Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear analysis capabilities

  1. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  2. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  3. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Petrie, L.M.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored.

  4. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom; Gorensek, M. B.; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF NUCLEAR ANALYSIS CAPABILITIES FOR DOE WASTE MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research involves research and development in support of complementary technologies that are required to fulfill the anticipated needs of the DOE in its charter to safely provide for the management and ultimate disposition of nuclear facilities and materials. Specifically, t...

  6. FINAL REPORT. DEVELOPMENT OF NUCLEAR ANALYSIS CAPABILITIES FOR DOE WASTE MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this three-year Environmental Management (EM) Science Program (EMSP) project has been to develop and demonstrate prototypical analysis capabilities that can be used by nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: 1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the u...

  7. EMSP project summary (Project ID: 60077): Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Rearden, B.T.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Petrie, L.M.

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypical analysis capabilities that can be used by nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, this project has been investigating the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses. It is also investigating the use of a new deterministic code that allows for specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model geometric details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored.

  8. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored. This report summarizes the progress achieved after only seven months of work on a three-year project.'

  9. Integrated Analysis Capability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Greg, J.; Frisch, H. P.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) software system intended to provide highly effective, interactive analysis tool for integrated design of large structures. Supports needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems. Developed to serve as software interface between computer programs from fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and dynamics of systems on one hand and executive software system and data base on other hand to yield highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention given to such users' requirements as handling data and online assistance with operational features and ability to add new modules of user's choice at future date. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  11. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  12. Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and programmatic aspects of the integrated analysis capability (IAC) are described. The (IAC) is an interdisciplinary analysis system containing a wide range of general purpose analysis programs that are interfaced via a common data base and a unified executive. The system is designed with significant interactive capability as well as the capability to support the entire range of design phases from the definition phase to the verification phase. The system functions as a standalone or interfaced with IPAD.

  13. Information warfare analysis capability

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, J.

    1998-11-18

    With the rapid growth of global computing and communications, information security is a critical issue in all national infrastructure protection discussions. The purpose of our LDRD project-the Information Operations, Warfare, and Assurance (IOWA) initiative-is to advance the enabling core technologies of this field. Special emphasis is placed on computer networks and telecommunication systems. During FY 1998, we developed (1) techniques for identifying the topology of large, complex computer networks, (2) data representation models for these systems, (3) high-performance methods for visualizing the resulting complex models, (4) automated analysis methods for processing large network representations, (5) specialized search techniques for isolating vulnerabilities, (6) a foundation for simulating network operation, and (7) an assessment methodology for determining the consequences of system component failure or disruption.

  14. Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2015-05-27

    In July 2014, DOE NP carried out a review of the US Nuclear Data Program. This led to several recommendations, including that the USNDP should “devise effective and transparent mechanisms to solicit input and feedback from all stakeholders on nuclear data needs and priorities.” The review also recommended that USNDP pursue experimental activities of relevance to nuclear data; the revised 2014 Mission Statement accordingly states that the USNDP uses “targeted experimental studies” to address gaps in nuclear data. In support of these recommendations, DOE NP requested that USNDP personnel organize a Workshop on Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications (NDNCA). This Workshop was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on 27-29 May 2015. The goal of the NDNCA Workshop was to compile nuclear data needs across a wide spectrum of applied nuclear science, and to provide a summary of associated capabilities (accelerators, reactors, spectrometers, etc.) available for the required measurements. The first two days of the workshop consisted of 25 plenary talks by speakers from 16 different institutions, on nuclear energy (NE), national security (NS), isotope production (IP), and industrial applications (IA). There were also shorter “capabilities” talks that described the experimental facilities and instrumentation available for the measurement of nuclear data. This was followed by a third day of topic-specific “breakout” sessions and a final closeout session. The agenda and copies of these talks are available online at http://bang.berkeley.edu/events/NDNCA/agenda. The importance of nuclear data to both basic and applied nuclear science was reflected in the fact that while the impetus for the workshop arose from the 2014 USNDP review, joint sponsorship for the workshop was provided by the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, a UC-Berkeley based organization funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  15. NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

    2011-04-18

    The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into

  16. Advanced Power System Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As a continuing effort to assist in the design and characterization of space power systems, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power and Propulsion Office developed a powerful computerized analysis tool called System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE). This year, SPACE was used extensively in analyzing detailed operational timelines for the International Space Station (ISS) program. SPACE was developed to analyze the performance of space-based photovoltaic power systems such as that being developed for the ISS. It is a highly integrated tool that combines numerous factors in a single analysis, providing a comprehensive assessment of the power system's capability. Factors particularly critical to the ISS include the orientation of the solar arrays toward the Sun and the shadowing of the arrays by other portions of the station.

  17. Fan Flutter Analysis Capability Enhanced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Stefko, George L.

    2001-01-01

    The trend in the design of advanced transonic fans for aircraft engines has been toward the use of complex high-aspect-ratio blade geometries with a larger number of blades and higher loading. In addition, integrally bladed disks or blisks are being considered in fan designs for their potential to reduce manufacturing costs, weight, and complexity by eliminating attachments. With such design trends, there is an increased possibility within the operating region of part-speed stall flutter (self-excited vibrations) that is exacerbated by the reduced structural damping of blisk fans. To verify the aeroelastic soundness of the design, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing and validating an accurate aeroelastic prediction and analysis capability. Recently, this capability was enhanced significantly as described here.

  18. MCNP capabilities for nuclear well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Little, R.C.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Hendricks, J.S. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1990-06-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. This paper discusses how the general-purpose continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP ({und M}onte {und C}arlo {und n}eutron {und p}hoton), part of the LARTCS, provides a computational predictive capability for many applications of interest to the nuclear well logging community. The generalized three-dimensional geometry of MCNP is well suited for borehole-tool models. SABRINA, another component of the LARTCS, is a graphics code that can be used to interactively create a complex MCNP geometry. Users can define many source and tally characteristics with standard MCNP features. The time-dependent capability of the code is essential when modeling pulsed sources. Problems with neutrons, photons, and electrons as either single particle or coupled particles can be calculated with MCNP. The physics of neutron and photon transport and interactions is modeled in detail using the latest available cross-section data.

  19. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-15

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  20. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  1. Seismic Analysis Capability in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.; Strang, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Seismic analysis is a technique which pertains to loading described in terms of boundary accelerations. Earthquake shocks to buildings is the type of excitation which usually comes to mind when one hears the word seismic, but this technique also applied to a broad class of acceleration excitations which are applied at the base of a structure such as vibration shaker testing or shocks to machinery foundations. Four different solution paths are available in NASTRAN for seismic analysis. They are: Direct Seismic Frequency Response, Direct Seismic Transient Response, Modal Seismic Frequency Response, and Modal Seismic Transient Response. This capability, at present, is invoked not as separate rigid formats, but as pre-packaged ALTER packets to existing RIGID Formats 8, 9, 11, and 12. These ALTER packets are included with the delivery of the NASTRAN program and are stored on the computer as a library of callable utilities. The user calls one of these utilities and merges it into the Executive Control Section of the data deck to perform any of the four options are invoked by setting parameter values in the bulk data.

  2. Stiff DAE integrator with sensitivity analysis capabilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-11-26

    IDAS is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for differential equation (ODE) systems with senstivity analysis capabilities. It provides both forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis options.

  3. Ukraine: Independent nuclear weapons capability rising. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dewing, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This thesis argues that Ukraine will move from possession of CIS-controlled nuclear weapons to the development of an independent nuclear capability. It attempts to show how the factors driving Ukraine towards remaining a nuclear state outweigh the factors acting in restraint. This thesis describes the contents of the Ukrainian arsenal, reviews its current material condition and investigates the likelihood that Ukraine can directly control it. This thesis also shows why Ukraine's most likely course in developing and independent nuclear weapons capability will be to retain its 46 SS-24 ICBMs. United States, Ukraine, Russia, Strategic weapons, National strategy, Nuclear strategy, Arms control, Strategic stability, Nuclear weapons Strategic command and control, International relations.

  4. A New Capability for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Sims, Bryan T.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new capability for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) design that has been developed, and presents the results of some analyses performed with this design tool. The purpose of the tool is to design to specified mission and material limits, while maximizing system thrust to weight. The head end of the design tool utilizes the ROCket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) code to generate a system design and system design requirements as inputs to the core analysis. ROCETS is a modular system level code which has been used extensively in the liquid rocket engine industry for many years. The core design tool performs high-fidelity reactor core nuclear and thermal-hydraulic design analysis. At the heart of this process are two codes TMSS-NTP and NTPgen, which together greatly automate the analysis, providing the capability to rapidly produce designs that meet all specified requirements while minimizing mass. A PERL based command script, called CORE DESIGNER controls the execution of these two codes, and checks for convergence throughout the process. TMSS-NTP is executed first, to produce a suite of core designs that meet the specified reactor core mechanical, thermal-hydraulic and structural requirements. The suite of designs consists of a set of core layouts and, for each core layout specific designs that span a range of core fuel volumes. NTPgen generates MCNPX models for each of the core designs from TMSS-NTP. Iterative analyses are performed in NTPgen until a reactor design (fuel volume) is identified for each core layout that meets cold and hot operation reactivity requirements and that is zoned to meet a radial core power distribution requirement.

  5. A New Capability for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Design

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Sims, Bryan T.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2007-01-30

    This paper describes a new capability for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) design that has been developed, and presents the results of some analyses performed with this design tool. The purpose of the tool is to design to specified mission and material limits, while maximizing system thrust to weight. The head end of the design tool utilizes the ROCket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) code to generate a system design and system design requirements as inputs to the core analysis. ROCETS is a modular system level code which has been used extensively in the liquid rocket engine industry for many years. The core design tool performs high-fidelity reactor core nuclear and thermal-hydraulic design analysis. At the heart of this process are two codes TMSS-NTP and NTPgen, which together greatly automate the analysis, providing the capability to rapidly produce designs that meet all specified requirements while minimizing mass. A PERL based command script, called CORE DESIGNER controls the execution of these two codes, and checks for convergence throughout the process. TMSS-NTP is executed first, to produce a suite of core designs that meet the specified reactor core mechanical, thermal-hydraulic and structural requirements. The suite of designs consists of a set of core layouts and, for each core layout specific designs that span a range of core fuel volumes. NTPgen generates MCNPX models for each of the core designs from TMSS-NTP. Iterative analyses are performed in NTPgen until a reactor design (fuel volume) is identified for each core layout that meets cold and hot operation reactivity requirements and that is zoned to meet a radial core power distribution requirement.

  6. Y-12 defense programs: Nuclear Packaging Systems testing capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Nuclear Packaging Systems (NPS) Department can manage/accomplish any packaging task. The NPS organization is responsible for managing the design, testing, certification, procurement, operation, refurbishment, maintenance, and disposal of packaging used to transport radioactive materials, other hazardous materials, and general cargoes on public roads and within the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Additionally, the NPS Department has developed a Quality Assurance plan for all packaging, design and procurement of nonweapon shipping containers for radioactive materials, and design and procurement of performance-oriented packaging for hazardous materials. Further, the NPS Department is responsible for preparation and submittal of Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP). The NPS Department coordinates shipping container procurement and safety certification activities that have lead-times of up to two years. A Packaging Testing Capabilities Table at the Oak Ridge complex is included as a table.

  7. Nuclear Forensics: A Capability at Risk (Abbreviated Version)

    SciTech Connect

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear forensics is important to our national security. Actions, including provision of appropriate funding, are needed now to sustain and improve the nation's nuclear forensics capabilities. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), working with cooperating agencies and national laboratories, should plan and implement a sustainable, effective nuclear forensics program. Nuclear forensics is the examination and evaluation of discovered or seized nuclear materials and devices or, in cases of nuclear explosions or radiological dispersals, of detonation signals and post-detonation debris. Nuclear forensic evidence helps law enforcement and intelligence agencies work toward preventing, mitigating, and attributing a nuclear or radiological incident. This report, requested by DHS, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the Department of Defense, makes recommendations on how to sustain and improve U.S. nuclear forensics capabilities. The United States has developed a nuclear forensics capability that has been demonstrated in real-world incidents of interdicted materials and in exercises of actions required after a nuclear detonation. The committee, however, has concerns about the program and finds that without strong leadership, careful planning, and additional funds, these capabilities will decline. Major areas of concern include: Organization. The responsibility for nuclear forensics is shared by several agencies without central authority and with no consensus on strategic requirements to guide the program. This organizational complexity hampers the program and could prove to be a major hindrance operationally. Sustainability. The nation's current nuclear forensics capabilities are available primarily because the system of laboratories, equipment, and personnel upon which they depend was developed and funded by the nuclear weapons program. However, the weapons program's funds are declining. Workforce and Infrastructure. Personnel skilled in nuclear forensics

  8. Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W.; Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

  9. Expanding Lookout Capabilities for Architectural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shick, B.

    SMC/SYSW/ENY's Lookout tool provides a M&S capability for architectural analysis. It models the contributions of ground and space-based assets in several mission threads and scenarios to quantify overall Space Situational Awareness (SSA) capability. Plotting performance results versus costs enables decision makers to identify and evaluate Best Value families of systems and combinations of architectures. Currently, SMC intends to use Lookout to impact the Fiscal Year 2012 budget programming cycle, the National SSA Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) and Architecture definition effort, planning for programs of record, and AFSPC & SMC leadership. Ultimately, Lookout will enable additional space superiority analysis. Previous Lookout work focused on modeling the metric tracking capabilities of the Space Surveillance Network (detecting and tracking) and proposed concepts to close identified collection shortfalls. SMC/SYSW/ENY leveraged some of the lessons learned in developing and implementing the metric tracking models to expand Lookout to develop an initial characterization capability, including non-resolved space object identification (SOI), imaging, and Foreign Instrumentation and Signals (FIS) Intelligence. Characterization collection phenomenologies added in FY08 and FY09 include mechanical tracking and phased array radars, visible telescopes, and signals collection. Lookout enables evaluating the characterization collections for quantity, quality, and timeliness. Capturing the Tasking, Collection, Processing, Exploitation, and Dissemination processes represent one of the biggest challenges in including characterization capabilities in mission thread and scenario-based analysis. The SMC/SYSW/ENY team met with several representatives of the community and held community-wide Technical Interchange Meetings. Based on feedback from these meetings, SMC created an infrastructure for modeling the tasking processes and scales to relate collection quality to intelligence

  10. Performance Capability of Single-Cavity Vortex Gaseous Nuclear Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.

    1963-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the maximum powerplant thrust-to-weight ratio possible with a single-cavity vortex gaseous reactor in which all the hydrogen propellant must diffuse through a fuel-rich region. An assumed radial temperature profile was used to represent conduction, convection, and radiation heat-transfer effects. The effect of hydrogen property changes due to dissociation and ionization was taken into account in a hydrodynamic computer program. It is shown that, even for extremely optimistic assumptions of reactor criticality and operating conditions, such a system is limited to reactor thrust-to-weight ratios of about 1.2 x 10(exp -3) for laminar flow. For turbulent flow, the maximum thrust-to-weight ratio is less than 10(exp -3). These low thrusts result from the fact that the hydrogen flow rate is limited by the diffusion process. The performance of a gas-core system with a specific impulse of 3000 seconds and a powerplant thrust-to-weight ratio of 10(exp -2) is shown to be equivalent to that of a 1000-second advanced solid-core system. It is therefore concluded that a single-cavity vortex gaseous reactor in which all the hydrogen must diffuse through the nuclear fuel is a low-thrust device and offers no improvement over a solid-core nuclear-rocket engine. To achieve higher thrust, additional hydrogen flow must be introduced in such a manner that it will by-pass the nuclear fuel. Obviously, such flow must be heated by thermal radiation. An illustrative model of a single-cavity vortex system employing supplementary flow of hydrogen through the core region is briefly examined. Such a system appears capable of thrust-to-weight ratios of approximately 1 to 10. For a high-impulse engine, this capability would be a considerable improvement over solid-core performance. Limits imposed by thermal radiation heat transfer to cavity walls are acknowledged but not evaluated. Alternate vortex concepts that employ many parallel vortices to achieve higher

  11. Assessment of Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Facility and Capability Needs

    SciTech Connect

    James Werner

    2014-07-01

    The development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system rests heavily upon being able to fabricate and demonstrate the performance of a high temperature nuclear fuel as well as demonstrating an integrated system prior to launch. A number of studies have been performed in the past which identified the facilities needed and the capabilities available to meet the needs and requirements identified at that time. Since that time, many facilities and capabilities within the Department of Energy have been removed or decommissioned. This paper provides a brief overview of the anticipated facility needs and identifies some promising concepts to be considered which could support the development of a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Detailed trade studies will need to be performed to support the decision making process.

  12. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Kostiuk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the analyses that may be incorporated into the Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant. The document will be used as a discussion tool to enable NASA and other integrated aviation system entities to evaluate, discuss, and prioritize analyses.

  13. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  14. On the pursuit of a nuclear development capability: The case of the Cuban nuclear program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin-Alvarado, Jonathan Calvert

    1998-09-01

    While there have been many excellent descriptive accounts of modernization schemes in developing states, energy development studies based on prevalent modernization theory have been rare. Moreover, heretofore there have been very few analyses of efforts to develop a nuclear energy capability by developing states. Rarely have these analyses employed social science research methodologies. The purpose of this study was to develop a general analytical framework, based on such a methodology to analyze nuclear energy development and to utilize this framework for the study of the specific case of Cuba's decision to develop nuclear energy. The analytical framework developed focuses on a qualitative tracing of the process of Cuban policy objectives and implementation to develop a nuclear energy capability, and analyzes the policy in response to three models of modernization offered to explain the trajectory of policy development. These different approaches are the politically motivated modernization model, the economic and technological modernization model and the economic and energy security model. Each model provides distinct and functionally differentiated expectations for the path of development toward this objective. Each model provides expected behaviors to external stimuli that would result in specific policy responses. In the study, Cuba's nuclear policy responses to stimuli from domestic constraints and intensities, institutional development, and external influences are analyzed. The analysis revealed that in pursuing the nuclear energy capability, Cuba primarily responded by filtering most of the stimuli through the twin objectives of economic rationality and technological advancement. Based upon the Cuban policy responses to the domestic and international stimuli, the study concluded that the economic and technological modernization model of nuclear energy development offered a more complete explanation of the trajectory of policy development than either the

  15. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) motivation and required capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y. K. M.; Park, J. M.; Canik, J. M.; Diem, S. J.; Sontag, A. C.; Lumsdaine, A.; Murakami, M.; Katoh, Y.; Burgess, T. W.; Korsah, K.; Patton, B. D.; Wagner, J. C.; Yoder, G. L.; Cole, M. J.; Fogarty, P. J.; Sawan, M.

    2011-10-01

    A compact (R0 ~ 1.2-1.3m), low aspect ratio, low-Q (<3) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) was recently assessed to provide a fully integrated, D-T-fueled, continuously driven plasma, volumetric nuclear environment of copious neutrons. This environment would be used to carry out, for the first time, discovery-driven research in fusion nuclear science and materials, in parallel with and complementary to ITER. This research would aim to test, discover, and understand new nuclear-nonnuclear synergistic interactions involving plasma material interactions, neutron material interactions, tritium fuel breeding and transport, and power extraction, and innovate and develop solutions for DEMO components. Progress will be reported on the fusion nuclear-nonnuclear coupling effects identified that motivate research on such an FNSF, and on the required capabilities in fusion plasma, device operation, and fusion nuclear science and engineering to fulfill its mission. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Nuclear energy related capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, Susan Y.

    2014-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' technology solutions are depended on to solve national and global threats to peace and freedom. Through science and technology, people, infrastructure, and partnerships, part of Sandia's mission is to meet the national needs in the areas of energy, climate and infrastructure security. Within this mission to ensure clean, abundant, and affordable energy and water is the Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Programs. The Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Programs have a broad range of capabilities, with both physical facilities and intellectual expertise. These resources are brought to bear upon the key scientific and engineering challenges facing the nation and can be made available to address the research needs of others. Sandia can support the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide by incorporating state-of-the-art technologies in safety, security, nonproliferation, transportation, modeling, repository science, and system demonstrations.

  17. Expanding capabilities of the debris analysis workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, David B.; Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.; Shubert, Ann J.; Gerhart, Charlotte M.; Yates, Ken W.; Leake, Michael

    1996-10-01

    Determining the hazards from debris-generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the United States Air Force (USAF) Phillips Laboratory (PL) Space Debris Research Program has developed a simulation software package called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW). This software provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris hazards. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for Department of Defense space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts who are not debris experts. The current version of DAW includes models for spacecraft breakup, debris orbital lifetime, collision hazard risk assessment, and collision dispersion, as well as a satellite catalog database manager, a drag inclusive propagator, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines. Together they provide capabilities to conduct several types of analyses, ranging from range safety assessments to satellite constellation risk assessment. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated system is an object oriented language layer scheduled to be added soon. Other candidate component models under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, other dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUNR workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  18. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  19. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  20. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Anderson, Kevin; Book, Paul

    1999-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the development of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC) and Beta version. We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models in the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC and Beta system development. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has seven chapters, a bibliography, and two appendices.

  1. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  2. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  3. PRELIMINARY NUCLEAR CRITICALITY NUCLEAR SAFETY EVLAUATION FOR THE CONTAINER SURVEILLANCE AND STORAGE CAPABILITY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Low, M; Matthew02 Miller, M; Thomas Reilly, T

    2007-04-30

    Washington Safety Management Solutions (WSMS) provides criticality safety services to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) at the Savannah River Site. One activity at SRS is the Container Surveillance and Storage Capability (CSSC) Project, which will perform surveillances on 3013 containers (hereafter referred to as 3013s) to verify that they meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 3013 for plutonium storage. The project will handle quantities of material that are greater than ANS/ANSI-8.1 single parameter mass limits, and thus required a Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). The WSMS methodology for conducting an NCSE is outlined in the WSMS methods manual. The WSMS methods manual currently follows the requirements of DOE-O-420.1B, DOE-STD-3007-2007, and the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) SCD-3 manual. DOE-STD-3007-2007 describes how a NCSE should be performed, while DOE-O-420.1B outlines the requirements for a Criticality Safety Program (CSP). The WSRC SCD-3 manual implements DOE requirements and ANS standards. NCSEs do not address the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) of non-reactor nuclear facilities that may be affected by overt or covert activities of sabotage, espionage, terrorism or other security malevolence. Events which are beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are outside the scope of a double contingency analysis.

  4. The Boeing plastic analysis capability for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The current BOPACE program is described as a nonlinear stress analysis program, which is based on a family of isoparametric finite elements. The theoretical, user, programmer, preprocessing aspects are discussed, and example problems are included. New features in the current program version include substructuring, an out-of-core Gauss wavefront equation solver, multipoint constraints, combined material and geometric nonlinearities, automatic calculation of inertia effects, provision for distributed as well as concentrated mechanical loads, follower forces, singular crack-tip elements, the SAIL automatic generation capability, and expanded user control over input quantity definition, output selection, and program execution. BOPACE is written in FORTRAN 4 and is currently available for both the IBM 360/370 and the UNIVAC 1108 machines.

  5. Nuclear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Kirby, K. D.

    1973-01-01

    Exploratory calculations were performed for several gas core breeder reactor configurations. The computational method involved the use of the MACH-1 one dimensional diffusion theory code and the THERMOS integral transport theory code for thermal cross sections. Computations were performed to analyze thermal breeder concepts and nonbreeder concepts. Analysis of breeders was restricted to the (U-233)-Th breeding cycle, and computations were performed to examine a range of parameters. These parameters include U-233 to hydrogen atom ratio in the gaseous cavity, carbon to thorium atom ratio in the breeding blanket, cavity size, and blanket size.

  6. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Schenter, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  7. Detection capability analysis of lunar retroreflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xue; Zhao, You; Fan, Zhongwei; Yu, Jin; Ma, Yunfeng

    2011-11-01

    The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) System is a part of the Lunar Exploration. It is used to detect the photons reflected by the retroreflector on the moon, and to accurately calculate range from the earth to the moon at a certain time, so as to improve the pointing precision of the telescope and correct the lunar orbit. The data is indispensable for other research about the moon. This paper not only analyses the main factors (the performance of chosen telescope, the power of laser used in LLR, the capability of detector) in affecting the detection capability of the Lunar Laser Ranging system, but also analyses the whole detection capability under the situation of all parts of an apparatus that could be attainable around the international areas. At last, the economic, feasible, with high performance-to-price ratio supporting programs are presented.

  8. START Analysis for ESAS Capability Needs Prioritization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, William; Mrozinski, Joe; Hua, Hook; Merida, Sofia; Shelton, Kacie; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Weisbin, Charles R.; Derleth, Jason

    2006-01-01

    START is a tool to optimize research and development primarily for NASA missions. It was developed within the Strategic Systems Technology Program Office, a division of the Office of the Chief Technologist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. START is capable of quantifying and comparing the risks, costs, and potential returns of technologies that are candidates for funding. START can be enormously helpful both in selecting technologies for development -- within the constraints of budget, schedule, and other resources -- and in monitoring their progress. START's methods are applicable to everything from individual tasks to multiple projects comprising entire programs of investigation. They can address virtually any technology assessment and capability prioritization issue. In this report, START is used to analyze the capability needs using data from NASA's Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS).

  9. NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Modeling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia D. Gentillon

    2009-09-01

    Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. In addition, thermal-hydraulic experiments are conducted to validate codes used to assess reactor safety. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and identifying relationships among the measured quantities that contribute to their understanding.

  10. Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.

    1984-01-06

    The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network.

  11. Acoustical analysis capability for pusher propeller installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Marsan, Mehmet; Lyon, Craig

    1990-01-01

    A new capability to predict the noise from pusher propeller installations has been developed. The pylon flowfield is modeled by potential flow theory for the outer solution and boundary layer theory for the inner solution. This flowfield is added to the performance prediction for a propeller contained in the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). Predictions of the noise are made using Farassat's method in the ANOPP Subsonic Propeller Noise Module. Comparisons of the predictions are made with noise data from a model scale SR-2 propeller in both tractor and pusher configurations taken in the NASA Langley Research Center Quiet Flow Facility. The results show good agreement near the plane of the propeller, but the quality of the agreement decreases toward the propeller axis.

  12. Overview of NASA Langley's Systems Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, Stephen; Kumar, Ajay; Brewer, Laura; Kimmel, Bill; Korte, John; Moul, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The Systems Analysis and Concepts Directorate (SACD) has been in the systems analysis business line supporting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aeronautics, exploration, space operations and science since the 1960 s. Our current organization structure is shown in Figure 1. SACD mission can be summed up in the following statements: 1. We conduct advanced concepts for Agency decision makers and programs. 2. We provide aerospace systems analysis products such as mission architectures, advanced system concepts, system and technology trades, life cycle cost and risk analysis, system integration and pre-decisional sensitive information. 3. Our work enables informed technical, programmatic and budgetary decisions. SACD has a complement of 114 government employees and approximately 50 on-site contractors which is equally split between supporting aeronautics and exploration. SACD strives for technical excellence and creditability of the systems analysis products delivered to its customers. The Directorate office is continuously building market intelligence and working with other NASA centers and external partners to expand our business base. The Branches strive for technical excellence and credibility of our systems analysis products by seeking out existing and new partnerships that are critical for successful systems analysis. The Directorates long term goal is to grow the amount of science systems analysis business base.

  13. LANL organic analysis detection capabilities for chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.; Hollis, K.W.; Monagle, M.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analysis is the analytical arm for several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) research programs and nuclear materials processes, including characterization and certification of nuclear and nonnuclear materials used in weapons, radioactive waste treatment and waste certification programs. Organic Analysis has an extensive repertoire of analytical technique within the group including headspace gas, PCBs/pesticides, volatile organics and semivolatile organic analysis. In addition organic analysis has mobile labs with analytic capabilities that include volatile organics, total petroleum hydrocarbon, PCBs, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and high explosive screening. A natural extension of these capabilities can be applied to the detection of chemical and biological agents,

  14. Spent nuclear fuel shipping cask handling capabilities of commercial light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Lezberg, A.J.; Votaw, E.F.; Collingham, M.I.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the cask handling capabilities of those reactors which are operating or under construction. A computerized data base that includes cask handling information was developed with information from the literature and utility-supplied data. The capability of each plant to receive and handle existing spent fuel shipping casks was then evaluated. Modal fractions were then calculated based on the results of these evaluations and the quantities of spent fuel projected to be generated by commercial nuclear power plants through 1998. The results indicated that all plants are capable of receiving and handling truck casks. Up to 118 out of 130 reactors (91%) could potentially handle the larger and heavier rail casks if the maximum capability of each facility is utilized. Design and analysis efforts and physical modifications to some plants would be needed to achieve this high rail percentage. These modifications would be needed to satisfy regulatory requirements, increase lifting capabilities, develop rail access, or improve other deficiencies. The remaining 12 reactors were determined to be capable of handling only the smaller truck casks. The percentage of plants that could receive and handle rail casks in the near-term would be reduced to 64%. The primary reason for a plant to be judged incapable of handling rail casks in the near-term was a lack of rail access. The remaining 36% of the plants would be limited to truck shipments. The modal fraction calculations indicated that up to 93% of the spent fuel accumulated by 1998 could be received at federal storage or disposal facilities via rail (based on each plant's maximum capabilities). If the near-term cask handling capabilities are considered, the rail percentage is reduced to 62%.

  15. Analysis of imaging system performance capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haim, Harel; Marom, Emanuel

    2013-06-01

    Present performance analysis of optical imaging systems based on results obtained with classic one-dimensional (1D) resolution targets (such as the USAF resolution chart) are significantly different than those obtained with a newly proposed 2D target [1]. We hereby prove such claim and show how the novel 2D target should be used for correct characterization of optical imaging systems in terms of resolution and contrast. We apply thereafter the consequences of these observations on the optimal design of some two-dimensional barcode structures.

  16. Capability to Monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    In September 1996, the United States was the first country to sign the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), an international agreement to ban all nuclear test explosions, now signed by 177 nations. The treaty is intended to impede the development of nuclear weapons as part of the international nonproliferation regime. The treaty is not yet in effect because it has not been ratified by enough countries-including the United States. As a result, many of its verification provisions have not yet been fully implemented. When implemented, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the Seismological Society of America (SSA) are confident that the combined worldwide monitoring resources will meet the verification goals of the CTBT.

  17. Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pyper, J.W.

    1984-06-01

    The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail.

  18. NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Analysis and Web Delivery Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia D. Gentillon

    2011-09-01

    Projects for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the very high temperature reactor. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high-temperature and high-fluence environments. The NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) at the Idaho National Laboratory has been established to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and for data analysis to identify useful relationships among the measured quantities. The capabilities are described from the perspective of NDMAS users, starting with those who just view experimental data and analytical results on the INL NDMAS web portal. Web display and delivery capabilities are described in detail. Also the current web pages that show Advanced Gas Reactor, Advanced Graphite Capsule, and High Temperature Materials test results are itemized. Capabilities available to NDMAS developers are more extensive, and are described using a second series of examples. Much of the data analysis efforts focus on understanding how thermocouple measurements relate to simulated temperatures and other experimental parameters. Statistical control charts and correlation monitoring provide an ongoing assessment of instrument accuracy. Data analysis capabilities are virtually unlimited for those who use the NDMAS web data download capabilities and the analysis software of their choice. Overall, the NDMAS provides convenient data analysis and web delivery capabilities for studying a very large and rapidly increasing database of well-documented, pedigreed data.

  19. Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsson, Erik; Gombosi, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: NASA capability roadmap activity. Advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis overview. Scientific modeling and simulation. Operations modeling. Multi-special sensing (UV-gamma). System integration. M and S Environments and Infrastructure.

  20. Stand Up of Uranium Capability for Swipe Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; Tracy Houghton; John Olson

    2013-11-01

    The INL has established the capability to process and analyze swipe samples to determine if the amount of U and Pu present on equipment and facilities are at the level typical for natural background, to quantify their isotopic composition and to determine if any off-normal isotopic ratio present in the sample is statistically relevant. A previous report detailed this capability for Pu and preliminarily for U; this report describes the measurements and analysis that were performed to demonstrate the INL capability for U. To establish that a piece of equipment is not contaminated with the element to be sampled, a fabric swipe is used to collect a sample of the materials present on the surface. The swipes are then processed and analyzed to determine if Pu and U are present on the sample at levels above what is accepted as natural background and, for the case of U, whether the isotope ratios deviate from the accepted natural background levels. Both the method applied for chemical processing of the swipes to remove and isolate the U and Pu and the method used to analyze the extracts influences the sensitivity and specificity. Over the years various methods have been developed for processing and analyzing these types of samples; the gold standard for these measurements involves a lengthy and complex separation process followed by analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). However, this method is expensive and time consuming, thus driving a need for a less complicated and more efficient method that provides the necessary level of sensitivity and specificity. Advances in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) over the last decade have enabled analyses of U and Pu that rival that of TIMS. This, coupled with the potential for simplifying the extraction and separation process required for an ICPMS analysis, prompted the INL’s development of methods that provide the analysis of swipes in a timely and efficient manner. U is present in the blank

  1. NASTRAN interfacing modules within the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1986-01-01

    The IAC program provides the framework required for the development of an extensive multidisciplinary analysis capability. Several NASTRAN related capabilities were developed which can all be expanded in a routine manner to meet in-house unique needs. Plans are to complete the work discussed herein and to provide it to the engineering community through COSMIC. Release is to be after the current IAC Level 2 contract work on the IAC executive system is completed and meshed with the interfacing modules and analysis capabilities under development at the GSFC.

  2. Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities Alternatives Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Bryan; Bill Landman; Porter Hill

    2012-12-01

    An alternatives analysis was performed for the Advanced Post-Irradiation Capabilities (APIEC) project in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets”. The Alternatives Analysis considered six major alternatives: ? No Action ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities distributed among multiple locations ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities consolidated at a few locations ? Construct New Facility ? Commercial Partnership ? International Partnerships Based on the alternatives analysis documented herein, it is recommended to DOE that the advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities be provided by a new facility constructed at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  3. Demand-Supply Balancing Capability Analysis for a Future Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogimoto, Kazuhiko; Kataoka, Kazuto; Ikegami, Takashi; Nonaka, Shunsuke; Azuma, Hitoshi; Fukutome, Suguru

    Under the anticipated high penetration of variable renewable energy generation such as photovoltaics and higher share of nuclear generation, the issue of supply-demand balancing capability should be evaluated and fixed in a future power system. Improvement of existing balancing measures and new technologies such as demand activation and energy storage are expected to solve the issue. Under the situation, a long-range power system supply-demand analysis should have the capability to evaluate the balancing capability and balancing counter measures. This paper presents a new analysis methodology of activated demand model and evaluation of supply-demand balancing capability for a long-range power system demand-supply analysis model, ESPRIT. Model analysis was made to verify the new methodology of the tool including day-ahead scheduling of a heat pump water heater, an EV/PHEV and a battery.

  4. Nuclear and radiochemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Yates, S.W.

    1988-06-15

    In this, their second fundamental review under the present authorship and title, they have chosen to continue their emphasis on topics representing the use of nuclear properties for chemical analysis. Excluded are topics in the areas of health physics, nuclear spectroscopy (unless directly related to analysis), nuclear engineering, fusion, radioactive waste disposal, fallout, and nuclear and particle physics. Other topics such as particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), plasma desorption mass spectrometry, radioimmunoassay, Moessbauer spectroscopy, nuclear dating methods, and radiotracer applications are treated briefly here, since they are adequately covered in other current reviews in this or other major journals. Only a brief mention is made of well logging, since many of the advances in this field do not currently appear in the open literature. As in their previous review, they finish with short comments on some interesting developments in nuclear and radiochemistry that are not strictly analytical in nature. This review is based largely on a computerized keyword search of Chemical Abstracts (CA) for the period from mid-November 1985 through December 31, 1987.

  5. Development of thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities for Oyster creek

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    GPU Nuclear (GPUN) has been involved in developing analytical methodologies for Oyster Creek plant thermal-hydraulic response simulation for approx. 15 yr. Plant-system-related transient analysis is being accomplished via RETRAN02 MOD4 and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analysis by SAFER-CORECOOL. This paper reviews the developmental process and lessons learned through this process.

  6. Simple SE Methods Deployed in Revitalizing the Nuclear Post- Irradiation Examination Capability for the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larry R. Zirker; R. Douglas Hamelin; Lori Braase

    2010-07-01

    The “crown jewels” of nuclear energy research facilities (i.e., hot cells, analysis systems, and scientists) have been centered at the Idaho National Laboratory for over 40 years, but in recent years, emphasis and funding for nuclear fuel research and development have declined to adversely affect the readiness and effectiveness of research facilities and equipment. Conversely, the current national nuclear renaissance forces the need for immediate enhancements in facilities, equipment, capabilities, and staff for the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of nuclear fuel. PIE characterizes the “burn-up” and structural integrity of fuel elements and defines the effectiveness of new fuels/alloys in search for optimum fuel burn-up and alloys for current and next generation nuclear reactors. This paper details how a team of system engineers adapted simple system engineering tools and techniques for a customer unfamiliar with the power and effectiveness of system engineering, to achieve project success.

  7. Nuclear and radiochemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Robertson, J.D.; Yates, S.W.

    1992-06-15

    This is the fourth in a series of periodic reviews on the subject of nuclear and radiochemical analysis. The review covers material found in books and journals concerning radiochemical, neutron activation, charged-particle activation, ion beam, isotope dilution, direct counting, transmission, attenuation, scattering, tracer, and isotopic dating methods.

  8. Progress toward the development of an aircraft icing analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the NASA efforts to develop an aircraft icing analysis capability is presented. Discussions are included of the overall and long term objectives of the program as well as current capabilities and limitations of the various computer codes being developed. Descriptions are given of codes being developed to analyze two and three dimensional trajectories of water droplets, airfoil ice accretion, aerodynamic performance degradation of components and complete aircraft configurations, electrothermal deicer, and fluid freezing point depressant deicer. The need for bench mark and verification data to support the code development is also discussed.

  9. SPAR improved structure/fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Pearson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of flowing fluid and elastic structure was added to the SPAR computer code. A method, developed and adopted for use in SPAR utilizes the existing assumed stress hybrid plan element in SPAR. An operational mode was incorporated in SPAR which provides the capability for analyzing the flaw of a two dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluid within rigid boundaries. Equations were developed to provide for the eventual analysis of the interaction of such fluids with an elastic solid.

  10. An Overview of Facilities and Capabilities to Support the Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    James Werner; Sam Bhattacharyya; Mike Houts

    2011-02-01

    Abstract. The future of American space exploration depends on the ability to rapidly and economically access locations of interest throughout the solar system. There is a large body of work (both in the US and the Former Soviet Union) that show that Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is the most technically mature, advanced propulsion system that can enable this rapid and economical access by its ability to provide a step increase above what is a feasible using a traditional chemical rocket system. For an NTP system to be deployed, the earlier measurements and recent predictions of the performance of the fuel and the reactor system need to be confirmed experimentally prior to launch. Major fuel and reactor system issues to be addressed include fuel performance at temperature, hydrogen compatibility, fission product retention, and restart capability. The prime issue to be addressed for reactor system performance testing involves finding an affordable and environmentally acceptable method to test a range of engine sizes using a combination of nuclear and non-nuclear test facilities. This paper provides an assessment of some of the capabilities and facilities that are available or will be needed to develop and test the nuclear fuel, and reactor components. It will also address briefly options to take advantage of the greatly improvement in computation/simulation and materials processing capabilities that would contribute to making the development of an NTP system more affordable. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Fuel fabrication, nuclear testing, test facilities.

  11. NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Analysis and Web Delivery Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia D. Gentillon

    2010-09-01

    Projects for the Very High Temperature Reactor Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the very high temperature reactor. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high-temperature and high-fluence environments. In addition, thermal-hydraulic experiments are conducted to validate codes used to assess reactor safety. The Very High Temperature Reactor Technology Development Office has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) at the Idaho National Laboratory to ensure that very high temperature reactor data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and for data analysis to identify useful relationships among the measured quantities.

  12. NUCLEAR FORENSICS ANALYSIS CENTER FORENSIC ANALYSIS TO DATA INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.

    2011-02-07

    The Nuclear Forensics Analysis Center (NFAC) is part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is one of only two USG National Laboratories accredited to perform nuclear forensic analyses to the requirements of ISO 17025. SRNL NFAC is capable of analyzing nuclear and radiological samples from bulk material to ultra-trace samples. NFAC provides analytical support to the FBI's Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), which is located within SRNL. REEF gives the FBI the capability to perform traditional forensics on material that is radiological and/or is contaminated. SRNL is engaged in research and development efforts to improve the USG technical nuclear forensics capabilities. Research includes improving predictive signatures and developing a database containing comparative samples.

  13. Verification and validation of COBRA-SFS transient analysis capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.; Cuta, J.M.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides documentation of the verification and validation testing of the transient capability in the COBRA-SFS code, and is organized into three main sections. The primary documentation of the code was published in September 1995, with the release of COBRA-SFS, Cycle 2. The validation and verification supporting the release and licensing of COBRA-SFS was based solely on steady-state applications, even though the appropriate transient terms have been included in the conservation equations from the first cycle. Section 2.0, COBRA-SFS Code Description, presents a capsule description of the code, and a summary of the conservation equations solved to obtain the flow and temperature fields within a cask or assembly model. This section repeats in abbreviated form the code description presented in the primary documentation (Michener et al. 1995), and is meant to serve as a quick reference, rather than independent documentation of all code features and capabilities. Section 3.0, Transient Capability Verification, presents a set of comparisons between code calculations and analytical solutions for selected heat transfer and fluid flow problems. Section 4.0, Transient Capability Validation, presents comparisons between code calculations and experimental data obtained in spent fuel storage cask tests. Based on the comparisons presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, conclusions and recommendations for application of COBRA-SFS to transient analysis are presented in Section 5.0.

