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Sample records for nsoi enhancing international

  1. The National Coalition for Sustained Optimal Iodine intake (NSOI): a case study of a successful experience from India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kapil; Chakrabarty, Arijit; Rah, Jee Hyun; Kumar, Rakesh; Aguayo, Victor; Ansari, Mohammad Anas; Sankar, Rajan; Karmarkar, Madhu Ganesh; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2014-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) constitute the single most important preventable cause of mental handicap at global level. Recognizing the importance of coordination and synergy of the activities of wide range of universal salt iodisation (USI) stakeholders, WHO/ Unicef/ ICCIDD has prescribed a national multi-sectoral coalition as one of the ten indicators essential for attaining sustainable elimination of IDD at national level. Challenge for coordination among different stakeholders of IDD/USI is even greater in democratic and diverse country like India. In the present article we present successful experience from India regarding formation of a national coalition and contributions made by the coalition towards promoting USI in India. The activities of the national coalition in India are classified into three phases; 1) Phase 1- year 2006 to 2009- the inception; 2) Phase 2- year 2009 to 2012- consolidation; 3) Phase 3- year 2013 and ongoing- expansion. The National coalition for Sustained Optimal Iodine Intake (NSOI) has been instrumental in ensuring greater coordination and synergy amongst IDD and USI stakeholders in India and partially responsible for the current 71 percentage household level coverage of adequately iodised salt. The most significant contribution of the national coalition has been to act as a high level advocacy channel and provide a platform for regular dialogue for all partners of the coalition. With "mission" approach and allocation of optimal resource, India can achieve and should achieve USI by 2015, an apt culmination of a decade of existence of the national coalition. PMID:25384725

  2. Enhancing the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2010-03-01

    We present results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that has the potential to increase the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a Tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  3. Enhancing the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Dean; Danner, Rolf; Lillie, Chuck

    2009-09-01

    We present preliminary results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that increases the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  4. Enhancing the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that increases the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a Tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  5. Enhancing the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2010-02-01

    We present results of systems studies expected to significantly enhance the science utility and reduce technical as well as cost risks for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Our Northrop Grumman team draws on the experience of building and operating Chandra and others of NASA's premier astrophysical observatories (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope) as well as our experience as a leading developer of deployable space structures. For IXO, we have developed (a) an optical bench concept that has the potential to increase the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements; (b) an instrument and system layout that increases the accessible field of regard; and (c) a number of design choices based on flight proven concepts that reduce cost risk. Our concept for the IXO deployable bench is a Tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. While the overall concept is innovative and will require further evaluation, it is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require any new technology. We have also explored the options opened by using hinged, articulating solar panels, and found that when used along with a fully enclosed MLI tent surrounding the optical bench, and an instrument module utilizing radially facing radiator panels, the enhanced configuration will enable us to greatly increase IXO's field of regard without distorting the optical bench beyond acceptable tolerances, making more of the sky accessible for observation at any given time.

  6. Enhancing the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, Dean; Lillie, Charles; Spittler, Connie

    2010-07-01

    Over the last two years, we have studied system concepts for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) with the goal of increasing the science return of the mission and to reduce technical and cost risk. We have developed an optical bench concept that has the potential to increase the focal length from 20 to 25 m within the current mass and stability requirements. Our deployable bench is a tensegrity structure formed by two telescoping booms (compression) and a hexapod cable (tension) truss. This arrangement achieves the required stiffness for the optical bench at minimal mass while employing only high TRL components and flight proven elements. The concept is based on existing elements, can be fully tested on the ground and does not require new technology. Our design further features hinged, articulating solar panels, an optical bench fully enclosed in MLI and an instrument module with radially facing radiator panels. We find that our design can be used over a wide range of sun angles, thereby greatly increasing IXO's field of regard, without distorting the optical bench. This makes a much larger fraction of the sky instantaneously accessible to IXO.

  7. Enhanced heat transfer computations for internally cooled cable superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. D.

    1985-03-01

    Superconducting magnets are built with conductors that are pool bath cooled, internally cooled with the superconductor cable and contained within a conduit, or conduction cooled. The first two embody superconductors are in direct contact with liquid helium. Practical designs of internally cooled cable superconductor (ICCS) are not cryostable. Such superconductors have shown multiple regions of stability and instability. A computational method of adjusting the heat transfer coefficient of a one dimensional system of equations to enhance joule heat removal, primarily in the central region of a pulse heated model of ICCS, has been used to attempt simulation of the multiple stability/instability experiment.

  8. Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency.

  9. Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas.

    PubMed

    Geyko, V I; Fisch, N J

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency. PMID:25215720

  10. Enhanced Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines By Employing Spinning Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-27

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A gain in fuel efficiency of several percent is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in the efficiency.

  11. Observed enhanced internal tides in winter near the Luzon Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junliang; He, Yinghui; Wang, Dongxiao; Liu, Tongya; Cai, Shuqun

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal characteristics and nonlinear interaction of internal tides (ITs) near the Luzon Strait in the northeastern South China Sea are investigated using 285 day, in situ observation data. It is found that ITs, which are dominated by the first-mode wave throughout the year, are the strongest in subsurface layer. Baroclinic incoherent diurnal (semidiurnal) variance accounts for about 85.7% (78.3%) of diurnal (semidiurnal) ITs. The amplitude and seasonal variation of the diurnal ITs are more prominent than those that are semidiurnal, e.g., the largest kinetic energy densities of diurnal and semidiurnal baroclinic tidal currents are 2.81 and 0.83 KJ/m2 in winter, respectively. It is considered that there are two reasons for the significantly enhanced ITs in winter: (1) it may be due to the Kuroshio intrusion, and (2) the enhanced diurnal ITs may be due to the enhanced diurnal barotropic tidal currents, while the enhanced semidiurnal ITs may be caused by the strong nonlinear interaction between diurnal IT constituents O1 and K1 due to their high vertical shears in subsurface layer. Thus, harmonic semidiurnal constituent D2 with a similar frequency of constituent M2 is induced; it subsequently enhances the semidiurnal ITs in this subsurface layer, and the associated energy is carried downward to enhance the semidiurnal ITs in the upper and lower layers.

  12. Enhanced radiation therapy with internalized polyelectrolyte modified nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peipei; Qiao, Yong; Wang, Chaoming; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2014-08-01

    A challenge of X-ray radiation therapy is that high dose X-ray under therapeutic conditions damages normal cells. This paper describes a nanoparticle-based method to enhance X-ray radiation therapy by delivering radio-sensitizing gold nanoparticles into cancer cells. The nanoparticles have been modified with cationic polyelectrolytes to allow internalization. Upon X-ray irradiation of nanoparticles, more photoelectrons and Auger electrons are generated to cause water ionization, leading to formation of free radicals that damage DNA of cancer cells. The X-ray dose required for DNA damage and cell killing is reduced by delivering gold nanoparticles inside cancer cells.

  13. Enhanced bioactivity of internally functionalized cationic dendrimers with PEG cores

    PubMed Central

    Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Mickler, Frauke M.; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Salomone, Fabrizio; Bardi, Giuseppe; Panniello, Mariangela; Amir, Elizabeth; Kang, Taegon; Killops, Kato L.; Bräuchle, Christoph; Amir, Roey J.; Hawker, Craig J.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid dendritic-linear block copolymers based on a 4-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG) core were synthesized using an accelerated AB2/CD2 dendritic growth approach through orthogonal amine/epoxy and thiol-yne chemistries. The biological activity of these 4-arm and the corresponding 2-arm hybrid dendrimers revealed an enhanced, dendritic effect with an exponential increase in cell internalization concomitant with increasing amine end-groups and low cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the ability of these hybrid dendrimers to induce endosomal escape combined with their facile and efficient synthesis makes them attractive platforms for gene transfection. The 4-arm-based dendrimer showed significantly improved DNA binding and gene transfection capabilities in comparison with the 2-arm derivative. These results combined with the MD simulation indicate a significant effect of both the topology of the PEG core and the multivalency of these hybrid macromolecules, on their DNA binding and delivery capablities. PMID:23140570

  14. Determining information management needs for enhanced international safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Badalamente, R.V.; DeLand, S.M.; Whiteson, R.; Anzelon, G.

    1994-08-01

    The Safeguards Information Management System initiative is a program of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation aimed at supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) efforts to strengthen safeguards through the enhancement of information management capabilities. The DOE hopes to provide the IAEA with the ability to correlate and analyze data from existing and new sources of information, including publicly available information, information on imports and exports, design information, environmental monitoring data, and non-safeguards information. The first step in this effort is to identify and define IAEA requirements. In support of this, we have created a users` requirements document based on interviews with IAEA staff that describes the information management needs of the end user projected by the IAEA, including needs for storage, retrieval, analysis, communication, and visualization of data. Also included are characteristics of the end user and attributes of the current environment. This paper describes our efforts to obtain the required information. We discuss how to accurately represent user needs and involve users for an international organization with a multi-cultural user population. We describe our approach, our experience in setting up and conducting the interviews and brainstorming sessions, and a brief discussion of what we learned.

  15. International Students' Enhanced Academic Performance: Effects of Campus Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banjong, Delphine N.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates international students' challenges, such as financial, English proficiency, loneliness/homesickness in the United States. In addition, it assesses how these students coped with such difficulties by making use of resources on campus, such as an international center, writing center, counseling center, and the student…

  16. Enhancing International Students' Experiences: An Imperative Agenda for Universities in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramachandran, Narayanan T.

    2011-01-01

    The role of international students as catalysts for internationalization and related reforms in the UK higher education sector is increasing. With the growing number of international students, administrators and academics are identifying ways to enable international students to adapt to the UK environment and enhance their experiences as students.…

  17. The International Children's Digital Library Enhances the Multicultural Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmons, Karen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the International Children's Digital Library (ICDL), an online digital library which gives students an opportunity to read and learn about other cultures and countries in a different way. The library's web site (http://www.icdlbooks.org) was designed by children, with the guidance and expertise of adults.…

  18. Using Post-Study-Abroad Experiences to Enhance International Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kevin W.; Jendzurski, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Many study abroad experiences offer opportunities for a broadened global perspective gleaned from interpersonal engagement with cultural others in an international setting. Unfortunately, and far too often, the campus majority who do not have this firsthand travel experience remain disengaged and might feel excluded. This article contends that…

  19. 75 FR 21386 - Philadelphia International Airport, Capacity Enhancement Program, Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Philadelphia International Airport, Capacity Enhancement Program, Environmental Impact Statement, Announcement of a Preferred Alternative AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... L. McDonald, Environmental Protection Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration,...

  20. Enhancing the International Dimension of Undergraduate Teacher Education (Mathematics): Vox Clamantis in Deserto?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Donald M.

    Now is the time for educators to strengthen commitment to "global awareness" in colleges of education, professional organizations, the schools, and society itself. Ways to enhance the learning and teaching of mathematics by adding an international dimension are discussed. Areas which appear promising for the addition of an international dimension…

  1. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  2. Enhanced International Space Station Ku-Band Telemetry Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Andrew J.; Pitts, R. Lee; Welch, Steven J.; Bryan, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is in an operational configuration. To fully utilize the ISS and take advantage of the modern protocols and updated Ku-band access, the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) has designed an approach to extend the Kuband forward link access for payload investigators to their on-orbit payloads. This dramatically increases the ground to ISS communications for those users. This access also enables the ISS flight controllers operating in the Payload Operations and Integration Center to have more direct control over the systems they are responsible for managing and operating. To extend the Ku-band forward link to the payload user community the development of a new command server is necessary. The HOSC subsystems were updated to process the Internet Protocol Encapsulated packets, enable users to use the service based on their approved services, and perform network address translation to insure that the packets are forwarded from the user to the correct payload repeating that process in reverse from ISS to the payload user. This paper presents the architecture, implementation, and lessons learned. This will include the integration of COTS hardware and software as well as how the device is incorporated into the operational mission of the ISS. Thus, this paper also discusses how this technology can be applicable to payload users of the ISS.

  3. Research Experience for Undergraduates: an International Program Enhancing Interdisciplinary Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Davis, K. L.; Phelps, T. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Gihring, T. M.; Onstott, T. C.; Nthangeni, B.; Piater, L.; van Heerden, E.

    2004-12-01

    This NSF-funded research experience for undergraduates (REU) took place in South Africa, where gold mines provided outstanding field sites to investigate biogeochemical processes in deep subsurface environments. Underrepresented minorities were encouraged to participate. Cross-disciplinary training was a major ambition for this REU Site: Biogeochemical Educational Experiences - South Africa. Students were selected from diverse academic disciplines (biology, chemistry, and geology) to participate in this interdisciplinary research program. Research projects included characterizing microbial communities with molecular and biochemical techniques, cultivating microorganisms, utilizing geochemical and isotopic parameters to constrain nutrient cycling in groundwater, investigating extreme enzymes and examining functional genes. During the REU, students collected biofilms and fissure water emanating from gas-rich boreholes in 2-3 km deep mines and performed laboratory research in teams under joint mentorship of U.S. and South African scientists. Research teams consisted of three to five students with at least one student from each country and at least two of the disciplines represented. Team membership reflected students' ranking of their choices among mentor-proposed projects. The REU encouraged students to increase scientific knowledge across disciplines, improve oral and written communication skills, and explore cultural and international challenges for scientific research in the global community. Each research team presented oral progress reports to the other research teams to provide communication skill development and to provide a forum for data exchange and interpretation among the various disciplines. Oral communication training culminated in a public presentation by each team at a university/industry science symposium. Mentors reviewed students' writing skills as they prepared text on experimental design, research findings, data interpretation, and literature

  4. Enhancing Student International Awareness and Global Competency through Compact International Experience Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schubert, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Short-term, study-abroad, elective engineering courses were developed in order to raise the international awareness and global competency of engineering students. These Compact International Experience (CIE) courses were taught in response to a strong student desire for engineering study abroad courses and an effort by the home institution to internationalize its curriculum. An assessment of repeat offerings of two three-semester-unit courses on Topics in Fluid Mechanics and Advanced Electronic Circuit Design in a three-week time frame in France and Australia was performed. The goals of the two CIE courses are an effective teaching of their respective technical content as well as a student understanding of the cultural environment and the impact of engineering solutions from a global and societal viewpoint. In the repeat offerings, increased interaction with local industry was an additional goal. The CIE courses were assessed through surveys completed at the beginning and end of the courses, weekly student reflection papers, course evaluations, and formalized instructor observations. Based on the assessment performed, the two CIE courses have been found to be a valuable approach in the delivery of engineering technical electives combined with an international experience.

  5. Internal Quality Assurance--Enhancing Quality Culture. ENQA Workshop Report 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ENQA (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education (ENQA), in cooperation with the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA, UK), organised a seminar on theme "Internal Quality Assurance--Enhancing quality culture" which was held on 8-9 June, 2010 in London, United Kingdom. The seminar marked the fourth annual meeting of the ENQA IQA Group…

  6. Aero/aeroderivative engines - Internal transducers offer potential for enhanced condition monitoring and vibration diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Malcolm J.

    1990-06-01

    Gas turbine aero engines and their ground based derivatives can benefit greatly from the enhanced condition and diagnostic data available from internal vibration transducers. This paper discusses transducer selection, illustrates typical transducer locations and mounting, and describes some of the rotor malfunctions that can be diagnosed from the vibrations data.

  7. Enhancing the Interpretability of the Overall Results of an International Test of English-Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, Spiros; Morgan, Rick; Becker, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the meaning of the scores of an English-language test by developing performance levels and descriptors for reporting overall test performance. The levels and descriptors were intended to accompany the total scale scores of TOEFL Junior® Standard, an international test of English as a second/foreign…

  8. Enhancing the Profile of Teachers as Curriculum Decision-Makers: Some International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Ian; Brooker, Ross; Aspland, Tania; Elliott, Bob

    This paper presents information from a series of preliminary asynchronous international conversations across four cultural contexts that focus on enhancing the profile of teachers in curriculum decision making. The paper challenges education systems to match the rhetoric about the place of teachers in curriculum decision making with curriculum…

  9. Internal quantum efficiency enhancement of GaInN/GaN quantum-well structures using Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Daisuke; Fadil, Ahmed Ou, Yiyu; Kopylov, Oleksii; Ou, Haiyan; Chen, Yuntian; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2015-09-15

    We report internal quantum efficiency enhancement of thin p-GaN green quantum-well structure using self-assembled Ag nanoparticles. Temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements are conducted to determine the internal quantum efficiency. The impact of excitation power density on the enhancement factor is investigated. We obtain an internal quantum efficiency enhancement by a factor of 2.3 at 756 W/cm{sup 2}, and a factor of 8.1 at 1 W/cm{sup 2}. A Purcell enhancement up to a factor of 26 is estimated by fitting the experimental results to a theoretical model for the efficiency enhancement factor.

  10. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength. PMID:27359341

  11. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper,S.; Rosenthal, M.; Fishbone, L.; Occhiogrosso, D.; Carroll, C.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Rankhauser, J.

    2008-10-22

    In 2007, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a yearlong review of the challenges facing the international safeguards system today and over the next 25 years. The study found that without new investment in international safeguards, the U.S. safeguards technology base, and our ability to support International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, will continue to erode and soon may be at risk. To reverse this trend, the then U.S. Secretary of Energy, Samuel Bodman, announced at the 2007 IAEA General Conference that the Department of Energy (DOE) would launch the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). He stated 'IAEA safeguards must be robust and capable of addressing proliferation threats. Full confidence in IAEA safeguards is essential for nuclear power to grow safely and securely. To this end, the U.S. Department of Energy will seek to ensure that modern technology, the best scientific expertise, and adequate resources are available to keep pace with expanding IAEA responsibilities.' To meet this goal, the NGSI objectives include the recruitment of international safeguards experts to work at the U.S. national laboratories and to serve at the IAEA's headquarters. Part of the latter effort will involve enhancing our existing efforts to place well-qualified Americans in a sufficient number of key safeguards positions within the IAEA's Department of Safeguards. Accordingly, the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards (ERIS) on October 22 and 23, 2008. The ISPO used a workshop format developed earlier with Sonalysts, Inc., that was followed at the U.S. Support Program's (USSP's) technology road-mapping sessions. ISPO invited participants from the U.S. DOE, the IAEA, the U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who either

  12. A novel airlift reactor enhanced by funnel internals and hydrodynamics prediction by the CFD method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua; Zhu, Jialiang

    2012-01-01

    Airlift reactors have been used widely in many industrial processes, but little work has been conducted on such reactors integrated with internals. In this study, a novel airlift reactor with a funnel internal was developed to achieve better flow conditions and advantages in biological processes. The CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulation method was employed to investigate the effect of the funnel internals on hydrodynamic properties in the reactor. A CFD model was developed for gas-liquid two-phase flow simulation in a bench-scale reactor. Grid-independent simulation results were verified with global-scale experimental data. The results showed that the local or global gas holdup could be enhanced by 15% and that turbulent kinetic energy could be reduced by a maximum of 7.8% when the superficial gas velocity was 1 cm/s. These features are beneficial for applications in stress-sensitive biological processes. PMID:22119313

  13. Overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances aluminium internalization by elevating vesicular trafficking in rice root apex

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Daoming; Shen, Hong; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) sequestration is required for internal detoxification of Al in plant cells. In this study, it was found that the rice OsPIN2 overexpression line (OX1) had significantly reduced Al content in its cell wall and increased Al concentration in cell sap only in rice root tips relative to the wild-type (WT). In comparison with WT, OX1 reduced morin staining of cytosolic Al, enhanced FM 4–64 staining of membrane vesicular trafficking in root tip sections (0–1mm), and showed morin-FM 4–64 fluorescence overlap. Recovery treatment showed that cell-wall-bound Al was internalized into vacuoles via endocytic vesicular trafficking after removal of external Al. In this process, OX1 showed a higher rate of Al internalization than WT. Brefeldin A (BFA) interfered with vesicular trafficking and resulted in inhibition of Al internalization. This inhibitory effect could be alleviated when BFA was washed out, and the process of alleviation was slower in the cells of WT than in those of OX1. Microscopic observations revealed that, upon Al exposure, numerous multilamellar endosomes were detected between the cell wall and plasma membrane in the cells of OX1. Moreover, more vesicles enriched with Al complexes accumulated in the cells of OX1 than in those of WT, and these vesicles transformed into larger structures in the cells of OX1. Taken together, the data indicate that endocytic vesicular trafficking might contribute to Al internalization, and that overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances rice Al tolerance via elevated endocytic vesicular trafficking and Al internalization. PMID:26254327

  14. Overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances aluminium internalization by elevating vesicular trafficking in rice root apex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daoming; Shen, Hong; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2015-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) sequestration is required for internal detoxification of Al in plant cells. In this study, it was found that the rice OsPIN2 overexpression line (OX1) had significantly reduced Al content in its cell wall and increased Al concentration in cell sap only in rice root tips relative to the wild-type (WT). In comparison with WT, OX1 reduced morin staining of cytosolic Al, enhanced FM 4-64 staining of membrane vesicular trafficking in root tip sections (0-1mm), and showed morin-FM 4-64 fluorescence overlap. Recovery treatment showed that cell-wall-bound Al was internalized into vacuoles via endocytic vesicular trafficking after removal of external Al. In this process, OX1 showed a higher rate of Al internalization than WT. Brefeldin A (BFA) interfered with vesicular trafficking and resulted in inhibition of Al internalization. This inhibitory effect could be alleviated when BFA was washed out, and the process of alleviation was slower in the cells of WT than in those of OX1. Microscopic observations revealed that, upon Al exposure, numerous multilamellar endosomes were detected between the cell wall and plasma membrane in the cells of OX1. Moreover, more vesicles enriched with Al complexes accumulated in the cells of OX1 than in those of WT, and these vesicles transformed into larger structures in the cells of OX1. Taken together, the data indicate that endocytic vesicular trafficking might contribute to Al internalization, and that overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances rice Al tolerance via elevated endocytic vesicular trafficking and Al internalization. PMID:26254327

  15. Coherent nanocavity structures for enhancement in internal quantum efficiency of III-nitride multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.; Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T.

    2014-04-21

    A “coherent” nanocavity structure has been designed on two-dimensional well-ordered InGaN/GaN nanodisk arrays with an emission wavelength in the green spectral region, leading to a massive enhancement in resonance mode in the green spectra region. By means of a cost-effective nanosphere lithography technique, we have fabricated such a structure on an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well epiwafer and have observed the “coherent” nanocavity effect, which leads to an enhanced spontaneous emission (SE) rate. The enhanced SE rate has been confirmed by time resolved photoluminescence measurements. Due to the coherent nanocavity effect, we have achieved a massive improvement in internal quantum efficiency with a factor of 88, compared with the as-grown sample, which could be significant to bridge the “green gap” in solid-state lighting.

  16. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper,S.E.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Occhogrosso, D.M.; Lockwood, D.; Carroll, C.J.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Fankhauser, J.

