 1970 to 1983. Although this region has been described as a focus of endemic infection, little published information is available. Seven male and two female Canadian Indians, aged 4-54 years, acquired the infection. Three children were infected; a mother and her son became ill one month apart. All cases presented as progressive pulmonary disease and no extrapulmonary involvement was found. Delay in diagnosis ranged from 11 days to eight weeks, with a mean of 31 days. Patients generally responded favorably to treatment with amphotericin B. Epidemiologic data suggest that environmental, geographic, occupational and recreational determinants are necessary factors in disease acquisition. PMID:21279155

  18. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  19. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  20. Equine pythiosis: report in crossed bred (Criole Venezuelan) horses.

    PubMed

    Salas, Y; Márquez, A; Canelón, J; Perazzo, Y; Colmenárez, V; López, J A

    2012-12-01

    Pythium insidiosum is a pathogenic oomycete known since 1890 that causes pythiosis in mammals. In this report, seven P. insidiosum isolates were recovered from Venezuelan horses and were characterized. The strains were recovered from biopsied tissues and kunkers collected from granulomatous masses located on the hind limb and from a nodular lesion in the left upper eyelid, which decrease the ability of the horses to be used for working purposes. The methods used to identify P. insidiosum isolates were based on the production of sporangia and zoospores, histopathology and PCR assay. To further characterize these strains, portions of the 18S rRNA genes of the seven isolates were sequenced. The sequences showed high homology to previously described P. insidiosum DNA sequences available in GenBank. Similar studies based on the morphological, histological and molecular data identified the etiological agent in samples of granulomatous lesions in these equines as P. insidiosum. In America, the infection has been diagnosed more frequently in equines of Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica and the United States of America. PMID:22772508

  1. Characterization of Genetic Variability of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin; Be, Nicholas A.; Allen, Jonathan; Weaver, Scott C.; Forrester, Naomi; Guerbois, Mathilde; Jaing, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused large outbreaks of severe illness in both horses and humans. New approaches are needed to rapidly infer the origin of a newly discovered VEEV strain, estimate its equine amplification and resultant epidemic potential, and predict human virulence phenotype. We performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of all available VEE antigenic complex genomes, verified that a SNP-based phylogeny accurately captured the features of a phylogenetic tree based on multiple sequence alignment, and developed a high resolution genome-wide SNP microarray. We used the microarray to analyze a broad panel of VEEV isolates, found excellent concordance between array- and sequence-based SNP calls, genotyped unsequenced isolates, and placed them on a phylogeny with sequenced genomes. The microarray successfully genotyped VEEV directly from tissue samples of an infected mouse, bypassing the need for viral isolation, culture and genomic sequencing. Finally, we identified genomic variants associated with serotypes and host species, revealing a complex relationship between genotype and phenotype. PMID:27054586

  2. Characterization of Genetic Variability of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Viruses.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Shea N; McLoughlin, Kevin; Be, Nicholas A; Allen, Jonathan; Weaver, Scott C; Forrester, Naomi; Guerbois, Mathilde; Jaing, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused large outbreaks of severe illness in both horses and humans. New approaches are needed to rapidly infer the origin of a newly discovered VEEV strain, estimate its equine amplification and resultant epidemic potential, and predict human virulence phenotype. We performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of all available VEE antigenic complex genomes, verified that a SNP-based phylogeny accurately captured the features of a phylogenetic tree based on multiple sequence alignment, and developed a high resolution genome-wide SNP microarray. We used the microarray to analyze a broad panel of VEEV isolates, found excellent concordance between array- and sequence-based SNP calls, genotyped unsequenced isolates, and placed them on a phylogeny with sequenced genomes. The microarray successfully genotyped VEEV directly from tissue samples of an infected mouse, bypassing the need for viral isolation, culture and genomic sequencing. Finally, we identified genomic variants associated with serotypes and host species, revealing a complex relationship between genotype and phenotype. PMID:27054586

  3. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection of Spiny Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Anne-Sophie; Gonzales, Marta; Ferro, Cristina; Tamayo, Margarita; Aronson, Judith; Paessler, Slobodan; Anishchenko, Michael; Boshell, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Enzootic strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) circulate in forested habitats of Mexico, Central, and South America, and spiny rats (Proechimys spp.) are believed to be the principal reservoir hosts in several foci. To better understand the host-pathogen interactions and resistance to disease characteristic of many reservoir hosts, we performed experimental infections of F1 progeny from Proechimys chrysaeolus collected at a Colombian enzootic VEEV focus using sympatric and allopatric virus strains. All animals became viremic with a mean peak titer of 3.3 log10 PFU/mL, and all seroconverted with antibody titers from 1:20 to 1:640, which persisted up to 15 months. No signs of disease were observed, including after intracerebral injections. The lack of detectable disease and limited histopathologic lesions in these animals contrast dramatically with the severe disease and histopathologic findings observed in other laboratory rodents and humans, and support their role as reservoir hosts with a long-term coevolutionary relationship to VEEV. PMID:15890116

  4. Assessment of routine malaria diagnosis in the Venezuelan Amazon.

    PubMed

    Metzger, W G; Vivas-Martínez, S; Giron, A; Vaccari, E; Campos, E; Rodríguez, I; Miranda, E; Terán, E; Olivo, L; Magris, M

    2011-05-01

    The quality of routine malaria diagnosis is a crucial topic of malaria control. The aim of this assessment was to monitor and evaluate the quality of routine malaria diagnosis in Amazonas (Venezuela) and to improve the quality control system. The traditional non-blinded quality control system was found to be overburdened with diagnostic samples. A modified sampling system with fewer samples to be tested was proposed. Expert microscopists blindly double-checked 1000 slides and 550 rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) (OptiMAL-IT) from health posts (HP). For Plasmodium vivax, HP microscopy and OptiMAL-IT showed sensitivies of 86% and 63%, respectively. For P. falciparum, HP microscopy and OptiMAL-IT showed sensitivities of 68% and 89%, respectively. Both methods lost accuracy when fewer parasites occurred in the sample. HP microscopists from different municipalities displayed significant differences in diagnostic quality. Overall, quality of routine malaria diagnosis in the Venezuelan Amazon is good but not optimal. The change from the traditional non-blinded quality control system to blinded cross-checking of a minimal selection of samples is - comparatively - a low cost intervention with possibly high impact on the quality of routine malaria diagnosis. The introduction of RDTs should be discussed carefully in order not to displace an existing network of HP microscopists. PMID:21376357

  5. Malaria diagnosis under field conditions in the Venezuelan Amazon.

    PubMed

    Metzger, W G; Vivas-Martínez, S; Rodriguez, I; Gonçalves, J; Bongard, E; Fanello, C I; Vivas, L; Magris, M

    2008-01-01

    To improve practical, accurate diagnosis of malaria in the Amazon rainforest of Venezuela, two rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) (OptiMAL-IT) and FalciVax) and a laboratory light microscope, used in the field with a battery-operated head lamp as an external light source, were evaluated against the standard laboratory microscope procedure for malaria detection. One hundred and thirty-six Yanomami patients were studied for the presence of malaria parasites. Thirty-three patients (24%) were positive for malaria (Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae). Twenty-one (64%) of the positive patients had <100 parasites/microl. Both RDTs showed poor sensitivity (24.2% for OptiMAL-IT) and 36.4% for FalciVax) but good specificity (99% both for OptiMAL-IT) and FalciVax). Field and laboratory microscopy showed sensitivities of 94% and 91%, respectively. The kappa coefficient was 0.90, indicating a high agreement between field and laboratory microscopy. We conclude that (i) adequate slide reading cannot be substituted by either of the two RDTs in the Venezuelan Amazon and (ii) the use of a light source such as that described above makes slide reading more feasible than hitherto in remote areas without electricity. PMID:17919672

  6. Characterization of genetic variability of Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin; Be, Nicholas A.; Allen, Jonathan; Weaver, Scott C.; Forrester, Naomi; Guerbois, Mathilde; Jaing, Crystal

    2016-04-07

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused large outbreaks of severe illness in both horses and humans. New approaches are needed to rapidly infer the origin of a newly discovered VEEV strain, estimate its equine amplification and resultant epidemic potential, and predict human virulence phenotype. We performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of all available VEE antigenic complex genomes, verified that a SNP-based phylogeny accurately captured the features of a phylogenetic tree based on multiple sequence alignment, and developed a high resolution genome-wide SNP microarray. We used the microarray to analyze a broadmore » panel of VEEV isolates, found excellent concordance between array- and sequence-based SNP calls, genotyped unsequenced isolates, and placed them on a phylogeny with sequenced genomes. The microarray successfully genotyped VEEV directly from tissue samples of an infected mouse, bypassing the need for viral isolation, culture and genomic sequencing. Lastly, we identified genomic variants associated with serotypes and host species, revealing a complex relationship between genotype and phenotype.« less

  7. Lymphoreticular and myeloid pathogenesis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D. H.; Harrison, A.; Murphy, K.; Flemister, M.; Murphy, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrastructural, histopathologic, and virologic studies of adult hamsters infected with virulent Venezuelan equine encelphalomyelitis (VEE) virus (Subtype I-B) demonstrated precise chronologic and topographic progression of lesions and viral replication in extraneural sites. Thymus contained the earliest lesions and the highest initial and subsequent viral titers. No particular cytotropism was observed as highly efficient viral replication and severe cytonecrosis proceded. Early cortical necrosis of splenic periarteriolar lymphocytic sheath was followed by lymphoblastoid repopulation of the peripheral zone. Massive bone marrow necrosis was accompained by ultrastructural evidence of VEE viral particle production in reticulum cells, rubricytes, myeloid cells, lymphoblastoid cells, and megakaryocytes. Speed, efficiency, destructiveness, and relative sensitivity of virtually all lymphoreticular and hematopoetic cells were hallmarks of virulent VEE infection in the hamster. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 12A and B Figure 13 Figure 7 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:941983

  8. Sandstone caves on Venezuelan tepuis: Return to pseudokarst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, R.; Lánczos, T.; Gregor, M.; Schlögl, J.; Šmída, B.; Liščák, P.; Brewer-Carías, Ch.; Vlček, L.

    2011-09-01

    Venezuelan table mountains (tepuis) host the largest arenite caves in the world. The most frequently used explanation of their origin so far was the "arenization" theory, involving dissolution of quartz cement around the sand grains and subsequent removing of the released grains by water. New research in the two largest arenite cave systems - Churi-Tepui System in Chimanta Massif and Ojos de Cristal System in Roraima Tepui showed that quartz dissolution plays only a minor role in their speleogenesis. Arenites forming the tepuis are not only quartzites but they display a wide range of lithification and breakdown, including also loose sands and sandstones. Speleogenetic processes are mostly concentrated on the beds of unlithified sands which escaped from diagenesis by being sealed by the surrounding perfectly lithified quartzites. Only the so-called "finger-flow" pillars testify to confined diagenetic fluids which flowed in narrow channels, leaving the surrounding arenite uncemented. Another factor which influenced the cave-forming processes by about 30% was lateritization. It affects beds formed of arkosic sandstones and greywackes which show strong dissolution of micas, feldspars and clay minerals, turning then to laterite ("Barro Rojo"). The main prerequisite to rank caves among karst phenomena is dissolution. As the dissolution of silicate minerals other than quartz appears to play not only a volumetrically important role but even a trigger role, these arenitic caves may be ranked as karst.

  9. Temporal distribution of heavy metal concentrations in oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae from the central Venezuelan coast.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Juan A; Handt, Helga; Mora, Abrahan; Vásquez, Yaneth; Azocar, José; Marcano, Eunice

    2013-08-15

    The oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae is a bivalve abundant in Venezuelan estuaries and consumed by local populations. No known values have been reported on trace metals in oysters from the central Venezuelan coast. We report the concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in the soft parts of C. rhizophorae, which were collected bimonthly between March 2008 and March 2009, at two sampling areas from the Central Venezuelan Coast: Buche estuary and Mochima estuary. Our results show that for each metal there is a similar temporal variation pattern. The concentrations of the heavy metals reported in this work are useful as reliable baselines and can be used for comparison in future environment studies. Concentrations in C. rhizophorae from the Buche estuary can be interpreted to be high on a global scale for Cd, Cu, Ni and Mn, indicating atypically raised bioavailabilities. PMID:23746942

  10. Determination of FeS(2) in Venezuelan laterites after a sulphurization process.

    PubMed

    La Brecque, J J; Rosales, P A

    1979-11-01

    A technique is presented for determination of FeS(2) in Venezuelan laterites after a sulphurization process. The determination is based on a reaction with water followed by a turbidimetric determination of sulphate ions in solution. The effect of the reaction time and of the particle size is investigated. Data are given showing the precision to be better than 3%, and the accuracy was studied by preparation of a series of synthetic samples of FeS(2), FeS and Venezuelan laterite. PMID:18962570

  11. PORTRAYALS OF COLOMBIAN AND VENEZUELAN IMMIGRANT ORGANISATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-R, Magaly; Aysa-Lastra, Maria

    2013-10-01

    This article compares the public images of Colombian and Venezuelan immigrant organisations in the United States. Immigrant organisations' webpages and the expression of their main aims and goals serve to identify their major concerns as they create public images not only for the organisation but for the immigrant community itself. To interpret the immigrant organisations' public images and their goals, we offer a multilevel study that considers immigrants' contexts of exit, which are related to the motivation of migrate and the particular sociodemographic makeup of immigrant groups. This paper adds the Venezuelan immigrant experience to the literature on immigrant organisations. PMID:25324586

  12. PORTRAYALS OF COLOMBIAN AND VENEZUELAN IMMIGRANT ORGANISATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    SANCHEZ-R, MAGALY; AYSA-LASTRA, MARIA

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the public images of Colombian and Venezuelan immigrant organisations in the United States. Immigrant organisations’ webpages and the expression of their main aims and goals serve to identify their major concerns as they create public images not only for the organisation but for the immigrant community itself. To interpret the immigrant organisations’ public images and their goals, we offer a multilevel study that considers immigrants’ contexts of exit, which are related to the motivation of migrate and the particular sociodemographic makeup of immigrant groups. This paper adds the Venezuelan immigrant experience to the literature on immigrant organisations. PMID:25324586

  13. Diurnal cycle in convergence patterns in the boundary layer east of the Andes and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Matilde; Skabar, Yanina García

    2011-06-01

    The South American Low-Level Jet Experiment (SALLJEX) provided a unique dataset to investigate the existence of a mesoscale low-level circulation and of a diurnal cycle in its related convergence pattern over the Southeastern South American region east of the Andes, as well as its relationship with deep convection during the warm season. The present paper builds upon high-resolution analyses produced, assimilating the data collected during the SALLJEX field campaign using BRAMS, and explores their capability to reproduce mesoscale circulations not resolved by the low density observational network available in this region. Results of the analyses show a diurnal oscillation signal in the mean boundary layer convergence pattern over the plains with a nocturnal (daytime) convergence (divergence) maximum. These results are coherent with previous findings of a nocturnal phase in the mature stage of organized deep convection and related precipitation in subtropical latitudes east of the Andes during the warm season. The diurnal cycle of convergence/divergence in the boundary layer is described over a 15-day period, during which different synoptic conditions occurred. During weakly forced environments a regime characterized by nocturnal eastward anomaly flow and convergence and daytime westward anomaly flow and divergence related to a mesoscale northwestern mountain-central plain flow regime dominates over the plains between the Andes Mountains, the Parana River Valley, and the southern Brazil mountain range. In contrast, during synoptic conditions dominated by the presence of a deep thermal low over northwestern Argentina and a related low-level jet, convergence at night is mainly accomplished by the predominantly meridional low-level jet, which exhibits an anomalous weak wind speed diurnal cycle with respect to its summer climatological mean. On the other hand daytime divergence is completely produced by the zonal wind component as in the previous synoptic situation

  14. Andes Altiplano, Northwest Argentina, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This view of the Andes Altiplano in northwest Argentina (25.5S, 68.0W) is dominated by heavily eroded older and inactive volcano peaks. The altiplano is a high altitude cold desert like the Tibetan Plateau but smaller in area. It is an inland extension of the hyperarid Atacama Desert of the west coast of South America and includes hundreds of volcanic edifices (peaks, cinder cones, lava flows, debris fields, lakes and dry lake beds (salars).

  15. The role of IKKβ in Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Moushimi; Voss, Kelsey; Sampey, Gavin; Senina, Svetlana; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Mueller, Claudius; Calvert, Valerie; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Carpenter, Calvin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Mogelsvang, Soren; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae. VEEV infection is characterized by extensive inflammation and studies from other laboratories implicated an involvement of the NF-κB cascade in the in vivo pathology. Initial studies indicated that at early time points of VEEV infection, the NF-κB complex was activated in cells infected with the TC-83 strain of VEEV. One upstream kinase that contributes to the phosphorylation of p65 is the IKKβ component of the IKK complex. Our previous studies with Rift valley fever virus, which exhibited early activation of the NF-κB cascade in infected cells, had indicated that the IKKβ component underwent macromolecular reorganization to form a novel low molecular weight form unique to infected cells. This prompted us to investigate if the IKK complex undergoes a comparable macromolecular reorganization in VEEV infection. Size-fractionated VEEV infected cell extracts indicated a macromolecular reorganization of IKKβ in VEEV infected cells that resulted in formation of lower molecular weight complexes. Well-documented inhibitors of IKKβ function, BAY-11-7082, BAY-11-7085 and IKK2 compound IV, were employed to determine whether IKKβ function was required for the production of infectious progeny virus. A decrease in infectious viral particles and viral RNA copies was observed with inhibitor treatment in the attenuated and virulent strains of VEEV infection. In order to further validate the requirement of IKKβ for VEEV replication, we over-expressed IKKβ in cells and observed an increase in viral titers. In contrast, studies carried out using IKKβ(-/-) cells demonstrated a decrease in VEEV replication. In vivo studies demonstrated that inhibitor treatment of TC-83 infected mice increased their survival. Finally, proteomics studies have revealed that IKKβ may interact with the viral protein nsP3. In conclusion, our studies have revealed that the host IKKβ protein may be

  16. The Role of IKKβ in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Moushimi; Voss, Kelsey; Sampey, Gavin; Senina, Svetlana; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Mueller, Claudius; Calvert, Valerie; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Carpenter, Calvin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Mogelsvang, Soren; Petricoin, Emanuel; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2014-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae. VEEV infection is characterized by extensive inflammation and studies from other laboratories implicated an involvement of the NF-κB cascade in the in vivo pathology. Initial studies indicated that at early time points of VEEV infection, the NF-κB complex was activated in cells infected with the TC-83 strain of VEEV. One upstream kinase that contributes to the phosphorylation of p65 is the IKKβ component of the IKK complex. Our previous studies with Rift valley fever virus, which exhibited early activation of the NF-κB cascade in infected cells, had indicated that the IKKβ component underwent macromolecular reorganization to form a novel low molecular weight form unique to infected cells. This prompted us to investigate if the IKK complex undergoes a comparable macromolecular reorganization in VEEV infection. Size-fractionated VEEV infected cell extracts indicated a macromolecular reorganization of IKKβ in VEEV infected cells that resulted in formation of lower molecular weight complexes. Well-documented inhibitors of IKKβ function, BAY-11-7082, BAY-11-7085 and IKK2 compound IV, were employed to determine whether IKKβ function was required for the production of infectious progeny virus. A decrease in infectious viral particles and viral RNA copies was observed with inhibitor treatment in the attenuated and virulent strains of VEEV infection. In order to further validate the requirement of IKKβ for VEEV replication, we over-expressed IKKβ in cells and observed an increase in viral titers. In contrast, studies carried out using IKKβ−/− cells demonstrated a decrease in VEEV replication. In vivo studies demonstrated that inhibitor treatment of TC-83 infected mice increased their survival. Finally, proteomics studies have revealed that IKKβ may interact with the viral protein nsP3. In conclusion, our studies have revealed that the host IKKβ protein may be

  17. Virological and serological studies of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, G S; Calisher, C H

    1976-01-01

    During the 1971 epidemic of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) in south Texas, 203 suspect VEE cases were evaluated by the Center for Disease Control. Sixty-seven were confirmed as cases of VEE. Laboratory confirmation was accomplished by isolation of VEE virus from a serum specimen taken during the acute illness in 50 (75%) of the confirmed cases. Serological confirmation was obtained in 17 cases (25%). Virus isolations were most often obtained from sera collected during the first 3 days of illness. Peak serum virus titers (algebraic mean, 10(5-7) suckling mouse intracranial 50% lethal doses [SMICLD50] per ml) occurred on day 2 of illness. One-half of the sera from which virus was isolated contained at least 10(5) SMICLD50/ml, which has been shown to be sufficient to infect some vector mosquitoes. Blood from 13 virus-positive VEE cases was obtained 1 and 11 months after illness. Hemagglutination-inhibiting, complement-fixing, and neutralizing antibodies were formed by all 13 patients 1 month after illness. Hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titers were essentially unchanged 11 months after illness. Complement-fixing antibody was undetectable 11 months after illness in 23% of cases and was detectable at dilutions of 1:8 or 1:6 in 77%. Neutralizing antibody (measured by log neutralization index) was not detectable 1 year after illness in one person (8%); titers had declined from 1.0 to 2.0 in 46%, were unchanged in 39%, and were not tested in one person (8%). No evidence of intrafamilial spread of VEE virus was obtained in either of two illness and antibody surveys. A randomized household illness and antibody survey of 681 Port Isabel residents revealed an inapparent infection ratio of 1:11 and an overall antibody prevalence of 3.2%. PMID:956360

  18. LANDSAT imagery of the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komer, C. A.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    The central Andes of South America extend from approximately 14 deg. S to 28 deg. S as an unbroken chain of mountains and volcanoes over 2000 km long. It is here that the Nazca plate dives under the South American plate at angles varying from 10 deg to 30 deg. Very little is known about the volcanoes comprising this classic, subduction-type plate margin. A catalogue of the volcanoes in the central Andes is being prepared by Dr. P.W. Francis and Dr. C.A. Wood at the NASA Lunar and Planetary Institute. At present, more than 800 volcanoes of Cenozoic age have been recognized in the chain, with an estimated 75-80 major, active Quarternary volcanoes. Approximately one hundred 1536 x 1536 pixel color composite Optronics positives were produced from six full LANDSAT Thermatic Mapper scenes and three partial TM scenes. These positives cover a large portion of the central Andes. The positives were produced from LANDSAT data using the VAX imaging package, LIPS. The scenes were first transferred from magnetic tape to disk. The LIPS package was then used to select volcanically interesting areas which were then electronically enhanced. Finally, the selected areas were transferred back to tape and printed on the Optronics equipment. The pictures are color composites using LANDSAT TM bands 7,4, and 2 in the red, green, and blue filters, respectively.

