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Sample records for nuclear association david

  1. 78 FR 60273 - David E. Cereghino, Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Association, Inc.; Notice of Transfer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission David E. Cereghino, Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative... Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Association, Inc. informed the Commission that the exemption from... transferred to Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Association, Inc. The project is located on John...

  2. David Dennison, the specific heat of hydrogen, and the discovery of nuclear spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Clayton

    2008-04-01

    The specific heat of hydrogen gas at low temperatures, first measured by Arnold Eucken in 1912, decreases sharply as the two rotational degrees of freedom freeze out. The ``old quantum theory'' could never explain this behavior satisfactorily, despite persistent efforts. Then in 1926, Heisenberg showed that in the new quantum mechanics, identical particles must have either symmetric or antisymmetric wave functions, and were the key to the spectrum of helium. Friedrich Hund first applied this concept to the rotational specific heat of hydrogen, with limited success. An experimental breakthrough came in 1926, when for the first time, spectral lines involving the ground state of molecular hydrogen were found in the far ultraviolet. Further measurements by the Japanese spectroscopist Takeo Hori led to a moment of inertia for molecular hydrogen more than double earlier estimates. Using this result, the American physicist David Dennison devised the modern theory in 1927, and in the process, found persuasive evidence for proton spin. Most of these actors were at Bohr's institute in Copenhagen in 1926--27; their interaction plays a central role in this story.

  3. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  4. David Gale: Restless Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Walter

    2006-01-01

    David Gale was one of the mathematicians responsible for the modern form of the theory of duality in linear programming and the associated proof of the minimax theorem in the theory of games. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Operations Research at the University of California at…

  5. Remembering David N. Schramm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    2001-03-01

    Eight months ago David Schramm died doing one of things he loved most - flying his airplane, known as Big-bang Aviation. He was to have been at this meeting doing something that he loved even more - going to scientific meetings to talk about the latest results and to renew friendships...

  6. Obituary: David Stanley Evans, 1916-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Frank N.

    2005-12-01

    headquartered in Cape Town, South Africa. David had designed and built a Newtonian spectrograph for the 74-inch Radcliffe Telescope with which he measured the first southern galaxy redshifts. David and his family spent 1965-66 in Austin, Texas, where he was a National Science Foundation Senior Visiting Scientist at the University of Texas and McDonald Observatory. They moved permanently to Austin in 1968 and David became a Professor of Astronomy and Associate Director of McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin. At McDonald Observatory, R. E. Nather had devised a high-speed photometer capable of measuring millisecond time-scale changes in brightness and with Brian Warner, he invented "high-speed astronomy". This instrument caused Evans to revive his occultation program and, over the next twenty years, he produced the major part of the angular diameters of late-type stars with his students and collaborators. In addition, David and collaborators used the extensive collections of the University of Texas to write "Herschel at the Cape". David was also involved in observing the occultation of ? Sco by Jupiter in 1972 and in observing, during a solar eclipse in 1973, the gravitational deflections in the positions of stars whose light passes near to the Sun. The eclipse was observed from Mauritania, and the observations confirmed Einstein's prediction again. David Evans and his students studied late-type stars that have large star-spots and others that flare. In addition, they studied stars whose lunar occultation observations had revealed them to be double or even more than two stars. David Evans's major scientific contribution was an application of his stellar angular diameters to deduce the surface brightness of stars with the result that with suitable color indices one could use photometry to deduce the angular diameter of stars. This is applicable to stars which can never be occulted by the Moon, and its application to Cepheid variable stars has yielded their

  7. Laurance David Hall.

    PubMed

    Coxon, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    An account is given of the life, scientific contributions, and passing of Laurance David Hall (1938-2009), including his early history and education at the University of Bristol, UK, and the synthesis and NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrates and other natural products during ∼20 years of research and teaching at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Lists of graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and sabbatical visitors are provided for this period. Following a generous endowment by Dr. Herchel Smith, Professor Hall built a new Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Cambridge University, UK, and greatly expanded his researches into the technology and applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and zero quantum NMR. MRI technology was applied both to medical problems such as the characterization of cartilage degeneration in knee joints, the measurement of ventricular function, lipid localization in animal models of atherosclerosis, paramagnetic metal complexes of polysaccharides as contrast agents, and studies of many other anatomical features, but also to several aspects of materials analysis, including food analyses, process control, and the elucidation of such physical phenomena as the flow of liquids through porous media, defects in concrete, and the visualization of fungal damage to wood. Professor Hall's many publications, patents, lectures, and honors and awards are described, and also his successful effort to keep the Asilomar facility in Pacific Grove, California as the alternating venue for the annual Experimental NMR Conference. Two memorial services for Professor Hall are remembered. PMID:21763510

  8. David Crighton 1942 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ffowcs Williams, John E.

    2001-06-01

    David Crighton was struck down by cancer in his fifty-eighth year. He was then at the height of his career and was one of the most admired personalities in fluid mechanics. He had specialized in wave theory, helping to understand and solve problems of practical importance using the full power of mathematical method. Efforts to control the sound and vibration caused by unsteady flow were never far from his thinking, and Crighton's contribution to those efforts has changed significantly the way the subject is viewed. Having first attracted him into the field and never losing my interest in the way he was influencing it, it is natural that I should comment on the technical developments while looking back on Crighton's professional life. The subject has changed a great deal and there are now many more researchers involved in its study, many of whom rely on techniques that Crighton pioneered really powerful mathematical methods. But the basic problems remain: powerful flows are noisy.

  9. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  10. Memories of David Kirzhnits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotovsky, B. M.

    2013-06-01

    In the mid-1950s, a new staff member appeared at the Theory Division of the Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN): David Abramovich Kirzhnits. A Moscow State University alumnus, after graduation he had been assigned to a large defense plant in the city of Gorky, where he had worked for several years as an engineer. He was "liberated" from there by Igor Evgenyevich Tamm, our department head, who managed to transfer him to FIAN. Igor Evgenyevich knew D. A. Kirzhnits - they had met in Moscow before Kirzhnits finished university. At that time Kirzhnits was performing thesis work with professor A. S. Kompaneyets as academic adviser. At his adviser's suggestion, D. Kirzhnits consulted with I. E. Tamm on questions pertaining to the thesis topic. I. E. Tamm took a great liking for the diploma student, and he even wanted to recruit D. A. Kirzhnits for the Theory Division immediately after graduation. But at that time (1949) this proved impossible for several reasons. First, D. Kirzhnits was, as they say, an "invalid of the fifth group" - a Jew - which during those years of violent struggle against cosmopolitanismb often proved an obstacle in looking for work. Second, during the years of mass repressions D. Kirzhnits' father had been arrested on treason charges (according to the charges, he had wanted to sell the Far East to Japan). After intensive investigation his father was released, but he lived only a little longer. Reports of this also could have impeded his acceptance. Third, Igor Evgenyevich didn't have enough weight in officials' eyes at that time and so was unable to overcome "first" and "second."...

  11. David's Understanding of Functions and Periodicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Hope

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of David, a senior enrolled in a high school precalculus course. David's understandings of functions and periodicity was explored, through clinical interviews and contextualized through classroom observations. Although David's precalculus class was traditional his understanding of periodic functions was unconventional David engaged…

  12. A tribute to David Triggle.

    PubMed

    Moos, Walter H

    2015-11-15

    "A gentleman and a scholar" is how many would characterize David Triggle. His insightful, thoughtful approaches to professional pursuits, both personal research and collaborative relationships, stand out by any measure. He has shaped students, colleagues, and whole fields, calcium ion channels and ligands being most representative of the latter. In recent years, he has expanded his contributions to important commentaries on politics and social challenges in the sciences. David is the rare intellect able to do all this and more, as outlined herein. PMID:25931149

  13. David Hume on Competent Judges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Marcia Muelder

    2004-01-01

    This essay is the eighth in an occasional series on past treatments of major issues in arts education policy from antiquity through the twentieth century. The essay on which it is based, David Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste," originally published in 1757, is too extensive to be reprinted here, but it is easily accessible in the public domain.…

  14. A Reply from David Elkind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1989-01-01

    Replying to Robert H. Anderson's article in the same "Principal" issue, David Elkind defends his article against classroom rotation. Elkind strongly favors multiage grouping and team teaching, but views the real issue as departmentalization and rotation versus self-contained classrooms. Although multiage grouping and team teaching are superior…

  15. [Movement disorders in David Copperfield].

    PubMed

    Garćia Ruiz, P J; Gulliksen, L L

    1999-01-01

    Charles Dickens' novels are a source of vivid neurological descriptions. Besides Pickwickian syndrome, many other neurological descriptions can be found in Dickens' novels. David Copperfield contains several characters with movement disorders including generalized dystonia (Mr. Uriah Heep), restless legs syndrome (the waiter), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr. Creakle). These neurological descriptions an probably based on the observation of actual patients. PMID:10570623

  16. The "O" Word: Issues in Outsourcing. Professional Associations React to the Challenge. Interviews with SLA's David Bender and AIIP's Jane Miller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    The executive director of the Special Libraries Association (SLA) and the president of the Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP) answer questions about outsourcing information services. Relevant policy, vendor-client relationships, managerial considerations, and effects on libraries are discussed. Two sidebars offer 19…

  17. Battling Creaticide: An Interview with David C. Berliner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David C. Berliner, a Regents' Professor in the College of Education at Arizona State University. His books include "Educational Psychology," "The Manufactured Crisis," and "The Handbook of Educational Psychology." He has served as president of the American Educational Research Association and of the…

  18. Hydrologic issues associated with nuclear waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Neretnieks, Ivars; Tsang, Yvonne

    2015-09-01

    Significant progress in hydrology, especially in subsurface flow and solute transport, has been made over the last 35 years because of sustained interest in underground nuclear waste repositories. The present paper provides an overview of the key hydrologic issues involved, and to highlight advances in their understanding and treatment because of these efforts. The focus is not on the development of radioactive waste repositories and their safety assessment, but instead on the advances in hydrologic science that have emerged from such studies. Work and results associated with three rock types, which are being considered to host the repositories, are reviewed, with a different emphasis for each rock type. The first rock type is fractured crystalline rock, for which the discussion will be mainly on flow and transport in saturated fractured rock. The second rock type is unsaturated tuff, for which the emphasis will be on flow from the shallow subsurface through the unsaturated zone to the repository. The third rock type is clay-rich formations, whose permeability is very low in an undisturbed state. In this case, the emphasis will be on hydrologic issues that arise from mechanical and thermal disturbances; i.e., on the relevant coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes. The extensive research results, especially those from multiyear large-scale underground research laboratory investigations, represent a rich body of information and data that can form the basis for further development in the related areas of hydrologic research.

  19. Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Barry E.

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) System, which was adopted by the Astrophysics Division for their Astrophysics Data System, is a solution to the system heterogeneity problem. The heterogeneous components of the Astrophysics problem is outlined. The Library and Library Consortium levels of the DAVID approach are described. The 'books' and 'kits' level is discussed. The Universal Object Typer Management System level is described. The relation of the DAVID project with the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program is explained.

  20. [Book review] Green engineering: environmentally conscious design, by David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boustany, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Review of: Green engineering: Environmentally conscious design / David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard / Prentice-Hall, Inc., One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. 2002. 552 pages. ISBN 0-13-061908-6.

  1. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    the ones first developed in the setting of the Sherrington--Kirkpatrick model of spin glasses. What this small anecdote hints at is the vastness of the terrain over which research on spin glasses is having a deep and lasting impact. As scientists we are, I think it's fair to say, at least partially motivated by a desire to receive some recognition for our work, some evidence that it has been engaging and stimulating to others in the field. But David's work far transcends this model, being pivotal not only to researchers in the originally-intended domain of rather obscure magnetic alloys, but also far, far beyond: from neuroscience and biological information processing, to the social sciences, including economics, and on to probability theory, computer science, the next generation of optimization algorithms, and the entire field of complexity theory. Indeed, one can regard spin glasses in the guise of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model as a conceptual version of the silicon revolution: a curiosity-driven scientific endeavour that continues to catalyse utterly unanticipated progress over far-flung domains. David captured it all perfectly in the title of his 2001 Bakerian Lecture: 'Magnets, microchips, memories and markets: [the] statistical physics of complex systems.' Many of us would consider ourselves wonderfully fortunate if our work were to have just a small fraction of the impact that David's has. Moreover, the scientific panorama revealed by investigations stimulated by David's work is beautiful, shocking and inspiring, a panorama broader still than condensed matter theory or even physics itself. So, when our spirits are down and our brows furrowed by some painful integral or a bug in our computer code, let us remember to pause and revel in the astonishing confluence of scientific themes that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and its associates capture. To echo a view I first heard from Giorgio Parisi: I'm not sure if there is anything more rich or surprising in

  2. Straight talk with...David Baker.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Khamsi, Roxanne

    2012-11-01

    Thirty years ago, technology companies began nestling their facilities close to academia, and the idea of the university research park was born. Soon after, the concept took off in the field of medicine, and today it's not hard to find such innovation hubs that house biomedical startups drawing on the brainpower of professors and students alike. In late September, the Tucson, Arizona-based Association of University Research Parks--which includes about 170 research parks--announced that David Baker would serve as president of the organization's board of directors for the next year and help guide its strategic goals for the next five years. Baker, who is also the executive director of the University Technology Park at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, spoke with Roxanne Khamsi about how the organization hopes to branch out and transform these workplaces. PMID:23135501

  3. David L. Rosenhan (1929-2012).

    PubMed

    Ross, Lee; Kavanagh, David

    2013-09-01

    Presents an obituary for David L. Rosenhan (1929-2012). A distinguished psychologist and professor emeritus at Stanford University, Rosenhan died February 6, 2012, at the age of 82, after a long illness. Born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on November 22, 1929, he received a bachelor's degree in mathematics (1951) from Yeshiva College and a master's degree in economics (1953) and a doctorate in psychology (1958) from Columbia University. A professor of law and of psychology at Stanford University from 1971 until his retirement in 1998, Rosenhan was a pioneer in applying psychological methods to the practice of law, including the examination of expert witnesses, jury selection, and jury deliberation. A former president of the American Psychology-Law Society and of the American Board of Forensic Psychology, Rosenhan was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of the American Psychological Association, and of the American Psychological Society. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty, he was a member of the faculties of Swarthmore College, Princeton University, Haverford College, and the University of Pennsylvania. He also served as a research psychologist at the Educational Testing Service. As generations of Stanford students can attest, David Rosenhan was a spellbinding lecturer who managed to convey the sense that he was speaking to each individual, no matter how large the group. To his graduate students, he was consistently encouraging and optimistic, always ready to share a joke or story, and gently encouraging of their creativity and progressive independence as researchers. The lessons he cared most about offering, in the classroom as in his research, were about human dignity and the need to confront abuse of power and human frailties. PMID:24016118

  4. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    PubMed

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work. PMID:27127250

  5. A Star of David catenane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, David A.; Pritchard, Robin G.; Stephens, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the synthesis of a [2]catenane that consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings, a molecular link. The woven scaffold is a hexameric circular helicate generated by the assembly of six tris(bipyridine) ligands with six iron(II) cations, with the size of the helicate promoted by the use of sulfate counterions. The structure of the ligand extension directs subsequent covalent capture of the catenane by ring-closing olefin metathesis. Confirmation of the Star of David topology (two rings, six crossings) is provided by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Extraction of the iron(II) ions with tetrasodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate affords the wholly organic molecular link. The self-assembly of interwoven circular frameworks of controlled size, and their subsequent closure by multiple directed covalent bond-forming reactions, provides a powerful strategy for the synthesis of molecular topologies of ever-increasing complexity.

  6. David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel.

    PubMed

    Hubel, David; Wiesel, Torsten

    2012-07-26

    While attending medical school at McGill, David Hubel developed an interest in the nervous system during the summers he spent at the Montreal Neurological Institute. After heading to the United States in 1954 for a Neurology year at Johns Hopkins, he was drafted by the army and was assigned to the Neuropsychiatry Division at the Walter Reed Hospital, where he began his career in research and did his first recordings from the visual cortex of sleeping and awake cats. In 1958, he moved to the lab of Stephen Kuffler at Johns Hopkins, where he began a long and fruitful collaboration with Torsten Wiesel. Born in Sweden, Torsten Wiesel began his scientific career at the Karolinska Institute, where he received his medical degree in 1954. After spending a year in Carl Gustaf Bernhard's laboratory doing basic neurophysiological research, he moved to the United States to be a postdoctoral fellow with Stephen Kuffler. It was at Johns Hopkins where he met David Hubel in 1958, and they began working together on exploring the receptive field properties of neurons in the visual cortex. Their collaboration continued until the late seventies. Hubel and Wiesel's work provided fundamental insight into information processing in the visual system and laid the foundation for the field of visual neuroscience. They have had many achievements, including--but not limited to--the discovery of orientation selectivity in visual cortex neurons and the characterization of the columnar organization of visual cortex through their discovery of orientation columns and ocular-dominance columns. Their work earned them the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1981, which they shared with Roger Sperry. PMID:22841302

  7. David L. Harrison: A Work Of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This article describes poet and writer David L. Harrison. A former School Board Chairman from Springfield, MO, David was responsible for beginning an annual "Teacher Appreciation Banquet" and for launching the "Sky High for Reading" program. The "Sky High for Reading" program encourages children in Springfield to read enough books so that, if…

  8. Climate changes associated with nuclear war

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear war, featuring explosion of half the world arsenal of nuclear weapons, would cause urban and forest fires that would inject 20-650 megatons of smoke into the atmosphere. The Northern Hemisphere optical depth would increase to between 0.5-14. All models indicate an increase in optical depths, a large net radiation gain in the smoke layer, and an antigreenhouse effect at the surface. Significant global cooling would proceed, transforming the global climate to a large degree toward that of an airless world. Persisting deficiencies in the models are identified, noting research areas which would improve the accuracies of the predictions.

  9. Coupled processes associated with nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with coupled processes which affect a nuclear waste repository. While there are many descriptive accounts of environmental degradation resulting from various land uses, the author emphasizes the geomorphic processes responsible for such changes and the reasons why various reclamation practices are valuable in environmental management.

  10. Heterogeneous distributed query processing: The DAVID system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Barry E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) project is the development of an easy to use computer system with which NASA scientists, engineers and administrators can uniformly access distributed heterogeneous databases. Basically, DAVID will be a database management system that sits alongside already existing database and file management systems. Its function is to enable users to access the data in other languages and file systems without having to learn the data manipulation languages. Given here is an outline of a talk on the DAVID project and several charts.

  11. Emergence of the nuclear industry and associated crime. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    Nuclear energy, in weapons production and electrical power generation, is a technology that has endured public scrutiny since the late 1940s. Societal acceptance of this industry has been affected by controversy in the following areas: health effects of exposure to radiation, possible consequences resulting from accidents, and nuclear nonproliferation. The literature review begins in Chapter 2 by examining the changing public perceptions of nuclear energy over the last forty years. Support for the ideals and practices of the industry has often wavered, due to media representation of incidents, accidents, and potential catastrophic events. The second part of the chapter highlights the crimes associated with nuclear energy in a chronological order of concern by nuclear industry security specialists. Research has found certain types of crime to be more prevalent during particular eras than others. Crimes instigated by spies, peace activists, terrorists, and the insider (employee) are reviewed, with an emphasis on insider crime.

  12. Embryos, DOHaD and David Barker.

    PubMed

    Fleming, T P; Velazquez, M A; Eckert, J J

    2015-10-01

    The early embryo and periconceptional period is a window during which environmental factors may cause permanent change in the pattern and characteristics of development leading to risk of adult onset disease. This has now been demonstrated across small and large animal models and also in the human. Most evidence of periconceptional 'programming' has emerged from maternal nutritional models but also other in vivo and in vitro conditions including assisted reproductive treatments, show consistent outcomes. This short review first reports on the range of environmental in vivo and in vitro periconceptional models and resulting long-term outcomes. Second, it uses the rodent maternal low protein diet model restricted to the preimplantation period and considers the stepwise maternal-embryonic dialogue that comprises the induction of programming. This dialogue leads to cellular and epigenetic responses by the embryo, mainly identified in the extra-embryonic cell lineages, and underpins an apparently permanent change in the growth trajectory during pregnancy and associates with increased cardiometabolic and behavioural disease in adulthood. We recognize the important advice of David Barker some years ago to investigate the sensitivity of the early embryo to developmental programming, an insight for which we are grateful. PMID:25952250

  13. Search for Thunderstorm Associated Nuclear Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, J. L.; Millan, R.; Boggs, S.; Eack, K.; Aulich, G.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from further analysis of thunderstorm data taken with a liquid nitrogen-cooled germanium spectrometer with energy range from 13 keV-2.6 MeV that was setup on South Baldy Peak at Langmuir Laboratory in New Mexico during June through August of 2005. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the suggestion made by Greenfield et al. (2003) that delayed gamma ray emissions associated with thunderstorms may be attributed to Chlorine-39 and Chlorine-38. We improve upon results of Boggs et al. (2005) by doing a careful spectral calibration to improve sensitivity.Two methods to determine the presence of chlorine emission lines were used; we created storm length background-subtracted spectra, and also examined the change in count rates in energy bins that correspond to the Chlorine emission energies. Both these methods confirm the conclusions of Boggs et al. that chlorine emission was not detected and any signature of Chlorine production was below the detectability of the detector. These results lead to an upper limit on photon flux in chlorine line emission that can be used to place an upper limit on chlorine production during thunderstorms.

  14. Exploring the Living Planet with David Attenborough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Jacquelin; Unwin, David

    1984-01-01

    In this interview David Attenborough, the celebrated natural history film maker and writer, talks about his highly successful television series, "The Living Planet." Devoted to the exposition of the world's ecosystems, the film represents a significant example of popular geographic education. (RM)

  15. David L. Gutmann (1925-2013).

    PubMed

    Rose, Jon; Huyck, Margaret; Grunes, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    David L. Gutmann, a pioneer in geropsychology and professor emeritus at Northwestern University, died on November 3, 2013, at the age of 88. A student of Bernice Neugarten, Bruno Bettelheim, and Erik Erikson, Gutmann discovered changes in adult psychological development related to parenting styles that held across diverse cultures. PMID:25046720

  16. Family Matters: A Conversation with David Popenoe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor David Popenoe, author of the controversial book "Disturbing the Nest: Family Change and Decline in Modern Societies" (1988). Popenoe heads the National Marriage Project at Rutgers University, where he taught sociology for forty-five years until his recent retirement. Here, Popenoe discusses his…

  17. David Ben-Gurion: A Creative Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemarin, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    David Ben-Gurion (1886-1973), the first Prime Minister of Israel, is included in Pasternak's (2001) list of the nine most memorable leaders of the twentieth century. All of them are remembered for the reforms they initiated. Roosevelt (USA), Stalin (Russia), Castro (Cuba), and Thatcher (England) focused on social-economical changes, whereas…

  18. Speaking Personally--With Mark David Milliron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark David Milliron, board chair of the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education, a trustee with Western Governors University, and a member of the advisory board for the University of Texas (UT) TeleCampus. He is also president and CEO of Catalyze Learning International, a private…

  19. A Conversation with...David Satcher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Neil A.

    1996-01-01

    David Satcher began his career as a medical geneticist and was appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1993. In this interview, Dr. Satcher talks about the responsibilities of the CDC and explains how a childhood experience inspired his interest in medicine and his continuing commitment to community service.…

  20. Interview with Dr. David H. Kalsbeek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, David M.

    2005-01-01

    David H. Kalsbeek currently is vice president for enrollment management at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. In that capacity, he leads the marketing and enrollment development strategies for the nation's largest and fastest-growing Catholic university, enrolling 23,000 students in eight colleges and six campuses throughout the greater…

  1. Another Perspective: An Interview with David Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ruth A.; Johnson, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    To provide another perspective on evaluation within nonformal settings, "New Directions for Evaluation" recently interviewed David Smith, the coordinator of the Professional Learning to Close the Achievement Gap program for the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, who has extensive background in education and educational research. He formerly held…

  2. Speaking Personally--With David Foster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    David Foster is the founder of Kryterion, an Internet test administration company, and currently serves there as chief scientist and executive vice president. He is the author of numerous articles for industry trade journals and textbooks and sits on the Council for the International Test Commission. In this interview, Foster talks about his…

  3. Reading Pictures: An Interview with David Wiesner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga-Dobai, Kinga

    2008-01-01

    Two-time Caldecott Honor winner (Free Fall, Sector 7) and three-time Caldecott Medal winner (Tuesday, The Three Pigs, Flotsam), David Wiesner is regarded as one of the most remarkable creators of visual storytelling living today. Wiesner is well known for his innovative and unique subject matter and his sophisticated painting-like illustrations…

  4. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  5. 77 FR 26765 - David H.M. Phelps: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration David H.M. Phelps: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) debarring David H.M. Phelps for a period of 20... Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Mr. David H.M. Phelps has been convicted of 10 felony counts...

  6. David Alan Walker (1928-2012).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gerald E; Heber, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    David Alan Walker, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Sheffield, UK and Fellow of the Royal Society, died on February 13, 2012. David had a marvelous 60 year career as a scientist, during which he was a researcher, mentor, valued colleague, and a prolific writer in the field of photosynthesis. His career was marked by creative breakthroughs in isolation and analysis of chloroplast metabolism in vitro and simple but valuable technical advances for measurement of photosynthesis in vivo that remain relevant on a global scale to production of crops and biofuels, as well as plant responses to climate change. We include here personal remembrances by the authors (GEE and UH), and by (in alphabetical order): Zoran Cerovic (France), Bob Furbank (Australia), Geoffrey Hind (USA), John Humby (UK), Agu Laisk (Estonia), Peter Lea (UK), Ross Lilley (Australia), Barry Osmond (Australia), Simon Robinson (Australia) and Charles Stirling (UK). PMID:22638915

  7. Remembering David B. Knaff (1941-2016).

    PubMed

    Malkin, Richard

    2016-07-01

    David Knaff began his scientific career in the Department of Cell Physiology at the University of California, Berkeley. At Berkeley, he worked on chloroplast electron carriers such as the cytochromes and plastocyanin and applied redox potentiometry to characterize these carriers in situ. He moved to Texas Tech University where he made major contributions in the study of ferredoxin-mediated reactions with chloroplast enzymes, most notably nitrite reductase. PMID:27130553

  8. 78 FR 26784 - David Freeman: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring David Freeman for 5 years from providing services in any capacity to a person that has an approved or pending drug product application. FDA bases this order on a finding that Mr. Freeman was convicted of introducing and delivering for introduction into interstate......