    2009-07-12

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards October 22 and 23, 2008. The workshop was sponsored by DOE/NA-243 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). Placing well-qualified Americans in sufficient number and in key safeguards positions within the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) Department of Safeguards is an important U.S. non-proliferation objective. The goal of the NGSI Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards was to improve U.S. efforts to recruit U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. BNL’s International Safeguards Project Office invited participants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the IAEA, U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who are either experts in international safeguards or who understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. A final report for the workshop will be finalized and distributed in early 2009. The main finding of the workshop was the need for an integrated recruitment plan to take into account pools of potential candidates, various government and private agency stakeholders, the needs of the IAEA, and the NGSI human capital development plan. There were numerous findings related to and recommendations for maximizing the placement of U.S. experts in IAEA Safeguards positions. The workshop participants offered many ideas for increasing the pool of candidates and increasing the placement rate. This paper will provide details on these findings and recommendations

  17. Enhanced magneto-optical imaging of internal stresses in the removed surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agalidi, Yuriy; Kozhukhar, Pavlo; Levyi, Sergii; Turbin, Dmitriy

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes a software method of reconstructing the state of the removed surface layer by visualising internal stresses in the underlying layers of the sample. Such a problem typically needs to be solved as part of forensic investigation that aims to reveal original marking of a sample with removed surface layer. For example, one may be interested in serial numbers of weapons or vehicles that had the surface layer of metal removed from the number plate. Experimental results of studying gradient internal stress fields in ferromagnetic sample using the NDI method of magneto-optical imaging (MOI) are presented. Numerical modelling results of internal stresses enclosed in the surface marking region are analysed and compared to the experimental results of magneto-optical imaging (MOI). MOI correction algorithm intended for reconstructing internal stress fields in the removed surface layer by extracting stresses retained by the underlying layers is described. Limiting ratios between parameters of a marking font are defined for the considered correction algorithm. Enhanced recognition properties for hidden stresses left by marking symbols are experimentally verified and confirmed.

  18. Internal Flow Simulation of Enhanced Performance Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced performance solid rocket booster concept for the space shuttle system has been proposed. The concept booster will have strong commonality with the existing, proven, reliable four-segment Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) with individual component design (nozzle, insulator, etc.) optimized for a five-segment configuration. Increased performance is desirable to further enhance safety/reliability and/or increase payload capability. Performance increase will be achieved by adding a fifth propellant segment to the current four-segment booster and opening the throat to accommodate the increased mass flow while maintaining current pressure levels. One development concept under consideration is the static test of a "standard" RSRM with a fifth propellant segment inserted and appropriate minimum motor modifications. Feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the potential for any significant departure in component performance/loading from the well-characterized RSRM. An area of concern is the aft motor (submerged nozzle inlet, aft dome, etc.) where the altered internal flow resulting from the performance enhancing features (25% increase in mass flow rate, higher Mach numbers, modified subsonic nozzle contour) may result in increased component erosion and char. To assess this issue and to define the minimum design changes required to successfully static test a fifth segment RSRM engineering test motor, internal flow studies have been initiated. Internal aero-thermal environments were quantified in terms of conventional convective heating and discrete phase alumina particle impact/concentration and accretion calculations via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two sets of comparative CFD simulations of the RSRM and the five-segment (IBM) concept motor were conducted with CFD commercial code FLUENT. The first simulation involved a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of the full motor, initial grain RSRM. The second set of analyses

  19. Enhanced Solar Energy Absorption by Internally-mixed Black Carbon in Snow Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Flanner, M. G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Cheng; Penner, Joyce E.; Jiao, C.

    2012-05-30

    Here we explore light absorption by snowpack containing black carbon (BC) particles residing within ice grains. Basic considerations of particle volumes and BC/snow mass concentrations show that there are generally 0:05-109 BC particles for each ice grain. This suggests that internal BC is likely distributed as multiple inclusions within ice grains, and thus the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) (Chylek and Srivastava, 1983) is a more appropriate optical representation for BC/ice composites than coated-sphere or standard mixing approximations. DEMA calculations show that the 460 nm absorption cross-section of BC/ice composites, normalized to the mass of BC, is typically enhanced by factors of 1.8-2.1 relative to interstitial BC. BC effective radius is the dominant cause of variation in this enhancement, compared with ice grain size and BC volume fraction. We apply two atmospheric aerosol models that simulate interstitial and within-hydrometeor BC lifecycles. Although only {approx}2% of the atmospheric BC burden is cloud-borne, 71-83% of the BC deposited to global snow and sea-ice surfaces occurs within hydrometeors. Key processes responsible for within-snow BC deposition are development of hydrophilic coatings on BC, activation of liquid droplets, and subsequent snow formation through riming or ice nucleation by other species and aggregation/accretion of ice particles. Applying deposition fields from these aerosol models in offline snow and sea-ice simulations, we calculate that 32-73% of BC in global surface snow resides within ice grains. This fraction is smaller than the within-hydrometeor deposition fraction because meltwater flux preferentially removes internal BC, while sublimation and freezing within snowpack expose internal BC. Incorporating the DEMA into a global climate model, we simulate increases in BC/snow radiative forcing of 43-86%, relative to scenarios that apply external optical properties to all BC. We show that snow metamorphism

  20. Giant Enhancement of Internal Electric Field Boosting Bulk Charge Separation for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Cai, Lejuan; Shang, Jian; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-06-01

    Incorporating carbon into Bi3 O4 Cl enhances its internal electric field by 126 times, which induces a bulk charge separation efficiency (ηbulk ) of 80%. This ultrahigh ηbulk value presents a state-of-the-art result in tuning the bulk charge separation. The generated C-doped Bi3 O4 Cl has a noble-metal- and electron-scavenger-free water-oxidation ability under visible light, which is difficult to achieve with most existing photocatalysts. PMID:27001143

  1. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by carbon soot aerosol internally mixed with sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Khalizov, Alexei F; Xue, Huaxin; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-02-12

    Light absorption by carbon soot increases when the particles are internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials, leading to increased radiative forcing, but the magnitude of this enhancement is a subject of great uncertainty. We have performed laboratory experiments of the optical properties of fresh and internally mixed carbon soot aerosols with a known particle size, morphology, and the mixing state. Flame-generated soot aerosol is size-selected with a double-differential mobility analyzer (DMA) setup to eliminate multiply charged particle modes and then exposed to gaseous sulfuric acid (10(9)-10(10) molecule cm(-3)) and water vapor (5-80% relative humidity, RH). Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot aerosol are measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively, and the absorption is derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. The optical properties of fresh soot are independent of RH, whereas soot internally mixed with sulfuric acid exhibits significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of sulfuric acid coating and relative humidity. For soot particles with an initial mobility diameter of 320 nm and a 40% H(2)SO(4) mass coating fraction, absorption and scattering are increased by 1.4- and 13-fold at 80% RH, respectively. Also, the single scattering albedo of soot aerosol increases from 0.1 to 0.5 after coating and humidification. Additional measurements with soot particles that are first coated with sulfuric acid and then heated to remove the coating show that both scattering and absorption are enhanced by irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules. Depending on the initial size and density of soot aggregates, restructuring acts to increase or decrease the absorption cross-section, but the combination of restructuring and encapsulation always results in an increased absorption for

  2. Edesign: Primer and Enhanced Internal Probe Design Tool for Quantitative PCR Experiments and Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Naoko; Delobel, Diane; Hanami, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo; Harbers, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Analytical PCR experiments preferably use internal probes for monitoring the amplification reaction and specific detection of the amplicon. Such internal probes have to be designed in close context with the amplification primers, and may require additional considerations for the detection of genetic variations. Here we describe Edesign, a new online and stand-alone tool for designing sets of PCR primers together with an internal probe for conducting quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and genotypic experiments. Edesign can be used for selecting standard DNA oligonucleotides like for instance TaqMan probes, but has been further extended with new functions and enhanced design features for Eprobes. Eprobes, with their single thiazole orange-labelled nucleotide, allow for highly sensitive genotypic assays because of their higher DNA binding affinity as compared to standard DNA oligonucleotides. Using new thermodynamic parameters, Edesign considers unique features of Eprobes during primer and probe design for establishing qPCR experiments and genotyping by melting curve analysis. Additional functions in Edesign allow probe design for effective discrimination between wild-type sequences and genetic variations either using standard DNA oligonucleotides or Eprobes. Edesign can be freely accessed online at http://www.dnaform.com/edesign2/, and the source code is available for download. PMID:26863543

  3. Trapping of microwave radiation in hollow polypyrrole microsphere through enhanced internal reflection: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Ritwik; Srivastava, Suneel K

    2015-01-01

    In present work, spherical core (polystyrene, PS)/shell (polypyrrole, PPy) has been synthesized via in situ chemical oxidative copolymerization of pyrrole (Py) on the surface of sulfonated PS microsphere followed by the formation of hollow polypyrrole (HPPy) shell by dissolving PS inner core in THF. Thereafter, we first time established that such fabricated novel art of morphology acts as a conducting trap in absorbing electromagnetic (EM) wave by internal reflection. Further studies have been extended on the formation of its silver nanocomposites HPPy/Ag to strengthen our contention on this novel approach. Our investigations showed that electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency (SE) of HPPy (34.5-6 dB) is significantly higher compared to PPy (20-5 dB) in the frequency range of 0.5-8 GHz due to the trapping of EM wave by internal reflection. We also observed that EMI shielding is further enhanced to 59-23 in 10 wt% Ag loaded HPPy/Ag-10. This is attributed to the simultaneous contribution of internal reflection as well as reflection from outer surface. Such high EMI shielding capacity using conducting polymers are rarely reported. PMID:25560384

  4. Trapping of microwave radiation in hollow polypyrrole microsphere through enhanced internal reflection: A novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, Ritwik; Srivastava, Suneel K.

    2015-01-01

    In present work, spherical core (polystyrene, PS)/shell (polypyrrole, PPy) has been synthesized via in situ chemical oxidative copolymerization of pyrrole (Py) on the surface of sulfonated PS microsphere followed by the formation of hollow polypyrrole (HPPy) shell by dissolving PS inner core in THF. Thereafter, we first time established that such fabricated novel art of morphology acts as a conducting trap in absorbing electromagnetic (EM) wave by internal reflection. Further studies have been extended on the formation of its silver nanocomposites HPPy/Ag to strengthen our contention on this novel approach. Our investigations showed that electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency (SE) of HPPy (34.5-6 dB) is significantly higher compared to PPy (20-5 dB) in the frequency range of 0.5-8 GHz due to the trapping of EM wave by internal reflection. We also observed that EMI shielding is further enhanced to 59-23 in 10 wt% Ag loaded HPPy/Ag-10. This is attributed to the simultaneous contribution of internal reflection as well as reflection from outer surface. Such high EMI shielding capacity using conducting polymers are rarely reported.

  5. A computational study on the enhanced stabilization of aminophenol derivatives by internal hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.

    2006-05-01

    The stabilization of aminophenol derivatives and their radicals due to internal hydrogen bonding has been analyzed by means of density functional theory and by topological electron density analysis. The calculations have been carried out at the B3LYP level of theory, using several basis sets, and by means of the CBS-4M composite approach. A strong O-H⋯NH 2 hydrogen bond is found to stabilize the aminophenol with the lone-pair of the nitrogen atom co-planar with the aromatic ring, contrasting with the optimized structure found for aniline. The effect of electron donors and electron acceptors on the strength of the internal hydrogen bond is also analyzed. For one of the species studied, 2,6-diaminophenol, the computed O-H bond dissociation enthalpy is only 300 kJ/mol, the lowest value found so far for phenol and other compounds containing the O-H bond, almost 25 kJ/mol lower than those found experimentally for pyrogallol and for vitamin E. The explanation for such a small value comes from the enhanced stabilization of the corresponding radical species by internal hydrogen bonding, combined with a decrease of the steric effects caused by rotation of the amino groups.

  6. Trapping of microwave radiation in hollow polypyrrole microsphere through enhanced internal reflection: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ritwik; Srivastava, Suneel K.

    2015-01-01

    In present work, spherical core (polystyrene, PS)/shell (polypyrrole, PPy) has been synthesized via in situ chemical oxidative copolymerization of pyrrole (Py) on the surface of sulfonated PS microsphere followed by the formation of hollow polypyrrole (HPPy) shell by dissolving PS inner core in THF. Thereafter, we first time established that such fabricated novel art of morphology acts as a conducting trap in absorbing electromagnetic (EM) wave by internal reflection. Further studies have been extended on the formation of its silver nanocomposites HPPy/Ag to strengthen our contention on this novel approach. Our investigations showed that electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency (SE) of HPPy (34.5-6 dB) is significantly higher compared to PPy (20-5 dB) in the frequency range of 0.5-8 GHz due to the trapping of EM wave by internal reflection. We also observed that EMI shielding is further enhanced to 59–23 in 10 wt% Ag loaded HPPy/Ag-10. This is attributed to the simultaneous contribution of internal reflection as well as reflection from outer surface. Such high EMI shielding capacity using conducting polymers are rarely reported. PMID:25560384

  7. Enhanced Spin Squeezing in Atomic Ensembles via Control of the Internal Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaee, Ezad; Norris, Leigh; Baragiola, Ben; Montano, Enrique; Hemmer, Daniel; Jessen, Poul; Deutsch, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    Abstract: We study the process by which the collective spin squeezing of an ensemble of Cesium atoms is enhanced by control of the internal spin state of the atoms. By increasing the initial atomic projection noise, one can enhance the Faraday interaction that entangles the atoms with a probe. The light acts as a quantum bus for creating atom-atom entanglement via measurement backaction. Further control can be used to transfer this entanglement to metrologically useful squeezing. We numerically simulate this protocol by a stochastic master equation, including QND measurement and optical pumping, which accounts for decoherence and transfer of coherences between magnetic sub-levels. We study the tradeoff between the enhanced entangling interaction and increased rates of decoherence for different initial state preparations. Under realistic conditions, we find that we can achieve squeezing with a ``CAT-State'' superpostion |F = 4, Mz = 4> + |F, Mz = -4> of ~ 9.9 dB and for the spin coherent state |F = 4, Mx = 4> of ~ 7.5 dB. The increased entanglement enabled by the CAT state preparation is partially, but not completely reduced by the increased fragility to decoherence. National Science Foundation.

  8. Carbon nanotubes enhance the internalization of drugs by cancer cells and decrease their chemoresistance to cytostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, M.; Xu, Y.; Dantuluri, V.; Mustafa, T.; Zhang, Y.; Karmakar, A.; Casciano, D.; Ali, S.; Biris, A.

    2013-02-01

    Etoposide is a semisynthetic, chemotherapeutic drug widely recommended to treat an extensive range of human cancers. Our studies indicate that, while etoposide is capable of killing human cancer cells, exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and etoposide results in enhanced cell death that appears to be synergistic and not merely additive. In this study, we used high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to quantify the internal effective dose of etoposide when the human pancreatic cancer cell (PANC-1) was exposed to the combination of these agents. Our results unequivocally indicate that SWCNTs improve etoposide uptake and increase its capacity to kill cancer cells. We suggest that a combination of SWCNTs and etoposide may prove to be a more efficient chemotherapeutic protocol, especially because of the potential to lower toxic drug doses to levels that may be useful in decreasing adverse side effects, as well as in lowering the probability of inducing chemoresistance in exposed cancer cells.

  9. Photothermal deflectometry enhanced by total internal reflection enables non-invasive glucose monitoring in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Pleitez, M A; Hertzberg, O; Bauer, A; Seeger, M; Lieblein, T; Lilienfeld-Toal, H V; Mäntele, W

    2015-01-21

    We present TIR-PTD spectroscopy, an IR-pump/VIS-probe method for the measurement of IR absorption spectra by means of photothermal deflectometry (PTD) enhanced by total internal reflection (TIR). It overcomes the limitations of IR spectroscopy for the study of opaque samples and allows molecular fingerprinting of IR-active liquids or solids. Another important advantage of the presented approach over traditional IR spectroscopy methods is the ability to obtain IR information by means of VIS detection, which is generally much cheaper and easier to handle than IR detection. By application of mid-IR TIR-PTD spectroscopy on human skin in vivo, we are demonstrating the correlation between epidermal- and blood-glucose levels on a type 1 diabetic patient. PMID:25408951

  10. ELiXIR—Solid-State Luminaire With Enhanced Light Extraction by Internal Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven C.; Steckl, Andrew J.

    2007-06-01

    A phosphor-converted light-emitting diode (pcLED) luminaire featuring enhanced light extraction by internal reflection (ELiXIR) with efficacy of 60 lm/W producing 18 lumens of yellowish green light at 100 mA is presented. The luminaire consists of a commercial blue high power LED, a polymer hemispherical shell lens with interior phosphor coating, and planar aluminized reflector. High extraction efficiency of the phosphor-converted light is achieved by separating the phosphor from the LED and using internal reflection to steer the light away from lossy reflectors and the LED package and out of the device. At 10 and 500 mA, the luminaire produces 2.1 and 66 lumens with efficacies of 80 and 37 lm/W, respectively. Technological improvements over existing commercial LEDs, such as more efficient pcLED packages or, alternatively, higher efficiency green or yellow for color mixing, will be essential to achieving 150 200 lm/W solid-state lighting. Advances in both areas are demonstrated.

  11. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  12. Enhancing phosphorus recovery by a new internal recycle seeding MAP reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qingliang; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Nan

    2008-09-01

    Phosphorus is a depleting resource that needs recovery from wastewater streams. The magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) crystallization process could simultaneously recover ammonium nitrogen and phosphorus at equal molar basis to yield slow-release MAP fertilizer. However, the present MAP processes are not efficient in recovering phosphorus at low P concentrations. This work presented and tested the performance of a newly proposed MAP reactor, the internal recycle seeding reactor (IRSR) that comprised of a reaction zone and a settling zone connecting with an internal recirculation loop. Owing to the enhanced secondary nucleation rates of MAP crystals in reaction zone under controlled circumstance, the proposed IRSR recovered 78% of phosphorus from wastewater at a low level of 21.7 mg-PL(-1). The optimal operation parameters for the IRSR were investigated with synthetic wastewater and determined as that the Mg/PO(4)(3-)-P molar ratio was 1.3-1.5:1, THRT was up to or longer than 1.14 h, the seed concentration of reaction zone was 0.40-1.0 gL(-1). Further needs for the proposed IRSR strategies were also discussed. PMID:18187321

  13. Plasmon Enhanced Internal Photoemission in Antenna-Spacer-Mirror Based Au/TiO₂ Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yurui; Jiao, Yang; Xiong, Kunli; Ogier, Robin; Yang, Zhong-Jian; Gao, Shiwu; Dahlin, Andreas B; Käll, Mikael

    2015-06-10

    Emission of photoexcited hot electrons from plasmonic metal nanostructures to semiconductors is key to a number of proposed nanophotonics technologies for solar harvesting, water splitting, photocatalysis, and a variety of optical sensing and photodetector applications. Favorable materials and catalytic properties make systems based on gold and TiO2 particularly interesting, but the internal photoemission efficiency for visible light is low because of the wide bandgap of the semiconductor. We investigated the incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency of thin TiO2 films decorated with Au nanodisk antennas in an electrochemical circuit and found that incorporation of a Au mirror beneath the semiconductor amplified the photoresponse for light with wavelength λ = 500-950 nm by a factor 2-10 compared to identical structures lacking the mirror component. Classical electrodynamics simulations showed that the enhancement effect is caused by a favorable interplay between localized surface plasmon excitations and cavity modes that together amplify the light absorption in the Au/TiO2 interface. The experimentally determined internal quantum efficiency for hot electron transfer decreases monotonically with wavelength, similar to the probability for interband excitations with energy higher than the Schottky barrier obtained from a density functional theory band structure simulation of a thin Au/TiO2 slab. PMID:25938263

  14. Enhancements to the GRIDGEN structured grid generation system for internal and external flow applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Chawner, John R.

    1992-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a government domain software package for interactive generation of multiple block grids around general configurations. Though it has been freely available since 1989, it has not been widely embraced by the internal flow community due to a misconception that it was designed for external flow use only. In reality GRIDGEN has always worked for internal flow applications, and GRIDGEN ongoing enhancements are increasing the quality of and efficiency with which grids for external and internal flow problems may be constructed. The software consists of four codes used to perform the four steps of the grid generation process. GRIDBLOCK is first used to decompose the flow domain into a collection of component blocks and then to establish interblock connections and flow solver boundary conditions. GRIDGEN2D is then used to generate surface grids on the outer shell of each component block. GRIDGEN3D generates grid points on the interior of each block, and finally GRIDVUE3D is used to inspect the resulting multiple block grid. Three of these codes (GRIDBLOCK, GRIDGEN2D, and GRIDVUE3D) are highly interactive and graphical in nature, and currently run on Silicon Graphics, Inc., and IBM RS/6000 workstations. The lone batch code (GRIDGEN3D) may be run on any of several Unix based platforms. Surface grid generation in GRIDGEN2D is being improved with the addition of higher order surface definitions (NURBS and parametric surfaces input in IGES format and bicubic surfaces input in PATRAN Neutral File format) and double precision mathematics. In addition, two types of automation have been added to GRIDGEN2D that reduce the learning curve slope for new users and eliminate work for experienced users. Volume grid generation using GRIDGEN3D has been improved via the addition of an advanced hybrid control function formulation that provides both orthogonality and clustering control at the block faces and clustering control on the block interior.

  15. Partnering International Universities to Enhance Climate Literacy through Interdisciplinary, Cross-Cultural Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, L. A.; Polk, J.; Strenecky, B.

    2015-12-01

    The climate change phenomenon will present complex, far-reaching challenges and opportunities, which will require leaders well-versed in interdisciplinary learning and international understanding. In an effort to develop the next generation of future leaders prepared for these challenges and opportunities, faculty from Western Kentucky University (WKU) and the University of Akureyri (UNAK), Iceland partnered to co-teach a course in climate change science and communication in Iceland. Students from both Institutions participated in the course to further enhance the cross-learning opportunity presented to the students. The 11-day course stationed out of three cities in Iceland, including Reykjavík, Vik, and Akureyri, the Icelandic gateway to the Arctic. In addition to undertaking field experiences such as hiking on glaciers, exploring ice caves, and touring geothermal plants, the group also hosted forums to discuss climate change with members of the Icelandic community, and completed The $100 Solution™ service-learning projects. A culminating point of the study abroad experience was a presentation by the students to persons from the University of Akureyri and representatives from the neighboring Icelandic communities about what they had learned about climate change science and communication during their travels. Through this experience, students were able to share their knowledge, which in turn gave them a deeper understanding of the issues they were learning throughout the study abroad program. In short, the program combined interdisciplinary learning, service-learning, and international understanding toward the goal of preparing the leaders of tomorrow with the skills to address climate change challenges.

  16. Enhancing International Research and Development-Project Activity on University Campuses: Insights from U.S. Senior International Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Peter H.; Deardorff, Darla K.; Bolognese, Kerry D.

    2011-01-01

    In the interconnected world of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, the ability of higher-education institutions to contribute to and benefit from international research undertakings, sustainable-development-project activity, and capacity-building endeavors requires transnational involvement. While the potential benefits are…

  17. A 32-nucleotide exon-splicing enhancer regulates usage of competing 5' splice sites in a differential internal exon.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M B; Bryan, J; Cooper, T A; Berget, S M

    1995-01-01

    Large alternatively spliced internal exons are uncommon in vertebrate genes, and the mechanisms governing their usage are unknown. In this report, we examined alternative splicing of a 1-kb internal exon from the human caldesmon gene containing two regulated 5' splice sites that are 687 nucleotides apart. In cell lines normally splicing caldesmon RNA via utilization of the exon-internal 5' splice site, inclusion of the differential exon required a long purine-rich sequence located between the two competing 5' splice sites. This element consisted of four identical 32-nucleotide purine-rich repeats that resemble exon-splicing enhancers (ESE) identified in other genes. One 32-nucleotide repeat supported exon inclusion, repressed usage of the terminal 5' splice site, and functioned in a heterologous exon dependent on exon enhancers for inclusion, indicating that the caldesmon purine-rich sequence can be classified as an ESE. The ESE was required for utilization of the internal 5' splice site only in the presence of the competing 5' splice site and had no effect when placed downstream of the terminal 5' splice site. In the absence of the internal 5' splice site, the ESE activated a normally silent cryptic 5' splice site near the natural internal 5' splice site, indicating that the ESE stimulates upstream 5' splice site selection. We propose that the caldesmon ESE functions to regulate competition between two 5' splice sites within a differential internal exon. PMID:7623794

  18. Enhanced gene transfection by photochemical internalization of protomine sulfate/DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Mathews, Marlon B.; Shih, En-Chung; Madsen, Steen J.; Kwon, Young Jik

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: One of many limitations for cancer gene therapy is the inability of the therapeutic gene to transfect a sufficient number of tumor cells. Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. The utility of PCI for the delivery of the GFP indicator gene on the same plasmid as a tumor suppressor gene (PTEN) was investigated in monolayers of U251 human glioma cells. Materials and Methods: U251 monolayers were incubated in AlPcS2a for 18 h. The monolayers were incubated with non-viral vectors for either 4 or 18 hrs. In all cases, light treatment was performed with a diode laser at a wavelength of 670 nm. The non-viral transfection agents, branched PEI or protomine sulfate (PS), were used with the plasmid construct (GFP-PTEN). Results: PS was much less toxic to the gliomas cells compared to BPEI but was highly inefficient at gene transfection. PCI resulted in a 5-10 fold increase in GFP protein expression compared to controls. Conclusions: Collectively, the results suggest that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance transfection of tumor suppressor genes in glioma cells.