  19. The basement of the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia: An allochthonous terrane in northwestern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero Suarez, A.

    The fault system of the Borde Llanero of Colombia represents the limit between two early Paleozoic geologic provinces: the Guiana Shield (Gondwana) to the east, and an allochthonous terrane — formerly a piece of the North American continent — to the west. The Baudó Range, the Western Cordillera, and the western flank of the Central Cordillera are the result of post-Jurassic accretion. In contrast the pre-Emsian metamorphic rocks of the eastern flank of the Central Cordillera, of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, and of the Mérida Andes correspond to an allochthonous terrane that was accreted to the north-western continental border of South America during the collision between North America and Gondwana in Silurian-Early Devonian times. Geochronologic and petrographic data indicate the presence of the Grenvillian granulite belt, represented by the Garzón-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta belt. This belt is separated from the Guiana Shield by a magmatic tract which is parallel to the Borde Llanero of Venezuela and Colombia. The late Paleozoic regional metamorphism in the Northern Andes of Colombia occurred during Late Silurian-Early Devonian times. Since the late Emsian, a sedimentary cycle was initiated on this allochthonous basement. The faunal records of northwestern South America and the North American continent are indistinguishable for that time. This similarity clearly shows that both northwestern South America and the North American regions of the Appalachians and New Mexico belong to the same paleobiogeographic province. The faunal communication in this case supports the idea of the immediate neighborhood of the two continents.

  20. A new case of an Holarctic element in the Colombian Andes: first record of Cordyla Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) from the Neotropical region.

    PubMed

    Kurina, Olavi; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of Mycetophilidae - Cordyla monticola sp. n., Cordyla pseudopusilla sp. n. and Cordyla reducta sp. n. - are described from the Colombian Andes, representing the first described species of Cordyla Meigen from the Neotropical region. Colour photos of their habitus, wing and terminalia are provided. The morphological affinities of male terminalia are discussed in a worldwide context. The distributional pattern of the genus clearly indicates a case of northern elements reaching the north-western region of the Neotropics that corresponds to a secondary extension of a Holarctic clade to the south. PMID:26445929

  1. A new case of an Holarctic element in the Colombian Andes: first record of Cordyla Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) from the Neotropical region

    PubMed Central

    Kurina, Olavi; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of Mycetophilidae – Cordyla monticola sp. n., Cordyla pseudopusilla sp. n. and Cordyla reducta sp. n. – are described from the Colombian Andes, representing the first described species of Cordyla Meigen from the Neotropical region. Colour photos of their habitus, wing and terminalia are provided. The morphological affinities of male terminalia are discussed in a worldwide context. The distributional pattern of the genus clearly indicates a case of northern elements reaching the north-western region of the Neotropics that corresponds to a secondary extension of a Holarctic clade to the south. PMID:26445929

  2. Venezuelan 'Demonstradora Del Hogar': An Example of Women in Nonformal Rural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruddle, Kenneth; Chesterfield, Ray

    1974-01-01

    An exception to Latin American extension program's stereotyped image of women is the Venezuelan home demonstrator program. A woman spends three years in trainning to enable her to effectively train village housewives in culturally acceptable ways to participate in the commercial sector of a modern farming economy. (AG)

  3. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

  4. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

  5. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

  6. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

  7. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207...

  8. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework help system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrates that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  9. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sande, Brett; VanLehn, K.; Treacy, D.; Shelby, R.

    2006-12-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrate that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  10. The use of radar and LANDSAT data for mineral and petroleum exploration in the Los Andes region, Venezuela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    A geological study of a 27,500 sq km area in the Los Andes region of northwestern Venezuela was performed which employed both X-band radar mosaics and computer processed Landsat images. The 3.12 cm wavelength radar data were collected with horizontal-horizontal polarization and 10 meter spatial resolution by an Aeroservices SAR system at an altitude of 12,000 meters. The radar images increased the number of observable suspected fractures by 27 percent over what could be mapped by LANDSAT alone, owing mostly to the cloud cover penetration capabilities of radar. The approximate eight fold greater spatial resolution of the radar images made possible the identification of shorter, narrower fractures than could be detected with LANDSAT data alone, resulting in the discovery of a low relief anticline that could not be observed in LANDSAT data. Exploration targets for petroleum, copper, and uranium were identified for further geophysical work.

  11. Panoramic View of the Andes Mountains, Chile and Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This panoramic view of the Andes Mountains of Chile and Argentina (24.5S, 69.5W) is dominated by the yellows and browns of the coastal Atacama Desert and the full width of the Andes altiplano, about 300 miles. Winter snow can be seen capping the 22,000 to 23,000 ft. peaks of the Andes. Wisps of cirrus clouds lie over the altiplano and offshore fog obscures the coast. In the distance, the low Chaco Plain appears green with pastures and agriculture.

  12. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Activity in the Gulf Coast Region of Mexico, 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A. Paige; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Irene; Leal, Grace; Flores-Mayorga, Jose M.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Singh, Amber J.; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003–2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas. PMID:23133685

  13. Magnetic properties of NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers from Venezuelan petcoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Sarah; Silva, Pedro; Molina, Wilmer; Brämer-Escamilla, Werner; Alcalá, Olgi; Cañizales, Edgard

    2015-05-01

    NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers (NiFe2O4/CNFs) have been successfully synthesized by hydrotermal method using Venezuelan petroleum coke (petcoke) as carbon source and NiFe2O4 as catalyst. The morphology, structural and magnetic properties of nanocomposite products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). XRD analysis revealed a cubic spinel structure and ferrite phase with high crystallinity. HR-TEM reveals the presence of CNFs with diameters of 4±2 nm. At room temperature, NiFe2O4/CNFs show superparamagnetic behavior with a maximum magnetization of 15.35 emu/g. Our findings indicate that Venezuelan petroleum coke is suitable industrial carbon source for the growth of magnetic CNFs.

  14. Ephemeroptera from the Venezuelan Guayanas's Uplands: Families Leptophlebiidae, Euthyplociidae and Oligoneuriidae.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Eduardo; Grillet, Maria-Eugenia; Nieto, Carolina; Molineri, Carlos; Guerrero, Edmundo

    2014-01-01

    As a continuation of a series of papers to improve the knowledge of the Ephemeroptera fauna of the Venezuelan Guayana's Uplands, an update of the families Leptophlebiidae, Euthyplociidae and Oligoneuriidae in the region is presented. As a result, Paramaka incognita sp. nov. is described, the female of Askola emmerichi is described for the first time, and the genera Askola, Hydrosmilodon and Leentvaaria, the subgenus Miroculis (Atroari) and the species Miroculis (M.) marauiae are recorded for the first time for Venezuela. PMID:25081161

  15. A melting pot of multicontinental mtDNA lineages in admixed Venezuelans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Ignacio-Veiga, Ana; Alvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Pastoriza-Mourelle, Ana; Ruíz, Yarimar; Pineda, Lennie; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arrival of Europeans in Colonial and post-Colonial times coupled with the forced introduction of sub-Saharan Africans have dramatically changed the genetic background of Venezuela. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate, through the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, the extent of admixture and the characterization of the most likely continental ancestral sources of present-day urban Venezuelans. We analyzed two admixed populations that have experienced different demographic histories, namely, Caracas (n = 131) and Pueblo Llano (n = 219). The native American component of admixed Venezuelans accounted for 80% (46% haplogroup [hg] A2, 7% hg B2, 21% hg C1, and 6% hg D1) of all mtDNAs; while the sub-Saharan and European contributions made up ∼10% each, indicating that Trans-Atlantic immigrants have only partially erased the native American nature of Venezuelans. A Bayesian-based model allowed the different contributions of European countries to admixed Venezuelans to be disentangled (Spain: ∼38.4%, Portugal: ∼35.5%, Italy: ∼27.0%), in good agreement with the documented history. Seventeen entire mtDNA genomes were sequenced, which allowed five new native American branches to be discovered. B2j and B2k, are supported by two different haplotypes and control region data, and their coalescence ages are 3.9 k.y. (95% C.I. 0-7.8) and 2.6 k.y. (95% C.I. 0.1-5.2), respectively. The other clades were exclusively observed in Pueblo Llano and they show the fingerprint of strong recent genetic drift coupled with severe historical consanguinity episodes that might explain the high prevalence of certain Mendelian and complex multi-factorial diseases in this region. PMID:22120584

  16. Stratigraphic and Petrological Constraints of Cretaceous Subduction Initiation and Arc-Continent Collision in the Northern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, S.; Cardona, A.; Mejia, D.; Parra, M.

    2014-12-01

    Middle to Late-Cretaceous orogenic events in the northern Andes have been commonly reconstructed from the analysis of inland basins or the integration of regional scale thermochronological, geochronological and geochemical datasets from the accreted blocks. In contrast, limited studies have been developed on the stratigraphic and deformational record of magmatic and sedimentary sequences exposed near the suture zones. New field and petrologic data are used to characterize an ophiolite type sequence that outcrops in the western flank from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. Stratigraphic analysis indicate the existence of Albian-Aptian deep marine pelitic sequence interbedded with minor chert and thin quartz sandstone beds that apparently change to a volcanic dominate stratigraphy. Deformed ophiolite-like mafic and ultramafic plutonic rocks and isolated pillow lavas are also exposed to the east in fault contact with the pelitic sequence. The pelitic and interlayered volcanic rocks represent the growth of an extensional Early-Cretaceous basin that followed a Late-Jurassic magmatic quiescence in the Northern Andes. The volcano-sedimentary record is probably related to the growth of a fore-arc basin in a new subduction zone that extends until the Late Cretaceous. The deformation and obduction of the ophiolitic association and the fore-arc basin were probably triggered by the Late Cretaceous collision with an allocthonous plateau-arc associated to the migration of the Caribbean plate.

  17. The Bolivian Orocline and its implications for the origin of the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Central Andes includes a complex combination of thrusting, wrenching and block rotation leading progressively to the curvature of the orogenic system of the South American continental margin at 18ºS (Bolivian Orocline). Tectonic deformation in the Bolivian Orocline cannot be realistically restored using information from balanced cross sections alone, as the deformation includes an important component of block rotation, associated to counterclockwise block rotation in southern Peru and clockwise rotation in northern Chile. Recent work shows that block rotations in the forearc are essentially pre-early Miocene, predating the onset of Neogene shortening in the Sub Andean zone. Most rotations in the forearc of northern Chile where acquired through a single tectonic event during the Paleogene-early Miocene which probably coincides with the Eocene orogen-wide Incaic event which affected large regions of the central Andes between ca. 50 and 40 Ma. Results from 2D restoration experiments support the hypothesis of the Paleogene formation of the Bolivian Orocline, as a consequence of differential shortening, concentrated in the Eastern Cordillera of Bolivia, southern Peru and northwestern Argentina. Within the southern central Andes four additional curvatures including striking changes in the pattern of rotations have been discovered. From north to south these are the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament, Vallenar, Maipo and Arauco oroclines. However, an important part of rotation needs to be balanced, in the forearc region, by two major conjugate oblique shear zones (Abancay Deflection and Antofagasta-Calama Lineament). These structural features are probably related to inherited lithospheric discontinuities associated with the accretion of basement terranes which could be responsible for producing and delimitating significant and abrupt changes in the magnitude of the Central Andean Rotation Pattern along the margin. While shortening and crustal

  18. SRTM Anaglyph: Laguna Mellquina, Andes Mountains, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This anaglyph of an area south of San Martin de Los Andes, Argentina, is the first Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) view of the Andes Mountains, the tallest mountain chain in the western hemisphere. This particular site does not include the higher Andes peaks, but it does include steep-sided valleys and other distinctive landforms carved by Pleistocene glaciers. Elevations here range from about 700 to 2,440 meters (2,300 to 8,000 feet). This region is very active tectonically and volcanically, and the landforms provide a record of the changes that have occurred over many thousands of years. Large lakes fill the broad mountain valleys, and the spectacular scenery here makes this area a popular resort destination for Argentinians.

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary SRTM elevation model. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed

  19. Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  20. Deformation of the Western Caribbean and Northwestern South America From GPS Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFemina, Peter; Mora-Paez, Hector; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Fernandes, Rui; Mothes, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the current kinematics of the western Caribbean and northwestern South America, two regions that are affected by ongoing collision of aseismic ridges and the motion of forearc slivers. We investigate these regions using a new PS derived surface velocity field spanning from Guatemala to Ecuador. The new velocity field and published earthquake slip vectors are inverted to solve for the Euler vectors of forearc blocks and interseismic elastic strain accumulation on block bounding faults using a block modeling approach. Along the western Caribbean margin, it has been demonstrated that the Cocos Ridge collision drives the Central American forearc block to the northwest. GPS network expansion in Panama and Colombia allows us to investigate the effect of ridge collision on the Panama region. In northwestern South America, the North Andes block (NAB) is a hypothesized tectonic block that migrates north-northeast relative to a stable South American reference frame. The motion of this block is thought to be derived by the collision of the Carnegie Ridge in southern Ecuador or by oblique convergence and high degrees of interplate coupling north of the ridge (i.e., strain partitioning). We test a suite of block models to investigate the tectonic nature of the Panama Region and North Andes block and the style of faulting in the upper plate accommodating block motion. Through the estimation of elastic strain accumulation on all block bounding faults, we improve the understanding of interseismic coupling along a convergent margin capable of producing M>8 earthquake and upper plate faults capable of M>6 earthquake.

  1. Three new species of woodlizards (Hoplocercinae, Enyalioides) from northwestern South America

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Venegas, Pablo J.; de Queiroz, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of three new species of Enyalioides from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and northern Peru is reported. Enyalioides altotambo sp. n. occurs in northwestern Ecuador and differs from other species of Enyalioides in having dorsal scales that are both smooth and homogeneous in size, a brown iris, and in lacking enlarged, circular and keeled scales on the flanks. Enyalioides anisolepis sp. n. occurs on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes in southern Ecuador and northern Peru and can be distinguished from other species of Enyalioides by its scattered, projecting large scales on the dorsum, flanks, and hind limbs, as well as a well-developed vertebral crest, with the vertebrals on the neck at least three times higher than those between the hind limbs. Enyalioides sophiarothschildae sp. n. is from the Amazonian slopes of the Cordillera Central in northeastern Peru; it differs from other species of Enyalioides in having caudal scales that are relatively homogeneous in size on each caudal segment, a white gular region with a black medial patch and several turquoise scales in males, as well as immaculate white labials and chin. A molecular phylogenetic tree of 18 species of hoplocercines is presented, including the three species described in this paper and Enyalioides cofanorum, as well as an updated identification key for species of Hoplocercinae. PMID:25901116

  2. Three new species of woodlizards (Hoplocercinae, Enyalioides) from northwestern South America.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Venegas, Pablo J; de Queiroz, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of three new species of Enyalioides from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and northern Peru is reported. Enyalioidesaltotambo sp. n. occurs in northwestern Ecuador and differs from other species of Enyalioides in having dorsal scales that are both smooth and homogeneous in size, a brown iris, and in lacking enlarged, circular and keeled scales on the flanks. Enyalioidesanisolepis sp. n. occurs on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes in southern Ecuador and northern Peru and can be distinguished from other species of Enyalioides by its scattered, projecting large scales on the dorsum, flanks, and hind limbs, as well as a well-developed vertebral crest, with the vertebrals on the neck at least three times higher than those between the hind limbs. Enyalioidessophiarothschildae sp. n. is from the Amazonian slopes of the Cordillera Central in northeastern Peru; it differs from other species of Enyalioides in having caudal scales that are relatively homogeneous in size on each caudal segment, a white gular region with a black medial patch and several turquoise scales in males, as well as immaculate white labials and chin. A molecular phylogenetic tree of 18 species of hoplocercines is presented, including the three species described in this paper and Enyalioidescofanorum, as well as an updated identification key for species of Hoplocercinae. PMID:25901116

  3. Deformation of Northwestern South America from GPS Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Paez, H.; La Femina, P. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Ruiz, A. G.; Fernandes, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The North Andes block (NAB) is a hypothesized tectonic block that migrates (escapes) north-northeast relative to a stable South American reference frame. The motion of this block is thought-to-be derived by the collision of the Carnegie Ridge in southern Ecuador and/or by oblique convergence and high degrees of interplate coupling north of the ridge (i.e., strain partitioning). At the latitude of Ecuador, the NAB is defined by transpressional deformation accommodating east-northeastward motion along its boundary with South America. In southern to central Colombia, the NAB is dissected by several mapped and prominent regional shear zones. At these latitudes the NAB may be bound to the west by the Choco block and the transpressional Atrato-Uraba fault system and to the east by the Guayaquil-Algeciras fault system. And in northern Colombia the Caribbean - South America plate boundary is defined by the NAB and proposed Maracaibo and Guajira blocks. We investigate the deformation of northwestern South America, including the kinematics of NAB utilizing a new velocity field based on continuous GPS and existing episodic GPS data in Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela and Panama. We reference these new velocities to a newly estimated Euler vector for the South America plate based on inversion of cGPS data from stations east of the Andes. The new velocity field and published earthquake slip vectors are inverted to solve for the Euler vectors of the NAB, Choco, Panama, Maracaibo and Guajira blocks and interseismic elastic strain accumulation (interseismic coupling) on block-bounding faults using a block modeling approach. We test a suite of block models to investigate the tectonic nature of the NAB along strike and the style of faulting in the upper plate accommodating block motion. Through the estimation of elastic strain accumulation on all block-bounding faults, we improve the understanding of interseismic coupling along a convergent margin capable of producing M>8 earthquakes

  4. Late Tertiary northwestward-vergent thrusting in Valle del Cauca, Colombian Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, C.A.; Sacks, P.E.; Secor, D.T. Jr.; Cordoba, F.

    1989-03-01

    The Valle del Cauca is a topographic basin situated between the Cordillera Central and the Cordillera Occidental in the Colombian Andes. The basement is Mesozoic mafic igneous rock of the Volcanic and Amaime Formations and clastic sediments and chert of the Espinal and Cisneros Formations. The basement was intruded by middle Cretaceous granodiorites (including the Batolito de Buga) and was deformed and metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The Mesozoic rocks originated in an oceanic setting and were accreted to northwestern South America during the Cretaceous or early Tertiary. Unconformably overlying the Mesozoic basement are the Eocene and Oligocene Vijes (marine limestone) and Guachinte and Cinta de Piedra (fluvial and deltaic sandstone and mudstone). In the Cordillera Central, the Cinta de Piedra is unconformably overlain by fanglomerate of the Miocene La Paila Formation. These clastics coarsen and thicken eastward. Geologic mapping and structural analyses show that the Mesozoic basement and its Tertiary cover are faulted and folded. Folds are asymmetric and overturned westward. Faults dip at shallow to moderate angles to the east and carry older sedimentary or basement rocks westward over younger rocks.

  5. [A study of seismic storms occurred from October 1989 to June 1990, in the neighborhood of Pico El Aguila and Piñango, Venezuelan Andes].

    PubMed

    Palme, C; Choy, J E

    1996-01-01

    Between October 1989 and June 1990 there were a large number of microearthquakes in the neighborhood of Pico El Aguila and Piñango, Mérida State, Venezuela. The epicenters form two clearly separated groups. The first one comprises events which occurred between October 1989 and March 1990. Their epicenters were located between 8.75 degrees N and 8.88 degrees N and between 70.75 degrees W and 70.88 degrees W. They are lined up in a northwest-southeast trend. The zone is crossed in its center by the Boconó fault zone, and the Valera fault is the northwest limit of the epicentral distribution. The second group of microearthquakes was recorded during April 1990, and its epicenters were located between 8.85 degrees N and 9.00 degrees N, and between 70.75 degrees W and 70.90 degrees W. They are lined up in a trend parallel to the first group. The Valera fault forms its southwest border, and the Piñango fault its northwest one. Based on the polarities, six composite focal mechanisms were constructed, three for the first group of events and three for the second one. In the first group, two mechanisms, one in each side of the Boconó fault zone, correspond to reverse faulting. A third mechanism, obtained from events close to the Boconó fault zone, correspond to a right-lateral strike-slip displacement. In the second group, two mechanisms correspond to reverse faulting and the third, located in the southwestern end of the lineation, close to the Valera fault, shows a left-lateral strike-slip mechanism. The Angelier graphical method was applied to the six mechanisms, which produced a range of acceptability for the orientation of the maximum stress axes between N 24 degrees W and N 51 degrees W. These characteristics can be explained by a mechanical model, postulated in this work for the study area, which explain the coexistence of reverse, right lateral strike slip and left lateral strike slip faulting under the same stress regime, assuming that this faulting occurs on preexisting faults. Some 25 Km northeast of the study area, the azimuth of the Boconó fault zone is approximately N 49 degrees E. In case that the orientation of the compression axis remains constant, this would mean, from the mechanics point of view, that the Boconó fault zone is a "weak" one, just as other strike-slip faults such as San Andreas Fault and the Big Sumatra Fault. PMID:9433825

  6. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Images of the Andes as a Classroom Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Fox, Andrew N.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the use of Thematic Mapper images in undergraduate geology instruction. The work of the Andes Project at Cornell University is discussed. Digitally enhanced illustrations of landforms in the Andes mountains of South America are provided. (CW)

  7. Land-atmosphere interactions during a Northwestern Argentina Low event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paegle, J.; Ferreira, L.; Saulo, C.; Seluchi, M.; Ruiz, J.