  9. Nuclear localization signal receptor importin alpha associates with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H M; Raikhel, N V

    1998-01-01

    Importin alpha is the nuclear localization signal (NLS) receptor that is involved in the nuclear import of proteins containing basic NLSs. Using importin alpha as a tool, we were interested in determining whether the cytoskeleton could function in the transport of NLS-containing proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Double-labeling immunofluorescence studies showed that most of the cytoplasmic importin alpha coaligned with microtubules and microfilaments in tobacco protoplasts. Treatment of tobacco protoplasts with microtubule- or microfilament-depolymerizing agents disrupted the strands of importin alpha in the cytoplasm, whereas a microtubule-stabilizing agent had no effect. Biochemical analysis showed that importin alpha associated with microtubules and microfilaments in vitro in an NLS-dependent manner. The interaction of importin alpha with the cytoskeleton could be an essential element of protein transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in vivo. PMID:9811789

  10. Structural Seismic Risk at David City, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, E.; Battlo, J.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Tapia, A.; Lindhom, C.

    2007-12-01

    At the southwest margin of the Isthmus of Panama, the Cocos, Nazca and Panama Microplate join in a triple junction. In this tectonic setting, the Panama Fracture Zone (PFZ) which bounds the Nazca and Cocos plate, subducts in an oblique and shallow manner. This zone is one of the most active seismic areas of Central America. On July 18, 1934, the largest earthquake in Panama in historical times (Ms= 7.7) occurred in its northern region. This event caused extensive damage to towns located in the border of Panama and Costa Rica and during the two subsequent days, six aftershocks with magnitude greater than 6.0 were recorded. David City, with 130,000 inhabitants is the most important urban center in southwestern Panama and lies at the northern end of the PFZ. This city was impacted by the strong destructive earthquakes (Ms>7.0) that took place in 1879 and 1934, both with epicenters located on the northern terminus of the PFZ. In this work, we collected and digitized historical seismograms to measure the centroid moment tensor (CMT) from the main 1934 earthquake. Additionally, we gathered new macroseismic information to create improved and more complete isoseismals maps of the 1879 and 1934 events. We determined the probabilistic seismic hazard for David City using records of historical and recent seismicity and the characteristics of local faults. The hazard computation results are presented as peak iso-acceleration curves for rock/hard soil for a recurrence time of 500 years. An elastic response spectrum was obtained with a uniform exceedance probability of 10% in 50 years with one degree of freedom and 5% of damping. Our results indicate maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) in downtown David of 3.8 and 4.5 m/s2 with a probability annual exceedance of 0.002 and 0.001, respectively. Structural vulnerability was determined analyzing the quality and construction design of housing, buildings, and critical facilities as well as the type of soil where these structures

  11. Detection of special nuclear materials with the associate particle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, Cédric; Deyglun, Clément; Pérot, Bertrand; Eléon, Cyrille; Normand, Stéphane; Sannié, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenolé; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R&D program against chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRN-E) threats, CEA is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with fast neutrons produced by an associated particle sealed tube neutron generator. The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction produces an alpha particle and a 14 MeV neutron almost back to back, allowing tagging neutron emission both in time and direction with an alpha particle position-sensitive sensor embedded in the generator. Fission prompt neutrons and gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons which are tagged by an alpha particle are detected in coincidence with plastic scintillators. This paper presents numerical simulations performed with the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo computer code and with post processing software developed with the ROOT data analysis package. False coincidences due to neutron and photon scattering between adjacent detectors (cross talk) are filtered out to increase the selectivity between nuclear and benign materials. Accidental coincidences, which are not correlated to an alpha particle, are also taken into account in the numerical model, as well as counting statistics, and the time-energy resolution of the data acquisition system. Such realistic calculations show that relevant quantities of SNM (few kg) can be distinguished from cargo and shielding materials in 10 min acquisitions. First laboratory tests of the system under development in CEA laboratories are also presented.

  12. Detection of special nuclear materials with the associate particle technique

    SciTech Connect

    Carasco, Cedric; Deyglun, Clement; Perot, Bertrand; Eleon, Cyrille; Normand, Stephane; Sannie, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenole; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-04-19

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R and D program against chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRN-E) threats, CEA is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with fast neutrons produced by an associated particle sealed tube neutron generator. The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction produces an alpha particle and a 14 MeV neutron almost back to back, allowing tagging neutron emission both in time and direction with an alpha particle position-sensitive sensor embedded in the generator. Fission prompt neutrons and gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons which are tagged by an alpha particle are detected in coincidence with plastic scintillators. This paper presents numerical simulations performed with the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo computer code and with post processing software developed with the ROOT data analysis package. False coincidences due to neutron and photon scattering between adjacent detectors (cross talk) are filtered out to increase the selectivity between nuclear and benign materials. Accidental coincidences, which are not correlated to an alpha particle, are also taken into account in the numerical model, as well as counting statistics, and the time-energy resolution of the data acquisition system. Such realistic calculations show that relevant quantities of SNM (few kg) can be distinguished from cargo and shielding materials in 10 min acquisitions. First laboratory tests of the system under development in CEA laboratories are also presented.

  13. First Scholarship at AGU Established by David E. Lumley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar, Joanna G.

    2009-09-01

    Shortly after AGU launched its annual voluntary contribution campaign last year—the theme was “Building Tomorrow's Talent Today”—the Union's development office received an e-mail message from David E. Lumley about establishing a scholarship for a high-school student or undergraduate. Many scientific societies and associations have quite a few named scholarships, but for AGU this was a new concept. Lumley was sure of what he wanted to do and even more excited when he learned that his scholarship would be a first for AGU. “I want to help inspire today's young minds to work on problems of global importance in both the energy and environment sectors of industry and academia,” Lumley said. Recipients of the David E. Lumley Young Scientist Scholarship for Energy and Environmental Science will be expected to present a paper and to participate in various student activities at Fall Meeting. “Meeting some of the ‘giants’ of geoscience and getting their feedback on research is a big deal for these young students. We sometimes lose sight of this,” he said.

  14. Investigation of Nuclear Gamma Ray Line Emission Associated with Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Millan, R. M.; Eack, K.; Aulich, G. D.

    2005-12-01

    The first conclusive observations of X-rays associated with thunderstorm activity were made in the 1980's and the prompt emission has been interpreted as bremsstrahlung produced by lightning-accelerated electrons. In 2004, Greenfield et al. reported the first detection of delayed gamma ray emission, with flux peaking 70 minutes after a lightning stroke and decaying exponentially over 50 minutes. They suggested the delayed gamma rays are a result of nuclear reactions in the atmosphere, creating excited Chlorine-39 and decaying with a 56-minute half-life. These results are compelling, but inconclusive; instrumentation capable of measuring the energy spectrum with high precision is necessary to confirm the existence of nuclear line emission associated with lightning. During June-September 2005, we used a spare RHESSI 7 cm-diameter segmented coaxial germanium spectrometer to continuously monitor gamma radiation on South Baldy Peak (10,800 ft) in New Mexico. The detector monitors gamma rays between ~18 keV-10 MeV with an energy resolution of ~2 keV@835 keV. South Baldy is the site of Langmuir Lab and was chosen to take advantage of other lightning research instrumentation located there, including New Mexico Tech's 3D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) which can determine the location of a lightning stroke to within about 50m. We describe the experiment and present the initial results.

  15. Reconstructing the Foreign Teacher: The Nativization of David Crook in Beijing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Craig K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a critical examination of the life and work of David Crook (1910-2000) as an English teacher in China from just prior to 1949 through the 1980's. It describes Crook's struggle to transcend attitudes of superiority commonly associated with native speaking English teachers at the time as well as his efforts to introduce innovations in…

  16. Discussion of David Thissen's Bad Questions: An Essay Involving Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Terry

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, University of North Carolina's associate dean of research and assessment at the School of Education Terry Ackerman poses questions and shares his thoughts on David Thissen's essay, "Bad Questions: An Essay Involving Item Response Theory" (this issue). Ackerman begins by considering the two purposes of Item Response…

  17. America's foremost early astronomer. [David Rittenhouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Rubincam, Milton, II

    1995-01-01

    The life of 18th century astronomer, craftsman, and partriot David Rittenhouse is detailed. As a craftsman, he distinguished himself as one of the foremost builders of clocks. He also built magnetic compasses and surveying instruments. The finest examples of his craftsmanship are considered two orreries, mechanical solar systems. In terms of astronomical observations, his best-known contribution was his observation of the transit of Venus in 1769. Rittenhouse constructed the first diffraction grating. Working as Treasurer of Pennsylvania throughout the Revolution, he became the first director of the Mint in 1792. Astronomical observations in later life included charting the position of Uranus after its discovery.

  18. Obituary: David Q. Wark, 1918-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillin, Larry Max

    2003-12-01

    the American Meteorological Society, the Lloyd V. Berkner Space Utilization Award from the American Astronautical Society, and the Robert M. Losey Award, from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. David Quentin Wark was born on 25 March 1918, in Spokane, Washington. He was the fourth and last child of Percival Damon Wark and Clara Belle (née Mackey) Wark. In 1921 his family moved to Altadena and Pasadena, California, where he lived until 1939. He attended Altadena Elementary School, Edison Elementary School, Washington Junior High School, Pasadena High School, and Pasadena Junior College. From 1938 to 1939, and again in the summer of 1940, he worked for the Associated Press and David Lawrence to earn money to resume his education. In 1939, he entered the University of California, Berkeley, from which he graduated with a BA in Astronomy with honors in May 1941. From 1941 to 1942 he did graduate study in meteorology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He resumed graduate studies part time in 1948 at the University of California, Berkeley, while working full time at the U.S. Weather Bureau and graduated with a PhD in Astronomy in January 1959. He remembered those times as tough days driving back and forth to Berkeley and living in Half-Moon Bay. Dr. Wark's professional career began in 1942 at the U.S. Naval Observatory, where he served as a Naval Officer until 1946. He then went to work for the U.S. Weather Bureau. He spent the first three years of that period in Istres, France, Frankfurt and Munich, Germany, and Cairo Egypt. From 1949 through 1958 he served at the Aviation Weather Forecast Office in San Francisco. He then moved to the U.S. Weather Bureau Office in Suitland, Maryland, where he worked from November 1958 until 3 July 1999, when he officially retired. He actually retired from NOAA because during this time, he saw the U.S. Weather Bureau become part of ESSA which, in turn, became a part the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING BELLTOWER AND PROJECTING VERANDA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING PROJECTING VERANDA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  1. 13. SECOND FLOOR, CHILDREN'S LIBRARY, LUNETTE PAINTING 'INVENTION' BY DAVID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SECOND FLOOR, CHILDREN'S LIBRARY, LUNETTE PAINTING 'INVENTION' BY DAVID HUTCHINSON, WEST HALF, LOOKING WEST - Yonkers Public Library, Nepperhan Avenue & South Broadway, Yonkers, Westchester County, NY

  2. 14. SECOND FLOOR, CHILDREN'S LIBRARY, LUNETTE PAINTING 'INVENTION' BY DAVID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. SECOND FLOOR, CHILDREN'S LIBRARY, LUNETTE PAINTING 'INVENTION' BY DAVID HUTCHINSON, NORTH HALF LOOKING NORTH - Yonkers Public Library, Nepperhan Avenue & South Broadway, Yonkers, Westchester County, NY

  3. Nuclear factor kappa B role in inflammation associated gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, Sahil; Vyas, Dinesh; Hollis, Michael; Aekka, Apporva; Vyas, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has an established role in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. NF-κB is also involved in critical mechanisms connecting inflammation and cancer development. Recent investigations suggest that the NF-κB signaling cascade may be the central mediator of gastrointestinal malignancies including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. This review will explore NF-κB’s function in inflammation-associated gastrointestinal malignancies, highlighting its oncogenic contribution to each step of carcinogenesis. NF-κB’s role in the inflammation-to-carcinoma sequence in gastrointestinal malignancies warrants stronger emphasis upon targeting this pathway in achieving greater therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25805923

  4. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-05-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development.

  5. David Lasser - An American Spaceflight Pioneer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Lasser, Amelia

    2002-01-01

    David Lasser was one of the founders of the American Interplanetary Society (later known as the American Rocket Society) and author of the first English-language book (in 1931) on the use of rockets for human spaceflight. His involvement in the fledgling spaceflight movement was short-lived as he moved on to pursue a distinguished, if turbulent, career in the labor movement. In lieu of an oral history, Mr. Lasser provided his recollections on the pioneering days of rocketry and his thoughts on mankind's destiny in space. This paper provides an overview of Mr. Lasser's life and accomplishments as an American spaceflight visionary, along with a compilation of the information that he graciously provided.

  6. In memoriam of David P. Rall.

    PubMed Central

    1999-01-01

    As a scientist, administrator, and diplomat, David P. Rall pioneered the effort to identify and understand the elements that make up the human environment and their consequences for human health. As an intellectual and aggressive activist, he educated scientists, governments, and the world community to the critical need to address the existence of environmental agents and their consequences for human health. As a leader he marshalled some of the best minds and hearts of his time to the cause of world health through a safe and clean environment. And as a visionary he provided the goals of environmental health science and the direction to guide both current and future generations. His death on September 28 brought to a close a chapter in the evolution of our understanding of the interconnectedness of human health and the environment, a chapter he was largely responsible for writing. Images pA538-a PMID:10544164

  7. David Lasser: An American Spaceflight Pioneer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Lasser, Amelia

    2002-01-01

    David Lasser was one of the founders of the American Interplanetary Society (later known as the American Rocket Society) and author of the first English-language book (in 1931) on the prospects of human spaceflight. Yet his involvement in the fledgling spaceflight movement was short-lived as he soon moved on to pursue a distinguished career in the cause of workers rights. In lieu of an oral history, the author corresponded with Mr. Lasser on a regular basis in the years before his death in 1996 to gather Mr. Lasser's views on human spaceflight activities as viewed from his unique perspective. This paper will document that correspondence with one of America's original spaceflight pioneers.

  8. David D. Derse, 1949-2009

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    David D. Derse, Ph.D., Head of the Retrovirus Gene Expression Section in the HIV Drug Resistance Program at the National Cancer Institute-Frederick (NCI-Frederick), passed away on October 9, 2009, a scant six weeks after being diagnosed with liver cancer. It was with great sadness that family, friends, and colleagues gathered together for his memorial service on Saturday, October 17, 2009, at the Middletown United Methodist Church in Maryland. As a NCI scientist since 1986, Dave studied the molecular mechanisms of infection and replication of a number of different types of retroviruses. Dave became an internationally known expert on human T cell lymphotrophic viruses type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and served on the editorial boards of Virology and Retrovirology. His most recent studies focused on the mechanisms of HTLV-1 virion morphogenesis, transmission, and replication. PMID:19951436

  9. 76 FR 12971 - David E. Berman: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration David E. Berman: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring David E. Berman, MD, for 3 years.... Berman pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor offense of the introduction into interstate commerce of...

  10. 77 FR 71189 - Falck, David P.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Falck, David P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 23, 2012, David P. Falck submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions...-8659. Comment Date: 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on December 14, 2012. Dated: November 23, 2012. Kimberly...

  11. 75 FR 10244 - Ellsworth, David C.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Ellsworth, David C.; Notice of Filing February 25, 2010. Take notice that on February 12, 2010, David C. Ellsworth filed an informational report for authority to hold...

  12. Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on Nov. 18 at NCI at Frederick to honor the outstanding research accomplishments of David Derse, Ph.D., and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.

  13. 76 FR 7837 - Magill, David W.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Magill, David W.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 4, 2011, David W. Magill submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking...

  14. Music: Part of the Basics at David Douglas and Salem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheasant, Marilyn

    1985-01-01

    This bulletin highlights elements of the music programs in two Oregon school districts--David Douglas School District 40 and Salem School District 24J--that have kept these programs viable in spite of financial constraints. Ingredients for success of the overall music program at David Douglas are first described. Important elements include hiring…

  15. Teaching Students about the Environment with Henry David Thoreau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Walden: The Ballad of Thoreau" is a two-act four-character play about the final two days writer Henry David Thoreau spent in his cabin before leaving Walden Pond. Teachers can use this play to teach about preserving the earth to students. This article presents a brief synopsis of the play and a brief biography of Henry David Thoreau.

  16. Estimate of thyroid doses for David A. Timothy and June Carrell from Nevada Test Site local fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-10-28

    David A. Timothy and June Rogers Carrell are litigants in Timothy vs US. They allege that their thyroid cancers have resulted from harm from radiation doses received as a result of local fallout from the testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. We have calculated a best estimate of the thyroid dose received by each litigant from external exposure and the ingestion of radionuclides with food. For David Timothy, the dose estimate is 7.8 rads. For June Carrell, it is 2.6 rads. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α, a multifunctional nuclear receptor associated with cardiovascular disease and cholesterol catabolism.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Sanchez, Olga Lidia; Rodriguez, Carmen; Gortares-Moroyoqui, Pablo; Estrada, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of death worldwide, are associated with high plasma cholesterol levels. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids (BAs) accounts for about 50% of total cholesterol elimination from the body. This phenomenon occurs in the liver and is regulated by nuclear receptors such as hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α). Therefore, special emphasis is given to HNF-4α properties and its multifunctional role, particularly in the conversion of cholesterol to BAs. HNF-4α is a highly conserved transcription factor that has the potential capacity to transactivate a vast number of genes, including CYP7 which codes for cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1; EC 1.14.13.17), the rate-limiting enzyme of BA biosynthesis. The fact that HNF-4α transactivation potential can be modulated via phosporylation is of particular interest. Additional findings on structural and functional characteristics of HNF-4α may eventually present alternatives to control the levels of cholesterol in the body and consequently reduce the risk of CVDs. PMID:24848804

  18. Mitochondrial regulation of cancer associated nuclear DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Chenghui; Naito, Akihiro; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Evans, Teresa T.; Douglas, Michael G.; Cooney, Craig A.; Fan Chunyang; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2007-12-21

    The onset and progression of cancer is associated with the methylation-dependent silencing of specific genes, however, the mechanism and its regulation have not been established. We previously demonstrated that reduction of mitochondrial DNA content induces cancer progression. Here we found that mitochondrial DNA-deficient LN{rho}0-8 activates the hypermethylation of the nuclear DNA promoters including the promoter CpG islands of the endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin. These are unmethylated and the corresponding gene products are expressed in the parental LNCaP containing mitochondrial DNA. The absence of mitochondrial DNA induced DNA methyltransferase 1 expression which was responsible for the methylation patterns observed. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase eliminated hypermethylation and expressed gene products in LN{rho}0-8. These studies demonstrate loss or reduction of mitochondrial DNA resulted in the induction of DNA methyltransferase 1, hypermethylation of the promoters of endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin, and reduction of the corresponding gene products.

  19. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  20. Constructibility issues associated with a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.A.

    1981-12-04

    This report contains the text and slide reproductions of a speech on nuclear waste disposal in basalt. The presentation addresses the layout of repository access shafts and subsurface facilities resulting from the conceptual design of a nuclear repository in basalt. The constructibility issues that must be resolved prior to construction are described. (DMC)

  1. David J. Hofmann (1937-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshler, Terry; Butler, James H.; Solomon, Susan; Barnes, John E.; Schnell, Russell C.

    2009-12-01

    David J. Hofmann, a pioneer in stratospheric aerosol and ozone research, passed away in Boulder, Colo., on 11 August 2009. He was 72. Dave, a frequent contributor to AGU publications and meetings, was elected an AGU Fellow in 2006. His long and prolific scientific career was, as he would say, simple in concept: Make a long-term commitment to specific measurements, pay attention to the details, and focus on the important issues that the measurements raise. This is simple in concept yet challenging to maintain in a world of short-term contracts and budgets. That Dave sustained and led key measurement programs through 25 years at the University of Wyoming (UW), in Laramie, and 17 years with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL, which became the Global Monitoring Division (GMD) of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory) in Boulder, speaks volumes about the scientific and societal benefits that have resulted from his work. Most of the measurement programs he initiated, and the instruments he helped develop for them, continue today as testament to the value of his focus and lasting influence.

  2. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  3. Characterization Report for the David Witherspoon Screen Art Site

    SciTech Connect

    Phyllis C. Weaver

    2011-01-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) of Environmental Management (EM) requested the technical assistance of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to characterize a tract of land associated with the David Witherspoon, Incorporated (DWI) Volunteer Equipment and Supply Company (VESC). This tract of land (hereinafter referred to as Screen Arts) is located in the Vestal Community in the 2000-block of Maryville Pike in south Knoxville, Tennessee, as shown in Figure A-1. This tract of land has been used primarily to store salvaged equipment and materials for resale, recycle, or for disposal in the former landfill once operated by DWI. The DWI Site industrial landfill and metal recycling business had been permitted by the Tennessee Division of Radiological Health to accept low-level radiologically contaminated metals. DWI received materials and equipment associated with operations from DOE sites, including those in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. It is likely that items stored at Screen Arts may have contained some residual radiological materials.

  4. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, SOUTH DAIRY BARN IN BACKGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  5. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, SOUTH DAIRY BARN IN BACKGROUND, WITH FIELD IN FOREGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  6. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, LIVING ROOM WITH TIFFANY STAINED GLASS WINDOWS INCLUDING 'FEEDING THE FLAMINGOES,' 'THE FOUR SEASONS,' AND 'THE BATHERS'. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  7. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, CENTRAL COURT WITH PORTRAIT OF TIFFANY BY SOROLLA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  8. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, INTERIOR OF TIFFANY CHAPEL SHOWING STAINED GLASS WINDOW. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  9. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, VIEW OF THE CENTRAL COURT WITH THE FOUNTAIN AND TIFFANY VASES IN NICHES. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  10. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE WITH COLD SPRING HARBOR IN BACKGROUND. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  11. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, TERRACE OVERLOOKING COLD SPRING HARBOR WITH VIEW OF 'TIFFANY TOWER'. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  12. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, 'THE SPRING' ONE OF SEVEN FOUNTAINS ON TIFFANY ESTATE. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  13. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, LIVING ROOM SHOWING LIGHTING FIXTURES OF TIFFANY'S DESIGN. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  14. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE AND BELLTOWER ON FRONT ELEVATION. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  15. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR LOOKING SOUTH AT HEARTH - Longview Farm, Paint-Carpentry-Blacksmith Shop, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  16. Interview With the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, David Wiesner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses David Wiesner, the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, and includes excerpts of an interview with him. Notes that Wiesner's books appeal to the imagination and often use art elements such as scale. Details the winning book, "The Three Pigs." (PM)

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July 1965 BARRACKS (West), Left - BARRACKS (East), Right (Combined into New Barn) - Fort Larned, Barracks (West), Larned, Pawnee County, KS

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July 1965 BARRACKS (West), Left - BARRACKS (East), Right (Combined into New Barn) - Fort Larned, Barracks (East), Larned, Pawnee County, KS

  19. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: David W. Johnson.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is David W. Johnson. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504568

  20. David Florida Laboratory: Support for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumoulin, Jean-Guy; Mamen, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    The comprehensive integration and environmental (including RF) test facilities of the Canadian Space Agency's David Florida Laboratory (CSA)(DFL) were used extensively for the MSAT Program. Following a description of the facilities, the paper outlines their application to the qualification of the two MSAT satellites following an overview of the test plan. Particular emphasis is given to passive intermodulation measurement (PIM) demands, which for the MSAT satellites, contributed to the need to extend the anechoic chamber. The extended chamber was also used for an EMC test and SAR signature test of the RADARSAT satellite. The DFL's facilities are being used for additional aspects of mobile satellite communications. One shielded anechoic Extra High Frequency (EHF) chamber and associated test equipment are employed predominantly for measuring the performance of the IRIDIUM satellites' Engineering Model Gateway Moveable Antennas (EM)(GMA). Other chambers are used for testing aeronautical antennas on behalf of Inmarsat. Still others combine thermal and PIM testing. The paper concludes with a review of the test requirements of evolving satcom missions such as Inmarsat Aero-1.

  1. Several novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identified in skeletal muscle have cytoskeletal associations.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Gavin S; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R W; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  2. Several Novel Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identified in Skeletal Muscle Have Cytoskeletal Associations*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K.; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  3. ACCIDENTS AND UNSCHEDULED EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH NON-NUCLEAR ENERGY RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accidents and unscheduled events associated with non-nuclear energy resources and technology are identified for each step in the energy cycle. Both natural and anthropogenic causes of accidents or unscheduled events are considered. Data concerning these accidents are summarized. ...