  14. Development and use of an integrated analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Walker, W. J.; Beste, D. L.; Price, G. A.; Young, J. P.; Frisch, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes a multi-discipline integrated analysis capability, designed to aid the engineering community in coupling of existing modules and in handling of the associated software and data. This capability consists of an executive program which manages tasks and data, a number of technical modules, graphics and special purpose modules, inter-module data flow interfaces, and associated user documentation. The current implementation provides specific modules and coupled solution paths for the thermal, structures and controls technologies. However, the system has been designed to serve also as a framework into which user groups may incorporate other modules and technologies. Details of the system architecture are discussed, in the context of the major design decisions and the software development and usage experience. The paper provides a brief discussion of some other integrated systems which are available or under development.

  15. User's guide for the REBUS-3 fuel cycle analysis capability

    SciTech Connect

    Toppel, B.J.

    1983-03-01

    REBUS-3 is a system of programs designed for the fuel-cycle analysis of fast reactors. This new capability is an extension and refinement of the REBUS-3 code system and complies with the standard code practices and interface dataset specifications of the Committee on Computer Code Coordination (CCCC). The new code is hence divorced from the earlier ARC System. In addition, the coding has been designed to enhance code exportability. Major new capabilities not available in the REBUS-2 code system include a search on burn cycle time to achieve a specified value for the multiplication constant at the end of the burn step; a general non-repetitive fuel-management capability including temporary out-of-core fuel storage, loading of fresh fuel, and subsequent retrieval and reloading of fuel; significantly expanded user input checking; expanded output edits; provision of prestored burnup chains to simplify user input; option of fixed-or free-field BCD input formats; and, choice of finite difference, nodal or spatial flux-synthesis neutronics in one-, two-, or three-dimensions.

  16. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the additions and modifications made to the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) in FY 1997 in support of the ASAC ORS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope and defines the QRS. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) facility that supports the QRS, and it includes a summary of the planned additions to the QRS in FY 1998. The document has five appendices.

  17. Biological Significance of Unwinding Capability of Nuclear Matrix-Associating DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, J.; Kohwi, Y.; Dickinson, L.; Joh, T.; Klehr, D.; Mielke, C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, T.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are thought to separate chromatin into topologically constrained loop domains. A MAR located 5' of the human β-interferon gene becomes stably base-unpaired under superhelical strain, as do the MARs flanking the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer; in both cases a nucleation site exists for DNA unwinding. Concatemerized oligonucleotides containing the unwinding nucleation site exhibited a strong affinity for the nuclear scaffold and augmented SV40 promoter activity in stable transformants. Mutated concatemerized oligonucleotides resisted unwinding, showed weak affinity for the nuclear scaffold, and did not enhance promoter activity. These results suggest that the DNA feature capable of relieving superhelical strain is important for MAR functions.

  18. Planning for exercises of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) forensic capabilities.

    PubMed

    Reutter, Dennis; Schutzer, Steven E; Craft, Charles M; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Fricke, Frederick L; Holowachuk, Scott A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Keim, Paul S; Pearson, James L; Sibert, Robert W; Velsko, Steve

    2010-12-01

    A forensic capability to help identify perpetrators and exclude innocent people should be an integral part of a strategy against terrorist attacks. Exercises have been conducted to increase our preparedness and response capabilities to chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) terrorist attacks. However, incorporating forensic components into these exercises has been deficient. CBRN investigations rely on forensic results, so the need to integrate a forensic component and forensics experts into comprehensive exercises is paramount. This article provides guidance for planning and executing exercises at local, state, federal, and international levels that test the effectiveness of forensic capabilities for CBRN threats. The guidelines presented here apply both to situations where forensics is only a component of a more general exercise and where forensics is the primary focus of the exercise. PMID:21142761

  19. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance capabilities for physical protection of... (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.25 Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material...

  20. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance capabilities for physical protection of... (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.25 Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material...

  1. Tat Peptide Is Capable of Importing Large Nanoparticles Across Nuclear Membrane in Digitonin Permeabilized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nitin, Nitin; LaConte, Leslie; Rhee, Won Jong; Bao, Gang

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the capabilities and limitations of nuclear import is crucial to efficient delivery of macromolecules and nanoparticles for diagnosis and targeted therapy of diseases. Here we report the Tat peptide-mediated import of different cargos into cell nucleus, including dye-labeled streptavidin protein, 43 and 90 nm fluorescent beads, as well as ∼20 nm quantum dots for kinetic measurements. Our results revealed significant differences between Tat- and NLS-mediated nuclear import: unlike delivery with the NLS, Tat peptide-based delivery is not inhibited by WGA blockage nor does it require ATP. Surprisingly, Tat peptide was able to import 90 nm beads into the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells, suggesting that its interaction with the nuclear envelope follows a mechanism different from that of NLS. The import kinetics was quantified using Tat peptide-conjugated QDs, yielding a kinetic constant of 0.0085 s−1. Taken together, our results suggest that, compared with NLS, Tat peptide-mediated nuclear import is faster, follows a different pathway, and is capable of importing large nanoparticles. These results have significant implications for the development of new approaches for delivery of cargo into the nuclei of living cells. PMID:19657743

  2. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Airport Capacity and Delay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David A.; Nelson, Caroline; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    The ASAC Airport Capacity Model and the ASAC Airport Delay Model support analyses of technologies addressing airport capacity. NASA's Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Airport Capacity Model estimates the capacity of an airport as a function of weather, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures, traffic characteristics, and the level of technology available. Airport capacity is presented as a Pareto frontier of arrivals per hour versus departures per hour. The ASAC Airport Delay Model allows the user to estimate the minutes of arrival delay for an airport, given its (weather dependent) capacity. Historical weather observations and demand patterns are provided by ASAC as inputs to the delay model. The ASAC economic models can translate a reduction in delay minutes into benefit dollars.

  3. Development of an analysis capability for the National Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, D.; Nelson, R.

    1997-10-24

    The purpose of this report is to examine the Department of Transportation`s (DOT) National Transportation System (NTS) initiative, to document what has been learned, and to outline a National Transportation Network Analysis Capability (NTNAC) based on a ``TRANSIMS-like`` approach. This study was conducted over a two month period at the end of FY1997. The scope of the effort was carefully defined to accommodate the short time horizon and to provide focus to a very large analytical problem. The objectives were to: (1) define the NTS and the NTS problem; (2) identify problem characteristics; (3) describe an analytical solution based on the TRANSIMS approach; (4) identify data requirements and availability; (5) develop criteria for a scenario to be used in a prototype demonstration; and (6) select a scenario for the prototype demonstration.

  4. Synfuel program analysis. Volume I. Procedures-capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Muddiman, J. B.; Whelan, J. W.

    1980-07-01

    This is the first of the two volumes describing the analytic procedures and resulting capabilities developed by Resource Applications (RA) for examining the economic viability, public costs, and national benefits of alternative synfuel projects and integrated programs. This volume is intended for Department of Energy (DOE) and Synthetic Fuel Corporation (SFC) program management personnel and includes a general description of the costing, venture, and portfolio models with enough detail for the reader to be able to specifiy cases and interpret outputs. It also contains an explicit description (with examples) of the types of results which can be obtained when applied to: the analysis of individual projects; the analysis of input uncertainty, i.e., risk; and the analysis of portfolios of such projects, including varying technology mixes and buildup schedules. In all cases, the objective is to obtain, on the one hand, comparative measures of private investment requirements and expected returns (under differing public policies) as they affect the private decision to proceed, and, on the other, public costs and national benefits as they affect public decisions to participate (in what form, in what areas, and to what extent).

  5. Fire protection of safe shutdown capability at commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, K.

    1993-07-01

    The comprehensive industrial safety standards and codes that exist today have evolved from lessons learned through past experience, research results, and improvements in technological capabilities. The current requirements for fire safety features of commercial nuclear power stations operated in the US are a notable example of this practice. Although fire protection has always been an important design requirement, from the aftermath of a serious fire that occurred in 1975 at the Browns Ferry plant, it was learned that the life safety and property protection concerns of the major fire insurance underwriters may not sufficiently encompass nuclear safety issues, particularly with regard to the potential for fire damage to result in the common mode failure of redundant trains of systems, and components important to the safe shutdown of the reactor. Following its investigations into the Browns Ferry fire, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) promulgated guidance documents, which ultimately developed into mandatory regulations, necessary to assure the implementation of a fire protection program that would address nuclear safety concerns. The new criteria that evolved, contain prescriptive design features, as well as personnel and administrative requirements the Commission determined to be necessary to provide a defense-in-depth level of protection against the hazards of fire and its associated effects on safety related equipment. These criteria are primarily contained in Appendix R of Title 10 to the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50). Since 1983, various members of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have provided technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in support of its evaluations of fire protection features implemented at commercial nuclear power stations operated in the US. This paper presents a discussion of the insights gained by the author during his active participation in this area.

  6. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian, Waris, Abdul; Ismail, Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by convertion rasio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loding scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  7. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Ismail; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-30

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  8. Essays on strategy: hostage rescue planning; maritime theater nuclear capability; strategic psychological operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, R.F.; Thomas, R.E.; Kriesel, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The essays in the volume won recognition in the 1984 Joint Chiefs of Staff Strategy Essay Competition. The volume contains three essays. The author of the first essay considers the requirements for successful planning of hostage rescues, specifically reviewing the Son Tay raid, the Mayaguez crisis, the Entebbe rescue, and the Iranian hostage rescue attempt. The author of the second essay looks at the US Navy's capability for maritime theater nuclear warfare, identifying problems and recommending improvements. The author of the third essay finds the United States lacking a national-level mechanism for coordinating military psychological operations and proposes a way to remedy the problem.

  9. Transient Reliability Analysis Capability Developed for CARES/Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2001-01-01

    The CARES/Life software developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center provides a general-purpose design tool that predicts the probability of the failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. This award-winning software has been widely used by U.S. industry to establish the reliability and life of a brittle material (e.g., ceramic, intermetallic, and graphite) structures in a wide variety of 21st century applications.Present capabilities of the NASA CARES/Life code include probabilistic life prediction of ceramic components subjected to fast fracture, slow crack growth (stress corrosion), and cyclic fatigue failure modes. Currently, this code can compute the time-dependent reliability of ceramic structures subjected to simple time-dependent loading. For example, in slow crack growth failure conditions CARES/Life can handle sustained and linearly increasing time-dependent loads, whereas in cyclic fatigue applications various types of repetitive constant-amplitude loads can be accounted for. However, in real applications applied loads are rarely that simple but vary with time in more complex ways such as engine startup, shutdown, and dynamic and vibrational loads. In addition, when a given component is subjected to transient environmental and or thermal conditions, the material properties also vary with time. A methodology has now been developed to allow the CARES/Life computer code to perform reliability analysis of ceramic components undergoing transient thermal and mechanical loading. This means that CARES/Life will be able to analyze finite element models of ceramic components that simulate dynamic engine operating conditions. The methodology developed is generalized to account for material property variation (on strength distribution and fatigue) as a function of temperature. This allows CARES/Life to analyze components undergoing rapid temperature change in other words, components undergoing thermal shock. In addition, the capability has

  10. Capability for Integrated Systems Risk-Reduction Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, J.; Lumpkins, S.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is working to increase the likelihoods of human health and performance success during long-duration missions, and subsequent crew long-term health. To achieve these goals, there is a need to develop an integrated understanding of how the complex human physiological-socio-technical mission system behaves in spaceflight. This understanding will allow HRP to provide cross-disciplinary spaceflight countermeasures while minimizing resources such as mass, power, and volume. This understanding will also allow development of tools to assess the state of and enhance the resilience of individual crewmembers, teams, and the integrated mission system. We will discuss a set of risk-reduction questions that has been identified to guide the systems approach necessary to meet these needs. In addition, a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space, called the Contributing Factor Map (CFM), is being applied as the backbone for incorporating information addressing these questions from sources throughout HRP. Using the common language of the CFM, information from sources such as the Human System Risk Board summaries, Integrated Research Plan, and HRP-funded publications has been combined and visualized in ways that allow insight into cross-disciplinary interconnections in a systematic, standardized fashion. We will show examples of these visualizations. We will also discuss applications of the resulting analysis capability that can inform science portfolio decisions, such as areas in which cross-disciplinary solicitations or countermeasure development will potentially be fruitful.

  11. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Noise Impact Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Ege, Russell; Burn, Melissa; Carey, Jeffrey; Bradley, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The Noise Impact Model (NIM) has been developed as part of the ASAC. Its primary purpose is to enable users to examine the impact that quieter aircraft technologies and/or operations might have on community noise impact and air carrier operating efficiency at any of 16 large- and medium-sized U.S. airports. The analyst chooses an airport and case year for study, selects a runway use configuration and set of flight tracks for the scenario, and has the option of reducing the noise of the aircraft that operate at the airport by 3, 6, or 10 decibels. NIM computes the resultant noise impact and estimates any airline operations improvements. Community noise impact is characterized in three ways: the size of the noise contour footprint, the number of people living within the.contours, and the number of homes located in the same contours. Distance and time savings are calculated by comparing the noise abatement flight path length to a less circuitous alternate routing. For a more efficient runway use configuration, the increase in capacity and reduction in delay are shown.

  12. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Noise Impact Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ege, Russell A.; Brown, Jerome; Bradley, Kevin; Grandi, Fabio

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the US aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The Noise Impact Model (NIM) has been developed as part of the ASAC. Its primary purpose is to enable users to examine the impact that quieter aircraft technologies and/or operation might have on community noise impact and air carrier operating efficiency at any of 16 large and medium size US airports. The analyst chooses an airport and case year for study, selects a runway use configuration and set of flight tracks for the scenario, and has the option of reducing the noise of the aircraft that operate at the airport by 3, 6, and 10 decibels, NIM computes the resultant noise impact and estimates any airline operational improvements. Community noise impact is characterized in three ways: the size of the noise contour footprint, the number of people living within the contours, and the number of homes located in the same contours. Distance and time savings are calculated by comparing the noise abatement flight path length to a less circuitous alternated routing. For a more efficient runway use configuration, the increase in capacity and reduction in delay are shown.

  13. Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Investment Model-Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jesse; Santmire, Tara

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Air Cargo Investment Model-Cargo (ACIMC), is to examine the economic effects of technology investment on the air cargo market, particularly the market for new cargo aircraft. To do so, we have built an econometrically based model designed to operate like the ACIM. Two main drivers account for virtually all of the demand: the growth rate of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and changes in the fare yield (which is a proxy of the price charged or fare). These differences arise from a combination of the nature of air cargo demand and the peculiarities of the air cargo market. The net effect of these two factors are that sales of new cargo aircraft are much less sensitive to either increases in GDP or changes in the costs of labor, capital, fuel, materials, and energy associated with the production of new cargo aircraft than the sales of new passenger aircraft. This in conjunction with the relatively small size of the cargo aircraft market means technology improvements to the cargo aircraft will do relatively very little to spur increased sales of new cargo aircraft.

  14. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  15. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    PubMed

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have evolved over approximately 40 years, through advances in devices to capture the image from a microscope, huge increases in computational power concurrent with amazing reduction in size of computers, new computer languages, and updated/expanded software algorithms. Remarkably, basic concepts for identifying sperm and their motion patterns are little changed. Older and slower systems remain in use. Most major spermatology laboratories and semen processing facilities have a CASA system, but the extent of reliance thereon ranges widely. This review describes capabilities and limitations of present CASA technology used with boar, bull, and stallion sperm, followed by possible future developments. Each marketed system is different. Modern CASA systems can automatically view multiple fields in a shallow specimen chamber to capture strobe-like images of 500 to >2000 sperm, at 50 or 60 frames per second, in clear or complex extenders, and in <2 minutes, store information for ≥ 30 frames and provide summary data for each spermatozoon and the population. A few systems evaluate sperm morphology concurrent with motion. CASA cannot accurately predict 'fertility' that will be obtained with a semen sample or subject. However, when carefully validated, current CASA systems provide information important for quality assurance of semen planned for marketing, and for the understanding of the diversity of sperm responses to changes in the microenvironment in research. The four take-home messages from this review are: (1) animal species, extender or medium, specimen chamber, intensity of illumination, imaging hardware and software, instrument settings, technician, etc., all affect accuracy and precision of output values; (2) semen production facilities probably do not need a substantially different CASA system whereas biology laboratories would benefit from systems capable of imaging and tracking sperm in deep chambers for a flexible

  16. Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture Analysis Capabilities in Grizzly

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Chakraborty, Pritam; Hoffman, William

    2015-03-01

    Efforts have been underway to develop fracture mechanics capabilities in the Grizzly code to enable it to be used to perform deterministic fracture assessments of degraded reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Development in prior years has resulted a capability to calculate -integrals. For this application, these are used to calculate stress intensity factors for cracks to be used in deterministic linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) assessments of fracture in degraded RPVs. The -integral can only be used to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws because it can only be used to obtain the stress intensity factor for pure Mode I loading. Off-axis flaws will be subjected to mixed-mode loading. For this reason, work has continued to expand the set of fracture mechanics capabilities to permit it to evaluate off-axis flaws. This report documents the following work to enhance Grizzly’s engineering fracture mechanics capabilities for RPVs: • Interaction Integral and -stress: To obtain mixed-mode stress intensity factors, a capability to evaluate interaction integrals for 2D or 3D flaws has been developed. A -stress evaluation capability has been developed to evaluate the constraint at crack tips in 2D or 3D. Initial verification testing of these capabilities is documented here. • Benchmarking for axis-aligned flaws: Grizzly’s capabilities to evaluate stress intensity factors for axis-aligned flaws have been benchmarked against calculations for the same conditions in FAVOR. • Off-axis flaw demonstration: The newly-developed interaction integral capabilities are demon- strated in an application to calculate the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for off-axis flaws. • Other code enhancements: Other enhancements to the thermomechanics capabilities that relate to the solution of the engineering RPV fracture problem are documented here.

  17. Evaluating the Quantitative Capabilities of Metagenomic Analysis Software.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequencing technologies are applied widely and frequently today to describe metagenomes, i.e., microbial communities in environmental or clinical samples, without the need for culturing them. These technologies usually return short (100-300 base-pairs long) DNA reads, and these reads are processed by metagenomic analysis software that assign phylogenetic composition-information to the dataset. Here we evaluate three metagenomic analysis software (AmphoraNet-a webserver implementation of AMPHORA2-, MG-RAST, and MEGAN5) for their capabilities of assigning quantitative phylogenetic information for the data, describing the frequency of appearance of the microorganisms of the same taxa in the sample. The difficulties of the task arise from the fact that longer genomes produce more reads from the same organism than shorter genomes, and some software assign higher frequencies to species with longer genomes than to those with shorter ones. This phenomenon is called the "genome length bias." Dozens of complex artificial metagenome benchmarks can be found in the literature. Because of the complexity of those benchmarks, it is usually difficult to judge the resistance of a metagenomic software to this "genome length bias." Therefore, we have made a simple benchmark for the evaluation of the "taxon-counting" in a metagenomic sample: we have taken the same number of copies of three full bacterial genomes of different lengths, break them up randomly to short reads of average length of 150 bp, and mixed the reads, creating our simple benchmark. Because of its simplicity, the benchmark is not supposed to serve as a mock metagenome, but if a software fails on that simple task, it will surely fail on most real metagenomes. We applied three software for the benchmark. The ideal quantitative solution would assign the same proportion to the three bacterial taxa. We have found that AMPHORA2/AmphoraNet gave the most accurate results and the other two software were under

  18. Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Derstine, K.L.; Blomquist, R.N.

    1994-03-01

    Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations.

  19. SPAR improved structural-fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study whose objective was to improve the operation of the SPAR computer code by improving efficiency, user features, and documentation is presented. Additional capability was added to the SPAR arithmetic utility system, including trigonometric functions, numerical integration, interpolation, and matrix combinations. Improvements were made in the EIG processor. A processor was created to compute and store principal stresses in table-format data sets. An additional capability was developed and incorporated into the plot processor which permits plotting directly from table-format data sets. Documentation of all these features is provided in the form of updates to the SPAR users manual.

  20. Implementing a Nuclear Power Plant Model for Evaluating Load-Following Capability on a Small Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arda, Samet Egemen

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) model is introduced into Positive Sequence Load Flow (PSLF) software by General Electric in order to evaluate the load-following capability of NPPs. The nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) consists of a reactor core, hot and cold legs, plenums, and a U-tube steam generator. The physical systems listed above are represented by mathematical models utilizing a state variable lumped parameter approach. A steady-state control program for the reactor, and simple turbine and governor models are also developed. Adequacy of the isolated reactor core, the isolated steam generator, and the complete PWR models are tested in Matlab/Simulink and dynamic responses are compared with the test results obtained from the H. B. Robinson NPP. Test results illustrate that the developed models represents the dynamic features of real-physical systems and are capable of predicting responses due to small perturbations of external reactivity and steam valve opening. Subsequently, the NSSS representation is incorporated into PSLF and coupled with built-in excitation system and generator models. Different simulation cases are run when sudden loss of generation occurs in a small power system which includes hydroelectric and natural gas power plants besides the developed PWR NPP. The conclusion is that the NPP can respond to a disturbance in the power system without exceeding any design and safety limits if appropriate operational conditions, such as achieving the NPP turbine control by adjusting the speed of the steam valve, are met. In other words, the NPP can participate in the control of system frequency and improve the overall power system performance.

  1. MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon) capabilities for nuclear well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Little, R.C.; Briesmeister, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. The general-purpose continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon), part of the LARTCS, provides a computational predictive capability for many applications of interest to the nuclear well logging community. The generalized three-dimensional geometry of MCNP is well suited for borehole-tool models. SABRINA, another component of the LARTCS, is a graphics code that can be used to interactively create a complex MCNP geometry. Users can define many source and tally characteristics with standard MCNP features. The time-dependent capability of the code is essential when modeling pulsed sources. Problems with neutrons, photons, and electrons as either single particle or coupled particles can be calculated with MCNP. The physics of neutron and photon transport and interactions is modeled in detail using the latest available cross-section data. A rich collections of variance reduction features can greatly increase the efficiency of a calculation. MCNP is written in FORTRAN 77 and has been run on variety of computer systems from scientific workstations to supercomputers. The next production version of MCNP will include features such as continuous-energy electron transport and a multitasking option. Areas of ongoing research of interest to the well logging community include angle biasing, adaptive Monte Carlo, improved discrete ordinates capabilities, and discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo hybrid development. Los Alamos has requested approval by the Department of Energy to create a Radiation Transport Computational Facility under their User Facility Program to increase external interactions with industry, universities, and other government organizations. 21 refs.

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Den Durpel, Luc Van

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims at performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.

  3. Evaluation of Nondestructive Assay/Nondestructive Examination Capabilities for Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Luptak, A.J.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the potential use of nondestructive assay (NDA) and nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies on DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). It presents the NDA/NDE information necessary for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) and the SNF storage sites to use when defining that role, if any, of NDA/NDE in characterization and certification processes. Note that the potential role for NDA/NDE includes confirmatory testing on a sampling basis and is not restricted to use as a primary, item-specific, data collection method. The evaluation does not attempt to serve as a basis for selecting systems for development or deployment. Information was collected on 27 systems being developed at eight DOE locations. The systems considered are developed to some degree, but are not ready for deployment on the full range of DOE SNF and still require additional development. The system development may only involve demonstrating performance on additional SNF, packaging the system for deployment, and developing calibration standards, or it may be as extensive as performing additional basic research. Development time is considered to range from one to four years. We conclude that NDA/NDE systems are capable of playing a key role in the characterization and certification of DOE SNF, either as the primary data source or as a confirmatory test. NDA/NDE systems will be able to measure seven of the nine key SNF properties and to derive data for the two key properties not measured directly. The anticipated performance goals of these key properties are considered achievable except for enrichment measurements on fuels near 20% enrichment. NDA/NDE systems can likely be developed to measure the standard canisters now being considered for co-disposal of DOE SNF. This ability would allow the preparation of DOE SNF for storage now and the characterization and certification to be finalize later.

  4. Long-term Preservation of Data Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Arviset, C.; Ibarra, A.; Pollock, A.

    2015-09-01

    While the long-term preservation of scientific data obtained by large astrophysics missions is ensured through science archives, the issue of data analysis software preservation has hardly been addressed. Efforts by large data centres have contributed so far to maintain some instrument or mission-specific data reduction packages on top of high-level general purpose data analysis software. However, it is always difficult to keep software alive without support and maintenance once the active phase of a mission is over. This is especially difficult in the budgetary model followed by space agencies. We discuss the importance of extending the lifetime of dedicated data analysis packages and review diverse strategies under development at ESA using new paradigms such as Virtual Machines, Cloud Computing, and Software as a Service for making possible full availability of data analysis and calibration software for decades at minimal cost.

  5. Establishment of a strain analysis capability using photoelastic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambrell, Samuel C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In accordance with the Research Plan prepared at the beginning of the Fellowship Program, the summer activities consisted of: training the personnel of the Structural Test Division of the Structures and Dynamics Laboratory in the theory and practice of strain analysis using photoelastic coatings; and performing strain analysis using photoelastic coatings on appropriate test articles. In support of these activities, the following actions were taken: (1) equipment and supplies necessary for strain analysis using photoelastic coatings were specified, purchased, and checked out; (2) four engineers were trained in the theory and practice of strain analysis using photoelastic coatings; (3) four technicians were trained in the practice of preparing and applying photoelastic coatings to both curved and flat surfaces; (4) in addition to the final program seminar, three seminars on the fundamentals and use of photoelastic coatings were presented to a total of 43 members of the various laboratories at MSFC; (5) a photoelastic coating was applied to and used in a test of a thrust vector control corner section; (6) to further assist the engineers with the use and understanding of photoelastic coatings, fifteen journal articles were located and copied, and camera settings for photographic fringe patterns were determined and recorded; and (7) two proposals for providing technical assistance in strain analysis at MSFC and testing of selected components/assemblies at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa were written for submission to NASA.

  6. Capabilities of the analysis tools of the IMPEx infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, V.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Kallio, E. J.; Topf, F.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Gangloff, M.; Budnik, E.; Bouchemit, M.; Renard, B.; Bourel, N.; Penou, E.; André, N.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.; Schmidt, W.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.

    2012-09-01

    The EU-FP7 Project "Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration" was established as a result of scientific collaboration between institutions across Europe and is working on the integration of a set of interactive data analysis and modeling tools in the field of space plasma and planetary physics. According to [1] these tools are comprised of AMDA, Clweb and 3DView from the data analysis and visualisation sector as well as Hybrid/MHD and Paraboloid magnetospheric models from the simulation sector. This presentation focuses on how these various tools will access observational and modeled data and display them in innovative and interactive ways.

  7. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  8. PRETREATMENT MODULE AND COST ANALYSIS CAPABILITY FOR THE COATINGS GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to enhance the Coatings Guide by developing cost analysis algorithms for each coating alternative and its complementary application equipment for metal and plastic painting processes. The Internet web-based tool allows the evaluation of costs of...

  9. Expanding Local Capabilities for the Computational Analysis of the UMass Lowell Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Michael

    In 2011 UMass Lowell received possession of fuel assemblies from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), whom recently suspended their nuclear program. In order to receive a license to use the fuel assemblies from WPI, it became necessary to update some of the computational tools used to support the UMass Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR). It also became desirable to add some additional computational capabilities that were previously unavailable. This thesis covers the different projects undertaken to expand the computational tools used in support of the UMLRR. The thesis is broken into four major sections. The first section discusses the development of a Matlab-based fuel management system for the UMLRR VENTURE model. The second section addresses the derivation of an appropriate lumped fission product cross section used in UMLRR physics studies. The third section presents the calculation of moderator and fuel reactivity coefficients for the UMLRR. The fourth and final part of this thesis discusses the theory and implementation of the equations needed for the calculation of the effective kinetic parameters for the UMLRR that are needed for transient and safety analysis computations. Combined, these enhancements and new capabilities significantly improve the local computational framework for support of the UMLRR.

  10. MAINTAINING HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY CAPABILITIES FOR NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrick, S.; Cordaro, J.; Reeves, G.; Mcintosh, J.; Mauldin, C.; Tietze, K.; Varble, D.

    2011-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a specialized need for analyzing low mass gas species at very high resolutions. The currently preferred analytical method is electromagnetic sector mass spectrometry. This method allows the NNSA Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) to resolve species of similar masses down to acceptable minimum detection limits (MDLs). Some examples of these similar masses are helium-4/deuterium and carbon monoxide/nitrogen. Through the 1980s and 1990s, there were two vendors who supplied and supported these instruments. However, with declining procurements and down turns in the economy, the supply of instruments, service and spare parts from these vendors has become less available, and in some cases, nonexistent. The largest NSE user of this capability is the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. The Research and Development Engineering (R&DE) Group in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) investigated the areas of instrument support that were needed to extend the life cycle of these aging instruments. Their conclusions, as to the focus areas of electromagnetic sector mass spectrometers to address, in order of priority, were electronics, software and hardware. Over the past 3-5 years, the R&DE Group has designed state of the art electronics and software that will allow high resolution legacy mass spectrometers, critical to the NNSA mission, to be operated for the foreseeable future. The funding support for this effort has been from several sources, including the SRS Defense Programs, NNSA Readiness Campaign, Pantex Plant and Sandia National Laboratory. To date, electronics systems have been upgraded on one development system at SRNL, two production systems at Pantex and one production system at Sandia National Laboratory. An NSE working group meets periodically to review strategies going forward. The R&DE Group has also applied their work to the electronics for a

  11. Development and application of structural dynamics analysis capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, Klaus W.; Hozaki, Shig

    1994-01-01

    Extensive research activities were performed in the area of multidisciplinary modeling and simulation of aerospace vehicles that are relevant to NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The efforts involved theoretical development, computer coding, and debugging of the STARS code. New solution procedures were developed in such areas as structures, CFD, and graphics, among others. Furthermore, systems-oriented codes were developed for rendering the code truly multidisciplinary and rather automated in nature. Also, work was performed in pre- and post-processing of engineering analysis data.

  12. Decision analysis as a life support technology assessment capability.

    PubMed

    Ballin, M G

    1995-01-01

    Applied research and technology development is often characterized by uncertainty, risk, and significant delays before tangible returns are obtained. Decision making regarding which technologies to advance and what resources to devote to them is a challenging but essential task, especially in a resource-constrained environment. In the application of life support technology to future manned space flight, new technology concepts typically are characterized by rough approximations of technology performance, uncertain future flight program needs, and a complex, time-intensive process to develop technology to a flight-ready status. Decision analysis is a quantitative, logic-based discipline that imposes formalism and structure to complex problems confronting a decision maker. It also accounts for the limits of knowledge available at the time a decision is needed. The utility of decision analysis to life support technology R&D was evaluated by applying it to two case studies. The methodology was found to provide useful insight for making technology development resource allocation decisions. PMID:11538570

  13. Reactor Physics Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Bowman, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for performing reactor physics analysis. This paper presents a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as next-generation power reactors and space reactors require new high-fidelity physics methods, such as those available in SCALE/TRITON, that accurately represent the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light water reactor designs.

  14. Reactor Physics Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. DeHart; Stephen M. Bowman

    2011-05-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for performing reactor physics analysis. This paper presents a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as next-generation power reactors and space reactors require new high-fidelity physics methods, such as those available in SCALE/TRITON, that accurately represent the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light water reactor designs.

  15. Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Weatherby

    2012-05-01

    The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage

  16. Dispersion analysis and linear error analysis capabilities of the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Previous error analyses conducted by the Guidance and Dynamics Branch of NASA have used the Guidance Analysis Program (GAP) as the trajectory simulation tool. Plans are made to conduct all future error analyses using the Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program. A study was conducted to compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU) error simulations of the two programs. Results of the GAP/SVDS comparison are presented and problem areas encountered while attempting to simulate IMU errors, vehicle performance uncertainties and environmental uncertainties using SVDS are defined. An evaluation of the SVDS linear error analysis capability is also included.

  17. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  18. Multispecies Diffusion Capability For The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code (LANL Milestone M31MS060301 Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, Gary A.

    2012-03-29

    This work addresses only diffusion. The contact solver in AMP was not sufficiently developed this year to attempt treatment of species contact. A cylindrical tensor diffusion coefficient model was added to the AMP code, with the KHHS model [1] implemented into the AMP material library as a specific example. A cylindrical tensor diffusion operator manufactured solution verification example was coded. Before meeting the full text of the milestone task, it remains to: (1) code and run a cylindrical tensor diffusion solver manufactured solution (2) code and run the validation example of [1] (3) document results. These are dependent on developing new capabilities for the AMP code requiring close collaboration with the AMP team at ORNL. The model implemented provides a good intermediate first step toward a general multi-species solver. The multi-species capability of the AMP nuclear fuel code [2] is intended to allow the modeling of radiation-driven redistribution of various elements through solid metal nuclear reactor fuels. The initial model AMP provides for U-Pu-Zr fuels is based on the analysis of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel development program experiment X419 post-irradiation data described in [1], referred to here as the KHHS model. This model may be specific to that experiment, but it was thought to provide a good start for the AMP code, because it (1) is formulated at the engineering scale, (2) decouples the species from each other, (3) predetermines the phase boundaries so that reference to a phase diagram is not needed, and (4) one of the authors (Hayes) was the NEAMS Fuels IPSC manager for FY11. The KHHS model is formulated for radial fluxes as little axial redistribution is seen experimentally. As U-Pu-Zr fuel is irradiated, the constituents migrate to form three annular regions. The center region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted, the middle region is Zr-depleted and U-enriched, and the outer region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted. The Pu concentration

  19. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  20. An Advanced Neutronic Analysis Toolkit with Inline Monte Carlo capability for BHTR Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Martin; John C. Lee

    2009-12-30

    Monte Carlo capability has been combined with a production LWR lattice physics code to allow analysis of high temperature gas reactor configurations, accounting for the double heterogeneity due to the TRISO fuel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 has been used in conjunction with CPM3, which was the testbench lattice physics code for this project. MCNP5 is used to perform two calculations for the geometry of interest, one with homogenized fuel compacts and the other with heterogeneous fuel compacts, where the TRISO fuel kernels are resolved by MCNP5.

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims atmore » performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.« less

  2. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, Peter Donald; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization’s nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a “Cyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)” focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  3. Assessing the Predictive Capability of the LIFEIV Nuclear Fuel Performance Code using Sequential Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, Christopher J.; Williams, Brian J.; Unal, Cetin

    2012-07-05

    This report considers the problem of calibrating a numerical model to data from an experimental campaign (or series of experimental tests). The issue is that when an experimental campaign is proposed, only the input parameters associated with each experiment are known (i.e. outputs are not known because the experiments have yet to be conducted). Faced with such a situation, it would be beneficial from the standpoint of resource management to carefully consider the sequence in which the experiments are conducted. In this way, the resources available for experimental tests may be allocated in a way that best 'informs' the calibration of the numerical model. To address this concern, the authors propose decomposing the input design space of the experimental campaign into its principal components. Subsequently, the utility (to be explained) of each experimental test to the principal components of the input design space is used to formulate the sequence in which the experimental tests will be used for model calibration purposes. The results reported herein build on those presented and discussed in [1,2] wherein Verification & Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) capabilities were applied to the nuclear fuel performance code LIFEIV. In addition to the raw results from the sequential calibration studies derived from the above, a description of the data within the context of the Predictive Maturity Index (PMI) will also be provided. The PMI [3,4] is a metric initiated and developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to quantitatively describe the ability of a numerical model to make predictions in the absence of experimental data, where it is noted that 'predictions in the absence of experimental data' is not synonymous with extrapolation. This simply reflects the fact that resources do not exist such that each and every execution of the numerical model can be compared against experimental data. If such resources existed, the justification for numerical models

  4. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report Server User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen R.; Villani, James A.; Wingrove, Earl R., III

    1996-01-01

    This report is a user's guide for the Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System (ASAC QRS) Report Server. The ASAC QRS is an automated online capability to access selected ASAC models and data repositories. It supports analysis by the aviation community. This system was designed by the Logistics Management Institute for the NASA Ames Research Center. The ASAC QRS Report Server allows users to obtain information stored in the ASAC Data Repositories.

  5. Nuclear Power Plant Module, NPP-1: Nuclear Power Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Robert L.

    The purpose of the Nuclear Power Plant Modules, NPP-1, is to determine the total cost of electricity from a nuclear power plant in terms of all the components contributing to cost. The plan of analysis is in five parts: (1) general formulation of the cost equation; (2) capital cost and fixed charges thereon; (3) operational cost for labor,…

  6. Robotics for Nuclear Material Handling at LANL:Capabilities and Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, Troy A; Lloyd, Jane A; Turner, Cameron J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear material processing operations present numerous challenges for effective automation. Confined spaces, hazardous materials and processes, particulate contamination, radiation sources, and corrosive chemical operations are but a few of the significant hazards. However, automated systems represent a significant safety advance when deployed in place of manual tasks performed by human workers. The replacement of manual operations with automated systems has been desirable for nearly 40 years, yet only recently are automated systems becoming increasingly common for nuclear materials handling applications. This paper reviews several automation systems which are deployed or about to be deployed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for nuclear material handling operations. Highlighted are the current social and technological challenges faced in deploying automated systems into hazardous material handling environments and the opportunities for future innovations.

  7. Assessment of spent nuclear fuel shipping cask handling capabilities of commercial light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.

    1985-08-01

    Realistic truck/rail modal fractions are specifically needed to support the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) and repository facility designs and envirionmental assessment activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spent fuel shipping cask handling capabilities at operating and planned commercial LWRs and use this information to estimate realistic truck/rail modal fractions. The cask handling parameter data collected in this study includes cask handling crane capabilities, dimensions of loading pools, structural limits, availability of rail service, past experience with spent fuel shipments (i.e., which cask was used.), and any other conditions which could impede or preclude use of a particular shipping cask. The results of this evaluation are presented for each reactor. A summary of the results which indicates the number of plants that are capable of handling each transport mode is presented. Note that two types of highway shipments are considered; legal-weight truck (LWT) and overweight truck (OWT). The primary differences between these two types of highway shipments are the size and cargo capacity of the spent fuel shipping casks. The OWT cask is roughly 50% heavier, 50% larger in diameter, and has a 300% larger cargo capacity. As a result of this size differential, some plants are capable of handling LWT casks but not OWT casks.

  8. Northwest Trajectory Analysis Capability: A Platform for Enhancing Computational Biophysics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Lins, Roberto D.; Soares, Thereza A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; Rose, Stuart J.; Williams, Leigh K.; Lai, Canhai; Critchlow, Terence J.; Straatsma, TP

    2008-07-30

    As computational resources continue to increase, the ability of computational simulations to effectively complement, and in some cases replace, experimentation in scientific exploration also increases. Today, large-scale simulations are recognized as an effective tool for scientific exploration in many disciplines including chemistry and biology. A natural side effect of this trend has been the need for an increasingly complex analytical environment. In this paper, we describe Northwest Trajectory Analysis Capability (NTRAC), an analytical software suite developed to enhance the efficiency of computational biophysics analyses. Our strategy is to layer higher-level services and introduce improved tools within the user’s familiar environment without preventing researchers from using traditional tools and methods. Our desire is to share these experiences to serve as an example for effectively analyzing data intensive large scale simulation data.

  9. Methodology, verification, and performance of the continuous-energy nuclear data sensitivity capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    A continuous-energy sensitivity coefficient capability has been introduced into MCNP6. The methods for generating energy-resolved and energy-integrated sensitivity profiles are discussed. Results from the verification exercises that were performed are given, and these show that MCNP6 compares favorably with analytic solutions, direct density perturbations, and comparisons to TSUNAMI-3D and MONK. Run-time and memory requirements are assessed for typical applications, and these are shown to be reasonable with modern computing resources. (authors)

  10. Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

  11. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  12. Evaluation of UF{sub 6}-to-UO{sub 2} conversion capability at commercial nuclear fuel fabrication facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Ranek, N. L.; Monette, F. A.

    2001-06-08

    This report examines the capabilities of existing commercial nuclear fuel fabrication facilities to convert depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) to uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs this information to determine whether using such capacity to convert DOE's inventory of depleted UF{sub 6} to a more stable form is a reasonable alternative that should be considered in the site-specific environmental impact statement for construction and operation of depleted UF{sub 6} conversion facilities. Publicly available information sources were consulted to ascertain the information summarized in this report. For domestic facilities, the information summarized includes currently operating capacity to convert depleted UF{sub 6} to UO{sub 2}; transportation distances from depleted UF{sub 6} storage locations near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, to the facilities; and regulatory requirements applicable to nuclear fuel fabrication and transportation of depleted UF{sub 6}. The report concludes that the total currently operating capability of U.S. commercial nuclear fuel fabricators to convert UF{sub 6} to UO{sub 2} is approximately 5,200 metric tons of UF{sub 6} per annum (tUF{sub 6}/a). This total includes 666 tUF{sub 6}/a scheduled for shutdown by the end of 2001. However, only about 300 tUF{sub 6}/a of this capacity could be confirmed as being possibly available to DOE. The report also provides some limited descriptions of the capabilities of foreign fuel fabrication plants to convert UF{sub 6} to uranium oxide forms.

  13. Blades and Towers Modal Analysis Code (BModes): Verification of Blade Modal Analysis Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G.

    2009-01-01

    BModes is a finite-element code we developed to provide coupled modes for flexible blades, rotating or non-rotating, and for towers, onshore or offshore (supported either on floating platforms or on monopile foundations). Both the blade and the tower allow a tip attachment, which is modeled as a rigid body with mass, six moments of inertia, and a mass centroid that may be offset from the blade or tower axis. Examples of tip attachments are aerodynamic brakes for blades and nacelle-rotor subassemblies for towers. Allowable supports for the tower include tension wires, floating platforms, and shallow-water monopiles with elastic foundation. Coupled modes (implying coupling of flap, lag, axial, and torsion motions) have several applications. Examples are: modeling of major flexible components for modal-based aeroelastic codes such as FAST, validation of turbine models using experimental data, modal-based fatigue analysis, and understanding of aeroelastic-stability behavior of turbines. This paper presents verification of the blade modal analysis capability of BModes. Verification begins with simple uniform beams, rotating and non-rotating, and progresses to realistic blades. BModes-computed modes for all models are compared with analytical modes, if possible to obtain, and with modes generated by RCAS. All results, presented in terms of frequencies and mode shapes, show excellent agreement.