    2009-12-01

    Impacts of changes in land use upon rainfall distribution and low-level circulation over subtropical Argentina are studied with a state-of-the art regional model (WRF, Weather Research Forecast model) in a downscaling mode, using various scenarios of soil moisture for a 10 day period. The selected case (starting January 29, 2003) was characterized by well-defined low level northerly flow that extended east of the Andes over subtropical latitudes. Four tests were conducted at 50 km horizontal resolution with 31 sigma levels, decreasing and increasing the soil moisture initial condition by 50% over the entire domain, 50 % reduction over northwest Argentina and 50% increase over South East South America. A control run with NCEP/GDAS initial conditions was used to assess the impact of the different soil moisture configurations. It was found that land-surface interactions are stronger when soil moisture is decreased, with a coherent reduction of precipitation over southern south America. Enhanced northerly winds are related to an increase in the zonal gradient of pressure at low levels. In contrast, when soil moisture is increased, no circulation changes are found, though there appears to be a local feedback effect between the land and precipitation The combined effects of changes in the circulation and in local stratification induced by soil wetness modifications, through variations in evaporation and CAPE, are as follows: there is a dynamical response in the dry run, essentially associated with a stronger LLJ, that involves decreased convergence in the northwestern portion of the domain and enhanced convergence at the exit region of the LLJ, which is displaced towards the south. This dynamical response is not as robust as that induced by changes in evaporation related to changes in soil moisture. These modifications also alter the stratification, in agreement with what has been found by other studies, resulting in coherent modifications of precipitation when

  8. ANDES Measurements for Advanced Reactor Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plompen, A. J. M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kopecky, S.; Nyman, M.; Rouki, C.; Salvador Castiñeira, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Calviani, M.; Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gonzalez Romero, E.; Aïche, M.; Jurado, B.; Mathieu, L.; Derckx, X.; Farget, F.; Rodrigues Tajes, C.; Bacquias, A.; Dessagne, Ph.; Kerveno, M.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Colonna, N.; Goncalves, I.; Penttilä, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Jokinen, A.

    2014-05-01

    A significant number of new measurements was undertaken by the ANDES “Measurements for advanced reactor systems” initiative. These new measurements include neutron inelastic scattering from 23Na, Mo, Zr, and 238U, neutron capture cross sections of 238U, 241Am, neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm, and measurements that explore the limits of the surrogate technique. The latter study the feasibility of inferring neutron capture cross sections for Cm isotopes, the neutron-induced fission cross section of 238Pu and fission yields and fission probabilities through full Z and A identification in inverse kinematics for isotopes of Pu, Am, Cm and Cf. Finally, four isotopes are studied which are important to improve predictions for delayed neutron precursors and decay heat by total absorption gamma-ray spectrometry (88Br, 94Rb, 95Rb, 137I). The measurements which are performed at state-of-the-art European facilities have the ambition to achieve the lowest possible uncertainty, and to come as close as is reasonably achievable to the target uncertainties established by sensitivity studies. An overview is presented of the activities and achievements, leaving detailed expositions to the various parties contributing to the conference.

  9. Late Pleistocene and Holocene Hydroclimate Variability in the Tropical Andes from Alpine Lake Sediments, Cordillera de Mérida, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. J.; Abbott, M. B.; Polissar, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The tropics play a major role in the global hydrologic cycle and changes to tropical rainfall patterns have critical implications for water resources and ecosystem dynamics over large geographic scales. In tropical South America, late Pleistocene and Holocene precipitation variability has been documented in geologic records and associated with numerous external and internal variables, including changes in summer insolation, South American summer monsoon strength, Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures, continental moisture recycling, and other climate processes. However, there are few records from the northern hemisphere tropical Americas, a key region for understanding interhemispheric linkages and the drivers of tropical hydroclimate variability. Here, we present a ~13 ka record of coupled hydroclimate and environmental changes from Laguna Brava, a small (~0.07 km2), hydrologically closed lake basin situated at 2400 m asl in the Cordillera de Mérida, Venezuela. Sediment cores collected from varying water depths and proximity to shore are placed in a chronologic framework using radiocarbon ages from terrestrial macrofossils, and analyzed for a suite of physical, bulk geochemical, and stable isotopic parameters. Compound specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of terrestrial plant waxes (long-chain n-alkanes) show a sharp increase in the late Pleistocene, followed by a long-term trend toward more negative values that suggest a ~20‰ decrease in the D/H ratios of South American tropical precipitation during the Holocene. This pattern is consistent in sign and magnitude to other South American precipitation reconstructions from both hemispheres, indicating interhemispheric similarities in tropical hydroclimate variability. Superimposed on this continent-scale trend are changes in moisture balance and environmental conditions in the Venezuelan Andes. We reconstruct these parameters at Laguna Brava at multidecadal and centennial resolution and evaluate this

  10. Characterization of Tityus scorpion venoms using synaptosome binding assays and reactivity towards Venezuelan and Brazilian antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Borges, Adolfo; De Sousa, Leonardo; Espinoza, Jorge; Melo, Marilia Martins; Santos, Raquel G; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Valadares, Diogo; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Venoms from Tityus species inhabiting five endemic regions of scorpionism in Venezuela (Andean, Perijá range, north-central, northeastern, and Guayana) and also southeast Brazil (T. serrulatus and T. bahiensis) were characterized immunologically in ELISA experiments using mouse- and rabbit-derived antibodies to evaluate their cross-reactivity and also functionally, utilizing synaptosome binding assays. While Brazilian and Venezuelan antivenoms cross-reacted poorly, T. discrepans (north-central Venezuela) and T. zulianus (Andean) venoms shared a greater immunological relatedness than with T. perijanensis (Perijá range). Anti-T. breweri (Guayana) antibodies fully cross-reacted with T. discrepans. Native PAGE indicated species-specific fingerprints for all venoms and revealed differences between two populations (Anzoátegui and Monagas States) of T. nororientalis (northeastern Venezuela). Components antigenically related to T. serrulatus beta-toxin TsVII were also detected in T. breweri, T. nororientalis (Anzoátegui) and T. funestus (Andean). Antibodies against T. serrulatus anatoxin TsNTxP did not cross-react significantly with any Venezuelan venoms indicating lack of TsNTxP homologues. The results suggest that the extent of antigenic reactivity depends on the studied species rather than the geographical distance between their habitats. All venoms, with T. discrepans to a lesser extent, were able to significantly displace [(125)I]-TsVII from its binding site in rat brain synaptosomes. Our data indicate that beta-toxins functionally related to TsVII but differing significantly in their antigenic regions exist in Venezuelan venoms from different endemic regions. Identification of shared epitopes with TsVII, at least for some species, may lead to the design of antibodies based on common epitopes for treating scorpion envenoming in Venezuela and Brazil. PMID:17920649

  11. Forensic analysis of Venezuelan elections during the Chávez presidency.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Raúl; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Hugo Chávez dominated the Venezuelan electoral landscape since his first presidential victory in 1998 until his death in 2013. Nobody doubts that he always received considerable voter support in the numerous elections held during his mandate. However, the integrity of the electoral system has come into question since the 2004 Presidential Recall Referendum. From then on, different sectors of society have systematically alleged electoral irregularities or biases in favor of the incumbent party. We have carried out a thorough forensic analysis of the national-level Venezuelan electoral processes held during the 1998-2012 period to assess these complaints. The second-digit Benford's law and two statistical models of vote distributions, recently introduced in the literature, are reviewed and used in our case study. In addition, we discuss a new method to detect irregular variations in the electoral roll. The outputs obtained from these election forensic tools are examined taking into account the substantive context of the elections and referenda under study. Thus, we reach two main conclusions. Firstly, all the tools uncover anomalous statistical patterns, which are consistent with election fraud from 2004 onwards. Although our results are not a concluding proof of fraud, they signal the Recall Referendum as a turning point in the integrity of the Venezuelan elections. Secondly, our analysis calls into question the reliability of the electoral register since 2004. In particular, we found irregular variations in the electoral roll that were decisive in winning the 50% majority in the 2004 Referendum and in the 2012 Presidential Elections. PMID:24971462

  12. Forensic Analysis of Venezuelan Elections during the Chávez Presidency

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Raúl; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Hugo Chávez dominated the Venezuelan electoral landscape since his first presidential victory in 1998 until his death in 2013. Nobody doubts that he always received considerable voter support in the numerous elections held during his mandate. However, the integrity of the electoral system has come into question since the 2004 Presidential Recall Referendum. From then on, different sectors of society have systematically alleged electoral irregularities or biases in favor of the incumbent party. We have carried out a thorough forensic analysis of the national-level Venezuelan electoral processes held during the 1998–2012 period to assess these complaints. The second-digit Benford's law and two statistical models of vote distributions, recently introduced in the literature, are reviewed and used in our case study. In addition, we discuss a new method to detect irregular variations in the electoral roll. The outputs obtained from these election forensic tools are examined taking into account the substantive context of the elections and referenda under study. Thus, we reach two main conclusions. Firstly, all the tools uncover anomalous statistical patterns, which are consistent with election fraud from 2004 onwards. Although our results are not a concluding proof of fraud, they signal the Recall Referendum as a turning point in the integrity of the Venezuelan elections. Secondly, our analysis calls into question the reliability of the electoral register since 2004. In particular, we found irregular variations in the electoral roll that were decisive in winning the 50% majority in the 2004 Referendum and in the 2012 Presidential Elections. PMID:24971462

  13. The first ANDES elements: 9-DOF plate bending triangles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    New elements are derived to validate and assess the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation. This is a brand new variant of the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements, which has recently attracted attention as an effective method for constructing high-performance elements for linear and nonlinear analysis. The ANDES formulation is based on an extended parametrized variational principle developed in recent publications. The key concept is that only the deviatoric part of the strains is assumed over the element whereas the mean strain part is discarded in favor of a constant stress assumption. Unlike conventional ANS elements, ANDES elements satisfy the individual element test (a stringent form of the patch test) a priori while retaining the favorable distortion-insensitivity properties of ANS elements. The first application of this formulation is the development of several Kirchhoff plate bending triangular elements with the standard nine degrees of freedom. Linear curvature variations are sampled along the three sides with the corners as gage reading points. These sample values are interpolated over the triangle using three schemes. Two schemes merge back to conventional ANS elements, one being identical to the Discrete Kirchhoff Triangle (DKT), whereas the third one produces two new ANDES elements. Numerical experiments indicate that one of the ANDES element is relatively insensitive to distortion compared to previously derived high-performance plate-bending elements, while retaining accuracy for nondistorted elements.

  14. Reconstructing climate variability using tree rings and glacier fluctuations in the southern Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, Juan-Carlos

    This thesis investigates climate variability in southern South America (south of 40°S) during the last 400 years using instrumental data, tree rings and glacier fluctuations. The dominant spatial and temporal patterns of a network of 25 homogeneous instrumental rainfall records were analyzed and used to define four regional precipitation series (1950-2000): northwestern Patagonia, central Patagonia, Patagonian plains-Atlantic, and southern Patagonia. Time series analysis of these regional patterns shows marked decadal variability for northwestern and central Patagonia, 3-7 year oscillations for Patagonian plains-Atlantic region, and a strong biannual oscillatory mode for southern Patagonia. Regional rainfall appears to be strongly influenced by Antarctic circulation modes (Antarctic Oscillation Index) while the ENSO influence on rainfall variability is less evident. Highly significant correlation of precipitation on the west coast of Patagonia with the pressure gradient between the subtropical eastern Pacific and the high-latitude south eastern Pacific is confirmed. A new network of 18 tree-ring chronologies from Pilgerodendron uviferum, an endemic conifer, was developed from sites along the western flank of the southern Andes. Highly significant series inter-correlation values ranged between 0.44 and 0.629 while mean sensitivity values ranged between 0.186 and 0.252. The series have relatively few missing rings (0.77-0.12% in individual chronologies). The oldest Pilgerodendron sampled to date was 859 years old while the chronology length ranged between 239 and 633 years. Ring-width series are correlated with precipitation but there were difficulties developing strong precipitation/ring-width relationships for individual stations/sites. However, two regional rainfall reconstructions were developed based on the inverse correlation between Pilgerodendron radial growth and the precipitation of northwestern and southern Patagonia. The reconstruction for spring

  15. CD4+ T cells provide protection against acute lethal encephalitis caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Peng, Bi-Hung; Bertke, Andrea S.; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Smith, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Poussard, Allison L.; Salazar, Milagros; Judy, Barbara M.; Zacks, Michele A.; Estes, D. Mark; Paessler, Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms of host survival resulting from viral encephalitis is critical to the development of vaccines. Here we have shown in several independent studies that high-dose treatment with neutralizing antibody prior to intranasal infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus had an antiviral effect in the visceral organs and prolonged survival time of infected mice, even in the absence of alpha beta T cells. Nevertheless, the antibody treatment did not prevent the development of lethal encephalitis. In contrary, the adoptive transfer of primed CD4+ T cells is necessary to prevent lethal encephalitis in mice lacking alpha beta T cell receptor. PMID:19446933

  16. Tectonics of the Argentine and Chilean Andes: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Andrés; Alvarado, Patricia; Arriagada, César; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    This Special Issue gathers a series of contributions derived from presentations at the 19° Congreso Geológico Argentino held in Córdoba in 2-6 June 2014. Specific subjects cover a wide variety of topics and regions of the Argentine and Chilean Andes, varying from sedimentological analyses and U/Pb dating of detrital zircons in different rocks to determine source areas for different times and regions along the southern Andes; satellite gravity data for monitoring earthquakes at the subduction zone to understand their complex rupture structure; fission track data from the Andes to the foreland region; use of seismic tomographies and conventional seismic reflection data for analyzing crustal structure; to paleomagnetic data and structural and morphological analyses (Fig. 1).

  17. Spatial diversity patterns of Pristimantis frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Meza-Joya, Fabio Leonardo; Torres, Mauricio

    2016-04-01

    Although biodiversity gradients have been widely documented, the factors governing broad-scale patterns in species richness are still a source of intense debate and interest in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. Here, we tested whether spatial hypotheses (species-area effect, topographic heterogeneity, mid-domain null model, and latitudinal effect) explain the pattern of diversity observed along the altitudinal gradient of Andean rain frogs of the genus Pristimantis. We compiled a gamma-diversity database of 378 species of Pristimantis from the tropical Andes, specifically from Colombia to Bolivia, using records collected above 500 m.a.s.l. Analyses were performed at three spatial levels: Tropical Andes as a whole, split in its two main domains (Northern and Central Andes), and split in its 11 main mountain ranges. Species richness, area, and topographic heterogeneity were calculated for each 500-m-width elevational band. Spatial hypotheses were tested using linear regression models. We examined the fit of the observed diversity to the mid-domain hypothesis using randomizations. The species richness of Pristimantis showed a hump-shaped pattern across most of the altitudinal gradients of the Tropical Andes. There was high variability in the relationship between area and species richness along the Tropical Andes. Correcting for area effects had little impact in the shape of the empirical pattern of biodiversity curves. Mid-domain models produced similar gradients in species richness relative to empirical gradients, but the fit varied among mountain ranges. The effect of topographic heterogeneity on species richness varied among mountain ranges. There was a significant negative relationship between latitude and species richness. Our findings suggest that spatial processes partially explain the richness patterns of Pristimantis frogs along the Tropical Andes. Explaining the current patterns of biodiversity in this hot spot may require further studies on

  18. EFFECT OF ADJUVANTS ON ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF RABBITS INOCULATED WITH VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, Michael; Klugerman, Maxwell R.

    1963-01-01

    Shepel, Michael (U.S. Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Maxwell R. Klugerman. Effect of adjuvants on antibody response of rabbits inoculated with Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus. J. Bacteriol. 85:1150–1155. 1963.—Hemagglutination-inhibition, neutralization, and complement-fixation tests were performed on sera of rabbits inoculated with Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) virus in combination with Freund's adjuvants and in Hank's salt solution. This study indicated that the complete adjuvants (i.e., with mycobacteria) considerably increased the antibody response to VEE virus. Mycobacterium butyricum (M. smegmatis) appeared to be more effective than M. tuberculosis H37Ra. In the absence of mycobacteria, the response was much less pronounced. Paper electrophoretic studies of the antisera demonstrated a marked increase in gamma-globulin production, an increase in the beta-globulin, and an increase in total protein as the result of adding VEE virus to the complete adjuvants. A decrease in the albumin fraction appeared to be caused by the complete adjuvants rather than by the VEE virus itself. The incomplete adjuvant (without mycobacteria) plus virus contributed little, if any, stimulation toward the production of gamma-globulin, nor did it appear to affect the serum-albumin levels. Images PMID:14044008

  19. Ecological studies of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis in north-central Venezuela, 1997-1998.

    PubMed

    Salas, R A; Garcia, C Z; Liria, J; Barrera, R; Navarro, J C; Medina, G; Vasquez, C; Fernandez, Z; Weaver, S C

    2001-01-01

    From 1997-1998, we investigated the possible continuous circulation of epizootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus suggested by a 1983 subtype IC interepizootic mosquito isolate made in Panaquire, Miranda State, Venezuela. The study area was originally covered by lowland tropical rainforest but has been converted into cacao plantations. Sentinel hamsters, small mammal trapping, mosquito collections, and human serosurveys were used to detect active or recent virus circulation. Six strains of subtype ID VEE virus were isolated from hamsters that displayed no apparent disease. Four other arboviruses belonging to group A (Togaviridae: Alphavirus), two Bunyamwera group (Bunyaviridae), and three Gamboa group (Bunyaviridae) arboviruses were also isolated from hamsters, as well as 8 unidentified viruses. Venezuelan equine encephalitis-specific antibodies were detected in 5 small mammal species: Proechimys guairae, Marmosa spp., and Didelphis marsupialis. Mosquito collections comprised of 38 different species, including 8 members of the subgenus Culex (Melanoconion), did not yield any virus isolates. Sera from 195 humans, either workers in the cacao plantation or nearby residents, were all negative for VEE virus antibodies. Sequences of 1,677 nucleotides from the P62 gene of 2 virus isolates indicated that they represent a subtype ID lineage that is distinct from all others characterized previously, and are unrelated to epizootic VEE emergence. PMID:11425168

  20. Virion envelope glycoproteins as epidermiological markers of Venezuelan encephalitis virus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, M E; Scherer, W F

    1980-01-01

    Virion polypeptide compositions of 26 isolates of Venezuelan encephalitis virus were analyzed by a reproducible and comparative technique of discontinuous sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Although the molecular weight of the core polypeptide for each isolate was 36,000, numbers and molecular weights of envelope glycoproteins were heterogeneous. Isolates associated with human, but not equine, disease usually had two glycoproteins of 50,000 to 51,000 and 51,000 to 55,000 molecular weight, whereas isolates associated with both human and equine disease usually had an additional, third polypeptide band of either 45,000 to 46,000 or 56,000 to 58,000 molecular weight. The former isolates were in hemagglutination inhibition subtypes I-D, I-E, III, or IV, and the latter were in subtypes I-A, I-B, I-C, or II. Thus virion envelope glycoproteins should be useful markers of Venezuelan encephalitis virus isolates in epidemiological investigations. PMID:7372798

  1. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Karen; de Mendonca, Elizabeth; Matute, Xiorama; Chaustre, Ismenia; Villalón, Marlene; Takiff, Howard

    2016-01-01

    The mutations in the CFTR gene found in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have geographic differences, but there are scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in a group of Venezuelan patients with CF. The 27 exons of the CFTR gene from 110 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program were amplified and sequenced. A total of 36 different mutations were identified, seven with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del (27.27%), p.Gly542* (3.18%), c.2988+1G>A (3.18%), p.Arg334Trp (1.36%), p.Arg1162* (1.36%), c.1-8G>C (1.36%), and p.[Gly628Arg;Ser1235Arg](1.36). In 40% of patients, all with a clinical diagnosis of CF, no mutations were found. This report represents the largest cohort of Venezuelan patients with CF ever examined, and includes a wider mutation panel than has been previously studied in this population. Mutations common in Southern European populations predominate, and several new mutations were discovered, but no mutations were found in 40% of the cohort. PMID:27022295

  2. Hydrolutos piaroa sp.n. (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae), a new semiaquatic Lutosini species from south-western Venezuelan lowland streams.