  19. Heat transfer enhancement by a multilobe vortex generator in internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Y.Y.; Leu, S.W.

    1999-04-01

    A three-dimensional computational method is employed to study the flow and heat transfer in internally finned tubes with a multilobe vortex generator inserted. Governing equations are discretized using the finite volume method. The irregular lobe geometry is treated using curvilinear nonstaggered grids. The linear interpolation method is adopted to calculate face velocities. The results show that secondary flows induced by the lobes are transformed to become axial vortices downstream of the vortex generator. As a consequence of the transport by the vortex flow, the core flow is moved to the fins and the tube wall, while the wall flow moves to the core. In this way, both heat transfer and flow mixing are enhanced. When the fin height is increased, the axial vortex is more restricted in the centerline region, and the strength of the vortex flow, represented by circulation, is decreased. In turn, the total pressure loss is also decreased. However, the heat transfer increases with fin height. Consequently, efficiency is greatly promoted.

  20. Identifying Areas of Tension in the Field of Technology-Enhanced Learning: Results of an International Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plesch, Christine; Kaendler, Celia; Rummel, Nikol; Wiedmann, Michael; Spada, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Despite steady progress in research in technology-enhanced learning (TEL), the translation of research findings and technology into educational practices falls short of expectations. We present five Areas of Tension which were identified and evaluated in an international Delphi study on TEL. These tensions might impede a more comprehensive…

  1. Assessment of Intern's Performance: A Key To Enhance School Leader Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovando, Martha N.

    This paper examines the assessment of interns' performance in a university-based internship program. A group of 46 school administrators (mainly principals) who supervised interns in a variety of school settings as part of a university-based school leader preparation program completed the Assessment of Interns' Performance form. The assessment was…

  2. Narrative Enhancement and Cognitive Therapy: A New Group-Based Treatment for Internalized Stigma among Persons with Severe Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Yanos, Philip T.; Roe, David; Lysaker, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Internalized stigma has been suggested to play a major role in negative changes in identity in severe mental illness. Evidence suggests that roughly one-third of people with severe mental illness show elevated internalized stigma and that it is linked to compromised outcomes in both subjective and objective aspects of recovery. Despite substantial evidence for the impact of internalized stigma, few efforts have been made to develop professionally-led treatment to address this issue. In this article, we discuss our development of a new, group-based approach to the treatment of internalized stigma which we have termed “narrative enhancement and cognitive therapy” (NECT). We describe the treatment approach and offer an illustration of it by way of a case vignette. PMID:21985260

  3. Narrative enhancement and cognitive therapy: a new group-based treatment for internalized stigma among persons with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Yanos, Philip T; Roe, David; Lysaker, Paul H

    2011-10-01

    Internalized stigma has been suggested to play a major role in negative changes in identity in severe mental illness. Evidence suggests that roughly one-third of people with severe mental illness show elevated internalized stigma and that it is linked to compromised outcomes in both subjective and objective aspects of recovery. Despite substantial evidence for the impact of internalized stigma, few efforts have been made to develop professionally led treatment to address this issue. In this article, we discuss our development of a new group-based approach to the treatment of internalized stigma which we have termed "narrative enhancement and cognitive therapy (NECT)". We describe the treatment approach and offer an illustration of it by way of a case vignette. PMID:21985260

  4. Broadening and Enhancing Geophysical Software to Study the Internal Structure of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimech, C.; Tong, V.; D'auria, L.; Corciulo, M.; ozeren, M. S.; Zollo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The acquisition of high resolution helioseismic data from Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory have yielded significant efforts in developing software to study the internal structure and dynamics of active regions and particularly the associated sunspots. The solar active regions trigger the emissions of strong flares and coronal mass ejections that affect our lives on Earth. As the computational techniques involved in studying the solar interior share a lot of similarities with terrestrial tomography, it is important to focus on the commonalities of the computational tasks by reusing various geophysical codes so they can operate consistently with helioseismic data and with each other. We present a project that brings together various concepts and best practices from the software industry to produce a generic framework that enables the expansion and enhancement of the numerical capabilities of geophysical software to solar physics. The source code is developed as free software, utilizing a completely free GNU computer system. Test tools are provided to help validate the code on both terrestrial and solar data for various algorithms. Contrary to older versions, the display results adopt greater functionality so that one can readily infer the program structure and understand the details of the computations. We provide examples of unit tesing and show how they simplify the validation of the code through every phase of the development process. Through a series of tools and common vocabulary, the added functionality accomodates new interdisciplinary collaboration in both solar and terrestrial seismology by helping track the various input and control parameters available and make debugging easier should things go wrong. We conclude with a discussion on how high impact research software should be communicated, peer reviewed, and made openly available as an official free software package having a dedicated mailing and bug-reporting list dedicated to open exchange of

  5. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles by carbopol to enhance mucoadhesion and cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Surassmo, Suvimol; Saengkrit, Nattika; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong; Suktham, Kunat; Woramongkolchai, Noppawan; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2015-06-01

    Mucoadhesive poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles having a modified shell-matrix derived from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and Carbopol (CP), a biodegradable polymer coating, to improve the adhesion and cell transfection properties were developed. The optimum formulations utilized a CP concentration in the range of 0.05-0.2%w/v, and were formed using modified emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. The resulting CP-PLGA nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their physical and chemical properties. The absorbed CP on the PLGA shell-matrix was found to affect the particle size and surface charge, with 0.05% CP giving rise to smooth spherical particles (0.05CP-PLGA) with the smallest size (285.90 nm), and strong negative surface charge (-25.70 mV). The introduction of CP results in an enhancement of the mucoadhesion between CP-PLGA nanoparticles and mucin particles. In vitro cell internalization studies highlighted the potential of 0.05CP-PLGA nanoparticles for transfection into SiHa cells, with uptake being time dependent. Additionally, cytotoxicity studies of CP-PLGA nanoparticles against SiHa cancer cells indicated that low concentrations of the nanoparticles were non-toxic to cells (cell viability >80%). From the various formulations studied, 0.05CP-PLGA nanoparticles proved to be the optimum model carrier having the required mucoadhesive profile and could be an alternative therapeutic efficacy carrier for targeted mucosal drug delivery systems with biodegradable polymer. PMID:25937384

  6. Use of Myometrium as an Internal Reference for Endometrial and Cervical Cancer on Multiphase Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Liao, Yu-San; Chen, Wen-Chang; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Lee, Li-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Myometrial smooth muscle is normally within the field of view for the gynecological imaging. This study aimed to investigate the use of normal myometrium as an internal reference for endometrial and cervical cancer during multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MCE-MRI) and to explore whether this information regarding tumor enhancement relative to the myometrium could be used to discriminate between endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods MRI images, before and after contrast enhancement, were analyzed in newly diagnosed cervical (n = 18) and endometrial cancer (n = 19) patients. Signal intensities (SIs) from tumor tissue and non-neoplastic myometrium were measured using imaging software. Results The relative signal for cervical cancer was approximately 30% higher than that of endometrial cancer after contrast administration. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for SI, relative signal enhancement, and tumor to myometrium contrast ratio (as used to discriminate between cervical cancer and endometrial cancer) was 0.7807, 0.7456 and 0.7895, respectively. There was no difference in SI of the normal myometrium between endometrial and cervical cancer patients prior to and after contrast administration. Using non-tumorous myometrium as an internal reference, the tumor to myometrium contrast ratio was significantly higher in tumor tissue from cervical cancer compared with that from endometrial cancer at 25 s post contrast enhancement (p = 0.0016), with an optimal sensitivity of 72.22% and specificity of 84.21%. Conclusion With SI normalized to baseline or normal myometrium, tumor tissue from cervical cancer patients showed significant hyperintensity compared with that of tumor tissue from endometrial cancer patients after contrast enhancement, yielding acceptable performance. The use of the myometrium as an internal reference may provide an alternative method to analyze MCE-MRI data. PMID:27326456

  7. Enhancement of internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation and replication of hepatitis C virus by PD98059

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Takayuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Shimotohno, Kunitada . E-mail: kshimoto@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-09-15

    Translation initiation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent manner. We found that HCV IRES-dependent protein synthesis is enhanced by PD98059, an inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, while cellular cap-dependent translation was relatively unaffected by the compound. Treatment of cells with PD98059 allowed for robust HCV replication following cellular incubation with HCV-positive serum. Though the molecular mechanism underlying IRES enhancement remains elusive, PD98059 is a potent accelerator of HCV RNA replication.

  8. Enhancement of environment and resources engineering studies through an international cooperation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, E.; Tuneski, A.

    2012-12-01

    , following the criteria and conditions for setting up a Joint Postgraduate Degree. The new second cycle degree courses are going to be activated in the academic year 2012/2012. Both the first and second cycle curricula, developed through the co-operation, exchange of know-how and expertise between partners, are based on the European Credit Transfer System and are in accordance with the Bologna Process. In DEREL a second objective is to implement a sustainable regional network aimed to offer lifelong learning seminars for environment and resources engineering education and training of interested stakeholders and organize workshops focused on strengthening the links in the knowledge triangle: environment education-innovation-research, with participation of postgraduate students, public services, enterprises and NGO's. Also, the good collaborative environment created, since 2005, with the project partners can be surely mentioned as an additional valuable objective of the two TEMPUS projects, enabling implementation of a sustainable international network for environment and resources engineering studies enhancement and development.

  9. Social Media Use to Enhance Internal Communication: Course Design for Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amy M.; Hinesly, Mary D.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly using social media to improve their internal communication. When successfully implemented, such initiatives can have a dramatic impact on internal efficiency, team collaboration, innovation, organizational alignment, and cultural transformation. This article describes a course offered by the Ross School of Business,…

  10. Think Globally! Enhancing the International Student Experience with LibGuides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Ning; Hall, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Enrollment of international students in colleges and universities across the United States is growing. The relocation process can be arduous for international students as they face many barriers transitioning to a new environment. With retention as a key component in the success of academic institutions, what resources and services can academic…

  11. "Community Connections": A Programme to Enhance Domestic and International Students' Educational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Ruth; Clayton, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that an important indicator of a successful sojourn for international students is social integration into the host community. Despite seemingly regular opportunities to integrate, many international students report that their interactions with local residents remain superficial. The "Community Connections" programme…

  12. Internal Audit: Does it Enhance Governance in the Australian Public University Sector?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to confirm if internal audit, a corporate control process, is functioning effectively in Australian public universities. The study draws on agency theory, published literature and best-practice guidelines to develop an internal audit evaluation framework. A survey instrument is thereafter developed from the framework and used as a…

  13. Enhancing Excellence and Equity in Schooling: Modality Theory, an International Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Tzu; Ansalone, George

    2008-01-01

    This international research examines the learning style preferences of Taiwanese students by gender and age in an attempt to determine which of the five learning style stimuli (environmental, emotional, sociological, physiological and psychological) are more likely to be a factor in student academic success. Utilizing an international perspective,…

  14. A Novel Cysteine Knot Protein for Enhancing Sperm Motility That Might Facilitate the Evolution of Internal Fertilization in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Misato; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Saito, Yoko; Kutsuzawa, Megumi; Fujita, Kosuke; Ochi, Haruki; Nakauchi, Yuni; Watanabe, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Internal fertilization ensures successful reproduction of tetrapod vertebrates on land, although how this mode of reproduction evolved is unknown. Here, we identified a novel gene encoding sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a key protein for the internal fertilization of the urodele Cynops pyrrhogaster by Edman degradation of an isolated protein and subsequent reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The SMIS gene encoded a 150 amino-acid sequence including the cysteine knot (CK) motif. No gene with substantial similarity to the SMIS was in the data bank of any model organisms. An active site of the SMIS was in the C-terminal region of the 2nd loop of CK motif. A synthetic peptide including the active site sequence bound to the midpiece and initiated/enhanced the circular motion of C. pyrrhogaster sperm, which allows penetration of the egg jelly specialized for the internal fertilization of this species. The synthetic peptide bound to whole sperm of Rhacophorus arboreus and enhanced the rotary motion, which is adapted to propel the sperm through egg coat matrix specialized for arboreal reproduction, while it bound to the tip of head and tail of Bufo japonicus sperm, and enhanced the vibratory motion, which is suited to sperm penetration through the egg jelly specialized for the reproduction of that species in freshwater. The polyclonal antibody against the active site of the SMIS specifically bound to egg coat matrix of R. arboreus. These findings suggest that diversification of amphibian reproductive modes accompanies the specialization of egg coat and the adaptation of sperm motility to penetrate the specialized egg coat, and SMIS acts as the sperm motility enhancer of anurans and urodeles that might facilitate to adaptively optimize sperm motility for allowing the establishment of internal fertilization. PMID:27579691

  15. Community Connections to Enhance Undergraduate International Business Education: An Example of Business Consulting Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annavarjula, Madan; Trifts, Jack W.

    2012-01-01

    Practical project experience as a means of augmenting traditional classroom learning has long been viewed as a value adding curricular exercise. While students participating in the projects gain valuable skills that will enhance their personal marketability, successful projects also benefit the client companies involved and help enhance the image…

  16. A total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy study of mass diffusion enhancement in water-based alumina nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Jocelyn; Coulombe, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    Mass diffusion of rhodamine 6G (R6G) in water-based alumina nanofluids is studied by means of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We report a mass diffusivity enhancement that reaches an order of magnitude in a 2 vol % nanofluid when compared to the value in deionized water. Since experiments were performed with positively charged R6G, interfacial complexation between the dye and the nanoparticles was not observed. The effect of local density variations on mass diffusivity measurements is also addressed. An explanation for the enhancement of mass diffusion is presented using arguments based on dispersion, and it is shown that it correctly describes the order of magnitude differences between the thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity enhancements reported in the literature.

  17. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Gillin, Michael; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2011-05-09

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%-20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles.

  18. Enhancing international earth science competence in natural hazards through 'geoNatHaz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Clague, John J.

    2010-05-01

    "geoNatHaz" is a Transatlantic Exchange Partnership project (TEP 2009-2012) within the framework of the EU-Canada programme for co-operation in higher education, training, and youth. The project is structured to improve knowledge and skills required to assess and manage natural hazards in mountain regions. It provides student exchanges between European and Canadian universities in order to enhance international competence in natural hazard research. The university consortium is led by Simon Fraser University (Canada) and Università degli studi di Torino (Italy). Partner universities include the University of British Columbia, Queen's University, Università di Bologna, Université de Savoie, and the University of Athens. Université de Lausanne (Switzerland) supports the geoNatHaz advisory board through its bilateral agreements with Canadian partner universities. The geoNatHaz project promotes cross-cultural understanding and internationalization of university natural hazard curricula through common lectures, laboratory exercises, and field activities. Forty graduate students from the seven Canadian and European partner universities will benefit from the project between 2009 and 2012. Some students enrolled in graduate-level earth science and geologic engineering programs spend up to five months at the partner universities, taking courses and participating in research teams under the direction of project scientists. Other students engage in short-term (four-week) exchanges involving training in classic natural hazard case-studies in mountain regions of Canada and Europe. Joint courses are delivered in English, but complementary cultural activities are offered in the languages of the host countries. Supporting organizations offer internships and technical and scientific support. Students benefit from work-study programs with industry partners. Supporting organizations include government departments and agencies (Geological Survey of Canada; CNR-IRPI National

  19. International mobility placements enable students and staff in Higher Education to enhance transversal and employability-related skills.

    PubMed

    Standley, Henrietta J

    2015-10-01

    Internationalization has commanded an ever-more prominent position in higher education over recent years, and is now firmly entrenched. While academia has long been outward looking-international research collaborations, conferences and student exchanges are well-established practices-it is relatively recently that internationalization has become a goal in its own right, rather than a consequence of normal academic activity. There are multiple interdependent drivers behind this: a focus on graduate employability and development of broad competencies and transferable skills in addition to subject-specific training, 'international awareness' being confirmed as a graduate attribute that is highly valued by employers, the availability of detailed information enabling prospective students to choose between Higher Education Institutions on the basis of their international opportunities and graduate employment rates, increasing competition between Institutions to attract the best students and to ascend national and international league tables, and (both driving and reflecting these trends) national policy frameworks. This minireview focuses on two aspects of internationalization of direct relevance to microbiology students and academic staff in a typical Higher Education Institution: student research placements overseas, and the impact of international mobility on teaching practice and the student experience. Practical strategies for developing intercultural awareness and enhancing employability are highlighted. PMID:26347299

  20. Development of a dialyzer with enhanced internal filtration to increase the clearance of low molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takayasu; Uchi, Yukihiko; Fukuda, Makoto; Miyazaki, Miwa; Uezumi, Satoshi; Hiyoshi, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    Accumulated low molecular weight proteins in hemodialysis patients require a high-flux dialyzer. There have been several methods proposed for enhancing internal filtration, including narrowing the inside diameter of the hollow fibers, lengthening the fibers, and increasing the fiber density ratio. We tried to enhance the internal filtration by increasing the pressure drop in the dialysate compartment through increasing the fiber density ratio. If the fiber density ratio is too high, however, an irregular dialysate path may result, thus decreasing dialysis performance. Therefore, we took note of the shape of the inner housing and added a short taper structure, which improved the dialysate path dramatically. Consequently, we developed an internal filtration-enhanced dialyzer (APS-Prototype) to improve dialysis performance. The internal filtration rate in water (measured by Doppler ultrasound) was 13.2 l/session for the APS-Prototype and 5.3 l/session for the APS-15E. The amount of alpha1-microglobulin (alpha1-MG) in bovine plasma was 0.34 g for the APS-Prototype and 0.11 g for the APS-15E. In addition, the amount of alpha1-MG in vivo was 29.0% +/- 5.8% for the APS-Prototype, significantly higher than that for the APS-15E (13.6% +/- 1.9%). The desirable loss of albumin is 2-4 g in hemodiafiltration, and it was 3.92 +/- 1.03 g for the APS-Prototype. The prototype showed excellent solute removal performance with no clinical or engineering problems. PMID:15558337

  1. An internal electron reservoir enhances catalytic CO2 reduction by a semisynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Camille R; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2016-08-01

    The development of an artificial metalloenzyme for CO2 reduction is described. The small-molecule catalyst [Ni(II)(cyclam)](2+) has been incorporated within azurin. Selectivity for CO generation over H(+) reduction is enhanced within the protein environment, while the azurin active site metal impacts the electrochemical overpotential and photocatalytic activity. The enhanced catalysis observed for copper azurin suggests an important role for intramolecular electron transfer, analogous to native CO2 reducing enzymes. PMID:27406946

  2. Time-resolved internal-electron-scattering effect of H2 + in enhanced ionization regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Zhou, Yueming; He, Mingrui; Li, Min; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron interference dynamics of H2 + in an intense infrared laser field. At intermediate internuclear distances, an interference fringe appears in the electron momentum distribution. By tracing the time evolution of the electron density, we identify an internal scattering channel of the electrons. The observed fringe is attributed to the interference between the internal scattered and direct photoelectrons. Our results reveal that the electron behaviors inside a molecule can be mapped onto the experimentally accessible photoelectron momentum spectra, suggesting a time-resolved way of probing the complex laser-driven electron dynamics on an attosecond time scale.

  3. Enhancing Student Competency and Employability in International Business through Master's Dissertations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinkovics, Rudolf R.; Richardson, Christopher; Lew, Yong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    A core component of International Business (IB) postgraduate programs around the world is the master's dissertation, which requires students to produce a written document, typically around 20,000 words in length, based on empirical research. While the dissertation is given considerable importance in such programs, often accounting for more than a…

  4. International Experiences as Professional Development to Enhance Classroom Practice: Beyond Educational Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John William, III

    2012-01-01

    Professional development of educators is a central feature in education reform efforts (Bredeson, 2000) and school improvement (Guskey & Huberman, 1995). The purpose of the study was to describe personal and professional gains from an international experience, notably the Fulbright-Hays Group Study Abroad Program, including new knowledge and…

  5. Strategies to Enhance Student Success: A Discourse Analysis of Academic Advice in International Student Handbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romerhausen, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    As the population of international students continues to rise at U.S. colleges and universities, multiple academic obstacles pose barriers to success. Research on strategies of intervention has primarily included face-to-face interactions while an exploration of other assistance approaches is minimal in comparison. This study explored the role…

  6. Enhancing International Postgraduates' Learning Experience with Online Peer Assessment and Feedback Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Esyin; Snee, Helena; Price, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Internationalisation and assessment and feedback are one of the main research agenda in the UK higher education. The study reports the Higher Education Academy Economics Network-funded research for international students' experience with peer assessment and feedback innovation. The Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) theoretical…

  7. International Exchange with a Disability: Enhancing Experiences Abroad through Advising and Mentoring (Practice Brief)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holben, Ashley; Özel, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Through interaction with an advisor or peer mentor and through exposure to the experiences of role models, students with disabilities gain an appreciation of the potential challenges and benefits of international exchange and make informed choices about whether, where, and how to go abroad. By adopting strategies for inclusive advising and role…

  8. Enhanced excitonic photoconductivity due to built-in internal electric field in TlGaSe{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Şale, Yasin; Balaban, Ertan

    2014-12-07

    The strong enhancement, by several orders of magnitude, of the excitonic peak within the photoconductivity spectrum of TlGaSe{sub 2} semiconductor was observed. The samples were polarized in external dc electric field, which was applied prior to the measurements. Due to the accumulation of charges near the surface, an internal electric field was formed. Electron-hole pairs that were created after the absorption of light are fallen in and then separated by the built-in electric field, which prevents radiative recombination process.

  9. Enhancement of Apoptosis by Titanium Alloy Internal Fixations during Microwave Treatments for Fractures: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Fu, Tengfei; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microwaves are used in one method of physical therapy and can increase muscle tissue temperature which is useful for improving muscle, tendon and bone injuries. In the study, we sought to determine whether titanium alloy internal fixations influence apoptosis in tissues subjected to microwave treatments at 2,450 MHz and 40 W during the healing of fractures because this issue is not yet fully understood. Methods In this study, titanium alloy internal fixations were used to treat 3.0-mm transverse osteotomies in the middle of New Zealand rabbits’ femurs. After the operation, 30-day microwave treatments were applied to the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies 3 days after the operation. The changes in the temperatures of the muscle tissues in front of the implants or the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies were measured during the microwave treatments. To characterize the effects of titanium alloy internal fixations on apoptosis in the muscles after microwave treatment, we performed TUNEL assays, fluorescent real-time (quantitative) PCR, western blotting analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection and transmission electron microscopy examinations. Results The temperatures were markedly increased in the animals with the titanium alloy implants. Apoptosis in the muscle cells of the implanted group was significantly more extensive than that in the non-implanted control group at different time points. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of the skeletal muscles of the implanted groups revealed muscular mitochondrial swelling, vacuolization. ROS, Bax and Hsp70 were up-regulated, and Bcl-2 was down-regulated in the implanted group. Conclusion Our results suggest that titanium alloy internal fixations caused greater muscular tissue cell apoptosis following 2,450 MHz, 40 W microwave treatments in this rabbit femur fracture models. PMID:26132082

  10. A Decision Support Framework for Feasibility Analysis of International Space Station (ISS) Research Capability Enhancing Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott,Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2004-01-01

    The assembly and operation of the ISS has generated significant challenges that have ultimately impacted resources available to the program's primary mission: research. To address this, program personnel routinely perform trade-off studies on alternative options to enhance research. The approach, content level of analysis and resulting outputs of these studies vary due to many factors, however, complicating the Program Manager's job of selecting the best option. To address this, the program requested a framework be developed to evaluate multiple research-enhancing options in a thorough, disciplined and repeatable manner, and to identify the best option on the basis of cost, benefit and risk. The resulting framework consisted of a systematic methodology and a decision-support toolset. The framework provides quantifiable and repeatable means for ranking research-enhancing options for the complex and multiple-constraint domain of the space research laboratory. This paper describes the development, verification and validation of this framework and provides observations on its operational use.