  14. Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-12-15

    This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

  15. Recent Developments in Nuclear Data Measurement capabilities at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at RPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danon, Y.; Daskalakis, A.; McDermott, B.; Thompson, N.; Youmans, A.; Block, R.; Barry, D.; Epping, B.; Leinweber, G.; Rapp, M.; Donovan, T.

    2016-03-01

    The Gaerttner LINAC Center at RPI uses a 60 MeV electron linear accelerator to produce short pulses of neutrons with duration of 5-5000 ns. The main research thrust at the Center is nuclear data for nuclear reactors and criticality safety applications. The Center includes several setups for time-of-flight measurements including neutron transmission, capture and scattering detectors, and a lead slowing-down spectrometer. Experiments were designed to produce neutron interaction cross sections that cover the energy range of 0.01 eV to 20 MeV. Recently added experiments include: setups for keV and fast neutron transmission, a C6D6 detector array for keV neutron capture measurements, and a fast neutron scattering system. Results discussed here include fast neutron scattering and angular distributions for natFe, iron capture measurements for incident neutrons from 1 keV to 2 MeV, fast neutron transmission through W and H2O samples, and keV transmission through Mo isotopes.

  16. Development of irradiation capabilities to address the challenges of the nuclear industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leay, L.; Bower, W.; Horne, G.; Wady, P.; Baidak, A.; Pottinger, M.; Nancekievill, M.; Smith, A. D.; Watson, S.; Green, P. R.; Lennox, B.; LaVerne, J. A.; Pimblott, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    With the announcement of the U.K. new nuclear build and the requirement to decommission old facilities, researchers require bespoke facilities to undertake experiments to inform decision making. This paper describes development of The University of Manchester's Dalton Cumbrian Facility, a custom built research environment which incorporates a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator as well as a self-shielded 60Co irradiator. The ion accelerator allows the investigation into the radiolytic consequences of various charged particles, including protons, alpha particles and a variety of heavier (metal and nonmetal) ions, while the 60Co irradiator allows the effects of gamma radiation to be studied. Some examples of work carried out at the facility are presented to demonstrate how this equipment can improve our mechanistic understanding of various aspects of the deleterious effects of radiation in the nuclear industry. These examples include applications in waste storage and reprocessing as well as geological storage and novel surveying techniques. The outlook for future research is also discussed.

  17. Assessment of Static Delamination Propagation Capabilities in Commercial Finite Element Codes Using Benchmark Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orifici, Adrian C.; Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    With capabilities for simulating delamination growth in composite materials becoming available, the need for benchmarking and assessing these capabilities is critical. In this study, benchmark analyses were performed to assess the delamination propagation simulation capabilities of the VCCT implementations in Marc TM and MD NastranTM. Benchmark delamination growth results for Double Cantilever Beam, Single Leg Bending and End Notched Flexure specimens were generated using a numerical approach. This numerical approach was developed previously, and involves comparing results from a series of analyses at different delamination lengths to a single analysis with automatic crack propagation. Specimens were analyzed with three-dimensional and two-dimensional models, and compared with previous analyses using Abaqus . The results demonstrated that the VCCT implementation in Marc TM and MD Nastran(TradeMark) was capable of accurately replicating the benchmark delamination growth results and that the use of the numerical benchmarks offers advantages over benchmarking using experimental and analytical results.

  18. An Analysis of Nuclear-Rocket Nozzle Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Bachkin, Daniel; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1960-01-01

    A nuclear-rocket regenerative-cooling analysis was conducted over a range of reactor power of 46 to 1600 megawatts and is summarized herein. Although the propellant (hydrogen) is characterized by a large heat-sink capacity, an analysis of the local heat-flux capability of the coolant at the nozzle throat indicated that, for conventional values of system pressure drop, the cooling capability was inadequate to maintain a selected wall temperature of 1440 R. Several techniques for improving the cooling capability were discussed, for example, high pressure drop, high wall temperature, refractory wall coatings, thin highly conductive walls, and film cooling. In any specific design a combination of methods will probably be utilized to achieve successful cooling.

  19. The role of society in engineering risk analysis: a capabilities-based approach.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colleen; Gardoni, Paolo

    2006-08-01

    This article proposes a new conceptual framework in engineering risk analysis to account for the net impact of hazards on individuals in a society. It analyzes four limitations of prevailing approaches to risk analysis and suggests a way to overcome them. These limitations are a result of how societal impacts are characteristically accounted for and valued. Prevailing approaches typically focus too narrowly on the consequences of natural or man-made hazards, not accounting for the broader societal impacts of such hazards. Such approaches lack a uniform and consistent metric for accounting for the impact of the nonquantifiable consequences (like psychological trauma or societal impacts) and rely upon implicit and potentially inaccurate value judgments when evaluating risks. To overcome these limitations, we propose an alternative, Capabilities-Based Approach to the treatment of society in risk analysis. A similar approach is currently used by the United Nations to quantitatively measure the degree of development in countries around the world. In a Capabilities-Based Approach, the potential benefits and losses due to a hazard are measured and compared in a uniform way by using individual capabilities (functionings individuals are able, still able, or unable to achieve) as a metric. This Capabilities-Based Approach provides a foundation for identifying and quantifying the broader, complex societal consequences of hazards and is based on explicit, value judgments. The Capabilities-Based Approach can accommodate different methods or techniques for risk determination and for risk evaluation and can be used in assessing risk in diverse types of hazards (natural or man-made) and different magnitudes that range from minor to catastrophic. In addition, implementing a Capabilities-Based Approach contributes to the development of a single standard for public policy decision making, since a Capabilities-Based Approach is already in use in development economics and policy. PMID

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

    2011-04-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall

  1. Investigation hydrogen-bonding capabilities of modified amide groups using calculated nuclear quadruple coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmi, F.; Hadipour, N. L.; Safinezhad, F.

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, χs, for 17 chemical species are calculated. These are retroamide, N-hydroxamide, N-amino amide, thioamide, methylamine and complexes which amide generates with retroamide and other modified amides. The charge distributions around quadrupolar nuclei are most affected upon intermolecular hydrogen bond formations. χs of these nuclei are computed using ab initio calculations. Some of our findings for average values of χs of 2H, 14N and 17O in hydrogen bonds are 200.00 kHz, 4.40 MHz and 10.50 MHz, respectively. There is a fairly linear dependency between RO⋯H and the logarithm of 2H χs. This correlation is approximately linear for 17O and 14N nuclei.

  2. Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems (TRACS) Initial Operating Capability (IOC) documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dana P.

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems (TRACS) software package is described. TRACS offers supplemental tools for the analysis, control, and interchange of project requirements. This package provides the fundamental capability to analyze and control requirements, serves a focal point for project requirements, and integrates a system that supports efficient and consistent operations. TRACS uses relational data base technology (ORACLE) in a stand alone or in a distributed environment that can be used to coordinate the activities required to support a project through its entire life cycle. TRACS uses a set of keyword and mouse driven screens (HyperCard) which imposes adherence through a controlled user interface. The user interface provides an interactive capability to interrogate the data base and to display or print project requirement information. TRACS has a limited report capability, but can be extended with PostScript conventions.

  3. An assessment on the PTS global radionuclide monitoring capabilities to detect the atmospheric traces of nuclear explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard; Auer, Matthias; Krysta, Monika

    2010-05-01

    In order to detect any kind of nuclear explosion world-wide the Provisional Technical Secretariat to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is building up a verification regime that performs global monitoring for typical signals expected from such an event. Backbone of this regime is the 321 facilities International Monitoring System (IMS) comprising 80 stations to monitor for particulate radionuclides known to be fission or activation products of a nuclear explosion. Every second station is also equipped with a system capable to monitor for the occurrence of the CTBT relevant isotopes Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe-133m, and Xe-135, which have the highest post-explosion fission yields among the noble gases, and are also not subject to wet deposition in the atmosphere. Moreover, they have a good chance to escape from the cavity of an underground nuclear explosion in contrast to the particulates. Effective radionuclide monitoring requires an optimum overall probability of a one-station detection of an atmospheric or underground nuclear explosion within 14 days. Consequently, the distribution of this detection probability is crucial for assessing the capacity of the radionuclide IMS to meet this requirement. The CTBT monitoring capabilities of the RN IMS are quite different in dependence on the environment in which the nuclear test is conducted (underground, underwater or atmospheric) as this determines the first crucial factor for the overall detection probability, the degree of containment. Secondly, the detection probability is subject to the nuclide specific decay and the dilution of any release (containment failure) during its atmospheric dispersion from the release location to one of the IMS stations. Thirdly, the detection limits of the measurement systems in use factor in. In the study presented here the radionuclide monitoring capabilities for detecting atmospheric and underground explosions, the latter mimicked by a 90% contained atmospheric release (first

  4. A nuclear training simulator implementing a capability for multiple, concurrent-training sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneveld, B.J.; Nannister, D.G.; Estes, K.R.; Johnsen, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Simulator at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has recently been upgraded to reflect plant installation of a distributed control system (DCS). The ATR Simulator re-design implements traditional needs for software extensibility and plant installation prototyping, but the driving force behind its new design was an instruction requirement for multiple, concurrent-training sessions. Support is provided for up to three concurrent, independent or interacting, training sessions of reactor, balance of plant, and experiment loop operators. This capability has been achieved by modifying the existing design to consistently apply client-server, parent-child, and peer-to-peer processing technologies, and then to encapsulate concurrency software into all interfaces. When the resulting component-oriented design is linked with build and runtime flexibility in a distributed computing environment, traditional needs for extensibility and parallel software and scenario development are satisfied with minimal additional effort. Sensible configuration management practices coupled with the ability to perform piecewise system builds also greatly facilitate prototyping of plant changes prior to installation.

  5. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report for Fiscal Year 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ege, Russell; Villani, James; Ritter, Paul

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the additions and modifications made to the Quick Response System (QRS) in FY 1998 in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. this Document builds upon the Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Responses System Report for Fiscal Year 1997.

  6. Data engineering systems: Computerized modeling and data bank capabilities for engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, H.; Trettau, R.; Zolotar, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Data Engineering System (DES) is a computer-based system that organizes technical data and provides automated mechanisms for storage, retrieval, and engineering analysis. The DES combines the benefits of a structured data base system with automated links to large-scale analysis codes. While the DES provides the user with many of the capabilities of a computer-aided design (CAD) system, the systems are actually quite different in several respects. A typical CAD system emphasizes interactive graphics capabilities and organizes data in a manner that optimizes these graphics. On the other hand, the DES is a computer-aided engineering system intended for the engineer who must operationally understand an existing or planned design or who desires to carry out additional technical analysis based on a particular design. The DES emphasizes data retrieval in a form that not only provides the engineer access to search and display the data but also links the data automatically with the computer analysis codes.

  7. The integration of a LANDSAT analysis capability with a geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrand, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The integration of LANDSAT data was achieved through the development of a flexible, compatible analysis tool and using an existing data base to select the usable data from a LANDSAT analysis. The software package allows manipulation of grid cell data plus the flexibility to allow the user to include FORTRAN statements for special functions. Using this combination of capabilities the user can classify a LANDSAT image and then selectivity merge the results with other data that may exist for the study area.

  8. Illustration and analysis of a coordinated approach to an effective forensic trace evidence capability.

    PubMed

    Stoney, David A; Stoney, Paul L

    2015-08-01

    An effective trace evidence capability is defined as one that exploits all useful particle types, chooses appropriate technologies to do so, and directly integrates the findings with case-specific problems. Limitations of current approaches inhibit the attainment of an effective capability and it has been strongly argued that a new approach to trace evidence analysis is essential. A hypothetical case example is presented to illustrate and analyze how forensic particle analysis can be used as a powerful practical tool in forensic investigations. The specifics in this example, including the casework investigation, laboratory analyses, and close professional interactions, provide focal points for subsequent analysis of how this outcome can be achieved. This leads to the specification of five key elements that are deemed necessary and sufficient for effective forensic particle analysis: (1) a dynamic forensic analytical approach, (2) concise and efficient protocols addressing particle combinations, (3) multidisciplinary capabilities of analysis and interpretation, (4) readily accessible external specialist resources, and (5) information integration and communication. A coordinating role, absent in current approaches to trace evidence analysis, is essential to achieving these elements. However, the level of expertise required for the coordinating role is readily attainable. Some additional laboratory protocols are also essential. However, none of these has greater staffing requirements than those routinely met by existing forensic trace evidence practitioners. The major challenges that remain are organizational acceptance, planning and implementation. PMID:26042437

  9. SCALE 6: Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Analysis Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Version 6 of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, released in February 2009, contains significant new capabilities and data for nuclear safety analysis and marks an important update for this software package, which is used worldwide. This paper highlights the capabilities of the SCALE system, including continuous-energy flux calculations for processing multigroup problem-dependent cross sections, ENDF/B-VII continuous-energy and multigroup nuclear cross-section data, continuous-energy Monte Carlo criticality safety calculations, Monte Carlo radiation shielding analyses with automated three-dimensional variance reduction techniques, one- and three-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for criticality safety evaluations, two- and three-dimensional lattice physics depletion analyses, fast and accurate source terms and decay heat calculations, automated burnup credit analyses with loading curve search, and integrated three-dimensional criticality accident alarm system analyses using coupled Monte Carlo criticality and shielding calculations.

  10. A Comparison of the Performance Capabilities of Radioisotope Energy Conversion Systems, Betavoltaic Cells, and other Nuclear Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfelds, Eric V; Prelas, Mark A.; Sudarshan, Loyalka K.; Tompson, Robert V.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper we compare the potential performance capabilities of several types of nuclear batteries to the Radioisotope Thermocouple Generators (RTG's) currently in use. There have been theoretical evaluations of, and some experimental testing of, several types of nuclear batteries including Radioisotope Energy Conversion Systems (RECS), Direct Energy Conversion (DEC) systems, and Betavoltaic Power Cells (BPC's). It has been theoretically shown, and to some extent experimentally demonstrated, that RECS, capacitive DEC systems, and possibly BPC's are all potentially capable of efficiencies well above the 9% maximum efficiency demonstrated to date in RTG's customized for deep space probe applications. Even though RTG's have proven their reliability and have respectable power to mass ratios, it is desirable to attain efficiencies of at least 25% in typical applications. High fuel efficiency is needed to minimize the quantities of radioisotopic or nuclear fuels in the systems, to maximize power to mass ratios, and to minimize housing requirements. It has been shown that RECS can attain electric power generation efficiencies greater than 18% for devices which use Sr-90 fuel and where the accompanying material is less than roughly twice the mass of the Sr-90 fuel. Other radioisotopic fuels such as Pu-238 or Kr-85 can also be placed into RECS in order to attain efficiencies over 18%. With the likely exception of one fuel investigated by the authors, all of the promising candidates for RECS fuels can attain electric power to mass ratios greater than 15 W kg{sup -1}. It has been claimed recently [1] that the efficiency of tritium-fueled BPC's can be as high as 25%. While this is impressive and tritium has the benefit of being a 'soft' radioisotopic fuel, the silicon wafer that holds the tritium would have to be considerably more massive than the tritium contained within it and immediately adjacent to the wafer. Considering realistic mass requirements for the presence of

  11. Integrated Analysis Capability pilot computer program. [large space structures and data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated analysis capability (IAC) computer software package was developed for the design analysis and performance evaluation of large space systems. The IAC aids the user in coupling the required technical disciplines (initially structures, thermal and controls), providing analysis solution paths which reveal critical interactive effects in order to study loads, stability and mission performance. Existing technical software modules, having a wide existing user community, are combined with the interface software to bridge between the different technologies and mathematical modeling techniques. The package is supported by executive, data management and interactive graphics software, with primary development within the superminicomputer environment.

  12. A new structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS. [Approximation Concepts Code for Efficient Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1975-01-01

    The creation of an efficient automated capability for minimum weight design of structures is reported. The ACCESS 1 computer program combines finite element analysis techniques and mathematical programming algorithms using an innovative collection of approximation concepts. Design variable linking, constraint deletion techniques and approximate analysis methods are used to generate a sequence of small explicit mathematical programming problems which retain the essential features of the design problem. Organization of the finite element analysis is carefully matched to the design optimization task. The efficiency of the ACCESS 1 program is demonstrated by giving results for several example problems.

  13. Materials analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability to produce focused beams of a few MeV light ions from Van de Graaff accelerators has resulted in the development of nuclear microprobes. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions, and particle-induced x-ray emission are used to provide spatially resolved information from the near surface region of materials. Rutherford backscattering provides nondestructive depth and mass resolution. Nuclear reactions are sensitive to light elements (Z < 15). Particle-induced x-ray analysis is similar to electron microprobe analysis, but 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive. The focused beams are usually produced with specially designed multiplets of magnetic quadrupoles. The LASL microprobe uses a superconducting solenoid as a final lens. The data are acquired by a computer interfaced to the experiment with CAMAC. The characteristics of the information acquired with a nuclear microprobe are discussed; the means of producing the beams of nuclear particles are described; and the limitations and applications of such systems are given.

  14. TIGER -- A technology to improve the delivery capability of nuclear bombs and the survivability of the delivery aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-31

    The TIGER (Terminal guided and Extended-Range) Program was initiated in 1972 to study improved delivery capabilities for stockpiled tactical nuclear bombs. The Southeast Asia conflict fostered the development of air-delivered standoff conventional weapons utilizing terminal guidance systems. SNL initiated the TIGER program to determine if current nuclear bombs could be provided with a similarly accurate standoff capabilities. These conventional weapon delivery techniques, while allowing highly accurate attack, generally require entering the target area at high altitude to establish line of sight to the target. In parallel with the TIGER program, system studies analyzed this concept and showed marked improvement in aircraft and weapon survivability with moderate standoff (10--20 km) if low level deliveries (60 m) could be accomplished. As a result of this work, the TIGER program was redirected in early 1974 to demonstrate a standoff bomb with good accuracy (90 m CEP) when delivered from low flying aircraft. This program redirection resulted in the selection of an inertial guidance system to replace the earlier terminal guidance systems. This program was called the Extended-Range Bomb (ERB). In May 1974, a joint Air Force/DOE study identified the desirability of having a single tactical weapon which could be employed against either fixed, preselected targets, or mobile battlefield targets. Studies conducted on the ERB system showed that the inertially guided weapon could fly not only the standoff mission but also a return-to-target mission against the mobile battlefield targets whose locations are not known accurately enough to use a standoff delivery. The ERB program evolved from these initial investigations into an exploratory program to develop the hardware and demonstrate the technology required to fly standoff and return-to-target trajectories. The application of this technology in the form of field retrofit kits to the B61 bomb is called TIGER II.

  15. 4D PhaseCam(Trade Mark) Capabilities: Modal Analysis and Multiple-Wavelength Mirror Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millerd, James E.; Hayes, John B.; Schmucker, Mark; Eng, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The PhaseCam is a dynamic phase shifting interferometer system manufactured by 4D Technology Corporation that is capable of very fast data acquisition. This rapid acquisition extends the capability of conventional interferometry to enable measurement in unstable environments, the generation of phase movies of surface shape and to facilitate modal analysis of structures. The PhaseCam hardware and software have been modified for MSFC to include synchronous modal optical measurement and analysis. These modifications will be discussed and data presented. The dynamic range of a phase shifting measurement is limited by local slope and pixel sampling to lambda/4 wave steps. Two-wavelength techniques can increase the effective measurement wavelength from microns to tens of centimeters and permit the phasing of mirror segments. A two wavelength PhaseCam will be discussed and measurement results presented.

  16. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D`Aquila, D.M.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  17. PASCO: Structural panel analysis and sizing code, capability and analytical foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Anderson, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer code denoted PASCO which can be used for analyzing and sizing uniaxially-stiffened composite panels is described. Buckling and vibration analyses are carried out with a linked-plate analysis computer code denoted VIPASA, which is incorporated in PASCO. Sizing is based on nonlinear mathematical programming techniques and employs a computer code denoted CONMIN, also incorporated in PASCO. Design requirements considered are initial buckling, material strength, stiffness, and vibration frequency. The capability of the PASCO computer code and the approach used in the structural analysis and sizing are described.

  18. Current Capabilities, Requirements and a Proposed Strategy for Interdependency Analysis in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Robin; Chozos, Nick; Salako, Kizito

    The UK government recently commissioned a research study to identify the state-of-the-art in Critical Infrastructure modelling and analysis, and the government/industry requirements for such tools and services. This study (Cetifs) concluded with a strategy aiming to bridge the gaps between the capabilities and requirements, which would establish interdependency analysis as a commercially viable service in the near future. This paper presents the findings of this study that was carried out by CSR, City University London, Adelard LLP, a safety/security consultancy and Cranfield University, defense academy of the UK.

  19. Multiattribute risk analysis in nuclear emergency management.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, R P; Lindstedt, M R; Sinkko, K

    2000-08-01

    Radiation protection authorities have seen a potential for applying multiattribute risk analysis in nuclear emergency management and planning to deal with conflicting objectives, different parties involved, and uncertainties. This type of approach is expected to help in the following areas: to ensure that all relevant attributes are considered in decision making; to enhance communication between the concerned parties, including the public; and to provide a method for explicitly including risk analysis in the process. A multiattribute utility theory analysis was used to select a strategy for protecting the population after a simulated nuclear accident. The value-focused approach and the use of a neutral facilitator were identified as being useful. PMID:11051070

  20. The Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability Roadmap Vision for Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas; Lieber, Mike; Norton, Charles; Fucik, Karen

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes a subset of the Advanced Modeling Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap that was developed for NASA in 2005. The AMSA Capability Roadmap Team was chartered to "To identify what is needed to enhance NASA's capabilities to produce leading-edge exploration and science missions by improving engineering system development, operations, and science understanding through broad application of advanced modeling, simulation and analysis techniques." The AMSA roadmap stressed the need for integration, not just within the science, engineering and operations domains themselves, but also across these domains. Here we discuss the roadmap element pertaining to integration within the engineering domain, with a particular focus on implications for future observatory missions. The AMSA products supporting the system engineering function are mission information, bounds on information quality, and system validation guidance. The Engineering roadmap element contains 5 sub-elements: (1) Large-Scale Systems Models, (2) Anomalous Behavior Models, (3) advanced Uncertainty Models, (4) Virtual Testing Models, and (5) space-based Robotics Manufacture and Servicing Models.

  1. Destructive analysis capabilities for plutonium and uranium characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Lav; Kuhn, Kevin J; Drake, Lawrence R; Decker, Diana L; Walker, Laurie F; Colletti, Lisa M; Spencer, Khalil J; Peterson, Dominic S; Herrera, Jaclyn A; Wong, Amy S

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Actinide Analytical Chemistry (AAC) group has been in existence since the Manhattan Project. It maintains a complete set of analytical capabilities for performing complete characterization (elemental assay, isotopic, metallic and non metallic trace impurities) of uranium and plutonium samples in different forms. For a majority of the customers there are strong quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) objectives including highest accuracy and precision with well defined uncertainties associated with the analytical results. Los Alamos participates in various international and national programs such as the Plutonium Metal Exchange Program, New Brunswick Laboratory's (NBL' s) Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program (SME) and several other inter-laboratory round robin exercises to monitor and evaluate the data quality generated by AAC. These programs also provide independent verification of analytical measurement capabilities, and allow any technical problems with analytical measurements to be identified and corrected. This presentation will focus on key analytical capabilities for destructive analysis in AAC and also comparative data between LANL and peer groups for Pu assay and isotopic analysis.

  2. Transitioning mine warfare to network-centric sensor analysis: future PMA technologies & capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, J. R.; Guthrie, R. S.; Cramer, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the requisite technologies and enabling capabilities for network-centric sensor data analysis within the mine warfare community. The focus includes both automated processing and the traditional humancentric post-mission analysis (PMA) of tactical and environmental sensor data. This is motivated by first examining the high-level network-centric guidance and noting the breakdown in the process of distilling actionable requirements from this guidance. Examples are provided that illustrate the intuitive and substantial capability improvement resulting from processing sensor data jointly in a network-centric fashion. Several candidate technologies are introduced including the ability to fully process multi-sensor data given only partial overlap in sensor coverage and the ability to incorporate target identification information in stride. Finally the critical enabling capabilities are outlined including open architecture, open business, and a concept of operations. This ability to process multi-sensor data in a network-centric fashion is a core enabler of the Navy's vision and will become a necessity with the increasing number of manned and unmanned sensor systems and the requirement for their simultaneous use.

  3. On-line analysis capabilities developed to support the AFW wind-tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra M.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of on-line analysis tools were developed to support two active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel tests. These tools were developed to verify control law execution, to satisfy analysis requirements of the control law designers, to provide measures of system stability in a real-time environment, and to provide project managers with a quantitative measure of controller performance. Descriptions and purposes of the developed capabilities are presented along with examples. Procedures for saving and transferring data for near real-time analysis, and descriptions of the corresponding data interface programs are also presented. The on-line analysis tools worked well before, during, and after the wind tunnel test and proved to be a vital and important part of the entire test effort.

  4. On-line analysis capabilities developed to support the AFW wind-tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra M.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of on-line analysis tools were developed to support two Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel tests. These tools were developed to verify control law execution, to satisfy analysis requirements of the control law designers, to provide measures of system stability in a real-time environment, and to provide project managers with a quantitative measure of controller performance. Description and purposes of capabilities which were developed are presented in this paper along with examples. Procedures for saving and transferring data for near real-time analysis, and descriptions of the corresponding data interface programs are also presented. The on-line analysis tools worked well before, during, and after the wind-tunnel tests and proved to be a vital and important part of the entire test effort.

  5. Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, John H.; Kemeny, John; King, Fraser; Ross, Alan M.; Ross, Benjamen

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

  6. Defense against nuclear weapons: a decision analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Orient, J.M.

    1985-02-01

    Response to the public health threat posed by nuclear weapons is a medical imperative. The United States, in contrast to other nations, has chosen a course that assures maximal casualties in the event of a nuclear attack, on the theory that prevention of the attack is incompatible with preventive measures against its consequences, such as blast injuries and radiation sickness. A decision analysis approach clarifies the risks and benefits of a change to a strategy of preparedness.

  7. A kinetics and thermalhydraulics capability for the analysis of research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.L.

    1984-02-01

    The PARET code, originally developed for the analysis of the SPERT-III experiments for temperatures and pressures typical of power reactors, has now been modified to include a selection of flow instability, departure from nucleate boiling, single-and two-phase heat transfer correlations, and a properties library considered more applicable to the low pressures, temperatures, and flow rates encountered in research reactors. The PARET code provides a coupled thermal, hydraulic, and point kinetics capability with continuous reactivity feedback, and an optional voiding model that estimates the voiding produced by subcooled boiling. This modified code has been adapted for the testing of methods and models and for subsequent use in the analysis of transient behavior in research reactors. Comparisons have been made with the experimental results from the SPERT-I transients, and the agreement with the experimental data is generally quite good. The selection of proper correlations and properties for the range of interest in research reactors was essential to the accuracy of the results. The code has also been applied to the analysis of the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores for protected and unprotected transients. The code provides an accurate capability for the analysis of research reactor transients. This modified version of the PARET code is available through the National Energy Software Center.

  8. Development of Commercial-Length Nuclear Fuel Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Larry J; Spellman, Donald J; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Chesser, Joel B; Morris, Robert Noel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program is pursuing disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium by reactor irradiation as the fissile constituent of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Lead test assemblies (LTAs) have been irradiated for approximately 36 months in Duke Energy s Catawba-1 nuclear power plant. Per the MOX fuel qualification plan, destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) are to be performed on second-cycle rods (irradiated to an average burnup of approximately 42 GWd/MTHM). These LTA bundles are planned to be returned to the reactor and further irradiated to approximately 52 GWd/MTHM. Nondestructive and destructive PIEs of these commercially irradiated weapons-derived MOX fuel rods will be conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL). PIE began in early 2009. In order to support the examination of the irradiated full-length (~3.66 m) MOX fuel rods, ORNL in 2004 began to develop the necessary infrastructure and equipment for the needed full-scope PIE capabilities. The preparations included modifying the IFEL building to handle a commercial spent-fuel shipping cask; procurement of cask-handling equipment and a skid to move the cask inside the building; development of in-cell handling equipment for cask unloading; and design, fabrication, and testing of the automated, state-of-the-art PIE examination equipment. This paper describes these activities and the full-scope PIE capabilities available at ORNL for commercial full-length fuel rods.

  9. User's guide for the PWR LOCA analysis capability of the WRAP-EM system

    SciTech Connect

    Beranek, F; Gregory, M V

    1980-02-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package (WRAP) has been expanded to provide the capability to analyze loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) in both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs) by using evaluation models (EMs). The input specifications for modules in the WRAP-EM system are presented in this document along with the JOSHUA input templates. This document, along with the WRAP user's guide, provides a step-by-step procedure for setting up a PWR data base for the WRAP-EM system. 12 refs.

  10. Biomolecular Analysis Capability for Cellular and Omics Research on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinart-Ramirez, Y.; Cooley, V. M.; Love, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) assembly complete ushered a new era focused on utilization of this state-of-the-art orbiting laboratory to advance science and technology research in a wide array of disciplines, with benefits to Earth and space exploration. ISS enabling capability for research in cellular and molecular biology includes equipment for in situ, on-orbit analysis of biomolecules. Applications of this growing capability range from biomedicine and biotechnology to the emerging field of Omics. For example, Biomolecule Sequencer is a space-based miniature DNA sequencer that provides nucleotide sequence data for entire samples, which may be used for purposes such as microorganism identification and astrobiology. It complements the use of WetLab-2 SmartCycler"TradeMark", which extracts RNA and provides real-time quantitative gene expression data analysis from biospecimens sampled or cultured onboard the ISS, for downlink to ground investigators, with applications ranging from clinical tissue evaluation to multigenerational assessment of organismal alterations. And the Genes in Space-1 investigation, aimed at examining epigenetic changes, employs polymerase chain reaction to detect immune system alterations. In addition, an increasing assortment of tools to visualize the subcellular distribution of tagged macromolecules is becoming available onboard the ISS. For instance, the NASA LMM (Light Microscopy Module) is a flexible light microscopy imaging facility that enables imaging of physical and biological microscopic phenomena in microgravity. Another light microscopy system modified for use in space to image life sciences payloads is initially used by the Heart Cells investigation ("Effects of Microgravity on Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes for Human Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery"). Also, the JAXA Microscope system can perform remotely controllable light, phase-contrast, and fluorescent observations. And upcoming confocal microscopy

  11. Assessment of international payload requirements on the dual keel space station - A systems analysis capabilities example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. L.; Andersen, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    In the early stages of spacecraft conceptual design, an investigation of subsystem requirements and their impacts on the total system provides insight into many aspects of the spacecraft design. Such an analysis has been performed on the dual keel space station to examine the system effects contributed by three international payloads provided by the Canadian, Japanese, and European Space Agencies. This example is used to illustrate some capabilities of available computer-driven tools and methods for a system analysis. Two space station configurations were examined, one without international payloads (the baseline configuration for the study) and one with the three international payloads. Each configuration was evaluated to define viewing limitations, rigid body dynamics and controls, structural dynamics, orbit lifetime, environmental control and life support, and thermal management effects. The performance, based on each subsystem evaluation, was then compared for the two configurations, and the results and recommendations are presented.

  12. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Conceptual Design and Mission Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kos, Larry D.; Russell, Tiffany E.

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) is an in-space transportation vehicle, comprised of three main elements, designed to support a long-stay human Mars mission architecture beginning in 2035. The stage conceptual design and the mission analysis discussed here support the current nuclear thermal propulsion going on within partnership activity of NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE). The transportation system consists of three elements: 1) the Core Stage, 2) the In-line Tank, and 3) the Drop Tank. The driving mission case is the piloted flight to Mars in 2037 and will be the main point design shown and discussed. The corresponding Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle (LV) is also presented due to it being a very critical aspect of the NCPS Human Mars Mission architecture due to the strong relationship between LV lift capability and LV volume capacity.

  13. Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

    2012-12-24

    This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well

  14. Nuclear analysis of Jordanian tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, K. A.; Saleh, N. S.

    The concentration of trace and minor elements in six different Jordanian and two foreign brands of cigarette tobacco and wrapping paper were determined using combined X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Rutherford backscatteing (RBS) analysis techniques. The cigarette filter and the ash were also analyzed to determine the trapped elements on the filter and their transference with smoke. The toxic effects of some elements have been briefly discussed.

  15. Analysis of nuclear power plant component failures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Items are shown that have caused 90% of the nuclear unit outages and/or deratings between 1971 and 1980 and the magnitude of the problem indicated by an estimate of power replacement cost when the units are out of service or derated. The funding EPRI has provided on these specific items for R and D and technology transfer in the past and the funding planned in the future (1982 to 1986) are shown. EPRI's R and D may help the utilities on only a small part of their nuclear unit outage problems. For example, refueling is the major cause for nuclear unit outages or deratings and the steam turbine is the second major cause for nuclear unit outages; however, these two items have been ranked fairly low on the EPRI priority list for R and D funding. Other items such as nuclear safety (NRC requirements), reactor general, reactor and safety valves and piping, and reactor fuel appear to be receiving more priority than is necessary as determined by analysis of nuclear unit outage causes.

  16. Molecular forensic science analysis of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Dallas David

    Concerns over the proliferation and instances of nuclear material in the environment have increased interest in the expansion of nuclear forensics analysis and attribution programs. A new related field, molecular forensic science (MFS) has helped meet this expansion by applying common scientific analyses to nuclear forensics scenarios. In this work, MFS was applied to three scenarios related to nuclear forensics analysis. In the first, uranium dioxide was synthesized and aged at four sets of static environmental conditions and studied for changes in chemical speciation. The second highlighted the importance of bulk versus particle characterizations by analyzing a heterogeneous industrially prepared sample with similar techniques. In the third, mixed uranium/plutonium hot particles were collected from the McGuire Air Force Base BOMARC Site and analyzed for chemical speciation and elemental surface composition. This work has identified new signatures and has indicated unexpected chemical behavior under various conditions. These findings have lead to an expansion of basic actinide understanding, proof of MFS as a tool for nuclear forensic science, and new areas for expansion in these fields.

  17. Nuclear radiation analysis for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.

    1980-09-01

    A multi-dimensional analysis of the radiation problems was performed for TFTR using the system established at PPPL. Simple, clean geometries were first used to establish the expected reference level. Different calculational models were compared. The characteristics of streaming and activation were then studied. It is shown that the objectives set forth for the TFTR shielding design are not entirely satisfied, based on our calculation. Using the results of this study as a baseline, a review of the shielding for TFTR and its upgrade, TFM, has been initiated with the objective of a shielding design modified to satisfy both modes of operation.

  18. Advances in Sensitivity Analysis Capabilities with SCALE 6.0 and 6.1

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Petrie Jr, Lester M; Williams, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis sequences of SCALE compute the sensitivity of k{sub eff} to each constituent multigroup cross section using perturbation theory based on forward and adjoint transport computations with several available codes. Versions 6.0 and 6.1 of SCALE, released in 2009 and 2010, respectively, include important additions to the TSUNAMI-3D sequence, which computes forward and adjoint solutions in multigroup with the KENO Monte Carlo codes. Previously, sensitivity calculations were performed with the simple and efficient geometry capabilities of KENO V.a, but now calculations can also be performed with the generalized geometry code KENO-VI. TSUNAMI-3D requires spatial refinement of the angular flux moment solutions for the forward and adjoint calculations. These refinements are most efficiently achieved with the use of a mesh accumulator. For SCALE 6.0, a more flexible mesh accumulator capability has been added to the KENO codes, enabling varying granularity of the spatial refinement to optimize the calculation for different regions of the system model. The new mesh capabilities allow the efficient calculation of larger models than were previously possible. Additional improvements in the TSUNAMI calculations were realized in the computation of implicit effects of resonance self-shielding on the final sensitivity coefficients. Multigroup resonance self-shielded cross sections are accurately computed with SCALE's robust deterministic continuous-energy treatment for the resolved and thermal energy range and with Bondarenko shielding factors elsewhere, including the unresolved resonance range. However, the sensitivities of the self-shielded cross sections to the parameters input to the calculation are quantified using only full-range Bondarenko factors.

  19. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Peña, M.; Sierra, O.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  20. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a coupled aeroelastic modeling capability by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed in the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses of the Block I Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level were performed. The computed results from the aeroelastic nozzle modeling are presented.

  1. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.

  2. Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This document is the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report. The purpose of this document is to present the results of the QRS unit and system tests in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope, defines the QRS system and presents the additions made to the QRS this year, explains the assumptions, constraints, and approach used to conduct QRS Unit and System Testing, and presents the schedule used to perform QRS Testing. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) Test Facility and testing environment and summarizes the QRS Unit and System Test effort and results.

  3. Multidisciplinary capability for analysis of the dynamics and control of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Lake, M. S.; Young, J. W.; Sutter, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a computerized data distribution capability, IMAT, in place at the NASA Langley Research Center for the multidisciplinary analysis of the dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. The paper includes results obtained in using IMAT to investigate the influence of the structural response of the space station framework on the control of a 300kw class, solar-dynamic-powered, dual-keel space station during an orbital reboost maneuver. The method of control, using an unfiltered proportional-plus-differential control law, led to a stable control system even with local flexible response measured at the control sensor location included as a part of the control error signal. The flexible response at the outboard solar dynamic system sun-line axis was close to the maximum rotation allowed for efficient operation; thus, active local control of each solar dynamic system may be necessary to limit sun-line axis rotations effectively during a reboost maneuver.

  4. A NEAR REAL-TIME BERYLLIUM MONITOR WITH CAM AND WIPE ANALYSIS CAPABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    D.T. Kendrick; Steven Saggese

    2002-12-01

    Science & Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), under contract No. DE-AC26-00NT40768, was tasked by the US Department of Energy--National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop and test a near real-time beryllium monitor for airborne and surface measurements. Recent public awareness of the health risks associated with exposure to beryllium has underscored the need for better, faster beryllium monitoring capabilities within the DOE. A near real-time beryllium monitor will offer significant improvements over the baseline monitoring technology currently in use. Whereas the baseline technology relies upon collecting an air sample on a filter and the subsequent analysis of the filter by an analytical laboratory, this effort developed a monitor that offers near real-time measurement results while work is in progress. Since the baseline typically only offers after-the-fact documentation of exposure levels, the near real-time capability provides a significant increase in worker protection. The beryllium monitor developed utilizes laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, or LIBS as the fundamental measurement technology. LIBS has been used in a variety of laboratory and field based instrumentation to provide real-time, and near-real-time elemental analysis capabilities. LIBS is an analytical technique where a pulsed high energy laser beam is focused to a point on the sample to be interrogated. The high energy density produces a small high temperature plasma plume, sometimes called a spark. The conditions within this plasma plume result in the constituent atoms becoming excited and emitting their characteristic optical emissions. The emission light is collected and routed to an optical spectrometer for quantitative spectral analysis. Each element has optical emissions, or lines, of a specific wavelength that can be used to uniquely identify that element. In this application, the intensity of the beryllium emission is used to provide a quantitative measure of the abundance of the

  5. Sandia capabilities for the measurement, characterization, and analysis of heliostats for CSP.

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, Charles E.; Christian, Joshua Mark; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Gill, David Dennis; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kolb, William J.; Moss, Timothy A.; Smith, Edward J.; Yellowhair, Julius

    2013-07-01

    The Concentrating Solar Technologies Organization at Sandia National Laboratories has a long history of performing important research, development, and testing that has enabled the Concentrating Solar Power Industry to deploy full-scale power plants. Sandia continues to pursue innovative CSP concepts with the goal of reducing the cost of CSP while improving efficiency and performance. In this pursuit, Sandia has developed many tools for the analysis of CSP performance. The following capabilities document highlights Sandia's extensive experience in the design, construction, and utilization of large-scale testing facilities for CSP and the tools that Sandia has created for the full characterization of heliostats. Sandia has extensive experience in using these tools to evaluate the performance of novel heliostat designs.

  6. Membrane dish analysis: A summary of structural and optical analysis capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, C.R.; Balch, C.D.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Wendelin, T.; Lewandowski, A.

    1991-11-01

    Research at SERI within the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program has focused on the development of membrane dish concentrators for space and terrestrial power applications. As potentially lightweight, inexpensive, high-performance structures, they are excellent candidates for space-deployable energy sources as well as cost-effective terrestrial energy concepts. A thorough engineering research treatment of these types of structures consists primarily of two parts: (1) structural mechanics of the membrane and ring support and (2) analysis and characterization of the concentrator optical performance. It is important to understand the effects of the membrane's structure and support system on the optical performance of the concentrator. This requires an interface between appropriate structural and optical models. Until recently, such models and the required interface have not existed. This report documents research that has been conducted at SERI in this area. It is a compilation of several papers describing structural models of membrane dish structures and optical models used to predict dish concentrator optical and thermal performance. The structural models were developed under SERI subcontract by Dr. Steele and Dr. Balch of Stanford University. The optical model was developed in-house by SERI staff. In addition, the interface between the models is described. It allows easy and thorough characterization of membrane dish systems from the mechanics to the resulting optical performance. The models described herein have been and continue to be extremely useful to SERI, industry, and universities involved with the modeling and analysis of lightweight membrane concentrators for solar thermal applications.

  7. ICAN/DAMP-integrated composite analyzer with damping analysis capabilities: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitrious A.; Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the computer code ICAN/DAMP (Integrated Composite Analyzer with Damping Analysis Capabilities) for the prediction of damping in polymer-matrix composites. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and is a version of the ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) computer program. The code incorporates a new module for synthesizing the material damping from micromechanics to laminate level. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are programmed relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from on-axis damping values. The hygrothermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites caused by temperature and moisture variation is modeled along with the damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix. The temperature rise is continuously vibrating composite plies and composite laminates is also estimated. The ICAN/DAMP user's manual provides descriptions of the damping analysis module's functions, structure, input requirements, output interpretation, and execution requirements. It only addresses the changes required to conduct the damping analysis and is used in conjunction with the 'Second Generation Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) Computer Code' user's manual (NASA TP-3290).