  4. Obituary: David Q. Wark, 1918-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillin, Larry Max

    2003-12-01

    David Q. Wark, a research meteorologist at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) and its predecessor organizations for 55 years, died of cancer 30 July 2002. He will be long remembered for his seminal contributions to the weather satellite program. A pioneer in the use of satellite sensors to provide observations of the Earth's environment for application to weather forecasting and atmospheric science, Dr. Wark was noted for his brilliant insights, dedication, and exceptional scientific achievements. He developed many of the theoretical and experimental techniques on which NOAA's current multi- billion-dollar meteorological satellite program is based. In the 1960's and early 1970's, he and his NOAA colleague Donald Hilleary were the motivating force and principal investigators for the first satellite instruments dedicated to sounding the atmosphere for temperature and water-vapor. These instruments included the Satellite Infra-Red Spectrometer (SIRS)-A and -B and the Vertical Temperature Profile Radiometer (VTPR), which were flown on NASA's Nimbus satellites and NOAA's ITOS-D satellites, respectively. With colleague Henry Fleming, he formulated the radiative transfer equation that quantifies the spectral radiances of the Earth and its atmosphere (measured at satellite altitude) and inverted that equation mathematically to infer the atmospheric temperature profile from satellite-based measurements of those radiances. A difficulty they had to overcome was that the mathematical problem is ill-posed, i.e., it admits of an infinite number of solutions. They arrived at a unique solution via an innovative application of a-priori information on the atmospheric state. This work was described in the landmark 1965 Wark and Fleming paper in the American Meteorological Society's Monthly Weather Review. From that early period until just weeks before his death, Dr. Wark continued

  5. Obituary: David Fulmer Bender, 1913-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sylvia L.

    2004-12-01

    David Fulmer Bender died in San Diego, California, on 13 September 2004, at the age of 91. His heart stopped suddenly while he was dancing. His pioneering work in establishing comprehensive, computer-accessible ephemerides of asteroids and comets found many applications, including the first-ever visit to an asteroid, Gaspra, by an interplanetary spacecraft. Dave was born in Reno, Nevada, on 10 February 1913, to Homer Charles Bender and Susan Bowers Bender. The family moved to Spokane, Washington, while Dave was very young. His father was a civil engineer and a graduate of MIT, who helped design bridges and dams throughout the Northwest, including the Grand Coolie Dam. Dave had a brother, Phillip (now deceased), who was one year younger. Advancing rapidly in the Spokane school system, Dave finished high school when he was 15 years old. At 16 he moved to Pasadena, California, and began his studies at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). In addition to pursuing his course work, he was active in track and football, a tendency toward physical exercise that stayed with him for the rest of his life. It was probably during these years that Dave heard a lecture by Albert Einstein, as mentioned to colleagues many years later. Dave received a BS degree in physics in 1933, an MS in 1934, and a PhD in 1937, all from Caltech. His dissertation was entitled, "The Index of Refraction of Air in the Photographic Infrared." During his sophomore year he found his way to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he met his future wife, Elizabeth Boyden at a social gathering. They were married in 1935. Dave's academic career spanned the years from 1937 to 1970, initially at Louisiana State University, Vanderbilt University, and then Fisk. As a life-long pacifist and conscientious objector, Dave served alternate duty during World War II. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the physics department at Whittier College in California, where he became the department chair and

  6. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  7. Nuclear association of cyclin D1 in human fibroblasts: tight binding to nuclear structures and modulation by protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scovassi, A I; Stivala, L A; Rossi, L; Bianchi, L; Prosperi, E

    1997-11-25

    The association of cyclin D1 with nuclear structures was investigated in normal human fibroblasts by using hypotonic detergent extraction procedures, immunofluorescence quantitation with flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis. About 20% of the total cellular levels of cyclin D1 was found to be tightly bound to nuclear structures, being the complex formation resistant to DNase I treatment and to high salt extraction. Maximal levels of the insoluble form of the protein were found in the middle to late G1 phase of the cell cycle. Cell fractionation and immunoprecipitation techniques after in vivo 32P-labeling showed that both soluble and nuclear-bound forms of cyclin D1 were phosphorylated. Both fractions were reactive to an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, while only the latter was detectable with an anti-phosphoserine antibody. Treatment with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, which induces a cell cycle arrest in early G1 phase, strongly reduced cyclin D1 phosphorylation. Concomitantly, the ratio of nuclear-bound/total cyclin D1 levels was reduced by about 60%, compared with the control value. The protein kinase A specific inhibitor isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H-89) induced a similar reduction in the ratio, with no significant modification in the total amount of protein. In contrast, both calphostin C and bisindolylmaleimide, specific inhibitors of protein kinase C, consistently increased by 30-50% the ratio of nuclear-bound/total amount of the cyclin protein. These results suggest that, during the G1 phase, formation of an insoluble complex of cyclin D1 occurs at nuclear matrix structures and that this association is mediated by a protein kinase A-dependent pathway. PMID:9417875

  8. Obituary: David Fulmer Bender, 1913-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sylvia L.

    2004-12-01

    David Fulmer Bender died in San Diego, California, on 13 September 2004, at the age of 91. His heart stopped suddenly while he was dancing. His pioneering work in establishing comprehensive, computer-accessible ephemerides of asteroids and comets found many applications, including the first-ever visit to an asteroid, Gaspra, by an interplanetary spacecraft. Dave was born in Reno, Nevada, on 10 February 1913, to Homer Charles Bender and Susan Bowers Bender. The family moved to Spokane, Washington, while Dave was very young. His father was a civil engineer and a graduate of MIT, who helped design bridges and dams throughout the Northwest, including the Grand Coolie Dam. Dave had a brother, Phillip (now deceased), who was one year younger. Advancing rapidly in the Spokane school system, Dave finished high school when he was 15 years old. At 16 he moved to Pasadena, California, and began his studies at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). In addition to pursuing his course work, he was active in track and football, a tendency toward physical exercise that stayed with him for the rest of his life. It was probably during these years that Dave heard a lecture by Albert Einstein, as mentioned to colleagues many years later. Dave received a BS degree in physics in 1933, an MS in 1934, and a PhD in 1937, all from Caltech. His dissertation was entitled, "The Index of Refraction of Air in the Photographic Infrared." During his sophomore year he found his way to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he met his future wife, Elizabeth Boyden at a social gathering. They were married in 1935. Dave's academic career spanned the years from 1937 to 1970, initially at Louisiana State University, Vanderbilt University, and then Fisk. As a life-long pacifist and conscientious objector, Dave served alternate duty during World War II. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the physics department at Whittier College in California, where he became the department chair and

  9. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  10. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  11. Astronaut David Wolf in medical experiment in SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut David A. Wolf, mission specialist, participates in an experiment that investigates in-space distribution and movement of blood and gas in the pulmonary system. The data gathered during the two-week flight will be compared with results of tests performed on Earth to determine the changes that occur in pulmonary functions.

  12. Fighting for the Past: Lessons from the David Irving Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, A. Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article offers lessons from the David Irving trial. These lessons about Holocaust denial allow educators to identify how deniers violate certain scholarly tenets. This also serves as a safeguard against legitimizing deniers' efforts, while also reinforcing important principles of historical inquiry. (Contains 11 notes.)

  13. David Booth: Drama as a Way of Knowing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Kaila

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how David Booth's ability to elicit both commitment and authenticity in children's creation of improvised dramas distinguishes him as a teacher. Describes various phases and aspects of a drama lesson given to a group of fourth, fifth, and sixth graders that demonstrate his powerful teaching technique called "story-drama." (JD)

  14. From the Ocean's Flotsam, David Wiesner Imagines a Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    David Wiesner's 2007 Caldecott Medal-winning "Flotsam" blends the events of everyday life with the surreal. As he often does in his picture books, Wiesner plays with size and scale, opening "Flotsam" with a full-page illustration of a sand crab and the enormous eye behind it before pulling back on the second page to reveal the creature's actual…

  15. Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

  16. Video from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld

    Cancer.gov

    Video footage from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld on Cancer Epidemiology over the Last Half-Century and Thoughts on the Future. The discussion took place on May 11, 2012, when DCEG hosted Dr. Schottenfeld as a Visiting Scholar.

  17. David Haynes: Chronicler of the African American Middle Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Profiles writer David Haynes, and discusses his four novels (an award-winning young adult book and three novels for the adult market). Concludes that Haynes' success as a novelist is due to his characters, a healthy dose of humor, and his realistic depiction of a wide range of African American characters without resorting to sensationalism or…

  18. Moral philosophers are moral experts! A reply to David Archard.

    PubMed

    Gordon, John-Stewart

    2014-05-01

    In his article 'Why Moral Philosophers Are Not and Should Not Be Moral Experts' David Archard attempts to show that his argument from common-sense morality is more convincing than other competing arguments in the debate. I examine his main line of argumentation and eventually refute his main argument in my reply. PMID:22994530

  19. Can Education Save the World? A Response to David Gruenewald

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stables, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Any commitment to education for sustainability assumes that teaching and learning can reduce or prevent damage to the biosphere. However, such an assumption remains deeply problematic. David Gruenewald's is only one of several possible epistemological positions. This article discusses the variety of such positions, arguing for that which might…

  20. Empowering Adolescent Readers: Intertextuality in Three Novels by David Almond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Don

    2008-01-01

    In "Skellig," "Kit's Wilderness," and "Clay", David Almond employs various types of intertextuality to enrich his narratives. Through the use of allusion, adaptation, collage, and mise-en-abyme, he encourages his adolescent readers to seek out precursor texts and to consider the interrelationships between these texts and his own. By so doing, he…

  1. David Almond's "Skellig": "A New Vista of Contemplation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Susan Louise

    2009-01-01

    The debates that have arisen regarding Darwin's theories of evolution and Christian views of creation and their place in education in the United States have frequently been extremely heated, resulting in trials, hearings, and laws. This article provides an overview of some of the disagreements and illustrates how David Almond's British novel,…

  2. Challenging Texts: Teaching Deliberately--Reading Henry David Thoreau's "Walden"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    One of the more difficult 19th-century American texts for high school students to read is undoubtedly Henry David Thoreau's "Walden." His erudite allusions, often page-long sentences, and sophisticated sense of the ironic initially leave many students cold. Still, the author encourages them to read amid the din of a cultural cacophony that shouts…

  3. Instructional Implications of David C. Geary's Evolutionary Educational Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweller, John

    2008-01-01

    David C. Geary's thesis has the potential to alter our understanding of those aspects of human cognition relevant to instruction. His distinction between biologically primary knowledge that we have evolved to acquire and biologically secondary knowledge that is culturally important, taught in educational institutions and which we have not evolved…

  4. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with David Dockterman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Michael F. Shaughnessy, Contributing Editor of this journal, interviews David Dockterman, Chief Architect, Learning Sciences, at Scholastic Education, where he provides guidance on turning research into practical programs. Dockterman was one of the founders of Tom Snyder Productions, a leading educational software developer and…

  5. Life after Death in Poverty: David Treuer's "Little"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirrup, David

    2005-01-01

    David Treuer's debut novel, "Little" (1995), is set on a Minnesota reservation, centering around a dilapidated housing tract that its small community of residents call "Poverty." Aptly named both for the condition and background of the housing, this name is the first pointer to the type of multifaceted reading that the novel merits. This essay…

  6. On Improving Teacher Effectiveness: A Conversation with David Berliner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Ron

    1982-01-01

    An interview with David Berliner explores his claims that research on teacher effectiveness will only be applied practically when "connoisseurs of teaching" act as teacher coaches, helping teachers to analyze the effects of their behaviors, specify new behaviors, and assess the results. (PGD)

  7. Reflections on the Scholarly Contributions of Professor David H. Jonassen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Lee, Chwee Beng; Hung, Woei

    2013-01-01

    The six papers in this special issue of "Computers and Education" honoring Professor David H. Jonassen are diverse in nature. They also reflect differing interpretations of the implications of Jonassen's work for research and development focused on instructional models and the factors influencing instruction as well as the directions for future…

  8. Grade 1 Students Meet David Wiesner's "Three Pigs."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Describes the oral, written, and visual arts responses of a group of Grade 1 children. Discusses first grade children's understandings of and responses to several Radical Change characteristics and metafictive techniques found in David Wiesner's "The Three Pigs" (2001), the 2002 Randolph Caldecott Medal winner. Explores the nature of the literary…

  9. STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker chats with white room closeout crew members Bob Saulnier (left), Regulo Villalobos and closeout crew leader Travis Thompson prior to entering the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A.

  10. The Sociological Foundations of David Elliott's "Music Matters" Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the ideas presented in the book, "Music Matters (David Elliott)." Discusses Elliott's stance on praxialism, stating that his book is based on social mediation of action as its behavioral theory. Addresses Elliott's concept of expertise and topics using an interactionist perspective as a means of interpretation. (CMK)

  11. Type B lamins remain associated with the integral nuclear envelope protein p58 during mitosis: implications for nuclear reassembly.

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J; Georgatos, S D

    1994-01-01

    p58 (also referred to as the lamin B receptor) is an integral membrane protein of the nuclear envelope known to form a multimeric complex with the lamins and other nuclear proteins during interphase. To examine the fate of this complex during mitosis, we have investigated the partitioning and the molecular interactions of p58 in dividing chicken hepatoma (DU249) cells. Using confocal microscopy and double immunolabelling, we show here that lamins B1 and B2 co-localize with p58 during all phases of mitosis and co-assemble around reforming nuclei. A close juxtaposition of p58/lamin B-containing vesicles and chromosomes is already detectable in metaphase; however, p58 and lamin reassembly proceeds slowly and is completed in late telophase--G1. Flotation of mitotic membranes in sucrose density gradients and analysis of mitotic vesicles by immunoelectron microscopy confirms that p58 and most of the type B lamins reside in the same compartment. Co-immunoprecipitation of both proteins by affinity-purified anti-p58 antibodies shows that they are physically associated in the context of a mitotic p58 'sub-complex'. This sub-assembly does not include the type A lamins which are fully solubilized during mitosis. Our data provide direct, in vivo and in vitro evidence that the majority of type B lamins remain connected to nuclear membrane 'receptors' during mitosis. The implications of these findings in nuclear envelope reassembly are discussed below. Images PMID:8168487

  12. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  13. A new gene mapping resource: Interspecies hybrids between Pere David`s deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus)

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, M.L.; Mathias, H.C.; Penty, J.M.; Hill, D.F.; Fennessy, P.F.; Dodds, K.G.

    1995-03-01

    Three male F{sub 1} hybrids between Pere David`s deer and red deer were mated to red deer to produce 143 backcross calves. The pedigrees are a rare example of a fertile hybrid between evolutionarily divergent species. We examined the use of these families for genetic mapping of evolutionarily conserved (Type I) loci by testing for genetic linkage between five species-specific protein variants and 12 conserved DNA probes. Two probes were homologous, and the remainder syntenic, to the protein coding loci in cattle or humans. Using six restriction enzymes, each DNA probe detected one or more restriction fragments specific to Pere David`s deer. Linkage analyses among the species-specific variants placed the loci into four linkage groups within which linkage between adjacent loci and gene order was supported by a LOD > 3. Southern and protein analysis of LDHA and ALB provided identical segregation data. These linkage groups were consistent with the cattle gene map and provide new information for comparing the gene maps of ruminants, humans and mice. The deer hybrids are an important new resource that can contribute to the comparative analysis of the mammalian genome. 68 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Panel Session on International Perspectives on the Future of Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph C. Perkowski

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Annual Meeting provided an opportunity to exchange viewpoints and consider current information regarding the evolution of selected commercial nuclear power trends worldwide. Within the overall topical context of radiation-related regulation, focus was placed on activities in the United Kingdom, Japan, and the United States, although general global developments were reviewed to some extent. This paper provides the reader with a sense of these activities as described by the authors and presenters: David Bennett (Environmental Agency, United Kingdom), Alan Hanson (AREVA), Shojiro Matsuura (Japan Nuclear Safety Research Association), and Alexander Marion (Nuclear Energy Institute).

  15. Panel session on international perspectives on the future of nuclear power.

    PubMed

    Perkowski, Joseph C

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Annual Meeting provided an opportunity to exchange viewpoints and consider current information regarding the evolution of selected commercial nuclear power trends worldwide. Within the overall topical context of radiation-related regulation, focus was placed on activities in the United Kingdom, Japan, and the United States, although general global developments were reviewed to some extent. This paper provides the reader with a sense of these activities as described by the authors and presenters: David Bennett (Environmental Agency, United Kingdom), Alan Hanson (AREVA), Shojiro Matsuura (Japan Nuclear Safety Research Association), and Alexander Marion (Nuclear Energy Institute). PMID:21399408

  16. Computational image analysis of nuclear morphology associated with various nuclear-specific aging disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Siwon; Wang, Wei; Ribeiro, Alexandrew J.S.; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Gregg, Siobhan Q.; Opresko, Patricia L.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2011-01-01

    Computational image analysis is used in many areas of biological and medical research, but advanced techniques including machine learning remain underutilized. Here, we used automated segmentation and shape analyses, with pre-defined features and with computer generated components, to compare nuclei from various premature aging disorders caused by alterations in nuclear proteins. We considered cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) with an altered nucleoskeletal protein; a mouse model of XFE progeroid syndrome caused by a deficiency of ERCC1-XPF DNA repair nuclease; and patients with Werner syndrome (WS) lacking a functional WRN exonuclease and helicase protein. Using feature space analysis, including circularity, eccentricity, and solidity, we found that XFE nuclei were larger and significantly more elongated than control nuclei. HGPS nuclei were smaller and rounder than the control nuclei with features suggesting small bumps. WS nuclei did not show any significant shape changes from control. We also performed principle component analysis (PCA) and a geometric, contour based metric. PCA allowed direct visualization of morphological changes in diseased nuclei, whereas standard, feature-based approaches required pre-defined parameters and indirect interpretation of multiple parameters. Both methods yielded similar results, but PCA proves to be a powerful pre-analysis methodology for unknown systems. PMID:22127259

  17. Subnuclear associations of the v-myb oncogene product and actin are dependent on ionic strength during nuclear isolation.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, W J; Baluda, M A

    1987-01-01

    The method used to isolate nuclei has a direct effect on the subnuclear association of the v-myb product, p48v-myb, and nuclear actin. Analysis of nuclei subjected to various isolation procedures showed that disruption of native nuclear structure during hypotonic treatment resulted in dissociation of p48v-myb from the nuclear matrix. Images PMID:3670313

  18. DAVID: A new video motion sensor for outdoor perimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    To be effective, a perimeter intrusion detection system must comprise both sensor and rapid assessment components. The use of closed circuit television (CCTV) to provide the rapid assessment capability, makes possible the use of video motion detection (VMD) processing as a system sensor component. Despite it's conceptual appeal, video motion detection has not been widely used in outdoor perimeter systems because of an inability to discriminate between genuine intrusions and numerous environmental effects such as cloud shadows, wind motion, reflections, precipitation, etc. The result has been an unacceptably high false alarm rate and operator work-load. DAVID (Digital Automatic Video Intrusion Detector) utilizes new digital signal processing techniques to achieve a dramatic improvement in discrimination performance thereby making video motion detection practical for outdoor applications. This paper begins with a discussion of the key considerations in implementing an outdoor video intrusion detection system, followed by a description of the DAVID design in light of these considerations.

  19. Magen David Adom--the EMS in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Daniel Y; Sorene, Eliot

    2008-01-01

    Israel is a small country with a population of around 7 million. The sole EMS provider for Israel is Magen David Adom (MDA) (translated as 'Red Shield of David'). MDA also carries out the functions of a National Society (similar to the Red Cross) and provides all the blood and blood product services for the country. Nationwide, the organisation responds to over 1000 emergency calls a day and uses doctors, paramedics, emergency medical technicians and volunteers. Local geopolitics has meant that MDA has to be prepared for anything from everyday emergency calls to suicide bombings and regional wars. MDA also prides itself in being able to rapidly assemble and dispatch mobile aid teams to scenes of international disasters. Such a broad range of activities is unusual for a single EMS organisation. PMID:17767990

  20. STS-86 Mission Specialist David Wolf in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Alliance (USA) orbiter vehicle closeout chief; and closeout team members, in background from left, Jim Davis, NASA quality assurance specialist; and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician. STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground at far left, is awaiting his turn.

  1. David Nelson, MD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. David E Nelson is the Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) Branch in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention. The CPFP is an internationally renowned postdoctoral program designed to train early career scientific researchers and leaders in the field of cancer prevention. Dr. Nelson came to the CPFP in 2008 after working at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta for many years. |

  2. About David Ruelle, After His 80th Birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    This is, with minor modifications, a text read at the 114th Statistical Mechanics meeting, in honor of D. Ruelle and Y. Sinai, at Rutgers, Dec. 13-15, 2015. It does not attempt to analyze, or not even just quote, all works of David Ruelle; I discuss, as usual in such occasions, a few among his works with which I have most familiarity and which were a source of inspiration for me.

  3. The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool: a novel biological module-centric algorithm to functionally analyze large gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Tan, Qina; Collins, Jack R; Alvord, W Gregory; Roayaei, Jean; Stephens, Robert; Baseler, Michael W; Lane, H Clifford; Lempicki, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool uses a novel agglomeration algorithm to condense a list of genes or associated biological terms into organized classes of related genes or biology, called biological modules. This organization is accomplished by mining the complex biological co-occurrences found in multiple sources of functional annotation. It is a powerful method to group functionally related genes and terms into a manageable number of biological modules for efficient interpretation of gene lists in a network context. PMID:17784955

  4. The MUC1 Extracellular Domain Subunit Is Found in Nuclear Speckles and Associates with Spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyadarsina; Ji, Jennifer W.; Martsching, Lindsay; Douglas, Gordon C.

    2012-01-01

    MUC1 is a large transmembrane glycoprotein and oncogene expressed by epithelial cells and overexpressed and underglycosylated in cancer cells. The MUC1 cytoplasmic subunit (MUC1-C) can translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. It is frequently assumed that the MUC1 extracellular subunit (MUC1-N) does not enter the nucleus. Based on an unexpected observation that MUC1 extracellular domain antibody produced an apparently nucleus-associated staining pattern in trophoblasts, we have tested the hypothesis that MUC1-N is expressed inside the nucleus. Three different antibodies were used to identify MUC1-N in normal epithelial cells and tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The results of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses as well as subcellular fractionation, Western blotting, and siRNA/shRNA studies, confirm that MUC1-N is found within nuclei of all cell types examined. More detailed examination of its intranuclear distribution using a proximity ligation assay, subcellular fractionation, and immunoprecipitation suggests that MUC1-N is located in nuclear speckles (interchromatin granule clusters) and closely associates with the spliceosome protein U2AF65. Nuclear localization of MUC1-N was abolished when cells were treated with RNase A and nuclear localization was altered when cells were incubated with the transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). While MUC1-N predominantly associated with speckles, MUC1-C was present in the nuclear matrix, nucleoli, and the nuclear periphery. In some nuclei, confocal microscopic analysis suggest that MUC1-C staining is located close to, but only partially overlaps, MUC1-N in speckles. However, only MUC1-N was found in isolated speckles by Western blotting. Also, MUC1-C and MUC1-N distributed differently during mitosis. These results suggest that MUC1-N translocates to the nucleus where it is expressed in nuclear speckles and that MUC1-N and MUC1-C have

  5. Nuclear lamins are not required for lamina-associated domain organization in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, Mario; van Steensel, Bas

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the nuclear lamina interacts with hundreds of large genomic regions, termed lamina-associated domains (LADs) that are generally in a transcriptionally repressed state. Lamins form the major structural component of the lamina and have been reported to bind DNA and chromatin. Here, we systematically evaluate whether lamins are necessary for the LAD organization in murine embryonic stem cells. Surprisingly, removal of essentially all lamins does not have any detectable effect on the genome-wide interaction pattern of chromatin with emerin, a marker of the inner nuclear membrane. This suggests that other components of the lamina mediate these interactions. PMID:25784758

  6. Nuclear envelope-associated endosomes deliver surface proteins to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chaumet, Alexandre; Wright, Graham D; Seet, Sze Hwee; Tham, Keit Min; Gounko, Natalia V; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis directs molecular cargo along three main routes: recycling to the cell surface, transport to the Golgi apparatus or degradation in endolysosomes. Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) is a bacterial protein that typically traffics to the Golgi and then the endoplasmic reticulum before translocating to the cytosol. Here we show that a substantial fraction of internalized PE is also located in nuclear envelope-associated endosomes (NAE), which display limited mobility, exhibit a propensity to undergo fusion and readily discharge their contents into the nuclear envelope. Electron microscopy and protein trapping in the nucleus indicate that NAE mediate PE transfer into the nucleoplasm. RNAi screening further revealed that NAE-mediated transfer depends on the nuclear envelope proteins SUN1 and SUN2, as well as the Sec61 translocon complex. These data reveal a novel endosomal route from the cell surface to the nucleoplasm that facilitates the accumulation of extracellular and cell surface proteins in the nucleus. PMID:26356418

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2009-09-30

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  8. Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

    2009-11-09

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  9. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis. PMID:27031510

  10. Nucleus accumbens associated 1 is recruited within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body through SUMO modification

    PubMed Central

    Tatemichi, Yoshinori; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Yasuhira, Shinji; Kasai, Shuya; Tada, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yuji; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2015-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens associated 1 (NACC1) is a cancer-associated BTB/POZ (pox virus and zinc finger/bric-a-brac tramtrack broad complex) gene, and is involved in several cellular functions in neurons, cancer and stem cells. Some of the BTB/POZ proteins associated with cancer biology are SUMOylated, which appears to play an important role in transcription regulation. We show that NACC1 is SUMOylated on a phylogenetically conserved lysine (K167) out of three consensus SUMOylation motif sites. Amino acid substitution in the SIM sequence (SIM/M) within the BTB/POZ domain partially reduced K167 SUMOylation activity of NACC1. Overexpression of GFP-NACC1 fusion protein leads to formation of discrete nuclear foci similar to promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NB), which colocalized with SUMO paralogues (SUMO1/2/3). Both NACC1 nuclear body formation and colocalization with SUMO paralogues were completely suppressed in the GFP-NACC1-SIM/M mutant, whereas they were partially maintained in the NACC1 K167R mutant. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that endogenous and exogenous NACC1 proteins colocalized with endogenous PML protein. A pull-down assay revealed that the consensus motifs of the SUMO acceptor site at K167 and the SIM within the BTB/POZ domain were both necessary for efficient binding to PML protein. Our study demonstrates that NACC1 can be modified by SUMO paralogues, and cooperates with PML protein. PMID:25891951

  11. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  12. Characterization of a novel Dp71 dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) present in the nucleus of HeLa cells: Members of the nuclear DAPC associate with the nuclear matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Rodriguez-Munoz, Rafael; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Gonzalez, Everardo; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro . E-mail: bcisnero@cinvestav.mx

    2006-10-01

    Dystrophin is an essential component in the assembly and maintenance of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), which includes members of the dystroglycan, syntrophin, sarcoglycan and dystrobrevin protein families. Distinctive complexes have been described in the cell membrane of different tissues and cultured cells. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of a novel DAPC present in the nuclei of HeLa cells, which contains dystrophin Dp71 as a key component. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation analyses, we found the presence of Dp71, {beta}-sarcoglycan, {beta}-dystroglycan, {alpha}- and {beta}-syntrophin, {alpha}1- and {beta}-dystrobrevin and nNOS in the nuclei of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that most of these proteins form a complex in the nuclear compartment. Next, we analyze the possible association of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix. We found the presence of Dp71, {beta}-dystroglycan, nNOS, {beta}-sarcoglycan, {alpha}/{beta} syntrophin, {alpha}1-dystrobrevin and {beta}-dystrobrevin in the nuclear matrix protein fractions and in situ nuclear matrix preparations from HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that Dp71, {beta}-dystroglycan and {beta}-dystrobrevin co-immunoprecipitated with the nuclear matrix proteins lamin B1 and actin. The association of members of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix indicates that they may work as scaffolding proteins involved in nuclear architecture.