    PubMed

    Derka, Tomáš; Svitok, Marek; Fedor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolutos piaroa, a new species of Lutosini (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae) from Tobogán de la Selva (Puerto Ayacucho region, SW Venezuela) is described and figured. Inhabiting aquatic environment it represents an unusual orthopteran with sternal and pleural area covered by fine microtrichia, forming a plastron. This is the first known Hydrolutos species sampled in lowland streams of Venezuelan Guayana. PMID:27395849

  3. Reflections on Andes' Goal-Free User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although the Andes project produced many results over its 18 years of activity, this commentary focuses on its contributions to understanding how a goal-free user interface impacts the overall design and performance of a step-based tutoring system. Whereas a goal-aligned user interface displays relevant goals as blank boxes or empty locations that…

  4. Convective initiation in the vicinity of the subtropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Houze, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme convection tends to form in the vicinity of mountain ranges, and the Andes in subtropical South America help spawn some of the most intense convection in the world. An investigation of the most intense storms for 11 years of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data shows a tendency for squall lines to initiate and develop in this region with the canonical leading convective line/trailing stratiform structure. The synoptic environment and structures of the extreme convection and MCSs in subtropical South America are similar to those found in other regions of the world, especially the United States. In subtropical South America, however, the topographical influence on the convective initiation and maintenance of the MCSs is unique. A capping inversion in the lee of the Andes is important in preventing premature triggering. The Andes and other mountainous terrain of Argentina focus deep convective initiation in a narrow region. Subsequent to initiation, the convection often evolves into propagating mesoscale convective systems similar to those seen over the Great Plains of the U. S. and produces damaging tornadoes, hail, and floods across a wide agricultural region. Numerical simulations conducted with the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model extend the observational analysis and provide an objective evaluation of storm initiation, terrain effects, and development mechanisms. The simulated mesoscale systems closely resemble the storm structures seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar as well as the overall shape and character of the storms shown in GOES satellite data. A sensitivity experiment with different configurations of topography, including both decreasing and increasing the height of the Andes Mountains, provides insight into the significant influence of orography in focusing convective initiation in this region. Lee cyclogenesis and a strong low-level jet are modulated by the height of the Andes Mountains and directly affect the character

  5. Thermophilization of adult and juvenile tree communities in the northern tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Alvaro; Stevenson, Pablo R; Feeley, Kenneth J

    2015-08-25

    Climate change is expected to cause shifts in the composition of tropical montane forests towards increased relative abundances of species whose ranges were previously centered at lower, hotter elevations. To investigate this process of "thermophilization," we analyzed patterns of compositional change over the last decade using recensus data from a network of 16 adult and juvenile tree plots in the tropical forests of northern Andes Mountains and adjacent lowlands in northwestern Colombia. Analyses show evidence that tree species composition is strongly linked to temperature and that composition is changing directionally through time, potentially in response to climate change and increasing temperatures. Mean rates of thermophilization [thermal migration rate (TMR), °C ⋅ y(-1)] across all censuses were 0.011 °C ⋅ y(-1) (95% confidence interval = 0.002-0.022 °C ⋅ y(-1)) for adult trees and 0.027 °C ⋅ y(-1) (95% confidence interval = 0.009-0.050 °C ⋅ y(-1)) for juvenile trees. The fact that thermophilization is occurring in both the adult and juvenile trees and at rates consistent with concurrent warming supports the hypothesis that the observed compositional changes are part of a long-term process, such as global warming, and are not a response to any single episodic event. The observed changes in composition were driven primarily by patterns of tree mortality, indicating that the changes in composition are mostly via range retractions, rather than range shifts or expansions. These results all indicate that tropical forests are being strongly affected by climate change and suggest that many species will be at elevated risk for extinction as warming continues. PMID:26261350

  6. Thermophilization of adult and juvenile tree communities in the northern tropical Andes

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Alvaro; Stevenson, Pablo R.; Feeley, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to cause shifts in the composition of tropical montane forests towards increased relative abundances of species whose ranges were previously centered at lower, hotter elevations. To investigate this process of “thermophilization,” we analyzed patterns of compositional change over the last decade using recensus data from a network of 16 adult and juvenile tree plots in the tropical forests of northern Andes Mountains and adjacent lowlands in northwestern Colombia. Analyses show evidence that tree species composition is strongly linked to temperature and that composition is changing directionally through time, potentially in response to climate change and increasing temperatures. Mean rates of thermophilization [thermal migration rate (TMR), °C⋅y−1] across all censuses were 0.011 °C⋅y−1 (95% confidence interval = 0.002–0.022 °C⋅y−1) for adult trees and 0.027 °C⋅y−1 (95% confidence interval = 0.009–0.050 °C⋅y−1) for juvenile trees. The fact that thermophilization is occurring in both the adult and juvenile trees and at rates consistent with concurrent warming supports the hypothesis that the observed compositional changes are part of a long-term process, such as global warming, and are not a response to any single episodic event. The observed changes in composition were driven primarily by patterns of tree mortality, indicating that the changes in composition are mostly via range retractions, rather than range shifts or expansions. These results all indicate that tropical forests are being strongly affected by climate change and suggest that many species will be at elevated risk for extinction as warming continues. PMID:26261350

  7. Structural and biophysical analysis of sequence insertions in the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus macro domain.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Jaime; Lichière, Julie; Rabah, Nadia; Beitzel, Brett F; Canard, Bruno; Coutard, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Random transposon insertions in viral genomes can be used to reveal genomic regions important for virus replication. We used these genomic data to evaluate at the protein level the effect of such insertions on the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus nsP3 macro domain. The structural analysis showed that transposon insertions occur mainly in loops connecting the secondary structure elements. Some of the insertions leading to a temperature sensitive viral phenotype (ts) are close to the cleavage site between nsP2 and nsP3 or the ADP-ribose binding site, two important functions of the macro domain. Using four mutants mimicking the transposon insertions, we confirmed that these insertions can affect the macro domain properties without disrupting the overall structure of the protein. PMID:25725151

  8. Chikungunya fever: Atypical and lethal cases in the Western hemisphere: A Venezuelan experience.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaime R; Leopoldo Códova G; Castro, Julio S; Rodríguez, Libsen; Saravia, Víctor; Arvelaez, Joanne; Ríos-Fabra, Antonio; Longhi, María A; Marcano, Melania

    2015-01-01

    A large epidemic of Chikungunya fever currently affects the Caribbean, Central and South America. Despite a high number of reported cases, little is known on the occurrence of severe clinical complications. We describe four Venezuelan patients with a severe and/or lethal course who exhibit unusual manifestations of the disease. Case 1 describes a 75 year-old man with rapid onset of septic shock and multi-organ failure. Cases 2 and 3 describe two patients with rapid aggressive clinical course who developed shock, severe purpuric lesions and a distinct area large of necrosis in the nasal region. Case 4 depicts a splenectomized woman with shock, generalized purpuric lesions, bullous dermatosis and acronecrosis of an upper limb. Chikungunya fever in the Western hemisphere may also associate with atypical and severe manifestations. Some patients experience a life-threatening, aggressive clinical course, with rapid deterioration and death due to multisystem failure. PMID:26793440

  9. Accion solidaria. A Venezuelan NGO confronts the Herculean task of providing drug access.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, S

    1997-05-01

    Venezuela does not currently recognize AIDS as a major public health problem, therefore, it does not fund AIDS services. It is estimated by the World Health Organization that Venezuela may have up to 250,000 HIV-infected citizens. Accion Solidaria (Action for Solidarity) is currently acting as a buyer's club, and as a source of medications from charitable groups in the United States such as the United Against AIDS International, for people living with HIV. Accion Solidaria is an entirely voluntary organization that receives monthly contributions from 41 people, just barely enough to purchase medications for 10 HIV-infected people. These efforts have been hindered by successive devaluations of Venezuelan currency. PMID:11364337

  10. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis in Panama: Fatal Endemic Disease and Genetic Diversity of Etiologic Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Evelia; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Cisneros, Julio; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961–2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama) and Panama provinces (central Panama) near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America. PMID:19564908

  11. [Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and hypothyroidism: the first Venezuelan case].

    PubMed

    Lima-Martínez, Marcos M; Zerpa, José; Gil, Victor

    2014-09-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to an abnormal cholesterol synthesis. It was first described by Smith, Lemli and Opitz in 1964. Many cases of SLOS have been described since then, leading to the recognition as a relatively common malformation syndrome. Affected individuals have dysmorphism, microcephaly, multiple congenital malformations, mental retardation, aggressiveness and hyperactivity. The severity of physical defects correlates with the severity of the cholesterol deficiency, which is caused by an abnormally low activity of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, the enzyme responsible for conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. The occurrence of hypothyroidism in association with SLOS is very unusual. We describe the first Venezuelan case in which both anomalies are associated. PMID:25272525

  12. Potential petroleum source rocks in a tertiary sequence of the Eastern Venezuelan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, K.; Lo Mónaco, G.; López, L.; Lo Mónaco, S.; Escobar, G.; Peralba, M. C. R.; Franco, N.; Kalkreuth, W.

    2012-08-01

    A core of a Tertiary age sequence from the Eastern Venezuelan Basin was analyzed in order to determine its potential for petroleum generation. Conventional geochemical methods, like Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarkers from saturated fractions and aromatic hydrocarbon ratios were used for assessing source-rock quality. The application of such methods indicated predominantly the presence of terrigenous organic matter with marine influence, deposited under suboxic to oxic conditions typical of continental environments. Thermal maturation in the range from beginning to mid oil window and organic matter type indicate that the sequence could have generated mainly gaseous hydrocarbons. Analysis by electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) indicates that sulfur is associated to both organic (bitumen and kerogen) and inorganic (mineral) phases and organic matter is observed filling fractures in the rocks.

  13. Natural Enzootic Vectors of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus in the Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Cristina; Boshell, Jorge; Moncayo, Abelardo C.; Gonzalez, Marta; Ahumada, Marta L.; Kang, Wenli

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the transmission cycle of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) strains believed to represent an epizootic progenitor, we identified natural vectors in a sylvatic focus in the middle Magdalena Valley of Colombia. Hamster-baited traps were placed into an active forest focus, and mosquitoes collected from each trap in which a hamster became infected were sorted by species and assayed for virus. In 18 cases, a single, initial, high-titered mosquito pool representing the vector species was identified. These vectors included Culex (Melanoconion) vomerifer (11 transmission events), Cx. (Mel.) pedroi (5 transmissions) and Cx. (Mel.) adamesi (2 transmissions). These results extend the number of proven enzootic VEEV vectors to 7, all of which are members of the Spissipes section of the subgenus Melanoconion. Our findings contrast with previous studies, which have indicated that a single species usually serves as the principal enzootic VEEV vector at a given location. PMID:12533281

  14. IRES-Based Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Vaccine Candidate Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Guerbois, Mathilde; Gorchakov, Rodion; Plante, Kenneth S.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus that causes periodic outbreaks that impact equine and human populations in the Americas. One of the VEEV subtypes located in Mexico and Central America (IE) has recently been recognized as an important cause of equine disease and death, and human exposure also appears to be widespread. Here, we describe the use of an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus to stably attenuate VEEV, creating a vaccine candidate independent of unstable point mutations. Mice infected with this virus produced antibodies and were protected against lethal VEEV challenge. This IRES-based vaccine was unable to establish productive infection in mosquito cell cultures or in intrathoracically injected Aedes taeniorhynchus, demonstrating that it cannot be transmitted from a vaccinee. These attenuation, efficacy and safety results justify further development for humans or equids of this new VEEV vaccine candidate. PMID:23351391

  15. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine’s ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype. PMID:26020513

  16. Association of common variants on chromosome 8q24 with gastric cancer in Venezuelan patients.

    PubMed

    Labrador, Luis; Torres, Keila; Camargo, Maria; Santiago, Laskhmi; Valderrama, Elvis; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel

    2015-07-15

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of death in the world, being Central and South America among the regions showing the highest incidence and mortality rates worldwide. Although several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the chromosomal region 8q24 by genome-wide association studies have been related with the risk of different kinds of cancers, their role in the susceptibility of gastric cancer in Latin American populations has not been evaluated yet. Hereby, we performed a case-control study to explore the associations between three SNPs at 8q24 and gastric cancer risk in Venezuelan patients. We analyzed rs1447295, rs4733616 and rs6983267 SNPs in 122 paraffin-embedded tumor samples from archival bank and 129 samples with chronic gastritis (obtained by upper endoscopy during the study) from the Central Hospital of Barquisimeto (Lara, Venezuela). Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP reactions designed in this study for efficient genotyping of formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded tissues. No significant differences in genotype frequencies between case and control groups were found. However, carriers of the homozygous TT genotype of SNP rs4733616 had an increased risk of developing poorly differentiated gastric cancer according to the codominant (OR=3.59, P=0.035) and the recessive models (OR=4.32, P=0.014, best-fitting model of inheritance), adjusted by age and gender. Our study suggests that the SNP rs4733616 is associated with susceptibility to poorly differentiated gastric cancer in Venezuelans. Additional studies are needed to further interrogate the prognostic value of the rs4733616 marker in this high-risk population for gastric cancer. PMID:25939847

  17. Northwestern University School of Speech: A History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rein, Lynn Miller

    This book presents a concise history of the first 100 years of development of the school of speech at Northwestern University (Illinois). Following an introduction that provides an overview of the school, the first chapter focuses on both the efforts of Robert McLean Cumnock to found a school of oratory on the principles of elocution and the…

  18. Protective efficacies of live attenuated and formaldehyde-inactivated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vaccines against aerosol challenge in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Stephenson, E H

    1984-01-01

    Although two investigational vaccines are used to immunize humans against Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus, neither had previously been tested for protective efficacy against aerosol exposure. Live attenuated vaccine (TC-83) protected all hamsters challenged by either aerosol or subcutaneous routes with 4.7 to 5.2 log10 PFU of virulent Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus. Formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine (C-84) failed to protect against aerosol challenge but did protect against subcutaneous challenge. Protection elicited by TC-83 vaccine did not depend solely on serum-neutralizing antibody. These studies suggest that TC-83 vaccine is preferable to C-84 vaccine for protecting laboratory workers at risk to aerosol exposure. PMID:6715512

  19. Radiocarbon chronology of the last glacial maximum and its termination in northwestern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Patricio I.; Denton, George H.; Moreno, Hugo; Lowell, Thomas V.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Kaplan, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    We examine the timing and magnitude of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the last glacial termination (LGT) in northwestern Patagonia, situated in the middle latitudes of South America. Our data indicate that the main phase of the LGT began with abrupt warm pulses at 17,800 and 17,100 cal yrs BP, accompanied by rapid establishment of evergreen temperate rainforests and extensive deglaciation of the Andes within 1000 years. This response shows that South American middle-latitude temperatures had approached average interglacial values by 16,800 cal yrs BP. The temperature rise in northwestern Patagonia coincides with the beginning of major warming and glacier recession in the Southern Alps of New Zealand at southern mid-latitudes on the opposite side of the Pacific Ocean. From this correspondence, the warming that began at 17,800 cal yrs BP appears to have been widespread in middle latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, accounting for at least 75% of the total temperature recovery from the LGM to the Holocene. Moreover, this warming pulse is coeval with the first half of the Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) in the North Atlantic region. HS1 featured a decline of North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, a southward shift of the westerly wind belt in both hemispheres and of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, as well as a weakening of the Asian monsoon. Along with the initiating trigger, identifying the mechanisms whereby these opposing climate signals in the two polar hemispheres interacted -whether through an oceanic or an atmospheric bipolar seesaw, or both- lies at the heart of understanding the LGT.

  20. Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, M. T.; Tomkin, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes The concept of a "glacial buzzsaw" was spawned by Steve Porter's observation in 1977 and 1988 that the "equilibrium line altitude" (ELA) for alpine glaciation in the Andes parallels the summit elevations of the range. The modern ELA in the Patagonian Andes drops from about 4.5 km at 30 S to about 1 km at 50 S, due to colder temperatures at higher latitudes. The summit elevations decrease steadily by a similar amount over this 2200 km distance. The landscape of the western side of the Patagonian Andes clearly shows that it has long been dominated by glacial erosion. Locally preserved tills indicate that alpine glaciation was active at 7 to 4.6 Ma, if not earlier. The idea of a glacial buzzsaw is that erosion by alpine glaciers is aggressive enough to limit the height of a mountain range. Fission-track cooling ages indicate modest long-term erosion rates (~0.5 to 1 km/Ma) for the Patagonian Andes, which precludes the possibility that the range was trimmed down to size by Quaternary- age glaciations. Furthermore, the range shows clear evidence of growth by continental subduction and tectonic accretion along its eastern margin. Evidence for recent tectonic shortening is based on the observation that the range has an approximately constant taper, as expected for a critical wedge. The width of the range decreases southward in parallel with the decreasing summit elevations. We have developed a general analytical model for coupled wedge growth and glacial erosion that accounts for much of the tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Andes. The model is based on an actively accreting wedge that maintains a constant taper geometry. The size of the wedge is controlled by competition between accretion and glacial erosion. Recent work by one of us (JHT) and Gerard Roe shows that the erosional yield caused by alpine glaciation is approximately proportional to the local elevation difference between the summit of the range and the

  1. Synchronous interhemispheric Holocene climate trends in the tropical Andes

    PubMed Central

    Polissar, Pratigya J.; Abbott, Mark B.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Vuille, Mathias; Bezada, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    Holocene variations of tropical moisture balance have been ascribed to orbitally forced changes in solar insolation. If this model is correct, millennial-scale climate evolution should be antiphased between the northern and southern hemispheres, producing humid intervals in one hemisphere matched to aridity in the other. Here we show that Holocene climate trends were largely synchronous and in the same direction in the northern and southern hemisphere outer-tropical Andes, providing little support for the dominant role of insolation forcing in these regions. Today, sea-surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean modulate rainfall variability in the outer tropical Andes of both hemispheres, and we suggest that this mechanism was pervasive throughout the Holocene. Our findings imply that oceanic forcing plays a larger role in regional South American climate than previously suspected, and that Pacific sea-surface temperatures have the capacity to induce abrupt and sustained shifts in Andean climate. PMID:23959896

  2. Epochs of intrusion-related copper mineralization in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillitoe, R. H.

    Seventy-four copper deposits and prospects related intimately to intrusive activity in the Andes have been dated radiometrically during the last 18 years by many different investigators, most of whom used the KAr method. The results are summarized and some of their local and regional implications are reviewed. A number of copper deposits, mainly of the porphyry type, were emplaced in, or near to, premineral volcanic sequences and (or) equigranular plutons. Such precursor volcanism lasted for as long as 9 Ma, and preceded mineralization by intervals of from less than 1 Ma to as much as 9 Ma. Precursor plutons were emplaced no more than 2 to 3 Ma prior to mineralization at several localities in Chile, but possibly as long as 10 to 30 Ma earlier in parts of Colombia and Peru. The time separating emplacement of progenitor stocks and hydrothermal alteration and accompanying copper mineralization, and the duration of alteration-mineralization sequences generally are both less than the analytical uncertainty of the KAr method. However, on the basis of a detailed study of the Julcani vein system in Peru and less clearcut evidence from elsewhere, it may be concluded that alteration and copper mineralization followed stock or dome emplacement by substantially less than 1 Ma and lasted for 0.5 to 2 Ma and, locally, possibly as long as 3 Ma. At several localities, post-mineral magmatic activity could not be separated by the KAr method from the preceding alteration-mineralization events. As many as nine epochs of copper mineralization, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to late Pliocene-Pleistocene, are recognizable in the central Andes of Chile, Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina, and at least four somewhat different epochs characterize the northern Andes of Colombia. Each epoch coincides with a discrete linear sub-belt, some of which extend for more than 2000 km along the length of the orogen. More than 90% of Andean copper resources, mainly as porphyry deposits, are

  3. First GPS baseline results from the North Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, James N.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Timothy H.; Neilan, Ruth E.; Ropain, Clemente

    1990-01-01

    The CASA Uno GPS experiment (January-February 1988) has provided the first epoch baseline measurements for the study of plate motions and crustal deformation in and around the North Andes. Two dimensional horizontal baseline repeatabilities are as good as 5 parts in 10 to the 8th for short baselines (100-1000 km), and better than 3 parts in 10 to the 8th for long baselines (greater than 1000 km). Vertical repeatabilities are typically 4-6 cm, with a weak dependence on baseline length. The expected rate of plate convergence across the Colombia Trench is 6-8cm/yr, which should be detectable by the repeat experiment planned for 1991. Expected deformation rates within the North Andes are of the order of 1 cm/yr, which may be detectable with the 1991 experiment.

  4. Synchronous interhemispheric Holocene climate trends in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Polissar, Pratigya J; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Vuille, Mathias; Bezada, Maximiliano

    2013-09-01

    Holocene variations of tropical moisture balance have been ascribed to orbitally forced changes in solar insolation. If this model is correct, millennial-scale climate evolution should be antiphased between the northern and southern hemispheres, producing humid intervals in one hemisphere matched to aridity in the other. Here we show that Holocene climate trends were largely synchronous and in the same direction in the northern and southern hemisphere outer-tropical Andes, providing little support for the dominant role of insolation forcing in these regions. Today, sea-surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean modulate rainfall variability in the outer tropical Andes of both hemispheres, and we suggest that this mechanism was pervasive throughout the Holocene. Our findings imply that oceanic forcing plays a larger role in regional South American climate than previously suspected, and that Pacific sea-surface temperatures have the capacity to induce abrupt and sustained shifts in Andean climate. PMID:23959896

  5. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  6. Paleoatimetry of southern Tibet and the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, J.; Dettinger, M. P.; DeCelles, P. G.; Leary, R.; Kapp, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Here we explore a variety of isotopic systems to reconstruct paleoatitude in southern Tibet and the central Andes. A multi-system approach is essential since the necessary mineral archives are not always available, and because diagenetic resetting of some systems clearly occurs. In the central Andes at ~24°S, carbonate is rare due to hyperaridity, and where present, evaporation in soils and lakes completely alters the primary meteoric signal. Waters of hydration of volcanic glass are a much more promising target in this region given the prevalence of volcanic tuffs. We have analyzed the δD value of a suite of modern and ancient glasses back to 34 Ma that show little change in elevation in the western Cordillera of the Andes. By contrast, the eastern Cordillera of the Andes rose in the last 15 Ma. This pattern is consistent with gradual eastward propagation of the whole orogen at this latitude, including the trench, forearc, magmatic arc, and foreland. The paleoaltimetry of Tibet poses quite different challenges to those in South America. Volcanic glass archives are so far unavailable, whereas carbonate archives are common but in some cases diagenetically reset. We have focused on records of conventional δ18O values and clumped isotope thermometry. One must treat both archives with great caution due to resetting, especially clumped isotopes. Available evidence suggests that southern Tibet has been near current elevations since the early Miocene. For the pre- Miocene we present new isotopic/paleosol records found along the suture zone of India and Asia that we believe partly chronicle the rise of the suture zone from near sea-level to >4000 m today.

  7. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, S.L.; Myers, S.C.; Wallace, T.C.; Zandt, G. |; Silver, P.G.; Drake, L.