  8. The ESA River and Lake System: Current Capabilities and User Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, P. A.; Smith, R. G.; Salloway, M. K.; Quessou, M.; Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B. M.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-12-01

    Measuring the earth's river and lake resources using satellite radar altimetry offers a unique global monitoring capability, which complements the detailed measurements made by the steadily decreasing number of in-situ gauges. To exploit this unique remote monitoring capability, a global pilot scheme was implemented in 2005 to derive river and lake surface height measurements from multi-mission satellite radar altimetry. Currently Near-Real-Time (NRT) products from the Jason-2 satellite altimeter are automatically generated within 3 days of the satellite measurement. Jason-1 and EnviSat, before it switched into its new 30-day orbit, have also produced NRT results. EnviSat RA-2 provided results for 1229 targets globally, with an additional 52 targets available from Jason-2. Cumulatively these combined missions represent over 20,000 measurements spanning 9 years. Supplementing the available NRT data are historical records and time-series. These are available for the complete EnviSat RA-2 35 day mission period and Jason-2. As the system has been in continuous operation it is possible to derive multi-mission results for a number of targets, providing users with easy access to a valuable historical reference of inland water height variation. This paper presents an overview of the current capabilities of the River and Lake Near-Real-Time system, along with examples of combined time-series over a number of targets. Many users have subscribed to this service, with requirements encompassing water resource management, river modelling, hydroelectric power generation and siting of in-situ gauges. Using the records from this very successful pilot scheme, a detailed analysis of River & Lake users has been undertaken to investigate user geographic distribution and data requirements, and to assess trends among the user data. The main focus of this analysis was based on overall current users, subscribed users and subscribed targets. From this analysis, it was observed that the

  9. STICAP: A linear circuit analysis program with stiff systems capability. Volume 1: Theory manual. [network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    STICAP (Stiff Circuit Analysis Program) is a FORTRAN 4 computer program written for the CDC-6400-6600 computer series and SCOPE 3.0 operating system. It provides the circuit analyst a tool for automatically computing the transient responses and frequency responses of large linear time invariant networks, both stiff and nonstiff (algorithms and numerical integration techniques are described). The circuit description and user's program input language is engineer-oriented, making simple the task of using the program. Engineering theories underlying STICAP are examined. A user's manual is included which explains user interaction with the program and gives results of typical circuit design applications. Also, the program structure from a systems programmer's viewpoint is depicted and flow charts and other software documentation are given.

  10. Membrane dish analysis: A summary of structural and optical analysis capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, C.R.; Balch, C.D.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Wendelin, T.; Lewandowski, A.

    1991-11-01

    Research at SERI within the Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Technology Program has focused on the development of membrane dish concentrators for space and terrestrial power applications. As potentially lightweight, inexpensive, high-performance structures, they are excellent candidates for space-deployable energy sources as well as cost-effective terrestrial energy concepts. A thorough engineering research treatment of these types of structures consists primarily of two parts: (1) structural mechanics of the membrane and ring support and (2) analysis and characterization of the concentrator optical performance. It is important to understand the effects of the membrane`s structure and support system on the optical performance of the concentrator. This requires an interface between appropriate structural and optical models. Until recently, such models and the required interface have not existed. This report documents research that has been conducted at SERI in this area. It is a compilation of several papers describing structural models of membrane dish structures and optical models used to predict dish concentrator optical and thermal performance. The structural models were developed under SERI subcontract by Dr. Steele and Dr. Balch of Stanford University. The optical model was developed in-house by SERI staff. In addition, the interface between the models is described. It allows easy and thorough characterization of membrane dish systems from the mechanics to the resulting optical performance. The models described herein have been and continue to be extremely useful to SERI, industry, and universities involved with the modeling and analysis of lightweight membrane concentrators for solar thermal applications.

  11. Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

    2009-05-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

  12. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  13. Common cause failure analysis of the rodded scram system of the Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 1 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, D.F.; Campbell, D.J.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1986-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a formal method for common cause failure analysis in a reliability analysis of the Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1 rodded scram system. The scram system failure of interest is loss of capability of the system to shut the reactor down when required. The results of this analysis support the ATWS program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The methods used in this analysis support the NRC's Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP).

  14. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Systems Engineering Cost/Risk Analysis Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability. Roadmaps for Systems Engineering Cost/Risk Analysis. Agency Objectives. Strategic Planning Transformation. Review Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Review Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  15. Analysis of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Meng, J.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic analysis, based on nuclear energy density functionals, is presented for shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes. Low-lying excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian, with parameters determined by constrained relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data, and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N = 90, that corresponds to a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  16. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Cost-Benefit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Eric M.; Edlich, Alexander; Santmire, Tara S.; Wingrove, Earl R.., III

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. Therefore, NASA is developing the ability to evaluate the potential impact of various advanced technologies. By thoroughly understanding the economic impact of advanced aviation technologies and by evaluating how the new technologies will be used in the integrated aviation system, NASA aims to balance its aeronautical research program and help speed the introduction of high-leverage technologies. To meet these objectives, NASA is building the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). NASA envisions ASAC primarily as a process for understanding and evaluating the impact of advanced aviation technologies on the U.S. economy. ASAC consists of a diverse collection of models and databases used by analysts and other individuals from the public and private sectors brought together to work on issues of common interest to organizations in the aviation community. ASAC also will be a resource available to the aviation community to analyze; inform; and assist scientists, engineers, analysts, and program managers in their daily work. The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. Commercial air carriers, in particular, are an important stakeholder in this community. Therefore, to fully evaluate the implications of advanced aviation technologies, ASAC requires a flexible financial analysis tool that credibly links the technology of flight with the financial performance of commercial air carriers. By linking technical and financial information, NASA ensures that its technology programs will continue to benefit the user community. In addition, the analysis tool must be capable of being incorporated into the

  17. Programmatic mission capabilities - chemistry and metallurgy research replacement (CMRR) project

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L Nguyen; Kornreich, Drew E; Wong, Amy S

    2011-01-04

    CMRR will have analysis capabilities that support all the nuclear-material programs and national security needs. CMRR will replace the aging CMR Building and provide a key component responsive infrastructure necessary to sustain all nuclear programs and the nuclear-weapons complex. Material characterization capabilities - evaluate the microstructures and properties of nuclear materials and provide experimental data to validate process and performance models. Analytical chemistry capabilities - provide expertise in chemical and radiochemical analysis of materials where actinide elements make up a significant portion of the sample.

  18. Advanced multi-dimensional deterministic transport computational capability for safety analysis of pebble-bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark Mzubanzi

    A coupled neutron transport thermal-hydraulics code system with both diffusion and transport theory capabilities is presented. At the heart of the coupled code is a powerful neutronics solver, based on a neutron transport theory approach, powered by the time-dependent extension of the well known DORT code, DORT-TD. DORT-TD uses a fully implicit time integration scheme and is coupled via a general interface to the thermal-hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT, an HTR-specific two dimensional core thermal-hydraulics code. Feedback is accounted for by interpolating multigroup cross sections from pre-generated libraries which are structured for user specified discrete sets of thermal-hydraulic parameters e.g. fuel and moderator temperatures. The coupled code system is applied to two HTGR designs, the PBMR 400MW and the PBMR 268MW. Steady-state and several design basis transients are modeled in an effort to discern with the adequacy of using neutron diffusion theory as against the more accurate but yet computationally expensive neutron transport theory. It turns out that there are small but significant differences in the results from using either of the two theories. It is concluded that diffusion theory can be used with a higher degree of confidence in the PBMR as long as more than two energy groups are used and that the result must be checked against lower order transport solution, especially for safety analysis purposes. The end product of this thesis is a high fidelity, state-of-the-art computer code system, with multiple capabilities to analyze all PBMR safety related transients in an accurate and efficient manner.

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE WATER-SPLITTING CAPABILITIES OF GALLIUM INDIUM PHOSPHIDE NITRIDE (GaInPN)

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.; Turner, J.

    2007-01-01

    With increasing demand for oil, the fossil fuels used to power society’s vehicles and homes are becoming harder to obtain, creating pollution problems and posing hazard’s to people’s health. Hydrogen, a clean and effi cient energy carrier, is one alternative to fossil fuels. Certain semiconductors are able to harness the energy of solar photons and direct it into water electrolysis in a process known as photoelectrochemical water-splitting. P-type gallium indium phosphide (p-GaInP2) in tandem with GaAs is a semiconductor system that exhibits water-splitting capabilities with a solar-tohydrogen effi ciency of 12.4%. Although this material is effi cient at producing hydrogen through photoelectrolysis it has been shown to be unstable in solution. By introducing nitrogen into this material, there is great potential for enhanced stability. In this study, gallium indium phosphide nitride Ga1-yInyP1-xNx samples were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in an atmospheric-pressure vertical reactor. Photocurrent spectroscopy determined these materials to have a direct band gap around 2.0eV. Mott-Schottky analysis indicated p-type behavior with variation in fl atband potentials with varied frequencies and pH’s of solutions. Photocurrent onset and illuminated open circuit potential measurements correlated to fl atband potentials determined from previous studies. Durability analysis suggested improved stability over the GaInP2 system.

  20. Metabolic Needs and Capabilities of Toxoplasma gondii through Combined Computational and Experimental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tymoshenko, Stepan; Oppenheim, Rebecca D.; Agren, Rasmus; Nielsen, Jens; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a human pathogen prevalent worldwide that poses a challenging and unmet need for novel treatment of toxoplasmosis. Using a semi-automated reconstruction algorithm, we reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic model, ToxoNet1. The reconstruction process and flux-balance analysis of the model offer a systematic overview of the metabolic capabilities of this parasite. Using ToxoNet1 we have identified significant gaps in the current knowledge of Toxoplasma metabolic pathways and have clarified its minimal nutritional requirements for replication. By probing the model via metabolic tasks, we have further defined sets of alternative precursors necessary for parasite growth. Within a human host cell environment, ToxoNet1 predicts a minimal set of 53 enzyme-coding genes and 76 reactions to be essential for parasite replication. Double-gene-essentiality analysis identified 20 pairs of genes for which simultaneous deletion is deleterious. To validate several predictions of ToxoNet1 we have performed experimental analyses of cytosolic acetyl-CoA biosynthesis. ATP-citrate lyase and acetyl-CoA synthase were localised and their corresponding genes disrupted, establishing that each of these enzymes is dispensable for the growth of T. gondii, however together they make a synthetic lethal pair. PMID:26001086

  1. A fully integrated microfluidic genetic analysis system with sample-in-answer-out capability.

    PubMed

    Easley, Christopher J; Karlinsey, James M; Bienvenue, Joan M; Legendre, Lindsay A; Roper, Michael G; Feldman, Sanford H; Hughes, Molly A; Hewlett, Erik L; Merkel, Tod J; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2006-12-19

    We describe a microfluidic genetic analysis system that represents a previously undescribed integrated microfluidic device capable of accepting whole blood as a crude biological sample with the endpoint generation of a genetic profile. Upon loading the sample, the glass microfluidic genetic analysis system device carries out on-chip DNA purification and PCR-based amplification, followed by separation and detection in a manner that allows for microliter samples to be screened for infectious pathogens with sample-in-answer-out results in < 30 min. A single syringe pump delivers sample/reagents to the chip for nucleic acid purification from a biological sample. Elastomeric membrane valving isolates each distinct functional region of the device and, together with resistive flow, directs purified DNA and PCR reagents from the extraction domain into a 550-nl chamber for rapid target sequence PCR amplification. Repeated pressure-based injections of nanoliter aliquots of amplicon (along with the DNA sizing standard) allow electrophoretic separation and detection to provide DNA fragment size information. The presence of Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) in 750 nl of whole blood from living asymptomatic infected mice and of Bordetella pertussis in 1 microl of nasal aspirate from a patient suspected of having whooping cough are confirmed by the resultant genetic profile. PMID:17159153

  2. Analysis of Time-Dependent Tritium Breeding Capability of Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaokang; Pu, Yong; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is an important mission for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) operating on a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel cycle. It is necessary to study the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and breeding tritium inventory variation with operation time so as to provide an accurate data for dynamic modeling and analysis of the tritium fuel cycle. A water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket is one candidate of blanket concepts for the CFETR. Based on the detailed 3D neutronics model of CFETR with the WCCB blanket, the time-dependent TBR and tritium surplus were evaluated by a coupling calculation of the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the fusion activation code FISPACT-2007. The results indicated that the TBR and tritium surplus of the WCCB blanket were a function of operation time and fusion power due to the Li consumption in breeder and material activation. In addition, by comparison with the results calculated by using the 3D neutronics model and employing the transfer factor constant from 1D to 3D, it is noted that 1D analysis leads to an over-estimation for the time-dependent tritium breeding capability when fusion power is larger than 1000 MW. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, and 2014GB119000), and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  3. Information Services at the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Ronald

    This paper describes the operations of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center. Established soon after an accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, its efforts were initially directed towards a detailed analysis of the accident. Continuing functions include: (1) the analysis of generic nuclear safety issues,…

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  5. Nuclear material production cycle vulnerability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.F.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses a method for rapidly and systematically identifying vulnerable equipment in a nuclear material or similar production process and ranking that equipment according to its attractiveness to a malevolent attacker. A multistep approach was used in the analysis. First, the entire production cycle was modeled as a flow diagram. This flow diagram was analyzed using graph theoretical methods to identify processes in the production cycle and their locations. Models of processes that were judged to be particularly vulnerable based on the cycle analysis then were developed in greater detail to identify equipment in that process that is vulnerable to intentional damage.

  6. Implementing a Federated Data Archive with Asynchronous Data Query, Gathering and Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, R.; Gordon, M.; Potter, R.

    2009-12-01

    Software architectures for data archives must be easily extensible to meet the requirements of new space science missions of increasing complexity and scope. Simultaneously, they must ensure that data is discoverable and easily usable by the research community. They must also respect the independence and rights of data providers, who may have digital rights management issues to enforce. The Canadian Space Science Data Portal (CSSDP) is facing these challenges by adopting a federated, portal-based, virtual observatory model, founded on Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) metadata. The approach allows for the separation of the search, discovery and retrieval of pertinent data from its actual storage location, and the insulation of the researcher from the technical details of such data search, discovery, retrieval and usage. CSSDP implements a federation approach that allows data storage locations and methods to evolve separately from data access, and for data analysis capabilities to be offered through a common interface. This allows further independence of (and changes to) any archive in the federation, which is achieved without any change to CSSDP itself and without any impact on individual researchers. As CSSDP has successfully addressed core data storage and access challenges, it is now moving toward supporting improved data manipulation and analysis. CSSDP currently supports researcher collaboration and researcher "tagging" of relevant data, along with basic analytics; in the future, CSSDP will also allow researchers to insert scientific workflows and data analysis tools into their workspace, This paper will discuss how relevant features were implemented for CSSDP, the knowledge gained, the value delivered to the space science research community, and how to position data archives to achieve the same result in related disciplines.

  7. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability and Systems Engineering Capability Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikins, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps. Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  8. JSC earth resources data analysis capabilities available to EOD revision B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A list and summary description of all Johnson Space Center electronic laboratory and photographic laboratory capabilities available to earth resources division personnel for processing earth resources data are provided. The electronic capabilities pertain to those facilities and systems that use electronic and/or photographic products as output. The photographic capabilities pertain to equipment that uses photographic images as input and electronic and/or table summarizes processing steps. A general hardware description is presented for each of the data processing systems, and the titles of computer programs are used to identify the capabilities and data flow.

  9. Description, Usage, and Validation of the MVL-15 Modified Vortex Lattice Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    MVL-15 is the most recent version of the Modified Vortex-Lattice (MVL) code developed within the Aerodynamics Systems Analysis Branch (ASAB) at NASA LaRC. The term "modified" refers to the primary modification of the core vortex-lattice methodology: inclusion of viscous aerodynamics tables that are linked to the linear solution via iterative processes. The inclusion of the viscous aerodynamics inherently converts the MVL-15 from a purely analytic linearized method to a semi-empirical blend which retains the rapid execution speed of the linearized method while empirically characterizing the section aerodynamics at all spanwise lattice points. The modification provides a means to assess non-linear effects on lift that occur at angles of attack near stall, and provides a means to determine the drag associated with the application of design strategies for lift augmentation such as the use of flaps or blowing. The MVL-15 code is applicable to the analyses of aircraft aerodynamics during cruise, but it is most advantageously applied to the analysis of aircraft operating in various high-lift configurations. The MVL methodology has been previously conceived and implemented; the initial concept version was delivered to the ASAB in 2001 (van Dam, C.), subsequently revised (Gelhausen, P. and Ozoroski, T. 2002 / AVID Inc., Gelhausen, P., and Roberts, M. 2004), and then overhauled (Ozoroski, T., Hahn, A. 2008). The latest version, MVL-15 has been refined to provide analysis transparency and enhanced to meet the analysis requirements of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. Each revision has been implemented with reasonable success. Separate applications of the methodology are in use, including a similar in-house capability, developed by Olson, E. that is tailored for structural and acoustics analyses. A central premise of the methodology is that viscous aerodynamic data can be associated with analytic inviscid aerodynamic results at each spanwise wing section

  10. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part I.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of three, covering very comprehensively human resource practices in a global and generic context. The series of papers presents practices which are directly of relevance to the health-care context, and which are based on proven, effective and pioneering approaches. The first paper covers practices based on British and European experiences, gathered from world-class organisations that have either been finalists or went on to win prestigious quality awards such as the British and European Quality Awards. The benchmarking analysis presented in this paper is based on the sub-criteria prescribed by the European Quality Awards Model, which include: how people resources are planned and improved; how the skills and capabilities of people are preserved and developed through recruitment, training and career progression; how people and teams agree targets and continuously review performance; how the involvement of everyone in continuous improvement is prompted and people empowered to take appropriate action; how effective top-down and bottom-up communication is achieved. PMID:10346313

  11. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development. Currently there is no fully coupled computational tool to analyze this fluid/structure interaction process. The objective of this study was to develop a fully coupled aeroelastic modeling capability to describe the fluid/structure interaction process during the transient nozzle operations. The aeroelastic model composes of three components: the computational fluid dynamics component based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, the computational structural dynamics component developed in the framework of modal analysis, and the fluid-structural interface component. The developed aeroelastic model was applied to the transient nozzle startup process of the Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level. The computed nozzle side loads and the axial nozzle wall pressure profiles from the aeroelastic nozzle are compared with those of the published rigid nozzle results, and the impact of the fluid/structure interaction on nozzle side loads is interrogated and presented.

  12. Social Justice Intents in Policy: An Analysis of Capability "for" and "through" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Trevor; Molla, Tebeje

    2015-01-01

    Primarily developed as an alternative to narrow measures of well-being such as utility and resources, Amartya Sen's capability approach places strong emphasis on people's substantive opportunities. As a broad normative framework, the capability approach has become a valuable tool for understanding and evaluating social arrangements (e.g. education…

  13. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... special nuclear material en route; and (iv) Determining and communicating alternative itineraries en route... authorization controls and procedures to provide current authorization schedules and access criteria for persons... and vehicles, to assess such identity against current authorization schedules and access...

  14. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... special nuclear material en route; and (iv) Determining and communicating alternative itineraries en route... authorization controls and procedures to provide current authorization schedules and access criteria for persons... and vehicles, to assess such identity against current authorization schedules and access...

  15. 10 CFR 73.25 - Performance capabilities for physical protection of strategic special nuclear material in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... special nuclear material en route; and (iv) Determining and communicating alternative itineraries en route... authorization controls and procedures to provide current authorization schedules and access criteria for persons... and vehicles, to assess such identity against current authorization schedules and access...

  16. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  17. Multi-Detector Analysis System for Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, Edward Lawrence; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat; Cole, Jerald Donald; Drigert, Mark William; Jewell, James Keith; Egger, Ann Elizabeth; Cordes, Gail Adele

    1999-09-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) program at INEEL is developing a system to characterize SNF for fissile mass, radiation source term, and fissile isotopic content. The system is based on the integration of the Fission Assay Tomography System (FATS) and the Gamma-Neutron Analysis Technique (GNAT) developed under programs supported by the DOE Office of Non-proliferation and National Security. Both FATS and GNAT were developed as separate systems to provide information on the location of special nuclear material in weapons configuration (FATS role), and to measure isotopic ratios of fissile material to determine if the material was from a weapon (GNAT role). FATS is capable of not only determining the presence and location of fissile material but also the quantity of fissile material present to within 50%. GNAT determines the ratios of the fissile and fissionable material by coincidence methods that allow the two prompt (immediately) produced fission fragments to be identified. Therefore, from the combination of FATS and GNAT, MDAS is able to measure the fissile material, radiation source term, and fissile isotopics content.

  18. Capability deprivation of people with Alzheimer's disease: An empirical analysis using a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Juan; Krishnakumar, Jaya; Bungener, Martine; Le Galès, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    How can one assess the quality of life of older people--particularly those with Alzheimer's disease--from the point of view of their opportunities to do valued things in life? This paper is an attempt to answer this question using as a theoretical framework the capability approach. We use data collected on 8841 individuals above 60 living in France (the 2008 Disability and Health Household Survey) and propose a latent variable modelling framework to analyse their capabilities in two fundamental dimensions: freedom to perform self-care activities and freedom to participate in the life of the household. Our results show that living as a couple, having children, being mobile and having access to local shops, health facilities and public services enhance both capabilities. Age, household size and male gender (for one of the two capabilities) act as impediments while the number of impairments reduces both capabilities. We find that people with Alzheimer's disease have a lower level and a smaller range of capabilities (freedom) when compared to those without, even when the latter have several impairments. Hence they need a special attention in policy-making. PMID:26773293

  19. Lighter-Than-Air UAV with slam capabilities for mapping applications and atmpsphere analysys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombatti, G.; Aboudan, A.; La Gloria, N.; Debei, S.; Flamini, E.

    Exploration of the planets and the moons of the Solar System has, up to now, been performed by remote sensing from Earth, fly-by probes, orbiters, landers and rovers. It must be outlined that remote sensing probes and orbiters can only provide non-contact, limited resolution imagery over a small number of spectral bands; on the other hand, landers provide high-resolution imagery and in-situ data collection and analysis capabilities, but only for a single site; while rovers allow imagery collection and in-situ science across their path. These characteristics of the described means highlight how mobility is a key requirement for planetary exploration missions. Autonomous Lighter-Than-Air systems can be used to explore unknown environments without obstacle avoidance problems, mapping large areas to different resolutions and perform a wide variety of measurements and experiments while traveling in the atmosphere. Sensor fusion between Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and vision systems can be used to support vehicle navigation and variable resolution surface mapping. In this work a minimal sensor suite composed by a navigation-grade IMU and stereo camera pair has been studied. At altitudes below 100 m stereo vision techniques can provide range, bearing and elevation measurements of a set of scattered points on the planetary surface. Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) extended Kalman filter algorithm has been adapted to deal with stereo camera observations. Sensor fusion with IMU measurements is used to track rapid vehicle movements and to maintain the vehicle position and attitude estimation also if, for a limited period of time, no vision measurements are available. Moreover the SLAM algorithm produces a scattered points map of the complete traveled area. In this work we analyse the dynamics of the airship in response of the encountered environment of Titan moon. Possible trajectories for an extended survey are investigated; this allows to have a precise

  20. Some studies on the use of NASTRAN for nuclear power plant structural analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlur, A. V.; Valathur, M.

    1973-01-01

    Studies made on the use of NASTRAN for nuclear power plant analysis and design are presented. These studies indicate that NASTRAN could be effectively used for static, dynamic and special purpose problems encountered in the design of such plants. Normal mode capability of NASTRAN is extended through a post-processor program to handle seismic analysis. Static and dynamic substructuring is discussed. Extension of NASTRAN to include the needs in the civil engineering industry is discussed.

  1. DEVELOP ECONOMIC ANALYSIS CAPABILITY OF THE SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE (SAGE)(SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task will upgrade and enhance the SAGE software system by developing cost algorithms that will give it a cost projection capability. This capability will complement the process selection capability of the existing system by giving the user a complete picture including the co...

  2. Extremely Intensive and Conservative Fault Capability Studies on Nuclear Facilities in Japan after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Fukushima Daiichi Incident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.

    2013-12-01

    Rocks of the Japanese islands are mostly faulted since the Mesozoic Era. The opening of the Sea of Japan in Middle Miocene stretched most of the Japanese crust together with rifting systems. Modern compressional tectonic regime started in Pliocene and accelerated during Quaternary. The ubiquitous bedrock fault prior to the Quaternary had long been regarded as incapable for the future rupturing. This view on the bedrock fault, however, is in question after the March 11, 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunamis. There is no scientific reason for the Tohoku earthquake to let the geologists and seismologists worry about the capability of the long-deceased fault. Neither the unexpected April 11, 2011 extensional faulting event on shore in southern Fukushima prefecture has any scientific reason as well. There was no change and no new stress field, but the psychological situation of the scientists and the public welcomed the wrong belief in unexpected stress changes all over Japan, in the same manner that the March 11 M 9 was not expected. Finally, the capabilities of the bedrock faults, fractures, and joints came up to concern about seismic safety of nuclear facilities. After the incidents, the nuclear regulation authority of Japan began reevaluation of the seismic safety of all facilities in Japan. The primary issues of the reevaluation were conjunctive multi-fault mega-earthquakes and the capabilities of the bedrock faults, precisely reflecting the Tohoku events. The former does not require immediate abandonment of a facility. However, the latter now denies any chance of continued operation. It is because of the new (July 2013) safety guide gave top priority to the capability of the displacement under a facility for the evaluation on safe operation. The guide also requires utmost deterministic manner in very conservative ways. The regulators ordered the utility companies to thoroughly examine the capability for several sites, and started review of the studies in late 2012

  3. Managing Human Resource Capabilities for Sustainable Competitive Advantage: An Empirical Analysis from Indian Global Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandekar, Aradhana; Sharma, Anuradha

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to examine the role of human resource capability (HRC) in organisational performance and sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) in Indian global organisations. Design/Methodology/Approach: To carry out the present study, an empirical research on a random sample of 300 line or human resource managers from…

  4. Measuring Organizational Learning Capability in Indian Managers and Establishing Firm Performance Linkage: An Empirical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Jyotsna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to measure Organizational Learning Capability (OLC) perception in the managers of public, private and multinational organizations and establish the link between OLC and firm performance. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected from a sample of 612 managers randomly drawn from Indian industry,…

  5. Numerical Analysis of the Output-Pulse Shaping Capability of Linear Transformer Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Fengju; Yin, Jiahui; Qiu, Aici

    2011-04-01

    Output-pulse shaping capability of a linear transformer driver (LTD) module under different conditions is studied, by conducting the whole circuit model simulation by using the PSPICE code. Results indicate that a higher impedance profile of the internal transmission line would lead to a wider adjustment range for the output current rise time and a narrower adjustment range for the current peak. The number of cavities in series has a positive effect on the output-pulse shaping capability of LTD. Such an improvement in the output-pulse shaping capability can primarily be ascribed to the increment in the axial electric length of LTD. For a triggering time interval longer than the time taken by a pulse to propagate through the length of one cavity, the output parameters of LTD could be improved significantly. The present insulating capability of gas switches and other elements in the LTD cavities may only tolerate a slightly longer deviation in the triggering time interval. It is feasible for the LTD module to reduce the output current rise time, though it is not useful to improve the peak power effectively.

  6. A Human Development and Capabilities "Prospective Analysis" of Global Higher Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    In global times, university education policy that holds the greatest promise for social responsibility is the focus here; the argument made is that such policy ought to be conceptualised using a normative human development and capabilities approach, drawing on the work of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. Their ideas offer a values-based way of…

  7. Surface Modeling, Solid Modeling and Finite Element Modeling. Analysis Capabilities of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.; Kare, Audhut P.

    1987-01-01

    Explores several concepts in computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Defines, evaluates, reviews and compares advanced computer-aided geometric modeling and analysis techniques. Presents the results of a survey to establish the capabilities of minicomputer based-systems with the CAD/CAM packages evaluated. (CW)

  8. Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  10. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  11. Nuclear material production cycle vulnerability analysis. Revision.

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.F.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses a method for rapidly and systematically identifying vulnerable equipment in a nuclear material or similar production process and ranking that equipment according to its attractiveness to a malevolent attacker. A multi-step approach was used in the analysis. First, the entire production cycle was modeled as a flow diagram. This flow diagram was analyzed using graph theoretical methods to identify processes in the production cycle and their locations. Models of processes that were judged to be particularly vulnerable based on the cycle analysis then were developed in greater detail to identify equipment in that process that is vulnerable to intentional damage. The information generated by this analysis may be used to devise protective features for critical equipment. The method uses directed graphs, fault trees, and evaluation matrices. Expert knowledge of plant engineers and operators is used to determine the critical equipment and evaluate its attractiveness to potential attackers. The vulnerability of equipment can be ranked and sorted according to any criterion desired and presented in a readily grasped format using matrices.

  12. Analysis of Thrust Vectoring Capabilities for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B .; Gromov, Konstantin; Murray, Emmanuell

    2005-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate the impact of the trajectory design of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) on the attitude control design is described in this paper. This paper shows how the thrust vectoring control torques, i.e. the torques required to steer the vehicle, depend on various parameters (thrust magnitude, thrust pod articulation angles, and thrust moment arms). Rather than using the entire reaction control system (RCS) system to steer the spacecraft, we investigate the potential utilization of only thrust vectoring of the main ion engines for the required attitude control to follow the representative trajectory. This study has identified some segments of the representative trajectory where the required control torque may exceed the designed ion engine capability, and how the proposed mitigation strategy succeeds in reducing the attitude control torques to within the existing capability.

  13. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part III.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This is the last part of a series of three papers which discussed very comprehensively best practice applications in human resource management by drawing special inferences to the healthcare context. It emerged from parts I and II that high performing organisations plan and intend to build sustainable capability through a systematic consideration of the human element as the key asset and through a continuous process of training, developing, empowering and engaging people in all aspects of organisational excellence. Part III brings this debate to a close by demonstrating what brings about organisational excellence and proposes a road map for effective human resource development and management, based on world class standards. Healthcare human resource professionals can now rise to the challenge and plan ahead for building organisational capability and sustainable performance. PMID:10346320

  14. Theoretical analysis of short-circuit capability of SiC power MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Soeno, Akitaka; Toguchi, Hiroaki; Aoi, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yukihiko; Tadano, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The short-circuit capability of Si power devices, defined in terms of critical energy density, is the product of the heat capacity in the heat generation region and the increase in temperature. However, for SiC power devices, the heat generation region is significantly smaller than that for Si power devices, because the drift-region thickness is about 10 times less in SiC power devices. Therefore, the formulae used for Si devices are not directly applicable to SiC devices. In this study, analytical formulae are derived for the short-circuit capability of a SiC power device and its dependence on the ambient temperature and the thickness of the n- drift region, on the basis of the thermal diffusion equation. The calculated results are found to be in good agreement with those of direct measurements.

  15. A human factors analysis of ADL activities: a capability-demand approach.

    PubMed

    Czaja, S J; Weber, R A; Nair, S N

    1993-09-01

    Older adults frequently encounter difficulties performing daily living activities. Often times these difficulties arise because environmental demands create barriers which hinder task performance. Currently, there is little empirical data that relate environmental demands to functional capabilities of older adults. The concepts and methods of Human Factors Engineering can be used to accomplish this goal. Human Factors views task performance within a systems context and maintains that successful task performance is dependent on a match between task demands and human capabilities. This article will discuss how Human Factors methodologies can be used to analyze problems encountered by older adults performing routine activities. Data from a study concerned with identifying physiological demands associated with personal and instrumental activities of daily living will be used to demonstrate the utility of using this approach. PMID:8409240

  16. An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale in Male Prison Inmates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Phillip N.; Wolford, Caitlin; Mandracchia, Jon T.; Jahn, Danielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Prison inmates are exposed to a number of adverse conditions prior to and during incarceration that place them at risk for suicide. The interpersonal theory of suicide may prove useful in better understanding suicide in prisons, allowing for more effective prevention and treatment programs. However, no studies of the interpersonal theory have been conducted in prison populations. Further, there have been no studies examining the factor structure of the assessment of one of the theory’s main constructs: the acquired capability for suicide. The current study examined the factor structure of the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale in a sample of male prison inmates. We found that a four-factor model provided the best statistical and conceptual fit; though, only three of these factors were meaningful with an additional method-factor. The three resulting factors were each associated with previous exposure to painful and provocative events, but none differentiated suicide attempter status. Results suggest that the interpersonal theory has promise in application to suicide in prison populations, but more work is needed to develop a self-report measure of acquired capability, particularly as it relates to prisoners. PMID:23230965

  17. Applicability of trends in nuclear safety analysis to space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    A survey is presented of some current trends in nuclear safety analysis that may be relevant to space nuclear power systems. This includes: lessons learned from operating power reactor safety and licensing; approaches to the safety design of advanced and novel reactors and facilities; the roles of risk assessment, extremely unlikely accidents, safety goals/targets; and risk-benefit analysis and communication.

  18. Dynamic analysis of a photovoltaic power system with battery storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Blaha, R. J.; Pickrell, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A photovolataic power system with a battery storage capability is analyzed. A dual battery current control concept is proposed, which enables the battery to either supply or accept power depending upon system environment and load conditions. A simulation of the power system, including the battery current control, is developed and evaluated. The evaulation demonstrate the visbility of the battery control concept of switch the battery from a charge to discharge mode and back as required by load and environmental conditions. An acceptable system operation is demonstrated over the entire insolation range. Additionally, system sensitivity, bandwidth, and damping characteristics of the battery control are shown to be acceptable for a projected hardware implementation.

  19. U.S. Government Capabilities to Support Analysis of Gamma Ray Data Submitted by Field Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, D J; Blackadar, J M; Dietrich, D D; Smith, D K; Lasche, G P; Waymire, D R

    2005-07-07

    As radiation detection in the interest of national security becomes increasingly commonplace, inevitable questions arise concerning the interpretation of data from handheld radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs). Field elements typically require fast answers to provide an effective defense and to minimize the impact on legitimate movement of people and goods. To support this need, on-call experts at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories cooperate in resolving radiation alarms rapidly and accurately. We present an overview, describe the work in progress to improve capabilities, and report on some of the lessons learned.

  20. U.S. Government Capabilities to Support Analysis of Gamma Ray Data Submitted by Field Elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, D. J.; Blackadar, J. M.; Dietrich, D. D.; Smith, D. K.; Lasché, George P.; Waymire, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    As radiation detection in the interest of national security becomes increasingly commonplace, inevitable questions arise concerning the interpretation of data from handheld radioisitope identifiers (RIIDs). Field elements typically require fast answers to provide an effective defense and to minimize the impact on legitimate movement of people and goods. To support this need, on-call experts at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories cooperate in resolving radiation alarms rapidly and accurately. They present an overview, describe the work in progress to improve capabilities, and report on some of the lessons learned.

  1. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  2. Carbon analysis in CdTe by nuclear activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibani, H.; Stoquert, J. P.; Hage-Ali, M.; Koebel, J. M.; Abdesselam, M.; Siffert, P.

    1991-06-01

    We describe the capabilities of the nuclear reaction 12C(d, n) 13Nlimit→β +13C the measurement of absolute concentrations of C in CdTe by the charged particle activation (CPA) method. This technique is used to determine the segregation coefficient of C introduced as an impurity in CdTe.

  3. Validation of cell analysis capability using ENDF/B-V nuclear data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the work which resulted in CELL-2 (referred to in this report as the ENDF/B-V version of EPRI-CELL), including the ENDF/B-V data testing, library generation, methods improvements, and code benchmarking. The new ENDF/B-V multigroup library is compared to the original EPRI-CELL library and differences are discussed. The results of a methods validation program are given, in which EPRI-CELL calculations of integral parameters and multigroup cross sections are compared to rigorous transport theory calculations of numerical benchmark problems. EPRI-CELL is used to compute isolated rod resonance integrals based on ENDF/B-V, which are then compared with experimental values. The results of a comprehensive reactor benchmarking study are given for clean UO/sub 2/ and MO/sub 2/ criticals, and for hot zero power PWR cores. Results of depletion calculations are compared with experimentally measured isotopic ratios for three power reactor cores.

  4. The IDEAL (Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Languages) modeling methodology: Capabilities and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, Ken H.; Bachert, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    The IDEAL (Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Languages) modeling methodology has been formulated and applied over a five-year period. It has proven to be a unique, integrated approach utilizing a top-down, structured technique to define and document the system of interest; a knowledge engineering technique to collect and organize system descriptive information; a rapid prototyping technique to perform preliminary system performance analysis; and a sophisticated simulation technique to perform in-depth system performance analysis.

  5. Capabilities of LIBS for analysis of geological samples at stand-off distances in a Mars atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, D. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Ferris, M. J.; Brennetot, R.; Maurice, S.

    2002-01-01

    The use of LIBS for stand-off elemental analysis of geological and other samples in a simulated Mars atmosphere is being evaluated. Analytical capabilities, matrix effects, and other factors effecting analysis are being determined. Through funding from NASA's Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP), we have been evaluating the use of LIBS for future use on landers and rovers to Mars. Of particular interest is the use of LIBS for stand-off measurements of geological samples up to 20 meters from the instrument. Very preliminary work on such remote LIBS measurements based on large laboratory type equipment was carried out about a decade ago. Recent work has characterized the capabilities using more compact instrumentation and some measurements have been conducted with LIBS on a NASA rover testbed.

  6. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory

  7. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

  8. Radiochemistry and nuclear methods of analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison with other aspects of physical science, nuclear and radiochemistry are small contributors to the overall scheme of things. Nuclear science is, however, an important player in various aspects of medicine, life sciences, industrial technology, physical sciences, archeometry and art, and theoretical/computational sciences. This new book fills the need for a contemporary text with a good mix of simple introductory theory, experimental methodology, and instrumentation for beginning students of nuclear science.

  9. Multifunctional non-viral gene vectors with enhanced stability, improved cellular and nuclear uptake capability, and increased transfection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhe; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Di; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell for nanoparticle stabilization, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) and mTAT (a cell-penetrating peptide) for accelerated cellular uptake, and a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS) for enhanced intracellular transport of DNA to the nucleus. In vitro study showed that coating of the binary PPMS/DNA polyplex with γ-PGA promotes cellular uptake of the polyplex particles, particularly by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive cells through the GGT-mediated endocytosis pathway. Conjugating PEG to the γ-PGA led to the formation of a ternary PPMS/DNA/PGA-g-PEG polyplex with decreased positive charges on the surface of the polyplex particles and substantially higher stability in serum-containing aqueous medium. The cellular uptake rate was further improved by incorporating mTAT into the ternary polyplex system. Addition of the NLS peptide was designed to facilitate intracellular delivery of the plasmid to the nucleus--a rate-limiting step in the gene transfection process. As a result, compared with the binary PPMS/LucDNA polyplex, the new mTAT-quaternary PPMS/LucDNA/NLS/PGA-g-PEG-mTAT system exhibited reduced cytotoxicity, remarkably faster cellular uptake rate, and enhanced transport of DNA to the nucleus. All these advantageous functionalities contribute to the remarkable gene transfection efficiency of the mTAT-quaternary polyplex both in vitro and in vivo, which exceeds that of the binary polyplex and commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000/DNA lipoplex. The multifunctional mTAT-quaternary polyplex system with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity represents a new type of promising non-viral vectors for the delivery of therapeutic genes to treat tumors.We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell

  10. Functional capabilities of modern and fossil hominid hands: three-dimensional analysis of trapezia.

    PubMed

    Tocheri, M W; Marzke, M W; Liu, D; Bae, M; Jones, G P; Williams, R C; Razdan, A

    2003-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) trapezium models from Homo sapiens, Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Australopithecus afarensis (A.L.333-80), and Homo habilis (O.H.7-NNQ) were acquired through laser digitizing. Least-square planes were generated for each articular surface, and the angles between the planes were compared. Each extant species displays an overall pattern that distinguishes it from the others. The observed angles in G. gorilla and P. troglodytes are more similar to one other than either is to H. sapiens. Our results, obtained from using new 3D modeling and analytical tools, raise interesting questions about the functional capabilities of the fossil trapezia. Multivariate statistical analyses indicate that A.L.333-80 is morphologically more similar to that of modern humans, whereas the O.H.7 trapezium is more similar to that of the gorilla. Significant differences between A.L.333-80 and the extant species occur, but some similarities to humans suggest the ability to form the distinctively human forceful pad-to-side and three-jaw chuck grips. Some key morphological differences from humans highlighted and quantified by our research suggest limitations in the functional capabilities of the O.H.7 trapezium, particularly in those that facilitate pronation at the base of the second metacarpal. If the O.H.7 trapezium represents part of the hand responsible for manufacturing and using the stone tools found at Olduvai, our results suggest that the hand manipulated the stones in a way for which we have no modern analog. Alternative considerations are that the O.H.7 trapezium is not representative of other trapezia from its species (i.e., N=1), or that it represents another primate or hominid species. PMID:12949830

  11. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part I: Template-Based Generic Programming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    An approach for incorporating embedded simulation and analysis capabilities in complex simulation codes through template-based generic programming is presented. This approach relies on templating and operator overloading within the C++ language to transform a given calculation into one that can compute a variety of additional quantities that are necessary for many state-of-the-art simulation and analysis algorithms. An approach for incorporating these ideas into complex simulation codes through general graph-based assembly is also presented. These ideas have been implemented within a set of packages in the Trilinos framework and are demonstrated on a simple problem from chemical engineering.

  12. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part I: Template-Based Generic Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    An approach for incorporating embedded simulation and analysis capabilities in complex simulation codes through template-based generic programming is presented. This approach relies on templating and operator overloading within the C++ language to transform a given calculation into one that can compute a variety of additional quantities that are necessary for many state-of-the-art simulation and analysis algorithms. An approach for incorporating these ideas into complex simulation codes through general graph-based assembly is also presented. These ideas have been implemented within a set of packages in the Trilinos framework and are demonstrated on a simple problem from chemical engineering.