  11. The HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein Causes Prolonged Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Signaling and Enhances Internalization of Phosphorylated Receptor Species

    PubMed Central

    Spangle, Jennifer M.; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 proteins are consistently expressed in HPV-associated lesions and cancers. HPV16 E6 sustains the activity of the mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling cascades under conditions of growth factor deprivation. Here we report that HPV16 E6 activated mTORC1 by enhanced signaling through receptor protein tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptors. This is evidenced by sustained signaling through these receptors for several hours after growth factor withdrawal. HPV16 E6 increased the internalization of activated receptor species, and the signaling adaptor protein GRB2 was shown to be critical for HPV16 E6 mediated enhanced EGFR internalization and mTORC1 activation. As a consequence of receptor protein kinase mediated mTORC1 activation, HPV16 E6 expression increased cellular migration of primary human epithelial cells. This study identifies a previously unappreciated mechanism by which HPV E6 proteins perturb host-signaling pathways presumably to sustain protein synthesis during the viral life cycle that may also contribute to cellular transforming activities of high-risk HPV E6 proteins. PMID:23516367

  12. The implementation of an isotope-edited internal standard for quantification of lowest drug concentrations using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in a lab on a chip device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, Anne; Rösch, Petra; Henkel, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    The application of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in combination with a microfluidic device and an isotopeedited internal standard seems to be a promising way for a new approach for quantitative SERS measurements. An innovative lab on a chip system offers the possibility for reproducible, quantitative online SERS measurements based on the application of isotope labelled internal standards and liquid/liquid segmented flow based flow-through Raman detection. Errors caused by the used method can be compensated by using an internal standard.

  13. Evaluating and Enhancing a Women's Health Curriculum in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Diane B; DaRosa, Debra A

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Resident education in women's health is required but is often underemphasized. Our aim was to identify women's health topics with the most relevance to our graduates’ practices and to determine how well they were prepared to address women's health issues. DESIGN Postgraduate survey. SETTING University-affiliated internal medicine residency program. PARTICIPANTS Program graduates in general internal medicine practice. METHODS A survey was drafted listing the 65 topics described in a published residency curriculum in women's health. Respondents indicated the extent to which each item was relevant to their practice and the adequacy of instruction received on a Likert-type scale of 1 (not relevant/inadequate) to 5 (highly relevant/adequate). RESULTS The response rate was 86%. Many of the items were highly relevant to our graduates’ practices. Learning needs were found in all areas as none of the topics were rated as “adequately” taught during residency. Many areas in the curriculum had low relevance scores. Few differences were seen in the perceived relevance of women's health problems or the adequacy of instruction received based on gender, practice type and setting, or amount of ambulatory training during residency. CONCLUSIONS Use of this survey has allowed us to tailor and prioritize learning issues in women's health to meet the needs of our graduates. Increased time in ambulatory rotations alone may not be sufficient to prepare residents to provide comprehensive care in this field. Further study of the effectiveness of a dedicated curriculum in women's heath is needed. PMID:15209589

  14. Enhanced internal gravity wave activity and breaking over the northeastern Pacific-eastern Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šácha, P.; Kuchař, A.; Jacobi, C.; Pišoft, P.

    2015-11-01

    We have found a stratospheric area of anomalously low annual cycle amplitude and specific dynamics in the stratosphere over the northeastern Pacific-eastern Asia coastal region. Using GPS radio occultation density profiles from the Formosat Satellite Mission 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC), we have discovered an internal gravity wave (IGW) activity and breaking hotspot in this region. Conditions supporting orographic wave sourcing and propagation were found. Other possible sources of wave activity in this region are listed. The reasons why this particular IGW activity hotspot was not discovered before as well as why the specific dynamics of this region have not been pointed out are discussed together with the weaknesses of using the mean potential energy as a wave activity proxy. Possible consequences of the specific dynamics in this region on the middle atmospheric dynamics and transport are outlined.

  15. Enhanced international prognostic index in Japanese patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Aya; Fujita, Shinya; Satake, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Azuma, Yoshiko; Tsubokura, Yukie; Hotta, Masaaki; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Tomoki; Nomura, Shosaku

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) International Prognostic Index (IPI), we analyzed 284 patients treated with the combination of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) in our institution in Japan. Their 5-year overall survival (OS) by risk level was 80.7%, 74.8%, 55.4% and 67.5% (P=0.005); and their 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 76.8%, 78.6%, 63.7% and 58.3% (P=0.0722). The NCCN-IPI is a simple scale that uses conventional clinical factors, but did not reflect survival in our cohort. The NCCN-IPI may require further evaluation for different regions and ethnicities before adopting it for routine clinical use. PMID:27489766

  16. Protective Coating Enhances the Durability of Retroreflectors for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1997-01-01

    Corner cube reflectors (retroreflectors) will be used on the International Space Station to aid in rendezvous and docking. They are designed to reflect light, such as that from a laser, directly back to the source. The resulting bright reflection from the surface can be used for critical alignment purposes. The housing for the reflectors is composed of polyoxymethylene, a polymer known as Delrin (DuPont), which is highly susceptible to erosion by the atomic oxygen environment that surrounds the station. Atomic oxygen is highly chemically reactive and will convert polymers such as Delrin into volatile oxidation products. This could cause the reflectors to detach from the housing or could cause volatile products and other contamination to recondense onto the surface of the reflectors, causing them to darken. The NASA Lewis Research Center is applying their patented fluoropolymer-filled silicon dioxide coating to the surface of the Delrin retroreflector to prevent degradation in performance caused by reactions with atomic oxygen.

  17. A new partnership to enhance international competitiveness for coal-related industries

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    Conducting business in countries with significant indigenous coal supplies and expected economic growth (China, Indonesia, India, Russia, Ukraine, South Africa, Columbia, Brazil, and Venezuela) is extremely difficult, not only from a socio-economic/cultural standpoint, but because little reliable information is available on the properties and quality of raw materials. The question is how to compete and create opportunities in these countries when little or nothing is known about the properties of the indigenous raw materials. To address this concern the Penn State University and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are partnering to develop an integrated database and sample bank of international coal and limestone samples of commercial value to power generation. The purpose of this partnership is to provide a reliable database linked to a convenient sample bank that would aid in resource evaluation and testing with regard to coal utilization including, but not limited to, combustion and combustion engineering, coke making, liquefaction, gasification, coalbed methane recovery, coal preparation, and mining. The Penn State-USGS-Private Sector partnership offers unique potential to provide this valuable service. The Penn State Energy Institute maintains a wide variety of analytical and testing equipment and expertise in coal-related engineering, chemistry and geology and has access to much more throughout the University system. For several decades the Institute has successfully maintained a large domestic coal sample bank. The USGS maintains a state-of-the-art analytical facility and a comprehensive domestic coal quality database. The USGS is actively working in about thirty countries to develop a reliable international coal quality database. Private sector will bring insights into the issues of competitiveness, certain knowledge of the marketplace and financial support.

  18. International guidelines for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: ultrasound imaging in the new millennium

    PubMed Central

    Lorentzen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    The intent of this review is to discuss and comment on common clinical scenarios in which contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) may play a decisive role and to illustrate important points with typical cases. With the advent of CEUS, the scope of indications for ultrasonography has been dramatically extended, and now includes functional imaging and tissue characterization, which in many cases enable tumor diagnosis without a biopsy. It is virtually impossible to imagine the practice of modern medicine as we know it in high-income countries without the use of imaging, and yet, an estimated two thirds of the global population may receive no such care. Ultrasound imaging with CEUS has the potential to correct this inequity. PMID:26867761

  19. Enhancing the Environmental Legacy of the International Polar Year 2007- 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, T.; Roura, R.; Perrault, M.

    2006-12-01

    The International Geophysical Year (IGY) left a legacy of peace and international cooperation in the form of the 1959 Antarctic Treaty. Since the IGY, the 1991 Protocol of Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty was signed and entered into force. The Protocol establishes that the protection of the environment and the wilderness values of Antarctica "shall be fundamental considerations in the planning and conduct of all activities in the Antarctic Treaty area". Fifty years on, the IPY 2007-08 can, in turn, leave behind a positive environmental legacy - where the sharing of facilities and logistics are encouraged, the human footprint in Antarctica is minimized and a future generation of environmentally aware scientists, logisticians and visitors is fostered. Based on an analysis of all Expressions of Interest submitted to the IPY, we found that about three-quarters of IPY's Antarctic projects plan to have fieldwork components. About one-third of these field projects expect to leave physical infrastructure in Antarctica. A number of projects plan to develop large-scale infrastructure, such as stations and observatories, in hitherto pristine areas. Fewer than one percent of Antarctic field projects address the issue of their environmental legacy: four projects indicated that the site will be cleaned up or the equipment will be removed at the end of the project; two projects indicated that their results may be useful for the management of the Antarctic environment, e.g., in the control of invasive species or setting up of marine protected areas. With the goal of increasing the environmental awareness of Antarctic field scientists, our contribution will review current research on the impacts of human activities science, tourism, exploitation of marine resources and global climate change - on the Antarctic environment. A preliminary analysis of the cumulative impacts of IPY activities will be presented. Case studies of scientific projects in Antarctica with a

  20. Technique for internal channelling of hydroentangled nonwoven scaffolds to enhance cell penetration

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Elaine R; Ingham, Eileen; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    An important requirement in thick, high-porosity scaffolds is to maximise cellular penetration into the interior and avoid necrosis during culture in vitro. Hitherto, reproducible control of the pore structure in nonwoven scaffolds has proved challenging. A new, channelled scaffold manufacturing process is reported based on water jet entanglement of fibres (hydroentangling) around filamentous template to form a coherent scaffold that is subsequently removed. Longitudinally-oriented channels were introduced within the scaffold in controlled proximity using 220 µm diameter cylindrical templates. In this case study, channelled scaffolds composed of poly(l-lactic acid) were manufactured and evaluated in vitro. Environmental scanning electron microscope and µCT (X-ray microtomography) confirmed channel openings in the scaffold cross-section before and after cell culture with human dermal fibroblasts up to 14 weeks. Histology at week 11 indicated that the channels promoted cell penetration and distribution within the scaffold interior. At week 14, cellular matrix deposition was evident in the internal channel walls and the entrances remained unoccluded by cellular matrix suggesting that diffusion conduits for mass transfer of nutrient to the scaffold interior could be maintained. PMID:22532409

  1. Why a standard contrast-enhanced MRI might be useful in intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Oeinck, Maximilian; Rozeik, Christoph; Wattchow, Jens; Meckel, Stephan; Schlageter, Manuel; Beeskow, Christel; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ischemic stroke of unknown cause cerebral vasculitis is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis, especially when signs of intracranial artery stenosis are found and laboratory findings show systemic inflammation. In such cases, high-resolution T1w vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 'black blood' technique) at 3 T is preferentially performed, but may not be available in every hospital. We report a case of an 84-year-old man with right hemispheric transient ischemic attack and signs of distal occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) in duplex sonography. Standard MRI with contrast agent pointed the way to the correct diagnosis since it showed an intramural contrast uptake in the right ICA and both vertebral arteries. Temporal artery biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis and dedicated vessel wall MRI performed later supported the suspected intracranial large artery inflammation. Our case also shows that early diagnosis and immunosuppressive therapy may not always prevent disease progression, as our patient suffered several infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory with consecutive high-grade hemiparesis of the right side within the following four months. PMID:26988083

  2. Nucleolin enhances internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation of Sp1 in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chia-Yang; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wang, Shao-An; Hsu, Tsung-I; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-01

    Our previous study indicated that specificity protein-1 (Sp1) is accumulated during hypoxia in an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-dependent manner. Herein, we found that the Sp1 was induced strongly at the protein level, but not in the mRNA level, in lung tumor tissue, indicating that translational regulation might contribute to the Sp1 accumulation during tumorigenesis. A further study showed that the translation of Sp1 was dramatically induced through an IRES-dependent pathway. RNA immunoprecipitation analysis of proteins bound to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Sp1 identified interacting protein - nucleolin. Knockdown of nucleolin significantly inhibited IRES-mediated translation of Sp1, suggesting that nucleolin positively facilitates Sp1 IRES activation. Further analysis of the interaction between nucleolin and the 5'-UTR of Sp1 mRNA revealed that the GAR domain was important for IRES-mediated translation of Sp1. Moreover, gefitinib, and LY294002 and MK2206 compounds inhibited IRES-mediated Sp1 translation, implying that activation of the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway via Akt activation triggers the IRES pathway. In conclusion, EGFR activation-mediated nucleolin phosphorylated at Thr641 and Thr707 was recruited to the 5'-UTR of Sp1 as an IRES trans-acting factor to modulate Sp1 translation during lung cancer formation. PMID:25173817

  3. The influence of surface functionalization on the enhanced internalization of magnetic nanoparticles in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Angeles; Cañete, Magdalena; Roca, Alejandro G; Calero, Macarena; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Serna, Carlos J; del Puerto Morales, María; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2009-03-01

    The internalization and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with four differently charged carbohydrates have been tested in the human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Neutral, positive, and negative iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by coating with dextran, aminodextran, heparin, and dimercaptosuccinic acid, resulting in colloidal suspensions stable at pH 7 with similar aggregate size. No intracellular uptake was detected in cells incubated with neutral charged nanoparticles, while negative particles showed different behaviour depending on the nature of the coating. Thus, dimercaptosuccinic-coated nanoparticles showed low cellular uptake with non-toxic effects, while heparin-coated particles showed cellular uptake only at high nanoparticle concentrations and induced abnormal mitotic spindle configurations. Finally, cationic magnetic nanoparticles show excellent properties for possible in vivo biomedical applications such as cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cancer treatment by hyperthermia: (i) they enter into cells with high effectiveness, and are localized in endosomes; (ii) they can be easily detected inside cells by optical microscopy, (iii) they are retained for relatively long periods of time, and (iv) they do not induce any cytotoxicity.

  4. Internal Plasma Properties and Enhanced Performance of an 8 cm Ion Thruster Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    There is a need for a lightweight, low power ion thruster for space science missions. Such an ion thruster is under development at NASA Glenn Research Center. In an effort to better understand the discharge performance of this thruster. a version of this thruster with an anode containing electrically isolated electrodes at the cusps was fabricated and tested. Discharge characteristics of this ring cusp ion thruster were measured without ion beam extraction. Discharge current was measured at collection electrodes located at the cusps and at the anode body itself. Discharge performance and plasma properties were measured as a function of discharge power, which was varied between 20 and 50 W. It was found that ion production costs decreased by as much as 20 percent when the two most downstream cusp electrodes were allowed to float. Floating the electrodes did not give rise to a significant increase in discharge power even though the plasma density increased markedly. The improved performance is attributed to enhanced electron containment.

  5. Enhanced light absorption in GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, S. P.; Vernon, S. M.; Sanfacon, M. M.; Mastrovito, A.

    The use of epitaxial multilayer dielectric mirrors (Bragg reflectors) as back-surface reflectors in thin-film GaAs solar cells on GaAs and silicon substrates is investigated. Al0.3Ga0.9As/Al0.85Ga0.15As Bragg reflectors were grown by low-pressure MOCVD on GaAs substrates and shown to exhibit near-ideal optical reflectance and structural perfection. Thin GaAs solar cells grown on Bragg reflectors showed increases in short-circuit current (0.5 to 1.0 mA/sq cm) and efficiency (0.7 percentage points) relative to cells without back reflectors. Efficiencies of 24.7 percent at one sun AM1.5 were measured for GaAs cells only 2 microns thick on Bragg reflectors. In addition to the optical enhancements, Bragg reflectors also appear to improve the defect structure of GaAs-on-Si solar cells. This approach should lead to improved efficiency for GaAs-on-Si solar cells and improved radiation resistance on GaAs cells.

  6. Adaptive cellular structures and devices with internal features for enhanced structural performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontecorvo, Michael Eugene

    This dissertation aims to develop a family of cellular and repeatable devices that exhibit a variety of force-displacement behaviors. It is envisioned that these cellular structures might be used either as stand-alone elements, or combined and repeated to create multiple types of structures (i.e. buildings, ship hulls, vehicle subfloors, etc.) with the ability to passively or actively perform multiple functions (harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, modulus change) over a range of loading types, amplitudes, and frequencies. To accomplish this goal, this work combines repeatable structural frameworks, such as that provided by a hexagonal cellular structure, with internal structural elements such as springs, viscous dampers, buckling plates, bi-stable von Mises trusses (VMTs), and pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs). The repeatable framework serves to position damping and load carrying elements throughout the structure, and the configuration of the internal elements allow each cell to be tuned to exhibit a desired force-displacement response. Therefore, gradient structures or structures with variable load paths can be created for an optimal global response to a range of loads. This dissertation focuses on the development of cellular structures for three functions: combined load-carrying capability with harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, and cell modulus variation. One or more conceptual designs are presented for devices that can perform each of these functions, and both experimental measurements and simulations are used to gain a fundamental understanding of each device. Chapter 2 begins with a presentation of a VMT model that is the basis for many of the elements. The equations of motion for the VMT are derived and the static and dynamic behavior of the VMT are discussed in detail. Next, two metrics for the energy dissipation of the VMT - hysteresis loop area and loss factor - are presented. The responses of the VMT to harmonic displacement

  7. International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES): a community-based comprehensive services model for refugee children in resettlement.

    PubMed

    Birman, Dina; Beehler, Sarah; Harris, Emily Merrill; Everson, Mary Lynn; Batia, Karen; Liautaud, Joan; Frazier, Stacy; Atkins, Marc; Blanton, Shanika; Buwalda, Johanna; Fogg, Louis; Cappella, Elise

    2008-01-01

    The development of evidence-based mental health interventions for refugees is complicated by the cultural and linguistic diversity of the participants, and the need to balance treatment of past traumatic experiences with ongoing support during the process of acculturation. In an effort to gather "practice-based evidence" from existing mental health services for refugees, a collaborative study of International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES), a comprehensive, community-based mental health program working with refugee children, was conducted to describe the program participants and service delivery model and to assess whether participants improved over time as a function of services. Results showed that participants improved, but that the improvement was not related to dosage of services. Implications of these findings for refugee mental health services are discussed and suggestions are made for future evaluation research of mental health services with refugees. PMID:18444734

  8. Enhanced beam amplification in a photorefractive Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20} crystal by internal reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Khomenko, A.V.; Garcia-Weidner, A.; Tentori, D.

    1996-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that internal reflections of a signal and (or) a pump beam allow one to increase beam amplification by two-beam coupling in a long Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20} crystal. When fanning is negligible, we achieve an enhancement of the amplification by adjustment of the spatial period of the transformation of the beam{close_quote}s polarization states with periodic reflections of the beams on the crystal boundaries. For the case of strong fanning the fanned beam is redirected by the reflections on the crystal surface, which allows one to use it as a pump beam, thus increasing net amplification gain. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  9. CASSIOPE Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Small Satellite Mission: Space Plasma Observations and International Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A. W.; James, H. G.

    2009-06-01

    In-situ observation of the micro-scale characteristics of plasma acceleration and related outflow processes is a primary scientific target of the Canadian Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) small satellite mission. The e-POP instrument payload will include imaging plasma and neutral particle sensors, magnetometers, dual-frequency GPS receivers, CCD cameras, a radio wave receiver and a beacon transmitter. The imaging plasma sensors will measure particle distributions and the magnetometers will measure field-aligned currents on the time scale of 10 ms and spatial scale of ~100 m. The CCD cameras will perform auroral imaging on the time scale of 100 ms and at spatial (pixel) resolution up to 0.4 km. The GPS and radio-wave receivers will perform near real-time imaging studies of the ionosphere in conjunction with ground-based radars, and the beacon transmitter in conjunction with ground receiving stations. The e-POP payload will be flown on the Canadian CASSIOPE small satellite, which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 into a polar orbit (325×1500 km, 80° inclination). International collaboration is an important and integral part of the e-POP mission strategy. Two of the 8 e-POP science instruments will be contributed by JAXA/ISAS, Japan, and Naval Research Laboratory, USA, respectively. Many of the planned e-POP investigations will entail coordinated observations using Canadian as well as foreign ground facilities, including magnetic and optical observatories, radars and heaters, such as the HAARP facility in Alaska, the EISCAT radar, and the NSF Antarctic facility. International collaboration in these investigations is expected to significantly enhance the science returns of the e-POP mission.