  13. Idealism and romantic patriotism for science - an interview with José Francisco David-Ferreira.

    PubMed

    David-Ferreira, José Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Jose Francisco David-Ferreira is one of the most influential Professors of Cell and Developmental Biology in Portugal. David-Ferreira pioneered the use of electron microscopy in cell biology and experimental embryology. He also paved the way for successive generations of biologists who cross-fertilized the national scientific community. As we discuss briefly below, David-Ferreira is above all a Pedagogue and an Institution builder. PMID:19247950

  14. Nesprin-3, a novel outer nuclear membrane protein, associates with the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Litjens, Sandy H.M.; Kuikman, Ingrid; Tshimbalanga, Ntambua; Janssen, Hans; van den Bout, Iman; Raymond, Karine; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2005-01-01

    Despite their importance in cell biology, the mechanisms that maintain the nucleus in its proper position in the cell are not well understood. This is primarily the result of an incomplete knowledge of the proteins in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) that are able to associate with the different cytoskeletal systems. Two related ONM proteins, nuclear envelope spectrin repeat (nesprin)–1 and –2, are known to make direct connections with the actin cytoskeleton through their NH2-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD). We have now isolated a third member of the nesprin family that lacks an ABD and instead binds to the plakin family member plectin, which can associate with the intermediate filament (IF) system. Overexpression of nesprin-3 results in a dramatic recruitment of plectin to the nuclear perimeter, which is where these two molecules are colocalized with both keratin-6 and -14. Importantly, plectin binds to the integrin α6β4 at the cell surface and to nesprin-3 at the ONM in keratinocytes, suggesting that there is a continuous connection between the nucleus and the extracellular matrix through the IF cytoskeleton. PMID:16330710

  15. Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-06-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

  16. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gedge, L.J.E.; Morrison, E.E.; Blair, G.E.; Walker, J.H. . E-mail: J.H.Walker@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  17. THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIAS ASSOCIATED WITH THORIUM-BASED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FOR PHWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Prichard, Andrew W.; Niehus, Mark T.; Collins, Brian A.; Bathke, Charles G.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Hase, Kevin R.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Robel, Martin; Smith, Brian W.

    2011-07-17

    This paper reports the continued evaluation of the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with thorium based nuclear fuel cycles. Specifically, this paper examines a thorium fuel cycle in which a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) is fueled with mixtures of natural uranium/233U/thorium. This paper uses a PHWR fueled with natural uranium as a base fuel cycle, and then compares material attractiveness of fuel cycles that use 233U/thorium salted with natural uranium. The results include the material attractiveness of fuel at beginning of life (BoL), end of life (EoL), and the number of fuel assemblies required to collect a bare critical mass of plutonium or uranium. This study indicates what is required to render the uranium as having low utility for use in nuclear weapons; in addition, this study estimates the increased number of assemblies required to accumulate a bare critical mass of plutonium that has a higher utility for use in nuclear weapons. This approach identifies that some fuel cycles may be easier to implement the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approach and have a more effective safeguards by design outcome. For this study, approximately one year of fuel is required to be reprocessed to obtain one bare critical mass of plutonium. Nevertheless, the result of this paper suggests that all spent fuel needs to be rigorously safeguarded and provided with high levels of physical protection. This study was performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy /National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA). The methodology and key findings will be presented.

  18. Invariant delineation of nuclear architecture in glioblastoma multiforme for clinical and molecular association.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Borowsky, Alexander; Loss, Leandro; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-04-01

    Automated analysis of whole mount tissue sections can provide insights into tumor subtypes and the underlying molecular basis of neoplasm. However, since tumor sections are collected from different laboratories, inherent technical and biological variations impede analysis for very large datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our objective is to characterize tumor histopathology, through the delineation of the nuclear regions, from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections. Such a representation can then be mined for intrinsic subtypes across a large dataset for prediction and molecular association. Furthermore, nuclear segmentation is formulated within a multi-reference graph framework with geodesic constraints, which enables computation of multidimensional representations, on a cell-by-cell basis, for functional enrichment and bioinformatics analysis. Here, we present a novel method, multi-reference graph cut (MRGC), for nuclear segmentation that overcomes technical variations associated with sample preparation by incorporating prior knowledge from manually annotated reference images and local image features. The proposed approach has been validated on manually annotated samples and then applied to a dataset of 377 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) whole slide images from 146 patients. For the GBM cohort, multidimensional representation of the nuclear features and their organization have identified 1) statistically significant subtypes based on several morphometric indexes, 2) whether each subtype can be predictive or not, and 3) that the molecular correlates of predictive subtypes are consistent with the literature. Data and intermediaries for a number of tumor types (GBM, low grade glial, and kidney renal clear carcinoma) are available at: http://tcga.lbl.gov for correlation with TCGA molecular data. The website also provides an interface for panning and zooming of whole mount tissue sections with/without overlaid segmentation results for quality

  19. Invariant Delineation of Nuclear Architecture in Glioblastoma Multiforme for Clinical and Molecular Association

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Borowsky, Alexander; Loss, Leandro; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Automated analysis of whole mount tissue sections can provide insights into tumor subtypes and the underlying molecular basis of neoplasm. However, since tumor sections are collected from different laboratories, inherent technical and biological variations impede analysis for very large datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our objective is to characterize tumor histopathology, through the delineation of the nuclear regions, from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections. Such a representation can then be mined for intrinsic subtypes across a large dataset for prediction and molecular association. Furthermore, nuclear segmentation is formulated within a multi-reference graph framework with geodesic constraints, which enables computation of multidimensional representations, on a cell-by-cell basis, for functional enrichment and bioinformatics analysis. Here, we present a novel method, Multi-Reference Graph Cut (MRGC), for nuclear segmentation that overcomes technical variations associated with sample preparation by incorporating prior knowledge from manually annotated reference images and local image features. The proposed approach has been validated on manually annotated samples and then applied to a dataset of 377 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) whole slide images from 146 patients. For the GBM cohort, multidimensional representation of the nuclear features and their organization have identified (i) statistically significant subtypes based on several morphometric indices, (ii) whether each subtype can be predictive or not, and (iii) that the molecular correlates of predictive subtypes are consistent with the literature. Data and intermediaries for a number of tumor types (GBM, low grade glial, and kidney renal clear carcinoma) are available at: http://tcga.lbl.gov for correlation with TCGA molecular data. The website also provides an interface for panning and zooming of whole mount tissue sections with/without overlaid segmentation results for

  20. David Hartley's views on Madness: With an introduction by GE Berrios.

    PubMed

    Berrios, G E

    2015-03-01

    The psychiatric aspects of David Hartley's writings have received less attention than the rest of his work. This Classic Text deals with Section VI of his Observations on Man …, namely, the 'Imperfections of the rational Faculty'. Hartley defines madness as an imperfection of reason that can be temporary or enduring. He makes use of his model of mental functioning to differentiate between eight clinical categories of madness, each representing a different pattern of vibrations of the nerves. Hartley developed this model based on Newton's theory of vibrations and, to explain the complexity of mental acts and entities, he combined it with his own version of the mechanism of Association of Ideas borrowed from John Locke. Much work needs to be done to identify the provenance of Hartley's nosology and nosography. PMID:25698690

  1. Association of Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein with Nuclear Structures In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kurg, Reet; Sild, Kristiina; Ilves, Aigi; Sepp, Mari; Ustav, Mart

    2005-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses which have the capacity to establish a persistent infection in mammalian epithelial cells. The papillomavirus E2 protein is a central coordinator of viral gene expression, genome replication, and maintenance. We have investigated the distribution of bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in nuclei of proliferating cells and found that E2 is associated with cellular chromatin. This distribution does not change during the entire cell cycle. The N-terminal transactivation domain, but not the C-terminal DNA-binding domain, of the E2 protein is responsible for this association. The majority of the full-length E2 protein can only be detected in chromatin-enriched fractions but not as a free protein in the nucleus. Limited micrococcal nuclease digestion revealed that the E2 protein partitioned to different chromatin regions. A fraction of the E2 protein was located at nuclear sites that are resistant against nuclease attack, whereas the remaining E2 resided on compact chromatin accessible to micrococcal nuclease. These data suggest that there are two pools of E2 in the cell nucleus: one that localizes on transcriptionally inactive compact chromatin and the other, which compartmentalizes to transcriptionally active nuclear structures of the cell. Our data also suggest that E2 associates with chromatin through cellular protein(s), which in turn is released from chromatin at 0.4 M salt. PMID:16051845

  2. Evidence for LINC1-SUN Associations at the Plant Nuclear Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Sad1/UNC84 (SUN) domain proteins are a highly conserved family of inner nuclear membrane localised proteins in eukaryotes. One of their main functions is as key components of nucleo-cytoskeletal bridging complexes, in which SUN proteins associate with nucleoskeletal elements. In metazoans these are the lamins, which form a supportive structural network termed the lamina. Plants lack sequence homologs of lamins but have a similar nucleoplasmic structural network to support the plant NE. Putative components of this plant lamina-like structure are Little Nuclei (LINC) proteins, which bear structural resemblance to lamins and fulfil similar functions. This work explores the associations between AtLINC1, AtSUN1 and AtSUN2. AtLINC1 is recruited to the NE by SUN proteins and is immobilised therein. This recruitment and the immobile properties are likely due to AtSUN1/2-AtLINC1 protein interactions occurring in planta. In addition, the SUN N-terminus appears to play an important role in mediating these interactions. The associations between AtLINC1 and plant SUN proteins are a first indicator of how the nucleoskeleton may be anchored to the nuclear membrane in plants. Building on the previous characterisation of Klarsicht/Anc1/Syne1 homology (KASH) like proteins in plants, this study advances the identification and characterisation of nucleo-cytoskeletal bridging complexes in plants. PMID:24667841

  3. Association of bovine papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kurg, Reet; Sild, Kristiina; Ilves, Aigi; Sepp, Mari; Ustav, Mart

    2005-08-01

    Papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses which have the capacity to establish a persistent infection in mammalian epithelial cells. The papillomavirus E2 protein is a central coordinator of viral gene expression, genome replication, and maintenance. We have investigated the distribution of bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in nuclei of proliferating cells and found that E2 is associated with cellular chromatin. This distribution does not change during the entire cell cycle. The N-terminal transactivation domain, but not the C-terminal DNA-binding domain, of the E2 protein is responsible for this association. The majority of the full-length E2 protein can only be detected in chromatin-enriched fractions but not as a free protein in the nucleus. Limited micrococcal nuclease digestion revealed that the E2 protein partitioned to different chromatin regions. A fraction of the E2 protein was located at nuclear sites that are resistant against nuclease attack, whereas the remaining E2 resided on compact chromatin accessible to micrococcal nuclease. These data suggest that there are two pools of E2 in the cell nucleus: one that localizes on transcriptionally inactive compact chromatin and the other, which compartmentalizes to transcriptionally active nuclear structures of the cell. Our data also suggest that E2 associates with chromatin through cellular protein(s), which in turn is released from chromatin at 0.4 M salt. PMID:16051845

  4. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1β-Associated Kidney Disease: More than Renal Cysts and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Verhave, Jacobien C; Bech, Anneke P; Wetzels, Jack F M; Nijenhuis, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β)-associated disease is a recently recognized clinical entity with a variable multisystem phenotype. Early reports described an association between HNF1B mutations and maturity-onset diabetes of the young. These patients often presented with renal cysts and renal function decline that preceded the diabetes, hence it was initially referred to as renal cysts and diabetes syndrome. However, it is now evident that many more symptoms occur, and diabetes and renal cysts are not always present. The multisystem phenotype is probably attributable to functional promiscuity of the HNF1β transcription factor, involved in the development of the kidney, urogenital tract, pancreas, liver, brain, and parathyroid gland. Nephrologists might diagnose HNF1β-associated kidney disease in patients referred with a suspected diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, medullary cystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, or CKD of unknown cause. Associated renal or extrarenal symptoms should alert the nephrologist to HNF1β-associated kidney disease. A considerable proportion of these patients display hypomagnesemia, which sometimes mimics Gitelman syndrome. Other signs include early onset diabetes, gout and hyperparathyroidism, elevated liver enzymes, and congenital anomalies of the urogenital tract. Because many cases of this disease are probably undiagnosed, this review emphasizes the clinical manifestations of HNF1β-associated disease for the nephrologist. PMID:26319241

  5. Nuclear envelope-associated dynein cooperates with Eg5 to drive prophase centrosome separation

    PubMed Central

    van Heesbeen, Roy G.H.P.; Raaijmakers, Jonne A.; Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Medema, René H.

    2013-01-01

    Eg5 (kinesin-5) is a highly conserved microtubule motor protein, essential for centrosome separation and bipolar spindle assembly in human cells. Using an “in vitro” evolution approach, we generated human cancer cells that can grow in the complete absence of Eg5 activity. Characterization of these Eg5-independent cells (EICs) led to the identification of a novel pathway for prophase centrosome separation, which depends on nuclear envelope (NE)-associated dynein. Here, we discuss our recent findings and elaborate on the mechanism by which dynein drives centrosome separation. PMID:23713137

  6. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen interacts with bromodomain protein Brd4 on host mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    You, Jianxin; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Denis, Gerald V; Harrington, William J; Ballestas, Mary E; Kaye, Kenneth M; Howley, Peter M

    2006-09-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is required for viral episome maintenance in host cells during latent infection. Two regions of the protein have been implicated in tethering LANA/viral episomes to the host mitotic chromosomes, and LANA chromosome-binding sites are subjects of high interest. Because previous studies had identified bromodomain protein Brd4 as the mitotic chromosome anchor for the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein, which tethers the viral episomes to host mitotic chromosomes (J. You, J. L. Croyle, A. Nishimura, K. Ozato, and P. M. Howley, Cell 117:349-360, 2004, and J. You, M. R. Schweiger, and P. M. Howley, J. Virol. 79:14956-14961, 2005), we examined whether KSHV LANA interacts with Brd4. We found that LANA binds Brd4 in vivo and in vitro and that the binding is mediated by a direct protein-protein interaction between the ET (extraterminal) domain of Brd4 and a carboxyl-terminal region of LANA previously implicated in chromosome binding. Brd4 associates with mitotic chromosomes throughout mitosis and demonstrates a strong colocalization with LANA and the KSHV episomes on host mitotic chromosomes. Although another bromodomain protein, RING3/Brd2, binds to LANA in a similar fashion in vitro, it is largely excluded from the mitotic chromosomes in KSHV-uninfected cells and is partially recruited to the chromosomes in KSHV-infected cells. These data identify Brd4 as an interacting protein for the carboxyl terminus of LANA on mitotic chromosomes and suggest distinct functional roles for the two bromodomain proteins RING3/Brd2 and Brd4 in LANA binding. Additionally, because Brd4 has recently been shown to have a role in transcription, we examined whether Brd4 can regulate the CDK2 promoter, which can be transactivated by LANA. PMID:16940503

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen induction by hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Veeranna, Ravindra P; Haque, Muzammel; Davis, David A; Yang, Min; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) play an important role in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) life cycle. In particular, hypoxia can activate lytic replication of KSHV and specific lytic genes, including the replication and transcription activator (RTA), while KSHV infection in turn can increase the levels and activity of HIFs. In the present study, we show that hypoxia increases the levels of mRNAs encoding KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines and also increases the levels of LANA protein. Luciferase reporter assays in Hep3B cells revealed a moderate activation of the LANA promoter region by hypoxia as well as by cotransfection with degradation-resistant HIF-1α or HIF-2α expression plasmids. Computer analysis of a 1.2-kb sequence upstream of the LANA translational start site identified six potential hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE). Sequential deletion studies revealed that much of this activity was mediated by one of these HREs (HRE 4R) oriented in the 3' to 5' direction and located between the constitutive (LTc) and RTA-inducible (LTi) mRNA start sites. Site-directed mutation of this HRE substantially reduced the response to both HIF-1α and HIF-2α in a luciferase reporter assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated binding of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α to this region. Also, HIF-1α was found to associate with RTA, and HIFs enhanced the activation of LTi by RTA. These results provide evidence that hypoxia and HIFs upregulate both latent and lytic KSHV replication and play a central role in the life cycle of this virus. PMID:22090111

  8. Potential advantages associated with implementing a risk-based inspection program by a nuclear facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Alexander, III; Balkey, Kenneth R.

    1995-05-01

    The current inservice inspection activities at a U.S. nuclear facility are based upon the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The Code selects examination locations based upon a sampling criteria which includes component geometry, stress, and usage among other criteria. This can result in a significant number of required examinations. As a result of regulatory action each nuclear facility has conducted probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) or individual plant examinations (IPE), producing plant specific risk-based information. Several initiatives have been introduced to apply this new plant risk information. Among these initiatives is risk-based inservice inspection. A code case has been introduced for piping inspections based upon this new risk- based technology. This effort brought forward to the ASME Section XI Code committee, has been initiated and championed by the ASME Research Task Force on Risk-Based Inspection Guidelines -- LWR Nuclear Power Plant Application. Preliminary assessments associated with the code case have revealed that potential advantages exist in a risk-based inservice inspection program with regard to a number of exams, risk, personnel exposure, and cost.

  9. Super-resolution imaging of nuclear import of adeno-associated virus in live cells.

    PubMed

    Kelich, Joseph M; Ma, Jiong; Dong, Biao; Wang, Qizhao; Chin, Mario; Magura, Connor M; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been developed as a promising human gene therapy vector. Particularly, recombinant AAV vector (rAAV) achieves its transduction of host cells by crossing at least three physiological barriers including plasma membrane, endosomal membrane, and nuclear envelope (NE). So far, the AAV transduction mechanism has not been explored thoroughly at the single viral particle level. In this study, we employed high-speed super-resolution single-point edge-excitation sub-diffraction (SPEED) microscopy to map the events of single rAAV2 particles infecting live human cells with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of 9-12 nm and 2-20 ms. Data reveal that rAAV2 particles are imported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) rather than nuclear membrane budding into the nucleus. Moreover, approximately 17% of the rAAV2 molecules starting from the cytoplasm successfully transverse the NPCs to reach the nucleoplasm, revealing that the NPCs act as a strict selective step for AAV delivery. This study lastly suggests a new pathway to improve AAV vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:26665132

  10. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Paert

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induces apoptosis in epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARD domain of AIRE is sufficient for apoptosis induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induced apoptosis involves GAPDH translocation to the nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deprenyl inhibits AIRE induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  11. Super-resolution imaging of nuclear import of adeno-associated virus in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelich, Joseph M; Ma, Jiong; Dong, Biao; Wang, Qizhao; Chin, Mario; Magura, Connor M; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been developed as a promising human gene therapy vector. Particularly, recombinant AAV vector (rAAV) achieves its transduction of host cells by crossing at least three physiological barriers including plasma membrane, endosomal membrane, and nuclear envelope (NE). So far, the AAV transduction mechanism has not been explored thoroughly at the single viral particle level. In this study, we employed high-speed super-resolution single-point edge-excitation sub-diffraction (SPEED) microscopy to map the events of single rAAV2 particles infecting live human cells with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of 9–12 nm and 2–20 ms. Data reveal that rAAV2 particles are imported through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) rather than nuclear membrane budding into the nucleus. Moreover, approximately 17% of the rAAV2 molecules starting from the cytoplasm successfully transverse the NPCs to reach the nucleoplasm, revealing that the NPCs act as a strict selective step for AAV delivery. This study lastly suggests a new pathway to improve AAV vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:26665132

  12. STS-86 Mission Specialist David Wolf suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf gets assistance from a suit technician while donning his orange launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Wolfs second flight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the rest of the STS-86 crew. Wolf is expected to live and work aboard the Russian space station for about four months.

  13. The Greening of the David L. Lawrence Pittsburgh Convention Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The David L. Lawrence Convention Center is the largest Gold LEED NC (new construction) certified convention center in the USA and the first of its kind in the world. The designation has been awarded by the United States Green Building Council through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. In this talk we discuss the unique green properties of this 1.5 million square foot Convention Center including the design and use of daylight, natural ventilation and other sustainable design and practices. No other building the size of the Convention Center (1.5 million square feet), uses natural ventilation or can illuminate an exhibition hall entirely through its windows and skylights. Approximately 75% of the convention center's exhibition space is lit by natural daylight. The use of natural ventilation and extensive day lighting is designed to reduce energy consumption by nearly 35% compared to traditional ventilated and lit buildings of a similar size.

  14. Astronaut David Brown talks with team members from South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown looks over the robot named 'L'il Max' with members of the team The Bot Kickers! from Northwestern High School, Rock Hill, S.C. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  15. Astronaut David Brown poses with ComBBat team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown poses with members of the team known as ComBBat, representing Central Florida's Astronaut and Titusville high schools. ComBBat was teamed with Boeing at KSC and Brevard Community College. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  16. Astronaut David Brown talks to FIRST team members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown talks with FIRST team members, Baxter Bomb Squad, from Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home, Ariz., during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  17. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy-electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. PMID:27254595

  18. Anhydrobiosis-Associated Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in the Sleeping Chironomid: Linkage with Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions (4He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3–4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  19. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  20. Building Consensus toward a Shared Purpose: A Profile of President David Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The author presents a profile of APPA president David Gray. One might say that David Gray's path into higher education facilities management was anything but traditional. Today, Gray is the assistant vice president of facilities services at Middle Tennessee State University. His professional career, however, actually began in banking. In 1993 he…

  1. 77 FR 67725 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Michelangelo's David Apollo”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Michelangelo's David Apollo'' SUMMARY... object to be included in the exhibition ``Michelangelo's David Apollo,'' imported from abroad for... display of the exhibit object at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, from on or about December...

  2. 78 FR 38363 - David A. Ruben, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration David A. Ruben, M.D.; Decision and Order On February 7, 2011, the Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Diversion Control, Drug Enforcement Administration, issued an Order to Show Cause to David A. Ruben, M.D....

  3. Evaluating Home Visitation: A Case Study of Evaluation at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Kay E.

    2005-01-01

    David Packard, chairman of the board of trustees of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and an engineer by training and profession, was personally steeped in scientific method and committed to the belief that public resources should be invested in programs on the basis of evidence. He extended this standard to the foundation's investments and…

  4. Discussion of David Thissen's Bad Questions: An Essay Involving Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Howard

    2016-01-01

    The usual role of a discussant is to clarify and correct the paper being discussed, but in this case, the author, Howard Wainer, generally agrees with everything David Thissen says in his essay, "Bad Questions: An Essay Involving Item Response Theory." This essay expands on David Thissen's statement that there are typically two principal…

  5. A Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities at Teachers College: David Eugene Smith's Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Diane R.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a history of David Eugene Smith's collection of historical books, manuscripts, portraits, and instruments related to mathematics. The study analyzes surviving documents, images, objects, college announcements and catalogs, and secondary sources related to Smith's collection. David Eugene Smith (1860-1944) travelled…

  6. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

  7. Modulation of Cellular and Viral Gene Expression by the Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Rolf; Barry, Chris; Dittmer, Dirk; Compitello, Nicole; Brown, Patrick O.; Ganem, Don

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also called human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), is the likely etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma. Common to these malignancies is that tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV. Viral gene expression is limited to a few genes, one of which is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), the product of ORF73. Examination of the primary sequence of LANA reveals some structural features reminiscent of transcription factors, leading us to hypothesize that LANA may regulate viral and cellular transcription during latency. In reporter gene-based transient transfection assays, we found that LANA can have either positive or negative effects on gene expression. While expression of a reporter gene from several synthetic promoters was increased in the presence of LANA, expression from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat (LTR)—and from NF-κB-dependent reporter genes—was reduced by LANA expression. In addition, the promoter of KSHV ORF73 itself is activated up to 5.5-fold by LANA. This autoregulation may be important in tumorigenesis, because two other genes (v-cyclin and v-FLIP) with likely roles in cell growth and survival are also controlled by this element. To identify cellular genes influenced by LANA, we employed cDNA array-based expression profiling. Six known genes (and nine expressed sequence tags) were found to be upregulated in LANA-expressing cell lines. One of these, Staf-50, is known to inhibit expression from the HIV LTR; most of the other known genes are interferon inducible, although the interferon genes themselves were not induced by LANA. These data demonstrate that LANA expression has effects on cellular and viral gene expression. We suggest that, whether direct or indirect in origin, these effects may play important roles in the pathobiology of KSHV infection. PMID:11119614

  8. Methylated TRF2 associates with the nuclear matrix and serves as a potential biomarker for cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Taylor R H; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2014-04-01

    Methylation of N-terminal arginines of the shelterin component TRF2 is important for cellular proliferation. While TRF2 is found at telomeres, where it plays an essential role in maintaining telomere integrity, little is known about the cellular localization of methylated TRF2. Here we report that the majority of methylated TRF2 is resistant to extraction by high salt buffer and DNase I treatment, indicating that methylated TRF2 is tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. We show that methylated TRF2 drastically alters its nuclear staining as normal human primary fibroblast cells approach and enter replicative senescence. This altered nuclear staining, which is found to be overwhelmingly associated with misshapen nuclei and abnormal nuclear matrix folds, can be suppressed by hTERT and it is barely detectable in transformed and cancer cell lines. We find that dysfunctional telomeres and DNA damage, both of which are potent inducers of cellular senescence, promote the altered nuclear staining of methylated TRF2, which is dependent upon the ATM-mediated DNA damage response. Collectively, these results suggest that the altered nuclear staining of methylated TRF2 may represent ATM-mediated nuclear structural alteration associated with cellular senescence. Our data further imply that methylated TRF2 can serve as a potential biomarker for cellular senescence. PMID:24721747

  9. Americium and plutonium association with magnesium hydroxide colloids in alkaline nuclear industry process environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Zoe; Ivanov, Peter; O'Brien, Luke; Sims, Howard; Taylor, Robin J.; Heath, Sarah L.; Livens, Francis R.; Goddard, David; Kellet, Simon; Rand, Peter; Bryan, Nick D.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviours of Pu, Am and colloids in feed solutions to the Site Ion-exchange Effluent Plant (SIXEP) at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing site in the U.K. have been studied. For both Pu and Am, fractions were found to be associated with material in the colloidal size range, with ˜50% of the Pu in the range 1-200 nm. The concentration of soluble Pu (<1 nm) was ˜1 nM, which is very similar to the solubility limit for Pu(V). The soluble Am concentration was of the order of 10-11 M, which was below the solubility limit of americium hydroxide. The size, morphology and elemental composition of the particulates and colloids in the feed solutions were investigated. Magnesium is homogeneously distributed throughout the particles, whereas U, Si, Fe, and Ca were present in localised areas only. Amongst some heterogeneous material, particles were identified that were consistent with hydrotalcite. The distribution of 241Am(III) on brucite (magnesium hydroxide) colloids of different sizes was studied under alkaline conditions representative of nuclear fuel storage pond and effluent feed solution conditions. The morphology of the brucite particles in the bulk material observed by ESEM was predominantly hexagonal, while that of the carbonated brucite consisted of hexagonal species mixed with platelets. The association of 241Am(III) with the brucite colloids was studied by ultrafiltration coupled with gamma ray-spectrometry. For carbonate concentrations up to 10-3 M, the 241Am(III) was mainly associated with larger colloids (>300 kDa), and there was a shift from the smaller size fractions to the larger over a period of 6 months. At higher carbonate concentrations (10-2 M), the Am was predominantly detected in the true solution fraction (<3 kDa) and in smaller size colloidal fractions, in the range 3-100 kDa.