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20{degree}S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70-74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32-38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20{degree}S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16{degree}S, 55-60 km) to south (20{degree}S, 70-74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  8. 3D density model of the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezzi, Claudia B.; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Sabine

    2009-12-01

    We developed a 3D density model of the continental crust, the subducted plate and the upper mantle of the Central Andes between 20-29°S and 74-61°W through the forward modelling of Bouguer anomaly. The goal of this contribution is to gain insight on the lithospheric structure integrating the available information (geophysical, geologic, petrologic, and geochemical) in a single model. The geometry of our model is defined and constrained by hypocentre location, reflection and refraction on and offshore seismic lines, travel time and attenuation tomography, receiver function analysis, magnetotelluric studies, thermal models and balanced structural cross-sections. The densities allocated to the different bodies are calculated considering petrologic and geochemical data and pressure and temperature conditions. The model consists of 31 parallel E-W vertical planes, where the continental crust comprises distinct bodies, which represent the different morphotectonic units of the Central Andes. We include a partial melting zone at midcrustal depths under the Altiplano-Puna (low-velocity zone) and consider the presence of a rheologically strong block beneath the Salar de Atacama basin, according to recent seismic studies. Contour maps of the depth of the continental Moho, the thickness of the lower crust and the depth to the bottom of the lithosphere below South America are produced. The possible percentage of partial melt in the Central Andes low-velocity zone is estimated. The residual anomaly is calculated by subtracting from the Bouguer anomaly the gravimetric effect of the modelled subducted slab and of the modelled Moho. Isostatic anomalies are calculated from regional and local isostatic Mohos calculated with and without internal loads, derived from our gravity model, which are then compared to the modelled continental Moho. This study contributes to a more detailed knowledge of the lithospheric structure of this region of the Andes and provides an integrated 3D

  9. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath Northwestern South America

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Hilst, R. ); Mann, P. )

    1993-02-01

    Tomographic images and deep seismicity of the mantle beneath northwestern South America support the existence of extensive and continuous subducted slabs which may be important controls on the neotectonic deformation of the overriding South America plate. Using tomographic data, we have estimated lateral continuity, regional dip, downdip length and approximate convergence direction of two, largely aseismic slabs. Tomographic data suggests that the Cauca slab, previously defined using earthquakes beneath southern Colombia, extends 300 km into the mantle beneath northern Colombia, has an average dip of 50[degrees], and is the downdip extension of Eocene to Miocene Panama island arc and Oligocene-Miocene oceanic crust of the Nazca plate. The Maracaibo slab of northern Colombia and western Venezuela extends up to 450 km into the mantle at an average angle of 16[degrees] and is the downdip extension of Late Cretaceous oceanic plateau crust of the Caribbean Sea. The boundary between the two slabs is less than 50 km in width. The Maracaibo and northern Cauca slabs are generally aseismic and not associated with an overlying volcanic arc. Instead, both slabs are overlain by broad zones of diffuse active faulting and topography in the northern Andes. The shallow dip, angle of oblique subduction and thickness of the Maracaibo slab may produce crustal deformation including northward tectonic escape of the Maracaibo block, a triangular wedge of continental crust in the overriding South America plate.

  10. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Induces Apoptosis through the Unfolded Protein Response Activation of EGR1

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Lundberg, Lindsay; Swales, Danielle; Waybright, Nicole; Pinkham, Chelsea; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a previously weaponized arthropod-borne virus responsible for causing acute and fatal encephalitis in animal and human hosts. The increased circulation and spread in the Americas of VEEV and other encephalitic arboviruses, such as eastern equine encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, underscore the need for research aimed at characterizing the pathogenesis of viral encephalomyelitis for the development of novel medical countermeasures. The host-pathogen dynamics of VEEV Trinidad donkey-infected human astrocytoma U87MG cells were determined by carrying out RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of poly(A) and mRNAs. To identify the critical alterations that take place in the host transcriptome following VEEV infection, samples were collected at 4, 8, and 16 h postinfection and RNA-Seq data were acquired using an Ion Torrent PGM platform. Differential expression of interferon response, stress response factors, and components of the unfolded protein response (UPR) was observed. The protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR was activated, as the expression of both activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CHOP (DDIT3), critical regulators of the pathway, was altered after infection. Expression of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) was induced in a PERK-dependent manner. EGR1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated lower susceptibility to VEEV-induced cell death than isogenic wild-type MEFs, indicating that EGR1 modulates proapoptotic pathways following VEEV infection. The influence of EGR1 is of great importance, as neuronal damage can lead to long-term sequelae in individuals who have survived VEEV infection. IMPORTANCE Alphaviruses represent a group of clinically relevant viruses transmitted by mosquitoes to humans. In severe cases, viral spread targets neuronal tissue, resulting in significant and life-threatening inflammation dependent on a combination

  11. Races of Heliconius erato (Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae) found on different sides of the Andes show wing size differences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in wing size in geographical races of Heliconius erato distributed over the western and eastern sides of the Andes are reported on here. Individuals from the eastern side of the Andes are statistically larger in size than the ones on the western side of the Andes. A statistical differenc...

  12. Peralkaline silicic volcanic rocks in northwestern nevada.

    PubMed

    Noble, D C; Chipman, D W; Giles, D L

    1968-06-21

    Late Tertiary silicic ashflow tuffs and lavas peralkaline in chemical character (atomic Na + K greater than Al), mainly comendites, occur over wide areas in northwestern Nevada and appear to be widespread in southeastern Oregon. Such peralkaline rocks-which are not uncommon in the western United States-and other chemically unusual silicic rocks are found near the margins rather than toward the center of the Great Basin. PMID:17800671

  13. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research.

    PubMed

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Andes. These studies documented a range of impacts on vegetation, birds and mammals; including changes in plant species richness, composition and vegetation cover and the tolerance of wildlife of visitor use. There was little research on the impacts of visitors on soils and aquatic systems and for some ecoregions in the Andes. We identify research priorities across the region that will enhance management strategies to minimise visitor impacts in Andean ecosystems. PMID:25201299

  14. Genetic and Anatomic Determinants of Enzootic Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection of Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Joan L.; Adams, A. Paige; Gorchakov, Rodion; Leal, Grace; Weaver, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a re-emerging, mosquito-borne viral disease with the potential to cause fatal encephalitis in both humans and equids. Recently, detection of endemic VEE caused by enzootic strains has escalated in Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia and Ecuador, emphasizing the importance of understanding the enzootic transmission cycle of the etiologic agent, VEE virus (VEEV). The majority of work examining the viral determinants of vector infection has been performed in the epizootic mosquito vector, Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus. Based on the fundamental differences between the epizootic and enzootic cycles, we hypothesized that the virus-vector interaction of the enzootic cycle is fundamentally different from that of the epizootic model. We therefore examined the determinants for VEEV IE infection in the enzootic vector, Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus, and determined the number and susceptibility of midgut epithelial cells initially infected and their distribution compared to the epizootic virus-vector interaction. Using chimeric viruses, we demonstrated that the determinants of infection for the enzootic vector are different than those observed for the epizootic vector. Similarly, we showed that, unlike A. taeniorhynchus infection with subtype IC VEEV, C. taeniopus does not have a limited subpopulation of midgut cells susceptible to subtype IE VEEV. These findings support the hypothesis that the enzootic VEEV relationship with C. taeniopus differs from the epizootic virus-vector interaction in that the determinants appear to be found in both the nonstructural and structural regions, and initial midgut infection is not limited to a small population of susceptible cells. PMID:22509419

  15. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus in Iquitos, Peru: Urban Transmission of a Sylvatic Strain

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Amy C.; Forshey, Brett M.; Notyce, Desiree; Astete, Helvio; Lopez, Victor; Rocha, Claudio; Carrion, Rebecca; Carey, Cristhiam; Eza, Dominique; Montgomery, Joel M.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzootic strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) have been isolated from febrile patients in the Peruvian Amazon Basin at low but consistent levels since the early 1990s. Through a clinic-based febrile surveillance program, we detected an outbreak of VEEV infections in Iquitos, Peru, in the first half of 2006. The majority of these patients resided within urban areas of Iquitos, with no report of recent travel outside the city. To characterize the risk factors for VEEV infection within the city, an antibody prevalence study was carried out in a geographically stratified sample of urban areas of Iquitos. Additionally, entomological surveys were conducted to determine if previously incriminated vectors of enzootic VEEV were present within the city. We found that greater than 23% of Iquitos residents carried neutralizing antibodies against VEEV, with significant associations between increased antibody prevalence and age, occupation, mosquito net use, and overnight travel. Furthermore, potential vector mosquitoes were widely distributed across the city. Our results suggest that while VEEV infection is more common in rural areas, transmission also occurs within urban areas of Iquitos, and that further studies are warranted to identify the precise vectors and reservoirs involved in urban VEEV transmission. PMID:19079600

  16. [Historic record of Gastrotheca ovifera (Anura: Hemiphractidae): decline evidence in Venezuelan coastal cloud forests].

    PubMed

    Valera-Leal, Javier; Acevedo, Aldemar; Pérez-Sánchez, Antonio; Vega, Jorge; Manzanilla, Jesús

    2011-03-01

    G. ovifera is a marsupial frog of the cloud and riparian forest from Western and Litoral sections of the Venezuelan Cordillera de la Costa (820-2 000m). This amphibian is considered as an endangered species by the IUCN Species Red List, due to its population decline in pristine and well preserved environments. This conservation status is based on anecdotic interpretations. We collected disperse data from museum records (national and international) and explored the possible association between collection records and precipitation data available for the Henri Pittier National Park (PNHP). Likewise, we carried out a systematic population monitoring of G. ovifera in historic and additional localities among the cloud forest of Rancho Grande, PNHP. We found 106 individuals in 11 zoological collections deposited during 1929-2007. After an effort of 646 hours/person we did not detect G. ovifera individuals in the evaluated localities; as well as no statistical significant associations between the annual precipitation average and the historic records of the species during 1941-1997 period (r = -0.054, p = 0.820, n = 19). We discussed the distribution, fluctuation and population changes of this species, analyzing it conservation status. PMID:21516654

  17. Structure of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus assembly intermediate isolated from infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Kristen; Lokesh, G.L.; Sherman, Michael; Watowich, Stanley

    2010-10-25

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a prototypical enveloped ssRNA virus of the family Togaviridae. To better understand alphavirus assembly, we analyzed newly formed nucleocapsid particles (termed pre-viral nucleocapsids) isolated from infected cells. These particles were intermediates along the virus assembly pathway, and ultimately bind membrane-associated viral glycoproteins to bud as mature infectious virus. Purified pre-viral nucleocapsids were spherical with a unimodal diameter distribution. The structure of one class of pre-viral nucleocapsids was determined with single particle reconstruction of cryo-electron microscopy images. These studies showed that pre-viral nucleocapsids assembled into an icosahedral structure with a capsid stoichiometry similar to the mature nucleocapsid. However, the individual capsomers were organized significantly differently within the pre-viral and mature nucleocapsids. The pre-viral nucleocapsid structure implies that nucleocapsids are highly plastic and undergo glycoprotein and/or lipid-driven rearrangements during virus self-assembly. This mechanism of self-assembly may be general for other enveloped viruses.

  18. An optical luminescence chronology for late Pleistocene aeolian activity in the Colombian and Venezuelan Llanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Andrew S.; Armitage, Simon J.; Berrío, Juan-Carlos; Bilbao, Bibiana A.; Boom, Arnoud

    2016-03-01

    The lowland savannas (Llanos) of Colombia and Venezuela are covered by extensive aeolian landforms for which little chronological information exists. We present the first optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) age constraints for dunes in the Llanos Orientales of lowland Colombia and new ages for dunes in the Venezuelan Llanos. The sampled dunes are fully vegetated and show evidence of post-depositional erosion. Ages range from 4.5 ± 0.4 to 66 ± 4 ka, with the majority dating to 27-10 ka (Marine Isotope Stage 2). Some dunes accumulated quickly during the last glacial maximum, although most were active 16-10 ka. Accretion largely ceased after 10 ka. All dunes are elongated downwind from rivers, parallel with dry season winds, and are interpreted as source-bordering features. As they are presently isolated from fluvial sediments by gallery forest it is proposed that activity was associated with a more prolonged dry season, which restricted gallery forest, leading to greater sediment availability on river shorelines. Such variability in dry season duration was potentially mediated by the mean latitude of the ITCZ. The cessation of most dune accretion after ca. 10 ka suggests reduced seasonality and a more northerly ITCZ position, consistent with evidence from the Cariaco Basin.

  19. [Presence of lectins, tannins and protease inhibitors in venezuelan marine algae].

    PubMed

    Perez-Lorenzo, S; Levy-Benshimol, A; Gomez-Acevedo, S

    1998-01-01

    The presence of lectins, tannins and protease inhibitors was studied in 27 algae species collected at four Venezuelan coral rift sites. Among the species studied, only six had hemagglutinating activity, apparently due to their lectin content. Higher hemagglutinating titers were obtained when the extracts were tested on pronase-treated erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was inhibited by simple sugars and by bovine submaxillary gland mucine. GaINAc was the only inhibitor of the hemagglutination caused by Grateulopia filicina extracts. None of the compounds tested inhibited the hemagglutination caused by Halimeda opuntia. The polyvinylpolypirrolidone treatment abolished the hemagglutinating activity of both brown and red algae. However, in Grateulopia filicina and Hypnea cervicornis (Rhodophyta) hemagglutinating activity persisted after the polyvinylpolypirrolidone treatment, presumably due to the presence of true lectins in those algae. Tannin content (presumably phlorotannins) was higher in the Phaeophyta as compared to the Rhodophyta. The brown alga Padina gymnospora had the higher content of these polyphenols. Trypsin inhibitors were detected, in minute ammounts, only in Padina gymnospora (Phaeophyta) and Acantophora spicifera (Rhodophyta). No subtilisin inhibition was observed whatsoever. PMID:10030041

  20. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Mucambo Virus (Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Complex Subtype IIIA) in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Volk, Sara M.; Arrigo, Nicole C.; Martinez, Raymond; Ramkissoon, Vernie; Adams, A. Paige; Thompson, Nadin N.; Adesiyun, Abiodun A.; Chadee, Dave D.; Foster, Jerome E.; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P.A.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Carrington, Christine V. F.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, alphaviruses in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) antigenic complex were the most frequently isolated arboviruses in Trinidad. Since then, there has been very little research performed with these viruses. Herein, we report on the isolation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of Mucambo virus (MUCV; VEE complex subtype IIIA), including 6 recently isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) portesi mosquitoes and 11 previously isolated in Trinidad and Brazil. Results show that nucleotide and amino acid identities across the complete structural polyprotein for the MUCV isolates were 96.6 – 100% and 98.7 – 100%, respectively, and the phylogenetic tree inferred for MUCV was highly geographically- and temporally- structured. Bayesian analyses suggest the sampled MUCV lineages have a recent common ancestry of approximately 198 years (with a 95% highest posterior density (HPD) interval of 63 – 448 years) prior to 2007, and an overall rate of evolution of 1.28 × 10−4 substitutions/site/yr. PMID:19631956

  1. Clinical trial with Secnidazole in a single dose in Venezuelan children infected by Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, M C; Jiménez, J C; Rodríguez, N; Costa, V; Villamizar, J; Silvera, A; Carrillo, M; Lira, C; Zerpa, E; López, Y

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate in an open, noncomparative study the use of secnidazole in oral suspension given to Venezuelan children infected with Giardia intestinalis, from a community in Carapita, a slum area in Caracas. Seventy children from 2 to 11 years old (38 males and 32 females) were treated with a single oral dose of secnidazole (30 mg/Kg of body weight), after clinical and parasitological evaluation to make the diagnosis of active giardiasis. The effectiveness of treatment was determined by clinical examination and parasitological evaluation of feces samples 15 days after treatment. The results showed 95% of clinical cure with a significant decrease of the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms. The parasitological cure was 98%, there were 4 failures at the end of treatment. Side effects observed after treatment were of mild intensity, lasting only few hours. These results show that a simple dose of secnidazole in an oral suspension is an effective, safe and well tolerated treatment for giardiasis in children and that this drug may be used as a mass treatment in risk populations. PMID:11029834

  2. [Microbiological assessment of the Gouda-type cheese-making process in a Venezuelan industry].

    PubMed

    Dáivila, Jacqueline; Reyes, Genara; Corzo, Otoniel

    2006-03-01

    The adoption of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system is necessary to assure the safety of the product in the cheese-making industry. The compliment of pre-requisite programs as Good Manufacture Practices (GMPs) and Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOPs) are required before the implementation of the HACCP plan. GMPs are the standards related to equipments, tools, personnel, etc. SSOPs are the procedures related to hygiene and sanitation of the plant and workers. The aim of this study was to assess the compliment of the pre-requisite programs and the microbiological conditions of the Gouda type cheese-making process in a Venezuelan processing plant before designing a HACCP plan. Samples were: (a) raw milk, pasteurized milk, curd and ripened cheese, (b) water, (c) environment of the production areas and ripening premises, (d) equipments before and after sanitation, (e) food handlers. Microbiological analyses were done according to COVENIN standards. This study showed that even though pasteurization process was effective to kill pathogen bacteria of the raw milk and the water was safe, however there are deficient manufacture practices in the hygiene as well as in sanitation of the plant and food handlers. Prerequisite programs (GMP-SSOP) of this industry need to be well established, controlled and evaluated. PMID:16786734

  3. Early response to the effect of iron fortification in the Venezuelan population.

    PubMed

    Layrisse, M; Chaves, J F; Mendez-Castellano; Bosch, V; Tropper, E; Bastardo, B; González, E

    1996-12-01

    In Venezuela a severe economic crisis beginning in 1983 provoked a progressive reduction of the quality and quantity of food consumed by the low socioeconomic strata of the population. In these strata, which represent > or = 80% of the Venezuelan population, we had seen a continuous increase in the prevalence of iron deficiency during that recent decade. As a result, in 1993 the Venezuela Government created the Special Commission for Enrichment of Foods. That same year a fortification program began in which precooked yellow and white maize and wheat flours were enriched with 20 and 50 mg Fe (as ferrous fumarate)/kg flour, respectively. The corn flour was also enriched with vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin, whereas the wheat flour was enriched with these same vitamins, except vitamin A. These two cereals represent 45% of the total energy consumed daily by the low socioeconomic strata of the population. A preliminary survey carried out in Caracas in 1994 in a population of 307 children aged 7, 11, and 15 y showed that the prevalence of iron deficiency determined by measuring the serum ferritin concentration and the prevalence of anemia were reduced from 37% and 19%, respectively, in 1992 to 15% and 10%, respectively in 1994. PMID:8942415

  4. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anuj; Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Puri, Raj K; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated. Changes in gene expression were correlated with histological changes in the brain. In addition, a molecular framework of changes in gene expression associated with progression of the disease was studied. Results Our results demonstrate that genes related to important immune pathways such as antigen presentation, inflammation, apoptosis and response to virus (Cxcl10, CxCl11, Ccl5, Ifr7, Ifi27 Oas1b, Fcerg1,Mif, Clusterin and MHC class II) were upregulated as a result of virus infection. The number of over-expressed genes (>1.5-fold level) increased as the disease progressed (from 197, 296, 400, to 1086 at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post infection, respectively). Conclusion Identification of differentially expressed genes in brain will help in the understanding of VEEV-induced pathogenesis and selection of biomarkers for diagnosis and targeted therapy of VEEV-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:18558011

  5. Endemic Venezuelan equine encephalitis in the Americas: hidden under the dengue umbrella

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Patricia V; Estrada-Franco, Jose G; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ferro, Cristina; Haddow, Andrew D; Weaver, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is an emerging infectious disease in Latin America. Outbreaks have been recorded for decades in countries with enzootic circulation, and the recent implementation of surveillance systems has allowed the detection of additional human cases in countries and areas with previously unknown VEE activity. Clinically, VEE is indistinguishable from dengue and other arboviral diseases and confirmatory diagnosis requires the use of specialized laboratory tests that are difficult to afford in resource-limited regions. Thus, the disease burden of endemic VEE in developing countries remains largely unknown, but recent surveillance suggests that it may represent up to 10% of the dengue burden in neotropical cities, or tens-of-thousands of cases per year throughout Latin America. The potential emergence of epizootic viruses from enzootic progenitors further highlights the need to strengthen surveillance activities, identify mosquito vectors and reservoirs and develop effective strategies to control the disease. In this article, we provide an overview of the current status of endemic VEE that results from spillover of the enzootic cycles, and we discuss public health measures for disease control as well as future avenues for VEE research. PMID:21765860

  6. Hydrocarbon-induced magnetic contrasts in some Venezuelan and Colombian oil wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo-Alvarez, Vincenzo; Aldana, Milagrosa; Díaz, Marisel; Bayona, Germán; Ayala, Carolina

    2006-10-01

    In this work we present a review of our current research on the subject of near-surface hydrocarbon-induced magnetic contrasts. Samples are drill cuttings from number of Venezuelan and Colombian oil fields, and some soils from an oil prospective area. Results from rock magnetic, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), extractable organic matter (EOM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are discussed in light of new experiments. Two types of magnetic susceptibility (MS) anomalies have been recognized in oil well samples (i.e. A and B-like). A-like anomalies are probably associated to a reducing environment caused by the underlying reservoirs, whereas B-like anomalies might reflect lithological contrasts. Samples from A-like anomalous levels reveal the restrictive presence of authigenic spherical aggregates of submicronic Fe-rich magnetic crystals. Peaks of organic matter free radical concentration (OMFRC) and EOM are also observed at depth levels that lie close to those with A-like anomalies. Hysteresis ratios J rs/Js and H cr/Hc could be used as additional criteria to recognize A-like magnetic contrasts. In soil samples, MS and OMFRC anomalies coincide with peaks of ethane concentration and an area underneath where source rock has reached appropriate conditions of pressure and temperature to generate hydrocarbons (Cretaceous kitchen). Different types of crude oils and subsurface structures could have also a direct effect on the observed amplitude of A-like anomalies.