  13. Fine pitch thermosonic wire bonding: analysis of state-of-the-art manufacturing capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavasin, Daniel

    1995-09-01

    A comprehensive process characterization was performed at the Motorola plastic package assembly site in Selangor, Malaysia, to document the current fine pitch wire bond process capability, using state-of-the-art equipment, in an actual manufacturing environment. Two machines, representing the latest technology from two separate manufacturers, were operated one shift per day for five days, bonding a 132 lead Plastic Quad Flat Pack. Using a test device specifically designed for fine pitch wire bonding, the bonding programs were alternated between 107 micrometers and 92 micrometers pad pitch, running each pitch for a total of 1600 units per machine. Wire, capillary type, and related materials were standardized and commercially available. A video metrology measurement system, with a demonstrated six sigma repeatability band width of 0.51 micrometers , was utilized to measure the bonded units for bond dimensions and placement. Standard Quality Assurance (QA) metrics were also performed. Results indicate that state-of-the-art thermosonic wire bonding can achieve acceptable assembly yields at these fine pad pitches.

  14. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  15. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part II.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is the second from a series of three, addressing human resource practices using best practice examples. The analysis covered is based on the experiences of organisations that have won the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) in the USA. The subcriteria covered in this benchmarking comparative analysis covers the following areas: human resource planning and management; employee involvement; employee education and training; employee performance and recognition; employee wellbeing and satisfaction. The paper concludes by reflecting on the likely implications for health-care professionals working in the human resource field. PMID:10346314

  16. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Developments in Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness of uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis (SA) has been improved in ASCEM by choosing from a variety of methods to best suit each model. Previously, ASCEM had a small toolset for UQ and SA, leaving out benefits of the many unincluded methods. Many UQ and SA methods are useful for analyzing models with specific characteristics; therefore, programming these methods into ASCEM would have been inefficient. Embedding the R programming language into ASCEM grants access to a plethora of UQ and SA methods. As a result, programming required is drastically decreased, and runtime efficiency and analysis effectiveness are increased relative to each unique model.

  17. Characterization of nuclear material by Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Alaerts, G.; Becker, B.; Heyse, J.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Mondelaers, W.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2016-11-01

    The use of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis for the characterization of nuclear materials is discussed. The method, which relies on resonance structures in neutron-induced reaction cross sections, can be applied as a non-destructive method to characterise complex nuclear materials such as melted fuel resulting from a severe nuclear accident. Results of a demonstration experiment at the GELINA facility reveal that accurate data can be obtained at a compact facility even in the case of strong overlapping resonances.

  18. An integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for protein analysis with magnetic bead-based sampling capabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Woo; Oh, Kwang W; Thomas, Jennifer H; Heineman, William R; Halsall, H Brian; Nevin, Joseph H; Helmicki, Arthur J; Henderson, H Thurman; Ahn, Chong H

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of an integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for fast and low-volume immunoassays using magnetic beads, which are used as both immobilization surfaces and bio-molecule carriers. Microfluidic components have been developed and integrated to construct a microfluidic biochemical detection system. Magnetic bead-based immunoassay, as a typical example of biochemical detection and analysis, has been successfully performed on the integrated microfluidic biochemical analysis system that includes a surface-mounted biofilter and electrochemical sensor on a glass microfluidic motherboard. Total time required for an immunoassay was less than 20 min including sample incubation time, and sample volume wasted was less than 50 microl during five repeated assays. Fast and low-volume biochemical analysis has been successfully achieved with the developed biofilter and immunosensor, which is integrated to the microfluidic system. Such a magnetic bead-based biochemical detection system, described in this paper, can be applied to protein analysis systems. PMID:15100857

  19. A Critical Examination of the Assessment Analysis Capabilities of OCLC ACAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Lucy E.

    2005-01-01

    Over 500 libraries have employed OCLC's iCAS and its successor Automated Collection Assessment and Analysis Services (ACAS) as bibliometric tools to evaluate monograph collections. This examination of ACAS reveals both its methodological limitations and its feasibility as an indicator of collecting patterns. The results can be used to maximize the…

  20. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  1. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization [MDAO] tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  2. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  3. The incorporation of plotting capability into the Unified Subsonic Supersonic Aerodynamic Analysis program, version B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    The B01 version of the United Subsonic Supersonic Aerodynamic Analysis program is the result of numerous modifications and additions made to the B00 version. These modifications and additions affect the program input, its computational options, the code readability, and the overlay structure. The following are described: (1) the revised input; (2) the plotting overlay programs which were also modified, and their associated subroutines, (3) the auxillary files used by the program, the revised output data; and (4) the program overlay structure.

  4. Motion capability analysis of a quadruped robot as a parallel manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jingjun; Lu, Dengfeng; Zhang, Zhongxiang; Pei, Xu

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the forward and inverse displacement analysis of a quadruped robot MANA as a parallel manipulator in quadruple stance phase, which is used to obtain the workspace and control the motion of the body. The robot MANA designed on the basis of the structure of quadruped mammal is able to not only walk and turn in the uneven terrain, but also accomplish various manipulating tasks as a parallel manipulator in quadruple stance phase. The latter will be the focus of this paper, however. For this purpose, the leg kinematics is primarily analyzed, which lays the foundation on the gait planning in terms of locomotion and body kinematics analysis as a parallel manipulator. When all four feet of the robot contact on the ground, by assuming there is no slipping at the feet, each contacting point is treated as a passive spherical joint and the kinematic model of parallel manipulator is established. The method for choosing six non-redundant actuated joints for the parallel manipulator from all twelve optional joints is elaborated. The inverse and forward displacement analysis of the parallel manipulator is carried out using the method of coordinate transformation. Finally, based on the inverse and forward kinematic model, two issues on obtaining the reachable workspace of parallel manipulator and planning the motion of the body are implemented and verified by ADAMS simulation.

  5. Development of an Automated LIBS Analytical Test System Integrated with Component Control and Spectrum Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Chen, Feipeng; Chen, Pengfei; Qiao, Shujun; Yang, Guang; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-08-01

    The present paper proposes an automated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analytical test system, which consists of a LIBS measurement and control platform based on a modular design concept, and a LIBS qualitative spectrum analysis software and is developed in C#. The platform provides flexible interfacing and automated control; it is compatible with different manufacturer component models and is constructed in modularized form for easy expandability. During peak identification, a more robust peak identification method with improved stability in peak identification has been achieved by applying additional smoothing on the slope obtained by calculation before peak identification. For the purpose of element identification, an improved main lines analysis method, which detects all elements on the spectral peak to avoid omission of certain elements without strong spectral lines, is applied to element identification in the tested LIBS samples. This method also increases the identification speed. In this paper, actual applications have been carried out. According to tests, the analytical test system is compatible with components of various models made by different manufacturers. It can automatically control components to get experimental data and conduct filtering, peak identification and qualitative analysis, etc. on spectral data. supported by the National Major Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development Special Funds of China (No. 2011YQ030113)

  6. Functional Analysis for an Integrated Capability of Arrival/Departure/Surface Management with Tactical Runway Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Okuniek, Nikolai; Lohr, Gary W.; Schaper, Meilin; Christoffels, Lothar; Latorella, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    The runway is a critical resource of any air transport system. It is used for arrivals, departures, and for taxiing aircraft and is universally acknowledged as a constraining factor to capacity for both surface and airspace operations. It follows that investigation of the effective use of runways, both in terms of selection and assignment as well as the timing and sequencing of the traffic is paramount to the efficient traffic flows. Both the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and NASA have developed concepts and tools to improve atomic aspects of coordinated arrival/departure/surface management operations and runway configuration management. In December 2012, NASA entered into a Collaborative Agreement with DLR. Four collaborative work areas were identified, one of which is called "Runway Management." As part of collaborative research in the "Runway Management" area, which is conducted with the DLR Institute of Flight Guidance, located in Braunschweig, the goal is to develop an integrated system comprised of the three DLR tools - arrival, departure, and surface management (collectively referred to as A/D/S-MAN) - and NASA's tactical runway configuration management (TRCM) tool. To achieve this goal, it is critical to prepare a concept of operations (ConOps) detailing how the NASA runway management and DLR arrival, departure, and surface management tools will function together to the benefit of each. To assist with the preparation of the ConOps, the integrated NASA and DLR tools are assessed through a functional analysis method described in this report. The report first provides the highlevel operational environments for air traffic management (ATM) in Germany and in the U.S., and the descriptions of the DLR's A/D/S-MAN and NASA's TRCM tools at the level of details necessary to compliment the purpose of the study. Functional analyses of each tool and a completed functional analysis of an integrated system design are presented next in the report. Future efforts to fully

  7. Characterization, fabrication, and analysis of soft dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, William

    Inspired by nature, the development of soft actuators has drawn large attention to provide higher flexibility and allow adaptation to more complex environment. This thesis is focused on utilizing electroactive polymers as active materials to develop soft planar dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation. The potential applications of such soft actuators are in flexible robotic arms and grippers, morphing structures and flapping wings for micro aerial vehicles. The embraces design for a freestanding actuator utilizes the constrained deformation imposed by surface stiffeners on an electroactive membrane to avert the requirement of membrane pre-stretch and the supporting frames. The proposed design increases the overall actuator flexibility and degrees-of-freedom. Actuator design, fabrication, and performance are presented for different arrangement of stiffeners. Digital images correlation technique were utilized to evaluate the in-plane finite strain components, in order to elucidate the role of the stiffeners in controlling the three dimensional deformation. It was found that a key controlling factor was the localized deformation near the stiffeners, while the rest of the membrane would follow through. A detailed finite element modeling framework was developed with a user-material subroutine, built into the ABAQUS commercial finite element package. An experimentally calibrated Neo-Hookean based material model that coupled the applied electrical field to the actuator mechanical deformation was employed. The numerical model was used to optimize different geometrical features, electrode layup and stacking sequence of actuators. It was found that by splitting the stiffeners into finer segments, the force-stroke characteristics of actuator were able to be adjusted with stiffener configuration, while keeping the overall bending stiffness. The efficacy of actuators could also be greatly improved by increasing the stiffener periodicity. The developed

  8. Simulating muscular thin films using thermal contraction capabilities in finite element analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Webster, Victoria A; Nieto, Santiago G; Grosberg, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Chiel, Hillel J; Quinn, Roger D

    2016-10-01

    In this study, new techniques for approximating the contractile properties of cells in biohybrid devices using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) have been investigated. Many current techniques for modeling biohybrid devices use individual cell forces to simulate the cellular contraction. However, such techniques result in long simulation runtimes. In this study we investigated the effect of the use of thermal contraction on simulation runtime. The thermal contraction model was significantly faster than models using individual cell forces, making it beneficial for rapidly designing or optimizing devices. Three techniques, Stoney׳s Approximation, a Modified Stoney׳s Approximation, and a Thermostat Model, were explored for calibrating thermal expansion/contraction parameters (TECPs) needed to simulate cellular contraction using thermal contraction. The TECP values were calibrated by using published data on the deflections of muscular thin films (MTFs). Using these techniques, TECP values that suitably approximate experimental deflections can be determined by using experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte MTFs. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed in order to investigate the contribution of individual variables, such as elastic modulus and layer thickness, to the final calibrated TECP for each calibration technique. Additionally, the TECP values are applicable to other types of biohybrid devices. Two non-MTF models were simulated based on devices reported in the existing literature. PMID:27450035

  9. Development of Integrated Flood Analysis System for Improving Flood Mitigation Capabilities in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Young-Il; Kim, Jong-suk

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the needs of people are growing for a more safety life and secure homeland from unexpected natural disasters. Flood damages have been recorded every year and those damages are greater than the annual average of 2 trillion won since 2000 in Korea. It has been increased in casualties and property damages due to flooding caused by hydrometeorlogical extremes according to climate change. Although the importance of flooding situation is emerging rapidly, studies related to development of integrated management system for reducing floods are insufficient in Korea. In addition, it is difficult to effectively reduce floods without developing integrated operation system taking into account of sewage pipe network configuration with the river level. Since the floods result in increasing damages to infrastructure, as well as life and property, structural and non-structural measures should be urgently established in order to effectively reduce the flood. Therefore, in this study, we developed an integrated flood analysis system that systematized technology to quantify flood risk and flood forecasting for supporting synthetic decision-making through real-time monitoring and prediction on flash rain or short-term rainfall by using radar and satellite information in Korea. Keywords: Flooding, Integrated flood analysis system, Rainfall forecasting, Korea Acknowledgments This work was carried out with the support of "Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science & Technology Development (Project No. PJ011686022015)" Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea

  10. The near boiling reactor: Conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Christopher J. P.

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the Victoria Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96°C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has highlighted additional areas

  11. Development of mixed-waste analysis capability for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; TenKate, L.B.; Wroblewski, A.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) are typically configured with ventilation to capture potentially toxic and corrosive gases emitted from the vaporization of sample aliquots. When radioactive elements are present, additional concerns (such as meeting safety guidelines and ALARA principles) must be addressed. This report describes a modification to a GFAAS that provides additional containment of vaporized sample aliquots. The modification was found to increase containment by a factor of 80, given expected operating conditions. The use of the modification allows more mixed-waste samples to be analyzed, permits higher levels of radioactive samples to be analyzed, or exposes the analyst to less airborne radioactivity. The containment apparatus was attached to a Perkin-Elmer Zeeman 5000 spectrophotometer for analysis of mixed-waste samples; however, it could also be used on other systems and in other applications where greater containment of vaporized material is desired.

  12. A Delayed Neutron Counting System for the Analysis of Special Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Madison Theresa

    Nuclear forensic analysis is a modem science that uses numerous analytical techniques to identify and attribute nuclear materials in the event of a nuclear explosion, radiological terrorist attack or the interception of illicit nuclear material smuggling. The Canadian Department of National Defence has participated in recent international exercises that have highlighted the Nation's requirement to develop nuclear forensics expertise, protocol and capabilities, specifically pertaining to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM). A delayed neutron counting (DNC) system has been designed and established at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) to enhance the Government's SNM analysis capabilities. This analytical technique complements those already at RMC by providing a rapid and non-destructive method for the analysis of the fissile isotopes of both uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu). The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at RMC produces a predominately thermal neutron flux. These neutrons induce fission in the SNM isotopes 233U, 235U and 239Pu releasing prompt fast neutrons, energy and radioactive fission fragments. Some of these fission fragments undergo beta - decay and subsequently emit neutrons, which can be recorded by an array of sensitive 3He detectors. The significant time period between the fission process and the release of these neutrons results in their identification as 'delayed neutrons'. The recorded neutron spectrum varies with time and the count rate curve is unique to each fissile isotope. In-house software, developed by this project, can analyze this delayed neutron curve and provides the fissile mass in the sample. Extensive characterization of the DNC system has been performed with natural U samples with 235 U content ranging from 2--7 microg. The system efficiency and dead time behaviour determined by the natural uranium sample analyses were validated by depleted uranium samples with similar quantities of 235 U resulting in a typical relative error of

  13. Quantifying the metabolic capabilities of engineered Zymomonas mobilis using linear programming analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsantili, Ivi C; Karim, M Nazmul; Klapa, Maria I

    2007-01-01

    Background The need for discovery of alternative, renewable, environmentally friendly energy sources and the development of cost-efficient, "clean" methods for their conversion into higher fuels becomes imperative. Ethanol, whose significance as fuel has dramatically increased in the last decade, can be produced from hexoses and pentoses through microbial fermentation. Importantly, plant biomass, if appropriately and effectively decomposed, is a potential inexpensive and highly renewable source of the hexose and pentose mixture. Recently, the engineered (to also catabolize pentoses) anaerobic bacterium Zymomonas mobilis has been widely discussed among the most promising microorganisms for the microbial production of ethanol fuel. However, Z. mobilis genome having been fully sequenced in 2005, there is still a small number of published studies of its in vivo physiology and limited use of the metabolic engineering experimental and computational toolboxes to understand its metabolic pathway interconnectivity and regulation towards the optimization of its hexose and pentose fermentation into ethanol. Results In this paper, we reconstructed the metabolic network of the engineered Z. mobilis to a level that it could be modelled using the metabolic engineering methodologies. We then used linear programming (LP) analysis and identified the Z. mobilis metabolic boundaries with respect to various biological objectives, these boundaries being determined only by Z. mobilis network's stoichiometric connectivity. This study revealed the essential for bacterial growth reactions and elucidated the association between the metabolic pathways, especially regarding main product and byproduct formation. More specifically, the study indicated that ethanol and biomass production depend directly on anaerobic respiration stoichiometry and activity. Thus, enhanced understanding and improved means for analyzing anaerobic respiration and redox potential in vivo are needed to yield further

  14. Filtered chorochronic interface as a capability for 3-D unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerolymos, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This note reviews the widely used phased-lagged [Erdos, J. L., E. Alzner, and W. McNally. 1977. AIAA Journal 15: 1559-68.] approach and corresponding chorochronic interface relations [Gerolymos G. A., G. J. Michon, and J. Neubauer. 2002. Journal of Propulsion and Power 18: 1139-52.] and explores its potential extension to the approximate unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery. The basic relations pertaining to the binary blade-row interaction case, for which chorochronic periodicity is exact in a phase-averaged rans framework, are briefly formulated, and selected computational examples illustrate the application of the method. Then, the filtered chorochronic interface is defined as the unsteady counterpart of the well-known mixing-plane concept. This interface takes into account only those tθ-waves which are compatible with the interaction of the immediately upstream and downstream blade-rows. The concept, which is similar to the decomposition-and-superposition method [Li, H. D., and L. He. 2005. ASME J ournal of Turbomachinery 127: 589-98.], is illustrated by 3-D computations of a ½-stage transonic compressor.

  15. A Decision Support Framework for Feasibility Analysis of International Space Station (ISS) Research Capability Enhancing Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott,Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2004-01-01

    The assembly and operation of the ISS has generated significant challenges that have ultimately impacted resources available to the program's primary mission: research. To address this, program personnel routinely perform trade-off studies on alternative options to enhance research. The approach, content level of analysis and resulting outputs of these studies vary due to many factors, however, complicating the Program Manager's job of selecting the best option. To address this, the program requested a framework be developed to evaluate multiple research-enhancing options in a thorough, disciplined and repeatable manner, and to identify the best option on the basis of cost, benefit and risk. The resulting framework consisted of a systematic methodology and a decision-support toolset. The framework provides quantifiable and repeatable means for ranking research-enhancing options for the complex and multiple-constraint domain of the space research laboratory. This paper describes the development, verification and validation of this framework and provides observations on its operational use.

  16. Enhancing DInSAR capabilities for landslide monitoring by applying GIS-based multicriteria filtering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, F.; Knospe, S.; Busch, W.

    2015-04-01

    Landslide detection and monitoring remain difficult with conventional differential radar interferometry (DInSAR) because most pixels of radar interferograms around landslides are affected by different error sources. These are mainly related to the nature of high radar viewing angles and related spatial distortions (such as overlays and shadows), temporal decorrelations owing to vegetation cover, and speed and direction of target sliding masses. On the other hand, GIS can be used to integrate spatial datasets obtained from many sources (including radar and non-radar sources). In this paper, a GRID data model is proposed to integrate deformation data derived from DInSAR processing with other radar origin data (coherence, layover and shadow, slope and aspect, local incidence angle) and external datasets collected from field study of landslide sites and other sources (geology, geomorphology, hydrology). After coordinate transformation and merging of data, candidate landslide representing pixels of high quality radar signals were filtered out by applying a GIS based multicriteria filtering analysis (GIS-MCFA), which excludes grid points in areas of shadow and overlay, low coherence, non-detectable and non-landslide deformations, and other possible sources of errors from the DInSAR data processing. At the end, the results obtained from GIS-MCFA have been verified by using the external datasets (existing landslide sites collected from fieldworks, geological and geomorphologic maps, rainfall data etc.).

  17. Nuclear reaction techniques in materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, G.; Lanford, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article discusses nuclear reaction microanalysis (NRA). In NRA, data accumulated in the frame of low-energy nuclear physics is put to advantage for analytical purposes. Unknown targets are bombarded and known reactions are observed. For NRA, the accelerator, detectors, spectrum recording and interpretation must be reliable, simple, and fast. Other MeV ion-beam analytical techniques are described which are complementary to NRA, such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS), proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), and the more recent method of elastic recoil detection (ERD). Applications for NRA range from solid-state physics and electrochemistry, semiconductor technology, metallurgy, materials science, and surface science to biology and archeology.

  18. Cambio : a file format translation and analysis application for the nuclear response emergency community.

    SciTech Connect

    Lasche, George P.

    2009-10-01

    Cambio is an application intended to automatically read and display any spectrum file of any format in the world that the nuclear emergency response community might encounter. Cambio also provides an analysis capability suitable for HPGe spectra when detector response and scattering environment are not well known. Why is Cambio needed: (1) Cambio solves the following problem - With over 50 types of formats from instruments used in the field and new format variations appearing frequently, it is impractical for every responder to have current versions of the manufacturer's software from every instrument used in the field; (2) Cambio converts field spectra to any one of several common formats that are used for analysis, saving valuable time in an emergency situation; (3) Cambio provides basic tools for comparing spectra, calibrating spectra, and isotope identification with analysis suited especially for HPGe spectra; and (4) Cambio has a batch processing capability to automatically translate a large number of archival spectral files of any format to one of several common formats, such as the IAEA SPE or the DHS N42. Currently over 540 analysts and members of the nuclear emergency response community worldwide are on the distribution list for updates to Cambio. Cambio users come from all levels of government, university, and commercial partners around the world that support efforts to counter terrorist nuclear activities. Cambio is Unclassified Unlimited Release (UUR) and distributed by internet downloads with email notifications whenever a new build of Cambio provides for new formats, bug fixes, or new or improved capabilities. Cambio is also provided as a DLL to the Karlsruhe Institute for Transuranium Elements so that Cambio's automatic file-reading capability can be included at the Nucleonica web site.

  19. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Pad B Catenary Capability Analysis and Technical Exchange Meeting (TEM) Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Kichak, Robert; Rakov, Vladimir; Kithil, Richard, Jr.; Sargent, Noel B.

    2009-01-01

    The existing lightning protection system at Pad 39B for the Space Shuttle is an outgrowth of a system that was put in place for the Apollo Program. Dr. Frank Fisher of Lightning Technologies was a key participant in the design and implementation of that system. He conveyed to the NESC team that the catenary wire provision was put in place quickly (as assurance against possible vehicle damage causing critical launch delays) rather than being implemented as a comprehensive system designed to provide a high degree of guaranteed protection. Also, the technology of lightning protection has evolved over time with considerable work being conducted by groups such as the electric utilities companies, aircraft manufacturers, universities, and others. Several accepted present-day methods for analysis of lightning protection were used by Drs. Medelius and Mata to study the expected lightning environment for the Pad 39B facility and to analyze the degree of protection against direct lightning attachment to the Space Shuttle. The specific physical configuration directly affects the vulnerability, so cases that were considered included the RSS next to and rolled back from the Space Shuttle, and the GOx Vent Arm both extended and withdrawn from the ET. Elements of the lightning protection system at Pad 39B are shown in Figure 6.0-1 and consist of an 80 foot insulating mast on top of the Fixed Support Structure (FSS), a catenary wire system that runs from the mast in a North/South direction to grounds 1000 feet away on each side of the mast, the RSS which can either be next to or away from the Space Shuttle, and a GOx vent that can either be extended or retracted from the top of the ET.

  20. Rapid architecture alternative modeling (RAAM): A framework for capability-based analysis of system of systems architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, Joseph V.

    problem domain by establishing an effective means to communicate the semantics from the RAAM framework. These techniques make it possible to include diverse multi-metric models within the RAAM framework in addition to system and operational level trades. A canonical example was used to explore the uses of the methodology. The canonical example contains all of the features of a full system of systems architecture analysis study but uses fewer tasks and systems. Using RAAM with the canonical example it was possible to consider both system and operational level trades in the same analysis. Once the methodology had been tested with the canonical example, a Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) capability model was developed. Due to the sensitive nature of analyses on that subject, notional data was developed. The notional data has similar trends and properties to realistic Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses data. RAAM was shown to be traceable and provided a mechanism for a unified treatment of a variety of metrics. The SEAD capability model demonstrated lower computer runtimes and reduced model creation complexity as compared to methods currently in use. To determine the usefulness of the implementation of the methodology on current computing hardware, RAAM was tested with system of system architecture studies of different sizes. This was necessary since system of systems may be called upon to accomplish thousands of tasks. It has been clearly demonstrated that RAAM is able to enumerate and evaluate the types of large, complex design spaces usually encountered in capability based design, oftentimes providing the ability to efficiently search the entire decision space. The core algorithms for generation and evaluation of alternatives scale linearly with expected problem sizes. The SEAD capability model outputs prompted the discovery a new issue, the data storage and manipulation requirements for an analysis. Two strategies were developed to counter large data sizes, the use

  1. Maximizing the U.S. Army’s Future Contribution to Global Security Using the Capability Portfolio Analysis Tool (CPAT)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davis, Scott J.; Edwards, Shatiel B.; Teper, Gerald E.; Bassett, David G.; McCarthy, Michael J.; Johnson, Scott C.; Lawton, Craig R.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Shelton, Liliana; Henry, Stephen M.; et al

    2016-02-01

    We report that recent budget reductions have posed tremendous challenges to the U.S. Army in managing its portfolio of ground combat systems (tanks and other fighting vehicles), thus placing many important programs at risk. To address these challenges, the Army and a supporting team developed and applied the Capability Portfolio Analysis Tool (CPAT) to optimally invest in ground combat modernization over the next 25–35 years. CPAT provides the Army with the analytical rigor needed to help senior Army decision makers allocate scarce modernization dollars to protect soldiers and maintain capability overmatch. CPAT delivers unparalleled insight into multiple-decade modernization planning usingmore » a novel multiphase mixed-integer linear programming technique and illustrates a cultural shift toward analytics in the Army’s acquisition thinking and processes. CPAT analysis helped shape decisions to continue modernization of the $10 billion Stryker family of vehicles (originally slated for cancellation) and to strategically reallocate over $20 billion to existing modernization programs by not pursuing the Ground Combat Vehicle program as originally envisioned. Ultimately, more than 40 studies have been completed using CPAT, applying operations research methods to optimally prioritize billions of taxpayer dollars and allowing Army acquisition executives to base investment decisions on analytically rigorous evaluations of portfolio trade-offs.« less

  2. Application of statistical process control and process capability analysis procedures in orbiter processing activities at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safford, Robert R.; Jackson, Andrew E.; Swart, William W.; Barth, Timothy S.

    1994-01-01

    Successful ground processing at KSC requires that flight hardware and ground support equipment conform to specifications at tens of thousands of checkpoints. Knowledge of conformance is an essential requirement for launch. That knowledge of conformance at every requisite point does not, however, enable identification of past problems with equipment, or potential problem areas. This paper describes how the introduction of Statistical Process Control and Process Capability Analysis identification procedures into existing shuttle processing procedures can enable identification of potential problem areas and candidates for improvements to increase processing performance measures. Results of a case study describing application of the analysis procedures to Thermal Protection System processing are used to illustrate the benefits of the approaches described in the paper.

  3. Extending the Capabilities of the Mooring Analysis Program: A Survey of Dynamic Mooring Line Theories for Integration into FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Masciola, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-03-01

    Techniques to model dynamic mooring lines come in various forms. The most widely used models include either a heuristic representation of the physics (such as a Lumped-Mass, LM, system), a Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) discretization of the lines (discretized in space), or a Finite-Difference (FD) model (which is discretized in both space and time). In this paper, we explore the features of the various models, weigh the advantages of each, and propose a plan for implementing one dynamic mooring line model into the open-source Mooring Analysis Program (MAP). MAP is currently used as a module for the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to model mooring systems quasi-statically, although dynamic mooring capabilities are desired. Based on the exploration in this manuscript, the lumped-mass representation is selected for implementation in MAP based on its simplicity, computational cost, and ability to provide similar physics captured by higher-order models.

  4. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  5. Verifying nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storages on a partial defect level: A software simulation tool for evaluating the capabilities of the Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grape, Sophie; Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan; Lindberg, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is an instrument that records the Cherenkov light emitted from irradiated nuclear fuels in wet storages. The presence, intensity and pattern of the Cherenkov light can be used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors to verify that the fuel properties comply with declarations. The DCVD is since several years approved by the IAEA for gross defect verification, i.e. to control whether an item in a storage pool is a nuclear fuel assembly or a non-fuel item [1]. Recently, it has also been endorsed as a tool for partial defect verification, i.e. to identify if a fraction of the fuel rods in an assembly have been removed or replaced. The latter recognition was based on investigations of experimental studies on authentic fuel assemblies and of simulation studies on hypothetic cases of partial defects [2]. This paper describes the simulation methodology and software which was used in the partial defect capability evaluations. The developed simulation procedure uses three stand-alone software packages: the ORIGEN-ARP code [3] used to obtain the gamma-ray spectrum from the fission products in the fuel, the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4 [4] for simulating the gamma-ray transport in and around the fuel and the emission of Cherenkov light, and the ray-tracing programme Zemax [5] used to model the light transport through the assembly geometry to the DCVD and to mimic the behaviour of its lens system. Furthermore, the software allows for detailed information from the plant operator on power and/or burnup distributions to be taken into account to enhance the authenticity of the simulated images. To demonstrate the results of the combined software packages, simulated and measured DCVD images are presented. A short discussion on the usefulness of the simulation tool is also included.

  6. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, D. R.

    1993-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power- gener-ating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive compo-nents are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in serv-ice. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress- corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  7. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, (4)He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart. PMID:27558995

  8. Multilayer Network Analysis of Nuclear Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Chen, Qu; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear reaction network is usually studied via precise calculation of differential equation sets, and much research interest has been focused on the characteristics of nuclides, such as half-life and size limit. In this paper, however, we adopt the methods from both multilayer and reaction networks, and obtain a distinctive view by mapping all the nuclear reactions in JINA REACLIB database into a directed network with 4 layers: neutron, proton, 4He and the remainder. The layer names correspond to reaction types decided by the currency particles consumed. This combined approach reveals that, in the remainder layer, the β-stability has high correlation with node degree difference and overlapping coefficient. Moreover, when reaction rates are considered as node strength, we find that, at lower temperatures, nuclide half-life scales reciprocally with its out-strength. The connection between physical properties and topological characteristics may help to explore the boundary of the nuclide chart. PMID:27558995

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  10. Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

  11. Rapid architecture alternative modeling (RAAM): A framework for capability-based analysis of system of systems architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, Joseph V.

    problem domain by establishing an effective means to communicate the semantics from the RAAM framework. These techniques make it possible to include diverse multi-metric models within the RAAM framework in addition to system and operational level trades. A canonical example was used to explore the uses of the methodology. The canonical example contains all of the features of a full system of systems architecture analysis study but uses fewer tasks and systems. Using RAAM with the canonical example it was possible to consider both system and operational level trades in the same analysis. Once the methodology had been tested with the canonical example, a Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) capability model was developed. Due to the sensitive nature of analyses on that subject, notional data was developed. The notional data has similar trends and properties to realistic Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses data. RAAM was shown to be traceable and provided a mechanism for a unified treatment of a variety of metrics. The SEAD capability model demonstrated lower computer runtimes and reduced model creation complexity as compared to methods currently in use. To determine the usefulness of the implementation of the methodology on current computing hardware, RAAM was tested with system of system architecture studies of different sizes. This was necessary since system of systems may be called upon to accomplish thousands of tasks. It has been clearly demonstrated that RAAM is able to enumerate and evaluate the types of large, complex design spaces usually encountered in capability based design, oftentimes providing the ability to efficiently search the entire decision space. The core algorithms for generation and evaluation of alternatives scale linearly with expected problem sizes. The SEAD capability model outputs prompted the discovery a new issue, the data storage and manipulation requirements for an analysis. Two strategies were developed to counter large data sizes, the use

  12. Navigating nuclear science: Enhancing analysis through visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, N.H.; Berkel, J. van; Johnson, D.K.; Wylie, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    Data visualization is an emerging technology with high potential for addressing the information overload problem. This project extends the data visualization work of the Navigating Science project by coupling it with more traditional information retrieval methods. A citation-derived landscape was augmented with documents using a text-based similarity measure to show viability of extension into datasets where citation lists do not exist. Landscapes, showing hills where clusters of similar documents occur, can be navigated, manipulated and queried in this environment. The capabilities of this tool provide users with an intuitive explore-by-navigation method not currently available in today`s retrieval systems.

  13. Nuclear reactor descriptions for space power systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, E. W.; Brown, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    For the small, high performance reactors required for space electric applications, adequate neutronic analysis is of crucial importance, but in terms of computational time consumed, nuclear calculations probably yield the least amount of detail for mission analysis study. It has been found possible, after generation of only a few designs of a reactor family in elaborate thermomechanical and nuclear detail to use simple curve fitting techniques to assure desired neutronic performance while still performing the thermomechanical analysis in explicit detail. The resulting speed-up in computation time permits a broad detailed examination of constraints by the mission analyst.

  14. Nuclear power plant fire protection: philosophy and analysis. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D. L.

    1980-05-01

    This report combines a fire severity analysis technique with a fault tree methodology for assessing the importance to nuclear power plant safety of certain combinations of components and systems. Characteristics unique to fire, such as propagation induced by the failure of barriers, have been incorporated into the methodology. By applying the resulting fire analysis technique to actual conditions found in a representative nuclear power plant, it is found that some safety and nonsafety areas are both highly vulnerable to fire spread and impotant to overall safety, while other areas prove to be of marginal importance. Suggestions are made for further experimental and analytical work to supplement the fire analysis method.

  15. A nuclear source term analysis for spacecraft power systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, W.H.

    1998-12-01

    All US space missions involving on board nuclear material must be approved by the Office of the President. To be approved the mission and the hardware systems must undergo evaluations of the associated nuclear health and safety risk. One part of these evaluations is the characterization of the source terms, i.e., the estimate of the amount, physical form, and location of nuclear material, which might be released into the environment in the event of credible accidents. This paper presents a brief overview of the source term analysis by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel for the NASA Cassini Space Mission launched in October 1997. Included is a description of the Energy Interaction Model, an innovative approach to the analysis of potential releases from high velocity impacts resulting from launch aborts and reentries.

  16. Analysis of dinosaur samples by nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiankang; Orlić, I.; Tang, S. M.; Wang, Yiming; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jieqing

    1997-07-01

    Several dinosaur bone and eggshell fossil samples unearthed at different sites in China were analyzed by means of nuclear microscopy. Concentrations and distributions of elements such as Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Sr, Y, Ce, Pb and U, etc. were obtained for each sample. The results of quantitative PIXE and RBS analyses show unusually high concentrations of U and Ce in several samples obtained from a period near the K-T boundary (between Cretaceous and Tertiary periods, 65 million years ago), suggesting that some form of environmental pollution could be the cause of dinosaur extinction.

  17. Satellite nuclear power station: An engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Clement, J. D.; Rosa, R. J.; Kirby, K. D.; Yang, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A nuclear-MHD power plant system which uses a compact non-breeder reactor to produce power in the multimegawatt range is analyzed. It is shown that, operated in synchronous orbit, the plant would transmit power safely to the ground by a microwave beam. Fuel reprocessing would take place in space, and no radioactive material would be returned to earth. Even the effect of a disastrous accident would have negligible effect on earth. A hydrogen moderated gas core reactor, or a colloid-core, or NERVA type reactor could also be used. The system is shown to approach closely the ideal of economical power without pollution.

  18. HOW TO DEAL WITH WASTE ACCEPTANCE UNCERTAINTY USING THE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FORECASTING AND ANALYSIS CAPABILITY SYSTEM (WACFACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Redus, K. S.; Hampshire, G. J.; Patterson, J. E.; Perkins, A. B.

    2002-02-25

    The Waste Acceptance Criteria Forecasting and Analysis Capability System (WACFACS) is used to plan for, evaluate, and control the supply of approximately 1.8 million yd3 of low-level radioactive, TSCA, and RCRA hazardous wastes from over 60 environmental restoration projects between FY02 through FY10 to the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). WACFACS is a validated decision support tool that propagates uncertainties inherent in site-related contaminant characterization data, disposition volumes during EMWMF operations, and project schedules to quantitatively determine the confidence that risk-based performance standards are met. Trade-offs in schedule, volumes of waste lots, and allowable concentrations of contaminants are performed to optimize project waste disposition, regulatory compliance, and disposal cell management.

  19. Advanced nuclear rocket engine mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Farbman, G.; Sulmeisters, T.; Buden, D.; Harris, P.

    1987-12-01

    The use of a derivative of the NERVA engine developed from 1955 to 1973 was evluated for potential application to Air Force orbital transfer and maneuvering missions in the time period 1995 to 2020. The NERVA stge was found to have lower life cycle costs (LCC) than an advanced chemical stage for performing low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO0 missions at any level of activity greater than three missions per year. It had lower life cycle costs than a high performance nuclear electric engine at any level of LEO to GEO mission activity. An examination of all unmanned orbital transfer and maneuvering missions from the Space Transportation Architecture study (STAS 111-3) indicated a LCC advantage for the NERVA stage over the advanced chemical stage of fifteen million dollars. The cost advanced accured from both the orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. Parametric analyses showed that the specific impulse of the NERVA stage and the cost of delivering material to low earth orbit were the most significant factors in the LCC advantage over the chemical stage. Lower development costs and a higher thrust gave the NERVA engine an LCC advantage over the nuclear electric stage. An examination of technical data from the Rover/NERVA program indicated that development of the NERVA stage has a low technical risk, and the potential for high reliability and safe operation. The data indicated the NERVA engine had a great flexibility which would permit a single stage to perform all Air Force missions.

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  2. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  3. Image analysis algorithms for the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) grating tilt sensor at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Rushford, Michael C.; Halpin, John M.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.

    2014-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system designed to produce a sequence of short pulses used to backlight imploding fuel capsules. Laser pulses from a short-pulse oscillator are dispersed in wavelength into long, low-power pulses, injected in the NIF main laser for amplification, and then compressed into high-power pulses before being directed into the NIF target chamber. In the target chamber, the laser pulses hit targets which produce x-rays used to backlight imploding fuel capsules. Compression of the ARC laser pulses is accomplished with a set of precision-surveyed optical gratings mounted inside of vacuum vessels. The tilt of each grating is monitored by a measurement system consisting of a laser diode, camera and crosshair, all mounted in a pedestal outside of the vacuum vessel, and a mirror mounted on the back of a grating inside the vacuum vessel. The crosshair is mounted in front of the camera, and a diffraction pattern is formed when illuminated with the laser diode beam reflected from the mirror. This diffraction pattern contains information related to relative movements between the grating and the pedestal. Image analysis algorithms have been developed to determine the relative movements between the gratings and pedestal. In the paper we elaborate on features in the diffraction pattern, and describe the image analysis algorithms used to monitor grating tilt changes. Experimental results are provided which indicate the high degree of sensitivity provided by the tilt sensor and image analysis algorithms.

  4. Exploration of high-dimensional scalar function for nuclear reactor safety analysis and visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Maljovec, D.; Wang, B.; Pascucci, V.; Bremer, P. T.; Pernice, M.; Mandelli, D.; Nourgaliev, R.

    2013-07-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user's guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving data from a nuclear reactor safety simulation. (authors)

  5. Exploration of High-Dimensional Scalar Function for Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user’s guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving dataset from a nuclear reactor safety simulation.

  6. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott; Podlesak, David; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  7. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

  8. Probabilistic analysis of accident precursors in the nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, M; De Gelder, P

    2004-07-26

    Feedback of operating experience has always been an important issue in the nuclear industry. A probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) can be used as a tool to analyse how an operational event might have developed adversely in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event. This process is called PSA-based event analysis (PSAEA). A comprehensive set of PSAEA guidelines was developed by an international project. The main characteristics of this methodology are summarised. This approach to analyse incidents can be used to meet different objectives of utilities or nuclear regulators. The paper describes the main objectives and the experiences of the Belgian nuclear regulatory organisation AVN with the application of PSA-based event analysis. Some interesting aspects of the process of PSAEA are further developed and underlined. Several case studies are discussed and an overview of the obtained results is given. Finally, the interest of a broad and interactive forum on PSAEA is highlighted. PMID:15231351

  9. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  10. Using a Simple Binomial Model to Assess Improvement in Predictive Capability: Sequential Bayesian Inference, Hypothesis Testing, and Power Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sigeti, David E.; Pelak, Robert A.

    2012-09-11

    We present a Bayesian statistical methodology for identifying improvement in predictive simulations, including an analysis of the number of (presumably expensive) simulations that will need to be made in order to establish with a given level of confidence that an improvement has been observed. Our analysis assumes the ability to predict (or postdict) the same experiments with legacy and new simulation codes and uses a simple binomial model for the probability, {theta}, that, in an experiment chosen at random, the new code will provide a better prediction than the old. This model makes it possible to do statistical analysis with an absolute minimum of assumptions about the statistics of the quantities involved, at the price of discarding some potentially important information in the data. In particular, the analysis depends only on whether or not the new code predicts better than the old in any given experiment, and not on the magnitude of the improvement. We show how the posterior distribution for {theta} may be used, in a kind of Bayesian hypothesis testing, both to decide if an improvement has been observed and to quantify our confidence in that decision. We quantify the predictive probability that should be assigned, prior to taking any data, to the possibility of achieving a given level of confidence, as a function of sample size. We show how this predictive probability depends on the true value of {theta} and, in particular, how there will always be a region around {theta} = 1/2 where it is highly improbable that we will be able to identify an improvement in predictive capability, although the width of this region will shrink to zero as the sample size goes to infinity. We show how the posterior standard deviation may be used, as a kind of 'plan B metric' in the case that the analysis shows that {theta} is close to 1/2 and argue that such a plan B should generally be part of hypothesis testing. All the analysis presented in the paper is done with a general

  11. Analysis of valve failure data for LWR nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    A computer analysis of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data file, compiled from Licensee Event Report (LER) data sheets, has been performed to characterize and highlight valve failures in light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants and provide guidance for valve improvement programs. The analysis is based on data from 1975 through 1978. Over this period, 889 valve citations were reported for pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants and 891 for boiling water reactor (BWR) plants. This report presents the pertinent LER data in a manner which indicates valve performance areas toward which improvement efforts may be directed.

  12. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies project. [spectrometer design and spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    The participation of undergraduates in nuclear quadrupole resonance research at Grambling University was made possible by NASA grants. Expanded laboratory capabilities include (1) facilities for high and low temperature generation and measurement; (2) facilities for radio frequency generation and measurement with the modern spectrum analyzers, precision frequency counters and standard signal generators; (3) vacuum and glass blowing facilities; and (4) miscellaneous electronic and machine shop facilities. Experiments carried out over a five year period are described and their results analyzed. Theoretical studies on solid state crystalline electrostatic fields, field gradients, and antishielding factors are included.