  10. A novel role for the nuclear membrane protein emerin in association of the centrosome to the outer nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Salpingidou, Georgia; Smertenko, Andrei; Hausmanowa-Petrucewicz, Irena; Hussey, Patrick J.; Hutchison, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    The type II inner nuclear membrane protein emerin is a component of the LINC complex that connects the nuclear lamina to the actin cytoskeleton. In emerin-null or -deficient human dermal fibroblasts we find that the centrosome is detached from the nucleus. Moreover, following siRNA knockdown of emerin in wild-type fibroblasts, the centrosome also becomes detached from the nucleus. We show that emerin interacts with tubulin, and that nocadozole-treated wild-type cells phenocopy the detached centrosome characteristic of emerin-null/deficient cells. We also find that a significant fraction of emerin is located at the outer nuclear membrane and peripheral ER, where it interacts directly with the centrosome. Our data provide the first evidence in mammalian cells as to the nature of the linkage of the centrosome, and therefore the tubulin cytoskeleton, with the outer nuclear membrane. PMID:17785515

  11. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  12. Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) Promotes the Nuclear Import of p73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Wu, Shengnan

    2011-01-01

    p73 has been identified as a structural and functional homolog of the tumor suppressor p53. However, mechanisms that regulate the localization of p73 have not been fully clarified. The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional coactivator. As a transcriptional coactivator, YAP needs to bind transcription factors to stimulate gene expression. p73 is a reported YAP target transcription factors and YAP has been shown to positively regulate p73 in promoting apoptosis. Previous studies show that p73 interacts with YAP through its PPPY motif, and increases p73 transactivation of apoptotic genes. In this study, we focused on YAP's regulation of the localization of p73. After transient transfection into Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and Human embryonic kidney 293T cells with GFP-YAP and/or YFP-p73, and incubated for 24 hours expression. p73 was fused to YFP to allow the examination of its subcellular localization. When expressed alone, YFP-p73 was distributed throughout the cell. When coexpressed with YAP, nuclear accumulation of YFP-p73 became evident. We quantitated the effect of YAP on the redistribution of YFP-p73 by counting cells with nuclear-only YFP signal. We found that YAP can influence the subcellular distribution of p73. Altogether, coexpression with YAP affected the subcellular distribution of the p73 protein. Our studies attribute a central role to YAP in regulating p73 accumulation and YAP, at least in part, might promote the nuclear import of p73.

  13. Likelihood-based association analysis for nuclear families and unrelated subjects with missing genotype data.

    PubMed

    Dudbridge, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Missing data occur in genetic association studies for several reasons including missing family members and uncertain haplotype phase. Maximum likelihood is a commonly used approach to accommodate missing data, but it can be difficult to apply to family-based association studies, because of possible loss of robustness to confounding by population stratification. Here a novel likelihood for nuclear families is proposed, in which distinct sets of association parameters are used to model the parental genotypes and the offspring genotypes. This approach is robust to population structure when the data are complete, and has only minor loss of robustness when there are missing data. It also allows a novel conditioning step that gives valid analysis for multiple offspring in the presence of linkage. Unrelated subjects are included by regarding them as the children of two missing parents. Simulations and theory indicate similar operating characteristics to TRANSMIT, but with no bias with missing data in the presence of linkage. In comparison with FBAT and PCPH, the proposed model is slightly less robust to population structure but has greater power to detect strong effects. In comparison to APL and MITDT, the model is more robust to stratification and can accommodate sibships of any size. The methods are implemented for binary and continuous traits in software, UNPHASED, available from the author. PMID:18382088

  14. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. PMID:22705584

  15. Environmental problems associated with decommissioning the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond.

    PubMed

    Oskolkov, B Ya; Bondarkov, M D; Gaschak, S P; Maksymenko, A M; Maksymenko, V M; Martynenko, V I; Farfán, E B; Jannik, G T; Marra, J C

    2010-11-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities associated with residual radioactive contamination of their territories is an imperative issue. Significant problems may result from decommissioning of cooling ponds with residual radioactive contamination. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond is one of the largest self-contained water reservoirs in the Chernobyl region and Ukrainian and Belorussian Polesye region. The 1986 ChNPP Reactor Unit Number Four significantly contaminated the ChNPP Cooling Pond. The total radionuclide inventory in the ChNPP Cooling Pond bottom deposits are as follows: ¹³⁷Cs: 16.28 ± 2.59 TBq; ⁹⁰Sr: 2.4 ± 0.48 TBq; and ²³⁹+²⁴⁰Pu: 0.00518 ± 0.00148 TBq. The ChNPP Cooling Pond is inhabited by over 500 algae species and subspecies, over 200 invertebrate species, and 36 fish species. The total mass of the living organisms in the ChNPP Cooling Pond is estimated to range from about 60,000 to 100,000 tons. The territory adjacent to the ChNPP Cooling Pond attracts many birds and mammals (178 bird species and 47 mammal species were recorded in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone). This article describes several options for the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning and environmental problems associated with its decommissioning. The article also provides assessments of the existing and potential exposure doses for the shoreline biota. For the 2008 conditions, the estimated total dose rate values were 11.4 40 μGy h⁻¹ for amphibians, 6.3 μGy h⁻¹ for birds, 15.1 μGy h⁻¹ for mammals, and 10.3 μGy h⁻¹ for reptiles, with the recommended maximum dose rate being equal to 40 μGy h⁻¹. However, drying the ChNPP Cooling Pond may increase the exposure doses to 94.5 μGy h⁻¹ for amphibians, 95.2 μGy h⁻¹ for birds, 284.0 μGy h⁻¹ for mammals, and 847.0 μGy h⁻¹ for reptiles. All of these anticipated dose rates exceed the recommended values. PMID:20938234

  16. Sir David Brewster's changing ideas on the plurality of worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asúa, Miguel

    2006-06-01

    In the course of his long life the Scottish physicist David Brewster wrote copiously about the plurality of worlds. More Worlds than One (1854), perhaps his strongest statement on the question, was written as an answer to William Whewell's On the Plurality of Worlds (1853), which argued that life was a privilege of the Earth. Brewster's ideas changed drastically along the years in many crucial issues such as the habitability of the Sun and the Moon, the possibility that extraterrestrials could be different from humans, and the occupation of the Earth by intelligent races in the distant past. This paper succinctly surveys Brewster's main lines of thought about the plurality of worlds underlining the significance of his first two articles devoted exclusively to this topic. They were published in 1838 in The Monthly Chronicle, and affirm the habitability of the planets while denying that of the Moon. As is the case with many Victorian scientists, belief in pluralism was for Brewster part and parcel of a complex of ideas and attitudes in which it is hard to distinguish science from religion. I shall argue that a fair number of the shifting opinions and inconsistencies detectable in Brewster's ideas on the plurality of worlds can be attributed to the fact that these were used as pliable apologetic instruments in his scientific writings, many of which are permeated by strong religious concerns.

  17. David Malament and the Conventionality of Simultaneity: A Reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünbaum, Adolf

    2010-10-01

    In 1977, David Malament proved the valuable technical result that the simultaneity relation of standard synchrony ɛ=1/2 with respect to an inertial observer O is uniquely definable in terms of the relation κ of causal connectibility. And he claimed that this definability undermines my own version of the conventionality of metrical simultaneity within an inertial frame. But Malament’s proof depends on the imposition of several supposedly “innocuous” constraints on any candidate for the simultaneity relation relative to O. Relying on Allen I. Janis’s 1983 challenge to one of these constraints, I argue that Malament’s technical result did not undermine my philosophical construal of the ontological status of relative metrical simultaneity. Furthermore, I show that (a) Michael Friedman’s peremptorily substantivalist critique of my conception, which Malament endorses, is ill-founded, and (b) if Malament had succeeded in discrediting my own conventionalist version of metrical simultaneity, he would likewise have invalidated Einstein’s pioneering version of it.

  18. Reconstructing apology: David Cameron's Bloody Sunday apology in the press.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Andrew; Lyons, Evanthia; Pehrson, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    While there is an acknowledgement in apology research that political apologies are highly mediated, the process of mediation itself has lacked scrutiny. This article suggests that the idea of reconstruction helps to understand how apologies are mediated and evaluated. David Cameron's apology for Bloody Sunday is examined to see how he constructs four aspects of apology: social actors, consequences, categorization, and reasons. The reconstruction of those aspects by British, Unionist, and Nationalist press along with reconstructions made by soldiers in an online forum are considered. Data analysis was informed by thematic analysis and discourse analysis which helped to explore key aspects of reconstruction and how elements of Cameron's apology are altered in subsequent mediated forms of the apology. These mediated reconstructions of the apology allowed their authors to evaluate the apology in different ways. Thus, in this article, it is suggested that the evaluation of the apology by different groups is preceded by a reconstruction of it in accordance with rhetorical goals. This illuminates the process of mediation and helps to understand divergent responses to political apologies. PMID:24286526

  19. Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-associated molecular signature predicts lung cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhongqing; Zhou, Tong; Gurguis, Christopher I.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wen, Qing; Lv, Jingzhu; Fang, Fang; Hecker, Louise; Cress, Anne E.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Donna D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), a transcription factor also known as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a key cytoprotective gene that regulates critical antioxidant and stress-responsive genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic target and useful biomarker in malignant disease. We hypothesized that NFE2L2-mediated gene expression would reflect cancer severity and progression. We conducted a meta-analysis of microarray data for 240 NFE2L2-mediated genes that were enriched in tumor tissues. We then developed a risk scoring system based on NFE2L2 gene expression profiling and designated 50 tumor-associated genes as the NFE2L2-associated molecular signature (NAMS). We tested the relationship between this gene expression signature and both recurrence-free survival and overall survival in lung cancer patients. We find that NAMS predicts clinical outcome in the training cohort and in 12 out of 20 validation cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regressions indicate that NAMS is a robust prognostic gene signature, independent of other clinical and pathological factors including patient age, gender, smoking, gene alteration, MYC level, and cancer stage. NAMS is an excellent predictor of recurrence-free survival and overall survival in human lung cancer. This gene signature represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human lung cancer. PMID:26596768

  20. Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-associated molecular signature predicts lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhongqing; Zhou, Tong; Gurguis, Christopher I; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wen, Qing; Lv, Jingzhu; Fang, Fang; Hecker, Louise; Cress, Anne E; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Donna D; Garcia, Joe G N; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), a transcription factor also known as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a key cytoprotective gene that regulates critical antioxidant and stress-responsive genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic target and useful biomarker in malignant disease. We hypothesized that NFE2L2-mediated gene expression would reflect cancer severity and progression. We conducted a meta-analysis of microarray data for 240 NFE2L2-mediated genes that were enriched in tumor tissues. We then developed a risk scoring system based on NFE2L2 gene expression profiling and designated 50 tumor-associated genes as the NFE2L2-associated molecular signature (NAMS). We tested the relationship between this gene expression signature and both recurrence-free survival and overall survival in lung cancer patients. We find that NAMS predicts clinical outcome in the training cohort and in 12 out of 20 validation cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regressions indicate that NAMS is a robust prognostic gene signature, independent of other clinical and pathological factors including patient age, gender, smoking, gene alteration, MYC level, and cancer stage. NAMS is an excellent predictor of recurrence-free survival and overall survival in human lung cancer. This gene signature represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human lung cancer. PMID:26596768

  1. Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

    1999-11-01

    Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

  2. A case of anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 antibody positive myopathy associated with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shin; Unoda, Ki-Ichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Ikeda, Soichiro; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-08-31

    Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are associated with myositis. Anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP-2) antibody was recently identified as a major MSA and was observed mostly in juvenile dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who presented with myopathy with anti-NXP-2 antibody and large cell carcinoma of the lung. He was hospitalized because of myalgia and edema of limbs. Neurological examination revealed mild proximal-dominant weakness in all four extremities, and laboratory studies showed elevated creatine kinase level (6,432 IU/l). Needle electromyography showed myogenic patterns. MRI of the lower limbs demonstrated inflammatory lesions in the thighs. Biopsied specimen from the left quadriceps femoris muscle showed mild mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate surrounding muscle fibres but no fiber necrosis. He was diagnosed with myopathy based on neurological examinations and clinical symptoms. His chest X-ray and CT showed tumor shadow on the right upper lung field, but CT didn't indicate the findings of interstitial lung disease. This was surgically removed, and a histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer was suspected. He was also treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy before and after operation. His symptoms of myopathy promptly remitted with the preoperative chemotherapy. His serum analysis was positive for the anti-NXP-2. Further investigation and experience of MSAs are necessary to evaluate the therapeutic strategy against cancer-associated myopathy/myositis. PMID:27477574

  3. Senescent cells develop a PARP-1 and nuclear factor-κB-associated secretome (PNAS)

    PubMed Central

    Ohanna, Mickaël; Giuliano, Sandy; Bonet, Caroline; Imbert, Véronique; Hofman, Véronique; Zangari, Joséphine; Bille, Karine; Robert, Caroline; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Hofman, Paul; Rocchi, Stéphane; Peyron, Jean-François; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Bertolotto, Corine

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma cells can enter the process of senescence, but whether they express a secretory phenotype, as reported for other cells, is undetermined. This is of paramount importance, because this secretome can alter the tumor microenvironment and the response to chemotherapeutic drugs. More generally, the molecular events involved in formation of the senescent-associated secretome have yet to be determined. We reveal here that melanoma cells experiencing senescence in response to diverse stimuli, including anti-melanoma drugs, produce an inflammatory secretory profile, where the chemokine ligand-2 (CCL2) acts as a critical effector. Thus, we reveal how senescence induction might be involved in therapeutic failure in melanoma. We further provide a molecular relationship between senescence induction and secretome formation by revealing that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling cascade, activated during senescence, drives the formation of a secretome endowed with protumoral and prometastatic properties. Our findings also point to the existence of the PARP-1 and NF-κB-associated secretome, termed the PNAS, in nonmelanoma cells. Most importantly, inhibition of PARP-1 or NF-κB prevents the proinvasive properties of the secretome. Collectively, identification of the PARP-1/NF-κB axis in secretome formation opens new avenues for therapeutic intervention against cancers. PMID:21646373

  4. An association between RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and ARTS-1 regulates extracellular TNFR1 release

    SciTech Connect

    Adamik, Barbara; Islam, Aminul; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Hawari, Feras I.; Zhang Jing; Levine, Stewart J.

    2008-07-04

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released to the extracellular space by two mechanisms, the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. Both pathways appear to be regulated by an interaction between TNFR1 and ARTS-1 (aminopeptidase regulator of TNFR1 shedding). Here, we sought to identify ARTS-1-interacting proteins that modulate TNFR1 release. Co-immunoprecipitation identified an association between ARTS-1 and RBMX (RNA-binding motif gene, X chromosome), a 43-kDa heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. RNA interference attenuated RBMX expression, which reduced both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible proteolytic cleavage of soluble TNFR1 ectodomains. Reciprocally, over-expression of RBMX increased TNFR1 exosome-like vesicle release and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible shedding of TNFR1 ectodomains. This identifies RBMX as an ARTS-1-associated protein that regulates both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains.

  5. DAVID--a translucent multi-wire transmission ionization chamber for in vivo verification of IMRT and conformal irradiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Poppe, B; Thieke, C; Beyer, D; Kollhoff, R; Djouguela, A; Rühmann, A; Willborn, K C; Harder, D

    2006-03-01

    Permanent in vivo verification of IMRT photon beam profiles by a radiation detector with spatial resolution, positioned on the radiation entrance side of the patient, has not been clinically available so far. In this work we present the DAVID system, which is able to perform this quality assurance measurement while the patient is treated. The DAVID system is a flat, multi-wire transmission-type ionization chamber, placed in the accessory holder of the linear accelerator and constructed from translucent materials in order not to interfere with the light field. Each detection wire of the chamber is positioned exactly in the projection line of a MLC leaf pair, and the signal of each wire is proportional to the line integral of the ionization density along this wire. Thereby, each measurement channel essentially presents the line integral of the ionization density over the opening width of the associated leaf pair. The sum of all wire signals is a measure of the dose-area product of the transmitted photon beam and of the total radiant energy administered to the patient. After the dosimetric verification of an IMRT plan, the values measured by the DAVID system are stored as reference values. During daily treatment the signals are re-measured and compared to the reference values. A warning is output if there is a deviation beyond a threshold. The error detection capability is a leaf position error of less than 1 mm for an isocentric 1 cm x 1 cm field, and of 1 mm for an isocentric 20 cm x 20 cm field. PMID:16481690

  6. Midwest Nuclear Training Association Annual Nuclear Instructors' Workshop (4th, Columbus, Ohio, October 16-18, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document reports the proceedings of a national workshop designed to provide nuclear trainers from the electric power industry with an opportunity to expand and improve their knowledge and skills in the development and implementation of effective training programs. The following papers are included: "Developing Positive Worker Behaviors:…

  7. The Nuclear Receptor, Nor-1, Induces the Physiological Responses Associated With Exercise.

    PubMed

    Goode, Joel M; Pearen, Michael A; Tuong, Zewen K; Wang, Shu-Ching M; Oh, Tae Gyu; Shao, Emily X; Muscat, George E O

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle remodels metabolic capacity, contractile and exercise phenotype in response to physiological demands. This adaptive remodeling response to physical activity can ameliorate/prevent diseases associated with poor diet and lifestyle. Our previous work demonstrated that skeletal muscle-specific transgenic expression of the neuron-derived orphan nuclear receptor, Nor-1 drives muscle reprogramming, improves exercise endurance, and oxidative metabolism. The current manuscript investigates the association between exercise, Nor-1 expression and the role of Nor-1 in adaptive remodeling. We demonstrate that Nor-1 expression is induced by exercise and is dependent on calcium/calcineurin signaling (in vitro and in vivo). Analysis of fatigue-resistant transgenic mice that express Nor-1 in skeletal muscle revealed increased hypertrophy and vascularization of muscle tissue. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic Nor-1 expression is associated with increased intracellular recycling, ie, autophagy, involving 1) increased expression of light chain 3A or LC3A-II, autophagy protein 5, and autophagy protein 12 in quadriceps femoris muscle extracts from Tg-Nor-1 (relative to Wild-type (WT) littermates); 2) decreased p62 expression indicative of increased autophagolysosome assembly; and 3) decreased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity. Transfection of LC3A-GFP-RFP chimeric plasmid demonstrated that autophagolysosome formation was significantly increased by Nor-1 expression. Furthermore, we demonstrated a single bout of exercise induced LC3A-II expression in skeletal muscle from C57BL/6 WT mice. This study, when combined with our previous studies, demonstrates that Nor-1 expression drives multiple physiological changes/pathways that are critical to the beneficial responses of muscle to exercise and provides insights into potential pharmacological manipulation of muscle reprogramming for the treatment of lifestyle induced chronic diseases. PMID:27144290

  8. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-10-03

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  9. Astronaut David Wolf draws blood from Martin Fettman for SLS-2 investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Inside the science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, Astronaut David A. Wolf draws blood from payload specialists Martin J. Fettman, DVM. Blood samples from crew members are critical to several Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-2) investigations.

  10. Associations between Disaster Exposures, Peritraumatic Distress, and Posttraumatic Stress Responses in Fukushima Nuclear Plant Workers following the 2011 Nuclear Accident: The Fukushima NEWS Project Study

    PubMed Central

    Shigemura, Jun; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Nishi, Daisuke; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Nomura, Soichiro; Yoshino, Aihide

    2014-01-01

    Background The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. The nearby Daini plant also experienced substantial damage but remained intact. Workers for the both plants experienced multiple stressors as disaster victims and workers, as well as the criticism from the public due to their company's post-disaster management. Little is known about the psychological pathway mechanism from nuclear disaster exposures, distress during and immediately after the event (peritraumatic distress; PD), to posttraumatic stress responses (PTSR). Methods A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,411 plant employees (Daiichi, n = 831; Daini, n = 580) 2–3 months post-disaster (total response rate: 80.2%). The socio-demographic characteristics and disaster-related experiences were assessed as independent variables. PD and PTSR were measured by the Japanese versions of Peritraumatic Distress Inventory and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. The analysis was conducted separately for the two groups. Bivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between independent variables, PD, and PTSR. Significant variables were subsequently entered in the multiple regression analyses to explore the pathway mechanism for development of PTSR. Results For both groups, PTSR highly associated with PD (Daiichi: adjusted β, 0.66; p<0.001; vs. Daini: adjusted β, 0.67; p<0.001). PTSR also associated with discrimination/slurs experience (Daiichi: 0.11; p<0.001; vs. Daini, 0.09; p = 0.005) and presence of preexisting illness(es) (Daiichi: 0.07; p = 0.005; vs. Daini: 0.15; p<.0001). Other disaster-related variables were likely to be associated with PD than PTSR. Conclusion Among the Fukushima nuclear plant workers, disaster exposures associated with PD. PTSR was highly affected by PD along with discrimination/slurs experience. PMID:24586278

  11. 76 FR 42159 - Lifting of Sanctions on Person Associated With the A.Q. Khan Nuclear Procurement Network

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... were first imposed on January 16, 2009 (see 74 FR 3126, Jan 16, 2009; Public Notice 6486). Dated: July... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Lifting of Sanctions on Person Associated With the A.Q. Khan Nuclear Procurement Network AGENCY: Bureau...

  12. Reporting nuclear cardiology: a joint position paper by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    PubMed

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Hacker, Marcus; Verberne, Hein J; Edenbrandt, Lars; Delgado, Victoria; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Galderisi, Maurizio; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Agostini, Denis; Gimelli, Alessia; Lindner, Oliver; Slart, Riemert; Ubleis, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The report of an imaging procedure is a critical component of an examination, being the final and often the only communication from the interpreting physician to the referring or treating physician. Very limited evidence and few recommendations or guidelines on reporting imaging studies are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed in this paper (myocardial perfusion, viability, innervation, and function as acquired by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography or hybrid imaging), headings cover laboratory and patient demographics, clinical indication, tracer administration and image acquisition, findings, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical outcome. PMID:25618478

  13. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials.

  14. A novel connexin50 mutation associated with congenital nuclear pulverulent cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Arora, A; Minogue, P J; Liu, X; Addison, P K; Russel-Eggitt, I; Webster, A R; Hunt, D M; Ebihara, L; Beyer, E C; Berthoud, V M; Moore, A T

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To screen for mutations of connexin50 (Cx50)/GJA8 in a panel of patients with inherited cataract and to determine the cellular and functional consequences of the identified mutation. Methods All patients in the study underwent a full clinical examination and leucocyte DNA was extracted from venous blood. The GJA8 gene was sequenced directly. Connexin function and cellular trafficking were examined by expression in Xenopus oocytes and HeLa cells. Results Screening of the GJA8 gene identified a 139 G to A transition that resulted in the replacement of aspartic acid by asparagine (D47N) in the coding region of Cx50. This change co-segregated with cataract among affected members of a family with autosomal dominant nuclear pulverulent cataracts. While pairs of Xenopus oocytes injected with wild type Cx50 RNA formed functional gap junction channels, pairs of oocytes injected with Cx50D47N showed no detectable intercellular conductance. Co-expression of Cx50D47N did not inhibit gap junctional conductance of wild type Cx50. In transiently transfected HeLa cells, wild type Cx50 localised to appositional membranes and within the perinuclear region, but Cx50D47N showed no immunostaining at appositional membranes with immunoreactivity confined to the cytoplasm. Incubation of HeLa cells transfected with Cx50D47N at 27°C resulted in formation of gap junctional plaques. Conclusions The pulverulent cataracts present in members of this family are associated with a novel GJA8 mutation, Cx50D47N, that acts as a loss-of-function mutation. The consequent decrease in lens intercellular communication and changes associated with intracellular retention of the mutant connexin may contribute to cataract formation. PMID:18006672

  15. Systematic and Statistical Errors Associated with Nuclear Decay Constant Measurements Using the Counting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Typical nuclear decay constants are measured at the accuracy level of 10-2. There are numerous reasons: tests of unconventional theories, dating of materials, and long term inventory evolution which require decay constants accuracy at a level of 10-4 to 10-5. The statistical and systematic errors associated with precision measurements of decays using the counting technique are presented. Precision requires high count rates, which introduces time dependent dead time and pile-up corrections. An approach to overcome these issues is presented by continuous recording of the detector current. Other systematic corrections include, the time dependent dead time due to background radiation, control of target motion and radiation flight path variation due to environmental conditions, and the time dependent effects caused by scattered events are presented. The incorporation of blind experimental techniques can help make measurement independent of past results. A spectrometer design and data analysis is reviewed that can accomplish these goals. The author would like to thank TechSource, Inc. and Advanced Physics Technologies, LLC. for their support in this work.

  16. Association between Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Methylation and Relative Telomere Length in Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Bo; Zou, Ji-Zhen; He, Cai; Zeng, Rui; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Fei-Fei; Liu, Zhuo; Ye, Hui; Wu, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background: DNA hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINEs-1) occurs during carcinogenesis, whereas information addressing LINE-1 methylation in Wilms tumor (WT) is limited. The main purpose of our study was to quantify LINE-1 methylation levels and evaluate their relationship with relative telomere length (TL) in WT. Methods: We investigated LINE-1 methylation and relative TL using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 20 WT tissues, 10 normal kidney tissues and a WT cell line. Significant changes were analyzed by t-tests. Results: LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and relative TLs were significantly shorter (P < 0.05) in WT compared with normal kidney. There was a significant positive relationship between LINE-1 methylation and relative TL in WT (r = 0.671, P = 0.001). LINE-1 Methylation levels were significantly associated with global DNA methylation (r = 0.332, P < 0.01). In addition, relative TL was shortened and LINE-1 methylation was decreased in a WT cell line treated with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine compared with untreated WT cell line. Conclusion: These results suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is common and may be linked to telomere shortening in WT. PMID:26608986

  17. Identification and Evaluation of Human Factors Issues Associated with Emerging Nuclear Plant Technology

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara,J.M.; Higgins,J.; Brown, William S.

    2009-04-01

    This study has identified human performance research issues associated with the implementation of new technology in nuclear power plants (NPPs). To identify the research issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were prioritized into four categories based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts representing vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. The study also identifies the priority of each issue and the rationale for those in the top priority category. The top priority issues were then organized into research program areas of: New Concepts of Operation using Multi-agent Teams, Human-system Interface Design, Complexity Issues in Advanced Systems, Operating Experience of New and Modernized Plants, and HFE Methods and Tools. The results can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas to support the safe operation of new NPPs.