  10. SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2011-01-19

    A collaborative study has been established under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management International Program between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, to investigate potential improvements in melt rate via chemical additions to the glass frit. Researchers at KRI suggested a methodology for selecting frit additives based on empirical coefficients for optimization of glass melting available in the Russian literature. Using these coefficients, KRI identified B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, and MnO as frit additives that were likely to improve melt rate without having adverse effects on crystallization of the glass or its chemical durability. The results of the melt rate testing in the SMK melter showed that the slurry feed rate (used as a gauge of melt rate) could be significantly increased when MnO or CuO were added to Frit 550 with the SMR-2 sludge. The feed rates increased by about 27% when MnO was added to the frit and by about 26% when CuO was added to the frit, as compared to earlier results for Frit 550 alone. The impact of adding additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the frit was minor when added with CuO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed a more significant, 39% improvement in melt rate when added with MnO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} also reduced the viscosity of the glasses during pouring. Samples of the glasses from the melt rate testing characterized at SRNL showed that there were no significant impacts on crystallization of the glasses. All of the glasses had very good chemical durability. Chemical composition measurements showed that the frit additives were present in concentrations below the targeted values in some of the glasses. Therefore, it is possible that higher concentrations of these additives may further improve melt rate, although the impacts of higher concentrations of these components on crystallization and durability would need to

  11. An Ultra-High Fluorescence Enhancement and High Throughput Assay for Revealing Expression and Internalization of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cheng, Tiantian; Xia, Yongqing; Lao, Jun; Ge, Baosheng; Ren, Hao; Khan, Naseer Ullah; Huang, Fang

    2016-04-18

    Revealing chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression, distribution, and internalization levels in different cancers helps to evaluate cancer progression or prognosis and to set personalized treatment strategy. We here describe a sensitive and high-throughput immunoassay for determining CXCR4 expression and distribution in cancer cells. The assay is accessible to a wide range of users in an ordinary lab only by dip-coating poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) spheres on the glass substrate. The self- assembled spheres form three-dimensional photonic colloidal crystals which enhance the fluorescence of CF647 and Alexa Fluor 647 by a factor of up to 1000. CXCR4 in cells is detected by using the sandwich immunoassay, where the primary antibody recognizes CXCR4 and the secondary antibody is labeled with CF647. With the newly established assay, we quantified the total expression of CXCR4, its distribution on the cell membrane and cytoplasm, and revealed their internalization level upon SDF-1α activation in various cancer cells, even for those with extremely low expression level. PMID:26879206

  12. Interprofessional Collaboration between Residents and Nurses in General Internal Medicine: A Qualitative Study on Behaviours Enhancing Teamwork Quality

    PubMed Central

    Muller-Juge, Virginie; Cullati, Stéphane; Blondon, Katherine S.; Hudelson, Patricia; Maître, Fabienne; Vu, Nu V.; Savoldelli, Georges L.; Nendaz, Mathieu R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective teamwork is necessary for optimal patient care. There is insufficient understanding of interactions between physicians and nurses on internal medicine wards. Objective To describe resident physicians’ and nurses’ actual behaviours contributing to teamwork quality in the setting of a simulated internal medicine ward. Methods A volunteer sample of 14 pairs of residents and nurses in internal medicine was asked to manage one non-urgent and one urgent clinical case in a simulated ward, using a high-fidelity manikin. After the simulation, participants attended a stimulated-recall session during which they viewed the videotape of the simulation and explained their actions and perceptions. All simulations were transcribed, coded, and analyzed, using a qualitative method (template analysis). Quality of teamwork was assessed, based on patient management efficiency and presence of shared management goals and of team spirit. Results Most resident-nurse pairs tended to interact in a traditional way, with residents taking the leadership and nurses executing medical prescriptions and assuming their own specific role. They also demonstrated different types of interactions involving shared responsibilities and decision making, constructive suggestions, active communication and listening, and manifestations of positive team building. The presence of a leader in the pair or a truly shared leadership between resident and nurse contributed to teamwork quality only if both members of the pair demonstrated sufficient autonomy. In case of a lack of autonomy of one member, the other member could compensate for it, if his/her own autonomy was sufficiently strong and if there were demonstrations of mutual listening, information sharing, and positive team building. Conclusions Although they often relied on traditional types of interaction, residents and nurses also demonstrated readiness for increased sharing of responsibilities. Interprofessional education should

  13. α-Hemolysin enhances Staphylococcus aureus internalization and survival within mast cells by modulating the expression of β1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Oliver; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Rohde, Manfred; Medina, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important sentinels of the host defence against invading pathogens. We previously reported that Staphylococcus aureus evaded the extracellular antimicrobial activities of MCs by promoting its internalization within these cells via β1 integrins. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing this process. We found that S. aureus responded to the antimicrobial mediators released by MCs by up-regulating the expression of α-hemolysin (Hla), fibronectin-binding protein A and several regulatory systems. We also found that S. aureus induced the up-regulation of β1 integrin expression on MCs and that this effect was mediated by Hla-ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10) interaction. Thus, deletion of Hla or inhibition of Hla-ADAM10 interaction significantly impaired S. aureus internalization within MCs. Furthermore, purified Hla but not the inactive HlaH35L induced up-regulation of β1 integrin expression in MCs in a dose-dependent manner. Our data support a model in which S. aureus counter-reacts the extracellular microbicidal mechanisms of MCs by increasing expression of fibronectin-binding proteins and by inducing Hla-ADAM10-mediated up-regulation of β1 integrin in MCs. The up-regulation of bacterial fibronectin-binding proteins, concomitantly with the increased expression of its receptor β1 integrin on the MCs, resulted in enhanced S. aureus internalization through the binding of fibronectin-binding proteins to integrin β1 via fibronectin. PMID:26595647

  14. Adaptive cellular structures and devices with internal features for enhanced structural performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontecorvo, Michael Eugene

    This dissertation aims to develop a family of cellular and repeatable devices that exhibit a variety of force-displacement behaviors. It is envisioned that these cellular structures might be used either as stand-alone elements, or combined and repeated to create multiple types of structures (i.e. buildings, ship hulls, vehicle subfloors, etc.) with the ability to passively or actively perform multiple functions (harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, modulus change) over a range of loading types, amplitudes, and frequencies. To accomplish this goal, this work combines repeatable structural frameworks, such as that provided by a hexagonal cellular structure, with internal structural elements such as springs, viscous dampers, buckling plates, bi-stable von Mises trusses (VMTs), and pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs). The repeatable framework serves to position damping and load carrying elements throughout the structure, and the configuration of the internal elements allow each cell to be tuned to exhibit a desired force-displacement response. Therefore, gradient structures or structures with variable load paths can be created for an optimal global response to a range of loads. This dissertation focuses on the development of cellular structures for three functions: combined load-carrying capability with harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, and cell modulus variation. One or more conceptual designs are presented for devices that can perform each of these functions, and both experimental measurements and simulations are used to gain a fundamental understanding of each device. Chapter 2 begins with a presentation of a VMT model that is the basis for many of the elements. The equations of motion for the VMT are derived and the static and dynamic behavior of the VMT are discussed in detail. Next, two metrics for the energy dissipation of the VMT - hysteresis loop area and loss factor - are presented. The responses of the VMT to harmonic displacement

  15. Dual Stimuli-Responsive Polymer Prodrugs Quantitatively Loaded by Nanoparticles for Enhanced Cellular Internalization and Triggered Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingming; Zhao, Kaijie; Wang, Lei; Lin, Shanqing; Li, Junjie; Chen, Jingbo; Zhao, Chengai; Ge, Zhishen

    2016-05-11

    Direct encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs into amphiphilic block copolymer micelles is frequently subjected to low drug loading efficiency (DLE) and loading content (DLC), as well as lower micellar stability and uncontrollable drug release. In this report, we prepare the copolymer prodrugs (PPEMA-co-PCPTM) via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of 2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl methacrylate (PEMA) and reduction-responsive CPT monomer (CPTM), which were quantitatively encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) micelles. The polymer prodrug-loaded nanoparticles showed high stability for a long time in aqueous solution or blood serum and even maintain similar size after a lyophilization-dissolution cycle. The tumoral pH (∼6.8)-responsive properties of PPEMA segments endow the micellar cores with triggered transition from neutral to positively charged and swellable properties. The PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles loading polymer prodrugs (PPEMA-b-PCPTM) eliminated burst drug release. Simultaneously, CPT drug release can be triggered by reductive agents and solution pH. At pH 6.8, efficient cellular internalization was achieved due to positively charged cores of the nanoparticles. As compared with nanoparticles loading PCPTM, higher cytotoxicity was observed by the nanoparticles loading PPEMA-b-PCPTM at pH 6.8. Further multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTs) penetration and growth suppression studies demonstrated that high-efficiency penetration capability and significant size shrinkage of MCTs were achieved after treatment by PPEMA-b-PCPTM-loaded nanoparticles at pH 6.8. Therefore, the responsive polymer prodrug encapsulation strategy represents an effective method to overcome the disadvantages of common hydrophobic drug encapsulation approaches by amphiphilic block copolymer micelles and simultaneously endows the nanoparticles with responsive drug release behaviors as well as enhanced cellular internalization and

  16. Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

    1992-01-01

    As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations

  17. Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

    As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations

  18. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate

    PubMed Central

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z′-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization. PMID:26617570

  19. Photochemical internalization (PCI) enhanced nonviral transfection of tumor suppressor and pro-drug activating genes; a potential treatment modality for gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen; Kwon, Young Jik; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    The overall objective of the research is to investigate the utility of photochemical internalization for the enhanced nonviral transfection of genes into cells. We have examined, in detail, the evaluation of photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral introduction of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and the PCI mediated transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) pro drug activating gene into glioma cell monolayers and multi-cell tumor spheroids. Expression of the CD gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).

  20. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017. PMID:26203423

  1. Altered synthetic response of Campylobacter jejuni to cocultivation with human epithelial cells is associated with enhanced internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, M E; Cieplak, W

    1992-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni has been shown to bind to and enter epithelial cells in culture. The interaction of C. jejuni with INT 407 epithelial cells was examined to determine whether bacterial protein synthesis is required for either binding or internalization. Chloramphenicol, a selective inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis, significantly reduced the internalization, but not binding, of C. jejuni compared with untreated controls as determined by protection from gentamicin. Electrophoretic analysis of metabolically labeled proteins revealed that C. jejuni cultured with INT 407 cells synthesized 14 proteins that were not detected in organisms cultured in medium alone. The inhibitory effect of chloramphenicol on internalization was reduced by preincubation of C. jejuni with INT 407 cells. The results indicate that C. jejuni, like some other enteric pathogens, engages in a directed response to cocultivation with epithelial cells by synthesizing one or more proteins that facilitate internalization and suggest that this phenomenon is relevant to the pathogenesis of enteritis caused by C. jejuni. Images PMID:1399005

  2. Enhancing Research Ethics Review Systems in Egypt: The Focus of an International Training Program Informed by an Ecological Developmental Approach to Enhancing Research Ethics Capacity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Hillary Anne; Hifnawy, Tamer; Silverman, Henry

    2015-12-01

    Recently, training programs in research ethics have been established to enhance individual and institutional capacity in research ethics in the developing world. However, commentators have expressed concern that the efforts of these training programs have placed 'too great an emphasis on guidelines and research ethics review', which will have limited effect on ensuring ethical conduct in research. What is needed instead is a culture of ethical conduct supported by national and institutional commitment to ethical practices that are reinforced by upstream enabling conditions (strong civil society, public accountability, and trust in basic transactional processes), which are in turn influenced by developmental conditions (basic freedoms of political freedoms, economic facilities, social opportunities, transparency guarantees, and protective security). Examining this more inclusive understanding of the determinants of ethical conduct enhances at once both an appreciation of the limitations of current efforts of training programs in research ethics and an understanding of what additional training elements are needed to enable trainees to facilitate national and institutional policy changes that enhance research practices. We apply this developmental model to a training program focused in Egypt to describe examples of such additional training activities. PMID:24894063

  3. Visual Literacy--Enhancing Human Potential. Readings from the 15th Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D., Ed.; And Others

    This document includes 46 papers presented at the International Visual Literacy Association Conference on topics ranging from prehistoric cave paintings to technology of the future. Major sections are devoted to research and theory, education, computer technology, and phototherapy. Emphasis is on increased understanding of opportunities available…

  4. Enhancing the International Business Curriculum through Partnership with the United States Department of Commerce: The "E" Award Internship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Management education has been subjected to scrutiny and criticism over its lack of relevance to the "real world" of management practice. In response, many institutions have developed and, in some cases, require students to complete an internship as part of their degree requirements. International business is a field of study where internships can…

  5. Integrated Logistics Support Analysis of the International Space Station Alpha: An Overview of the Maintenance Time Dependent Parameter Prediction Methods Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepehry-Fard, F.; Coulthard, Maurice H.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this publication is to introduce the enhancement methods for the overall reliability and maintainability methods of assessment on the International Space Station. It is essential that the process to predict the values of the maintenance time dependent variable parameters such as mean time between failure (MTBF) over time do not in themselves generate uncontrolled deviation in the results of the ILS analysis such as life cycle costs, spares calculation, etc. Furthermore, the very acute problems of micrometeorite, Cosmic rays, flares, atomic oxygen, ionization effects, orbital plumes and all the other factors that differentiate maintainable space operations from non-maintainable space operations and/or ground operations must be accounted for. Therefore, these parameters need be subjected to a special and complex process. Since reliability and maintainability strongly depend on the operating conditions that are encountered during the entire life of the International Space Station, it is important that such conditions are accurately identified at the beginning of the logistics support requirements process. Environmental conditions which exert a strong influence on International Space Station will be discussed in this report. Concurrent (combined) space environments may be more detrimental to the reliability and maintainability of the International Space Station than the effects of a single environment. In characterizing the logistics support requirements process, the developed design/test criteria must consider both the single and/or combined environments in anticipation of providing hardware capability to withstand the hazards of the International Space Station profile. The effects of the combined environments (typical) in a matrix relationship on the International Space Station will be shown. The combinations of the environments where the total effect is more damaging than the cumulative effects of the environments acting singly, may include a

  6. Internalization of the Extracellular Full-Length Tau Inside Neuro2A and Cortical Cells Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Mathilde; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ris, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Tau protein is mainly intracellular. However, several studies have demonstrated that full-length Tau can be released into the interstitial fluid of the brain. The physiological or pathological function of this extracellular Tau remains unknown. Moreover, as evidence suggests, extracellular Tau aggregates can be internalized by neurons, seeding Tau aggregation. However, much less is known about small species of Tau. In this study, we hypothesized that the status of phosphorylation could alter the internalization of recombinant Tau in Neuro2A and cortical cells. Our preliminary results revealed that the highly phosphorylated form of Tau entered the cells ten times more easily than a low phosphorylated one. This suggests that hyperphosphorylated Tau protein could spread between neurons in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27548242

  7. Internally labeled Cy3/Cy5 DNA constructs show greatly enhanced photo-stability in single-molecule FRET experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonbae; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA constructs labeled with cyanine fluorescent dyes are important substrates for single-molecule (sm) studies of the functional activity of protein–DNA complexes. We previously studied the local DNA backbone fluctuations of replication fork and primer–template DNA constructs labeled with Cy3/Cy5 donor–acceptor Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) chromophore pairs and showed that, contrary to dyes linked ‘externally’ to the bases with flexible tethers, direct ‘internal’ (and rigid) insertion of the chromophores into the sugar-phosphate backbones resulted in DNA constructs that could be used to study intrinsic and protein-induced DNA backbone fluctuations by both smFRET and sm Fluorescent Linear Dichroism (smFLD). Here we show that these rigidly inserted Cy3/Cy5 chromophores also exhibit two additional useful properties, showing both high photo-stability and minimal effects on the local thermodynamic stability of the DNA constructs. The increased photo-stability of the internal labels significantly reduces the proportion of false positive smFRET conversion ‘background’ signals, thereby simplifying interpretations of both smFRET and smFLD experiments, while the decreased effects of the internal probes on local thermodynamic stability also make fluctuations sensed by these probes more representative of the unperturbed DNA structure. We suggest that internal probe labeling may be useful in studies of many DNA–protein interaction systems. PMID:24627223

  8. Post-Polio Health International including International Ventilator Users Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... post-polio.org. Check out International Ventilator Users Network Post-Polio Health International's mission is to enhance ... Polio Health International (PHI) Including International Ventilator Users Network 4207 Lindell Blvd., #110, Saint Louis, MO 63108- ...

  9. Enhanced internal quantum efficiency and light extraction efficiency from textured GaN/AlGaN quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cabalu, J.S.; Thomidis, C.; Moustakas, T.D.; Riyopoulos, S.; Zhou Lin; Smith, David J.

    2006-03-15

    GaN/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on randomly textured and atomically smooth (0001) GaN templates. Smooth and textured GaN templates were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by varying the III/V ratio and the substrate temperature during growth by the hydride vapor-phase epitaxy method. We find that the MQWs replicate the texture of the GaN template, which was found to have a Gaussian distribution. The peak photoluminescence intensity from the textured MQWs is always higher than from the smooth MQWs and for GaN (7 nm)/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N (8 nm) MQWs, it is 700 times higher than that from similarly produced MQWs on smooth GaN templates. This result is attributed partly to the enhancement in light extraction efficiency and partly to the enhancement in internal quantum efficiency. The origin of the increase in internal quantum efficiency is partly due to the reduction of the quantum-confined Stark effect, since the polarization vector intersects the quantum well (QW) planes at angles smaller than 90 deg. , and partly due to the charge redistribution in the QWs caused by the polarization component parallel to the planes of the QWs.

  10. Enhanced Fenton-like removal of nitrobenzene via internal microelectrolysis in nano zerovalent iron/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sihai; Wu, Yaoguo; Yao, Hairui; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of Fenton-like catalysis using nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) is limited by nZVI aggregation and activity loss due to inactive ferric oxide forming on the nZVI surface, which hinders electron transfer. A novel iron-carbon composite catalyst consisting of nZVI and granular activated carbon (GAC), which can undergo internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis spontaneously, was successfully fabricated by the adsorption-reduction method. The catalyst efficiency was evaluated in nitrobenzene (NB) removal via the Fenton-like process (H2O2-nZVI/GAC). The results showed that nZVI/GAC composite was good for dispersing nZVI on the surface of GAC, which permitted much better removal efficiency (93.0%) than nZVI (31.0%) or GAC (20.0%) alone. Moreover, iron leaching decreased from 1.28 to 0.58 mg/L after reaction of 240 min and the oxidation kinetic of the Fenton-like reaction can be described well by the second-order reaction kinetic model (R2=0.988). The composite catalyst showed sustainable catalytic ability and GAC performed as a medium for electron transfer in internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis to promote Fe2+ regeneration and Fe3+/Fe2+ cycles. Therefore, this study represents an important method to design a low cost and high efficiency Fenton-like catalyst in practical application. PMID:26744946

  11. Enhancing the Quantitative Representation of Socioeconomic Conditions in the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) using the International Futures Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, D. S.; Siraj, A.; Hughes, B.

    2013-12-01

    The international research community is currently in the process of developing new scenarios for climate change research. One component of these scenarios are the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs), which describe a set of possible future socioeconomic conditions. These are presented in narrative storylines with associated quantitative drivers. The core quantitative drivers include total population, average GDP per capita, educational attainment, and urbanization at the global, regional, and national levels. At the same time there have been calls, particularly by the IAV community, for the SSPs to include additional quantitative information on other key social factors, such as income inequality, governance, health, and access to key infrastructures, which are discussed in the narratives. The International Futures system (IFs), based at the Pardee Center at the University of Denver, is able to provide forecasts of many of these indicators. IFs cannot use the SSP drivers as exogenous inputs, but we are able to create development pathways that closely reproduce the core quantitative drivers defined by the different SSPs, as well as incorporating assumptions on other key driving factors described in the qualitative narratives. In this paper, we present forecasts for additional quantitative indicators based upon the implementation of the SSP development pathways in IFs. These results will be of value to many researchers.

  12. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization. PMID:27060485

  13. Hydrogen sulfide augments neutrophil migration through enhancement of adhesion molecule expression and prevention of CXCR2 internalization: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; Cunha, Thiago M; Freitas, Andressa; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Souto, Fabrício O; Fukada, Sandra Y; Grespan, Renata; Alencar, Nylane M N; Neto, Alberto F; Rossi, Marcos A; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Hothersall, John S; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we have addressed the role of H(2)S in modulating neutrophil migration in either innate (LPS-challenged naive mice) or adaptive (methylated BSA (mBSA)-challenged immunized mice) immune responses. Treatment of mice with H(2)S synthesis inhibitors, dl-propargylglycine (PAG) or beta-cyanoalanine, reduced neutrophil migration induced by LPS or methylated BSA (mBSA) into the peritoneal cavity and by mBSA into the femur/tibial joint of immunized mice. This effect was associated with decreased leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on endothelium. Predictably, treatment of animals with the H(2)S donors, NaHS or Lawesson's reagent, enhanced these parameters. Moreover, the NaHS enhancement of neutrophil migration was not observed in ICAM-1-deficient mice. Neither PAG nor NaHS treatment changed LPS-induced CD18 expression on neutrophils, nor did the LPS- and mBSA-induced release of neutrophil chemoattractant mediators TNF-alpha, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and LTB(4). Furthermore, in vitro MIP-2-induced neutrophil chemotaxis was inhibited by PAG and enhanced by NaHS treatments. Accordingly, MIP-2-induced CXCR2 internalization was enhanced by PAG and inhibited by NaHS treatments. Moreover, NaHS prevented MIP-2-induced CXCR2 desensitization. The PAG and NaHS effects correlated, respectively, with the enhancement and inhibition of MIP-2-induced G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression. The effects of NaHS on neutrophil migration both in vivo and in vitro, together with CXCR2 internalization and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression were prevented by the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)(+)) channel blocker, glybenclamide. Conversely, diazoxide, a K(ATP)(+) channel opener, increased neutrophil migration in vivo. Together, our data suggest that during the inflammatory response, H(2)S augments neutrophil adhesion and locomotion, by a mechanism dependent on K(ATP)(+) channels. PMID:18768887

  14. Enhancing interprofessional education and practice: Development and implementation of a new graduate-level course using the international classification of functioning, disability, and health.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tram; Fayed, Nora; Gorter, Jan Willem; MacDermid, Joy

    2016-05-01

    Since the introduction of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), there is increasing awareness among health professionals to consider a biopsychosocial approach to patients' health and functioning. Although diffusion of the ICF as a concept is widely recognized, application of the ICF within health education and practice requires attention, training, and support. This article describes the development and implementation of a new graduate-level course using the ICF to assist health professionals and graduate trainees in rehabilitation. The innovation behind this course is its focus on application of the ICF in research and practice through a combination of peer support and instructor mentorship. The value of the ICF for interprofessional education, research, and practice includes promotion of a broad perspective to health, application of theory in practice, and enhanced communication and collaboration in healthcare. PMID:27028165

  15. The midterm outcome and MACE of robotically enhanced grafting of left anterior descending artery with left internal mammary artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed the midterm outcome and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events in UK’s largest Da Vinci assisted robotic coronary revascularisation cohort. This study was set up at the Imperial College NHS Trust, St. Mary’s Hospital, London, United Kingdom. Method Benchmarking approach through retrospective audit of the regional outcomes against standards in the published literature. Data was collected from the patient’s records, communication with the primary care physicians and the national strategic tracing service. The results were compared with the published literature. Patients who underwent robotic assisted coronary revascularisation were included. Other robotic procedures or minimally invasive revascularisation without the use of the Da Vinci robot were excluded. The main outcome measure was the midterm survival up to five years and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) up to three years. Results Since April 2002, one hundred consecutive patients underwent either off pump robotic assisted single vessel small thoracotomy (SVST, n = 88), or off pump total endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TCAB, n = 12). All patients were operated on by the same primary surgeon but different assisting surgeons. All patients received a left internal mammary arterial (LIMA) graft as planned. The primary outcome of total one month and three years MACE and up to five year survival was 0, 9 and 96% respectively. Conclusions The procedural success rates in terms of morbidity and mortality up to five years are compatible to the outcomes observed outside the United Kingdom. These results are not inferior to that of conventional off pump single vessel coronary surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention to the LAD. PMID:24438127

  16. Enhancing our Understanding of the Arctic Atmospheric Hydrological Cycle using Observations from an International Arctic Water Vapor Isotope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Werner, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the role of water vapor and clouds in positive feedback mechanisms, water vapor is a key player in the future of Arctic climate. Ecosystems and human societies are vulnerable to climate change through even minor changes in precipitation patterns, including the occurrence of extreme events. It is therefore essential to monitor, understand and model correctly the mechanisms of transport of moisture, at the regional scale. Water isotopes - the relative abundance of heavy and light water in the atmosphere - hold the key to understanding the physical processes influencing future Arctic climate. Water isotope observations in the atmosphere are a modern analog to the Rosetta Stone for understanding the processes involved in evaporation, moisture transport, cloud formation and to track moisture origin. Indeed, technological progress now allows continuous, in situ or remote sensing monitoring of water isotopic composition. In parallel, a growing number of atmospheric circulation models are equipped with the explicit modeling of water stable isotopes, allowing evaluation at the process scale. We present here data obtained through national or bi-national initiatives from stations onboard an icebreaker and land based stations in Greenland, Iceland, Svalbard, and Siberia - together forming an emerging international Arctic water vapor isotope network. Using water tagging and back trajectories we show water vapor of Arctic origin to have a high d-excess fingerprint. This show the potential of using water vapor isotopes as tracer for changes in the Arctic hydrological cycle. Using the network of monitoring stations we quantify using the isotopes advection of air masses and the key processes affecting the water vapor en-route between stations. We have successfully used the obtained atmospheric water vapor isotope observations to benchmark isotope-enabled general circulation models. This comparison allows us to address key processes of the atmospheric hydrological cycle for

  17. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Jin Lee, Seung; Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok; Park, Jong-Chul

    2013-08-01

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH2 (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and -N=CH (400.80 eV) and -NH3+ (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.

  18. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Park, Jong-Chul; Jin Lee, Seung; Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok

    2013-08-21

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH{sub 2} (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH{sub 3}{sup +} (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.