  13. Enhancing army analysis capability for warfighter protection: TRADOC-RDECOM M&S decision support environment collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athmer, Keith; Gaughan, Chris; McDonnell, Joseph S.; Leach, Robert; Davis, Bert; Truong, Kiet; Borum, Howard; Leslie, Richard; Ma, Lein

    2012-05-01

    The development of an Integrated Base Defense (IBD) is a significant challenge for the Army with many analytical gaps. The IBD problem space is complex, with evolving requirements and a large stakeholder base. In order to evaluate and analyze IBD decisions, the Training & Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Maneuver Support Center of Excellence (MSCoE) led and continues to lead a series of IBD focused experiments and wargames. Modeling and Simulation (M&S) significantly contributes to this effort. To improve IBD M&S capabilities, a collaborative demonstration with the Research, Development and Engineering Command's (RDECOM's) M&S Decision Support Environment (MSDSE) was held in September 2011. The results of this demonstration provided key input to MSCoE IBD related concepts and technologies. Moreover, it established an initial M&S toolset that will significantly improve force protection in combat zones and Army installations worldwide by providing leaders a capability to conduct analysis of defense and mission rehearsals. The demonstration was executed with a "human in the loop" Battle Captain, who was aided by mission command assets such as Base Expeditionary Targeting and Surveillance Sensors-Combined (BETSS-C). The Common Operating Picture was populated and stimulated using Science & Technology (S&T) M&S, allowing for a realistic representation of physical phenomena without the need for real systems. Novel methods were used for simulation orchestration, and for initializing the simulations and Opposing Force (OPFOR) activities. Ultimately, this demonstration showed that the MSDSE is suitable to support TRADOC IBD analyses and that S&T M&S is ready to be used in a demanding simulation environment. This paper will highlight the event's outcomes and lessons identified.

  14. California GAMA Special Study. Development of a Capability for the Analysis of Krypton-85 in Groundwater Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Ate; Bibby, Richard K.; Moran, Jean E.; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-06-01

    A capability for the analysis of krypton-85 (85Kr) in groundwater samples was developed at LLNL. Samples are collected by extracting gas from 2000-4000 L of groundwater at the well, yielding approximately 0.2 cm3 STP krypton. Sample collection takes 1 to 4 hours. Krypton is purified in the laboratory using a combination of molecular sieve and activated charcoal traps, and transferred to a liquid scintillation vial. The 85Kr activity is measured by liquid scintillation on a Quantulus 1220 liquid scintillation counter from PerkinElmer. The detection limit for a typical 0.2 cm3Kr sample size is 11% of the present day activity in air, corresponding to the decay corrected activity in air in 1987. The typical measurement uncertainty is below 10% for recently recharged samples. Six groundwater samples were collected, purified and counted. 85Kr was not detected in any of the samples counted at LLNL. 85Kr was detected by the low level counting laboratory of Bern University in all samples between 1.5 and 6.6 decays per minute per cm3 krypton, corresponding to decay corrected activities in air between 1971 and 1985. The new capability is an excellent complement to tritium-helium, expanding the existing suite of age dating tools available to the GAMA program (35S, 3H/3He, 14C and radiogenic helium). 85Kr can replace 3H/3He in settings where 3H/3He ages are impossible to determine (for example where terrigenic helium overwhelms tritiogenic helium) and provides additional insight into travel time distributions in complex mixed groundwater systems.

  15. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... COMMISSION Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear... subsection to NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power..., Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants:...

  16. Nuclear structure analysis using the Orange Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, J.-M.; Pascovici, Gh.; Christen, S.; Meersschout, T.; Bernards, C.; Fransen, Ch.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Thiel, S.; Jolie, J.; Materna, Th.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, an Orange spectrometer, a focusing iron-free magnetic spectrometer, has been installed at a beam line of the 10 MV Tandem accelerator of the IKP of the University of Cologne. The high efficiency of 15% of 4{pi} for the detection of conversion electrons and the energy resolution of 1% makes the Orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. From the conversion electron spectrum, transition multipolarities can be determined using the so called K to L ratio. In combination with an array of germanium and lanthanum bromide detectors, e{sup -}-{gamma}-coincidences can be performed to investigate the level scheme. Moreover, the very fast lanthanum bromide scintillator with an energy resolution of 3% allows e{sup -}-{gamma} lifetime measurements down to 0.3 ns. A second Orange spectrometer can be added to build the Double Orange Spectrometer for e{sup -}-e{sup -}-coincidences. It is indispensable for lifetime measurements of low intensity or nearby lying transitions as often occur in odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. The capabilities are illustrated with several examples.

  17. CAC - NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET CORE ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important factors in the development of nuclear rocket engine designs is to be able to accurately predict temperatures and pressures throughout a fission nuclear reactor core with axial hydrogen flow through circular coolant passages. CAC is an analytical prediction program to study the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a circular coolant passage. CAC predicts as a function of time axial and radial fluid conditions, passage wall temperatures, flow rates in each coolant passage, and approximate maximum material temperatures. CAC incorporates the hydrogen properties model STATE to provide fluid-state relations, thermodynamic properties, and transport properties of molecular hydrogen in any fixed ortho-para combination. The program requires the general core geometry, the core material properties as a function of temperature, the core power profile, and the core inlet conditions as function of time. Although CAC was originally developed in FORTRAN IV for use on an IBM 7094, this version is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and is designed to be machine independent. It has been successfully compiled on IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS with Lahey F77L, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS 4.1.1, and a VAX series computer running VMS 5.4-3. CAC requires 300K of RAM under MS-DOS, 422K of RAM under SunOS, and 220K of RAM under VMS. No sample executable is provided on the distribution medium. Sample input and output data are included. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. CAC was developed in 1966, and this machine independent version was released in 1992. IBM-PC and IBM are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Lahey F77L is a registered trademark of Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. VMS is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  18. Enhanced binding capability of nuclear factor-κB with demethylated P2X3 receptor gene contributes to cancer pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You-Lang; Jiang, Guo-Qin; Wei, Jinrong; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Hongyan; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling is implicated in both cancer development and inflammation processes. However, the roles and mechanisms of NF-κB signaling in the development of cancer-induced pain (CIP) remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate the roles of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in regulation of the purinergic receptor (P2X3R) plasticity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of CIP rats. We showed here that tumor cell injection produced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, and an enhanced body weight-bearing difference, which was correlated with an upregulation of p65 and P2X3R expression in lumber DRGs and a potentiation of ATP-evoked responses of tibia-innervating DRG neurons. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling using p65 inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, BAY-11-7082, or lentiviral-p65 short-hairpin RNA significantly attenuated CIP and reversed the activities of P2X3R. Interestingly, tumor cell injection led to a significant demethylation of CpG island in p2x3r gene promoter and enhanced ability of p65 to bind the promoter of p2x3r gene. Our findings suggest that upregulation of P2X3R expression was mediated by the enhanced binding capability of p65 with demethylated promoter of p2x3r gene, thus contributing to CIP. NF-κBp65 might be a potential target for treating CIP, a neuropathic pain generated by tumor cell-induced injury to nerves that innervate the skin. PMID:26049406

  19. Enhanced binding capability of nuclear factor-κB with demethylated P2X3 receptor gene contributes to cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, You-Lang; Jiang, Guo-Qin; Wei, Jinrong; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Hongyan; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling is implicated in both cancer development and inflammation processes. However, the roles and mechanisms of NF-κB signaling in the development of cancer-induced pain (CIP) remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate the roles of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in regulation of the purinergic receptor (P2X3R) plasticity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of CIP rats. We showed here that tumor cell injection produced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, and an enhanced body weight–bearing difference, which was correlated with an upregulation of p65 and P2X3R expression in lumber DRGs and a potentiation of ATP-evoked responses of tibia-innervating DRG neurons. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling using p65 inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, BAY-11-7082, or lentiviral-p65 short-hairpin RNA significantly attenuated CIP and reversed the activities of P2X3R. Interestingly, tumor cell injection led to a significant demethylation of CpG island in p2x3r gene promoter and enhanced ability of p65 to bind the promoter of p2x3r gene. Our findings suggest that upregulation of P2X3R expression was mediated by the enhanced binding capability of p65 with demethylated promoter of p2x3r gene, thus contributing to CIP. NF-κBp65 might be a potential target for treating CIP, a neuropathic pain generated by tumor cell–induced injury to nerves that innervate the skin. PMID:26049406

  20. ASSESSMENT OF CAPABILITIES AND RESEARCH NEEDS IN THE AREA OF HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL IONIZING RADIATION: A JOINT REPORT TO THE CONGRESS BY THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, AND THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the capabilities, research needs and on-going projects of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission related to the health effects of low-level ionizing radiation. The statutory authorities of both EPA and NRC related to radiat...

  1. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  2. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, Jasmina L.

    1993-01-01

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J; Burchell, Timothy D; Corwin, William R; Fisher, Stephen Eugene; Forsberg, Charles W.; Morris, Robert Noel; Moses, David Lewis

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  4. Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.

    1993-05-01

    Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

  5. Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

  6. Isotopic Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel with an Ultra-High Rate HPGe Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2014-06-06

    A longstanding challenge is the assay of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Determining the isotopic content of SNF requires gamma-ray spectroscopy. PNNL has developed new digital filtering and analysis techniques to produce an ultra high-rate gamma-ray spectrometer from a standard coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystal. This ~40% efficient detector has been operated for SNF measurements at a throughput of about 400k gamma-ray counts per second (kcps) at an input rate of 1.3 Mcps. Optimized filtering algorithms preserve the spectroscopic capability of the system even at these high rates. This talk will present the results of a SNF measurement with aged SNF pellets at PNNL’s Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, first results with a FPGA front end processor capable of processing the data in real time, and the development path toward a multi-element system to assay fuel assemblies.

  7. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  8. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 4; Cold Flow Analyses and CFD Analysis Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of model inlet air temperature drift during a test run was performed to aid in the decision on the need for and/or the schedule for including heaters in the SRMAFTE. The Sverdrup acceptance test data was used to determine the drift in air temperature during runs over the entire range of delivered flow rates and pressures. The effect of this temperature drift on the model Reynolds number was also calculated. It was concluded from this study that a 2% change in absolute temperature during a test run could be adequately accounted for by the data analysis program. A handout package of these results was prepared and presented to ED35 management.

  9. LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-07-27

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

  10. Automatic data processing and analysis system for monitoring region around a planned nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiira, Timo; Kaisko, Outi; Kortström, Jari; Vuorinen, Tommi; Uski, Marja; Korja, Annakaisa

    2015-04-01

    The site of a new planned nuclear power plant is located in Pyhäjoki, eastern coast of the Bay of Bothnia. The area is characterized by low-active intraplate seismicity, with earthquake magnitudes rarely exceeding 4.0. IAEA guidelines state that when a nuclear power plant site is evaluated a network of sensitive seismographs having a recording capability for micro-earthquakes should be installed to acquire more detailed information on potential seismic sources. The operation period of the network should be long enough to obtain a comprehensive earthquake catalogue for seismotectonic interpretation. A near optimal configuration of ten seismograph stations will be installed around the site. A central station, including 3-C high-frequency and strong motion seismographs, is located in the site area. In addition, the network comprises nine high-frequency 3-C stations within a distance of 50 km from the central station. The network is dense enough to fulfil the requirements of azimuthal coverage better than 180o and automatic event location capability down to ~ ML -0.1 within a radius of 25 km from the site. Automatic processing and analysis of the planned seismic network is presented. Following the IAEA guidelines, real-time monitoring of the site area is integrated with the automatic detection and location process operated by the Institute of Seismology, University of Helsinki. In addition interactive data analysis is needed. At the end of year 2013 5 stations have been installed. The automatic analysis utilizes also 7 near by stations of national seismic networks of Finland and Sweden. During this preliminary phase several small earthquakes have been detected. The detection capability and location accuracy of the automatic analysis is estimated using chemical explosions at 15 known sites.

  11. Nuclear risk analysis of the Ulysses mission

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, B.W.; Vaughan, F.R. ); Englehart, D.R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    The use of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator fueled with plutonium-238 dioxide on the Space Shuttle-launched Ulysses mission implies some level of risk due to potential accidents. This paper describes the method used to quantify risks in the Ulysses mission Final Safety Analysis Report prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy. The starting point for the analysis described herein is following input of source term probability distributions from the General Electric Company. A Monte Carlo technique is used to develop probability distributions of radiological consequences for a range of accident scenarios thoughout the mission. Factors affecting radiological consequences are identified, the probability distribution of the effect of each factor determined, and the functional relationship among all the factors established. The probability distributions of all the factor effects are then combined using a Monte Carlo technique. The results of the analysis are presented in terms of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDF) by mission sub-phase, phase, and the overall mission. The CCDFs show the total probability that consequences (calculated health effects) would be equal to or greater than a given value.

  12. Analysis of Operation PLUMBBOB nuclear test smoky aerial radiological data

    SciTech Connect

    Steadman, C.R. Jr.; Kennedy, N.C.; Quinn, V.E.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analysis of the aerial radiological data collected following the SMOKY nuclear test of Operation PLUMBBOB. The methods of converting these aerial data to exposure rates compatible with those measured by ground-level monitors are discussed. A fallout pattern, based upon the resulting aerial exposure-rate values, is presented for the downwind area where no ground-level exposure-rate measurements were made. This WSNSO extended fallout pattern is compared with a similar analysis prepared in the late 1950s. An evaluation of the enhanced fallout areas shown in the extended pattern is made. The appendices contain discussions of the aerial data collection and analysis procedures, and contain tabulated radiological data used in the extended fallout pattern analysis. 7 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Multi-Elemental Nuclear Analysis of soil reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metairon, S.; Zamboni, C. B.; Medeiros, I. M. M. Amaral; Menezes, M. À. B. C.

    2011-08-01

    The elements concentration in the soil reference material (IAEA/SOIL-7) was obtained using the parametric Neutron Activation Analysis technique in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN (CNEN-SP). The results obtained were in good agreement with the respective nominal values from this reference material suggesting the viability of using this parametric procedure for environmental investigations.

  14. Multiscale Methods for Nuclear Reactor Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Benjamin S.

    The ability to accurately predict local pin powers in nuclear reactors is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause fuel pin failure during steady state and transient operation. In the research presented here, methods are developed to improve the local solution using high order methods with boundary conditions from a low order global solution. Several different core configurations were tested to determine the improvement in the local pin powers compared to the standard techniques, that use diffusion theory and pin power reconstruction (PPR). Two different multiscale methods were developed and analyzed; the post-refinement multiscale method and the embedded multiscale method. The post-refinement multiscale methods use the global solution to determine boundary conditions for the local solution. The local solution is solved using either a fixed boundary source or an albedo boundary condition; this solution is "post-refinement" and thus has no impact on the global solution. The embedded multiscale method allows the local solver to change the global solution to provide an improved global and local solution. The post-refinement multiscale method is assessed using three core designs. When the local solution has more energy groups, the fixed source method has some difficulties near the interface: however the albedo method works well for all cases. In order to remedy the issue with boundary condition errors for the fixed source method, a buffer region is used to act as a filter, which decreases the sensitivity of the solution to the boundary condition. Both the albedo and fixed source methods benefit from the use of a buffer region. Unlike the post-refinement method, the embedded multiscale method alters the global solution. The ability to change the global solution allows for refinement in areas where the errors in the few group nodal diffusion are typically large. The embedded method is shown to improve the global solution when it is applied to a MOX/LEU assembly

  15. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Mars Mission Systems Analysis and Requirements Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, Jack; Chiroux, Robert C.; Thomas, Dan; Crane, Tracie

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Mars transportation vehicle design concepts developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office. These vehicle design concepts provide an indication of the most demanding and least demanding potential requirements for nuclear thermal propulsion systems for human Mars exploration missions from years 2025 to 2035. Vehicle concept options vary from large "all-up" vehicle configurations that would transport all of the elements for a Mars mission on one vehicle. to "split" mission vehicle configurations that would consist of separate smaller vehicles that would transport cargo elements and human crew elements to Mars separately. Parametric trades and sensitivity studies show NTP stage and engine design options that provide the best balanced set of metrics based on safety, reliability, performance, cost and mission objectives. Trade studies include the sensitivity of vehicle performance to nuclear engine characteristics such as thrust, specific impulse and nuclear reactor type. Tbe associated system requirements are aligned with the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Reference Mars mission as described in the Explorations Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) report. The focused trade studies include a detailed analysis of nuclear engine radiation shield requirements for human missions and analysis of nuclear thermal engine design options for the ESAS reference mission.

  16. Analysis of Eddy Current Capabilities for the Detection of Outer Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking in Small Bore Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Phillip; Simpson, John

    2007-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for the detection of outer diameter damage in tubing and many complex aerospace structures often requires the use of an inner diameter probe due to a lack of access to the outside of the part. In small bore structures the probe size and orientation are constrained by the inner diameter of the part, complicating the optimization of the inspection technique. Detection of flaws through a significant remaining wall thickness becomes limited not only by the standard depth of penetration, but also geometrical aspects of the probe. Recently, an orthogonal eddy current probe was developed for detection of such flaws in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters. In this case, the detection of deeply buried stress corrosion cracking by an inner diameter eddy current probe was sought. Probe optimization was performed based upon the limiting spatial dimensions, flaw orientation, and required detection sensitivity. Analysis of the probe/flaw interaction was performed through the use of finite and boundary element modeling techniques. Experimental data for the flaw detection capabilities, including a probability of detection study, will be presented along with the simulation data. The results of this work have led to the successful deployment of an inspection system for the detection of stress corrosion cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters.

  17. Analysis of Eddy Current Capabilities for the Detection of Outer Diameter Cracking in Small Bore Metallic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Phillip; Simpson, John

    2008-02-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for the detection of outer diameter damage in tubing and many complex aerospace structures often requires the use of an inner diameter probe due to a lack of access to the outside of the part. In small bore structures the probe size and orientation are constrained by the inner diameter of the part, complicating the optimization of the inspection technique. Detection of flaws through a significant remaining wall thickness becomes limited not only by the standard depth of penetration, but also geometrical aspects of the probe. Recently, an orthogonal eddy current probe was developed for detection of such flaws in space shuttle primary reaction control system (PRCS) thrusters. In this case, the detection of deeply buried intergranular cracking by an inner diameter eddy current probe was sought. Probe optimization was performed based upon the limiting spatial dimensions, flaw orientation, and required detection sensitivity. Analysis of the probe/flaw interaction was performed through the use of finite element modeling techniques. Experimental data for the flaw detection capabilities, including a probability of detection study, will be presented along with the simulation data. The results of this work have led to the successful deployment of an inspection system for the detection of intergranular cracking in PRCS thrusters.

  18. Constraining the symmetry energy content of nuclear matter from nuclear masses: A covariance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, C.; Agrawal, B. K.; De, J. N.

    2015-08-01

    Elements of nuclear symmetry energy evaluated from different energy density functionals parametrized by fitting selective bulk properties of few representative nuclei are seen to vary widely. Those obtained from experimental data on nuclear masses across the periodic table, however, show that they are better constrained. A possible direction in reconciling this paradox may be gleaned from comparison of results obtained from use of the binding energies in the fitting protocol within a microscopic model with two sets of nuclei, one a representative standard set and another where very highly asymmetric nuclei are additionally included. A covariance analysis reveals that the additional fitting protocol reduces the uncertainties in the nuclear symmetry energy coefficient, its slope parameter, as well as the neutron-skin thickness in 208Pb nucleus by ˜50 % . The central values of these entities are also seen to be slightly reduced.

  19. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  20. PBMR nuclear design and safety analysis: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, C.

    2006-07-01

    PBMR is a high-temperature helium-cooled graphite-moderated continuous-fuelled pebble bed reactor. The power conversion unit is directly coupled to the reactor and the power turbines are driven through a direct closed-circuit helium cycle. An overview is presented on the nuclear engineering analyses used for the design and safety assessment for the PBMR. Topics addressed are the PBMR design, safety and licensing requirements, nuclear engineering analysis results, software verification and validation, and advances in software development. (authors)

  1. Analysis of evaporation in nuclear waste boreholes in unsaturated tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1993-12-31

    We present an analysis of evaporation in a nuclear waste borehole in unsaturated tuff. In unsaturated tuff, water in contact with a waste container will evaporate due to the difference in vapor pressure between water in a flat film and water held in rock pores with curved interfaces. Decay heat will also enhance evaporation. It is important to study evaporation in a potential geologic repository of nuclear waste in unsaturated rock because the corrosion of waste containers is increased with liquid water. For radionuclides other than gaseous ones, their release from waste solids requires liquid water.

  2. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and

  3. Nuclear monitoring by nonradioactive noble gas sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The perceived importance of measuring the xenon and krypton isotopics of nuclear activities has increased substantially in recent years. We have performed a systems analysis and theoretical simulation of the production, atmospheric dispersion, and isotopic abundances of noble-gas fission products, addressing several questions of interest, including: the relative isotopic variation as a function of nuclear fuel composition, reactor operational history, reactor type, distance from stack, and ambient meteorological conditions. Of particular importance in this analysis was the question of back-calculating process parameters of interest given noble-gas isotopic data. An analysis of the effect of measurement uncertainties was also performed. The results of these analyses indicate that this monitoring concept should be experimentally feasible.

  4. ADDING REALISM TO NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLVING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-15

    Two new criticality modeling approaches have greatly increased the efficiency of dissolver operations in H-Canyon. The first new approach takes credit for the linear, physical distribution of the mass throughout the entire length of the fuel assembly. This distribution of mass is referred to as the linear density. Crediting the linear density of the fuel bundles results in using lower fissile concentrations, which allows higher masses to be charged to the dissolver. Also, this approach takes credit for the fact that only part of the fissile mass is wetted at a time. There are multiple assemblies stacked on top of each other in a bundle. On average, only 50-75% of the mass (the bottom two or three assemblies) is wetted at a time. This means that only 50-75% (depending on operating level) of the mass is moderated and is contributing to the reactivity of the system. The second new approach takes credit for the progression of the dissolving process. Previously, dissolving analysis looked at a snapshot in time where the same fissile material existed both in the wells and in the bulk solution at the same time. The second new approach models multiple consecutive phases that simulate the fissile material moving from a high concentration in the wells to a low concentration in the bulk solution. This approach is more realistic and allows higher fissile masses to be charged to the dissolver.

  5. Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

    2010-04-16

    A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

  6. In-field analysis and assessment of nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Myers, W.S.; Olivares, J.A.; Phillips, J.R.; York, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has actively developed and implemented a number of instruments to monitor, detect, and analyze nuclear materials in the field. Many of these technologies, developed under existing US Department of Energy programs, can also be used to effectively interdict nuclear materials smuggled across or within national borders. In particular, two instruments are suitable for immediate implementation: the NAVI-2, a hand-held gamma-ray and neutron system for the detection and rapid identification of radioactive materials, and the portable mass spectrometer for the rapid analysis of minute quantities of radioactive materials. Both instruments provide not only critical information about the characteristics of the nuclear material for law-enforcement agencies and national authorities but also supply health and safety information for personnel handling the suspect materials.

  7. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagielski, J.; Ostaszewska, U.; Bielinski, D. M.; Grambole, D.; Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R.; Kosinska, A.

    2016-03-01

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H+, He+ and Ar+ studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.

  8. Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization for Multiscale Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Chockalingam, K.; Perez, D. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-03-01

    Engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations can benefit by utilizing high-fidelity models running at a lower length scale. Lower length-scale models provide a detailed view of the material behavior that is used to determine the average material response at the macroscale. These lower length-scale calculations may provide insight into material behavior where experimental data is sparse or nonexistent. This multiscale approach is especially useful in the nuclear field, since irradiation experiments are difficult and expensive to conduct. The lower length-scale models complement the experiments by influencing the types of experiments required and by reducing the total number of experiments needed. This multiscale modeling approach is a central motivation in the development of the BISON-MARMOT fuel performance codes at Idaho National Laboratory. These codes seek to provide more accurate and predictive solutions for nuclear fuel behavior. One critical aspect of multiscale modeling is the ability to extract the relevant information from the lower length-scale sim- ulations. One approach, the asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) technique, has proven to be an effective method for determining homogenized material parameters. The AEH technique prescribes a system of equations to solve at the microscale that are used to compute homogenized material constants for use at the engineering scale. In this work, we employ AEH to explore the effect of evolving microstructural thermal conductivity and elastic constants on nuclear fuel performance. We show that the AEH approach fits cleanly into the BISON and MARMOT codes and provides a natural, multidimensional homogenization capability.

  9. An analysis of international nuclear fuel supply options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J'tia Patrice

    As the global demand for energy grows, many nations are considering developing or increasing nuclear capacity as a viable, long-term power source. To assess the possible expansion of nuclear power and the intricate relationships---which cover the range of economics, security, and material supply and demand---between established and aspirant nuclear generating entities requires models and system analysis tools that integrate all aspects of the nuclear enterprise. Computational tools and methods now exist across diverse research areas, such as operations research and nuclear engineering, to develop such a tool. This dissertation aims to develop methodologies and employ and expand on existing sources to develop a multipurpose tool to analyze international nuclear fuel supply options. The dissertation is comprised of two distinct components: the development of the Material, Economics, and Proliferation Assessment Tool (MEPAT), and analysis of fuel cycle scenarios using the tool. Development of MEPAT is aimed for unrestricted distribution and therefore uses publicly available and open-source codes in its development when possible. MEPAT is built using the Powersim Studio platform that is widely used in systems analysis. MEPAT development is divided into three modules focusing on: material movement; nonproliferation; and economics. The material movement module tracks material quantity in each process of the fuel cycle and in each nuclear program with respect to ownership, location and composition. The material movement module builds on techniques employed by fuel cycle models such as the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) code developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) for the analysis of domestic fuel cycle. Material movement parameters such as lending and reactor preference, as well as fuel cycle parameters such as process times and material factors are user-specified through a Microsoft Excel(c) data spreadsheet

  10. Multiscale integral analysis of a HT leakage in a fusion nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, M.; Fradera, J.; Perlado, J. M.; Zamora, I.; Martínez-Saban, E.; Colomer, C.; Briani, P.

    2016-05-01

    The present work presents an example of the application of an integral methodology based on a multiscale analysis that covers the whole tritium cycle within a nuclear fusion power plant, from a micro scale, analyzing key components where tritium is leaked through permeation, to a macro scale, considering its atmospheric transport. A leakage from the Nuclear Power Plants, (NPP) primary to the secondary side of a heat exchanger (HEX) is considered for the present example. Both primary and secondary loop coolants are assumed to be He. Leakage is placed inside the HEX, leaking tritium in elementary tritium (HT) form to the secondary loop where it permeates through the piping structural material to the exterior. The Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system removes the leaked tritium towards the NPP exhaust. The HEX is modelled with system codes and coupled to Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) to account for tritium dispersion inside the nuclear power plants buildings and in site environment. Finally, tritium dispersion is calculated with an atmospheric transport code and a dosimetry analysis is carried out. Results show how the implemented methodology is capable of assessing the impact of tritium from the microscale to the atmospheric scale including the dosimetric aspect.

  11. NUCLEAR DATA RESOURCES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    PRITYCHENKO, B.

    2006-06-05

    The mission of the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) includes collection, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and applied nuclear technologies. In 2004, to answer the needs of nuclear data users, NNDC completed a project to modernize storage and management of its databases and began offering new nuclear data Web services. Examples of nuclear reaction, nuclear structure and decay database applications along with a number of nuclear science codes are also presented.

  12. A human reliability analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.F.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in a human reliability analysis (HRA) conducted during a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process performed at the Pantex plant. The probability of human errors during the disassembly process is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons processing. The methods include the systematic identification of potential human-initiated or enabled accident sequences using an accident-sequence fault tree, the extensive use of walkthroughs and videotaping of the disassembly process, and hands-on testing of postulated human errors. THERP modeling of rule-based behavior and operational data analysis of errors in skill-based behavior are described. A simple method for evaluating the approximate likelihood of nonmalevolent violations of procedures was developed and used to examine the process. The HRA occurred concurrently with process design, so considerable interaction between the analysts and designers occurred and resulted in design changes that are discussed in the paper.

  13. Sensitivity analysis using computer calculus: A nuclear waste isolation application

    SciTech Connect

    Oblow, E.M.; Pin, F.G.; Wright, R.Q.

    1986-09-01

    An automated procedure for performing large-scale sensitivity studies based on the use of computer calculus is presented. The procedure is embodied in a FORTRAN precompiler called GRESS, which automatically processes computer models adding derivative-taking capabilities to the normal calculated results. The theory and applicability of the GRESS codes are described and tested against a major geohydrological modeling problem. The SWENT nuclear waste repository modeling code is used as the basis for these studies. Results for a test problem involving groundwater flow in the vicinity of the Richton Salt Dome are discussed in detail. Sensitivity results are compared with analytical, perturbation, and alternate sensitivity approaches to the problem. Five-place accuracy in these sensitivity results is verified for all cases in which the effects of nonlinearities are made sufficiently small. Conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of GRESS in the problem studied and for more general large-scale modeling sensitivity studies.

  14. Analysis of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuels for Repository Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    L.F. Pincock; W.D. Hintze; J. Duguid

    2006-02-07

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) consists of hundreds of different fuel types in various conditions. In order to analyze and model the DOE SNF for its suitability for repository disposal, several generalizations and simplifications were necessary. This paper describes the methodology used to arrive at a suitable DOE SNF surrogate and summarizes the proposed analysis of this DOE SNF surrogate for its appropriateness as a representative SNF.

  15. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  16. Preliminary analysis of the postulated changes needed to achieve rail cask handling capabilities at selected light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Konzek, G.J.

    1986-02-01

    Reactor-specific railroad and crane information for all LWRs in the US was extracted from current sources of information. Based on this information, reactors were separated into two basic groups consisting of reactors with existing, usable rail cask capabilities and those without these capabilities. The latter group is the main focus of this study. The group of reactors without present rail cask handling capabilities was further separated into two subgroups consisting of reactors considered essentially incapable of handling a large rail cask of about 100 tons and reactors where postulated facility changes could result in rail cask handling capabilities. Based on a selected population of 127 reactors, the results of this assessment indicate that usable rail cask capabilities exist at 83 (65%) of the reactors. Twelve (27%) of the remaining 44 reactors are deemed incapable of handling a large rail cask without major changes, and 32 reactors are considered likely candidates for potentially achieving rail cask handling capabilities. In the latter group, facility changes were postulated that would conceptually enable these reactors to handle large rail casks. The estimated cost per plant of required facility changes varied widely from a high of about $35 million to a low of <$0.3 million. Only 11 of the 32 plants would require crane upgrades. Spur track and right-of-way costs would apparently vary widely among sites. These results are based on preliminary analyses using available generic cost data. They represent lower bound values that are useful for developing an initial assessment of the viability of the postulated changes on a system-wide basis, but are not intended to be absolute values for specific reactors or sites.

  17. Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

  18. Preliminary Assessment of ATR-C Capabilities to Provide Integral Benchmark Data for Key Structural/Matrix Materials that May be Used for Nuclear Data Testing and Analytical Methods Validation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify some suggested types of experiments that can be performed in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical (ATR-C) facility. A fundamental computational investigation is provided to demonstrate possible integration of experimental activities in the ATR-C with the development of benchmark experiments. Criticality benchmarks performed in the ATR-C could provide integral data for key matrix and structural materials used in nuclear systems. Results would then be utilized in the improvement of nuclear data libraries and as a means for analytical methods validation. It is proposed that experiments consisting of well-characterized quantities of materials be placed in the Northwest flux trap position of the ATR-C. The reactivity worth of the material could be determined and computationally analyzed through comprehensive benchmark activities including uncertainty analyses. Experiments were modeled in the available benchmark model of the ATR using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.0 cross section library. A single bar (9.5 cm long, 0.5 cm wide, and 121.92 cm high) of each material could provide sufficient reactivity difference in the core geometry for computational modeling and analysis. However, to provide increased opportunity for the validation of computational models, additional bars of material placed in the flux trap would increase the effective reactivity up to a limit of 1$ insertion. For simplicity in assembly manufacture, approximately four bars of material could provide a means for additional experimental benchmark configurations, except in the case of strong neutron absorbers and many materials providing positive reactivity. Future tasks include the cost analysis and development of the experimental assemblies, including means for the characterization of the neutron flux and spectral indices. Oscillation techniques may also serve to provide additional means for experimentation and validation of computational methods and acquisition of

  19. Preliminary Assessment of ATR-C Capabilities to Provide Integral Benchmark Data for Key Structural/Matrix Materials that May be Used for Nuclear Data Testing and Analytical Methods Validation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide a fundamental computational investigation into the possible integration of experimental activities with the Advanced Test Reactor Critical (ATR-C) facility with the development of benchmark experiments. Criticality benchmarks performed in the ATR-C could provide integral data for key matrix and structural materials used in nuclear systems. Results would then be utilized in the improvement of nuclear data libraries and as a means for analytical methods validation. It is proposed that experiments consisting of well-characterized quantities of materials be placed in the Northwest flux trap position of the ATR-C. The reactivity worth of the material could be determined and computationally analyzed through comprehensive benchmark activities including uncertainty analyses. Experiments were modeled in the available benchmark model of the ATR using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.0 cross section library. A single bar (9.5 cm long, 0.5 cm wide, and 121.92 cm high) of each material could provide sufficient reactivity difference in the core geometry for computational modeling and analysis. However, to provide increased opportunity for the validation of computational models, additional bars of material placed in the flux trap would increase the effective reactivity up to a limit of 1$ insertion. For simplicity in assembly manufacture, approximately four bars of material could provide a means for additional experimental benchmark configurations, except in the case of strong neutron absorbers and many materials providing positive reactivity. Future tasks include the cost analysis and development of the experimental assemblies, including means for the characterization of the neutron flux and spectral indices. Oscillation techniques may also serve to provide additional means for experimentation and validation of computational methods and acquisition of integral data for improving neutron cross sections. Further assessment of oscillation

  20. Disentangling the Circularity in Sen's Capability Approach: An Analysis of the Co-Evolution of Functioning Achievement and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Martin; Coad, Alex

    2011-01-01

    There is an ambiguity in Amartya Sen's capability approach as to what constitutes an individual's resources, conversion factors and valuable functionings. What we here call the "circularity problem" points to the fact that all three concepts seem to be mutually endogenous and interdependent. To econometrically account for this entanglement we…

  1. Stability analysis for a planar parallel manipulator with the capability of self-coordinating the load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingyu; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Pu; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Genliang; Zhao, Longhai

    2015-07-01

    Redundantly actuated parallel manipulators have the advantage of enhancing load-carrying capability over their non-redundant ones, however they also cause the problem of uneven load distribution and need a high requirement for the control system. This paper presents a 2-RPR/RP planar redundantly actuated parallel manipulator which can self-coordinate the distribution of external loads. This capability is realized by an appropriate design of the moving platform to make the manipulator stable at equilibrium position. The stability is proved by the theorem of direct Lyapunov method in classical mechanics. The numerical simulations are conducted to validate the stable capability by means of the observation of potential energies and phase planes. This paper offers an alternative way to design a redundantly actuated manipulator with the capability of self-coordinating the load distribution to actuations, such that parts of the controlling work are assigned to the manipulator itself by its own structure and only a little work remains to the control system.

  2. Reimagining What's Possible: How NREL's Energy Analysis and Decision Support Capabilities are Guiding Energy Systems Transformation at Home and Around the World; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This engaging brochure shows examples of how NREL enables energy system transformation through robust capabilities in energy analysis and decision support. By reimagining what's possible for renewable energy, NREL contributes to the Department of Energy mission to create energy systems that are cleaner, more reliable, and more secure.

  3. Safety analysis of irradiated nuclear fuel transportation container

    SciTech Connect

    Uspuras, E.; Rimkevicius, S.

    2007-07-01

    Ignalina NPP comprises two Units with RBMK-1500 reactors. After the Unit 1 of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant was shut down in 2004, approximately 1000 fuel assemblies from Unit were available for further reuse in Unit 2. The fuel-transportation container, vehicle, protection shaft and other necessary equipment were designed in order to implement the process for on-site transportation of Unit 1 fuel for reuse in the Unit 2. The Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was developed to demonstrate that the proposed set of equipment performs all functions and assures the required level of safety for both normal operation and accident conditions. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the content and main results of SAR, focusing attention on the container used to transport spent fuel assemblies from Unit I on Unit 2. In the SAR, the structural integrity, thermal, radiological and nuclear safety calculations are performed to assess the acceptance of the proposed set of equipment. The safety analysis demonstrated that the proposed nuclear fuel transportation container and other equipment are in compliance with functional, design and regulatory requirements and assure the required safety level. (authors)

  4. Characterization/Selection of a Continuous Wave Laser for RIMS Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Sunny; Alves, F.; Karunasiri, G.; Smith, C.; Isselhardt, B.

    2015-03-01

    The effort to implement the technology of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to problems of nuclear forensics involves the use of multiple lasers to selectively ionize the elements of concern. While current systems incorporate pulsed lasers, we present the results of a feasibility study to determine alternative (Continuous Wave) laser technologies to be employed for analysis of the actinides and fission products of debris from a nuclear detonation. RIMS has the potential to provide rapid isotope ratio quantification of the actinides and important fission products for post detonation nuclear forensics. The current approach to ionize uranium and plutonium uses three Ti-Sapphire pulsed lasers capable of a fundamental wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. In this work, we describe the use of a COTS CW laser to replace one of the pulsed lasers used for the second resonance excitation step of plutonium near 847.282 nm. We characterize the critical laser parameters necessary to achieve high precision isotope ratio measurements including the stability over time of the mean wavelength, bandwidth and spectral mode purity. This far narrower bandwidth laser provides a simpler setup, more robust hardware (greater mobility), and more efficient use of laser irradiance.

  5. Systems analysis of solid fuel nuclear engines in cislunar space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, U.; Koelle, H. H.; Balzer-Sieb, R.; Bernau, D.; Czarnitzki, J.; Floete, A.; Goericke, D.; Lindenthal, A.; Protsch, R.; Teschner, O.

    1984-12-01

    The use of nuclear engines in cislunar space was studied and the restrictions imposed on nuclear ferries by the chemical Earth to lower Earth orbit (LEO) transportation system were analyzed. The operating conditions are best met by tungsten-water-moderated reactors due to a high specific impulse and long durability. Specific transportation cost for LEO to geostationary orbit (GEO) and LEO to lunar orbit flights were calculated for a transportation system life of 50 yr. Average transportation costs are estimated to be 141 $/kg. No difference is made for both routes. An additional analysis of smaller and larger flight units shows only small cost reductions by employing larger ferries but a significant cost increase in case smaller flight units are used.

  6. Radionuclide Analysis on Bamboos following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Higaki, Shogo; Hirota, Masahiro; Akita, Kae; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    In response to contamination from the recent Fukushima nuclear accident, we conducted radionuclide analysis on bamboos sampled from six sites within a 25 to 980 km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Maximum activity concentrations of radiocesium 134Cs and 137Cs in samples from Fukushima city, 65 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 71 and 79 kBq/kg, dry weight (DW), respectively. In Kashiwa city, 195 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the sample concentrations were in excess of 3.4 and 4.3 kBq/kg DW, respectively. In Toyohashi city, 440 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi, the concentrations were below the measurable limits of up to 4.5 Bq/kg DW. In the radiocesium contaminated samples, the radiocesium activity was higher in mature and fallen leaves than in young leaves, branches and culms. PMID:22496858

  7. Seismological analysis of the fourth North Korean nuclear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Gernot; Gestermann, Nicolai; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea has conducted its fourth underground nuclear explosions on 06.01.2016 at 01:30 (UTC). The explosion was clearly detected and located by the seismic network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Additional seismic stations of international earthquake monitoring networks at regional distances, which are not part of the IMS, are used to precisely estimate the epicenter of the event in the North Hamgyong province (41.38°N / 129.05°E). It is located in the area of the North Korean Punggye-ri nuclear test site, where the verified nuclear tests from 2006, 2009, and 2013 were conducted as well. The analysis of the recorded seismic signals provides the evidence, that the event was originated by an explosive source. The amplitudes as well as the spectral characteristics of the signals were examined. Furthermore, the similarity of the signals with those from the three former nuclear tests suggests very similar source type. The seismograms at the 8,200 km distant IMS station GERES in Germany, for example, show the same P phase signal for all four explosions, differing in the amplitude only. The comparison of the measured amplitudes results in the increasing magnitude with the chronology of the explosions from 2006 (mb 4.2), 2009 (mb 4.8) until 2013 (mb 5.1), whereas the explosion in 2016 had approximately the same magnitude as that one three years before. Derived from the magnitude, a yield of 14 kt TNT equivalents was estimated for both explosions in 2013 and 2016; in 2006 and 2009 yields were 0.7 kt and 5.4 kt, respectively. However, a large inherent uncertainty for these values has to be taken into account. The estimation of the absolute yield of the explosions depends very much on the local geological situation and the degree of decoupling of the explosive from the surrounding rock. Due to the missing corresponding information, reliable magnitude-yield estimation for the

  8. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  9. Graph-Based Analysis of Nuclear Smuggling Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry; Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Chilton, Lawrence

    2009-12-01

    Much of the data that is collected and analyzed today is structural, consisting not only of entities but also of relationships between the entities. As a result, analysis applications rely upon automated structural data mining approaches to find patterns and concepts of interest. This ability to analyze structural data has become a particular challenge in many security-related domains. In these domains, focusing on the relationships between entities in the data is critical to detect important underlying patterns. In this study we apply structural data mining techniques to automate analysis of nuclear smuggling data. In particular, we choose to model the data as a graph and use graph-based relational learning to identify patterns and concepts of interest in the data. In this paper, we identify the analysis questions that are of importance to security analysts and describe the knowledge representation and data mining approach that we adopt for this challenge. We analyze the results using the Russian nuclear smuggling event database.