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K is overexpressed and associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruirui; Zeng, Ying; Xu, Haifan; Chen, Zhuo; Xiang, Mengqin; Fu, Yun; Yin, Yufang; Zhong, Jing; Zeng, Min; Wang, Peihua; You, Qin; Zeng, Xi

    2016-08-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is one of the major pre-mRNA-binding proteins, that is involved in translational modifications. In our previous studies, we found that hnRNP K is associated with human gastric cancer. The protein levels of hnRNP K were detected in cell lines and tissue microarrays. The correlation between hnRNP K expression and patient survival rate was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. In addition, we also detected hnRNP K expression in preoperative and postoperative serum samples from patients with gastric cancer, and serum samples from healthy volunteers. We found that hnRNP K was overexpressed in the gastric cancer cell lines. The levels of hnRNP K were significantly elevated in the gastric cancer tissues compared with that noted in the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosal and normal gastric mucosal sampes, and hnRNP K expression was found to correlate with tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. However, the level of serum hnRNP K did not differ significantly between gastric cancer patients and healthy volunteers. We also found that patients whose tumors showed elevated expression of hnRNP K had poor survival. The present study suggests that hnRNP K is a promising tissue biomarker for diagnosing gastric cancer and is a prognostic indicator for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27278897

  19. Tissue-specific expression and cDNA cloning of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, G.; Amara, S.G.; Lerner, M.R. )

    1988-07-01

    Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases have antibodies against nuclear antigens. An example is anti-Sm sera, which recognize proteins associated with small nuclear RNA molecules (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles). In this paper anti-Sm sera were used to probe immunoblots of various rat tissues. A previously unidentified M{sub r} 28,000 polypeptide was recognized by these anti-Sm sera. This polypeptide, referred to as N, is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, being most abundant in rat brain, less so in heart, and undetectable in the other tissues examined. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed against the cap structure of small nuclear RNAs have demonstrated that N is a snRNP-associated polypeptide. Anti-Sm serum was also used to isolate a partial cDNA clone ({lambda}rb91) from a rat brain phage {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library. A longer cDNA clone was obtained by rescreening the library with {lambda}rb91. In vitro transcription and subsequent translation of this subcloned, longer insert (pGMA2) resulted in a protein product with the same electrophoretic and immunological properties as N, confirming that pGMA2 encodes N. The tissue distribution of N and the involvement of snRNP particles in nuclear pre-mRNA processing may imply a role for N in tissue-specific pre-mRNA splicing.

  20. Abnormal mitosis in hypertetraploid cells causes aberrant nuclear morphology in association with H2O2-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu

    2008-09-01

    Aberrant nuclear morphology, such as nuclei with irregular shapes or fragmented nuclei, is often observed in senescent cells, but its biological significance is not fully understood. My previous study showed that aberrant nuclear morphology in senescent human fibroblasts is attributable to abnormal mitosis in later passages. In this study, the production of abnormal nuclei in association with premature senescence was investigated. Premature senescence was induced by brief exposure of human fibroblasts to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and mitosis was observed by time-lapse microscopy. In addition, cell cycle and nuclear morphology after exposure to H(2)O(2) were also analyzed using a laser scanning cytometer. Time-lapse analysis revealed that the induction of premature senescence caused abnormal mitoses, such as mitotic slippage or incomplete mitosis, especially in later days after H(2)O(2) exposure and often resulted in abnormal nuclear morphology. Analysis by laser scanning cytometer showed significantly higher frequency of abnormal cells with deformed nuclei and abnormal mitotic cells with misaligned chromosomes in a hypertetraploid subpopulation. These results suggest that unstable hypertetraploid cells, formed in association with H(2)O(2)-induced premature senescence, cause abnormal mitosis that leads to aberrant nuclear morphology. PMID:18618767

  1. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011. PMID:21532541

  2. Nuclear translocation of the cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, upon induction of skeletal muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cambier, Linda; Pomies, Pascal

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, is expressed in differentiated skeletal muscle. {yields} smALP is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts upon induction of myogenesis. {yields} The differentiation-dependent nuclear translocation of smALP occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. {yields} The LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear accumulation of the protein. {yields} smALP might act in the nucleus to control some critical aspect of the muscle differentiation process. -- Abstract: The skALP isoform has been shown to play a critical role in actin organization and anchorage within the Z-discs of skeletal muscles, but no data is available on the function of the smALP isoform in skeletal muscle cells. Here, we show that upon induction of differentiation a nuclear translocation of smALP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts, concomitant to an up-regulation of the protein expression, occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear translocation of the protein.

  3. Proliferation dangers associated with nuclear medicine: getting weapons-grade uranium out of radiopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bill; Ruff, Tilman A

    2007-01-01

    Abolishing the threat of nuclear war requires the outlawing of nuclear weapons and dismantling current nuclear weapon stockpiles, but also depends on eliminating access to fissile material (nuclear weapon fuel). The near-universal use of weapons-grade, highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce radiopharmaceuticals is a significant proliferation hazard. Health professionals have a strategic opportunity and obligation to progress the elimination of medically-related commerce in HEU, closing one of the most vulnerable pathways to the much-feared 'terrorist bomb'. PMID:17987979

  4. Regulation of viral and cellular gene expression by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus polyadenylated nuclear RNA.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Tarrant-Elorza, Margaret; Verma, Subhash; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Pari, Gregory S

    2013-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the cause of Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity lymphoma. In cell culture, KSHV results in a latent infection, and lytic reactivation is usually induced with the expression of K-Rta or by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA) and/or n-butyrate. Lytic infection is marked by the activation of the entire viral genomic transcription cascade and the production of infectious virus. KSHV-infected cells express a highly abundant, long, noncoding transcript referred to as polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). PAN RNA interacts with specific demethylases and physically binds to the KSHV genome to mediate activation of viral gene expression. A recombinant BACmid lacking the PAN RNA locus fails to express K-Rta and does not produce virus. We now show that the lack of PAN RNA expression results in the failure of the initiation of the entire KSHV transcription program. In addition to previous findings of an interaction with demethylases, we show that PAN RNA binds to protein components of Polycomb repression complex 2 (PRC2). RNA-Seq analysis using cell lines that express PAN RNA shows that transcription involving the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle, immune response, and inflammation is dysregulated. Expression of PAN RNA in various cell types results in an enhanced growth phenotype, higher cell densities, and increased survival compared to control cells. Also, PAN RNA expression mediates a decrease in the production of inflammatory cytokines. These data support a role for PAN RNA as a major global regulator of viral and cellular gene expression. PMID:23468496

  5. Polymorphisms in the nuclear factor kappa B gene association with recurrent embryo implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Luo, L; Li, D H; Li, X P; Zhang, S C; Yan, C F; Wu, J F; Qi, Y H; Zhao, J

    2016-01-01

    Despite more than a century of intensive study, the mechanisms of successful pregnancy remain unclear. Recent research suggests that NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B) plays an important role in embryo implantation. In the current study, we aimed to identify SNPs that contribute to genetic susceptibility for recurrent implantation failure (RIF). Thus, we examined the potential associations between RIF and ten SNPs (rs28362491, rs3774932, rs1598856, rs230528, rs230521, rs3774956, rs4648055, rs3774964, rs4648068, and rs3774968) of the NF-κB gene. Participants included 209 patients with RIF and 395 controls. Our results revealed that there were statistically significant differences observed in the allelic and genotypic frequencies of the rs28362491 promoter in the NF-κB gene. The frequency of the del/ del genotype was significantly higher in RIF patients than in healthy controls (P = 0.004). Compared with healthy controls, the RIF patients carried a higher frequency of the rs28362491 del allele (P = 0.010). Furthermore, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed in the three identified haplotype blocks (D' > 0.9). Particularly, in block 1 (rs230528-rs230521), the A-C haplotype occurred significantly more frequently (P = 0.029) in subjects with RIF (P = 0.0003). In contrast, the A-G haplotype occurred significantly less frequently (P = 0.008) in RIF subjects. These findings support an important role for G-712A polymorphisms of NF-κB in RIF, and may guide future studies that aim to characterize genetic risk factors for RIF. PMID:27173287

  6. On Our Changing Family Values: A Conversation with David Elkind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    1996-01-01

    The idealized nuclear family values of romantic love, maternalism, and domesticity are being supplanted by postmodernist sentiments such as consensual love, shared parenting, and urbanity. Today's "competent" kids are developing more stress-related problems. Schools can help families by placing students' and teachers' needs above political and…

  7. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This document contains the appendixes for the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The following topics are covered in the appendixes: (A) David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Historical Data, (B) Fieldwork Plans for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, (C) Risk Assessment, (D) Remediation Technology Discussion, (E) Engineering Support Documentation, (F) Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements, and (G) Cost Estimate Documentation.

  8. Issues Associated with IAEA Involvement in Assured Nuclear Fuel Supply Arrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, Carol E.; Mathews, Carrie E.

    2008-02-08

    Assured nuclear fuel supply has been discussed at various times as a mechanism to help limit expansion of enrichment and reprocessing (E&R) capability beyond current technology holders. Given the events in the last few years in North Korea and Iran, concern over weapons capabilities gained from acquisition of E&R capabilities has heightened and brought assured nuclear fuel supply (AFS) again to the international agenda. Successful AFS programs can be valuable contributions to strengthening the nonproliferation regime and helping to build public support for expanding nuclear energy.

  9. Nuclear Pattern of CXCR4 Expression Is Associated with a Better Overall Survival in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Bahram; Fakhari, Shohreh; Sheikhesmaili, Farshad; Fathi, Fardin; Rooshani, Daem; Hoseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Nikzaban, Mehrnoush

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Previous studies have shown that stromal-derived factor-1 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXCR4, play a crucial role in metastasis of various tumors. Similarly, it has been cleared that CXCR4 is expressed on the cell surface of gastric cancers. However, nuclear expression of CXCR4 and its clinical importance have not been yet studied. Materials and Methods. Herein, we studied the expression of CXCR4 in gastric samples from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma as well as human gastric carcinoma cell line, AGS, by employing RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques. Results. RT-PCR data showed that CXCR4 is highly expressed on AGS cells. This was confirmed by IHC and FACS as CXCR4 was detected on cell membrane, in cytoplasm, and in nucleus of AGS cells. Moreover, we found that both cytoplasmic and nuclear CXCR4 are strongly expressed in primary gastric cancer and the cytoplasmic pattern of CXCR4 tends to be associated with a shorter overall survival than nuclear staining. In conclusion, we present evidence for the first time that both cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of CXCR4 are detectable in gastric cancer tissues. However, the role of both cytoplasmic and nuclear CXCR4 needs to be further elucidated. PMID:24659999

  10. Identification and characterisation of a nuclear localisation signal in the SMN associated protein, Gemin4

    SciTech Connect

    Lorson, Monique A.; Dickson, Alexa M.; Shaw, Debra J.; Todd, Adrian G.; Young, Elizabeth C.; Morse, Robert; Wolstencroft, Catherine; Lorson, Christian L.; Young, Philip J.

    2008-10-10

    Gemin4 is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein that is involved in U snRNP assembly, apoptosis, nuclear/cytoplasmic transportation, transcription, and RNAi pathways. Gemin4 is one of the core components of the Gemin-complex, which also contains survival motor neuron (SMN), the seven Gemin proteins (Gemin2-8), and Unrip. Mutations in the SMN1 gene cause the autosomal recessive disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Although the functions assigned to Gemin4 predominantly occur in the nucleus, the mechanisms that mediate the nuclear import of Gemin4 remain unclear. Here, using a novel panel of Gemin4 constructs we identify a canonical nuclear import sequence (NLS) in the N-terminus of Gemin4. The Gemin4 NLS is necessary and independently sufficient to mediate nuclear import of Gemin4. This is the first functional NLS identified within the SMN-Gemin complex.

  11. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  12. The Small Nuclear Genomes of Selaginella Are Associated with a Low Rate of Genome Size Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baniaga, Anthony E.; Arrigo, Nils; Barker, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes evolved in Selaginella. We compared the rates of nuclear genome size evolution in Selaginella and major vascular plant clades in a comparative phylogenetic framework. For the analyses, we collected 29 new flow cytometry estimates of haploid genome size in Selaginella to augment publicly available data. Selaginella possess some of the smallest known haploid nuclear genome sizes, as well as the lowest rate of genome size evolution observed across all vascular land plants included in our analyses. Additionally, our analyses provide strong support for a history of haploid nuclear genome size stasis in Selaginella. Our results indicate that Selaginella, similar to other early diverging lineages of vascular land plants, has relatively low rates of genome size evolution. Further, our analyses highlight that a rapid transition to a small genome size is only one route to an extremely small genome. PMID:27189987

  13. The Small Nuclear Genomes of Selaginella Are Associated with a Low Rate of Genome Size Evolution.

    PubMed

    Baniaga, Anthony E; Arrigo, Nils; Barker, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes evolved in Selaginella We compared the rates of nuclear genome size evolution in Selaginella and major vascular plant clades in a comparative phylogenetic framework. For the analyses, we collected 29 new flow cytometry estimates of haploid genome size in Selaginella to augment publicly available data. Selaginella possess some of the smallest known haploid nuclear genome sizes, as well as the lowest rate of genome size evolution observed across all vascular land plants included in our analyses. Additionally, our analyses provide strong support for a history of haploid nuclear genome size stasis in Selaginella Our results indicate that Selaginella, similar to other early diverging lineages of vascular land plants, has relatively low rates of genome size evolution. Further, our analyses highlight that a rapid transition to a small genome size is only one route to an extremely small genome. PMID:27189987

  14. Analysis of the formation, expression, and economic impacts of risk perceptions associated with nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.; Hunter, S.; Calzonetti, F.J.

    1992-10-01

    This report investigates how communities hosting nuclear facilities form and express perceptions of risk and how these risk perceptions affect local economic development. Information was collected from site visits and interviews with plant personnel, officials of local and state agencies, and community activists in the hosting communities. Six commercial nuclear fuel production facilities and five nuclear facilities operated for the US Department of Energy by private contractors were chosen for analysis. The results presented in the report indicate that the nature of risk perceptions depends on a number of factors. These factors are (1) level of communication by plant officials within the local community, (2) track record of the facility. operator, (3) process through which community and state officials receive information and form opinions, (4) level of economic links each plant has with the local community, and (15) physical characteristics of the facility itself. This report finds that in the communities studied, adverse ask perceptions have not affected business location decisions, employment levels in the local community, tourism, or agricultural development. On the basis of case-study findings, this report recommends that nuclear facility siting programs take the following observations into account when addressing perceptions of risk. First, the quality of a facility`s participation with community activists, interest groups, and state agencies helps to determine the level of perceived risk within a community. Second, the development of strong economic links between nuclear facilities and their host communities will produce a higher level of acceptance of the nuclear facilities.

  15. Solid cancer mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure at the French atomic energy commission and nuclear fuel company.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2011-07-01

    Studies of nuclear workers make it possible to directly quantify the risks associated with ionizing radiation exposure at low doses and low dose rates. Studies of the CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) and AREVA Nuclear Cycle (AREVA NC) cohort, currently the most informative such group in France, describe the long-term risk to nuclear workers associated with external exposure. Our aim is to assess the risk of mortality from solid cancers among CEA and AREVA NC nuclear workers and its association with external radiation exposure. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated and internal Poisson regressions were conducted, controlling for the main confounding factors [sex, attained age, calendar period, company and socioeconomic status (SES)]. During the period 1968-2004, there were 2,035 solid cancers among the 36,769 CEA-AREVA NC workers. Cumulative external radiation exposure was assessed for the period 1950-2004, and the mean cumulative dose was 12.1 mSv. Mortality rates for all causes and all solid cancers were both significantly lower in this cohort than in the general population. A significant excess of deaths from pleural cancer, not associated with cumulative external dose, was observed, probably due to past asbestos exposure. We observed a significant excess of melanoma, also unassociated with dose. Although cumulative external dose was not associated with mortality from all solid cancers, the central estimated excess relative risk (ERR) per Sv of 0.46 for solid cancer mortality was higher than the 0.26 calculated for male Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors 50 years or older and exposed at the age of 30 years or older. The modification of our results after stratification for SES demonstrates the importance of this characteristic in occupational studies, because it makes it possible to take class-based lifestyle differences into account, at least partly. These results show the great potential of a further joint international study of

  16. Coiled bodies contain U7 small nuclear RNA and associate with specific DNA sequences in interphase human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, M R; Matera, A G

    1995-01-01

    Coiled bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles whose structures appear to be highly conserved in evolution. In rapidly cycling cells, they are typically located in the nucleoplasm but are often found in contact with the nucleolus. The CBs in human cells contain a unique protein, called p80-coilin. Studies on amphibian oocyte nuclei have revealed a protein within the "sphere" organelle that shares significant structural similarity to p80-coilin. Spheres and CBs are also highly enriched in small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and other RNA-processing components. We present evidence that, like spheres, CBs contain U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and associate with specific chromosomal loci. Using biotinylated 2'-O-methyl oligonucleotides complementary to the 5' end of U7 snRNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that U7 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, excluding nucleoli, and is concentrated in CBs. Interestingly, we found that CBs often associate with subsets of the histone, U1, and U2 snRNA gene loci in interphase HeLa-ATCC and HEp-2 monolayer cells. However, in a strain of suspension-grown HeLa cells, called HeLa-JS1000, we found a much lower rate of association between CBs and snRNA genes. Possible roles for CBs in the metabolism of these various histone and snRNAs are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7597053

  17. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein U associates with YAP and regulates its co-activation of Bax transcription.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael; Borchers, Christoph; Milgram, Sharon L

    2004-06-18

    Although initially described as a cytosolic scaffolding protein, YAP (Yes-associated protein of 65 kDa) is known to associate with multiple transcription factors in the nucleus. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we show that YAP interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP U), an RNA- and DNA-binding protein enriched in the nuclear matrix that also plays a role in the regulation of gene expression. hnRNP U interacts specifically with the proline-rich amino terminus of YAP, a region of YAP that is not found in the related protein TAZ. Although hnRNP U and YAP localize to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, YAP does not translocate to the nucleus in an hnRNP U-dependent manner. Furthermore, hnRNP U and YAP only interact in the nucleus, suggesting that the association between the two proteins is regulated. Co-expression of hnRNP U attenuates the ability of YAP to increase the activity of a p73-driven Bax-luciferase reporter plasmid. In contrast, hnRNP U has no effect when co-expressed with a truncated YAP protein lacking the hnRNP U-binding site. Because YAP is distinguished from the homologue TAZ by its proline-rich amino terminus, the YAP-hnRNP U interaction may uniquely regulate the nuclear function(s) of YAP. The YAP-hnRNP U interaction provides another mechanism of YAP transcriptional regulation. PMID:15096513

  18. Highlights of the Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul, 2005: The incremental value of nuclear medicine for patient management and care.

    PubMed

    Cuocolo, Alberto; Acampa, Wanda; Varrone, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco

    2006-03-01

    The 2005 Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) took place in Istanbul on October 15-19, under the chairmanship of Professor Hatice Durak. The programme was of excellent quality and represented a further step towards the achievement of a standardized EANM congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success: there were more than 4,000 participants, and 1,670 abstracts were received. Of these, 1,399 were accepted for oral or poster presentations, with a rejection rate of 16.2%. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine, and addressed particularly advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well-established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, nephrology, and infection and inflammation. It is noteworthy that a number of studies presented at this congress focussed on the quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, and identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and management. These and many other studies presented at the congress demonstrate once more the crucial role that nuclear medicine has to play in contemporary medicine. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as volume 32, supplement 1 of the Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in September 2005. PMID:16538466

  19. The GIP gamma-tubulin complex-associated proteins are involved in nuclear architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Batzenschlager, Morgane; Masoud, Kinda; Janski, Natacha; Houlné, Guy; Herzog, Etienne; Evrard, Jean-Luc; Baumberger, Nicolas; Erhardt, Mathieu; Nominé, Yves; Kieffer, Bruno; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2013-01-01

    During interphase, the microtubular cytoskeleton of cycling plant cells is organized in both cortical and perinuclear arrays. Perinuclear microtubules (MTs) are nucleated from γ-Tubulin Complexes (γ-TuCs) located at the surface of the nucleus. The molecular mechanisms of γ-TuC association to the nuclear envelope (NE) are currently unknown. The γ-TuC Protein 3 (GCP3)-Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) is the smallest γ-TuC component identified so far. AtGIP1 and its homologous protein AtGIP2 participate in the localization of active γ-TuCs at interphasic and mitotic MT nucleation sites. Arabidopsis gip1gip2 mutants are impaired in establishing a fully functional mitotic spindle and exhibit severe developmental defects. In this study, gip1gip2 knock down mutants were further characterized at the cellular level. In addition to defects in both the localization of γ-TuC core proteins and MT fiber robustness, gip1gip2 mutants exhibited a severe alteration of the nuclear shape associated with an abnormal distribution of the nuclear pore complexes. Simultaneously, they showed a misorganization of the inner nuclear membrane protein AtSUN1. Furthermore, AtGIP1 was identified as an interacting partner of AtTSA1 which was detected, like the AtGIP proteins, at the NE. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of a γ-TuC component in both nuclear shaping and NE organization. Functional hypotheses are discussed in order to propose a model for a GIP-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic continuum. PMID:24348487

  20. Prevalence of nuclear cataract in Swiss veal calves and its possible association with mobile telephone antenna base stations.

    PubMed

    Hässig, Michael; Jud, F; Naegeli, H; Kupper, J; Spiess, B M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to valuate the prevalence of nuclear cataract in veal calves and to elucidate a possible impact by mobile phone base stations (MPBS). For this experiment a cohort study was conducted. A follow-up of the geographical location of each dam and its calf from conception through the fetal period up to slaughter was performed. The first trimester of gestation (organogenesis) was particularly emphasized. The activities of selected protective antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase [GPx]) were assessed in aqueous humor of the eye to evaluate the redox status. Of 253 calves, 79 (32 %) had various degrees of nuclear cataract, but only 9 (3.6 %) calves had severe nuclear cataract. Results demonstrate a relation between the location of veals calves with nuclear cataracts in the first trimester of gestation and the strength of antennas. The number of antennas within 100 to 199 meters was associated with oxidative stress and there was an association between oxidative stress and the distance to the nearest MPBS. Oxidative stress was increased in eyes with cataract (OR per kilometer: 0.80, confidence interval 95 % 0.62,0.93). It has not been shown that the antennas actually affected stress. Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics showed an accuracy of 100 % in negative cases with low radiation, and only 11.11 % accuracy in positive cases with high radiation. This reflects, that there are a lot of other possibilities for nuclear cataract beside MPBS. Further studies on the influence of electromagnetic fields during embryonic development animal or person at risk are indicated. PMID:19780007

  1. Nitric oxide induces thioredoxin-1 nuclear translocation: Possible association with the p21Ras survival pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Roberto J.; Yodoi, J.; Debbas, V.; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Stern, A.; Monteiro, Hugo P. . E-mail: hpmonte@uol.com.br

    2006-10-06

    One of the major redox-regulating molecules with thiol reducing activity is thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1). TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that exists in the extracellular millieu, cytoplasm, and nucleus, and has a distinct role in each environment. It is well known that TRX-1 promptly migrates to the nuclear compartment in cells exposed to oxidants. However, the intracellular location of TRX-1 in cells exposed to nitrosothiols has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the exposure of HeLa cells to increasing concentrations of the nitrosothiol S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) promoted TRX-1 nuclear accumulation. The SNAP-induced TRX-1 translocation to the nucleus was inhibited by FPTIII, a selective inhibitor of p21Ras. Furthermore, TRX-1 migration was attenuated in cells stably transfected with NO insensitive p21Ras (p21{sup RasC118S}). Downstream to p21Ras, the MAP Kinases ERK1/2 were activated by SNAP under conditions that promote TRX-1 nuclear translocation. Inhibition of MEK prevented SNAP-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and TRX-1 nuclear migration. In addition, cells treated with p21Ras or MEK inhibitor showed increased susceptibility to cell death induced by SNAP. In conclusion, our observations suggest that the nuclear translocation of TRX-1 is induced by SNAP involving p21Ras survival pathway.

  2. David Brailer on a private-public health information technology infrastructure. Interview by Susan V. White.

    PubMed

    Brailer, David

    2004-01-01

    David Brailer, MD PhD, was appointed the first National Health Information Technology Coordinator by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson on May 6, 2004. As National Coordinator he is to execute President Bush's Executive Order of April 27, 2004, calling for widespread deployment of health information technology (HIT) within 10 years. Dr. Brailer is an authority on clinical data sharing, local health information exchanges, and the use of peer-to-peer technologies in healthcare. He is a leader in the strategy and financing of quality and efficiency in healthcare, with a particular emphasis on HIT and health systems management. Previously, Dr. Brailer was a Senior Fellow at the Health Technology Center in San Francisco, advising a variety of regional and national data-sharing projects and several major corporations about the role of IT in improving the quality of healthcare. Dr. Brailer recently completed 10 years as Chairman and CEO of CareScience, Inc., a provider of care management services and Internet-based solutions that help reduce medical errors and improve physician and hospital-based performance. Dr. Brailer holds doctoral degrees in both medicine and economics. While in medical school, he was a Charles A. Dana Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the first recipient of the National Library of Medicine Martin Epstein Award for his work in expert systems. Dr. Brailer was among the first medical students to serve on the Board of Trustees of the American Medical Association. PMID:15603091

  3. Biological Significance of Unwinding Capability of Nuclear Matrix-Associating DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, J.; Kohwi, Y.; Dickinson, L.; Joh, T.; Klehr, D.; Mielke, C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, T.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are thought to separate chromatin into topologically constrained loop domains. A MAR located 5' of the human β-interferon gene becomes stably base-unpaired under superhelical strain, as do the MARs flanking the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer; in both cases a nucleation site exists for DNA unwinding. Concatemerized oligonucleotides containing the unwinding nucleation site exhibited a strong affinity for the nuclear scaffold and augmented SV40 promoter activity in stable transformants. Mutated concatemerized oligonucleotides resisted unwinding, showed weak affinity for the nuclear scaffold, and did not enhance promoter activity. These results suggest that the DNA feature capable of relieving superhelical strain is important for MAR functions.

  4. N-terminal determinants of human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein in nuclear targeting and disrupting PML-associated subnuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Huh, Yong Ho; Kim, Young-Eui; Lee, Karim; Kim, Sunyoung; Ahn, Jin-Hyun . E-mail: jahn@med.skku.ac.kr

    2007-05-04

    The 72-kDa IE1 protein of human cytomegalovirus disrupts PML-associated subnuclear structures (PODs) by inducing PML desumoylation. This process correlates with the functions of IE1 in transcriptional regulation and efficient viral replication. Here, we defined the N-terminal regions of IE1 required for nuclear targeting and POD-disrupting activity. Although the 24 N-terminal amino acids encoded by exon 2, which were previously shown to be essential for nuclear targeting, did not appear to contain typical basic nuclear localization signals, these residues were able to efficiently convey the GFP protein into the nucleus, suggesting a role in promoting nuclear translocation. In assays using a series of N-terminal truncation IE1 mutants, which were forced to enter the nucleus, exon 2 was completely dispensable for POD disruption. However, the predicted two {alpha}-helix regions in exon 3 were identified as important structural determinants for protein stability and for the correlating activities in POD disruption and PML desumoylation.