  19. An immersive “simulation week” enhances clinical performance of incoming surgical interns improved performance persists at 6 months follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pritam; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Pucher, Philip H.; Hashimoto, Daniel A.; Beyer-Berjot, Laura; Bharathan, Rasiah; Middleton, Katherine E.; Jones, Joanne; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background The transition from student to intern can be challenging. The “August” or “July effect” describes increased errors and reduced patient safety during this transition. The study objectives were to develop, pilot, and evaluate clinical performance after an immersive simulation course for incoming interns. Methods Graduating students were recruited for a 1-week immersive simulation course. Controls received no simulation training. Primary outcome (at baseline, and 1 and 6 months) was clinical performance on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) of clinical procedures and surgical technical skills. Secondary outcomes were self-reported confidence and clinical procedure logbook data. Results Nineteen students were recruited. Sixteen completed the 6-month follow-up, 10 in the intervention group and 6 in the control group. No differences were demonstrated between interventions and controls at baseline (OSCE [median, 66 vs 78; P = .181], technical skills [48 vs 52.5; P = .381], and confidence [101 vs 96; P = .368]). Interventions outperformed controls at 1 month (OSCE [111 vs 82; P = .001], technical skills [78.5 vs 63; P = .030], and confidence [142 vs 119; P < .001]), and 6 months (OSCE [107 vs 93; P = .007], technical skills [92.5 vs 69; P = .044], and confidence [148 vs 129; P = .022]). No differences were observed in numbers of clinical procedures performed at 1 (P = .958), 4 (P = .093), or 6 months (P = .713). Conclusion The immersive simulation course objectively improved subjects’ clinical skills, technical skills, and confidence. Despite similar clinical experience as controls, the intervention group’s improved performance persisted at 6 months follow-up. This feasible and effective intervention to ease transition from student to intern could reduce errors and enhance patient safety. PMID:25633735

  20. Experimental investigation of certain internal condensing and boiling flows: Their sensitivity to pressure fluctuations and heat transfer enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivisalu, Michael Toomas

    Space-based (satellite, scientific probe, space station, etc.) and millimeter -- to -- micro-scale (such as are used in high power electronics cooling, weapons cooling in aircraft, etc.) condensers and boilers are shear/pressure driven. They are of increasing interest to system engineers for thermal management because flow boilers and flow condensers offer both high fluid flow-rate-specific heat transfer capacity and very low thermal resistance between the fluid and the heat exchange surface, so large amounts of heat may be removed using reasonably-sized devices without the need for excessive temperature differences. However, flow stability issues and degredation of performance of shear/pressure driven condensers and boilers due to non-desireable flow morphology over large portions of their lengths have mostly prevented their use in these applications. This research is part of an ongoing investigation seeking to close the gap between science and engineering by analyzing two key innovations which could help address these problems. First, it is recommended that the condenser and boiler be operated in an innovative flow configuration which provides a non-participating core vapor stream to stabilize the annular flow regime throughout the device length, accomplished in an energy-efficient manner by means of ducted vapor re-circulation. This is demonstrated experimentally.. Second, suitable pulsations applied to the vapor entering the condenser or boiler (from the re-circulating vapor stream) greatly reduce the thermal resistance of the already effective annular flow regime. For experiments reported here, application of pulsations increased time-averaged heat-flux up to 900 % at a location within the flow condenser and up to 200 % at a location within the flow boiler, measured at the heat-exchange surface. Traditional fully condensing flows, reported here for comparison purposes, show similar heat-flux enhancements due to imposed pulsations over a range of frequencies

  1. Internal-Modified Dithiol DNA-Directed Au Nanoassemblies: Geometrically Controlled Self-Assembly and Quantitative Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Properties.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuan; Shan, Hangyong; Li, Min; Chen, Shu; Liu, Jianyu; Cheng, Yanfang; Ye, Cui; Yang, Zhilin; Lai, Xuandi; Hu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a hierarchical DNA-directed self-assembly strategy to construct structure-controlled Au nanoassemblies (NAs) has been demonstrated by conjugating Au nanoparticles (NPs) with internal-modified dithiol single-strand DNA (ssDNA) (Au-B-A or A-B-Au-B-A). It is found that the dithiol-ssDNA-modified Au NPs and molecule quantity of thiol-modified ssDNA grafted to Au NPs play critical roles in the assembly of geometrically controlled Au NAs. Through matching Au-DNA self-assembly units, geometrical structures of the Au NAs can be tailored from one-dimensional (1D) to quasi-2D and 2D. Au-B-A conjugates readily give 1D and quasi-2D Au NAs while 2D Au NAs can be formed by A-B-Au-B-A building blocks. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements and 3D finite-difference time domain (3D-FDTD) calculation results indicate that the geometrically controllable Au NAs have regular and linearly "hot spots"-number-depended SERS properties. For a certain number of NPs, the number of "hot spots" and accordingly enhancement factor of Au NAs can be quantitatively evaluated, which open a new avenue for quantitative analysis based on SERS technique. PMID:26581251

  2. Measuring the morphology and density of internally mixed black carbon with SP2 and VTDMA: new insight into the absorption enhancement of black carbon in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Kecorius, Simonas; Wang, Zhibin; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong; Wiedensohler, Alfred; He, Kebin

    2016-04-01

    The morphology and density of black carbon (BC) cores in internally mixed BC (In-BC) particles affect their mixing state and absorption enhancement. In this work, we developed a new method to measure the morphology and effective density of the BC cores of ambient In-BC particles using a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) during the CAREBeijing-2013 campaign from 8 to 27 July 2013 at Xianghe Observatory. This new measurement system can select size-resolved ambient In-BC particles and measure the mobility diameter and mass of the In-BC cores. The morphology and effective density of the ambient In-BC cores are then calculated. For the In-BC cores in the atmosphere, changes in their dynamic shape factor (χ) and effective density (ρeff) can be characterized as a function of the aging process (Dp/Dc) measured by SP2 and VTDMA. During an intensive field study, the ambient In-BC cores had an average shape factor χ of ˜ 1.2 and an average density of ˜ 1.2 g cm-3, indicating that ambient In-BC cores have a near-spherical shape with an internal void of ˜ 30 %. From the measured morphology and density, the average shell / core ratio and absorption enhancement (Eab) of ambient BC were estimated to be 2.1-2.7 and 1.6-1.9, respectively, for In-BC particles with sizes of 200-350 nm. When the In-BC cores were assumed to have a void-free BC sphere with a density of 1.8 g cm-3, the shell / core ratio and Eab were overestimated by ˜ 13 and ˜ 17 %, respectively. The new approach developed in this work improves the calculations of the mixing state and optical properties of ambient In-BC particles by quantifying the changes in the morphology and density of ambient In-BC cores during aging.

  3. Enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins: experiences from the Lower Mekong River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douven, W.; Mul, M. L.; Álvarez, B. F.; Son, L. H.; Bakker, N.; Radosevich, G.; van der Zaag, P.

    2012-03-01

    This paper analyses the design and impact of capacity building programmes aimed at enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins. Case study is a programme developed by the Mekong River Commission (MRC). A post training evaluation was applied to assess its impact in terms of individual capacity enhancement and change (use and application of knowledge, factors hampering application, and change in function and opportunities within their organisation). The design of the Capacity Building Programme of the MRC Flood Management and Mitigation Programme showed a well balanced range of subjects (such as IWRM, models and decision support systems and international water law) which are required for such an integrated topic. The post training evaluation, 6 months after the last training workshop, showed the increase in familiarity of the topics for all 37 respondents, with highest increase for the respondents with few years of working experience and from training and educational institutions. The relevance of the subjects taught is shown by the fact that 95% of the respondents indicated they saw the relevance of the subjects and 78% had already used some knowledge acquired in their job. The respondents also indicated that they did not have sufficient opportunities to apply all knowledge acquired. The phased implementation and training of lecturers during the training workshops, had a good impact, directly through increasing involvement in facilitation and delivery of the capacity building programme and through the use of the knowledge gained in short courses and development of curricula at their training institute. For these types of capacity building programmes, a few recommendations can be made. The selection of participants is crucial for the application of the learned knowledge in their work. The integrative nature of transboundary water issues calls for a capacity building programme addressing a

  4. Enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins: experiences from the Lower Mekong River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douven, W.; Mul, M. L.; Fernández-Álvarez, B.; Hung, S. Lam; Bakker, N.; Radosevich, G.; van der Zaag, P.

    2012-09-01

    This paper analyses the design and impact of capacity building programmes aimed at enhancing capacities of riparian professionals to address and resolve transboundary issues in international river basins. The case study is a programme developed by the Mekong River Commission (MRC). A post-training evaluation was applied to assess its impact in terms of individual capacity enhancement and change (use and application of knowledge, factors hampering application, and change in function and opportunities within the organisation). The design of the Capacity Building Programme of the MRC Flood Management and Mitigation Programme required a well balanced range of subjects (such as IWRM (integrated water resources management), model and decision support systems, and international water law). The post-training evaluation, 6 months after the last training workshop, showed an increase in familiarity with the topics for all 37 respondents, with the highest increase for the respondents with few years of working experience and from training and education institutions. The relevance of the subjects taught was highlighted by 95% of the respondents, and 78% of the participants had already used some of the acquired knowledge in their job. The respondents indicated that they did not have sufficient opportunities to apply all knowledge. The phased implementation and training of lecturers during the training workshops had a good impact, directly through increasing involvement in facilitation and delivery of the capacity building programme and through the use of the knowledge gained in short courses and development of curricula at their institute. For these types of capacity building programmes, a few recommendations can be made. The selection of participants is crucial for the application of the learned knowledge in their work. The integrative nature of transboundary water issues calls for a capacity building programme addressing a wide range of subjects, which can be understood by a

  5. Enhanced capture of healthcare-related harms and injuries in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    PubMed

    Southern, Danielle A; Pincus, Harold A; Romano, Patrick S; Burnand, Bernard; Harrison, James; Forster, Alan J; Moskal, Lori; Quan, Hude; Droesler, Saskia E; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Colin, Cyrille; Gurevich, Yana; Brien, Susan E; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Üstün, Bedirhan; Ghali, William A

    2016-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) plans to submit the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) to the World Health Assembly in 2018. The WHO is working toward a revised classification system that has an enhanced ability to capture health concepts in a manner that reflects current scientific evidence and that is compatible with contemporary information systems. In this paper, we present recommendations made to the WHO by the ICD revision's Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group (Q&S TAG) for a new conceptual approach to capturing healthcare-related harms and injuries in ICD-coded data. The Q&S TAG has grouped causes of healthcare-related harm and injuries into four categories that relate to the source of the event: (a) medications and substances, (b) procedures, (c) devices and (d) other aspects of care. Under the proposed multiple coding approach, one of these sources of harm must be coded as part of a cluster of three codes to depict, respectively, a healthcare activity as a 'source' of harm, a 'mode or mechanism' of harm and a consequence of the event summarized by these codes (i.e. injury or harm). Use of this framework depends on the implementation of a new and potentially powerful code-clustering mechanism in ICD-11. This new framework for coding healthcare-related harm has great potential to improve the clinical detail of adverse event descriptions, and the overall quality of coded health data. PMID:26660444

  6. Dilute nitride resonant cavity enhanced photodetector with internal gain for the λ ∼ 1.3 μm optical communications window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkan, N.; Erol, A.; Sarcan, F.; Al-Ghuraibawi, L. F. F.; Nordin, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a novel dilute nitride-based resonant cavity enhanced photodetector (RCEPD) operating at 1.286 μm. The RCEPD was fabricated using 21 pairs top and 24 pairs bottom GaAs/AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors for mirrors and 7 nm thick nine GaAs/Ga0.65In0.35N0.02 As0.98 quantum wells as the absorption region. For a 15 μm diameter window, the photocurrent at 1.286 μm is 27 μA and 42 μA, at V = 0 and -1 V, respectively, whereas the dark current is as low as 1.7 nA at -1 V. At the operating wavelength, an excellent wavelength selectivity with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 nm, and a high quantum efficiency of 43% are demonstrated. The device exhibits significant internal gain at very small reverse bias voltages of V ⩾ -2 V with an overall quantum efficiency of 67%. These are the best ever recorded values for a dilute nitride RCEPD.

  7. Enhancement of Medical Interns' Levels of Clinical Skills Competence and Self-Confidence Levels via Video iPods: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Designing and delivering evidence-based medical practice for students requires careful consideration from medical science educators. Social Web (Web 2.0) applications are a part of today’s educational technology milieu; however, empirical research is lacking to support the impact of interactive Web 2.0 mobile applications on medical educational outcomes. Objectives The aim of our study was to determine whether instructional videos provided by iPod regarding female and male urinary catheter insertion would increase students’ confidence levels and enhance skill competencies. Methods We conducted a prospective study with medical trainee intern (TI) participants: 10 control participants (no technological intervention) and 11 intervention participants (video iPods). Before taking part in a skills course, they completed a questionnaire regarding previous exposure to male and female urinary catheterization and their level of confidence in performing the skills. Directly following the questionnaire, medical faculty provided a 40-minute skills demonstration in the Advanced Clinical Skills Centre (ACSC) laboratory at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. All participants practiced the skills following the demonstrations and were immediately evaluated by the same faculty using an assessment rubric. Following the clinical skill evaluation, participants completed a postcourse questionnaire regarding skill confidence levels. At the end of the skills course, the intervention group were provided video iPods and viewed a male and a female urinary catheterization video during the next 3 consecutive months. The control group did not receive educational technology interventions during the 3-month period. At the end of 3 months, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire and a clinical assessment of urinary catheterization skills at the ACSC lab. Results The results indicate a decline in skill competency over time among the control group for both male and female

  8. Increased sensitivity of glioma cells to 5-fluorocytosine following photo-chemical internalization enhanced nonviral transfection of the cytosine deaminase suicide gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Chun, Changho; Kwon, Young Jik; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-05-01

    Despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the outcomes of patients with GBM have not significantly improved. Tumor recurrence in the resection margins occurs in more than 80% of cases indicating aggressive treatment modalities, such as gene therapy are warranted. We have examined photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene into glioma cells. The CD gene encodes an enzyme that can convert the nontoxic antifungal agent, 5-fluorocytosine, into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Multicell tumor spheroids derived from established rat and human glioma cell lines were used as in vitro tumor models. Plasmids containing either the CD gene alone or together with the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (UPRT) gene combined with the gene carrier protamine sulfate were employed in all experiments.PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS2a and 670 nm laser irradiance. Protamine sulfate/CD DNA polyplexes proved nontoxic but inefficient transfection agents due to endosomal entrapment. In contrast, PCI mediated CD gene transfection resulted in a significant inhibition of spheroid growth in the presence of, but not in the absence of, 5-FC. Repetitive PCI induced transfection was more efficient at low CD plasmid concentration than single treatment. The results clearly indicate that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance transfection of a tumor suicide gene such as CD, in malignant glioma cells and cells transfected with both the CD and UPRT genes had a pronounced bystander effect. PMID:24610460

  9. International Perspectives on Fieldcourses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairn, Karen; Higgitt, David; Vanneste, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Considers the context of internationalism for the enhancement of fieldwork practices. Discusses whether fieldcourses are valuable experiences. Addresses specific issues affecting internationalisation of fieldcourses, such as financial considerations, sharing courses (staff and resources), overseas fieldtrips and expeditions, safety, and student…

  10. The enhanced Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program: The relationship between internalizing symptoms and family functioning in children aged 9–11 years old

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Patricia; Rooney, Rosanna M.; Kane, Robert T.; Hassan, Sharinaz; Nesa, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The family context plays a critical role in the health of the child. This was the first study to examine the usefulness of the General Functioning subscale of the Family Assessment Device (FAD-GF) in assessing family functioning and its relationship to internalizing symptoms in school-aged children aged between 9 and 11 years of age. Eight hundred and forty-seven year 4 and 5 students from 13 schools (607 intervention students, and 240 control students) participated in the Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills Program (AO-PTS) – a universal school-based program targeting internalizing symptoms. Students rated how ‘healthy’ they perceived their family to be at pre-test and at 6-months follow-up. Although some aspects of validity and reliability could be improved, results indicated that perceptions of family functioning at pre-test were predictive of internalizing symptoms at the 6-months follow-up. The FAD-GF therefore showed promise as a potential measure of family functioning for children as young as 9 years old. Regardless of children’s pre-test levels of perceived family functioning, no intervention effects were found on the anxiety and depression scales; this finding suggests that child perceptions of family functioning may act as a general protective factor against internalizing symptomology. PMID:25983698

  11. Beyond the Classroom: International Education and the Community College. Volume IV. Working with Local Business To Enhance Asian-Pacific Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, Robert W., Ed.; Shimabukuro, James N., Ed.

    Part of a four-volume set in which community college educators discuss their efforts to internationalize the educational experience of the students and communities they serve, volume IV in this series focuses on the growing importance of community colleges in providing short-term, intensive training in international business and intercultural…

  12. SIB-DOTA: A trifunctional prosthetic group potentially amenable for multi-modal labeling that enhances tumor uptake of internalizing monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, G.; White, B. J.; Affleck, D.J.; Zhao, X.G.; Welsh, P.C.; McDougald, D.; Choi, J.; Zalutsky, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    A major drawback of internalizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) radioiodinated with direct electrophilic approaches is that tumor retention of radioactivity is compromised by the rapid washout of iodo-tyrosine, the primary labeled catabolite for mAbs labeled via this strategy. In our continuing efforts to develop more versatile residualizing labels that could overcome this problem, we have designed SIB-DOTA, a prosthetic labeling template that combines the features of the prototypical, dehalogenation resistant N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate (SIB) with DOTA, a useful macrocyclic chelator for labeling with radiometals. Herein we describe the synthesis of the unlabeled standard of this prosthetic moiety, its protected tin precursor, and radioiodinated SIB-DOTA. An anti-EGFRvIII-reactive mAb, L8A4 was radiolabeled with [131I]SIB-DOTA in 27.1 ± 6.2% (n = 2) conjugation yields and its targeting properties to the same mAb labeled with [125I]SGMIB both in vitro and in vivo using U87MG·ΔEGFR cells and xenografts were compared. In vitro paired-label internalization assays showed that the intracellular radioactivity from [131I]SIB-DOTA-L8A4 was 21.4 ± 0.5% and 26.2 ± 1.1% of initially bound radioactivity at 16 and 24 h, respectively. In comparison, these values for [125I]SGMIB-L8A4 were 16.7 ± 0.5% and 14.9 ± 1.1%. Similarly, the SIB-DOTA prosthetic group provided better tumor targeting in vivo than SGMIB over 8 d period. These results suggest that SIB-DOTA warrants further evaluation as a residualizing agent for labeling internalizing mAbs including those targeted to EGFRvIII. PMID:23159039

  13. Enhanced cellular internalization of CdTe quantum dots mediated by arginine- and tryptophan-rich cell-penetrating peptides as efficient carriers.

    PubMed

    Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Johari-Ahar, Mohammad; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Shahbazi Mojarrad, Javid; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2016-09-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), as a new class of fluorescent tags, have been widely used for biomedical applications. Despite their various advantages, QDs do not efficiently enter cells on their own, and aggregation often occurs following internalization. In the present study, we have designed three QD-cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes to increase the uptake of QD into cells. The results demonstrated that R9 and R5W3R4 form relatively stable noncovalent complexes with QDs, considerably increasing the rate and efficiency of QD uptake by A549 cells. These data suggest that cationic CPPs could efficiently transfer QDs into cells in a non-toxic manner. PMID:25884240

  14. Efficient enhancement of internal proton transfer of branched π-extended organic chromophore under one-photon and near-infrared two-photon irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yulong; Lu, Yao; Ma, Huiying; Ding, Ge; Zhang, Shengtao; Luo, Ziping; Li, Hongru; Gao, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The new branched π-extended conjugated triphenylamine-based organic chromophores bearing with proton transfer segments were synthesized. Internal H-bonding effect in the ground state of these new π-extended chromophores is demonstrated by X-ray single crystal diffraction, 1H NMR spectra and UV-vis spectroscopy. Intramolecular proton transfer in the excited singlet state of the enlarged organic chromophore is greatly increased by the branched structure under one-photo and near-infrared two-photon excitation respectively. The fundamental mechanism of intramolecular proton transfer in the excited state was preliminarily revealed by the potential energy barrier computation of enol-keto phototautomerization.

  15. Internal-Modified Dithiol DNA–Directed Au Nanoassemblies: Geometrically Controlled Self–Assembly and Quantitative Surface–Enhanced Raman Scattering Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuan; Shan, Hangyong; Li, Min; Chen, Shu; Liu, Jianyu; Cheng, Yanfang; Ye, Cui; Yang, Zhilin; Lai, Xuandi; Hu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a hierarchical DNA–directed self–assembly strategy to construct structure–controlled Au nanoassemblies (NAs) has been demonstrated by conjugating Au nanoparticles (NPs) with internal–modified dithiol single-strand DNA (ssDNA) (Au–B–A or A–B–Au–B–A). It is found that the dithiol–ssDNA–modified Au NPs and molecule quantity of thiol–modified ssDNA grafted to Au NPs play critical roles in the assembly of geometrically controlled Au NAs. Through matching Au–DNA self–assembly units, geometrical structures of the Au NAs can be tailored from one–dimensional (1D) to quasi–2D and 2D. Au–B–A conjugates readily give 1D and quasi–2D Au NAs while 2D Au NAs can be formed by A–B–Au–B–A building blocks. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements and 3D finite–difference time domain (3D-FDTD) calculation results indicate that the geometrically controllable Au NAs have regular and linearly “hot spots”–number–depended SERS properties. For a certain number of NPs, the number of “hot spots” and accordingly enhancement factor of Au NAs can be quantitatively evaluated, which open a new avenue for quantitative analysis based on SERS technique. PMID:26581251

  16. IGSN at Work in the Land Down Under: Exploiting an International Sample Identifier System to Enhance Reproducibility of Australian Geochemcial and Geochronological Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrakova, I.; Klump, J. F.; McInnes, B.; Wyborn, L. A.; Brown, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Geo-Sample Number (IGSN) provides a globally unique identifier for physical samples used to generate analytical data. This unique identifier provides the ability to link each physical sample to any analytical data undertaken on that sample, as well as to any publications derived from any data derived on the sample. IGSN is particularly important for geochemical and geochronological data, where numerous analytical techniques can be undertaken at multiple analytical facilities not only on the parent rock sample itself, but also on derived sample splits and mineral separates. Australia now has three agencies implementing IGSN: Geoscience Australia, CSIRO and Curtin University. All three have now combined into a single project, funded by the Australian Research Data Services program, to better coordinate the implementation of IGSN in Australia, in particular how these agencies allocate IGSN identifiers. The project will register samples from pilot applications in each agency including the CSIRO National Collection of Mineral Spectra database, the Geoscience Australia sample collection, and the Digital Mineral Library of the John De Laeter Centre for Isotope Research at Curtin University. These local agency catalogues will then be aggregated into an Australian portal, which will ultimately be expanded for all geoscience specimens. The development of this portal will also involve developing a common core metadata schema for the description of Australian geoscience specimens, as well as formulating agreed governance models for registering Australian samples. These developments aim to enable a common approach across Australian academic, research organisations and government agencies for the unique identification of geoscience specimens and any analytical data and/or publications derived from them. The emerging pattern of governance and technical collaboration established in Australia may also serve as a blueprint for similar collaborations internationally.

  17. Enhancing quality and integrity in biomedical research in Africa: an international call for greater focus, investment and standardisation in capacity strengthening for frontline staff.