  10. Solid Phase Microextraction for the Analysis of Nuclear Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M

    2001-06-01

    This document is a compendium of answers to commonly asked questions about solid phase microextraction as it relates to the analysis of nuclear weapons. We have also included a glossary of terms associated with this analytical method as well as pertinent weapons engineering terminology. Microextraction is a new collection technique being developed to nonintrusively sample chemicals from weapon headspace gases for subsequent analysis. The chemicals that are being targeted outgas from the high explosives and other organic materials used in the weapon assembly. This technique is therefore a valuable tool to: (1) remotely detect and assess the aging of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and, in some cases, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) organic materials; and (2) identify potential compatibility issues (i.e., materials interactions) that should be more carefully monitored during surveillance tear-downs. Microextraction is particularly attractive because of the practical constraints inherent to the weapon surveillance procedure. To remain transparent to other core surveillance activities and fall within nuclear safety guidelines, headspace analysis of the weapons requires a procedure that: (1) maintains ambient temperature conditions; (2) allows practical collection times of less than 20 min; (3) maintains the integrity of the weapon gas volume; (4) provides reproducible and quantitative results; and (5) can identify all possible targets.

  11. Transient analysis and startup simulation of a thermionic space nuclear reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Xue, Huimin; Paramonov, D. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The thermionic transient analysis model is used to simulate the startup of the TOPAZ-2 space nuclear power system in orbit. The simulated startup procedures are assumed for the purpose of demonstrating the capabilities of the model and may not represent an accurate account of the actual startup procedures of the TOPAZ-2 system. The temperature reactivity feedback effects of the moderator, UO[sub 2] fuel, electrodes, coolant, and other components in the core are calculated, and their effects on the thermal and criticality conditions of the reactor are investigated. Also, estimates of the time constants of the temperature reactivity feedback for the UO[sub 2] fuel and the ZrH moderator during startup, as well as of the total temperature reactivity feedback as a function of the reactor steady-state thermal power, are obtained.

  12. Nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsies: Applications in pathology and clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Ph; Coquet, M.; Gherardi, R. K.; Stoedzel, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsy sections has been recently applied to investigate different muscle disorders. This technique, employed as a complementary examination in the frame of pathological studies, permitted to confirm the diagnosis for a first pathology and to elucidate the cause of a second. In skeletal muscles of a young patient suffering from a slow progressive myopathy, calcium accumulations have been demonstrated in histologically abnormal fibers. These findings have been compared to histopathological characteristics previously described. On the other hand, we have evaluated muscle sections from two patients who presented symptoms of an inflammatory myopathy, a rare pathology that recently emerged in France. The chemical analyses permitted us to highlight local aluminium infiltration in muscles. The hypothesis of an unusual reaction to intramuscular aluminium accumulation has been advanced. These studies demonstrate the capability for ion beam microanalytical techniques to address acute problems in pathology.

  13. Protein folding at atomic resolution: analysis of autonomously folding supersecondary structure motifs by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Sadqi, Mourad; de Alba, Eva; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein folding has been conventionally hampered by the assumption that all single-domain proteins fold by an all-or-none process (two-state folding) that makes it impossible to resolve folding mechanisms experimentally. Here we describe an experimental method for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding at atomic resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method is specifically developed for the study of small proteins that fold autonomously into basic supersecondary structure motifs, and that do so in the sub-millisecond timescale (folding archetypes). From the NMR experiments we obtain hundreds of atomic unfolding curves that are subsequently analyzed leading to the determination of the characteristic network of folding interactions. The application of this approach to a comprehensive catalog of elementary folding archetypes holds the promise of becoming the first experimental approach capable of unraveling the basic rules connecting protein structure and folding mechanism. PMID:22987355

  14. Computational neutronic analysis of the nuclear vapor thermal rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, E.T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kuras, S.; Maya, I.; Diaz, N.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Calculational procedures and results are presented for the neutronic analysis of the Nuclear Vapor Thermal Reactor (NVTR) rocket engine. The NVTR, in a rocket engine, uses modified NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by highly enriched (>85%) uranium tetrafluoride (UF[sub 4]) vapor. In the NVTR, the hydrogen propellant is the primary coolant, is physically separated from the UF[sub 4] vapor (which is not circulated), is maintained at high pressure (50 to 100 atm), and exits the core at 3100 to 3500 K.

  15. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  16. Risk analysis of nuclear safeguards regulations. [Aggregated Systems Model (ASM)

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Altman, W.D.; Judd, B.R.

    1982-06-01

    The Aggregated Systems Model (ASM), a probabilisitic risk analysis tool for nuclear safeguards, was applied to determine benefits and costs of proposed amendments to NRC regulations governing nuclear material control and accounting systems. The objective of the amendments was to improve the ability to detect insiders attempting to steal large quantities of special nuclear material (SNM). Insider threats range from likely events with minor consequences to unlikely events with catastrophic consequences. Moreover, establishing safeguards regulations is complicated by uncertainties in threats, safeguards performance, and consequences, and by the subjective judgments and difficult trade-offs between risks and safeguards costs. The ASM systematically incorporates these factors in a comprehensive, analytical framework. The ASM was used to evaluate the effectiveness of current safeguards and to quantify the risk of SNM theft. Various modifications designed to meet the objectives of the proposed amendments to reduce that risk were analyzed. Safeguards effectiveness was judged in terms of the probability of detecting and preventing theft, the expected time to detection, and the expected quantity of SNM diverted in a year. Data were gathered in tours and interviews at NRC-licensed facilities. The assessment at each facility was begun by carefully selecting scenarios representing the range of potential insider threats. A team of analysts and facility managers assigned probabilities for detection and prevention events in each scenario. Using the ASM we computed the measures of system effectiveness and identified cost-effective safeguards modifications that met the objectives of the proposed amendments.

  17. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  18. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  19. PHOBICS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center of mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, we outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, we then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that we plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{zeta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi}{r_arrow} K{sup +}K{sup -} decays.

  20. PHOBOS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-07-15

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, the authors outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, they then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that they plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{eta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays.

  1. Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

    2007-11-27

    Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

  2. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  3. Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite analysis of Aegilops cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Watson, Christy J W; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Mori, Naoki; Rehman, Maqsood; Zemetra, Robert S; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2005-08-01

    Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 4x = 28, genome CCDD) is an allotetraploid formed by hybridization between the diploid species Ae. tauschii Coss. (2n = 2x = 14, genome DD) and Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer (2n = 2x = 14, genome CC). Previous research has shown that Ae. tauschii contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. However, our analysis with chloroplast microsatellite markers showed that 1 of the 36 Ae. cylindrica accessions studied, TK 116 (PI 486249), had a plastome derived from Ae. markgrafii rather than Ae. tauschii. Thus, Ae. markgrafii has also contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. Our analysis of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers also suggests that D-type plastome and the D genome in Ae. cylindrica were closely related to, and were probably derived from, the tauschii gene pool of Ae. tauschii. A determination of the likely source of the C genome and the C-type plastome in Ae. cylindrica was not possible. PMID:15986256

  4. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shucheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-20

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at the NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance parameters of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  5. Challenges in structural analysis for deformed nuclear reactivity assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, Tyler N.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.

    2010-09-01

    Launch safety calculations for past space reactor concepts have usually been limited to immersion of the reactor in water and/or sand, using nominal system geometries or in some cases simplified compaction scenarios. Deformation of the reactor core by impact during the accident sequence typically has not been considered because of the complexity of the calculation. Recent advances in codes and computing power have made such calculations feasible. The accuracy of such calculations depends primarily on the underlying structural analysis. Even though explicit structural dynamics is a mature field, nuclear reactors present significant challenges to obtain accurate deformation predictions. The presence of a working fluid is one of the primary contributors to challenges in these predictions. The fluid-structure interaction cannot be neglected because the fluid surrounds the nuclear fuel which is the most important region in the analysis. A detailed model of a small eighty-five pin reactor was built with the working fluid modeled as smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) elements. Filling the complex volume covered by the working fluid with SPH elements required development of an algorithm which eliminates overlaps between hexahedral and SPH elements. The results with and without the working fluid were found to be considerably different with respect to reactivity predictions.

  6. System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

    2009-07-01

    A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via hightemperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

  7. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance characteristics of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  8. SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

    2008-09-01

    A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

  9. A project to improve the capabilities of minorities in energy fields and a cost benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sara, T.S.; Jones, M. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    The project being reported in this document had three components: (1) a research project to carry out cost-benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant at Tuskegee University, (2) seminars to improve the high-technology capabilities of minority persons, and (3) a class in energy management. The report provides a background on the three components listed above. The results from the research on the ethyl alcohol plant, are discussed, along with the seminars, and details of the energy management class.

  10. Computational image analysis of nuclear morphology associated with various nuclear-specific aging disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Siwon; Wang, Wei; Ribeiro, Alexandrew J.S.; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Gregg, Siobhan Q.; Opresko, Patricia L.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2011-01-01

    Computational image analysis is used in many areas of biological and medical research, but advanced techniques including machine learning remain underutilized. Here, we used automated segmentation and shape analyses, with pre-defined features and with computer generated components, to compare nuclei from various premature aging disorders caused by alterations in nuclear proteins. We considered cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) with an altered nucleoskeletal protein; a mouse model of XFE progeroid syndrome caused by a deficiency of ERCC1-XPF DNA repair nuclease; and patients with Werner syndrome (WS) lacking a functional WRN exonuclease and helicase protein. Using feature space analysis, including circularity, eccentricity, and solidity, we found that XFE nuclei were larger and significantly more elongated than control nuclei. HGPS nuclei were smaller and rounder than the control nuclei with features suggesting small bumps. WS nuclei did not show any significant shape changes from control. We also performed principle component analysis (PCA) and a geometric, contour based metric. PCA allowed direct visualization of morphological changes in diseased nuclei, whereas standard, feature-based approaches required pre-defined parameters and indirect interpretation of multiple parameters. Both methods yielded similar results, but PCA proves to be a powerful pre-analysis methodology for unknown systems. PMID:22127259

  11. Manned geosynchronous mission requirements and system analysis study extension. Manned Orbital Transfer Vehicle (MOTV) capabilities handbook and user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The primary change in crew capsule definition is a smaller MOTV crew capsule, switching from a 3-man capsule to a 2-man capsule. A second change permitted crew accommodations for sleeping and privacy to be combined with the flight station. The current baseline DRM, ER1, requires 2 men for 3 to 4 days to repair a multi-disciplined GOE Platform and a modest amount of mission dedicated hardware. A 2-man MOTV crew capsule to be used as a design reference point for the OTV, and its interfaces between the STS and other associated equipment or facilities are described in detail. The functional capabilities of the 2-man capsule, as well as its application to a wide range of generic missions, is also presented. The MOTV turnaround is addressed and significant requirements for both space based and ground based scenarios are summarized.

  12. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 22: Advanced Radionuclide Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  13. Monte Carlo Capabilities of the SCALE Code System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rearden, B. T.; Petrie, L. M.; Peplow, D. E.; Bekar, K. B.; Wiarda, D.; Celik, C.; Perfetti, C. M.; Ibrahim, A. M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    SCALE is a widely used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a "plug-and-play" framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE's graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2, to be released in 2014, will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. An overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  14. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Petrie, Jr., Lester M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Bekar, Kursat B.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Celik, Cihangir; Perfetti, Christopher M.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, Michael E.; et al

    2014-09-12

    SCALE is a broadly used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport asmore » well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Finally, an overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.« less

  15. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Petrie, Jr., Lester M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Bekar, Kursat B.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Celik, Cihangir; Perfetti, Christopher M.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, Michael E.; Marshall, William J.

    2014-09-12

    SCALE is a broadly used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Finally, an overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  16. ACTN3 Genotype, Athletic Status, and Life Course Physical Capability: Meta-Analysis of the Published Literature and Findings from Nine Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Tamuno; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Cooper, Cyrus; Deary, Ian J; Gunnell, David; Harris, Sarah E; Kumari, Meena; Martin, Richard M; Moran, Colin N; Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Ring, Susan M; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Smith, George Davey; Starr, John M; Kuh, Diana; Day, Ian NM

    2011-01-01

    The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, although not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For life course physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research program, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (P = 0.09, n = 7,672 in males; P = 0.90, n = 7,839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go, or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population. Hum Mutat 32:1–11, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21542061

  17. Molecular analysis of Baylisascaris columnaris revealed mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Baylisascaris species are intestinal nematodes of skunks, raccoons, badgers, and bears belonging to the genus Ascarididae. Oral uptake of embryonated Baylisascaris sp. eggs by a wide variety of mammals and birds can lead to visceral, ocular and neurological larva migrans. B. procyonis, the raccoon roundworm, is known to cause severe illness in intermediate hosts and in humans, whereas the skunk roundworm B. columnaris is probably less pathogenic. Skunks and raccoons are kept as pets in Europe, sometimes together with cats and dogs, living in close contact with humans. B. procyonis and B. columnaris are difficult to differentiate based on morphological criteria and molecular and phylogenetic information concerning B. columnaris is missing. This is the first study on the genetic characterisation of B. columnaris, based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers. Methods B. columnaris worms were isolated from pet skunks, and used for molecular analysis. PCR primers targeted at mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 and 2 (CO1 and CO2), ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and ribosomal 28S genes were used. DNA sequences from B. columnaris, B. procyonis and B. transfuga from bears were analysed by cluster analysis. Results Four different multi-locus genotypes were found in B. columnaris, based on 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two insertions / deletions in CO1, CO2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S. Conclusions The genetic characteristics of B. columnaris show close resemblance to those of B. procyonis, but in contrast to B. procyonis, show several polymorphisms in both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. These polymorphisms could be used as a tool to differentiate B. columnaris from B. procyonis in molecular diagnostic assays, and to identify B. columnaris by PCR, in addition to or replacing morphometric analysis. This might lead to more insight into the zoonotic relevance of B. columnaris in humans. PMID:23627901

  18. Numerical analysis of a nuclear fuel element for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Schutzenhofer, Luke

    1991-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model with porosity and permeability formulations in the transport equations has been developed to study the concept of nuclear thermal propulsion through the analysis of a pulsed irradiation of a particle bed element (PIPE). The numerical model is a time-accurate pressure-based formulation. An adaptive upwind scheme is employed for spatial discretization. The upwind scheme is based on second- and fourth-order central differencing with adaptive artificial dissipation. Multiblocked porosity regions have been formulated to model the cold frit, particle bed, and hot frit. Multiblocked permeability regions have been formulated to describe the flow shaping effect from the thickness-varying cold frit. Computational results for several zero-power density PIPEs and an elevated-particle-temperature PIPE are presented. The implications of the computational results are discussed.

  19. Controlling Wind Turbines for Secondary Frequency Regulation: An Analysis of AGC Capabilities Under New Performance Based Compensation Policy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, J.; Pao, L. Y.; Fleming, P.; Ela, E.

    2015-02-01

    As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio there has been an increased interest for wind turbines to control their active power output to provide ancillary services which support grid reliability. One of these ancillary services is the provision of frequency regulation, also referred to as secondary frequency control or automatic generation control (AGC), which is often procured through markets which recently adopted performance-based compensation. A wind turbine with a control system developed to provide active power ancillary services can be used to provide frequency regulation services. Simulations have been performed to determine the AGC tracking performance at various power schedule set-points, participation levels, and wind conditions. The performance metrics used in this study are based on those used by several system operators in the US. Another metric that is analyzed is the damage equivalent loads (DELs) on turbine structural components, though the impacts on the turbine electrical components are not considered. The results of these single-turbine simulations show that high performance scores can be achieved when there is sufficient wind resource available. The capability of a wind turbine to rapidly and accurately follow power commands allows for high performance even when tracking rapidly changing AGC signals. As the turbine de-rates to meet decreased power schedule set-points there is a reduction in the DELs, and the participation in frequency regulation has a negligible impact on these loads.

  20. A frequency-domain approach for fast analysis of binary black hole parameter estimation capability of LISA-like instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John G.; Marsat, Sylvain N.; Graff, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Space-based gravitational-wave instruments such as LISA will provide extraordinary precise information about the central black holes in early galaxies. Fine details about merging black holes are encoded in the gravitational waveforms that these instruments will measure, and sky position information is encoded in the measured signals through the rich structure of the instrumental transfer function. Estimating of our ability to extract this information has so far been an arduous time-consuming process allowing few comprehensive studies and often requiring shortcuts which may impact the accuracy of the results. We report on an effort to speed up the generation of accurate response signals for LISA-type instruments based on Effective-One-Body (EOB) gravitational wave signal models. Our approach begins with reduced order models of the EOB waveforms directly in the Fourier domain. We then apply fast yet accurate techniques for encoding the time-dependent response of LISA-type detectors in Fourier domain and for computing the integrals required in estimating the parameter measurement capability. Our ultimate aim is to provide tools that make it easy for astrophysicists with other expertise to rapidly assess how space-based gravitational wave observations could impact their field.

  1. An Empirical Analysis of Human Performance and Nuclear Safety Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Larry G. Blackwood

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis, which was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was to test whether an empirical connection exists between human performance and nuclear power plant safety culture. This was accomplished through analyzing the relationship between a measure of human performance and a plant’s Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE). SCWE is an important component of safety culture the NRC has developed, but it is not synonymous with it. SCWE is an environment in which employees are encouraged to raise safety concerns both to their own management and to the NRC without fear of harassment, intimidation, retaliation, or discrimination. Because the relationship between human performance and allegations is intuitively reciprocal and both relationship directions need exploration, two series of analyses were performed. First, human performance data could be indicative of safety culture, so regression analyses were performed using human performance data to predict SCWE. It also is likely that safety culture contributes to human performance issues at a plant, so a second set of regressions were performed using allegations to predict HFIS results.

  2. Climatographic analysis of the Zion nuclear power station site

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.A.; Venne, M.G.; Keen, C.S.; Miller, C.W.; Whitcomb, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    The computerized emergency response dose assessment codes (ERDACs) used in the nuclear industry commonly rely on Gaussian plume dispersion techniques. In coastal zones, particularly within 15 km of the shoreline, complex four-dimensional mesoscale meteorological regimes often violate some of the basic assumptions of Gaussian dispersion. For example, a land breeze will initially advect materials offshore into unpopulated areas. Such effluents may pool over water only to return to land in the next morning's onshore flow, but in locations and concentrations unknown and undeterminable from on-site data and standard Gaussian modeling techniques. Improving the performance of ERDACs for a given coastal site requires a climatographic inventory of that site and its surroundings. This involves identifying the coastal mesoscale regimes (CMRs) that affect the site, including their annual frequencies of occurrence and the meteorological conditions that characterize them. Such a climatographic analysis has been performed for the Zion nuclear power station (NPS), which is located just north of Chicago, Illinois, on the western shore of southern Lake Michigan. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of this study and its implications for radiological emergency response activities.

  3. Climatographic analysis of the Zion Nuclear Power Station site

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.W.; Whitcomb, R.C. ); Lyons, W.A.; Venne, M.G.; Keen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The computerized emergency response dose assessment codes (ERDACs) used in the nuclear industry commonly rely on Gaussian plume dispersion techniques. In coastal zones, particularly within 15 km of the shoreline, complex four-dimensional mesoscale meteorological regimes often violate some of the basic assumptions of Gaussian dispersion. For example a land breeze will initially advect materials offshore into unpopulated areas. Such effluents may pool over water only to return to land in the next morning's onshore flow, but in locations and concentrations unknown and undeterminable from on-site data and standard Gaussian modeling techniques. Improving the performance of ERDACs for a given coastal site requires a climatographic inventory of that site and its surroundings. This involves identifying the coastal mesoscale regimes (CMRs) that affect the site, including their annual frequencies of occurrence and the meteorological conditions that characterize them. Such a climatographic analysis has been performed for the Zion nuclear power station (NPS), which is located just north of Chicago, Illinois, on the western shore of southern Lake Michigan. The purpose of this papers is to summarize the results of this study and its implications for radiological emergency response activities. A conceptual framework for allocating resources in developing an adequate emergency response system includes three major factors: (1) frequency of the mesoscale regimes; (2) extent to which the regime can result in high concentrations/doses; (3) ease with which it can be modeled, with due consideration given for input data requirements.

  4. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L.; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A.; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S.; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Elucidating their 110 MDa structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Fifteen out of about thirty nucleoporins (Nups) are structured and form the Y- and inner ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ∼60 nm in diameter 1. The scaffold is decorated with transport channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine (FG)-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y-complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here, we combined cryo electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modeling to generate the most comprehensive architectural model of the NPC to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y-complexes and to inner ring complex members. We demonstrate that the higher eukaryotic transport channel Nup358 (RanBP2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport channel Nups. We conclude that, similarly to coated vesicles, multiple copies of the same structural building block - although compositionally identical - engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  5. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Trkov, A.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  6. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  7. Global NLO Analysis of Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2008-02-21

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by a global analysis of experimental measurements on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A{sup '}} and Drell-Yan cross section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A{sup '}}, and their uncertainties are estimated by the Hessian method. The NPDFs are obtained in both leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of {alpha}{sub s}. As a result, valence-quark distributions are relatively well determined, whereas antiquark distributions at x>0.2 and gluon distributions in the whole x region have large uncertainties. The NLO uncertainties are slightly smaller than the LO ones; however, such a NLO improvement is not as significant as the nucleonic case.

  8. A Nuclear Reaction Analysis study of fluorine uptake in flint

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Weathers, D. L.; Picton, F.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Matteson, S.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O resonance reaction is a powerful method of fluorine depth profiling. We have used this method to study the fluorine uptake phenomenon in mineral flint, which could potentially develop into a method of dating archeological flint artifacts. Flint samples cut with a rock saw were immersed in aqueous fluoride solutions for different times for the uptake study. The results suggest that fluorine uptake is not a simple phenomenon, but rather a combination of several simultaneous processes. Fluorine surface adsorption appears to play an important role in developing the fluorine profiles. The surface adsorption was affected by several parameters such as pH value and fluorine concentration in the solution, among others. The problem of surface charging for the insulator materials during ion bombardment is also reported.

  9. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, David E

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place

  10. Mercury + VisIt: Integration of a Real-Time Graphical Analysis Capability into a Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Validation of the problem definition and analysis of the results (tallies) produced during a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation can be a complicated, time-intensive processes. The time required for a person to create an accurate, validated combinatorial geometry (CG) or mesh-based representation of a complex problem, free of common errors such as gaps and overlapping cells, can range from days to weeks. The ability to interrogate the internal structure of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometry, prior to running the transport calculation, can improve the user's confidence in the validity of the problem definition. With regard to the analysis of results, the process of extracting tally data from printed tables within a file is laborious and not an intuitive approach to understanding the results. The ability to display tally information overlaid on top of the problem geometry can decrease the time required for analysis and increase the user's understanding of the results. To this end, our team has integrated VisIt, a parallel, production-quality visualization and data analysis tool into Mercury, a massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport code. VisIt provides an API for real time visualization of a simulation as it is running. The user may select which plots to display from the VisIt GUI, or by sending VisIt a Python script from Mercury. The frequency at which plots are updated can be set and the user can visualize the simulation results as it is running.

  11. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  12. Gap Analysis to Support Modeling the Long-Term Degradation of Used Nuclear Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Philip J.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Ross, Steven B.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Hanson, Brady D.; Devanathan, Ram

    2015-04-01

    Welded stainless steel canisters are being used worldwide for dry storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies, and the number of canisters in use is steadily increasing. In support of work currently being pursued at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand the atmospheric corrosion behavior of spent fuel dry storage systems, a gap analysis is underway to assess the state of knowledge for modeling of the long-term degradation of a UNF canister. The fundamental aim of this work is to inform research and development (R&D) efforts to establish a sound technical basis to support the extended dry storage of UNF for 100+ years. The analysis is considering all major components of the atmosphere corrosion degradation processes, ranging from contaminant sources and climatic interactions to regional conditions of particle transport and deposition, to microscale effects leading to stress corrosion cracking. The results of this gap analysis will be used to define the R&D pathway to develop an integrated multi-scale atmospheric corrosion modeling capability for UNF in dry storage canisters that can support the safe and reliable performance of these structures for more than 100 years.

  13. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  14. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  15. Enhancement of Integrated Power System Analysis Package Capability by Integration of Object-Oriented Physical System Modeling Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongesombut, Komsan; Takazawa, Tsuyoshi; Tada, Yasuyuki; Mitani, Yasunori

    There are many commercial power system analysis packages available on the market. Although most of these tools are typically computationally efficient, they do not provide the flexibility and ability to simulate generic models of generators or networks. This is cumbersome for research and development purposes. The development of power system models of appropriate fidelity is a key aspect of power system simulation processes. The models must allow all relevant multi-disciplinary modeling criteria, e.g. model structure and data handling, to be computed efficiently, easily, and with sufficient accuracy. This paper presents how the adoption of recent technology on object-oriented physical systems modeling can be implemented with an integrated power system analysis package MidFielder. Used in combination with MidFielder, this can provide the completeness of power system analysis package for industrial, educational and research purposes. In order to realize the proposed interface system, this paper also discusses about methods to manage a large set of power system data by using database technology and means of graphical user interface (GUI).

  16. The mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway is capable of mediating nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk through the PPAR system of transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Parl, Angelika; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Clay, Hayley B.; Reiss, Sara; Li, Zhen; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The function of the mitochondria fatty acid synthesis pathway is partially unknown. •Overexpression of the pathway causes transcriptional activation through PPARs. •Knock down of the pathway attenuates that activation. •The last enzyme in the pathway regulates its own transcription. •Products of the mtFASII pathway are able to drive nuclear transcription. -- Abstract: Mammalian cells contain two fatty acid synthesis pathways, the cytosolic FASI pathway, and the mitochondrial FASII pathway. The selection behind the conservation of the mitochondrial pathway is not completely understood, given the presence of the cytosolic FAS pathway. In this study, we show through heterologous gene reporter systems and PCR-based arrays that overexpression of MECR, the last step in the mtFASII pathway, causes modulation of gene expression through the PPAR pathway. Electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate that overexpression of MECR causes increased binding of PPARs to DNA, while cell fractionation and imaging studies show that MECR remains localized to the mitochondria. Interestingly, knock down of the mtFASII pathway lessens the effect of MECR on this transcriptional modulation. Our data are most consistent with MECR-mediated transcriptional activation through products of the mtFASII pathway, although we cannot rule out MECR acting as a coactivator. Further investigation into the physiological relevance of this communication will be necessary to better understand some of the phenotypic consequences of deficits in this pathway observed in animal models and human disease.

  17. Structural Analysis of Shipping Casks, Vol. 9. Energy Absorption Capabilities of Plastically Deformed Struts Under Specified Impact Loading Conditions (Thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.

    2001-02-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the energy absorption characteristics of plastically deformed inclined struts under impact loading. This information is needed to provide a usable method by which designers and analysts of shipping casks for radioactive or fissile materials can determine the energy absorption capabilities of external longitudinal fins on cylindrical casks under specified impact conditions. A survey of technical literature related to experimental determination of the dynamic plastic behavior of struts revealed no information directly applicable to the immediate problem, especially in the impact velocity ranges desired, and an experimental program was conducted to obtain the needed data. Mild-steel struts with rectangular cross sections were impacted by free-falling weights dropped from known heights. These struts or fin specimens were inclined at five different angles to simulate different angles of impact that fins on a shipping cask could experience under certain accident conditions. The resisting force of the deforming strut was measured and recorded as a function of time by using load cells instrumented with resistance strain gage bridges, signal conditioning equipment, an oscilloscope, and a Polaroid camera. The acceleration of the impacting weight was measured and recorded as a function of time during the latter portion of the testing program by using an accelerometer attached to the drop hammer, appropriate signal conditioning equipment, the oscilloscope, and the camera. A digital computer program was prepared to numerically integrate the force-time and acceleration-time data recorded during the tests to obtain deformation-time data. The force-displacement relationships were then integrated to obtain values of absorbed energy with respect to deformation or time. The results for various fin specimen geometries and impact angles are presented graphically, and these curves may be used to compute the energy absorption capacity of

  18. High-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules including nuclear motion and a nuclear modes analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, C. B.; Abu-samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2010-04-15

    We present a generic approach for treating the effect of nuclear motion in high-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules. Our procedure relies on a separation of nuclear and electron dynamics where we account for the electronic part using the Lewenstein model and nuclear motion enters as a nuclear correlation function. We express the nuclear correlation function in terms of Franck-Condon factors, which allows us to decompose nuclear motion into modes and identify the modes that are dominant in the high-order harmonic generation process. We show results for the isotopes CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} and thereby provide direct theoretical support for a recent experiment [S. Baker et al., Science 312, 424 (2006)] that uses high-order harmonic generation to probe the ultrafast structural nuclear rearrangement of ionized methane.

  19. High-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules including nuclear motion and a nuclear modes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Abu-Samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2010-04-01

    We present a generic approach for treating the effect of nuclear motion in high-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules. Our procedure relies on a separation of nuclear and electron dynamics where we account for the electronic part using the Lewenstein model and nuclear motion enters as a nuclear correlation function. We express the nuclear correlation function in terms of Franck-Condon factors, which allows us to decompose nuclear motion into modes and identify the modes that are dominant in the high-order harmonic generation process. We show results for the isotopes CH4 and CD4 and thereby provide direct theoretical support for a recent experiment [S. Baker , Science 312, 424 (2006)] that uses high-order harmonic generation to probe the ultrafast structural nuclear rearrangement of ionized methane.

  20. Nuclear Forensic Science: Analysis of Nuclear Material Out of Regulatory Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristo, Michael J.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Marks, Naomi; Knight, Kim; Cassata, William S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear forensic science seeks to identify the origin of nuclear materials found outside regulatory control. It is increasingly recognized as an integral part of a robust nuclear security program. This review highlights areas of active, evolving research in nuclear forensics, with a focus on analytical techniques commonly employed in Earth and planetary sciences. Applications of nuclear forensics to uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) are discussed first. UOCs have become an attractive target for nuclear forensic researchers because of the richness in impurities compared to materials produced later in the fuel cycle. The development of chronometric methods for age dating nuclear materials is then discussed, with an emphasis on improvements in accuracy that have been gained from measurements of multiple radioisotopic systems. Finally, papers that report on casework are reviewed, to provide a window into current scientific practice.

  1. Collaborative human-machine nuclear non-proliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, F.L.; Badalamente, R.V.; Stewart, T.S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a project investigating support concepts for the information treatment needs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, also referred to as the Agency) and its attempts to strengthen international safeguards. The aim of the research was to define user/computer interface concepts and intelligent support features that will enhance the analyst`s access to voluminous and diverse information, the ability to recognize and evaluate uncertain data, and the capability to make decisions and recommendations. The objective was to explore techniques for enhancing safeguards analysis through application of (1) more effective user-computer interface designs and (2) advanced concepts involving human/system collaboration. The approach was to identify opportunities for human/system collaboration that would capitalize on human strengths and still accommodate human limitations. This paper documents the findings and describes a concept prototype, Proliferation Analysis Support System (PASS), developed for demonstration purposes. The research complements current and future efforts to enhance the information systems used by the IAEA, but has application elsewhere, as well.

  2. Procedure for implementation of temperature-dependent mechanical property capability in the Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Robinson, James C.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is presented to allow the use of temperature dependent mechanical properties in the Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) System for solid structural elements. This is accomplished by including a modular runstream in the main EAL runstream. The procedure is applicable for models with multiple materials and with anisotropic properties, and can easily be incorporated into an existing EAL runstream. The procedure (which is applicable for EAL elastic solid elements) is described in detail, followed by a description of the validation of the routine. A listing of the EAL runstream used to validate the procedure is included in the Appendix.

  3. Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2008-01-21

    Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

  4. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64. PMID:22021060

  5. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2005-07-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis

  6. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Knudson

    2003-10-02

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Mycobacterium brisbanense Reveals a Possible Soil Origin and Capability in Fertiliser Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wee, Wei Yee; Tan, Tze King; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium brisbanense is a member of Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex, which includes rapidly growing Mycobacterium spp. that normally inhabit soil, dust and water, and can sometimes cause respiratory tract infections in humans. We present the first whole-genome analysis of M. brisbanense UM_WWY which was isolated from a 70-year-old Malaysian patient. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identification of this strain as M. brisbanense and showed that it has an unusually large genome compared with related mycobacteria. The large genome size of M. brisbanense UM_WWY (~7.7Mbp) is consistent with further findings that this strain has a highly variable genome structure that contains many putative horizontally transferred genomic islands and prophage. Comparative analysis showed that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is the only Mycobacterium species that possesses a complete set of genes encoding enzymes involved in the urea cycle, suggesting that this soil bacterium is able to synthesize urea for use as plant fertilizers. It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism. Nevertheless, a large number of predicted virulence genes were identified in M. brisbanense UM_WWY that are mostly shared with well-studied mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus. These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense. PMID:27031249

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Mycobacterium brisbanense Reveals a Possible Soil Origin and Capability in Fertiliser Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Wei Yee; Tan, Tze King; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium brisbanense is a member of Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex, which includes rapidly growing Mycobacterium spp. that normally inhabit soil, dust and water, and can sometimes cause respiratory tract infections in humans. We present the first whole-genome analysis of M. brisbanense UM_WWY which was isolated from a 70-year-old Malaysian patient. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identification of this strain as M. brisbanense and showed that it has an unusually large genome compared with related mycobacteria. The large genome size of M. brisbanense UM_WWY (~7.7Mbp) is consistent with further findings that this strain has a highly variable genome structure that contains many putative horizontally transferred genomic islands and prophage. Comparative analysis showed that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is the only Mycobacterium species that possesses a complete set of genes encoding enzymes involved in the urea cycle, suggesting that this soil bacterium is able to synthesize urea for use as plant fertilizers. It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism. Nevertheless, a large number of predicted virulence genes were identified in M. brisbanense UM_WWY that are mostly shared with well-studied mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus. These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense. PMID:27031249

  9. Phyllosilicate analysis capabilities of the CheMin mineralogical instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL '11) Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S.; Bristow, T. F.; Sarrazin, P.

    2011-12-01

    The CheMin mineralogical instrument on the MSL '11 Curiosity rover will return quantitative X-ray diffraction data (XRD) from scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected from the Mars surface. Samples of 45-65 mm3 from material sieved to <150 μm will be delivered through a funnel to one of 27 reuseable sample cells (five additional cells on the sample wheel contain diffraction or fluorescence standards). Sample cells are 8-mm diameter discs with 7-μm thick Mylar or Kapton windows spaced 170 μm apart. Within this volume, the sample is shaken by piezoelectric vibration at sonic frequencies, causing the powder to flow past a narrow, collimated X-ray beam in random orientations over the course of an analysis. In this way, diffraction patterns exhibiting little to no preferred orientation can be obtained even from minerals normally exhibiting strong preferred orientation such as phyllosilicates. Individual analyses will require several hours over one or more Mars sols. For typical well-ordered minerals, CheMin has a Minimum Detection Limit (MDL) of <3% by mass, an accuracy of better than 15% and a precision of better than 10% for phases present in concentrations >4X MDL (12%). The resolution of the diffraction patterns is 0.30 degrees 2θ, and the angular measurement range is 4-55 degrees 2θ. With this performance, CheMin can identify and distinguish a number of clay minerals. For example, discrimination between 1:1 phyllosilicates (such as the kaolin minerals), with repeat distances of ~7Å, and smectites (e.g., montmorillonite, nontronite, saponite), with repeat distances from 10-15Å, is straightforward. However, it is important to note that the variety of treatments used in terrestrial laboratories to aid in discrimination of clay minerals will not be accessible on Mars (e.g., saturation with ethylene glycol vapor, heat treatments). Although these treatments will not be available on Mars, dehydration within the CheMin instrument could be used to

  10. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  11. Diagnostic capability of salivary biomarkers in the assessment of head and neck cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Leite, André Ferreira; Gozal, David; Chardin, Hélène; De Luca Canto, Graziela

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic value of salivary biological markers in the diagnosis of head and neck carcinoma. Studies were gathered by searching Cochrane, EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, and PubMed. The references were also crosschecked and a partial grey literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar. The methodology of selected studies was evaluated using the 14-item Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies. After a two-step selection process, 15 articles were identified and subjected to qualitative and quantitative analyses. The studies were homogeneous, and all had high methodological quality. Combined biomarkers demonstrated better accuracy with higher sensitivity and specificity than those tested individually. Furthermore, the salivary biomarkers reviewed predicted the early stages of head and neck carcinoma better than the advanced stages. A restricted set of five single biomarkers (interleukin-8, choline, pipecolinic acid, l-phenylalanine, and S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine) as well as combined biomarkers demonstrated excellent diagnostic test accuracy. The present systematic review confirms the potential value of a selected set of salivary biomarkers as diagnostic tools for head and neck carcinoma. PMID:26170140

  12. Uncertainty Analysis and Order-by-Order Optimization of Chiral Nuclear Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, B. D.; Ekström, A.; Forssén, C.; Strömberg, D. Fahlin; Jansen, G. R.; Lilja, O.; Lindby, M.; Mattsson, B. A.; Wendt, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ) provides a systematic approach to describe low-energy nuclear forces. Moreover, χ EFT is able to provide well-founded estimates of statistical and systematic uncertainties—although this unique advantage has not yet been fully exploited. We fill this gap by performing an optimization and statistical analysis of all the low-energy constants (LECs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order. Our optimization protocol corresponds to a simultaneous fit to scattering and bound-state observables in the pion-nucleon, nucleon-nucleon, and few-nucleon sectors, thereby utilizing the full model capabilities of χ EFT . Finally, we study the effect on other observables by demonstrating forward-error-propagation methods that can easily be adopted by future works. We employ mathematical optimization and implement automatic differentiation to attain efficient and machine-precise first- and second-order derivatives of the objective function with respect to the LECs. This is also vital for the regression analysis. We use power-counting arguments to estimate the systematic uncertainty that is inherent to χ EFT , and we construct chiral interactions at different orders with quantified uncertainties. Statistical error propagation is compared with Monte Carlo sampling, showing that statistical errors are, in general, small compared to systematic ones. In conclusion, we find that a simultaneous fit to different sets of data is critical to (i) identify the optimal set of LECs, (ii) capture all relevant correlations, (iii) reduce the statistical uncertainty, and (iv) attain order-by-order convergence in χ EFT . Furthermore, certain systematic uncertainties in the few-nucleon sector are shown to get substantially magnified in the many-body sector, in particular when varying the cutoff in the chiral potentials. The methodology and results presented in this paper open a new frontier for uncertainty quantification in ab initio nuclear theory.

  13. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry. (JMT)

  14. RELAP-7 Beta Release: Summary of Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, Richard C.; Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua

    2014-12-01

    RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Building upon the decades of software development at the INL, we began the development of RELAP-7 in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway. As part of this development, the first lines of RELAP-7 code were committed to the software revision control repository on November 7th, 2011. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. RELAP-7 is built using the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). MOOSE provides improved numerical calculations (including higher-order integration in both space and time, yielding converged second-order accuracy). The RELAP-7 code structure is based on multiple physical component models such as pipes, junctions, pumps, etc. Each component can have options for different fluid models such as single- and two-phase flow. This component-based and physics-based software architecture allows RELAP-7 to adopt different physical models for different applications. A relatively new two-phase hydrodynamic model, termed the ''7-Equation model'' for two phasic pressures, velocities, energies, and volumetric fraction, is incorporated into RELAP-7 for liquid-gas (water-steam) flows. This new model allows second-order integration because it is well-posed, which will reduce the numerical error associated with traditional systems analysis codes. In this paper, we provide a RELAP-7 capability list describing analysis features, range of applicability, and reactor components that will be available for the December 15th, 2014 beta release of the software.

  15. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Richard B.

    2012-02-01

    Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were found to increase exponentially with energy, possibly consistent with the Axel-Brink hypothesis, although considerable excess strength observed for transitions between 4-8 MeV. No similar energy dependence was observed in EGAF or ARC data. BM1W average values were nearly constant at all energies above 1 MeV with substantial excess strength below 1 MeV and between 4-8 MeV. BE2W values decreased exponentially by a factor of 1000 from 0 to 16 MeV. The distribution of ENSDF transition probabilities for all multipolarities could be described by a lognormal statistical distribution. BE1W, BM1W, and BE2W strengths all increased substantially for initial transition level energies between 4-8 MeV possibly due to dominance of spin-flip and Pygmy resonance transitions at those excitations. Analysis of the average resonance capture data indicated no transition probability dependence on final level spins or energies between 0-3 MeV. The comparison of favored to unfavored transition probabilities for odd-A or odd-Z targets indicated only partial support for the expected branching intensity ratios with many unfavored transitions having nearly the same strength as favored ones. Average resonance capture BE2W transition strengths generally increased with greater deformation. Analysis of ARC data suggest that there is a large E2 admixture in M1 transitions with the mixing ratio δ ≈ 1.0. The ENSDF reduced transition strengths were considerably stronger than those derived from capture gamma ray

  16. Code System for Performance Assessment Ground-water Analysis for Low-level Nuclear Waste.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-02-09

    Version 00 The PAGAN code system is a part of the performance assessment methodology developed for use by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating license applications for low-level waste disposal facilities. In this methodology, PAGAN is used as one candidate approach for analysis of the ground-water pathway. PAGAN, Version 1.1 has the capability to model the source term, vadose-zone transport, and aquifer transport of radionuclides from a waste disposal unit. It combines themore » two codes SURFACE and DISPERSE which are used as semi-analytical solutions to the convective-dispersion equation. This system uses menu driven input/out for implementing a simple ground-water transport analysis and incorporates statistical uncertainty functions for handling data uncertainties. The output from PAGAN includes a time- and location-dependent radionuclide concentration at a well in the aquifer, or a time- and location-dependent radionuclide flux into a surface-water body.« less

  17. Contributed Review: Nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jonathan Fordham, Edmund J.

    2014-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  18. Monte-Carlo Application for Nondestructive Nuclear Waste Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Engels, R.; Frank, M.; Furletov, S.; Furletova, J.; Genreith, C.; Havenith, A.; Kemmerling, G.; Kettler, J.; Krings, T.; Ma, J.-L.; Mauerhofer, E.; Neike, D.; Payan, E.; Perot, B.; Rossbach, M.; Schitthelm, O.; Schumann, M.; Vasquez, R.