  5. High frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 protein expression in human bladder cancer is associated with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Egr-1 (early growth response-1 transcription factor) has been proposed to be involved in invasion and metastasis processes of human bladder cancer, but Egr-1 protein expression levels in human bladder cancer have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the expression levels of Egr-1 protein in early stages of human bladder cancer and correlated it to later progression. Methods Expression of Egr-1 protein in human bladder cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry, on a tissue microarray constructed from tumors from 289 patients with non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. Results The frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling correlated to bladder cancer stage, grade and to later progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-4). Stage T1 tumors exhibited significantly higher frequencies of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling than Ta tumors (P = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that a high frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling was significantly associated with a higher risk of progression to stage T2-4 (log-rank test, P = 0.035). Tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling were found to localize at the tumor front in some of the tumor biopsies. Conclusion The results from this study support a potential involvement of Egr-1 in the progression from non-muscle invasive bladder cancers to muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:19878561

  6. Seismic activity and faulting associated with a large underground nuclear explosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, R.M.; McKeown, F.A.; Healy, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    The 1.1-megaton nuclear test Benham caused movement on previously mapped faults and was followed by a sequence of small earthquakes. These effects were confined to a zone extending not more than 13 kilometers from ground zero; they are apparently related to the release of natural tectonic strain.

  7. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  8. Genome Assembly of Citrus Leprosis Virus Nuclear Type Reveals a Close Association with Orchid Fleck Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Andrew; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Wei, Gang; Choudhary, Nandlal; Achor, Diann; Shao, Jonathan; Levy, Laurene; Nakhla, Mark K.; Hollingsworth, Charla R.; Hartung, John S.; Schneider, William L.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type (CiLV-N) was identified by small RNA sequencing utilizing leprosis-affected citrus samples collected from the state of Querétaro, Mexico. The nucleotide identity and phylogenetic analysis indicate that CiLV-N is very closely related to orchid fleck virus, which typically infects Cymbidium species. PMID:23887919

  9. Interview with David H. Jonassen: Looking at the Field of Educational Technology from Radical and Multiple Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Ali

    2012-01-01

    There are people whose names are identified with their fields. When an outsider wants to learn about the field of educational technology and enters some keywords, David H. Jonassen is perhaps one the few people whose names will appear instantly. Of course, this is not without reasons. David H. Jonassen has produced enormous amount of work…

  10. Conflict, Retrenchment, and Reappraisal: The Administration of Higher Education. The David D. Henry Lectures, 1972-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    The first five David D. Henry lectures, and discussion and response to the first four, are presented in this book. Following a brief introduction by John E. Corbally and a biography of David Dobbs Henry, Clark Kerr's paper, "The Administration of Higher Education in an Era of Change and Conflict" (presented in October, 1972) focuses on change and…

  11. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometric Isotopic Determination of Nuclear Wastes Sources Associated with Hanford Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, John C.; Dresel, P. Evan; Farmer, Orville T.

    2007-11-01

    The subsurface distribution of a nuclear waste tank leak on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site was sampled by slant drilling techniques in order to characterize the chemical and radiological characteristics of the leaked material and assess geochemical transport properties of hazardous constituents. Sediment core samples recovered from the borehole were subjected to distilled water and acid leaching procedures with the resulting leachates analyzed for isotopic and chemical signatures. High-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) techniques were used for determination of isotopic ratios for Cs, I, Mo. Analysis of the isotopic patterns of I and Mo combined with associated chemical data showed evidence for at least two separate intrusions of nuclear waste into the subsurface. Isotopic data for Cs was inconclusive with respect to a source attribution signature.

  12. David F. Treagust: congenial soul, science educator, and international research leader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth; Rennie, Leonie; Venville, Grady; Chu, Hye-Eun; Fensham, Peter; Gallagher, James; Duit, Reinders; Graeber, Wolfgang; van den Berg, Ed; Hand, Brian; Ritchie, Stephen; Dillon, Justin

    2011-09-01

    For almost a half century David F. Treagust has been an exemplary science educator who has contributed through his dedication and commitments to students, curriculum development and collaboration with teachers, and cutting edge research in science education that has impacted the field globally, nationally and locally. A hallmark of his outstanding career is his collaborative style that inspires others to produce their best work.

  13. Writing in the American Grain: Peter Elbow's and David Bartholomae's Emersonian Pedagogies of Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Argues that, although Peter Elbow's and David Bartholomae's pedagogies attempt in different ways to authorize students to write, both rely on the experience and resistance to language as the primary means of empowerment. Suggests that Elbow and Bartholomae must continually defer authority, keeping it suspended between experience and its…

  14. The Fifties ... Fifty Years Later: "Connection" Interviews Historian David Halberstam on a Half Century of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connection: The Journal of the New England Board of Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with historian David Halberstam who graduated from Harvard University in 1955 after serving as managing editor of the "Harvard Crimson." Upon graduation, he joined the staff of the "Daily Times Leader" newspaper of West Point, Mississippi, and then moved on to the "Nashville Tennessean," where he covered the…

  15. Astronaut David Wolf participates in training for contingency EVA in WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut David A. Wolf participates in training for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-58 mission. The mission specialist was about to be submerged to a point of neutral buoyancy in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). In this view, Wolf is aided by technicians in donning the gloves for his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU).

  16. Latino Initiatives: Progress and Challenges. A Report by the Administration of Mayor David N. Dinkins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Adelita M.

    This annual report for 1990 details initiatives by a select group of New York City (New York) agencies on matters of particular concern to Latinos. New York City's mayor, David Dinkins, originally presented these initiatives in August of 1990 to a meeting of Latino leaders representing diverse agencies and community organization. Highlights of…

  17. In Support of the Cognitive-Developmental Approach to Moral Education: A Response to David Carr

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Aaron; Cummings, Rhoda

    2004-01-01

    David Carr (2002) has argued against the use of developmental theories as a basis for curriculum development in moral education. Although we find common ground with some aspects of Carr's arguments, we disagree with several of his criticisms of the cognitive-developmental approach to moral education. He confuses romantic ideology (as espoused by…

  18. A Response to David Kirk: Personal/Professional Views from US Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Peter; van der Mars, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This paper represents the views of two scholars in the USA with respect to the scholar lecture presented by David Kirk at the 2012 BERA -- Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) Special Interest Group meeting. We discuss how two unique features of the American universities have an impact on both the corporate nature of our work and our…

  19. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... appropriately trained provider within 4 weeks or sooner, if required, and within 1-hour travel time from the beneficiary's residence. The geographic area that represents 1-hour travel time surrounding an MTF is referred... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care...

  20. Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King Jr., and the American Tradition of Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. fundamentally altered the tradition of protest and reform. Compares and contrasts the role of each man in U.S. social and constitutional history. Concludes that while Thoreau lacked the broad influence of King, his writings influenced both King and Mohandas Gandhi. (CFR)

  1. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with David M. Monetti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulgham, Susan M.; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Contributing editors Susan Fulgham and Michael Shaughnessy present their interview with David M. Monetti, Professor in the Department of Psychology and Counseling at Valdosta State University. Monetti teaches courses in educational psychology, learning, and measurement and evaluation. He is actively involved with the public schools as a researcher…

  2. Resident database interfaces to the DAVID system, a heterogeneous distributed database management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroh, Marsha

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for building interfaces of resident database management systems to a heterogeneous distributed database management system under development at NASA, the DAVID system, was developed. The feasibility of that methodology was demonstrated by construction of the software necessary to perform the interface task. The interface terminology developed in the course of this research is presented. The work performed and the results are summarized.

  3. David Gruby 1810-1898: unveiling of a portrait bust in his birthplace.

    PubMed

    Holubar, Karl; Wikonkál, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    David Gruby (1810-1898) was an early mycologist, the most prominent between Agostino Bassi (1773-1856) who discovered the fungus on silk worms and Raymond Sabouraud (1864-1938) who wrote the first textbook in the field. PMID:21137641

  4. The Archives of the History of American Psychology: An Interview with David B. Baker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Loreto R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with David B. Baker, Director of the Archives of the History of American Psychology. Covers topics such as: Baker's interest in the history of psychology, his work at the Archives of the History of American Psychology, and recommendations for teachers when addressing history in non-history courses. (CMK)

  5. Student-Text Interaction: A Modified Replication of David Bloome's Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Karen

    In his ethnographic study of junior high school literacy activities, David Bloome found support for four theoretical constructs of the student-text interaction: (1) education is a process of cultural transmission; (2) reading is defined in terms of the sociocultural context in which it occurs; (3) the interpretation of behavior and of signs occurs…

  6. Bringing the Social Sciences to Health Policy: An Appreciation of David Mechanic.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Carol A; Gray, Bradford H

    2016-08-01

    David Mechanic has been a pioneering leader in the social and behavioral sciences of health, health services, and health and mental health policy for more than fifty years. One of David's most distinctive qualities has been his vision in identifying trends and defining new research areas and perspectives in health care policy. His early work on how methods of physician payment by capitation and fee-for-service in England and the United States affected physicians' responses to patients and patient care addressed present challenges and many ongoing studies of payment mechanisms. His papers on rationing of health care established a framework for examining alternative allocation mechanisms and just decision making. Influential papers dealt with risk selection, policy challenges in managed care, reducing racial disparities, trust relationships between patients, doctors, and the public and health institutions, and the predicaments of health reform. Focusing on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, David explored its opportunities and challenges especially in providing comprehensive and effective behavioral health services. A hallmark of his work has been his redirecting our attention to the most severely ill and those in greatest need. Less visible is the leadership and institution building endeavors and the many honors David has received. PMID:27127251

  7. Evaluation of the Oregon Business Council-David Douglas Model School District Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; Stone, Patricia

    The Oregon Business Council (OBC)-David Douglas Model District Project was undertaken for two reasons: (1) to create a model for a district's accelerated implementation of all the elements of school reform as mandated in Oregon House Bill 3565; and (2) to learn lessons about school reform that would inform OBC member companies and school districts…

  8. Some Thoughts on Censorship and the Teaching of Huckleberry Finn: An Interview with David Bradley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with David Bradley, professor of English at Temple University (PA), who defends the teaching of Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn" to black students despite recent moves to remove the book from some public school libraries because it is deemed offensive. Bradley provides recommendations for teaching "Huckleberry Finn" and…

  9. Education, Educational Research, and the "Grammar" of Understanding: A Response to David Bridges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyers, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article is the author's response to a paper presented by David Bridges. Bridges' central question: "Is there something exclusive and superior about insider understanding which the outsider cannot understand?" is indeed not only crucial to the contexts he explicitly deals with, i.e. religious understanding, ethnographic research and…

  10. David Noble's Battle to Defend the 'Sacred Space' of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on the crusade of David F. Noble, a history professor at York University (Ontario), against distance education, which he sees as the latest episode in the saga of the corporatization of American higher education. Notes Noble's views on the relationship between politics and technology, intellectual property issues of courseware, and the…

  11. David F. Treagust: Congenial Soul, Science Educator, and International Research Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Kenneth; Rennie, Leonie; Venville, Grady; Chu, Hye-Eun; Fensham, Peter; Gallagher, James; Duit, Reinders; Graeber, Wolfgang; van den Berg, Ed; Hand, Brian; Ritchie, Stephen; Dillon, Justin

    2011-01-01

    For almost a half century David F. Treagust has been an exemplary science educator who has contributed through his dedication and commitments to students, curriculum development and collaboration with teachers, and cutting edge research in science education that has impacted the field globally, nationally and locally. A hallmark of his outstanding…

  12. Commentary on "An Evolutionarily Informed Education Science" by David C. Geary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, George F. R.

    2008-01-01

    Dr. David C. Geary's article centers on the concept of inherited folk psychology modules, together with the idea of a transition from primary to secondary learning. This article suggests that there exist only effective folk psychology modules, which are the result of interaction of inherited primary emotional systems with the physical, biological,…

  13. Finding Our Way Back to Healthy Eating: A Conversation with David A. Kessler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    In this interview, David Kessler, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, explains why so many people overeat. Changing lifestyles promote the constant availability of food and around-the-clock eating. In today's highly processed foods, food companies are able to dial in the exact amount of fat, sugar, and salt that will make…

  14. David Hume's Monetary Theory Revisited: Was He Really a Quantity Theorist and an Inflationist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wennerlind, Carl

    2005-01-01

    David Hume's monetary theory has been controversial since its formulation. Lately, the focus has been on Hume's alleged misapplication of the quantity theory of money. While he appears to subscribe to a simple quantity theory with money neutrality, in a famously contested passage in the essay Of Money, he violates the neutrality condition by…

  15. Proof of George Andrews’s and David Robbins’s q-TSPP conjecture

    PubMed Central

    Koutschan, Christoph; Kauers, Manuel; Zeilberger, Doron

    2011-01-01

    The conjecture that the orbit-counting generating function for totally symmetric plane partitions can be written as an explicit product formula has been stated independently by George Andrews and David Robbins around 1983. We present a proof of this long-standing conjecture.

  16. David Kirk on Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy: In Dialogue with Steven Stolz (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Steven A.; Kirk, David

    2015-01-01

    Forming the first of two articles, this dialogue begins from the dilemma posed in the writings of David Kirk that physical education is in crisis because the dominant practice of physical education as "sport-techniques" is resistant to change. In order to make sense of crisis discourse, the discussion explores the potential for change in…

  17. David Dorfman's "Here": A Community-Building Approach in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Mila

    2009-01-01

    Over a three-month period, Arcadia High School and Arizona State University formed a community partnership with the help of New York modern dance choreographer David Dorfman to create an original dance titled "Here." Dorfman's community-building approach is based on personal refection, collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving, genuine…

  18. An Interview with David Rindskopf: A Leading Voice on Teaching Statistics and Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David Rindskopf, a Distinguished Professor of Educational Psychology and Psychology at the City University of New York Graduate Center, where he has taught since 1979. His research and teaching are in the area of applied statistics, measurement, and research design. He is a fellow of the American Statistical…

  19. Improving the Quality of the Teaching Force: A Conversation with David C. Berliner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2001-01-01

    In a question-and-answer session, David C. Berliner discusses wide range of topics related to current state of the teaching profession, including qualities of the expert teacher, attracting higher quality teachers, teacher career-stage programs, merit pay, and promising reforms for teacher education in last decade. (PKP)

  20. Charles David Keeling and the story of atmospheric CO2 measurements.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel C

    2010-10-01

    When he was a postdoc in geochemistry at Caltech, Charles David Keeling found himself ideally prepared for the moment when funding for the International Geophysical Year enabled him to design and build a CO(2) monitoring station on Mauna Loa in Hawaii in 1957. He applied rigorous analytical procedures to a geophysical study with enormous implications for humanity. PMID:20536268

  1. More Purpose than Meaning in RE: A Response to James Conroy, David Lundie, and Vivienne Baumfield

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osbeck, Christina

    2012-01-01

    In their essay "Failures of meaning in religious education", James Conroy, David Lundie, and Vivienne Baumfield report findings from their recent project "Does Religious Education Work?", during which ethnographic studies in 24 British schools were conducted. In this response I first highlight the importance of the character of RE for considering…

  2. Forging Futures with Teens and Science Fiction: A Conversation with Greg Bear and David Brin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moltz, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Greg Bear and David Brin, two science fiction writers who started Reading for the Future, an international project geared toward secondary school students that shows teachers and librarians how science fiction inspires young readers. Discusses programs that have come out of this group; standards for books geared toward…

  3. On a Theme by Rene David: Comparative Law as "Technique Indispensable."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Explores a text by Rene David relating to the teaching of comparative law and the comparative teaching of law. Discusses bijural education as a way to comprehensively teach the civil and common law traditions. Addresses construction of a bijural curriculum and skills of comparative law teaching. (EV)

  4. Incorporating a Cross-Cultural Perspective in the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum: An Interview with David Matsumoto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, G. William, IV

    2000-01-01

    Provides an interview with David Matsumoto, Professor of Psychology and Director of the Culture and Emotion Research Laboratory at San Francisco State University. He has studied emotion, human interaction, and culture for more than 15 years. Focuses on cross-cultural psychology and perspectives in relation to the psychology curriculum. (CMK)

  5. 76 FR 66995 - David T. Koon, M.D.; Revocation of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... practitioner whose state license has been suspended or revoked. David W. Wang, 72 FR 54297, 54298 (2007); Sheran Arden Yeates, 71 FR 39130, 39131 (2006); Dominick A. Ricci, 58 FR 51104, 51105 (1993); Bobby Watts, 53 FR 11919, 11920 (1988). See also 21 U.S.C. 824(a)(3) (authorizing the revocation of a...

  6. Being "Stresslessly Invisible": The Rise and Fall of Videophony in David Foster Wallace's "Infinite Jest"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbat, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    In a satiric chapter of David Foster Wallace's novel "Infinite Jest," a mock media expert reports how American consumers of the near future recoil from a new communication device known as "videophony" and return to the voice-only telephone of the Bell Era. This article explores the said chapter in the framework of media theories reading the…

  7. Remapping Place and Narrative in Native American Literature: David Treuer's "The Hiawatha"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirwan, Padraig

    2007-01-01

    David Treuer's 1997 novel, "The Hiawatha," engages the traditional literary strategies employed by Native American writing, compares those strategies to earlier narratives (Native American and canonically American), offers a reassessment of indigenous novelistic structures, engages critical responses to tribal fiction, and does so in response to…

  8. Astronaut David Scott on slope of Hadley Delta during Apollo 15 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, with tongs and gnomon in hand, studies a boulder on the slope of Hadley Delta during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) or Rover is in right foreground. View is looking slightly south of west. 'Bennett Hill' is at extreme right. Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, took this photograph.

  9. Children and Religious Education in an Age of Globalization: Learning from David Ng

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Joyce Ann

    2002-01-01

    This article assesses David Ng's contribution to religious education with children. Ng offered practical strategies for full inclusion of children in faith communities. One limitation in Ng's work on children is its lack of attention to the role of culture, an unusual omission given his interest in multicultural religious education. This gap…

  10. Physics for Teachers: Understanding Physics: David Cassidy, Gerald Holton, & James Rutherford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubisz, John L.

    2009-11-01

    Physics for Teachers: Understanding Physics, by David Cassidy, Gerald Holton, & James Rutherford and published by Springer Verlag, New York, NY 10010 (2002), pp. xxiii + 851 80.00 hardback. ISBN 0-387-98756-8. Student Guide & Instructor Guide are also available. The text and Instructor Guide are available online at http://www.dcassidybooks.com/up.html

  11. Objectivism and Education: A Response to David Elkind's "The Problem with Constructivism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2005-01-01

    This paper responds to David Elkind's article "The Problem with Constructivism," published in the Summer 2004 issue of The EducationalForum. It argues that Elkind?s thesis?teacher, curricular, and societal readiness lead to the implementation of constructivism?is conceptually problematic. This paper also critiques constructivism and supports…

  12. 78 FR 36591 - David M. Lewis, D.M.D., Dismissal of Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ....'' Ronald J. Riegel, 63 FR 67132, 67133 (1998); see also William W. Nucklos, 73 FR 34330 (2008). So too..., 73 FR at 34330. Accordingly, there is neither a registration, nor an application, to act upon, and... Enforcement Administration David M. Lewis, D.M.D., Dismissal of Proceeding On December 5, 2012, the...

  13. David Douglas Duncan's Changing Views on War: An Audio-Visual Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Politowski, Richard

    This paper is the script for a slide presentation about photographer David Douglas Duncan and his view of war. It is intended to be used with slides made from pictures Duncan took during World War II, the Korean War, and the war in Viet Nam and published in various books and periodicals. It discusses a shift in emphasis to be seen both in the…

  14. 76 FR 39865 - Mr. David Creasey; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Mr. David Creasey; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment In... regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed the... environmental assessment (EA). The proposed 20-kilowatt project would be located on Lincoln Creek and...

  15. For David and All Children with Autism: From a Father's and Researcher's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, R. Sandlin, III

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his journey with autism which began when his son, David Braxton Hughes Lowe, was diagnosed in September of 2005. It was the confirmation of suspicions that he had had since he was about a year old. As a father and a physician, this was a particularly disheartening sequence of events. Over the next few months, he…

  16. Simulating the Camp David Negotiations: A Problem-Solving Tool in Critical Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Sean F.; Miller, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects critically on simulations. Building on the authors' experience simulating the Palestinian-Israeli-American Camp David negotiations of 2000, they argue that simulations are useful pedagogical tools that encourage creative--but not critical--thinking and constructivist learning. However, they can also have the deleterious…

  17. A Life in Research, an Adventure in Creativity: An Interview with David W. Chan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David W. Chan, founding director of the Program for the Gifted and Talented at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Chan has worked at the university for nearly 30 years, first in the Department of Psychiatry and then in the Department of Educational Psychology. Currently, he is also an adjunct professor of…

  18. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: David Weekley Homes, Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on David Weekley Homes of Houston, Texas. The builder plans homes as a "system," with features such as wood-framed walls that are air-sealed then insulated with R-13 unfaced fiberglass batts plus an external covering of R-2 polyisocyanurate rigid foam sheathing.

  19. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus interacts with origin recognition complexes at the LANA binding sequence within the terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subhash C; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Kaul, Rajeev; Robertson, Erle S

    2006-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) DNA persists in latently infected cells as an episome via tethering to the host chromosomes. The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of KSHV binds to the cis-acting elements in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the genome through its carboxy terminus. Previous studies have demonstrated that LANA is important for episome maintenance and replication of the TR-containing plasmids. Here we report that LANA associates with origin recognition complexes (ORCs) when bound to its 17-bp LANA binding cognate sequence (LBS). Chromatin immunoprecipitation of multiple regions across the entire genome from two KSHV-infected cell lines, BC-3 and BCBL-1, revealed that the ORCs predominantly associated with the chromatin structure at the TR as well as two regions within the long unique region of the genome. Coimmunoprecipitation of ORCs with LANA-specific antibodies shows that ORCs can bind and form complexes with LANA in cells. This association was further supported by in vitro binding studies which showed that ORCs associate with LANA predominantly through the carboxy-terminal DNA binding region. KSHV-positive BC-3 and BCBL-1 cells arrested in G(1)/S phase showed colocalization of LANA with ORCs. Furthermore, replication of The TR-containing plasmid required both the N- and C termini of LANA in 293 and DG75 cells. Interestingly, our studies did not detect cellular ORCs associated with packaged viral DNA as an analysis of purified virions did not reveal the presence of ORCs, minichromosome maintenance proteins, or LANA. PMID:16474132

  20. Increased EID1 nuclear translocation impairs synaptic plasticity and memory function associated with pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rugao; Lei, Joy X; Luo, Chun; Lan, Xun; Chi, Liying; Deng, Panyue; Lei, Saobo; Ghribi, Othman; Liu, Qing Yan

    2012-03-01

    Though loss of function in CBP/p300, a family of CREB-binding proteins, has been causally associated with a variety of human neurological disorders, such as Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Huntington's disease and drug addiction, the role of EP300 interacting inhibitor of differentiation 1 (EID1), a CBP/p300 inhibitory protein, in modulating neurological functions remains completely unknown. Through the examination of EID1 expression and cellular distribution, we discovered that there is a significant increase of EID1 nuclear translocation in the cortical neurons of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient brains compared to that of control brains. To study the potential effects of EID1 on neurological functions associated with learning and memory, we generated a transgenic mouse model with a neuron-specific expression of human EID1 gene in the brain. Overexpression of EID1 led to an increase in its nuclear localization in neurons mimicking that seen in human AD brains. The transgenic mice had a disrupted neurofilament organization and increase of astrogliosis in the cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, we demonstrated that overexpression of EID1 reduced hippocampal long-term potentiation and impaired spatial learning and memory function in the transgenic mice. Our results indicated that the negative effects of extra nuclear EID1 in transgenic mouse brains are likely due to its inhibitory function on CBP/p300 mediated histone and p53 acetylation, thus affecting the expression of downstream genes involved in the maintenance of neuronal structure and function. Together, our data raise the possibility that alteration of EID1 expression, particularly the increase of EID1 nuclear localization that inhibits CBP/p300 activity in neuronal cells, may play an important role in AD pathogenesis. PMID:22186421

  1. IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH FROM THE COAL AND NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES AND OTHER TECHNOLOGIES ASSOCIATED WITH ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates major public health impacts of electric power generation and transmission associated with the nuclear fuel cycle and with coal use. Only existing technology is evaluated. For the nuclear cycle, effects of future use of fuel reprocessing and long-term radioact...

  2. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Central Nervous System Development and Associated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Ana Maria; Moreno-Ramos, Oscar Andrés; Haider, Neena B

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily is composed of a wide range of receptors involved in a myriad of important biological processes, including development, growth, metabolism, and maintenance. Regulation of such wide variety of functions requires a complex system of gene regulation that includes interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying complex, and the proper recognition of ligands. NHRs are able to coordinate the expression of genes in numerous pathways simultaneously. This review focuses on the role of nuclear receptors in the central nervous system and, in particular, their role in regulating the proper development and function of the brain and the eye. In addition, the review highlights the impact of mutations in NHRs on a spectrum of human diseases from autism to retinal degeneration. PMID:27168725

  3. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Central Nervous System Development and Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ana Maria; Moreno-Ramos, Oscar Andrés; Haider, Neena B.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily is composed of a wide range of receptors involved in a myriad of important biological processes, including development, growth, metabolism, and maintenance. Regulation of such wide variety of functions requires a complex system of gene regulation that includes interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying complex, and the proper recognition of ligands. NHRs are able to coordinate the expression of genes in numerous pathways simultaneously. This review focuses on the role of nuclear receptors in the central nervous system and, in particular, their role in regulating the proper development and function of the brain and the eye. In addition, the review highlights the impact of mutations in NHRs on a spectrum of human diseases from autism to retinal degeneration. PMID:27168725

  4. Behavioral differences of irradiated persons associated with the Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk, and Chernobyl nuclear accidents.