    PubMed

    Kombe, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of biomedical research depends heavily on the quality of research data collected. In turn, data quality depends on processes of data collection, a task undertaken by frontline research staff in many research programmes in Africa and elsewhere. These frontline research staff often have additional responsibilities including translating and communicating research in local languages, seeking informed consent for study participation and maintaining supportive relationships between research institutions and study participants and wider communities. The level of skills that fieldworkers need to undertake these responsibilities clearly affects the quality of data collected, the ethics of research 'on the ground' and the short and long term acceptability of research.We organised an international workshop in Kenya in July 2014 to discuss the role of frontline staff in scientific research. A total of 25 field managers from 9 African countries and the UK met for 2.5 days to discuss the relationship between data quality and institutional performance management systems and how they affect career progression and supportive supervision policies of research frontline staff.From this workshop, and supporting an expanding literature on the role of fieldworkers in international health research, participants agreed that fieldworkers' roles present them with practical and ethical challenges that their routine training does not adequately prepare them for. We argue that the common and complex challenges facing fieldworkers should in part be addressed through increased investment and collaborative agreements across types of research institutions in Africa. We call for standardization of core elements of training for this critically important cadre of research staff who perform similar roles and encounter similar challenges in many African settings. Although many valuable training elements are offered in institutions, there is a need to develop broader, more grounded and

  18. Quantitative determination of H2, HD, and D2 internal-state distributions by (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinnen, Klaus-Dieter; Buntine, Mark A.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Zare, Richard N.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental study of (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection of H2, HD, and D2 via the E,F two-photon transition, in which the relationship between ion signals and quantum-state populations was determined by calibration against a thermal effusive source. Vibrational and rotational correction factors were obtained for 102 rovibrational levels for v-double-prime = 0, 1, and 2 and for J-double-prime ranging from 0 to 17. These correction factors make it possible to convert ion signals into relative quantum-state populations without relying on a theoretical description of the (2+1) REMPI process.

  19. A Facile and Low-Cost Method to Enhance the Internal Quantum Yield and External Light-Extraction Efficiency for Flexible Light-Emitting Carbon-Dot Films

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Lin, H. T.; Talite, M. J.; Tzeng, T. T.; Hsu, C. L.; Chiu, K. P.; Lin, C. A. J.; Shen, J. L.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed, non-toxic carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. They are promising emissive layers for flexible light-emitting devices. To this end, the CDs in pristine aqueous solutions need to be transferred to form solid-state thin films without sacrificing their original PL characteristics. Unfortunately, solid-state PL quenching induced by extra non-radiative (NR) energy transfer among CDs would significantly hinder their practical applications in optoelectronics. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method has been utilized to fabricate high-performance CD/polymer light-emitting flexible films with submicron-structured patterns. The patterned polymers can serve as a solid matrix to disperse and passivate CDs, thus achieving high internal quantum yields of 61%. In addition, they can act as an out-coupler to mitigate the waveguide-mode losses, approximately doubling the external light-extraction efficiency. Such CD/polymer composites also exhibit good photo-stability, and thus can be used as eco-friendly, low-cost phosphors for solid-state lighting. PMID:26822337

  20. Strategic information is everyone's business: perspectives from an international stakeholder meeting to enhance strategic information data along the HIV Cascade for people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Richard D; Hegle, Jennifer; Sabin, Keith; Agustian, Edo; Johnston, Lisa G; Mills, Stephen; Todd, Catherine S

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at increased HIV transmission risk because of unsafe injecting practices and a host of other individual, network, and structural factors. Thus, PWID have a great need for services within the Cascade of HIV prevention, diagnosis, care, and treatment (HIV Cascade). Yet the systems that monitor their progress through the Cascade are often lacking. Subsequently, fewer reliable data are available to guide programs targeting this key population (KP). Programmatic data, which are helpful in tracking PWID through the Cascade, also are limited because not all countries have harm reduction programming from which to estimate Cascade indicators. Also, due to stigma and the illegal nature of drug use, PWID may not disclose their drug use behavior or HIV status when accessing services. Consequently, PWID appear to have low HIV testing rates and, for those living with HIV, lower access to health services and lower viral suppression rates than do other KP groups. This commentary, based on outcomes from an international stakeholder meeting, identifies data gaps and proposes solutions to strengthen strategic information (SI), the systematic collection, analysis, and dissemination of information, to optimize HIV prevention, care, and treatment programming for PWID. PMID:26471018

  1. Using the Enhanced Daily Load Stimulus Model to Quantify the Mechanical Load and Bone Mineral Density Changes Experienced by Crew Members on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genc, K. O.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Kuklis, M. M.; Maender, C. C.; Rice, A. J.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of exercise countermeasures during long-duration space missions, bone mineral density (BMD) and predicted bone strength of astronauts continue to show decreases in the lower extremities and spine. This site-specific bone adaptation is most likely caused by the effects of microgravity on the mechanical loading environment of the crew member. There is, therefore, a need to quantify the mechanical loading experienced on Earth and on-orbit to define the effect of a given "dose" of loading on bone homeostasis. Gene et al. recently proposed an enhanced DLS (EDLS) model that, when used with entire days of in-shoe forces, takes into account recently developed theories on the importance of factors such as saturation, recovery, and standing and their effects on the osteogenic response of bone to daily physical activity. This algorithm can also quantify the tinting and type of activity (sit/unload, stand, walk, run or other loaded activity) performed throughout the day. The purpose of the current study was to use in-shoe force measurements from entire typical work days on Earth and on-orbit in order to quantify the type and amount of loading experienced by crew members. The specific aim was to use these measurements as inputs into the EDLS model to determine activity timing/type and the mechanical "dose" imparted on the musculoskeletal system of crew members and relate this dose to changes in bone homeostasis.

  2. Angular and internal state distributions of H2 (+) generated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 using time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perreault, William E; Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    We report direct measurement of the anisotropy parameter β for the angular distribution of the photoelectron and photoion in (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process of H2 X (1)Σg (+) (v = 0, J = 0) molecules through the intermediate H2 E,F (1)Σg (+) (v' = 0, J' = 0) level (λ = 201.684 nm) using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight spectra were recorded as the direction of polarization of the ionizing laser was varied with respect to the flight axis of the H2 molecular beam and were fitted to an angular distribution in an appropriately rotated coordinate system with the z-axis oriented along the time-of-flight axis. The anisotropy parameter β was found to be 1.72 ± 0.13 by fitting the time-of-flight spectra and agreed with previous measurements. Using secondary ionization with a delayed laser pulse of different wavelength, we also determined the vibrational energy distribution of the ions, showing that 98% ± 4% of the ions are generated in their ground vibrational state, in agreement with the calculated Franck-Condon factors between the H2 E,F (1)Σg (+) (v' = 0) and H2 (+) X (1)Σg (+) (v″) vibrational levels. PMID:27276949

  3. Angular and internal state distributions of H2+ generated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 using time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, William E.; Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N.

    2016-06-01

    We report direct measurement of the anisotropy parameter β for the angular distribution of the photoelectron and photoion in (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process of H2 X 1 Σg + (v = 0, J = 0) molecules through the intermediate H2 E,F 1 Σg + (v' = 0, J' = 0) level (λ = 201.684 nm) using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight spectra were recorded as the direction of polarization of the ionizing laser was varied with respect to the flight axis of the H2 molecular beam and were fitted to an angular distribution in an appropriately rotated coordinate system with the z-axis oriented along the time-of-flight axis. The anisotropy parameter β was found to be 1.72 ± 0.13 by fitting the time-of-flight spectra and agreed with previous measurements. Using secondary ionization with a delayed laser pulse of different wavelength, we also determined the vibrational energy distribution of the ions, showing that 98% ± 4% of the ions are generated in their ground vibrational state, in agreement with the calculated Franck-Condon factors between the H2 E,F 1 Σg + (v' = 0) and H 2+ X 1 Σg + (v″) vibrational levels.

  4. Enhancing the output current of a CdTe solar cell via a CN-free hydrocarbon luminescent down-shifting fluorophore with intramolecular energy transfer and restricted internal rotation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilin; Olsen, Joseph; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2015-04-01

    A CN-free hydrocarbon fluorophore (Perylene-TPE) was synthesized as a new luminescent down-shifting (LDS) material. Its photophysical properties in both the solution state and the solid state were studied. The unity fluorescence quantum yield of Perylene-TPE observed in its solid state is considered to be from the characteristics of intramolecular energy transfer (IET) and restricted internal rotation (RIR). This is supported by the results from theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements. For the photovoltaic application of Perylene-TPE, a theoretical modeling study suggests that using the LDS film of Perylene-TPE may increase the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell by 2.95%, enhance the spectral response of a CdTe solar cell at 400 nm by 41%, and shift the incident solar photon distribution from short-wavelength (<500 nm) to long-wavelength (>500 nm). Experimentally, placing a LDS film of Perylene-TPE on a CdTe solar cell can enhance its output Jsc by as high as 3.30 ± 0.31%, which is comparable to the current commercially available LDS material – Y083 (3.28% ± 0.37%). PMID:25679960

  5. International Committee expands structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    AGU's Committee on International Participation has recently undergone a restructuring, or “perestroika,” according to International Secretary Juan Roederer. By establishing the new ad hoc Regional Advisory Committees (RACs) and Corresponding Members, AGU will help assure that it is serving its worldwide membership and strengthening its international relations.The CIP, through the new RACs, will identify the needs of geophysicists outside the United States and Canada and add services not currently available and enhance existing services. The International Secretary will then make recommendations to the appropriate AGU program and administrative committees. The CIP may also propose special activities such as the ongoing Berkner Membership Program for developing countries and the Latin America Visiting Scientist Program.

  6. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  7. International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kenn; Habermann, Ulla; Chowdhury, Omar Faruque; Guerra, Iraida Manzanilla

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Introduction to International Perspectives" (Allen); "Volunteerism in the Welfare State: The Case of Denmark" (Habermann); "Grassroots Organizing in Bangladesh" (Chowdhury); and "Volunteerism in Latin America" (Guerra). (SK)

  8. International Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  9. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  10. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  11. Decision Analysis of Postremission Therapy in Cytogenetically Intermediate-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Impact of FLT3 Internal Tandem Duplication, Nucleophosmin, and CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein Alpha.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Saiko; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukunaga, Keiko; Yui, Shunsuke; Wakita, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Usuki, Kensuke; Uoshima, Nobuhiko; Yanada, Masamitsu; Shono, Katsuhiro; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Mizuno, Ishikazu; Yano, Shingo; Takeuchi, Jin; Kanda, Junya; Okamura, Hiroshi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Inokuchi, Koiti; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    We performed a decision analysis comparing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) versus chemotherapy in first complete remission for patients with cytogenetically intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia, depending on the presence or absence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD), nucleophosmin (NPM1), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) mutations. Adjusted means of the patient-reported EQ-5D index were used as quality-of-life (QOL) estimates. In 332 patients for which FLT3-ITD status was available, FLT3-ITD was present in 60. In 272 patients without FLT3-ITD, NPM1 mutations were present in 83. CEBPA biallelic mutations were detected in 53 patients. For patients harboring FLT3-ITD, allo-HCT improved life expectancy (LE) (52 versus 32 months during 10-year observation) and QOL-adjusted life expectancy (QALE, 36 versus 21). Monte-Carlo simulation identified allo-HCT as the favored strategy in 100% of simulations. In patients without FLT3-ITD, allo-HCT improved LE/QALE with or without NPM1 mutations. However, sensitivity analyses showed that the results were not robust enough. For patients harboring CEBPA biallelic mutations, chemotherapy was favored (LE, 53 versus 84; QALE, 37 versus 59), whereas, for patients with monoallelic mutations or wild-type CEBPA, allo-HCT was favored (LE, 68 versus 54; QALE, 48 versus 37). Sensitivity analyses did not change the results in either group. In conclusion, based on a Markov decision analysis, allo-HCT was a favored postremission strategy in patients with FLT3-ITD, and chemotherapy was favored in patients with biallelic CEBPA mutations. A prospective study is warranted to determine the value of allo-HCT, especially in FLT3-ITD-negative patients. PMID:27040395

  12. International Business Research: Coauthorship Patterns and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kam C; Fung, Hung-Gay; Leung, Wai K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigate published international business research in four international business journals over a 10-year period, 1995-2004: (a) patterns of coauthorship across regions, and (b) the relation between coauthorship patterns and the quality of international business (IB) articles. A cross-region coauthorship enhances the quality of an…

  13. 76 FR 70225 - Advisory Council to the Internal Revenue Service; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Advisory Council to the Internal Revenue Service; Meeting AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Internal Revenue Service Advisory Council (IRSAC... with Voluntary Disclosure, Enhance Collection by taking Unsecured Debt into Consideration, Schedule...

  14. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  15. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabb, Winston; Bender, David R.; Haycock, Ken; Horodyski, John

    2001-01-01

    Includes three annual reports: one from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, the Special Libraries Association, and a report on innovations in Canadian libraries that discusses electronic initiatives, partnerships, books and publishing, school libraries, national issues, local challenges, and funding. (LRW)

  16. International Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pests and diseases of plants in agriculture are a shared international problem. Yet some of the very places that pest invaders come from often lack the institutional structure and organization necessary to help in understanding the biology of the pest or disease. Strengthening entomology by stimulat...

  17. International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, R. Stephen

    In a world characterized by increasing global interdependence, the provision of international education programs must be an essential concern of the community college president. Frequently, these programs are considered too sophisticated for community college students or are misconceived as: (1) pleasure junkets; (2) strategies for increasing…

  18. International Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havard-Williams, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Discussion of standardization on an international scale for resource sharing--cooperation, coordination, interlibrary loans, cooperative acquisition and cataloging--focuses on a definition of standards; the development of standards for cataloging; public, school, and university libraries; and library education. A 60-item bibliography is included.…

  19. International Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Donald A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This issue begins with a conceptual introduction to economic specialization, exports and imports, and the importance of international trade. Four instructional units follow this introduction, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit called "Traders and Travelers," which involves young students in five activities that illustrate our…

  20. Moral Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Opponents of biomedical enhancement often claim that, even if such enhancement would benefit the enhanced, it would harm others. But this objection looks unpersuasive when the enhancement in question is a moral enhancement — an enhancement that will expectably leave the enhanced person with morally better motives than she had previously. In this article I (1) describe one type of psychological alteration that would plausibly qualify as a moral enhancement, (2) argue that we will, in the medium-term future, probably be able to induce such alterations via biomedical intervention, and (3) defend future engagement in such moral enhancements against possible objections. My aim is to present this kind of moral enhancement as a counter-example to the view that biomedical enhancement is always morally impermissible. PMID:19132138

  1. The Calcium Solution: Developing Potato Cultivars With Enhanced Tuber Storage and Internal Quality by Genetic Improvement of Tuber Calcium Accumulation Ability Enetic Improvement of Potato for Tuber Calcium Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuber internal quality is a major limiting factor for the U.S. potato industry. Breeders invest time and money in producing advanced selections which, in the end, often fail because of tuber internal defects, tuber bruising, or storage quality issues. In-season fertilization with calcium is known to...

  2. Teaching International Law: Concepts in International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starbird, Caroline; Pettit, Jenny; Singleton, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce students to public international law. Topics covered include international public organizations, such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, international courts, international human rights law, international trade law, and international environmental law. The goal of each study is to examine how…

  3. Osirak and international security

    SciTech Connect

    Fainberg, A.

    1981-10-01

    Mr. Fainberg states that no factual justification can be made for Israel's bombing of an Iraqi reactor under construction on the grounds that Iraq was diverting nuclear materials for weapons. Despite limitations to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspection procedure, he feels the raid was premature even if Iraq's long-range goal is to develop a nuclear capability and renounce the non-proliferation treaty it signed. The effect of the raid has not enhanced Israel's security, but a precedent has been set that weakens the safeguards structure and threatens world security. Steps need to be taken to strengthen international safeguards and make them more acceptable to developing countries since there is no way to ban nuclear-produced electricity. (DCK)

  4. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  5. OLED devices with internal outcoupling

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jie Jerry; Sista, Srinivas Prasad; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhao, Ri-An; Chichak, Kelly Scott; Youmans, Jeffrey Michael; Janora, Kevin Henry; Turner, Larry Gene

    2015-03-03

    Optoelectronic devices that have enhanced internal outcoupling are disclosed. The devices include a substrate, an anode, a cathode, an electroluminescent layer, and a hole injecting layer. The hole injecting layer includes inorganic nanoparticles that have a bimodal particle size distribution and which are dispersed in an organic matrix.

  6. Operating internationally

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    When Enron Power Corp. took over a 28 MW power facility at the former US Naval base in Subic Bay, the Philippines, the company was required to employ 139 people to run the plant. This large labor force was necessary not because of the plant's operational needs, but because of local labor practices and unemployment pressures. Independent power companies have become all too familiar with the high cost and complexity of developing projects in emerging international markets. Some of the most significant issues involve taxation, unfamiliar legal systems, changing regulations, and foreign investment restrictions. In addition, questions about currency exchange, national credit worthiness, and political stability add to the difficulty of international development. However, one of the most daunting challenges centers not on development, but on long-term operations and maintenance (O M). A key concern is finding qualified labor. Most developers and O M companies agree that local people should run the plant, with the top person, or persons, thoroughly trained in the developer's company philosophy.

  7. Ball-and-Stick Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling: Molecular Simulations Involving Enhanced Sampling within Conformational or Alchemical Subspaces of Low Internal Dimensionalities, Minimal Irrelevant Volumes, and Problem-Adapted Geometries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, ball-and-stick local elevation umbrella sampling (B&S-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the sampling in computer simulations of (bio)molecular systems. It enables the calculation of conformational free-energy differences between states (or alchemical free-energy differences between molecules), even in situations where the definition of these states relies on a conformational subspace involving more than a few degrees of freedom. The B&S-LEUS method consists of the following steps: (A) choice of a reduced conformational subspace; (B) representation of the relevant states by means of spheres ("balls"), each associated with a biasing potential involving a one-dimensional radial memory-based term and a radial confinement term; (C) definition of a set of lines ("sticks") connecting these spheres, each associated with a biasing potential involving a one-dimensional longitudinal memory-based term and a transverse confinement term; (D) unification of the biasing potentials corresponding to the union of all of the spheres and lines (active subspace) into a single biasing potential according to the enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) scheme; (E) build-up of the memory using the local elevation (LE) procedure, leading to a biasing potential enabling a nearly uniform sampling (radially within the spheres, longitudinally within the lines) of the active subspace; (F) generation of a biased ensemble of configurations using this preoptimized biasing potential, following an umbrella sampling (US) approach; and (G) calculation of the relative free energies of the states via reweighting and state assignment. The main characteristics of this approach are: (i) a low internal dimensionality, that is, the memory only involves one-dimensional grids (acceptable memory requirements); (ii) a minimal irrelevant volume, that is, the conformational volume opened to sampling includes a minimal fraction of irrelevant regions in terms of the free energy of the physical system or of

  8. International environmental law and global public health.

    PubMed Central

    Schirnding, Yasmin von; Onzivu, William; Adede, Andronico O.

    2002-01-01

    The environment continues to be a source of ill-health for many people, particularly in developing countries. International environmental law offers a viable strategy for enhancing public health through the promotion of increased awareness of the linkages between health and environment, mobilization of technical and financial resources, strengthening of research and monitoring, enforcement of health-related standards, and promotion of global cooperation. An enhanced capacity to utilize international environmental law could lead to significant worldwide gains in public health. PMID:12571726

  9. Recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling.

    PubMed

    Han, J C; Dutta, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper focuses on turbine blade internal cooling. Internal cooling is achieved by passing the coolant through several rib-enhanced serpentine passages inside the blade and extracting the heat from the outside of the blades. Both jet impingement and pin-fin-cooling are also used as a method of internal cooling. In the past number of years there has been considerable progress in turbine blade internal cooling research and this paper is limited to reviewing a few selected publications to reflect recent developments in turbine blade internal cooling. PMID:11460626

  10. 26 CFR 1.43-2 - Qualified enhanced oil recovery project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified enhanced oil recovery project. 1.43-2 Section 1.43-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.43-2 Qualified enhanced oil recovery project. (a) Qualified enhanced oil recovery project. A “qualified enhanced...

  11. Building Capacity through International Student Affairs Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Roberts, Darbi L.

    2012-01-01

    In order to build local capacity in an international higher education setting, the Qatar Study Tour and Young Professionals Institute (QST and YPI) was created as an inquiry-based learning experience shared among diverse participants and designed to enhance learning at both the local and international levels. The intent of the QST and YPI model…

  12. On the New International Communication Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Charles W., III

    The International Communication Agency (ICA) was created in April 1978 to help facilitate relations between the United States and other nations. Its main function is to enrich the supplies of information among peoples in order to enhance understanding. An examination of the international context in which the ICA will operate reveals the urgent…

  13. Defining International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Holly Moran

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the three facets of international education: international studies, international education exchange, and technical assistance. Also explores the effects of internationalizing higher education and the present state of international education. (EV)

  14. The International Halley Watch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newburn, R. L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The International Halley Watch has been designed to maximize the scientific value of ground-based observations of Halley's Comet. Important in their own right, such observations have also enhanced the value of space observations, setting the brief duration flyby data in the context of the overall apparition, placing the extremely high resolution encounter data into the normal scale of observations, and filling in missing data. The IHW has standardized observing techniques wherever useful and possible, coordinated the observing, and is now collecting data from publication in a comprehensive Halley Archieve. The IHW has been designed to avoid the problems of 1910 where the two major monographs on Halley were not published until 21 and 24 years later and where much data remains unpublished to this day. The Giacobini-Zinner Watch preovided support to the ICE mission and complements the IHW by using the same ground-based techniques at the same time of study another very different comet for comparison.

  15. International cooperation in water resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.R.; Beall, R.M.; Giusti, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    Advancements in hydrology proceeded slowly until the late 1800's when new ventures created a surge of interest and accomplishment. Progress waned again until the middle 20th century when an International Hydrological Decade was conceived, eventually receiving wide multinational support from governmental agencies and nongovernmental institutions. Organized by UNESCO, the Decade program was launched January 1, 1965. Participation included 107 nations, six United Nations agencies, and more than a dozen international scientific organizations. The initial program emphasized scientific research, and international cooperation; the second half of the Decade, emphasized technical assistance and technology transfer, largerly through education, training and demonstration. The success of the Decade led to the establishment of the International Hydrological Program, again under the aegis of UNESCO, to continue the work of the Decade indefinitely. The five major program activities, now involving about 90 countries and several international organizations, include: the scientific program, the promotion of education and training, the enhancement of information exchange, support of technical assistance, and the enlargement of regional cooperation. A significant amount of activity related to hydrological data networks and forecasting is carried on in an Operational Hydrology Programme by the WMO, chiefly through its Commission for Hydrology. Other international governmental organizations with a strong interest in water include the UN, the UN Development Programme, the FAO, the WHO, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Environment Programme, the International Standardization Organization, and developmental institutions such as the World Bank. The specialized interests of researchers outside of the governmental structure, are met through association in various scientific and technical organizations which are world wide in scope and membership. Notwithstanding a sometimes

  16. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  17. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  18. Bilateral internal laryngoceles mimicking asthma.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Elif A; Elsürer, Cağdaş; Serin, Gediz M; Unal, O Faruk

    2013-05-01

    Laryngocele is an air-filled, abnormal dilation of the laryngeal saccule that extends upward within the false vocal fold, in communication with the laryngeal lumen. A case of 43-year-old male with bilateral internal laryngoceles, who has been treated as asthma for 4 years, is presented. The patient had dyspnea, cough, and excessive phlegm for a month and a late onset stridor. Flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscopy showed bilateral cystic enlargements of the false vocal folds and true vocal folds could not be visualized. Laryngeal CT without contrast enhancement showed bilateral internal laryngoceles. Submucosal total excision of bilateral cystic masses including parts of false vocal folds was performed. The symptoms resolved immediately after surgery. Although the incidence of internal laryngocele is rare, it should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of upper airway problems and diagnostic flexible nasopharnygolaryngoscopy is routinely indicated for airway evaluation in at-risk patients. PMID:24174956

  19. Teaching international animal agriculture.

    PubMed

    Lukefahr, S D

    1999-11-01

    Students who major in animal science at U.S. institutions are generally exposed to a curriculum that emphasizes commercial, large-scale production of the few traditional food animals: cattle, poultry, sheep, and swine. Globally, most farmers live in lesser-developed countries under limited-resource conditions of land, feed supplies, equipment, and capital. The promotion of commercial animal production enterprises may not be appropriate for such farms because it can subject farmers to considerable economic risk. Rather, use of limited numbers of large livestock, locally adapted breeds, or smaller livestock (e.g., ducks, goats, guinea pigs, and rabbits) may be more appropriate under subsistence, integrated farming systems. In this global context, a course in international animal agriculture has been taught for 15 yr to undergraduate and graduate students. The course consists of a review of traditional and potential livestock species well suited for impoverished families on small farms and methods to implement sustainable livestock projects, including feasibility, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation stages. To enhance student understanding, global food issues and challenges are illustrated with case studies. A term paper is also assigned for which students choose three suitable livestock species or local breeds that would be complementary on a small crop farm (< 5 ha). Daily dietary requirements of protein and energy per family member are calculated. Itemized enterprise budgets and production tables are prepared. Early in the course, the general consensus of students was that people who are malnourished and live in poverty have low personal ambition and motivation, and that their problems should be amenable to solution by application of American technology and expertise. The course modifies such attitudes and enhances a student's critical thinking and problem-solving abilities and communication skills. Course evaluations indicated that students believed

  20. Community College Internal Auditors: Internal Audit Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ronna; And Others

    This guidebook includes information compiled by the "Audit Manual" committee of Community College Internal Auditors (CCIA) from several California community college districts regarding their internal auditing practices. The first section of the guidebook discusses the purpose of internal audits, indicating that audits assist members of the…

  1. Biocatalyst Enhancement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing availability of enzyme collections has assisted attempts by pharmaceutical producers to adopt green chemistry approaches to manufacturing. A joint effort between an enzyme producer and a pharmaceutical manufacturer has been enhanced over the past three years by ena...