  7. Andes Mountain Snow Distribution, Properties, and Trend: 1979-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.

    2015-04-01

    Andes snow presence, absence, properties, and water amount are key components of Earth's changing climate system that incur far-reaching physical ramifications. Modeling developments permit relatively high-resolution (4-km horizontal grid; 3-h time step) Andes snow estimates for 1979-2014. SnowModel, in conjunction with land cover, topography, and 35-years of NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis data, was used to create a spatially distributed, time-evolving, snow-related dataset that included air temperature, snow precipitation, snow-season timing and length, maximum snow water equivalent depth, and average snow density. Regional variability is a dominant feature of the modeled snow-property trends from an area northeast of Quito (latitude: 2.65°S to 0.23°N) to Patagonia (latitude: 52.15°S to 46.44°S). For example, the Quito area annual snow cover area changed -45%, -43% around Cusco (latitude: 14.75°S to 12.52°S), -5% east of Santiago (including the Olivares Basin), and 25% in Patagonia. The annual snow covered area for the entire Andes decreased 13%, mainly in the elevation band between 4,000-5,000 m a.s.l. In spite of strong regional variability, the data clearly show a general positive trend in mean annual air temperature and precipitation, and a decreasing trend in snow precipitation, snow precipitation days, and snow density. Also, the snow-cover onset is later and the snow-cover duration - the number of snow cover days - decreased.

  8. Detail view to show northwestern section of the building with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show northwestern section of the building with its modified mansard roof - Internal Revenue Service Headquarters Building, 1111 Constitution Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Large amplitude waves detected with balloons near the Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Giraldez, A.

    Spectral results from a vertical sounding of temperature and wind velocity performed with an open stratospheric balloon in Argentina near the Andes mountains between 12 and 25 km of altitude, are reported. The use of sonic anemometers allows for a higher resolution than in previous experiments. The data records are studied in successive subintervals, yielding a good spectral correlation between the ascent and the descent around and below the tropopause. The possibilities of an orographic origin for large amplitude modes observed in the spectra and of wave generation by non linear interactions between them are discussed.

  10. Giant evaporite belts of the Neogene central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Ricardo N.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Tabbutt, Kenneth T.; Vandervoort, Dirk S.

    1991-04-01

    Large volumes of continental evaporites accumulated within the central Andes during Neogene uplift of the Altiplano-Puna plateau and development of the Andean volcanic arc. Halite and gypsum are dominant minerals, along with local and economically important borates. Playa conditions have existed since ca. 15 Ma; halite and borate deposition has occurred for the past 7 to 8 m.y. Evaporites formed in salar environments (e.g., playa lakes) and are characterized by complex mineral assemblages, occurrence, zonation, and geochemistry. Evaporite deposition was controlled by volcanism, geothermal activity, closed drainage, and climate. These Andean deposits, and their controls, differ from evaporites in other continental and marine environments.

  11. Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Silva, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A model is presented accounting for many features of the Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex situated in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes which contains 50 recently active volcanoes. The dominant elements of the complex are several large nested caldera complexes which are the source structures for the major regionally distributed ignimbrite sheets that characterize the complex. The study of the complex reveals the importance of the intersection of subsidiary axis-oblique tectonic trends related to regional stress fields peculiar to individual oceanic ridge sections with the axis-parallel trends predominant at all spreading centers in localizing hydrothermal discharge zones.

  12. Episodic Cenozoic volcanism and tectonism in the Andes of Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; McKee, E.H.; Farrar, E.; Petersen, U.

    1974-01-01

    Radiometric and geologic information indicate a complex history of Cenozoic volcanism and tectonism in the central Andes. K-Ar ages on silicic pyroclastic rocks demonstrate major volcanic activity in central and southern Peru, northern Chile, and adjacent areas during the Early and Middle Miocene, and provide additional evidence for volcanism during the Late Eocene. A provisional outline of tectonic and volcanic events in the Peruvian Andes during the Cenozoic includes: one or more pulses of igneous activity and intense deformation during the Paleocene and Eocene; a period of quiescence, lasting most of Oligocene time; reinception of tectonism and volcanism at the beginning of the Miocene; and a major pulse of deformation in the Middle Miocene accompanied and followed through the Pliocene by intense volcanism and plutonism. Reinception of igneous activity and tectonism at about the Oligocene-Miocene boundary, a feature recognized in other circum-Pacific regions, may reflect an increase in the rate of rotation of the Pacific plate relative to fixed or quasifixed mantle coordinates. Middle Miocene tectonism and latest Tertiary volcanism correlates with and probably is genetically related to the beginning of very rapid spreading at the East Pacific Rise. ?? 1974.

  13. Heinrich I and Younger Dryas Glaciation in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, J.; Zech, R.; May, J.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2009-12-01

    Short term climate reversals, such as Heinrich I (H-I) and the Younger Dryas (YD), are well documented in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the respective response of the climate system in the Southern Hemisphere during these events remains enigmatic. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from the Wara Wara Valley (17°S, 66°W), Cordillera Cochabamba, that reveal glacial advances in the Central Andes before 14.3 ka and 11.9 ka. These advances correlate with H-I and YD and coincide with the lake transgression phases Tauca (18-14 ka) and Coipasa (13-11 ka) on the Altiplano. They corroborate the precipitation sensitivity of glacier mass balances in the semi-arid Central Andes. We suggest that sufficient moisture for glacial advances can be explained by enhanced upper tropospheric easterlies as a response to an intensified tropical circulation and sustained la Niña like patterns in the eastern Pacific. This redistribution of the ocean and atmospheric circulation was caused by a southward shift of the ITCZ due to northern hemispheric cooling. At 10.8 ka glacier advanced again attributed to increased moisture supply by enhanced polar advection and SE trade winds during the Early Holocene. Final deglaciation started only at 9.2 ka induced by a change to drier conditions.

  14. Geology and petroleum resources of northwestern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Klemme, H.D.

    1986-05-01

    The main onshore basins of northwestern Africa are (1) basins in the Atlas folded geosynclinal belt adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea, (2) the Tindouf, Bechar, and Reggane basins of western Algeria and southern Morocco, and (3) the Taoudeni basin of Mauritania and Mali. Coastal basins are (1) the Essaouria basin of southwestern Morocco, (2) the Tarfaya basin of Western Sahara, (3) the Senegal basin of Senegal and western Mauritania, (4) the Sierra Leone-Liberia basin, and (5) the Ivory Coast basin. The petroleum geology and resource potential of these basins is detailed.

  15. Small molecule inhibitors of Ago2 decrease Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replication.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Cathaleen; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; Shafagati, Nazly; Johnson, Alexandra; Senina, Svetlana; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoover, Lisa I; Fredricksen, Brenda L; Dinman, Jonathan; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2014-12-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is classified as a Category B Select Agent and potential bioterror weapon for its severe disease course in humans and equines and its potential for aerosol transmission. There are no current FDA licensed vaccines or specific therapies against VEEV, making identification of potential therapeutic targets a priority. With this aim, our research focuses on the interactions of VEEV with host microRNA (miRNA) machinery. miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that act as master regulators of gene expression by downregulating or degrading messenger RNA, thus suppressing production of the resultant proteins. Recent publications implicate miRNA interactions in the pathogenesis of various viral diseases. To test the importance of miRNA processing for VEEV replication, cells deficient in Ago2, an important component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), and cells treated with known Ago2 inhibitors, notably acriflavine (ACF), were utilized. Both conditions caused decreased viral replication and capsid expression. ACF treatment promoted increased survival of neuronal cells over a non-treated, infected control and reduced viral titers of fully virulent VEEV as well as Eastern and Western Equine Encephalitis Viruses and West Nile Virus, but not Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. ACF treatment of VEEV TC-83 infected mice resulted in increased in vivo survival, but did not affect survival or viral loads when mice were challenged with fully virulent VEEV TrD. These results suggest that inhibition of Ago2 results in decreased replication of encephalitic alphaviruses in vitro and this pathway may be an avenue to explore for future therapeutic development. PMID:25448087

  16. Role of angiotensin II in experimental Venezuelan equine encephalitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, John; Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Vargas, Renata; Hernández-Fonseca, Juan P; Quiroz, Yasmir; Godoy, Rosario

    2015-10-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. The inflammation induced by the VEE virus is associated with a high mortality rate in mice. Angiotensin II (Ang II), a pro-inflammatory molecule, is produced in the normal rat brain. There is no information about the role of this molecule in the inflammatory events occurring during VEE and the effect of inflammation on the mortality rate in VEE-virus-infected rats. This study was designed to determine the role of Ang II in VEE and to analyze the effect of inflammation on mortality in infected rats. Two groups of rats were studied: 1) Virus-infected animals and controls (n = 60) were treated with losartan (a blocker of the Ang II-AT1 receptor) or with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB) or left untreated and analyzed for morbidity and mortality. 2) Animals treated using the same protocol (n = 30) were sacrificed at day 4 postinfection and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and histopathology and for cytokine production. Increased expression of Ang II, ICAM-1, ED-1 and cytokines (IL-1α, MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-10) in infected animals was observed. The main histopathology findings were dilated capillaries and capillaries with endothelial detachment. Losartan and PDTC reduced the expression of IL-1α, MCP-1, and IL-10, and the number of dilated capillaries and capillaries with endothelial detachment. Survival analysis showed that 100% mortality was reached earlier in infected rats treated with losartan (day 14) or PDTC (day 11) than in untreated animals (day 19). These findings suggest that Ang II plays a role in VEE and that brain inflammation is protective against viral infection. PMID:26156105

  17. The Ubiquitin Proteasome System Plays a Role in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Moushimi; Keck, Forrest; Lindquist, Michael; Voss, Kelsey; Scavone, Lauren; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Roberts, Brian; Bailey, Charles; Schmaljohn, Connie; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have been implicated in utilizing or modulating the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) to enhance viral multiplication and/or to sustain a persistent infection. The mosquito-borne Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the Togaviridae family and is an important biodefense pathogen and select agent. There are currently no approved vaccines or therapies for VEEV infections; therefore, it is imperative to identify novel targets for therapeutic development. We hypothesized that a functional UPS is required for efficient VEEV multiplication. We have shown that at non-toxic concentrations Bortezomib, a FDA-approved inhibitor of the proteasome, proved to be a potent inhibitor of VEEV multiplication in the human astrocytoma cell line U87MG. Bortezomib inhibited the virulent Trinidad donkey (TrD) strain and the attenuated TC-83 strain of VEEV. Additional studies with virulent strains of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) demonstrated that Bortezomib is a broad spectrum inhibitor of the New World alphaviruses. Time-of-addition assays showed that Bortezomib was an effective inhibitor of viral multiplication even when the drug was introduced many hours post exposure to the virus. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the VEEV capsid protein is ubiquitinated in infected cells, which was validated by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays. Subsequent studies revealed that capsid is ubiquitinated on K48 during early stages of infection which was affected by Bortezomib treatment. This study will aid future investigations in identifying host proteins as potential broad spectrum therapeutic targets for treating alphavirus infections. PMID:25927990

  18. Diffusion and spatially resolved NMR in Berea and Venezuelan oil reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Murgich, J; Corti, M; Pavesi, L; Voltini, F

    1992-01-01

    Conventional and spatially resolved proton NMR and relaxation measurements are used in order to study the molecular motions and the equilibrium and nonequilibrium diffusion of oils in Berea sandstone and Venezuelan reservoir rocks. In the water-saturated Berea a single line with T*2 congruent to 150 microseconds is observed, while the relaxation recovery is multiexponential. In an oil reservoir rock (Ful 13) a single narrow line is present while a distribution of relaxation rates is evidenced from the recovery plots. On the contrary, in the Ful 7 sample (extracted at a deeper depth in a different zone) two NMR components are present, with 3.5 and 30 KHz linewidths, and the recovery plot exhibits biexponential law. No echo signal could be reconstructed in the oil reservoir rocks. These findings can be related to the effects in the micropores, where motions at very low frequency can occur in a thin layer. From a comparison of the diffusion constant in water-saturated Berea, D congruent to 5*10(-6) cm2/sec, with the ones in model systems, the average size of the pores is estimated around 40 A. The density profiles at the equilibrium show uniform distribution of oils or of water, and the relaxation rates appear independent from the selected slice. The nonequilibrium diffusion was studied as a function of time in a Berea cylinder with z axis along H0, starting from a thin layer of oil at the base, and detecting the spin density profiles d(z,t) with slice-selection techniques. Simultaneously, the values of T1's were measured locally, and the distribution of the relaxation rates was observed to be present in any slice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1461080

  19. Biogeochemistry of a treeline watershed, northwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1950, mean annual temperatures in northwestern Alaska have increased. Change in forest floor and soil temperature or moisture could alter N mineralization rates, production of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and organic nitrogen (DON), and their export to the aquatic ecosystem. In 1990, we began study of nutrient cycles in the 800-ha Asik watershed, located at treeline in the Noatak National Preserve, northwestern Alaska. This paper summarizes relationships between topographic aspect, soil temperature and moisture, inorganic and organic N pools, C pools, CO2 efflux, growing season net N mineralization rates, and stream water chemistry. Forest floor (O2) C/N ratios, C pools, temperature, and moisture were greater on south aspects. More rapid melt of the soil active layer (zone of annual freeze-thaw) and permafrost accounted for the higher moisture. The O2 C and N content were correlated with moisture, inorganic N pools, CO2 efflux, and inversely with temperature. Inorganic N pools were correlated with temperature and CO2 efflux. Net N mineralization rates were positive in early summer, and correlated with O2 moisture, temperature, and C and N pools. Net nitrification rates were inversely correlated with moisture, total C and N. The CO2 efflux increased with temperature and moisture, and was greater on south aspects. Stream ion concentrations declined and DOC increased with discharge. Stream inorganic nitrogen (DIN) output exceeded input by 70%. Alpine stream water nitrate (NO-3) and DOC concentrations indicated substantial contributions to the watershed DIN and DOC budgets.

  20. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  1. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  2. Prediction equations for Warner-Bratzler shear force using principal component regression analysis in Brahman-influenced Venezuelan cattle.

    PubMed

    Jerez-Timaure, N; Huerta-Leidenz, N; Ortega, J; Rodas-González, A

    2013-03-01

    A database consisting of 331 beef animals (Brahman-crossbred) was used to determine the multivariate relationships between carcass and beef palatability traits of Venezuelan cattle and to develop prediction equations for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The first three principal components (PC) explained 77.53% of the standardized variance. Equations were obtained for each sex class and the total variability observed in WBSF could be explained by its orthogonal regression with carcass weight (CW), fat cover (FC), fat thickness (FT), and skeletal maturity (SM). Prediction equations were: WBSF(steers)=3.566+0.003(CW)-0.033(FC)-0.015(FT)+0.0004(SM); WBSF(heifers)=4.824+0.002(CW)-0.229(FC)+0.096(FT)-0.064(SM); WBSF(bulls)=3.516+0.009(CW)+0.154(FC)-0.129(FT)-0.006(SM). A higher proportion of the variation was explained by the PC when variables of greater weight were selected to define each PC. The equation set presented herein could become an important tool to improve the Venezuelan carcass grading system. PMID:23261538

  3. Epidemiological modeling and risk analysis of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis in the human population of Coastal Chiapas, Mexico in 2007-2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of 101 febrile illness patients sero positive for Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEEV) was carried out in a retrospective study along 18 municipalities and endemic VEEV pacific coastal regions of the State of Chiapas in southern Mexico. Geographic information systems (GIS), satellite imag...

  4. Paleoindian settlement of the high-altitude Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, Kurt; Hodgins, Gregory; Moore, Katherine; Zarrillo, Sonia; Miller, Christopher; Bromley, Gordon R M; Leach, Peter; Reid, David A; Álvarez, Willy Yépez; Sandweiss, Daniel H

    2014-10-24

    Study of human adaptation to extreme environments is important for understanding our cultural and genetic capacity for survival. The Pucuncho Basin in the southern Peruvian Andes contains the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world, about 900 meters above confidently dated contemporary sites. The Pucuncho workshop site [4355 meters above sea level (masl)] includes two fishtail projectile points, which date to about 12.8 to 11.5 thousand years ago (ka). Cuncaicha rock shelter (4480 masl) has a robust, well-preserved, and well-dated occupation sequence spanning the past 12.4 thousand years (ky), with 21 dates older than 11.5 ka. Our results demonstrate that despite cold temperatures and low-oxygen conditions, hunter-gatherers colonized extreme high-altitude Andean environments in the Terminal Pleistocene, within about 2 ky of the initial entry of humans to South America. PMID:25342802

  5. Ancient ice islands in salt lakes of the Central Andes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurlbert, S.H.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Massive blocks of freshwater ice and frozen sediments protrude from shallow, saline lakes in the Andes of southwestern Bolivia and northeastern Chile. These ice islands range up to 1.5 kilometers long, stand up to 7 meters above the water surface, and may extend out tens of meters and more beneath the unfrozen lake sediments. The upper surfaces of the islands are covered with dry white sediments, mostly aragonite or calcite. The ice blocks may have formed by freezing of the fresh pore water of lake sediments during the "little ice age." The largest blocks are melting rapidly because of possibly recent increases in geothermal heat flux through the lake bottom and undercutting by warm saline lake water during the summer.

  6. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle. PMID:15860623

  7. Seismic Imaging of a Nascent Batholith in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.

    2013-12-01

    Cordilleran mountain belts, such as the modern central Andes and Mesozoic western North American Cordillera formed in regions of significant upper plate compression and were punctuated by high flux magmatic events that coalesced into large composite batholiths. Unlike the North American Cordillera, compressive mountain building is still active in the central Andes and any large modern batholith still at depth must be inferred from surface volcanics and geophysical data. In the Andes it has been suggested that a modern batholith exists beneath the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC), the location of a 11-1 Ma ignimbrite flare-up, however, the magmatic underpinnings has only been geophysically investigated in a few widely spaced locations and a migmatite zone of crustal melt with minimal mantle input remains a viable competing interpretation. We present new high-resolution 3-D seismic images of the APVC crust based on a joint inversion of ambient noise surface-wave dispersion data and receiver functions from broadband stations and identify a shallow (<20 km depth) low-velocity body that we interpret as a magmatic mush zone, the Altiplano-Puna Mush Body (APMB). Below the APMB, we observe near-vertical zones of low velocity that bifurcate near the base of the crust with one arm of low velocity migrating under the main volcanic arc and a second separate arm of low velocity below the voluminous backarc volcanism. Previous attenuation tomography studies have traced these zones through the mantle where they intersect the top of the subducting Nazca slab at locations with elevated seismic activity, providing strong evidence that the deeper near-vertical zones of low velocity we are imaging are related to dewatering of the slab and associated mantle-sourced melt pathways. Based on these considerations, we suggest the ~200 km diameter and ~20 km thick body is a nascent silicic batholith compatible with the magma mush model of batholith formation. The direct imaging of this

  8. Seismological observations in Northwestern South America: Evidence for two subduction segments, contrasting crustal thicknesses and upper mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarce, Jefferson; Monsalve, Gaspar; Becker, Thorsten W.; Cardona, Agustín; Poveda, Esteban; Alvira, Daniel; Ordoñez-Carmona, Oswaldo

    2014-12-01

    The cause of tectonic deformation in northwestern South America and its link to upper mantle structure and flow are debated. We use a combination of broadband and short period travel time seismic data for P-waves to show that observations are consistent with the presence of two subduction segments in Colombia and contrasting values of crustal thickness. In Northern Colombia, at latitudes greater than 6°N, most of the seismic stations are associated with negative teleseismic travel time residuals, relative to a regional mean, suggesting that the upper mantle is seismically faster than predicted from global models. In particular, for the Caribbean coastal plains there are no signs of significant anomalies in the upper mantle, evidenced by the small magnitude of the travel time delays and subdued Pn speeds (~ 7.97 km/s). To the southeast of such plains there is an increase in magnitude of the negative travel time residuals, including the Northern Eastern Cordillera, the Perija Range and the Merida Andes. An analysis of non-isostatic residual topography, based on a model of crustal thickness in northwestern South America, is consistent with a slab-associated upper mantle flow beneath the region just east of the Bucaramanga Nest. We interpret these results to indicate the presence of a Caribbean slab, initially flat beneath the Caribbean coastal plains, and steepening sharply in the southeast, including the area of Bucaramanga. For most of the western Andean region and the Pacific coast, south of 6°N, teleseismic differential travel time residuals are predominantly positive, indicating that the upper mantle is in general seismically slower than the reference model. Beneath the Central Cordillera, just to the east of this area, the residuals become smaller and predominantly negative; residual non-isostatic topography is negative as well. These features are probably related to the effect of the Nazca subduction developing an asthenospheric wedge.

  9. Complex brittle deformation pattern along the Southern Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberón, Vanesa; Sue, Christian; Ronda, Gonzalo; Ghiglione, Matías

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes is located in the southern extreme of the Pacific subduction zone, where the Antartic oceanic plate sinks underneath South America. The history of the area begins with compression during Paleozoic, Jurassic extension associated to the rift and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, then a sag stage in the Lower Cretaceous followed by a foreland phase as a result of plate tectonics (Ghiglione et al., 2016). The kinematic study is concentrated in the Argentinean foothills, between 46°40' and 48° SL. We measured around 800 fault planes and their striaes with the sense of movement in order to characterize the stress field. The software used to make the stress inversion were Tensor (Delvaux, 2011) and Multiple Inverse Method MIM (Yamaji et al., 2011). The stress field map was built with the results of the MIM. We present new data from 48 sites located in the northern sector of the Southern Patagonian Andes. The measurements were made in several rocks from Paleozoic to Lower Cretaceous, even though most were taken in pyroclastic jurassic rocks from El Quemado Complex. Paleostress tensors obtained are mostly strike-slip, although a 25% is normal and there are a few compresional. The pattern of faults found is complex. In some sites the tensor can be locally linked to satellite images and observations from the field or be related to a major thrust front. There is no clear correlation between the age and/or lithology with the tensor since the youngest rocks measured are Lower Cretaceous. Probably there are several generations of family faults connected to different and recent tectonic phases then the paleostress tensors might correspond to the latest tectonic events.

  10. Protoplanetary Disk Structure with Grain Evolution: The ANDES Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimkin, V.; Zhukovska, S.; Wiebe, D.; Semenov, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T.; Henning, Th.

    2013-03-01

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: "ANDES" ("AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation"). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R <~ 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R >~ 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO2, NH2CN, HNO, H2O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  11. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T. E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de E-mail: henning@mpia.de E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-03-20

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  12. First results of a high resolution reflection seismic survey of the Central Northern Venezuelan Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, J.; van Welden, A.; Audemard, F.; de Batist, M.; Beck, C.; Scientific Party, G.