    2014-06-01

    Radioactive waste has to undergo a process of quality checking in order to check its conformance with national regulations prior to its transport, intermediate storage and final disposal. Within the quality checking of radioactive waste packages non-destructive assays are required to characterize their radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents. The Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety of the Forschungszentrum Jülich develops in the framework of cooperation nondestructive analytical techniques for the routine characterization of radioactive waste packages at industrial-scale. During the phase of research and development Monte Carlo techniques are used to simulate the transport of particle, especially photons, electrons and neutrons, through matter and to obtain the response of detection systems. The radiological characterization of low and intermediate level radioactive waste drums is performed by segmented γ-scanning (SGS). To precisely and accurately reconstruct the isotope specific activity content in waste drums by SGS measurement, an innovative method called SGSreco was developed. The Geant4 code was used to simulate the response of the collimated detection system for waste drums with different activity and matrix configurations. These simulations allow a far more detailed optimization, validation and benchmark of SGSreco, since the construction of test drums covering a broad range of activity and matrix properties is time consuming and cost intensive. The MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation) test facility was developed to identify and quantify non-radioactive elements and substances in radioactive waste drums. MEDINA is based on prompt and delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (P&DGNAA) using a 14 MeV neutron generator. MCNP simulations were carried out to study the response of the MEDINA facility in terms of gamma spectra, time dependence of the neutron energy spectrum

  19. Analysis of the confluence of three patterns using the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) images for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Bliss, Erlan; Roberts, Randy; Rushford, Michael; Wilhelmsen, Karl; Zobrist, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight highdensity internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Employing up to eight backlighters, ARC can produce an X-ray "motion picture" to diagnose the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-ofpicosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. The function of the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) in ARC is to provide superimposed near-field and far-field images on a common optical path. The Images are then analyzed to extract beam centering and pointing data for the control system. The images contain the confluence of pointing, centering, and reference patterns. The patterns may have uneven illumination, particularly when the laser is misaligned. In addition, the simultaneous appearance of three reference patterns may be co-incidental, possibly masking one or more of the patterns. Image analysis algorithms have been developed to determine the centering and pointing position of ARC from these images. In the paper we describe the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the centers of these patterns. Results are provided, illustrating how well the process meets system requirements.

  20. Numerical Stability and Control Analysis Towards Falling-Leaf Prediction Capabilities of Splitflow for Two Generic High-Performance Aircraft Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Eric F.

    1998-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis are performed using the Lockheed-Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems (LMTAS) Splitflow computational fluid dynamics code to investigate the computational prediction capabilities for vortex-dominated flow fields of two different tailless aircraft models at large angles of attack and sideslip. These computations are performed with the goal of providing useful stability and control data to designers of high performance aircraft. Appropriate metrics for accuracy, time, and ease of use are determined in consultations with both the LMTAS Advanced Design and Stability and Control groups. Results are obtained and compared to wind-tunnel data for all six components of forces and moments. Moment data is combined to form a "falling leaf" stability analysis. Finally, a handful of viscous simulations were also performed to further investigate nonlinearities and possible viscous effects in the differences between the accumulated inviscid computational and experimental data.

  1. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  2. Spherical tensor analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Carravetta, Marina; Antonioli, Gian Carlo; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2005-06-22

    In a nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment, the spin density operator may be regarded as a superposition of irreducible spherical tensor operators. Each of these spin operators evolves during the NMR experiment and may give rise to an NMR signal at a later time. The NMR signal at the end of a pulse sequence may, therefore, be regarded as a superposition of spherical components, each derived from a different spherical tensor operator. We describe an experimental method, called spherical tensor analysis (STA), which allows the complete resolution of the NMR signal into its individual spherical components. The method is demonstrated on a powder of a (13)C-labeled amino acid, exposed to a pulse sequence generating a double-quantum effective Hamiltonian. The propagation of spin order through the space of spherical tensor operators is revealed by the STA procedure, both in static and rotating solids. Possible applications of STA to the NMR of liquids, liquid crystals, and solids are discussed. PMID:16035785

  3. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

  4. Intelligent signal analysis methodologies for nuclear detection, identification and attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis

    Detection and identification of special nuclear materials can be fully performed with a radiation detector-spectrometer. Due to several physical and computational limitations, development of fast and accurate radioisotope identifier (RIID) algorithms is essential for automated radioactive source detection and characterization. The challenge is to identify individual isotope signatures embedded in spectral signature aggregation. In addition, background and isotope spectra overlap to further complicate the signal analysis. These concerns are addressed, in this thesis, through a set of intelligent methodologies recognizing signature spectra, background spectrum and, subsequently, identifying radionuclides. Initially, a method for detection and extraction of signature patterns is accomplished by means of fuzzy logic. The fuzzy logic methodology is applied on three types of radiation signal processing applications, where it exhibits high positive detection, low false alarm rate and very short execution time, while outperforming the maximum likelihood fitting approach. In addition, an innovative Pareto optimal multiobjective fitting of gamma ray spectra using evolutionary computing is presented. The methodology exhibits perfect identification while performs better than single objective fitting. Lastly, an innovative kernel based machine learning methodology was developed for estimating natural background spectrum in gamma ray spectra. The novelty of the methodology lies in the fact that it implements a data based approach and does not require any explicit physics modeling. Results show that kernel based method adequately estimates the gamma background, but algorithm's performance exhibits a strong dependence on the selected kernel.

  5. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}F-can{close_quotes}); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}Z-can{close_quotes}); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle ({open_quotes}CO-4{close_quotes}). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O and UF{sub 4}+oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and H{sub 2}O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant.

  6. 78 FR 1154 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing a draft regulatory basis document to support the potential amendment of its regulations concerning nuclear power plant licensees' onsite emergency response capabilities. The NRC is seeking public comments on this document. The issuance of this draft regulatory basis document is one of the actions stemming from the NRC's......

  7. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  8. Interviewing a Silent (Radioactive) Witness through Nuclear Forensic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Varga, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear forensics is a relatively young discipline in science which aims at providing information on nuclear material of unknown origin. The determination of characteristic parameters through tailored analytical techniques enables establishing linkages to the material's processing history and hence provides hints on its place and date of production and on the intended use. PMID:26376028

  9. Integration of Gis-analysis and Atmospheric Modelling For Nuclear Risk and Vulnerability Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigina, O.; Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A.

    The paper is devoted to the problems of residential radiation risk and territorial vul- nerability with respect to nuclear sites in Europe. The study suggests two approaches, based on an integration of the GIS-analysis and the atmospheric modelling, to calcu- late radiation risk/vulnerability. First, modelling simulations were done for a number of case-studies, based on real data, such as reactor core inventory and estimations from the known accidents, for a number of typical meteorological conditions and different accidental scenarios. Then, using these simulations and the population database as input data, the GIS-analysis reveals administrative units at the highest risk with re- spect to the mean individual and collective doses received by the population. Then, two alternative methods were suggested to assess a probabilistic risk to the population in case of a severe accident on the Kola and Leningrad NPPs (as examples) based on social-geophysical factors: proximity to the accident site, population density and presence of critical groups, and the probabilities of wind trajectories and precipitation. The two latter probabilities were calculated by the atmospheric trajectory models and statistical methods for many years. The GIS analysis was done for the Nordic coun- tries as an example. GIS-based spatial analyses integrated with mathematical mod- elling allow to develop a common methodological approach for complex assessment of regional vulnerability and residential radiation risk, by merging together the sepa- rate aspects: modelling of consequences, probabilistic analysis of atmospheric flows, dose estimation etc. The approach was capable to create risk/vulnerability maps of the Nordic countries and to reveal the most vulnerable provinces with respect to the radiation risk sites.

  10. Analysis constants for database of neutron nuclear data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedenko, S. V.; Jeremiah, J. Joseph; Knyshev, V. V.; Shamanin, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    At present there is a variety of experimental and calculation nuclear data which are rather entirely presented in the following evaluated nuclear data libraries: ENDF (USA), JEFF (Europe), JENDL (Japan), TENDL (Russian Federation), ROSFOND (Russian Federation). Libraries of nuclear data, used for neutron-physics calculations in programs: Scale (Origen-Arp), MCNP, WIMS, MCU, and others. Nevertheless all existing nuclear data bases, including evaluated ones, contain practically no information about threshold neutron reactions on 232Th nuclei; available values of outputs and cross-sections significantly differ by orders. The work shows necessity of nuclear constants corrections which are used in the calculations of grids and thorium storage systems. The results of numerical experiments lattices and storage systems with thorium.

  11. Mars Mission Analysis Trades Based on Legacy and Future Nuclear Propulsion Options

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, Russell; Lentati, Andrea; Cichon, Jaclyn

    2007-01-30

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of mission-based system trades when using a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system for Solar System exploration. The results are based on comparing reactor designs that use a ceramic-metallic (CERMET), graphite matrix, graphite composite matrix, or carbide matrix fuel element designs. The composite graphite matrix and CERMET designs have been examined for providing power as well as propulsion. Approaches to the design of the NTP to be discussed will include an examination of graphite, composite, carbide, and CERMET core designs and the attributes of each in regards to performance and power generation capability. The focus is on NTP approaches based on tested fuel materials within a prismatic fuel form per the Argonne National Laboratory testing and the ROVER/NERVA program. NTP concepts have been examined for several years at Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne for use as the primary propulsion for human missions beyond earth. Recently, an approach was taken to examine the design trades between specific NTP concepts; NERVA-based (UC)C-Graphite, (UC,ZrC)C-Composite, (U,Zr)C-Solid Carbide and UO2-W CERMET. Using Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne's multidisciplinary design analysis capability, a detailed mission and vehicle model has been used to examine how several of these NTP designs impact a human Mars mission. Trends for the propulsion system mass as a function of power level (i.e. thrust size) for the graphite-carbide and CERMET designs were established and correlated against data created over the past forty years. These were used for the mission trade study. The resulting mission trades presented in this paper used a comprehensive modeling approach that captures the mission, vehicle subsystems, and NTP sizing.

  12. Mars Mission Analysis Trades Based on Legacy and Future Nuclear Propulsion Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyner, Russell; Lentati, Andrea; Cichon, Jaclyn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of mission-based system trades when using a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system for Solar System exploration. The results are based on comparing reactor designs that use a ceramic-metallic (CERMET), graphite matrix, graphite composite matrix, or carbide matrix fuel element designs. The composite graphite matrix and CERMET designs have been examined for providing power as well as propulsion. Approaches to the design of the NTP to be discussed will include an examination of graphite, composite, carbide, and CERMET core designs and the attributes of each in regards to performance and power generation capability. The focus is on NTP approaches based on tested fuel materials within a prismatic fuel form per the Argonne National Laboratory testing and the ROVER/NERVA program. NTP concepts have been examined for several years at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for use as the primary propulsion for human missions beyond earth. Recently, an approach was taken to examine the design trades between specific NTP concepts; NERVA-based (UC)C-Graphite, (UC,ZrC)C-Composite, (U,Zr)C-Solid Carbide and UO2-W CERMET. Using Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne's multidisciplinary design analysis capability, a detailed mission and vehicle model has been used to examine how several of these NTP designs impact a human Mars mission. Trends for the propulsion system mass as a function of power level (i.e. thrust size) for the graphite-carbide and CERMET designs were established and correlated against data created over the past forty years. These were used for the mission trade study. The resulting mission trades presented in this paper used a comprehensive modeling approach that captures the mission, vehicle subsystems, and NTP sizing.

  13. FLUKA capabilities for microdosimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Northum, J D; Guetersloh, S B; Braby, L A

    2012-01-01

    Delta-ray transport is important in microdosimetric studies, and how Monte Carlo models handle delta electrons using condensed histories is important for accurate simulation. The purpose of this study was to determine how well FLUKA can simulate energy deposition spectra in a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and produce a reliable estimate of delta-ray events produced when a TEPC is exposed to high-energy heavy ions (HZE) like those in the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) environment. A 1.27-cm spherical TEPC with a low-pressure gas simulating a 1-μm site, typical of the one flown on the ISS, was constructed in FLUKA, and its response was compared to experimental data for an (56)Fe-ion beam at 360 MeV/nucleon. Several narrow beams at different impact parameters were used to explain the response of the same detector exposed to a uniform field of radiation. Additionally, the effect that wall thickness had on the response of the TEPC and the range of delta rays in the tissue-equivalent (TE) wall material was investigated, and FLUKA produced the expected wall effect for primary particles passing outside the sensitive volume. A final comparison to experimental data was made for the simulated TEPCs exposed to various broad beams in the energy range of 200-1000 MeV/nucleon. FLUKA overestimated energy deposition in the gas volume in all cases. The FLUKA results differed from the experimental data by an average of 25.2% for y(F) and 12.4% for y(D). It is suggested that this difference can be reduced by adjusting the FLUKA default ionization potential and density correction factors. Accurate transport codes are desirable because of the high cost of beam time for experimental evaluation of energy deposition spectra produced by HZE ions and the flexibility that calculations offer in the TEPC engineering and design process. PMID:22050453

  14. NJOY 99/2001: new capabilities in data processing

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    The NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System is used all over the world to process evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries for applications. Over the last few years, a number of new capabilities have been added to the system to provide advanced features for MCNP, MCNPX, and other applications codes. These include probability tables for unresolved range self shielding, capabilities optimized for high-energy libraries (typically to 150 MeV for accelerator applications), options for detailed treatments of incident and outgoing charged particles, and a capability to handle photonuclear reactions. These new features and recent experience using NJOY99 for library production will be discussed, along with possible future work, such as delayed-neutron processing and capabilities to handle the new generation of photo-atomic, electro-atomic, and atomic-relaxation evaluations now becoming available in ENDF format. The latest version of the code, NJOY 2001, uses modern Fortran90 style, modularization, and memory allocation methods. The Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF) format has become the standard for representing nuclear data throughout the world, being used in the US ENDF/B libraries, the European JEF libraries, the Japanese JENDL libraries, and many others. At the same time, the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System, which is used to convert evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into data libraries for nuclear applications, has become the method of choice throughout the world. The combination of these modern libraries of evaluated nuclear data and NJOY processing has proved very capable for classical applications in reactor analysis, fusion work, shielding, and criticality safety. However, over the last few years, new applications have appeared that require extended evaluated data and new processing techniques. A good example of this is the interest in accelerator-boosted applications, which has led to the need for data to higher energies, such as 150 Me

  15. High Altitude Long Endurance UAV Analysis Model Development and Application Study Comparing Solar Powered Airplane and Airship Station-Keeping Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, Thomas A.; Nickol, Craig L.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There have been ongoing efforts in the Aeronautics Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center to develop a suite of integrated physics-based computational utilities suitable for modeling and analyzing extended-duration missions carried out using solar powered aircraft. From these efforts, SolFlyte has emerged as a state-of-the-art vehicle analysis and mission simulation tool capable of modeling both heavier-than-air (HTA) and lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle concepts. This study compares solar powered airplane and airship station-keeping capability during a variety of high altitude missions, using SolFlyte as the primary analysis component. Three Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) concepts were designed for this study: an airplane (Operating Empty Weight (OEW) = 3285 kilograms, span = 127 meters, array area = 450 square meters), a small airship (OEW = 3790 kilograms, length = 115 meters, array area = 570 square meters), and a large airship (OEW = 6250 kilograms, length = 135 meters, array area = 1080 square meters). All the vehicles were sized for payload weight and power requirements of 454 kilograms and 5 kilowatts, respectively. Seven mission sites distributed throughout the United States were selected to provide a basis for assessing the vehicle energy budgets and site-persistent operational availability. Seasonal, 30-day duration missions were simulated at each of the sites during March, June, September, and December; one-year duration missions were simulated at three of the sites. Atmospheric conditions during the simulated missions were correlated to National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) historical data measurements at each mission site, at four flight levels. Unique features of the SolFlyte model are described, including methods for calculating recoverable and energy-optimal flight trajectories and the effects of shadows on solar energy collection. Results of this study indicate that: 1) the airplane concept attained longer periods of on

  16. Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents. Volume 1, Safety analysis reports for DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of Volume 1 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for DOE nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 1 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SARs for DOE nuclear facilities.

  17. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  18. Enhanced ocean observational capability

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A M; Esser, B K

    2000-01-10

    Coastal oceans are vital to world health and sustenance. Technology that enables new observations has always been the driver of discovery in ocean sciences. In this context, we describe the first at sea deployment and operation of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) for continuous measurement of trace elements in seawater. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate that an ICPMS could be operated in a corrosive and high vibration environment with no degradation in performance. Significant advances occurred this past year due to ship time provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD), as well as that funded through this project. Evaluation at sea involved performance testing and characterization of several real-time seawater analysis modes. We show that mass spectrometers can rapidly, precisely and accurately determine ultratrace metal concentrations in seawater, thus allowing high-resolution mapping of large areas of surface seawater. This analytical capability represents a significant advance toward real-time observation and understanding of water mass chemistry in dynamic coastal environments. In addition, a joint LLNL-SIO workshop was convened to define and design new technologies for ocean observation. Finally, collaborative efforts were initiated with atmospheric scientists at LLNL to identify realistic coastal ocean and river simulation models to support real-time analysis and modeling of hazardous material releases in coastal waterways.

  19. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1981-06-01

    The areas studied during the period of the contract included determinations of cross sections for nuclear reactions, determination of neutron capture cross sections of radionuclides, application of special activation techniques, and x-ray counting, elucidation of synergic solvent extraction mechanisms and development of new solvent extraction techniques, and the development of a PIXE analytical facility. The thermal neutron capture cross section of /sup 22/Na was determined, and cross sections and energy levels were determined for /sup 20/Ne(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 17/O, /sup 20/Ne(n,P)/sup 20/F, and /sup 40/Ar(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 37/S. Inelastic scattering with 2 to 3 MeV neutrons followed by counting of the metastable states permits analysis of the following elements: In, Sr, Cd, Hg, and Pb. Bromine can be detected in the presence of a 500-fold excess of Na and/or K by thermal neutron activation and x-ray counting, and as little as 0.3 x 10/sup -9/ g of Hg can be detected by this technique. Mediun energy neutrons (10 to 160 MeV) have been used to determine Tl, Pb, and Bi by (n,Xn) and (n,PXn) reactions. The reaction /sup 19/F(P,..cap alpha..)/sup 76/O has been used to determine as little as 50 ..mu..mol of Freon -14. Mechanisms for synergic solvent extractions have been elucidated and a new technique of homogeneous liquid-liquid solvent extraction has been developed in which the neutral complex is rapidly extracted propylene carbonate by raising and lowering the temperature of the system. An external-beam PIXE system has been developed for trace element analyses of a variety of sample types. Various sample preparation techniques have been applied to a diverse range of samples including marine sediment, coral, coal, and blood.

  20. Structural Safety Analysis Based on Seismic Service Conditions for Butterfly Valves in a Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements. PMID:24955416

  1. Structural safety analysis based on seismic service conditions for butterfly valves in a nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon; Lee, Kwon-Hee; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements. PMID:24955416

  2. Risk analysis and solving the nuclear waste siting problem

    SciTech Connect

    Inhaber, H.

    1993-12-01

    In spite of millions of dollars and countless human resources being expended on finding nuclear wastes sites, the search has proved extremely difficult for the nuclear industry. This may be due to the approach followed, rather than inadequacies in research or funding. A new approach to the problem, the reverse Dutch auction, is suggested. It retains some of the useful elements of the present system, but it also adds new ones.

  3. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  4. 78 FR 56869 - Nuclear Infrastructure Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ...The Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the Supplement Analysis (SA) of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (Nuclear Infrastructure or NI PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0310) published in December 2000. In......

  5. RESTRUCTURING RELAP5-3D FOR NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; George L. Mesina; Joshua M. Hykes

    2006-06-01

    RELAP5-3D is used worldwide for analyzing nuclear reactors under both operational transients and postulated accident conditions. Development of the RELAP code series began in 1975 and since that time the code has been continuously improved, enhanced, verified and validated [1]. Since RELAP5-3D will continue to be the premier thermal hydraulics tool well into the future, it is necessary to modernize the code to accommodate the incorporation of additional capabilities to support the development of the next generation of nuclear reactors [2]. This paper discusses the reengineering of RELAP5-3D into structured code.

  6. Review of Overall Safety Manual for space nuclear systems. An evaluation of a nuclear safety analysis methodology for plutonium-fueled space nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.; Inhaber, H.

    1984-02-01

    As part of its duties in connection with space missions involving nuclear power sources, the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) of the Office of Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Preparedness has been assigned the task of reviewing the Overall Safety Manual (OSM) (memo from B.J. Rock to J.R. Maher, December 1, 1982). The OSM, dated July 1981 and in four volumes, was prepared by NUS Corporation, Rockville, Maryland, for the US Department of Energy. The OSM provides many of the technical models and much of the data which are used by (1) space launch contractors in safety analysis reports and (2) the broader Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) safety evaluation reports. If fhs interaction between the OSM, contractors, and INSRP is to work effectively, the OSM must be accurate, comprehensive, understandable, and usable.

  7. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

    2011-05-01

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance

  8. Global nuclear material control model

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-05-01

    The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of a disposition program for special nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool that treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. Such a tool must represent the fundamental data, information, and capabilities of the fuel cycle including an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, and a framework supportive of national or international perspective. They have developed a prototype global nuclear material management and control systems analysis capability, the Global Nuclear Material Control (GNMC) model. The GNMC model establishes the framework for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material.

  9. Library of sophisticated functions for analysis of nuclear spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morháč, Miroslav; Matoušek, Vladislav

    2009-10-01

    In the paper we present compact library for analysis of nuclear spectra. The library consists of sophisticated functions for background elimination, smoothing, peak searching, deconvolution, and peak fitting. The functions can process one- and two-dimensional spectra. The software described in the paper comprises a number of conventional as well as newly developed methods needed to analyze experimental data. Program summaryProgram title: SpecAnalysLib 1.1 Catalogue identifier: AEDZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 42 154 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 379 437 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Pentium 3 PC 2.4 GHz or higher, Borland C++ Builder v. 6. A precompiled Windows version is included in the distribution package Operating system: Windows 32 bit versions RAM: 10 MB Word size: 32 bits Classification: 17.6 Nature of problem: The demand for advanced highly effective experimental data analysis functions is enormous. The library package represents one approach to give the physicists the possibility to use the advanced routines simply by calling them from their own programs. SpecAnalysLib is a collection of functions for analysis of one- and two-parameter γ-ray spectra, but they can be used for other types of data as well. The library consists of sophisticated functions for background elimination, smoothing, peak searching, deconvolution, and peak fitting. Solution method: The algorithms of background estimation are based on Sensitive Non-linear Iterative Peak (SNIP) clipping algorithm. The smoothing algorithms are based on the convolution of the original data with several types of filters and algorithms based on discrete

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE 'SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA' NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS GENOME BY RESTRICTION ENDONUCLEASES AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restriction endonuclease analysis was used to differentiate between four strains of Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear polyhedrosis virus from different geographical areas. In addition, partial denaturation was performed, and a partial denaturation map was constructed for the Ohio str...

  11. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, R.E.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.

  12. Kernel CMAC with improved capability.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Szabó, Tamás

    2007-02-01

    The cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) has some attractive features, namely fast learning capability and the possibility of efficient digital hardware implementation. Although CMAC was proposed many years ago, several open questions have been left even for today. The most important ones are about its modeling and generalization capabilities. The limits of its modeling capability were addressed in the literature, and recently, certain questions of its generalization property were also investigated. This paper deals with both the modeling and the generalization properties of CMAC. First, a new interpolation model is introduced. Then, a detailed analysis of the generalization error is given, and an analytical expression of this error for some special cases is presented. It is shown that this generalization error can be rather significant, and a simple regularized training algorithm to reduce this error is proposed. The results related to the modeling capability show that there are differences between the one-dimensional (1-D) and the multidimensional versions of CMAC. This paper discusses the reasons of this difference and suggests a new kernel-based interpretation of CMAC. The kernel interpretation gives a unified framework. Applying this approach, both the 1-D and the multidimensional CMACs can be constructed with similar modeling capability. Finally, this paper shows that the regularized training algorithm can be applied for the kernel interpretations too, which results in a network with significantly improved approximation capabilities. PMID:17278566

  13. Exploratory Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization via Integrated Topological and Geometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Diego Mandelli; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-10-01

    A recent trend in the nuclear power engineering field is the implementation of heavily computational and time consuming algorithms and codes for both design and safety analysis. In particular, the new generation of system analysis codes aim to embrace several phenomena such as thermo-hydraulic, structural behavior, and system dynamics, as well as uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses. The use of dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodologies allows a systematic approach to uncertainty quantification. Dynamic methodologies in PRA account for possible coupling between triggered or stochastic events through explicit consideration of the time element in system evolution, often through the use of dynamic system models (simulators). They are usually needed when the system has more than one failure mode, control loops, and/or hardware/process/software/human interaction. Dynamic methodologies are also capable of modeling the consequences of epistemic and aleatory uncertainties. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. The major challenges in using MC and DET methodologies (as well as other dynamic methodologies) are the heavier computational and memory requirements compared to the classical ET analysis. This is due to the fact that each branch generated can contain time evolutions of a large number of variables (about 50,000 data channels are typically present in RELAP) and a large number of scenarios can be generated from a single initiating event (possibly on the order of hundreds or even thousands). Such large amounts of information are usually very difficult to organize in order to identify the main trends in scenario evolutions and the main risk contributors for each initiating event. This report aims to improve Dynamic PRA methodologies by tackling the two challenges mentioned above using: 1) adaptive sampling techniques to reduce computational cost of the analysis

  14. Nuclear stockpile stewardship and Bayesian image analysis (DARHT and the BIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, James L

    2011-01-11

    Since the end of nuclear testing, the reliability of our nation's nuclear weapon stockpile has been performed using sub-critical hydrodynamic testing. These tests involve some pretty 'extreme' radiography. We will be discussing the challenges and solutions to these problems provided by DARHT (the world's premiere hydrodynamic testing facility) and the BIE or Bayesian Inference Engine (a powerful radiography analysis software tool). We will discuss the application of Bayesian image analysis techniques to this important and difficult problem.

  15. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  16. Adapting Human Reliability Analysis from Nuclear Power to Oil and Gas Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-09-01

    ABSTRACT: Human reliability analysis (HRA), as currently used in risk assessments, largely derives its methods and guidance from application in the nuclear energy domain. While there are many similarities be-tween nuclear energy and other safety critical domains such as oil and gas, there remain clear differences. This paper provides an overview of HRA state of the practice in nuclear energy and then describes areas where refinements to the methods may be necessary to capture the operational context of oil and gas. Many key distinctions important to nuclear energy HRA such as Level 1 vs. Level 2 analysis may prove insignifi-cant for oil and gas applications. On the other hand, existing HRA methods may not be sensitive enough to factors like the extensive use of digital controls in oil and gas. This paper provides an overview of these con-siderations to assist in the adaptation of existing nuclear-centered HRA methods to the petroleum sector.

  17. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN FRANCE AND JAPAN ON LOCAL GOVERNMENTS' INVOLVEMENT IN NUCLEAR SAFETY GOVERNANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Shin-Etsu; Shiroyama, Hideaki

    This paper shows a comparative analysis between France and Japan on the way of the local governments' involvement in nuclear safety governance through some interviews. In France, a law came into force that requires related local governments to establish "Commision Locale d'Information" (CLI), which means the local governments officially involve in nuclear regulatory activity. Meanwhile, in Japan, related local governments substantially involve in the operation of nuclear facilities through the "safety agreements" in spite of the lack of legal authority. As a result of comparative analysis, we can point out some institutional input from French cases as follows: to clarify the local governments' roles in the nuclear regulation system, to establish the official channels of communication among nuclear utilities, national regulatory authorities and local governments, and to stipulate explicitly the transparency as a purpose of safety regulation.

  18. Evaluation of the multi-element capabilities of collision/reaction cell inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in wine analysis.

    PubMed

    Grindlay, Guillermo; Mora, Juan; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T C; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2014-10-01

    This work explores the multi-element capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with collision/reaction cell technology (CCT-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of both spectrally interfered and non-interfered nuclides in wine samples using a single set of experimental conditions. The influence of the cell gas type (i.e. He, He+H2 and He+NH3), cell gas flow rate and sample pre-treatment (i.e. water dilution or acid digestion) on the background-equivalent concentration (BEC) of several nuclides covering the mass range from 7 to 238u has been studied. Results obtained in this work show that, operating the collision/reaction cell with a compromise cell gas flow rate (i.e. 4 mL min(-1)) improves BEC values for interfered nuclides without a significant effect on the BECs for non-interfered nuclides, with the exception of the light elements Li and Be. Among the different cell gas mixtures tested, the use of He or He+H2 is preferred over He+NH3 because NH3 generates new spectral interferences. No significant influence of the sample pre-treatment methodology (i.e. dilution or digestion) on the multi-element capabilities of CCT-ICP-MS in the context of simultaneous analysis of interfered and non-interfered nuclides was observed. Nonetheless, sample dilution should be kept at minimum to ensure that light nuclides could be quantified in wine. Finally, a direct 5-fold aqueous dilution is recommended for the simultaneous trace and ultra-trace determination of spectrally interfered and non-interfered elements in wine by means of CCT-ICP-MS. The use of the CCT is mandatory for interference-free ultra-trace determination of Ti and Cr. Only Be could not be determined when using the CCT due to a deteriorated limit of detection when compared to conventional ICP-MS. PMID:25059175

  19. Processes and Procedures for Application of CFD to Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz; Patrick J. Roache; Ismail B. Celik; William D. Pointer; Yassin A. Hassan

    2006-09-01

    Traditionally, nuclear reactor safety analysis has been performed using systems analysis codes such as RELAP5, which was developed at the INL. However, goals established by the Generation IV program, especially the desire to increase efficiency, has lead to an increase in operating temperatures for the reactors. This increase pushes reactor materials to operate towards their upper temperature limits relative to structural integrity. Because there will be some finite variation of the power density in the reactor core, there will be a potential for local hot spots to occur in the reactor vessel. Hence, it has become apparent that detailed analysis will be required to ensure that local ‘hot spots’ do not exceed safety limits. It is generally accepted that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are intrinsically capable of simulating fluid dynamics and heat transport locally because they are based on ‘first principles.’ Indeed, CFD analysis has reached a fairly mature level of development, including the commercial level. However, CFD experts are aware that even though commercial codes are capable of simulating local fluid and thermal physics, great care must be taken in their application to avoid errors caused by such things as inappropriate grid meshing, low-order discretization schemes, lack of iterative convergence and inaccurate time-stepping. Just as important is the choice of a turbulence model for turbulent flow simulation. Turbulence models model the effects of turbulent transport of mass, momentum and energy, but are not necessarily applicable for wide ranges of flow types. Therefore, there is a well-recognized need to establish practices and procedures for the proper application of CFD to simulate flow physics accurately and establish the level of uncertainty of such computations. The present document represents contributions of CFD experts on what the basic practices, procedures and guidelines should be to aid CFD analysts to obtain accurate

  20. Analysis of nuclear quantum effects on hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Swalina, Chet; Wang, Qian; Chakraborty, Arindam; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2007-03-22

    The impact of nuclear quantum effects on hydrogen bonding is investigated for a series of hydrogen fluoride (HF)n clusters and a partially solvated fluoride anion, F-(H2O). The nuclear quantum effects are included using the path integral formalism in conjunction with the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (PICPMD) method and using the second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) approach. For the HF clusters, a directional change in the impact of nuclear quantum effects on the hydrogen-bonding strength is observed as the clusters evolve toward the condensed phase. Specifically, the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects increases the F-F distances for the (HF)n=2-4 clusters and decreases the F-F distances for the (HF)n>4 clusters. This directional change occurs because the enhanced electrostatic interactions between the HF monomers become more dominant than the zero point energy effects of librational modes as the size of the HF clusters increases. For the F-(H2O) system, the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects decreases the F-O distance and strengthens the hydrogen bonding interaction between the fluoride anion and the water molecule because of enhanced electrostatic interactions. The vibrationally averaged 19F shielding constant for F-(H2O) is significantly lower than the value for the equilibrium geometry, indicating that the electronic density on the fluorine decreases as a result of the quantum delocalization of the shared hydrogen. Deuteration of this system leads to an increase in the vibrationally averaged F-O distance and nuclear magnetic shielding constant because of the smaller degree of quantum delocalization for deuterium. PMID:17388289

  1. Testing and technical capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, R.W.; Dill, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Capabilities of the following are outlined: state-of-the-art-services, measurement control and capabilities coordination, sampling and standard section, analytical technology section, environmental-industrial hygiene section, spectrochemical section, inorganic and production control section, instrumentation and control section, instrument technology, and mass spectrometry-isotopic section.

  2. Capability and Deliberation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of deliberation in the context of the capability approach to human well-being from the standpoint of the individual doing the reflecting. The concept of a "strong evaluator" is used develop a concept of the agent of capability. The role of values is discussed in the process of deliberating, particularly the nature of…

  3. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  4. Widening Participation; Widening Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes that widening participation in higher education might distinctively be conceptualised beyond economically driven human capital outcomes, as a matter of widening capability. Specifically, the paper proposes forming the capability of students to become and to be "strong evaluators", able to make reflexive and informed choices…

  5. Analysis of nuclear test TRINITY radiological and meteorological data

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, V.E.

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the TRINITY nuclear test. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. Comparisons of the WSNSO fallout analyses with analyses performed in the 1940s are presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1987 fallout patterns are tabulated in appendices.

  6. Nuclear forensic analysis of a non-traditional actinide sample.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jamie L; Kuhn, Kevin; Byerly, Benjamin; Colletti, Lisa; Fulwyler, James; Garduno, Katherine; Keller, Russell; Lujan, Elmer; Martinez, Alexander; Myers, Steve; Porterfield, Donivan; Spencer, Khalil; Stanley, Floyd; Townsend, Lisa; Thomas, Mariam; Walker, Laurie; Xu, Ning; Tandon, Lav

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear forensic publications, performance tests, and research and development efforts typically target the bulk global inventory of intentionally safeguarded materials, such as plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U). Other materials, such as neptunium (Np), pose a nuclear security risk as well. Trafficking leading to recovery of an interdicted Np sample is a realistic concern especially for materials originating in countries that reprocesses fuel. Using complementary forensic methods, potential signatures for an unknown Np oxide sample were investigated. Measurement results were assessed against published Np processes to present hypotheses as to the original intended use, method of production, and origin for this Np oxide. PMID:27474299

  7. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) mechanical; (2) environmental, gas, liquid; (3) electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (4) optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the report.

  8. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents

  9. Analysis of cross sections using various nuclear potential

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza; Muhammad Zamrun, F.

    2014-05-02

    The relevant astrophysical reaction rates which are derived from the reaction cross sections are necessary input to the reaction network. In this work, we analyse several theoretical models of the nuclear potential which give better prediction of the cross sections for some selected reactions.

  10. Hematocrit analysis through the use of an inexpensive centrifugal polyester-toner device with finger-to-chip blood loading capability.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Gilbert, Rachel J; Mejia, Maximo; Shukla, Nishant; Haverstick, Doris M; Garner, Gavin T; Landers, James P

    2016-06-14

    Hematocrit (HCT) measurements are important clinical diagnostic variables that help physicians diagnose and treat various medical conditions, ailments, and diseases. In this work, we present the HCT Disc, a centrifugal microdevice fabricated by a Print, Cut and Laminate (PCL) method to generate a 12-sample HCT device from materials costing <0.5 USD (polyester and toner or PeT). Following introduction from a drop of blood (finger stick), whole blood metering and cell sedimentation are controlled by centrifugal force, only requiring a CD player motor as external hardware and, ultimately, a cell phone for detection. The sedimented volume from patient blood in the HCT Disc was analyzed using a conventional scanner/custom algorithm for analysis of the image to determine a hematocrit value, and these were compared to values generated in a clinical laboratory, which correlated well. To enhance portability and assure simplicity of the HCT measurement, values from image analysis by a cell phone using a custom application was compared to the scanner. Fifteen samples were analyzed with cell phone image analysis system and were found to be within 4% of the HCT values determined in the clinical lab. We demonstrate the feasibility of the PeT device for HCT measurement, and highlight its uniquely low cost (<0.5 USD), speed (sample-to-answer <8 min), multiplexability (12 samples), low volume whole blood requirement (<3 μL), rotation speeds (<4000 rpm) needed for effective measurement as well as the direct finger-to-chip sample loading capability. PMID:27181638

  11. The Economic Crisis and its Ethical Relevance for Public Health in Europe - an Analysis in the Perspective of the Capability Approach.

    PubMed

    Brall, Caroline; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Brand, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Policy responses to the economic crisis have manifest consequences to European population health and health systems. The aim of this article is to assess, by using the capability approach advanced by Sen, the ethical dimension of trade-offs made in health policy due to austerity measures. From a capability approach point of view, austerity measures such as reducing resources for health care, further deregulating the health care market or moving towards privatisation are ethically challenging since they limit opportunities and capabilities for individuals of a population. Public policies should thus aim to guarantee sufficient capabilities (options to access health care and possibilities to make healthy choices) for its populations. Prioritising those in need is a notion the capability approach particularly focuses on in its goal of supporting those with the least capabilities. PMID:27070963

  12. Incorporation of a risk analysis approach for the nuclear fuel cycle advanced transparency framework.

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Carmen Margarita; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko; Kitabata, Takuya; Vugrin, Eric D.; Vugrin, Kay White; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Cleary, Virginia D.

    2007-05-01

    Proliferation resistance features that reduce the likelihood of diversion of nuclear materials from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. A framework that monitors process information continuously can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation by measuring and reducing diversion risk, thus ensuring the legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation makes this possible by generating instantaneous system state data that can be used to track and measure the status of the process and material at any given time. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are working in cooperation to develop an advanced transparency framework capable of assessing diversion risk in support of overall plant transparency. The ''diversion risk'' quantifies the probability and consequence of a host nation diverting nuclear materials from a civilian fuel cycle facility. This document introduces the details of the diversion risk quantification approach to be demonstrated in the fuel handling training model of the MONJU Fast Reactor.

  13. The Analysis of North Korea's Nuclear Tests by Turkish National Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semin, K.; Meral Ozel, N.; Destici, T. C.; Necmioglu, O.; Kocak, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) announced the conduct of a third underground nuclear test on 12 February 2013 in the northeastern part of the country as the previous tests that were conducted in 2009 and 2006. The latest nuclear test is the best detected nuclear event by the global seismic networks. The magnitude estimates show that each new test increased in size when compared with the previous one. As Turkish NDC (National Data Center), we have analyzed the 2013 and 2009 nuclear tests using seismic data from International Monitoring System (IMS) stations through the International Data Center (IDC) located in Vienna. Discrimination analysis was performed based on mb:Ms magnitude ratio and spectral analysis. We have also applied array based waveform cross-correlation to show the similarity of the nuclear tests and precise arrival time measurements for relative location estimates and basic infrasound analysis using two IMS infrasound stations for the 2013 event. Seismic analysis were performed using softwares such as Geotool, EP (Event processor from Norsar) and Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) and the infrasound data were analyzed by using PMCC from CEA-France. The IMS network is operating under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The CTBTO verification system is under continuous development, also making use of the state of the art technologies and methodologies.

  14. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-07-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision.

  15. [Quantitative Analysis of Immuno-fluorescence of Nuclear Factor-κB Activation].

    PubMed

    Xiu, Min; He, Feng; Lou, Yuanlei; Xu, Lu; Xiong Jieqi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Sisun; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-01

    Immuno-fluorescence technique can qualitatively determine certain nuclear translocation, of which NF-κB/ p65 implicates the activation of NF-κB signal pathways. Immuno-fluorescence analysis software with independent property rights is able to quantitatively analyze dynamic location of NF-κB/p65 by computing relative fluorescence units in nuclei and cytoplasm. We verified the quantitative analysis by Western Blot. When we applied the software to analysis of nuclear translocation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced (0. 5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h) primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) , we found that nuclear translocation peak showed up at 2h as with calculated Western blot verification results, indicating that the inventive immuno-fluorescence analysis software can be applied to the quantitative analysis of immuno-fluorescence. PMID:26485997

  16. Sensitivity analysis of synergistic collaborative scenarios towards sustainable nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fesenko, G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Poplavskaya, E.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents results of the study on the role of collaboration among countries towards sustainable global nuclear energy systems. The study explores various market shares for nuclear fuel cycle services, possible scale of collaboration among countries and assesses benefits and issues relevant for collaboration between suppliers and users of nuclear fuel cycle services. The approach used in the study is based on a heterogeneous world model with grouping of the non-personified nuclear energy countries according to different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The methodology applied in the analysis allocates a fraction of future global nuclear energy generation to each of such country-groups as a function of time. The sensitivity studies performed show the impacts of the group shares on the scope of collaboration among countries and on the resulting possible reactor mix and nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure versus time. The study quantitatively demonstrates that the synergistic approach to nuclear fuel cycle has a significant potential for offering a win-win collaborative strategy to both, technology holders and technology users on their joint way to future sustainable nuclear energy systems. The study also highlights possible issues on such a collaborative way. (authors)

  17. Natural Environment Capabilities at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Willis, Emily M.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is integral in developing, maintaining, and investigating NASA missions such as Space Launch Systems (SLS), currently under development, as well as many NASA and other agency satellite missions. We present the space environment capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at MSFC. These in-house capabilities include model development, analysis of space and terrestrial related data, spacecraft charging anomaly investigations, surface charging modeling including Nascap-2k, space environment definition and radiation parts assessment. All aspects of space and terrestrial design are implemented with the goal of devising missions to be successful at launch and in the space environment of LEO, polar, GEO, and interplanetary orbits. In this poster, we show examples of recent applications of branch capabilities to NASA missions.

  18. Soviet short-range nuclear forces: flexible response or flexible aggression. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.R.

    1987-03-23

    This essay takes a critical look at Soviet short-range nuclear forces in an effort to identify Soviet capabilities to fight a limited nuclear war with NATO. From an analysis of Soviet military art, weapon-system capabilities and tactics, the author concludes that the Soviets have developed a viable limited-nuclear-attack option. Unless NATO reacts to this option, the limited nuclear attack may become favored Soviet option and result in the rapid defeat of NATO.

  19. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  20. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.