  2. Enhancer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Masanori; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    During embryonic development, genes are expressed under a strict spatial and temporal order in cells and tissues. This regulation is governed by regulatory regions in the genome, usually identified as enhancers (Kondoh, 2008). The identification and mapping of a set of enhancers allow clarification of essential regulatory elements involved in the enhancer action and their interacting protein factors. Enhancer analysis also determines upstream signaling cascades that regulate interacting protein factors. If the regulatory regions do not function properly, spatio-temporal order of the gene expression will be disrupted, and this may cause abnormal development and dis eases (Kleinjan & van Heyningen, 2005; Sabherwal et al., 2007). Thus, identifica tion of the regulatory regions provides an important entry point to clarify regulatory mechanisms underlying embryonic development.

  3. LASIK enhancements.

    PubMed

    Durrie, D S; Vande Garde, T L

    2000-01-01

    As the field of refractive surgery continues to evolve, an increasing number of surgical options are available for LASIK enhancements. Nonetheless, older methods such as AK continue to play an important role in enhancement procedures. Improvements in instruments and techniques allow for previously made LASIK flaps to be safely lifted for additional myopic or hyperopic ablations. Newer methods such as Intacs placement provide an effective option for patients who are not good candidates for further ablative procedures. These advancements allow refractive surgeons to treat a wider range of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism effectively in eyes with a history of LASIK surgery. PMID:10941651

  4. Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project Overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize Project (GEM) is a collaborative effort of public and private sector researchers to broaden and enhance the maize germplasm base. The GEM Project has cooperators from 26 private companies, 17 Universities, 7 USDA-ARS Research Units, 1 NGO, and 12 international pub...

  5. Skin penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E

    2013-04-15

    The skin has evolved to prevent excessive water loss from the internal organs and to limit the ability of xenobiotics and hazardous substances to enter the body. Notwithstanding this barrier function, a number of strategies have been developed by scientists to deliver drugs to and through the skin. The aim of this review is to consider the various types of chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) which have been investigated in the scientific literature. Potential pathways for CPEs to exert their action are examined with reference to the physical chemistry of passive skin transport. The emphasis is on those studies which have focussed on human and porcine skin because of the limitations associated with skin permeation data collated from other species. Where known, the mechanisms of action of these compounds are also discussed. Examples of enhancers used in commercial topical and transdermal formulations are provided. It is proposed that overall the effects of CPEs on the skin barrier may best be explained by a Diffusion-Partition-Solubility theory. Finally, some of the limitations of studies in the literature are considered and the importance of monitoring the fate of the penetration enhancer as well as the active is highlighted. PMID:23462366

  6. International Volunteering: Employability, Leadership and More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Andrew; Charleston, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of individuals in transition between education and work during international volunteering expeditions. While it was expected that outcomes might include employability enhancement and skill development, the authors aimed to clarify what the main factors were, examine employability…

  7. Simulating History to Understand International Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Kimberly; Baranowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To understand world politics, one must appreciate the context in which international systems develop and operate. Pedagogy studies demonstrate that the more active students are in their learning, the more they learn. As such, using computer simulations can complement and enhance classroom instruction. CIVILIZATION is a computer simulation game…

  8. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  9. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  10. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... partner – it's your best friend. Welcome. The Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is a 501 (c) 3 non- ... and cures is your participation in the Hepatitis Foundation International Registry. Whether you are affected, a caregiver, ...

  11. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Register for the 25th Annual ITNS Symposium The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) cordially invites transplant nurses ... Barriers (PDF) This pocket guide, developed by the International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS), provides an overview of ...

  12. Postpartum Support International

    MedlinePlus

    ... An Emergency Help in my Area: Support Map International Support PSI Warmline (English and Spanish) PSI Ayuda ... Psychosis Related Tragedies Order PSI Conference Recordings The International Marcé Society Research and Review Multi-Language Resources ...

  13. Melanoma International Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gershenwald, MD May 09, 2015 Our Awards Melanoma International Foundation Our Mission: To develop personalized strategies with ... the state of Pennsylvania, certificate #29498 © 2013 Melanoma International Foundation. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of ...

  14. Enhancing bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Koenigsberg, S.

    1997-02-01

    Oxygen is often the limiting factor in aerobic bioremediation. Without adequate oxygen, contaminant degradation will either cease or proceed by highly inefficient anaerobic processes. Researchers at Regenesis Bioremediation Products recently develope a technology to combat this problem, Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) a unique formulation of magnesium peroxide release oxygen slowly when hydrated. ORC is idea for supporting bioremediation of underground storage tank releases. ORC treatment represents a low intensity approach to remediation - simple, passive, low-cost, long term enhancement of a natural attenuation. 1 fig.

  15. Taxonomy of potential international safeguards regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, J.R.; Allentuck, J.

    1994-08-01

    Since the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) search for the components of Iraq`s nuclear weapons program under the auspices of the United Nations Security Council, a consensus for enhancing, strengthening or expanding the scope of international safeguards has developed. Some of the enhanced safeguards concepts which have been suggested include the following: short-notice, challenge, and random inspections; effluent monitoring in onsite, near site, and fly-by modes; local and wide-area environmental monitoring; and utilization of data from space-platform sensors. Potential safeguards regimes can be classified according to the functional and technical criteria which would be necessary for implementation of various enhanced safeguards concepts. While the nature of the regime which will emerge cannot be predicted, the classification of possible regimes according to major characteristics can be useful for identifying functional criteria and implementation challenges, focusing development efforts on the functional criteria, and planning for efficient use of safeguards resources. Precedents established in previously negotiated treaties -- the Chemical Weapons Convention, the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe, START, and Open Skies -- are examined with regard to enhancement of the international safeguards regime for nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. Bilateral, multilateral and regional integration of enhanced safeguards elements is considered.

  16. A Realistic International Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Criticizes college textbooks for adopting a "party line" of laissez-faire economic doctrine which asserts the benefits of free trade. Offers an alternative interpretation of international trade, covering such topics as the effect of unregulated international trade on wage levels, and international lending. (JDH)

  17. Unit III: International Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxey, Phyllis

    1983-01-01

    This lesson helps students understand the global network involved in international events. Students have an opportunity to examine the impact of international law and the role of international organizations, national governments, and private individuals in the effort to secure the release of United States hostages in Iran. (AM)

  18. Building Internationally Literate Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Katie; Philip, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How can we as librarians bring children and books from a variety of cultures and backgrounds together to create a more internationally literate community? This workshop addresses that question with a discussion of what it means to be internationally literate as well as internationally-minded, followed by an outline of some evaluation criteria…

  19. Improving Internal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonus, Thaddeus, Ed.

    Guidelines for developing the internal communications of colleges and universities, researching internal communication needs, and increasing information flow through traditional and nontraditional media are provided in 11 articles. Titles and authors include the following: "Work for an Open Internal Communication Policy" (Thaddeus Bonus); "Five…

  20. Superresolution via enhanced evanescent tunneling.

    PubMed

    Salandrino, Alessandro; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2011-02-15

    We here propose the concept of enhanced evanescent tunneling (EET). Our analysis indicates that by means of a suitable control field, the transmission of evanescent waves across a forbidden gap can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude-well beyond the ordinary frustrated total internal reflection case. We show how such a phenomenon can be used to probe both the amplitude and phase of the evanescent portion of the angular spectrum, thereby allowing target superresolution. In principle EET can be manifested in other areas of physics where wave tunneling is involved. PMID:21326431

  1. Pathway from Vocational Education and Associate Degree to Higher Education: Chinese International Students in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Ling; Tran, Ly Thi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing international students' decision to engage in international education is essential for education providers to better cater for students' educational expectations and enhance their attractiveness to international students. Whilst there has been extensive research on the reasons why international students undertake…

  2. EDITORIAL: Enhancing nanolithography Enhancing nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Lithography was invented in late 18th century Bavaria by an ambitious young playwright named Alois Senefelder. Senefelder experimented with stone, wax, water and ink in the hope of finding a way of reproducing text so that he might financially gain from a wider distribution of his already successful scripts. His discovery not only facilitated the profitability of his plays, but also provided the world with an affordable printing press that would ultimately democratize the dissemination of art, knowledge and literature. Since Senefelder, experiments in lithography have continued with a range of innovations including the use of electron beams and UV that allow increasingly higher-resolution features [1, 2]. Applications for this have now breached the limits of paper printing into the realms of semiconductor and microelectronic mechanical systems technology. In this issue, researchers demonstrate a technique for fabricating periodic features in poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) [3]. Their method combines field enhancements from silica nanospheres with laser-interference lithography to provide a means of patterning a polymer that has the potential to open the market of low-end, high-volume microelectronics. Laser-interference lithography has already been used successfully in patterning. Researchers in Korea used laser-interference lithography to generate stamps for imprinting a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure into green light emitting diodes (LEDs) [4]. The imprinted patterns comprised depressions 100 nm deep and 180 nm wide with a periodicity of 295 nm. In comparison with unpatterned LEDs, the intensity of photoluminescence was enhanced by a factor of seven in the LEDs that had the photonic crystal structures imprinted in them. The potential of exploiting field enhancements around nanostructures for new technologies has also attracted a great deal of attention. Researchers in the USA and Australia have used the field

  3. [Fundamentals of internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Stehouwer, C D A

    2006-04-01

    The most important diagnostic tools of the internist are the patient history and physical examination, after which a plan must be made for further diagnostic evaluation and treatment. For this the internist uses clinical reasoning based on his or her knowledge of evidence-based medicine and pathobiology. Pathobiology is primarily concerned with the question of how something works; evidence-based medicine is concerned with whether something works, and if so, how often or how much on average. Diseases do not exist in their own right and diagnostic criteria are based on consensus. A diagnosis of a 'disease' is based on our observation of patients as well as our opinions, whether right or wrong, regarding its cause. It is important to distinguish between 'partial causes' and a 'causative complement'. As a result of this concept, the biological relevance of a partial cause in the development of a disease cannot be derived from the strength of the link between it and the disease. Our opinions regarding the cause of disease appear to be based on induction. However, induction is not a good foundation from which to determine causation. Hypotheses on the cause of disease cannot be proved. They can, however, be disproved. Education, training, research and patient care all depend on effective communication. Communication is enhanced if the thesis is given first and thereafter the arguments. Hence, transfer of patient information such as during a morning report should begin with a working diagnosis (the 'thesis') and thereafter the findings of patient history, et cetera (the 'arguments'). At this time, too little attention is given to these branches of clinical reasoning and communication in education and continuing education in internal medicine. PMID:16649402

  4. CARE 3, Version 4 enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, L. A.; Stiffler, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The enhancements and error corrections to CARE III Version 4 are listed. All changes to Version 4 with the exception of the internal redundancy model were implemented in Version 5. Version 4 is the first public release version for execution on the CDC Cyber 170 series computers. Version 5 is the second release version and it is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 for execution on the DEC VAX 11/700 series computers and many others.

  5. Prospects of international trade in irradiated foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    Irradiation is gaining recognition as a physical process for reducing food losses, enhancing hygienic quality of food and facilitating food trade. At present, 36 countries have approved the use of irradiation for processing collectively over 40 food items either on an unconditional or restricted basis. Commercial use of irradiated foods and food ingredients is being carried out in 22 countries. Technology transfer on food irradiation is being intensified to local industry in different regions. worldwide, a total of 40 commercial/demonstration irradiators available for treating foods have been or are being constructed. Acceptance and control of international trade in irradiated foods were discussed at the International Conference on the Acceptance, Control of and Trade in Irradiated Food, jointly convened by FAO, IAEA, WHO and ITC-UNCTAD/GATT in Geneva, Switzerland, 12-16 December 1988. An "International Document on Food Irradiation" was adopted by consensus at this Conference which will facilitate wider acceptance and control of international trade in irradiated foods.

  6. The World in Bexley...Instructional Units Incorporating International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bexley City School District, OH.

    This publication contains sample instructional units that were developed by staff members of the Bexley, Ohio City School District at an international education institute. The 33 units began with the regular curriculum of the district, and sought to integrate aspects of international education in such a way as to enhance the learning experience.…

  7. Using Web-Based Foreign Advertisements in International Marketing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The author examines the use of the Web-based foreign advertisements for enhancing the international awareness of undergraduate marketing students. An analysis compares the adaptation of advertisements for identical products to the cultural perceptions and values of consumers in different countries. In a sample of 110 international marketing…

  8. deKieffer International Fellowship Award Receives Endowment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dick

    2009-01-01

    The AECT International Division held its 22nd annual dinner and auction on November 6, 2008 in Orlando, Florida. During this event it was announced that the "ect" Foundation is now the recipient of a $10,000 endowment intended to further enhance the annual monetary award of the Robert E. deKieffer International Fellowship Award. The gift was made…

  9. International School Psychology: Psychology's Worldwide Portal to Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    International school psychology is discussed in reference to scholarly and professional development within psychology, the emergence of an international association of school psychology, its efforts to promote school psychology, prevailing characteristics of school psychologists, and additional efforts needed to further enhance its development.…

  10. Can Financial Incentives Enhance Educational Outcomes? Evidence from International Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in financial incentives to encourage students to attend school and to improve their academic achievement, graduation rates, and other outcomes. Conditional cash transfer programs in developing countries, especially PROGRESA in Mexico, have found positive effects on attendance in large-scale…

  11. Enhancing International Business Education through Restructuring Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Subhash C.

    2009-01-01

    Many scholars have found fault with the way business schools conduct their business (Pfeffer & Fong, 2002; Mintzberg, 2004; Bennis & O'Toole, 2005; Andrews & Tyson, 2006). This article argues that B-schools should overhaul their curriculum and encourage faculty to undertake research which is useful for practitioners. Suggestions are made for…

  12. Curriculum Considerations for Enhancing Baccalaureate Learning for International Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Karen T.; Haas, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    A nursing education program for Israeli students included a final semester in the United States. Program adjustments were made to address English-language fluency, cultural orientation to collectivism, support services for academic writing, and other issues related to the specific learning needs of this population. (SK)

  13. Enhanced International Space Station Ku-Band Telemetry Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Andrew; Pitts, Lee; Welch, Steven; Bryan, Jason

    2014-01-01

    (1) The ISS is diligently working to increase utilization of the resources this unique laboratory provides; (2) Recent upgrades enabled the use of Internet Protocol communication using the CCSDS IP Encapsulation protocol; and (3) The Huntsville Operations Support Center has extended the onboard LAN to payload teams enabling the use of standard IP protocols for payload operations.

  14. Can Financial Incentives Enhance Educational Outcomes? Evidence from International Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in financial incentives to encourage students to attend school and to improve their academic achievement, graduation rates, and other outcomes. Conditional cash transfers programmes in developing countries, especially PROGRESA in Mexico, have found positive effects on attendance in large-scale…

  15. The International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882 and 1932, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. Fifty years later, the world s space science community will again come together for international programs of scientific collaboration: the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), the Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY), and the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007. This time, research will extend out into the Heliosphere to focus on solar-terrestrial-planetary interactions. The ambitious plans for the IHY, eGY and IPY incorporate the activities of scientists in 191 nations, as well as the IGY Gold Historical Preservation initiative, plus a series of coordinated campaigns involving more than 100 instruments and models, education and public outreach programs, a developing nations instrument development program, and opportunities for supported research worldwide. The presentation will focus on the efforts and operations which will make these activities possible.

  16. International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.; Harrison, R.; Poland, A.; St.Cyr, O. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Rabin, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882-83 and 1932-33, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. The IGY involved about 60,000 scientists from 66 nations, working at thousands of stations, from pole to pole to obtain simultaneous, global observations on Earth and in space. There had never been anything like it before. The fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year will occur in 2007. We propose to organize an international program of scientific collaboration for this time period called the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Like it predecessors, the IHY will focus on fundamental global questions of Earth science.

  17. Delaware County Community College Business and International Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware County Community Coll., Media, PA.

    In 1987, Delaware County Community College (DCCC) initiated the Delaware Valley Trade Enhancement Project, comprising a number of activities to promote the involvement of local firms in international trade. One of the first activities of the Delaware Valley Trade Enhancement project was a survey of over 6,000 small and medium-sized businesses in…

  18. Ethics of international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, Kp; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Education and research together are vital components of academic institutions and globalization has improved health care education and research in numerous ways, one of which is multinational/transnational research/international collaboration. Usually academic institutions of high-income countries and institutions in low-income countries participate in collaboration. These collaborative research are guided by international ethics codes proposed by the international ethics committee to avoid stringent follow/unethical practices. PMID:25709946

  19. International safeguards data authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, R.B.; Smith, C.E.; DeLand, S.M.; Manatt, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    The International Safeguards community is becoming increasingly reliant on information stored in electronic form. In international monitoring and related activities it must be possible to verify and maintain the integrity of this electronic information. This paper discusses the use of data authentication technology to assist in accomplishing this task. The paper provides background information, identifies the relevance to international safeguards, discusses issues related to export controls, algorithm patents, key management and the use of commercial vs. custom software.

  20. Rotor internal friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  1. Expanding the role of internal facility assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpa, R.L.; Levenson, J.B.; Weaver, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    The US Air Force (USAF) Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management Program (ECAMP) is an effective and comprehensive system to evaluate environmental compliance at individual USAF installations. The ECAMP assessment is typically performed by a team of experts from the installation`s Major Command (MAJCOM) Headquarters, and is often augmented with technical contractor support. As directed by Air Force policy, an external ECAMP assessment is required at a minimum of every three years for each installation. In the intervening years, each installation is required to perform an internal ECAMP assessment, with its own personnel and resources. Even though team composition differs, the internal and external ECAMP assessments are likely to be very similar in scope, objectives, and deliverables. For over nine years, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has supported several Air Force MAJCOMs in performing their external ECAMP assessments. More recently, ANL has also had the opportunity to provide technical support and training at individual installations during their preparation and conduct of internal ECAMP assessments. From that experience, the authors have learned that the quality and value of the internal assessment is enhanced by making it a vehicle for training, planning, and interaction among organizations. Various strategies and techniques have been successfully employed to derive maximum benefit and insight from the internal assessment process. Experiences that involve expanding the scope and objectives of internal assessments to meet specific goals are presented. The expansion of scope and objectives include preassessment training, planning, and evaluator interactions as part of the overall internal assessment process.

  2. International Comparisions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    International Comparisions Database (Web, free access)   The International Comparisons Database (ICDB) serves the U.S. and the Inter-American System of Metrology (SIM) with information based on Appendices B (International Comparisons), C (Calibration and Measurement Capabilities) and D (List of Participating Countries) of the Comit� International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA). The official source of the data is The BIPM key comparison database. The ICDB provides access to results of comparisons of measurements and standards organized by the consultative committees of the CIPM and the Regional Metrology Organizations.

  3. EM International. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  4. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  5. The international lithosphere program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinn, Edward A.

    The International Lithosphere Program is a new international interdisciplinary research program in the solid earth sciences that has been established by the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) at the joint request of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) and the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS). Its goal is a better understanding of the development of the earth, particularly those aspects upon which human society depends for its well-being.The International Lithosphere Program (ILP) is a natural sequel to a series of international cooperative projects in the geosciences that began with the International Geophysical Year in 1957-58 and continued with the Upper Mantle Project in the 1960's and the International Geodynamics Project (IGP) in the 1970's. In 1977, IUGG and IUGS established an inter-union task group to consider the possibility of a successor to the IGP for the 1980's. The task group, under cochairmen Carl Kisslinger (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado), foreign secretary of the American Geophysical Union, and J. Henning Illies (Geophysical Institute, University of Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany), invited suggestions and comments from the two unions and the national committees in the member countries. Their report, which was completed late in 1978, proposed a new project on the dynamics, origin, and evolution of the lithosphere. This proposal was approved by the IUGS Executive Committee in December 1979 and by the IUGS Council in June 1980. An inter-union steering committee, established in 1979 under the joint chairmanship of Kisslinger and Illies, developed the organizational framework and constitution of the new program. These were approved by resolution of the ICSU Governing Board in September 1980, and the Inter-Union Commission on the Lithosphere (ICL) was established to implement the program. National members of ICSU were urged to establish

  6. Model-based internal wave processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Chambers, D.H.

    1995-06-09

    A model-based approach is proposed to solve the oceanic internal wave signal processing problem that is based on state-space representations of the normal-mode vertical velocity and plane wave horizontal velocity propagation models. It is shown that these representations can be utilized to spatially propagate the modal (dept) vertical velocity functions given the basic parameters (wave numbers, Brunt-Vaisala frequency profile etc.) developed from the solution of the associated boundary value problem as well as the horizontal velocity components. Based on this framework, investigations are made of model-based solutions to the signal enhancement problem for internal waves.

  7. Managing International Consulting Projects and International Business Courses Using Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prachyl, Cheryl; Quintanilla, Hector; Gutiérrez, Luis Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey and Texas Wesleyan University used technology based courses to enhance internationalization of their curricula. These courses required students to use computer technology as the distance communication medium and to complete an applied international consulting project as part of each…

  8. International Education (Working Paper).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruson, Edward S.

    The history, objectives, and funding patterns for international education are discussed. Attention is directed toward the language and area study centers of the U.S. Office of Education, undergraduate/graduate and scholarly exchange programs, and the support of advanced research in international studies. The main source of funds for language and…

  9. Issues in International Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Eight articles address issues and programs in international rehabilitation. The issue is introduced by a message from the Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of Education for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, Robert R. Davila. Next, "A History of International Rehabilitation" (Nora Ellen Groce) reports on…

  10. Discipline and Internalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Martin L.

    1994-01-01

    Although Grusec and Goodnow make interesting suggestions concerning discipline variables that may affect internalization, their ideas are not integrated into a theory, and their definition of internalization is limited because parent-child similarity may result from children's attributing their values to parents. A theory linking discipline and…