    2008-05-01

    . The main SSF fault is not clearly expressed in all profiles as a clear rupture of the sea floor sediments but rather as highly deformed zones. Our data set, also evidences preliminary, due to relatively wide spacing fo the seismic grid- the interest of the studied areas for the investigation of regional natural hazards (climatic, seismo-tectonic), and of the impact of sea level changes in the southeastern Caribbean. This project was funded by FONACIT project PI-2003000090 and French-Venezuelan ECOS-Nord scientific exchange program.

  13. Characterization of enzootic foci of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus in western Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Barrera, R; Torres, N; Freier, J E; Navarro, J C; García, C Z; Salas, R; Vasquez, C; Weaver, S C

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of the sylvatic subtype ID Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viruses in the lowland tropical forests of western Venezuela was investigated using remote sensing and geographic information system technologies. Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper satellite imagery was used to study the reflectance patterns of VEE endemic foci and to identify other locations with similar reflectance patterns. Enzootic VEE virus variants isolated during this study are the closest genetic relatives of the epizootic viruses that emerged in western Venezuela during 1992-1993. VEE virus surveillance was conducted by exposing sentinel hamsters to mosquito bites and trapping wild vertebrates in seven forests identified and located by means of the satellite image. We isolated VEE viruses from 48 of a total of 1,363 sentinel hamsters in two of the forests on six occasions, in both dry and wet seasons. None of the 12 small vertebrates captured in 8,190 trap-nights showed signs of previous VEE virus infection. The satellite image was classified into 13 validated classes of land use/vegetation using unsupervised and supervised techniques. Data derived from the image consisted of the raw digital values of near- and mid-infrared bands 4, 5, and 7, derived Tasseled Cap indices of wetness, greenness, and brightness, and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. Digitized maps provided ancillary data of elevation and soil geomorphology. Image enhancement was applied using Principal Component Analysis. A digital layer of roads together with georeferenced images was used to locate the study sites. A cluster analysis using the above data revealed two main groups of dense forests separated by spectral properties, altitude, and soil geomorphology. Virus was isolated more frequently from the forest type identified on flat flood plains of main rivers rather than the forest type found on the rolling hills of the study area. The spatial analysis suggests that mosquitoes carrying the enzootic viruses

  14. Reply to the Comment on "Sandstone caves on Venezuelan tepuis: Return to pseudokarst?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, R.; Lánczos, T.; Gregor, M.; Schlögl, J.; Šmída, B.; Liščák, P.; Brewer-Carías, Ch.; Vlček, L.

    2013-09-01

    In Aubrecht et al. (2011) we brought new data showing that the arenitic caves in the Venezuelan tepuis did not necessarily originate through quartz cement dissolution ('arenization') but the main portion of the caves originated because of poor lithification prior to erosion. An additional important process is lateritization which is responsible for at least 30% of the caves' volume. Sauro et al. (2012) in their comment support the 'arenization' theory (quartz cement dissolution) and provide several arguments against some points of our research. Their main objections and arguments relate to the following topics: 1) the validity of the arenization theory, 2) the origin and importance of the 'finger-flow' pillars, 3) the importance of the Schmidt hammer measurements and, 4) metamorphism of the Matauí Formation. In our reply we present further documentation that: The quartz cement dissolution theory of cave evolution was far less documented petrographically than the new theory presented by us. Although the presence of quartz dissolution is evident, there is no current evidence that it is widespread or that it plays a trigger role. Many of the presented examples of corrosion on quartz grains could have been caused by local alkalization. In addition, the hydrogeochemical data presented in the comment to support the 'arenization' theory do not in fact contradict our speleogenetic interpretations. 'Finger-flow' pillars are speleogenetic indicators and not speleogenetic factors. Their absence in some caves provides no evidence against our theory. Schmidt hammer measurements only objectivize the data on contrasting hardness in the Matauí Formation beds. They do not say anything about the origin of this difference. The arguments of Sauro et al. (2012) involve the metamorphic overprint of the Matauí Formation shown by the presence of pyrophyllite and quartz mobilizations. Because quartz mobilization also occurs in hypergenic conditions, it may be neglected as a metamorphic

  15. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Studies of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Cysteine Protease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Compton, Jaimee R; Leary, Dagmar H; Olson, Mark A; Lee, Michael S; Cheung, Jonah; Ye, Wenjuan; Ferrer, Mark; Southall, Noel; Jadhav, Ajit; Morazzani, Elaine M; Glass, Pamela J; Marugan, Juan; Legler, Patricia M

    2016-05-31

    The Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) cysteine protease (EC 3.4.22.-) is essential for viral replication and is involved in the cytopathic effects (CPE) of the virus. The VEEV nsP2 protease is a member of MEROPS Clan CN and characteristically contains a papain-like protease linked to an S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase (SAM MTase) domain. The protease contains an alternative active site motif, (475)NVCWAK(480), which differs from papain's (CGS(25)CWAFS), and the enzyme lacks a transition state-stabilizing residue homologous to Gln-19 in papain. To understand the roles of conserved residues in catalysis, we determined the structure of the free enzyme and the first structure of an inhibitor-bound alphaviral protease. The peptide-like E64d inhibitor was found to bind beneath a β-hairpin at the interface of the SAM MTase and protease domains. His-546 adopted a conformation that differed from that found in the free enzyme; one or both of the conformers may assist in leaving group departure of either the amine or Cys thiolate during the catalytic cycle. Interestingly, E64c (200 μM), the carboxylic acid form of the E64d ester, did not inhibit the nsP2 protease. To identify key residues involved in substrate binding, a number of mutants were analyzed. Mutation of the motif residue, N475A, led to a 24-fold reduction in kcat/Km, and the conformation of this residue did not change after inhibition. N475 forms a hydrogen bond with R662 in the SAM MTase domain, and the R662A and R662K mutations both led to 16-fold decreases in kcat/Km. N475 forms the base of the P1 binding site and likely orients the substrate for nucleophilic attack or plays a role in product release. An Asn homologous to N475 is similarly found in coronaviral papain-like proteases (PLpro) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus. Mutation of another motif residue, K480A, led to a 9

  16. Nitrogen mineralization in soils under grasses and under trees in a protected Venezuelan savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, L. F.; García-Miragaya, J.; Chacón, N.

    Nitrogen mineralization was evaluated in soils beneath the most common woody species growing isolated within the grass matrix of a Venezuelan Trachypogon savanna, which has been protected from fire and cattle grazing since 1961. Adult trees of three evergreen species, Byrsonima crassifolia (L) H. B. K., Curatella americana L., and Bowdichia virgilioides H. B. K; and two deciduous, Godmania macrocarpa Hemsley and Cochlospermun vitifolium (Wild) Spreng were selected. The amount of N mineralized (NH 4+-N+NO 3--N) during 15 weeks of laboratory incubation of soils collected from beneath trees, was significantly higher ( p<0.01) than those from under grasses. Values of N mineralized on soil from under trees were from 21.28 to 82.65% greater than for soil from under grasses. A highly significant ( p<0.01) positive correlation, for all soils, was found between Nm and SOC, and between Nm and Nt. The higher N mineralization rates under trees would reflect a higher soil biological activity, due to higher SOC and Nt, of the soils under the tree canopies than those under grasses. The N availability values obtained under all species reveal the importance these trees have for creating enriched areas on generally oligotrophic soils. Nitrogen mineralized in the soil from beneath evergreen trees was significantly ( p<0.01) higher than from under deciduous trees, being 25.87% higher on average. Similarly to the relation found for all soils, a highly significant ( p<0.01) positive correlation between Nm and SOC and between Nm and Nt was also obtained for soils beneath all trees, indicating the importance of SOC and Nt for nitrogen mineralization processes in this savanna. The higher SOC and Nt contents found under evergreen trees are probably due to the longer time they have been established on the site as compared to the deciduous ones. The chemical quality of fresh fallen leaves (as measured by their lignin/nitrogen ratio) did not seem to influence the quality of the SOM (as

  17. An accreted continental terrane in northwestern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourier, T.; Laj, C.; Mégard, F.; Roperch, P.; Mitouard, P.; Farfan Medrano, A.

    1988-04-01

    A paleomagnetic study of over 250 cores from 26 sites sampled in Early to Late Cretaceous and Paleogene volcanic, plutonic and sedimentary formations of the Lancones basin in the Piura province of northern Peru, indicates that most of these lithologies carry a stable primary remanent magnetization whose direction is significantly different from that of coeval formations of stable South America. A clockwise rotation ranging from 90° for the lowermost units to 35° for the uppermost ones has been documented, although the lack of precise chronology has not allowed a detailed temporal description. Four sites from Late Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) formations in the Amotape-Tahuin Range also show a 110° clockwise rotation and yield evidence for a northward displacement. When considered together with previous geological studies, these data are consistent with the hypothesis of the accretion of an Amotape-Tahuin continental terrane to the Peruvian margin in Neocomian times. The accretion was followed by in situ rotation, suggesting a dextral shear regime. These results indicate that the geodynamical evolution of northern Peru is more closely related to the processes observed in Ecuador than to those classically assumed for the Central Andes of Peru.

  18. Ethnobotanical Knowledge Is Vastly Under-Documented in Northwestern South America

    PubMed Central

    Cámara-Leret, Rodrigo; Paniagua-Zambrana, Narel; Balslev, Henrik; Macía, Manuel J.

    2014-01-01

    A main objective of ethnobotany is to document traditional knowledge about plants before it disappears. However, little is known about the coverage of past ethnobotanical studies and thus about how well the existing literature covers the overall traditional knowledge of different human groups. To bridge this gap, we investigated ethnobotanical data-collecting efforts across four countries (Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia), three ecoregions (Amazon, Andes, Chocó), and several human groups (including Amerindians, mestizos, and Afro-Americans). We used palms (Arecaceae) as our model group because of their usefulness and pervasiveness in the ethnobotanical literature. We carried out a large number of field interviews (n = 2201) to determine the coverage and quality of palm ethnobotanical data in the existing ethnobotanical literature (n = 255) published over the past 60 years. In our fieldwork in 68 communities, we collected 87,886 use reports and documented 2262 different palm uses and 140 useful palm species. We demonstrate that traditional knowledge on palm uses is vastly under-documented across ecoregions, countries, and human groups. We suggest that the use of standardized data-collecting protocols in wide-ranging ethnobotanical fieldwork is a promising approach for filling critical information gaps. Our work contributes to the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and emphasizes the need for signatory nations to the Convention on Biological Diversity to respond to these information gaps. Given our findings, we hope to stimulate the formulation of clear plans to systematically document ethnobotanical knowledge in northwestern South America and elsewhere before it vanishes. PMID:24416449

  19. Solimoes megashear: Intraplate tectonics in northwestern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, M.V. )

    1991-03-01

    A belt of deformation in the Solimoes basin of northwestern Brazil extends east-northeast from near the Peruvian border for about 1300 km. The belt is characterized by the en echelon arrangement of folds and faults interpreted as the result of right-slip displacements in a transpressive regime. The structures were formed during Late Jurassic time, probably due to collision of South America with allochthonous terranes as the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean began. The Iquitos arch near the western end of the megashear separates the Solimoes basin from Subandean basins. The development of the Iquitos arch is interpreted to be related to orogenic loading along western South America by the Andean mountain belt. In Brazil, folds and faults associated with the Solimoes megashear hold hydrocarbons within Paleozoic strata, and 15 gas and oil fields have so far been discovered.

  20. 16. OFFICE INTERIORLocated on the Glenarm Place (northwestern) side, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. OFFICE INTERIOR--Located on the Glenarm Place (northwestern) side, with the windows facing the light well. Southeast - Empire Building, 430 Sixteenth Street, South Corner of Sixteenth Street & Glenarm Place, Denver, Denver County, CO

  1. DETAIL OF NORTHWESTERN CORNER, WEST FACADE, SHOWING WINDOW AND LOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTHWESTERN CORNER, WEST FACADE, SHOWING WINDOW AND LOADING DOCK RAMP, LOOKING SOUTH - Eglin Air Force Base, Motor Repair Shop, Northwest of Flager Road, Chisk Lane & southern edge of Weekly Bayou, Valparaiso, Okaloosa County, FL

  2. 14. INTERIOR, NORTHWESTERN WING, SHOW ROOM, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR, NORTHWESTERN WING, SHOW ROOM, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  3. 15. INTERIOR, NORTHWESTERN WING, SHOW ROOM, DETAIL OF BALCONY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR, NORTHWESTERN WING, SHOW ROOM, DETAIL OF BALCONY - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  4. FACING SOUTH OF LANDSCAPING IN NORTHWESTERN PORTION OF PARK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING SOUTH OF LANDSCAPING IN NORTHWESTERN PORTION OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  5. Northeastern Exterior, Northwestern Exterior, & Southwestern Exterior Elevations, Northeastern Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northeastern Exterior, Northwestern Exterior, & Southwestern Exterior Elevations, Northeastern Interior, Southeastern Interior, & Southwestern Interior Elevations, Floor Plan, and Eastern Corner Detail - Manatoc Reservation, Vale Edge Adirondack, 1075 Truxell Road, Peninsula, Summit County, OH

  6. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Pyron, R Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H; Guayasamin, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history. PMID:27120100

  7. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Pyron, R. Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H.; Guayasamin, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history. PMID:27120100

  8. Across the southern Andes on fin: glacial refugia, drainage reversals and a secondary contact zone revealed by the phylogeographical signal of Galaxias platei in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Habit, Evelyn M; Walde, Sandra J; Battini, Miguel A; Adams, Emily D M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    We employed DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial (control region, COI) regions from 212 individuals of Galaxias platei (Pisces, Galaxiidae) collected throughout Patagonia (25 lakes/rivers) to examine how Andean orogeny and the climatic cycles throughout the Quaternary affected the genetic diversity and phylogeography of this species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed four deep genealogical lineages which likely represent the initial division of G. platei into eastern and western lineages by Andean uplift, followed by further subdivision of each lineage into separate glacial refugia by repeated Pleistocene glacial cycles. West of the Andes, refugia were likely restricted to the northern region of Patagonia with small relicts in the south, whereas eastern refugia appear to have been much larger and widespread, consisting of separate northern and southern regions that collectively spanned most of Argentinean Patagonia. The retreat of glacial ice following the last glacial maximum allowed re-colonization of central Chile from nonlocal refugia from the north and east, representing a region of secondary contact between all four glacial lineages. Northwestern glacial relicts likely followed pro-glacial lakes into central Chilean Patagonia, whereas catastrophic changes in drainage direction (Atlantic --> Pacific) for several eastern palaeolakes were the likely avenues for invasions from the east. These mechanisms, combined with evidence for recent, rapid and widespread population growth could explain the extensive contemporary distribution of G. platei throughout Patagonia. PMID:19017262

  9. Tectonic control on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Kober, Florian; Hippe, Kristina; Lendzioch, Theodora; Grischott, Reto; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro; Christl, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Effects of a positive feedback loop between erosion and tectonics have been shown by analogue and numerical models and have been inferred from field observations at the scale of mountain ranges. We present new data from the Bolivian Andes supporting these observations, although common geomorphic parameters do not indicate a simple correlation. The upper Rio Grande segment, located between Cochabamba, Santa Cruz and Sucre, drains a major catchment in the central Bolivian Cordillera, from the Eastern Cordillera (EC) in the W, through the Interandean Zone (IAZ) and the Subandes (SA) in the E. The catchment covers an area of 58939 km² with an altitude range from 400 to 5150 m above sea level. Geologically, the Bolivian Andes comprise (from W to E) the Altiplano, the EC, the IAZ and the SA fold and thrust belts. The Altiplano represents an almost perfectly closed basin with distinct barriers defined by the Western Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera. The Rio Grande does not reach the Altiplano (unlike Rio La Paz and Rio Consata) but has its western drainage divide along the high peaks of the EC that experienced a period of intense shortening between Late Oligocene and Miocene. Near Cochabamba, the EC comprises metasedimentary siliciclastic rocks of Ordovician age. These rocks are overlain by Cretaceous to Paleocene and / or Neogene sediments with an angular unconformity. The IAZ and SA form an east-vergent fold and thrust belt and comprise Paleozoic and Mesozoic units. Farther east, the structures of the SA progressively include Neogene foreland strata of the Chaco foreland basin. The Chaco basin rests on the Brazilian shield east of the Subandean Belt and forms the modern foreland basin, where the lower Rio Grande catchment is sited. We obtained 58 cosmogenic 10Be catchment wide denudation rates for the Rio Grande catchments upstream of Abapó. They range from 7 mm/kyr to 1550 mm/kyr thus integrating at maximum over the last 10.000 years, with a mean of 262 mm/kyr. In

  10. In mice the efficiency of immunization with Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis virus TC-83 is transiently increased by dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Negrette, B; Bonilla, E; Valero, N; Giraldoth, D; Medina-Leendertz, S; Añez, F

    2001-12-01

    To determine whether treatment with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) improves the efficiency of immunization against the Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis (VEE) virus, mice were vaccinated with the TC-83 VEE virus. DHEA (10 mg/kg) was administered in a single dose, 4 hours before vaccination. IgM antibody titers were determined at days 7, 14 and 21 post-immunization. Treatment with DHEA increased antibody titers at day 14 after immunization. Mice were challenged with live VEE virus at day 21, and viral titers were plaque assayed in chicken embryo fibroblasts from days 2 to 5 post-infection. After the challenge, viremia decreased on day 2 and brain virus levels were reduced at day 4 in mice treated with DHEA. These results suggest that DHEA treatment could enhance the efficiency of immunization against VEE virus in mice. PMID:11787268

  11. Vector Competence of Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus for Equine-Virulent Subtype IE Strains of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Deardorff, Eleanor R.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    The mosquito Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus is a proven vector of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) subtype IE in Central America. It has been shown to be highly susceptible to infection by this subtype, and conversely to be highly refractory to infection by other VEEV subtypes. During the 1990s in southern coastal Mexico, two VEE epizootics in horses were attributed to subtype IE VEEV. These outbreaks were associated with VEEV strains with an altered infection phenotype for the epizootic mosquito vector, Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus. To determine the infectivity for the enzootic vector, Culex taeniopus, mosquitoes from a recently established colony were orally exposed to VEEV strains from the outbreak. The equine-virulent strains exhibited high infectivity and transmission potential comparable to a traditional enzootic subtype IE VEEV strain. Thus, subtype IE VEEV strains in Chiapas are able to efficiently infect enzootic and epizootic vectors and cause morbidity and mortality in horses. PMID:20519599

  12. Using gas geochemistry to delineate structural compartments and assess petroleum reservoir-filling directions: A Venezuelan case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, G.; Escobar, M.; Lorenzo, E.; Gallego, J. R.; Tocco, R.

    2013-04-01

    Here we examined the light hydrocarbon and nitrogen content and isotopic signatures of eleven gaseous samples in order to evaluate lateral intra-reservoir continuity in a Venezuelan reservoir in the central area of Lake Maracaibo Basin. At least three single compartments, located in the northern-central and southern parts of the reservoir, are revealed by nitrogen concentrations showing clear step-like compositional breaks. The occurrence of step-breaks was also supported by the isotopic signature of individual hydrocarbon compounds in the range of C1-C4 alkanes. Samples presented only slight differences in N2 and hydrocarbon gas compositions within the central and northern parts of the reservoir, and therefore it was not possible to infer structural barriers in coherence with the geological section. Some oil bulk parameters corroborate gradual changes that provide additional information on the reservoir-filling history, thus suggesting that the lateral physical-chemical equilibrium of fluids was not reached in this reservoir.

  13. 1,5-Iodonaphthyl azide-inactivated V3526 protects against aerosol challenge with virulent venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paridhi; Sharma, Anuj; Spurgers, Kevin B; Bakken, Russell R; Eccleston, Lori T; Cohen, Jeffrey W; Honnold, Shelley P; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-05-27

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a New World alphavirus. VEEV is highly infectious in aerosolized form and has been identified as a bio-terrorism agent. There is no licensed vaccine for prophylaxis against VEEV. The current IND vaccine is poorly immunogenic and does not protect against an aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. We have previously shown that VEEV inactivated by 1,5-iodonaphthyl azide (INA) protects against footpad challenge with virulent VEEV. In this study, we inactivated an attenuated strain of VEEV, V3526, with INA and evaluated its protective efficacy against aerosol challenge with wild type VEEV. We demonstrated that among three routes of immunization, intramuscular immunization with INA-inactivate V3526 (INA-iV3526) provided complete protection against aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. Our data suggests that INA-iV3526 can be explored further for development as an effective vaccine candidate against aerosol challenge of virulent VEEV. PMID:27129427

  14. INDUCTION OF NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES TO HENDRA AND NIPAH GLYCOPROTEINS USING A VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS IN VIVO EXPESSION SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Defang, Gabriel N.; Khetawat, Dimple; Broder, Christopher C.; Quinnan, Gerald V.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of Hendra Virus (HeV) and Nipah Virus (NiV) which can cause fatal infections in both animals and humans has triggered a search for an effective vaccine. Here, we have explored the potential for generating an effective humoral immune response to these zoonotic pathogens using an alphavirus-based vaccine platform. Groups of mice were immunized with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) encoding the attachment or fusion glycoproteins of either HeV or NiV. We demonstrate the induction of highly potent cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to both viruses using this approach. Preliminary study suggested early enhancement in the antibody response with use of a modified version of VRP. Overall, these data suggest that the use of an alphavirus-derived vaccine platform might serve as a viable approach for development of an effective vaccine against the henipaviruses. PMID:21050901

  15. Orographic effects of the subtropical and extratropical Andes on upwind precipitating clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viale, Maximiliano; Garreaud, René

    2015-05-01

    The orographic effect of the Andes (30°S-55°S) on upwind precipitating clouds from midlatitude frontal systems is investigated using surface and satellite data. Rain gauges between 33°S and 44°S indicate that annual precipitation increases from the Pacific coast to the windward slopes by a factor of 1.8 ± 0.3. Hourly gauges and instantaneous satellite estimates reveal that the cross-barrier increase in annual precipitation responds to an increase in both the intensity and frequency of precipitation. CloudSat satellite data indicate that orographic effects of the Andes on precipitating ice clouds increase gradually from midlatitudes to subtropics, likely as a result of a reduction of synoptic forcing and an increase of the height of the Andes equatorward. To the south of 40°S, the thickness of clouds slightly decreases from offshore to the Andes. The total ice content increases substantially from the open ocean to the coastal zone (except to the south of 50°S, where there is no much variation over the ocean), and then experience little changes in the cross-mountain direction over the upstream and upslope sectors. Nevertheless, the maximum ice content over the upslope sector is larger and occurs at a lower level than their upwind counterparts. In the subtropics, the offshore clouds contain almost no ice, but the total and maximum ice content significantly increases toward the Andes, with values being much larger than their counterparts over the extratropical Andes. Further, the largest amounts of cloud ice are observed upstream of the tallest Andes, suggesting that upstream blocking dominates there.

  16. Constraining Glacier Sensitivity across the Andes: A Modeling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Rupper, S.; Lowell, T. V.

    2011-12-01

    Valley glaciers are sensitive indicators of climate change. Records of former glacial fluctuations have been extensively used to reconstruct paleoclimatic conditions at different temporal and spatial scales. These reconstructions typically do not account for variations in regional climate conditions. Based on modeling results, it has been suggested these regional climate conditions could play an important role modulating the magnitude of glacier response for large scale climate perturbations. The climatically diverse Andes mountain range represents an ideal setting to test hypothesis of glacier sensitivity variability. Here, we quantify glacier sensitivity to climate change in different climatic regimes across the Andean. By applying a regional Surface Energy Mass Balance model (SEMB), we analyze the change in the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) for a sample of 234 glaciers, under different climatic perturbations. Our results suggest that ELAs of Andean glaciers respond linearly to changes in temperature, with rates that oscillate between 153 and 186 m/°C. For example, with a perturbation of -6°C (~Global LGM), our model predicts a drop in the ELA of 916 m for the least sensitive glaciers and 1117 m for the more sensitive ones. This glacier sensitivity variability exhibits a very distinctive spatial distribution. The most sensitive glaciers are located in Central Chile (south of 31°C), and the Western Cordillera of Peru (north of 13°S). In contrast, lower sensitivity glaciers are situated in the inner Tropics, Eastern Cordillera of Peru and Bolivia (south of 13°S), and part of southern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. When analyzing the response of glaciers to changes in accumulation, our results suggest that under a scenario of increasing precipitation, glacier behavior is nonlinear. A statistical cluster analysis of glacier sensitivity divides our 234 glaciers into three distinct groups. The most sensitive glaciers correspond to those situated in western

  17. Large slope failures in the La Paz basin, Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, N. J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Rabus, B.; Guzmán, M. A.; Minaya, E.; Clague, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The La Paz basin in the eastern Bolivian Andes has been a hotspot for large-scale, deep-seated gravitational slope deformation during the Holocene. In less than 2 Ma, a network of steep-sided valleys up to 800 m deep formed in sediments of the Altiplano Plateau and underlying basement rocks. We characterize the distribution, extent, mechanisms, and modern activity of large-scale failures within this landscape using optical image interpretation, existing geologic maps, synthetic RADAR interferometry (InSAR), and field investigation. Deposits of nearly 20 landslides larger than 100 Mm3 occur within the basin. Most failures have occurred in weakly lithified Late Miocene to Pliocene sedimentary rocks and include earth flows, translational and rotational landslides, and plug flows. Failures in underlying tectonized Paleozoic sedimentary rocks include bedding-parallel rockslides. The largest failure is the 3 km3 Achcocalla earth flow (ca. 11 ka BP), which ran out ~20 km. Other dated events span the period from the early Holocene to nearly the Colonial historic period. InSAR results show that many large slope failures, including the Achocalla earth flow, are currently moving at rates of a few centimeters to a few decimeters per year. Rapid deposition, shallow burial, and rapid incision of the basin fills produced steep slopes in weak geologic materials that, coupled with groundwater discharge from the valley walls, are the primary controls on instability. In contrast, the Altiplano surface has changed little in 2 Ma and the adjacent slopes of the Cordilleran Real, although steep, are relatively stable. Of the over 100 landslides that have occurred in the city of La Paz since the early twentieth century, most are at the margins of large, deep-seated prehistoric failures, and two of the most damaging historic landslides (Hanko-Hanko, 1582; Pampahasi, 2011) were large-scale reactivations of previously failed slopes. Improved understanding of large, deep-seated landslides in

  18. Moho topography in the central Andes and its geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Sobolev, S. V.; Kind, R.

    2002-06-01

    P-to-S converted waves at the continental Moho together with waves multiply reflected between the Earth's surface and the Moho have been used to estimate the Moho depth and average crustal Vp/ Vs variations in the central Andes. Our analysis confirms and significantly complements the Moho depth estimates previously obtained from wide-angle seismic studies and receiver functions. The resulting crustal thickness varies from about 35 km in the forearc region to more than 70 km beneath the plateau and thins (30 km) further to the east in the Chaco plains. Beneath the Andean plateau, the Moho is deeper in the north (Altiplano) and shallower in the south (Puna), where the plateau attains its maximum elevation. A non-linear relation exists between crustal thickness and elevation (and Bouguer gravity), suggesting that the crust shallower than 50-55 km is predominately felsic in contrast to a predominately mafic crust below. Such a relation also implies a 100 km thick thermal lithosphere beneath the Altiplano and with a lithospheric thinning of a few tens of kilometers beneath the Puna. Absence of expected increase in lithospheric thickness in regions of almost doubled crust strongly suggests partial removal of the mantle lithosphere beneath the entire plateau. In the Subandean ranges at 19-20°S, the relation between altitude and crustal thickness indicates a thick lithosphere (up to 130-150 km) and lithospheric flexure. Beneath a relative topographic low at the Salar de Atacama, a thick crust (67 km) suggests that the lithosphere in this region is abnormally cold and dynamically subsided, possibly due to coupling with the subducting plate. This may be related to the strongest (Ms=8.0) known intra-slab earthquake in the central Andes that happened very close to this region in 1950. The average crustal Vp/ Vs ratio is about 1.77 for the Altiplano-Puna and it reaches the highest values (1.80-1.85) beneath the volcanic arc, indicating high ambient crustal temperatures and

  19. Moho Topography In The Central Andes and Its Geodynamic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Sobolev, S. V.; Kind, R.

    P-to-S converted waves at the continental Moho together with waves multiply reflected between the Earth's surface and the Moho have been used to estimate the Moho depth and average crustal Vp/Vs variations in the central Andes. Our analysis confirms and significantly complements the Moho depth estimates previously obtained from wide angle seismic studies and receiver functions. The resulting crustal thickness varies from about 35 km in the forearc region to more than 70 km beneath the plateau and thins (30 km) further to the east in the Chaco plains. Beneath the Andean plateau, the Moho is deeper in the north (Altiplano) and shallower in the south (Puna), where the plateau attains its maximum elevation. A non-linear relation exists between crustal thickness and elevation (and Bougeur gravity) suggesting that the crust shallower than 50­55 km is predominately felsic in contrast to a predominately mafic crust below. Such a relation also implies a 100 km thick thermal lithosphere beneath the Alti- plano and with a lithospheric thinning of a few tens of kilometers beneath the Puna. Absence of expected increase in lithospheric thickness in regions of almost doubled crust strongly suggests partial removal of the mantle lithosphere beneath the entire plateau. In the Subandean ranges at 19­20S, the relation between altitude and crustal thickness indicates a thick lithosphere (up to 130­150 km) and lithospheric flexure. Beneath a relative topographic low at the Salar de Atacama, a thick crust (67 km) suggests that the lithosphere in this region is abnormally cold and dynamically sub- sided, possibly due to coupling with the subducting plate. This may be related to the strongest (Ms=8.0) known intra-slab earthquake in the central Andes that happened very close to this region in 1950. The average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is about 1.77 for the Altiplano-Puna and it reaches the highest values (1.80­1.85) beneath the volcanic arc, indicating high ambient crustal temperatures and

  20. Genetic Characterization of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus from Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru: Identification of a New Subtype ID Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Patricia V.; Adams, A. Paige; Suárez, Victor; Beingolea, Luis; Vargas, Jorge; Manock, Stephen; Freire, Juan; Espinoza, Willan R.; Felices, Vidal; Diaz, Ana; Liang, Xiaodong; Roca, Yelin; Weaver, Scott C.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of human and equine cases of severe disease in the Americas. A passive surveillance study was conducted in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador to determine the arboviral etiology of febrile illness. Patients with suspected viral-associated, acute, undifferentiated febrile illness of <7 days duration were enrolled in the study and blood samples were obtained from each patient and assayed by virus isolation. Demographic and clinical information from each patient was also obtained at the time of voluntary enrollment. In 2005–2007, cases of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) were diagnosed for the first time in residents of Bolivia; the patients did not report traveling, suggesting endemic circulation of VEEV in Bolivia. In 2001 and 2003, VEE cases were also identified in Ecuador. Since 1993, VEEV has been continuously isolated from patients in Loreto, Peru, and more recently (2005), in Madre de Dios, Peru. We performed phylogenetic analyses with VEEV from Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru and compared their relationships to strains from other parts of South America. We found that VEEV subtype ID Panama/Peru genotype is the predominant one circulating in Peru. We also demonstrated that VEEV subtype ID strains circulating in Ecuador belong to the Colombia/Venezuela genotype and VEEV from Madre de Dios, Peru and Cochabamba, Bolivia belong to a new ID genotype. In summary, we identified a new major lineage of enzootic VEEV subtype ID, information that could aid in the understanding of the emergence and evolution of VEEV in South America. PMID:19753102

  1. Genetic characterization of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus from Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru: identification of a new subtype ID lineage.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Patricia V; Adams, A Paige; Suárez, Victor; Beingolea, Luis; Vargas, Jorge; Manock, Stephen; Freire, Juan; Espinoza, Willan R; Felices, Vidal; Diaz, Ana; Liang, Xiaodong; Roca, Yelin; Weaver, Scott C; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of human and equine cases of severe disease in the Americas. A passive surveillance study was conducted in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador to determine the arboviral etiology of febrile illness. Patients with suspected viral-associated, acute, undifferentiated febrile illness of <7 days duration were enrolled in the study and blood samples were obtained from each patient and assayed by virus isolation. Demographic and clinical information from each patient was also obtained at the time of voluntary enrollment. In 2005-2007, cases of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) were diagnosed for the first time in residents of Bolivia; the patients did not report traveling, suggesting endemic circulation of VEEV in Bolivia. In 2001 and 2003, VEE cases were also identified in Ecuador. Since 1993, VEEV has been continuously isolated from patients in Loreto, Peru, and more recently (2005), in Madre de Dios, Peru. We performed phylogenetic analyses with VEEV from Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru and compared their relationships to strains from other parts of South America. We found that VEEV subtype ID Panama/Peru genotype is the predominant one circulating in Peru. We also demonstrated that VEEV subtype ID strains circulating in Ecuador belong to the Colombia/Venezuela genotype and VEEV from Madre de Dios, Peru and Cochabamba, Bolivia belong to a new ID genotype. In summary, we identified a new major lineage of enzootic VEEV subtype ID, information that could aid in the understanding of the emergence and evolution of VEEV in South America. PMID:19753102

  2. Over three millennia of mercury pollution in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Colin A.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Biester, Harald; Wolfe, Alexander P.

    2009-01-01

    We present unambiguous records of preindustrial atmospheric mercury (Hg) pollution, derived from lake-sediment cores collected near Huancavelica, Peru, the largest Hg deposit in the New World. Intensive Hg mining first began ca. 1400 BC, predating the emergence of complex Andean societies, and signifying that the region served as a locus for early Hg extraction. The earliest mining targeted cinnabar (HgS) for the production of vermillion. Pre-Colonial Hg burdens peak ca. 500 BC and ca. 1450 AD, corresponding to the heights of the Chavín and Inca states, respectively. During the Inca, Colonial, and industrial intervals, Hg pollution became regional, as evidenced by a third lake record ≈225 km distant from Huancavelica. Measurements of sediment-Hg speciation reveal that cinnabar dust was initially the dominant Hg species deposited, and significant increases in deposition were limited to the local environment. After conquest by the Inca (ca. 1450 AD), smelting was adopted at the mine and Hg pollution became more widely circulated, with the deposition of matrix-bound phases of Hg predominating over cinnabar dust. Our results demonstrate the existence of a major Hg mining industry at Huancavelica spanning the past 3,500 years, and place recent Hg enrichment in the Andes in a broader historical context. PMID:19451629

  3. Active Folding of the Tame Anticline, Eastern Foothills, Colombian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloza-Fajardo, G.; Taylor, M. H.; Mora, A.; Stockli, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    We integrate neotectonic mapping and interpretation of seismic reflection profiles to evaluate the kinematics of folding and development of the Quaternary Tame anticline and Cusiana fault at 6.5 N Latitude in the eastern foothills of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. The Tame anticline is located approximately 660 km to the east of the Nazca-South America and 810 km to the south of the Caribbean-South America subduction zones plate boundaries in a retroarc foreland basin setting. The Tame anticline is an elongated, N15E trending structure, 14 km long N-S by 6 km wide E-W, that represents the most frontal active structure of the northern Colombian Andes. The Tame fold is related to the east-directed Cusiana fault that day lights to the south. Seismic reflection profiles indicate the Cusiana fault is a listric, west-dipping blind structure. The east flowing antecedent Macaguana creek has incised the Tame fold forming three prominent terrace levels, uplifted approximately 220, 150 and 100 meters, above current river levels. The surfaces were sampled for terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides using the depth profiling approach to account for inheritance. Surface exposure ages from the highest to lowest surfaces are 93.9, 50.8 and 32.4 kyrs at the 1σ level respectively, which were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. Trishear kinematic modeling was used to retrodeform the folding history and based on the surface abandonment ages, we will present shortening rates at millennial timescales.

  4. Use and legacy of mercury in the Andes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin A; Hintelmann, Holger; Ague, Jay J; Burger, Richard; Biester, Harald; Sachs, Julian P; Engstrom, Daniel R

    2013-05-01

    Both cinnabar (HgS) and metallic mercury (Hg(0)) were important resources throughout Andean prehistory. Cinnabar was used for millennia to make vermillion, a red pigment that was highly valued in pre-Hispanic Peru; metallic Hg(0) has been used since the mid-16th century to conduct mercury amalgamation, an efficient process of extracting precious metals from ores. However, little is known about which cinnabar deposits were exploited by pre-Hispanic cultures, and the environmental consequences of Hg mining and amalgamation remain enigmatic. Here we use Hg isotopes to source archeological cinnabar and to fingerprint Hg pollution preserved in lake sediment cores from Peru and the Galápagos Islands. Both pre-Inca (pre-1400 AD) and Colonial (1532-1821 AD) archeological artifacts contain cinnabar that matches isotopically with cinnabar ores from Huancavelica, Peru, the largest cinnabar-bearing district in Central and South America. In contrast, the Inca (1400-1532 AD) artifacts sampled are characterized by a unique Hg isotopic composition. In addition, preindustrial (i.e., pre-1900 AD) Hg pollution preserved in lake sediments matches closely the isotopic composition of cinnabar from the Peruvian Andes. Industrial-era Hg pollution, in contrast, is distinct isotopically from preindustrial emissions, suggesting that pre- and postindustrial Hg emissions may be distinguished isotopically in lake sediment cores. PMID:23597056

  5. On recent measurements from the Andes Lidar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Snively, Jonathan; Heale, Christopher; Cao, Bing

    2016-07-01

    The Andes Lidar Observatory is an upper atmosphere observatory located in Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.3S, 70.7W). It houses a Na Wind/Temperature Lidar, an all sky airglow imager, a mesospheric temperature mapper, an infrared imager and a meteor radar. This suite of instrumentation provides comprehensive measurements of the mesopause region and enables detailed study of wave dynamics. With the recent upgrade of the Na lidar, many complex dynamic processes were observed and resolved in detail. I will present several intriguing phenomena seen in the lidar measurement from recent campaigns, and a detailed analysis of a complex wave propagation event, which involved a large vertical wind oscillation exceeding 10 m/s. A nonlinear gravity wave model was able to reproduce most of the observed features. The results suggest that the wave experienced partial reflections at two altitudes and a critical layer in between, resulting in large vertical wind amplitude and multi-layer distribution of wave energy.

  6. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE TROPICAL ANDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Freddy; Kazama, So

    In this paper are investigated the net radiation (Rn) and the potential glacier melt discharge trends in a glacier in the tropical Andes, for the assessment of climate change impacts on the water resources availability in remote regions. It is assessed the applicability of remote sensing techniques, through the performance evaluation of the Surface and Energy Balance algorithm (SEBAL). For the calibration it is used ground data observed on the ablation surface of the Zongo glacier in Bolivia. The potential climate change impacts quantified are on the glacier melt discharge. The inferences are calibrated in the period 2004-2007. Results show that the SEBAL performance is adequate from an engineering perspective (Root Mean Square Error for albedo estimations are 0.15, in average). Climate change impacts for the period 1986-2005 are an increase of 42% in the Rn, and the loss in the glacier ablation area of 37% (both in reference to 1986). The melt from the studied glacier in the period 2004-2007 is estimated to produce a maximum potential energy of 3.1 [MW h] in average per day (dry season), which in the practice can be used to quantify the potential impacts of the climate change in partially glacierized catchments.

  7. Dendrogeomorphic reconstruction of flash floods in the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteller, Alejandro; Stoffel, Markus; Crespo, Sebastián; Villalba, Ricardo; Corona, Christophe; Bianchi, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Flash floods represent a significant natural hazard in small mountainous catchments of the Patagonian Andes and have repeatedly caused loss to life and infrastructure. At the same time, however, documentary records of past events remain fairly scarce and highly fragmentary in most cases. In this study, we therefore reconstruct the spatiotemporal patterns of past flash flood activity along the Los Cipreses torrent (Neuquén, Argentina) using dendrogeomorphic methods. Based on samples from Austrocedrus chilensis, Pseudotsuga menziesii, and Nothofagus dombeyi, we document 21 flash flood events covering the period A.D. 1890-2009 and reconstruct mean recurrence intervals of events at the level of individual trees being impacted, which varies from 4 to 93 years. Results show that trees tend to be older (younger) in sectors of the torrent with gentler (steeper) slope gradients. Potential triggers of flash floods were analyzed using daily temperature and precipitation data from a nearby weather station. Weather conditions leading to flash floods are abundant precipitations during one to three consecutive days, combined with temperatures above the rain/snow threshold (2 °C) in the whole watershed.

  8. Did Andean Uplift Control Climate Change in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    Sedimentological data indicate that a semi-arid/arid climate has prevailed across the Central Andes from over 25 Ma to 4 Ma. Between 4 and 3 Ma a marked switch to hyperaridity occurred along the western margin of South America between 10 and 27 degrees South. Palaeoaltitude data, although poorly constrained, suggest that a substantial proto-Central Andean mountain range was in place between 15 and 9 Ma. Evidence for this is provided by the presence of thick successions of evaporates developed within endorheic basins in the Altiplano/Puna area. These data support the idea that the Andean rain shadow existed by 15 Ma or earlier, and that rather than changing the pre-existing climatic regime it reinforced the already arid climate. The change to hyperaridity in western South America is attributed to a combination of global climate cooling and enhanced upwelling of the Humboldt current generated by closure of the Central American Seaway between 3.5 and 3 Ma, and did not result from the rain shadow generated by Andean orogenesis. Evidence for a global causal mechanism is seen in the Namib Desert. The switch to hyperaridity in the Namib also occurred around 3 Ma but was independent of orographic effects generated by a large mountain range.

  9. Indian hospitals and government in the colonial Andes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gabriela

    2013-04-01

    This article examines the reception of the early modern hospital among the indigenous people of the Andes under Spanish colonial rule. During the period covered by this study (sixteenth to mid-eighteenth centuries), the hospital was conceived primarily as a manifestation of the sovereign’s paternalistic concern for his subjects’ spiritual well being. Hospitals in the Spanish American colonies were organised along racial lines, and those catering to Indians were meant to complement the missionary endeavour. Besides establishing hospitals in the main urban centres, Spanish colonial legislation instituted hospitals for Indians in provincial towns and in small rural jurisdictions throughout the Peruvian viceroyalty. Indian hospitals often met with the suspicion and even hostility of their supposed beneficiaries, especially indigenous rulers. By conceptualising the Indian hospital as a tool of colonial government, this article investigates the reasons behind its negative reception, the work of adaptation that allowed a few of them to thrive, and the eventual failure of most of these institutions. PMID:24070345

  10. Phytoplankton in the northwestern Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, I. N.; Flint, M. V.; Druzhkova, E. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Sergeeva, V. M.

    2015-07-01

    Studies were conducted in the northwestern Kara Sea in late September of 2007 and 2011. The assessment of species, size, structure, abundance, and biomass of phytoplankton and the role of autotrophic and heterotrophic components in phytocenoses was conducted. The abundance of autotrophic micro-, nanoand picoplankton increased by more than an order of magnitude in each of the following smaller-sized groups of algae. Microphytoplankton dominated in the total biomass of autotrophic phytoplankton. The wet biomass of microphytoplankton was 2.5 times higher than the wet biomass of nanophytoplankton and 5 times higher than that of picoplankton. Nanophytoplankton dominated in abundance and biomass in the heterotrophic component of phytoplankton. The ratio of the total abundance of autotrophic and heterotrophic phytotoplankton was 7: 1, the ratio of the wet biomass of the both groups was 2.5: 1, and the proportion of the carbon biomass was 2: 1. Three biotopes were distinguished in the area of the outer shelf, the continental slope, and the deepwater area adjacent to the St. Anna Trough, which differed in composition and quantitative characteristics of phytocenoses. Frontal zones dividing the biotopes are characterized by high phytoplankton biomass and the dominance of diatoms in the community (more than 40% of the total biomass), which indicates the local availability of "new" nutrients for planktonic algae.