    PubMed

    Collins, D L

    1992-10-01

    Three nuclear accidents besides Chernobyl have occurred in the former Soviet Union. The accidents occurred around Kyshtym and Chelyabinsk in the Ural Mountains between 1949 and 1967 and contaminated over one-half million people. The health ministries are now interested in the data previously collected on these irradiated populations in order to examine the health (e.g., psychological, hereditary, genome damage, etc.) implications of long-term radiation exposure. PMID:1454181

  5. Distribution of nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes in three pollinator fig wasps associated with Ficus pumila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Min; Compton, Stephen G.; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs) are nuclear sequences transferred from mitochondrial genomes. Although widespread, their distribution patterns among populations or closely related species are rarely documented. We amplified and sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene to check for NUMTs in three fig wasp species that pollinate Ficus pumila (Wiebesia sp. 1, 2 and 3) in Southeastern China using direct and cloned sequencing. Unambiguous sequences (332) of 487 bp in length belonging to 33 haplotypes were found by direct sequencing. Their distribution was highly concordant with those of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). Obvious signs of co-amplification of NUMTs were indicated by their uneven distribution. NUMTs were observed in all individuals of 12 populations of Wiebesia sp. 3, and 13 individuals of three northern populations of Wiebesia sp. 1. Sequencing clones of potential co-amplification products confirmed that they were NUMTs. These NUMTs either clustered as NUMT clades basal to mtDNA Cytb clades (basal NUMTs), or together with Cytb haplotypes. Basal NUMTs had either stop codons or frame-shifting mutations resulting from deletion of a 106 bp fragment. In addition, no third codon or synonymous substitutions were detected within each NUMT clade. The phylogenetic tree indicated that basal NUMTs had been inserted into nuclei before divergence of the three species. No significant pairwise differences were detected in their ratios of third codon substitutions, suggesting that these NUMTs originated from one transfer event, with duplication in the nuclear genome resulting in the coexistence of the 381 bp copy. No significant substitution differences were detected between Cytb haplotypes and NUMTs that clustered with Cytb haplotypes. However, these NUMTs coexisted with Cytb haplotypes in multiple populations, suggesting that these NUMT haplotypes were recently inserted into the nuclear genome. Both basal and recently inserted NUMTs were rare

  6. Sinkhole-type subsidence over abandoned coal mines in St. David, Illinois. Mine subsidence report, St. David, Illinois. A field survey and analysis of mine subsidence of abandoned coal mines in St. David, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Wildanger, E.G.; Mahar, J.; Nieto, A.

    1980-01-01

    This study examined the geologic data, mining history, and subsidence trends of the St. David region. Mine subsidence has occurred due to collapse of the abandoned mine workings. The known subsidence areas have been mapped and described. Results of the study include: (1) St. David has been undermined by both large shipping mines and smaller local mines; (2) sinkholes will continue to develop in this area in response to rock failure and roof collapse above the abandoned mine workings; (3) some primary factors that contribute to the sinkhole problems are the undermining and roof rock composition; (4) sinkholes will be smaller in the future; (5) ten of the 63 sinkholes occurred close enough to structures to cause damage, and only six sinkholes caused damage; (6) ways to minimize potential damage to future homes from sinkhole subsidence are manageable; (7) threats to residents lie in the collapse of heavy walls, brick chimneys, breaks in gas, water, or electrical lines; and (8) location of future subsidence is not predictable. (DP)

  7. Dss1 associating with the proteasome functions in selective nuclear mRNA export in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Mannen, Taro; Andoh, Tomoko; Tani, Tokio

    2008-01-25

    Dss1p is an evolutionarily conserved small protein that interacts with BRCA2, a tumor suppressor protein, in humans. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain lacking the dss1{sup +} gene ({delta}dss1) shows a temperature-sensitive growth defect and accumulation of bulk poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature. In situ hybridization using probes for several specific mRNAs, however, revealed that the analyzed mRNAs were exported normally to the cytoplasm in {delta}dss1, suggesting that Dss1p is required for export of some subsets of mRNAs. We identified the pad1{sup +} gene, which encodes a component of the 26S proteasome, as a suppressor for the ts{sup -} phenotype of {delta}dss1. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Pad1p could suppress neither the defect in nuclear mRNA export nor a defect in proteasome function. In addition, loss of proteasome functions does not cause defective nuclear mRNA export. Dss1p seems to be a multifunctional protein involved in nuclear export of specific sets of mRNAs and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in fission yeast.

  8. HE4 expression is associated with hormonal elements and mediated by importin-dependent nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Lokich, Elizabeth; Singh, Rakesh K.; Han, Alex; Romano, Nicole; Yano, Naohiro; Kim, Kyukwang; Moore, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Antiestrogens including tamoxifen and fulvestrant have been evaluated as chemotherapeutics for ovarian cancer, particularly in cases of platinum resistant disease. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is highly overexpressed in women with ovarian cancer and overexpression of HE4 has been found to correlate with platinum resistance. However, the role of HE4 in modulating responses to hormones and hormonal therapy has not been characterized in ovarian cancer. Here we demonstrate that 17β-estradiol, tamoxifen, and fulvestrant induce nuclear and nucleolar translocation of HE4 and that HE4 overexpression induces resistance to antiestrogens. HE4 was found to interact with estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and HE4 overexpression resulted in ER-α downregulation in vitro and in human ovarian cancers. We identified a novel role for importin-4 in governing the nuclear transport of HE4. Treatment with ivermectin, an importin inhibitor, blocked HE4/importin-4 nuclear accumulation and sensitized HE4-overexpressing ovarian cancer cells to fulvestrant and tamoxifen. PMID:24975515

  9. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HBx) were assessed in 328 HBV-associated HCCs and in 155 matched nontumorous tissues by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: The positive rates of HBsAg and cytoplasmic HBx staining in tumor tissue were lower than those in nontumorous tissue (7.3% vs. 57.4%, p < .001; 43.4% vs. 81.3%, p < .001). Conversely, nuclear HBx was detected more frequently in tumors than in nontumorous tissue (52.1% vs. 30.3%, p < .001). HCCs expressing HBsAg, HBcAg, or cytoplasmic HBx had smaller size; lower Edmondson-Steiner (ES) nuclear grade, pT stage, and serum alpha-fetoprotein, and less angioinvasion than HCCs not expressing HBV-associated proteins. Exceptionally, nuclear HBx-positive HCCs showed higher ES nuclear grade and more frequent large-vessel invasion than did nuclear HBx-negative HCCs. In survival analysis, only nuclear HBx-positive HCCs had shorter disease-free survival than nuclear HBx-negative HCCs in pT1 and ES nuclear grade 1–2 HCC subgroup (median, 126 months vs. 35 months; p = .015). Conclusions: Our data confirmed that expression of normal HBV-associated proteins generally decreases in tumor cells in comparison to nontumorous hepatocytes, with the exception of nuclear HBx, which suggests that nuclear HBx plays a role in recurrence of well-differentiated and early-stage HCCs. PMID:27086597

  10. 75 FR 77920 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ..., Contact: Mr. Andrew Stuyvenberg, Projects Branch 2, Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear Reactor... Commission. David J. Wrona, Chief, Projects Branch 2, Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear Reactor... proposed action (license renewal) include no action and reasonable alternative energy sources. As...

  11. TSH stimulates 32P-labeling of thyroid nuclear HMG 14, a protein associated with actively transcribed chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.; Palmer, R.J.; Spaulding, S.W.

    1982-04-01

    Thyroid slices were incubated with 32P with or without TSH. 32P-labeling of acid-soluble nuclear proteins was then examined by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. We found that TSH enhanced the labeling of the high mobility group protein HMG 14, a protein that is preferentially associated with actively transcribed chromatin. This observation suggests that changes in HMG 14 phosphorylation may be involved in mediating TSH-induced effects on the structure and function of active chromatin.

  12. Theoretical nuclear physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    As the three-year period FY93-FY96 ended, there were six senior investigators on the grant full-time: Bulgac, Henley, Miller, Savage, van Kolck and Wilets. This represents an increase of two members from the previous three-year period, achieved with only a two percent increase over the budget for FY90-FY93. In addition, the permanent staff of the Institute for Nuclear Theory (George Bertsch, Wick Haxton, and David Kaplan) continued to be intimately associated with our physics research efforts. Aurel Bulgac joined the Group in September, 1993 as an assistant professor, with promotion requested by the Department and College of Arts and Sciences by September, 1997. Martin Savage, who was at Carnegie-Mellon University, jointed the Physics Department in September, 1996. U. van Kolck continued as research assistant professor, and we were supporting one postdoctoral research associate, Vesteinn Thorssen, who joined us in September, 1995. Seven graduate students were being supported by the Grant (Chuan-Tsung Chan, Michael Fosmire, William Hazelton, Jon Karakowski, Jeffrey Thompson, James Walden and Mitchell Watrous).

  13. Topologically associated domains enriched for lineage-specific genes reveal expression-dependent nuclear topologies during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neems, Daniel S.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Smith, Erica D.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The linear distribution of genes across chromosomes and the spatial localization of genes within the nucleus are related to their transcriptional regulation. The mechanistic consequences of linear gene order, and how it may relate to the functional output of genome organization, remain to be fully resolved, however. Here we tested the relationship between linear and 3D organization of gene regulation during myogenesis. Our analysis has identified a subset of topologically associated domains (TADs) that are significantly enriched for muscle-specific genes. These lineage-enriched TADs demonstrate an expression-dependent pattern of nuclear organization that influences the positioning of adjacent nonenriched TADs. Therefore, lineage-enriched TADs inform cell-specific genome organization during myogenesis. The reduction of allelic spatial distance of one of these domains, which contains Myogenin, correlates with reduced transcriptional variability, identifying a potential role for lineage-specific nuclear topology. Using a fusion-based strategy to decouple mitosis and myotube formation, we demonstrate that the cell-specific topology of syncytial nuclei is dependent on cell division. We propose that the effects of linear and spatial organization of gene loci on gene regulation are linked through TAD architecture, and that mitosis is critical for establishing nuclear topologies during cellular differentiation. PMID:26957603

  14. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Carvo, Alan E.

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  15. The subcellular localization of PBX1 and EXD proteins depends on nuclear import and export signals and is modulated by association with PREP1 and HTH.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, J; Kilstrup-Nielsen, C; Blasi, F; Mavilio, F; Zappavigna, V

    1999-04-15

    Nuclear localization of the Extradenticle (EXD) and PBX1 proteins is regionally restricted during Drosophila and mammalian development. We studied the subcellular localization of EXD, PBX, and their partners Homothorax (HTH) and PREP1, in different cell contexts. HTH and PREP1 are cytoplasmic and require association with EXD/PBX for nuclear localization. EXD and PBX1 are nuclear in murine fibroblasts but not in Drosophila Schneider cells, in which they are actively exported to the cytoplasm. Coexpression of EXD/PBX with HTH/PREP1 causes nuclear localization of their heterodimers in both cell contexts. We propose that heterodimerization with HTH/PREP induces nuclear translocation of EXD and PBX1 in specific cell contexts by blocking their nuclear export. PMID:10215622

  16. The subcellular localization of PBX1 and EXD proteins depends on nuclear import and export signals and is modulated by association with PREP1 and HTH

    PubMed Central

    Berthelsen, Jens; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Blasi, Francesco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear localization of the Extradenticle (EXD) and PBX1 proteins is regionally restricted during Drosophila and mammalian development. We studied the subcellular localization of EXD, PBX, and their partners Homothorax (HTH) and PREP1, in different cell contexts. HTH and PREP1 are cytoplasmic and require association with EXD/PBX for nuclear localization. EXD and PBX1 are nuclear in murine fibroblasts but not in Drosophila Schneider cells, in which they are actively exported to the cytoplasm. Coexpression of EXD/PBX with HTH/PREP1 causes nuclear localization of their heterodimers in both cell contexts. We propose that heterodimerization with HTH/PREP induces nuclear translocation of EXD and PBX1 in specific cell contexts by blocking their nuclear export. PMID:10215622

  17. 75 FR 42469 - Firstenergy Nuclear Operating Company; Request for Licensing Action

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Firstenergy Nuclear Operating Company; Request for Licensing Action Notice is hereby given that by petition dated April 5, 2010, David Lochbaum (petitioner) has requested that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) take action with regard to...

  18. Structural protein 4.1R is integrally involved in nuclear envelope protein localization, centrosome–nucleus association and transcriptional signaling

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Adam J.; Almendrala, Donna K.; Go, Minjoung M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional structural protein 4.1R is required for assembly and maintenance of functional nuclei but its nuclear roles are unidentified. 4.1R localizes within nuclei, at the nuclear envelope, and in cytoplasm. Here we show that 4.1R, the nuclear envelope protein emerin and the intermediate filament protein lamin A/C co-immunoprecipitate, and that 4.1R-specific depletion in human cells by RNA interference produces nuclear dysmorphology and selective mislocalization of proteins from several nuclear subcompartments. Such 4.1R-deficiency causes emerin to partially redistribute into the cytoplasm, whereas lamin A/C is disorganized at nuclear rims and displaced from nucleoplasmic foci. The nuclear envelope protein MAN1, nuclear pore proteins Tpr and Nup62, and nucleoplasmic proteins NuMA and LAP2α also have aberrant distributions, but lamin B and LAP2β have normal localizations. 4.1R-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a similar phenotype. We determined the functional effects of 4.1R-deficiency that reflect disruption of the association of 4.1R with emerin and A-type lamin: increased nucleus–centrosome distances, increased β-catenin signaling, and relocalization of β-catenin from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Furthermore, emerin- and lamin-A/C-null cells have decreased nuclear 4.1R. Our data provide evidence that 4.1R has important functional interactions with emerin and A-type lamin that impact upon nuclear architecture, centrosome–nuclear envelope association and the regulation of β-catenin transcriptional co-activator activity that is dependent on β-catenin nuclear export. PMID:21486941

  19. Leukemia risk associated with chronic external exposure to ionizing radiation in a French cohort of nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2012-11-01

    Leukemia is one of the earliest cancer effects observed after acute exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Leukemia mortality after external exposure at low doses and low-dose rates has been investigated at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Nuclear Fuel Company (AREVA NC) after an additional follow-up of 10 years. The cohort included radiation-monitored workers employed for at least one year during 1950-1994 at CEA or AREVA NC and followed during 1968-2004. Association between external exposure and leukemia mortality was estimated with excess relative risk (ERR) models and time-dependent modifying factors were investigated with time windows. The cohort included 36,769 workers, followed for an average of 28 years, among whom 73 leukemia deaths occurred. Among the workers with a positive recorded dose, the mean cumulative external dose was 21.7 mSv. Results under a 2-year lag assumption suggested that the risk of leukemia (except chronic lymphatic leukemia) increased significantly by 8% per 10 mSv. The magnitude of the association for myeloid leukemia was larger. The higher ERR/Sv for doses received 2-14 years earlier suggest that time since exposure modifies the effect. The ERR/Sv also appeared higher for doses received at exposure rates ≥20 mSv per year. These results are consistent with those found in other studies of nuclear workers. However, confidence intervals are still wide. Further analyses should be conducted in pooled cohorts of nuclear workers. PMID:23050984

  20. The herpesvirus associated ubiquitin specific protease, USP7, is a negative regulator of PML proteins and PML nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Sarkari, Feroz; Wang, Xueqi; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

    2011-01-01

    The PML tumor suppressor is the founding component of the multiprotein nuclear structures known as PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), which control several cellular functions including apoptosis and antiviral effects. The ubiquitin specific protease USP7 (also called HAUSP) is known to associate with PML-NBs and to be a tight binding partner of two herpesvirus proteins that disrupt PML NBs. Here we investigated whether USP7 itself regulates PML-NBs. Silencing of USP7 was found to increase the number of PML-NBs, to increase the levels of PML protein and to inhibit PML polyubiquitylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. This effect of USP7 was independent of p53 as PML loss was observed in p53-null cells. PML-NBs disruption was induced by USP7 overexpression independently of its catalytic activity and was induced by either of the protein interaction domains of USP7, each of which localized to PML-NBs. USP7 also disrupted NBs formed from some single PML isoforms, most notably isoforms I and IV. CK2α and RNF4, which are known regulators of PML, were dispensable for USP7-associated PML-NB disruption. The results are consistent with a novel model of PML regulation where a deubiquitylase disrupts PML-NBs through recruitment of another cellular protein(s) to PML NBs, independently of its catalytic activity. PMID:21305000

  1. Association analyses of vitamin D-binding protein gene with compression strength index variation in Caucasian nuclear families

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X.-H.; Xiong, D.-H.; Liu, X.-G.; Guo, Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, J.; Recker, R. R.; Deng, H.-W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study was conducted to test whether there exists an association between vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene and compression strength index (CSI) phenotype. Candidate gene association analyses were conducted in total sample, male subgroup, and female subgroup, respectively. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significant association results were found in males, suggesting the importance of DBP gene polymorphisms on the variation in CSI especially in Caucasian males. Introduction CSI of the femoral neck (FN) is a newly developed phenotype integrating information about bone size, body size, and bone mineral density. It is considered to have the potential to improve the performance of risk assessment for hip fractures because it is based on a combination of phenotypic traits influencing hip fractures rather than a single trait. CSI is under moderate genetic determination (with a heritability of ~44% found in this study), but the relevant genetic study is still rather scarce. Methods Based on the known physiological role of DBP in bone biology and the relatively high heritability of CSI, we tested 12 SNPs of the DBP gene for association with CSI variation in 405 Caucasian nuclear families comprising 1,873 subjects from the Midwestern US. Association analyses were performed in the total sample, male and female subgroups, respectively. Results Significant associations with CSI were found with two SNPs (rs222029, P=0.0019; rs222020, P=0.0042) for the male subgroup. Haplotype-based association tests corroborated the single-SNP results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the DBP gene might be one of the genetic factors influencing CSI phenotype in Caucasians, especially in males. PMID:19543766

  2. Operational experience feedback in the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO).

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Ramon

    2004-07-26

    Operators in high-risk industries need to be learning organisations, learning from themselves and from the others. This presentation will describe how the nuclear industry is dealing in an integrated manner with the feedback of operating experience (OE), both internal and external, to increase the safety and reliability of power plants; it will describe how it; investigates events, reports events and analyses trends, shares information to prevent recurrence, performs corrective action and training, performs assessments to verify effectiveness. The plants have achieved great improvements in performance overall, and to improve further, the industry is evolving. Instead of just learning from past events (reactive) it is now focusing on lower level indications of problems (precursors) through low level events reporting, trending and analysis. A hallmark of the industry is its desire to be self-critical. Emphasis is placed on improving the bottom quartile performing plants. PMID:15231349

  3. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100{sup 0}C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced.

  4. David crighton, 1942-2000: a commentary on his career and his influence on aeroacoustic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ffowcs Williams, John E.

    David Crighton, a greatly admired figure in fluid mechanics, Head of the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge, and Master of Jesus College, Cambridge, died at the peak of his career. He had made important contributions to the theory of waves generated by unsteady flow. Crighton's work was always characterized by the application of rigorous mathematical approximations to fluid mechanical idealizations of practically relevant problems. At the time of his death, he was certainly the most influential British applied mathematical figure, and his former collaborators and students form a strong school that continues his special style of mathematical application. Rigorous analysis of well-posed aeroacoustical problems was transformed by David Crighton.

  5. Astronaut David Wolf participates in training for contingency EVA in WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut David A. Wolf participates in training for contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-58 mission. The mission specialist was about to be submerged ito a point of neutral buoyancy in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). In this view, Wolf is displaying the flexibility of his training version of the Shuttle extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) by lifting his arms above his head (31701); Wolf waves to the camera before he is submerged in the WETF (31702).

  6. Rittenhouse, David (1732-96) and Rittenhouse, Benjamin (1740-1825)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    David was an instrument-maker and astronomer, born in Paper Mill Run, PA, self-taught, as a young man he made clocks and telescopes, introduced the use of spider's webs as cross-hairs in transit telescopes and made orreries to show planetary motions. He used his own instruments for astronomy. He worked to survey the MASON and DIXON line and taught astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. He b...

  7. Spicy science: David Julius and the discovery of temperature-sensitive TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Diana M

    2015-01-01

    This invited biographical review covers the career of Dr. David Julius and his discovery of thermosensitive TRP channels. Dr. Julius is currently the Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine and Professor and Chair of Physiology at the University of California, San Francisco Medical School. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has received many distinguished awards for his landmark discoveries of the molecular basis of pain and thermosensation. PMID:27227012

  8. Using optically scanned 3D data in the restoration of Michelangelo's David

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopigno, Roberto; Cignoni, Paolo; Callieri, Marco; Ganovelli, Fabio; Impoco, G.; Pingi, P.; Ponchio, F.

    2003-10-01

    Modern 3D scanning technologies allow to reconstruct 3D digital representations of Cultural Heritage artifacts in a semi-automatic way, characterized by very high accuracy and wealth of details. The availability of an accurate digital representation opens several possibilities of utilization to experts (restorers, archivists, museum curators), or to ordinary people (students, museum visitors). 3D scanned data are commonly used for the production of animations, interactive visualizations, or virtual reality applications. A much more exciting opportunity is to use these data in the restoration of Cultural Heritage artworks. The integration between 3D graphic and restoration represents an open research field where many new supporting tools are required; the David restoration project has given several starting points and guidelines to the definition and development of innovative solutions. Digital 3D models can be used in two different but not subsidiary modes: as an instrument for the execution of specific investigations and as a supporting media for the archival and integration of all the restoration-related information, gathered with the different studies and analysis performed on the artwork. In this paper we present some recent work done in the framework of the Michelangelo's David restoration project. A 3D model of the David was reconstructed by the Digital Michelangelo Project, using laser-based 3D scanning technology. We have developed some tools to make those data accessible and useful in the restoration. Preliminary results are reported here together with some directions for further research.

  9. Geo-Space observation of atmospheric environmental effects associated with 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Hattori, Katsumi; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Our approach of using multiple geo-space observation is based on the LAIC (Lithosphere- Atmosphere- Ionosphere Coupling) model and the gained experience during similar analysis of Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. We do collect a unique dataset of geophysical data for the period around the time of the most active phase of Fukushima explosions (from 12 March till 31 March, 71-90 DOY). We analyzed following data sets: (i) ground temperature and relative humidity data from the JMA network of Japan, (ii) satellite meteorological data and assimilative models to obtain the integrated water vapor chemical potential; (iii) the infrared emission on the top of atmosphere measured by NOAA and GEOS satellites estimated as Outgoing Longwave Radiation; and (iv) multiple ionospheric measurements , including ground based ionosondes, GPS vTEC from GEONET network, COSMIC/FORMOSAT constellation occultation data, JASON satellite TEC measurements, and tomography reconstruction technique to obtain 3D distribution of electron concentration around the Fukushima power plant. As a result we were able to detect the anomalies in different geophysical parameters representing the dynamics of the Fukushima nuclear accident development and the effects on the atmospheric environment. Their temporal evolution demonstrates the synergy in different atmospheric anomalies development what implies the existence of the common physical mechanism described by the LAIC model.

  10. Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant, with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 850-950 °C. In this concept, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, a nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. This paper assesses the issues pertaining to shell-and-tube and compact heat exchangers. A detailed thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop inside both printed circuit and shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The analysis included evaluation of the role of key process parameters, geometrical factors in heat exchanger designs, and material properties of structural alloys. Calculations were performed for helium-to-helium, helium-to-helium/nitrogen, and helium-to-salt heat exchangers.

  11. Association of nuclear and mitochondrial genes with audiological examinations in Iranian patients with nonaminoglycoside antibiotics-induced hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Balali, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Farhadi, Mohammad; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh; Ashkezari, Mahmoud Dehghani; Hemami, Mohsen Rezaei; Arabzadeh, Hossein; Falah, Masoumeh; Meng, Goh Yong; Houshmand, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations play an important role in causing sensorineural hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of the mitochondrial genes RNR1, MT-TL1, and ND1 as well as the nuclear genes GJB2 and GJB6 with audiological examinations in nonfamilial Iranians with cochlear implants, using polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and RNA secondary structure analysis. We found that there were no novel mutations in the mitochondrial gene 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) in patients with and without GJB2 mutation (GJB2+ and GJB2−, respectively), but a total of six polymorphisms were found. No mutations were observed in tRNALeu(UUR) (MT-TL1). Furthermore, eight polymorphisms were found in the mitochondrial ND1 gene. Additionally, no mutations were observed in the nuclear GJB6 gene in patients in the GJB2− and GJB2+ groups. The speech intelligibility rating and category of auditory perception tests were statistically assessed in patients in the GJB2− and GJB2+ groups. The results indicated that there was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the categories of auditory perception score in the GJB2− group compared to that in the GJB2+ group. Successful cochlear implantation was observed among individuals with GJB2 mutations (GJB2+) and mitochondrial polymorphisms compared to those without GJB2 mutations (GJB2−). In conclusion, the outcome of this study suggests that variation in the mitochondrial and nuclear genes may influence the penetrance of deafness. Therefore, further genetic and functional studies are required to help patients in making the best choice for cochlear implants. PMID:26889084

  12. Characterization of two nuclear mammalian homologous DNA-pairing activities that do not require associated exonuclease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Akhmedov, A T; Bertrand, P; Corteggiani, E; Lopez, B S

    1995-01-01

    We have developed an assay to study homologous DNA-pairing activities in mammalian nuclear extracts. This assay is derived from the POM blot assay, described earlier, which was specific for RecA activity in bacterial crude extracts. In the present work, proteins from mammalian nuclear extracts were resolved by electrophoresis on SDS/polyacrylamide gels and then electrotransferred onto a nitrocellulose membrane coated with circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The blot obtained was incubated with a labeled homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Homologous pairing between the ssDNA and the labeled dsDNA was detected by autoradiography as a radioactive spot on the membrane. In nuclear extracts from mammalian cells, we found two major polypeptides of 100 and 75 kDa, able to promote the formation of stable plectonemic joints. Joint molecule formation required at least one homologous end on the dsDNA, but either end of the dsDNA could be recruited to initiate the reaction. For each polypeptide, the reaction required divalent cations such as Mg2+, Ca2+, or Mn2+. Although ATP was not necessary, ADP was inhibitory in each case. Unlike most of the known eukaryotic DNA-pairing proteins, both activities identified here were able to promote the formation of joint molecules without requiring an associated exonuclease activity. In addition, these two proteins were detected in cell lines from different tissues and from different mammalian species (human, mouse, and hamster). Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7878049

  13. RAP80, a novel nuclear protein that interacts with the retinoid-related testis-associated receptor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhijiang; Kim, Yong-Sik; Jetten, Anton M

    2002-08-30

    In this study, we describe the characterization of a novel nuclear protein, referred to as RAP80. The RAP80 cDNA was cloned from a human testis cDNA library and encodes a 719-amino acid protein containing two potential CX(2)CX(11)HX(3)C-type zinc finger motifs at its carboxyl-terminal region. Analysis of its genomic structure revealed that the RAP80 gene covers more than 90 kb and consists of 15 exons and 14 introns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapped the RAP80 gene to human chromosome 5q35. RAP80 mRNA is expressed in many human tissues, but its expression is particularly high in testis. In situ hybridization showed that RAP80 is highly expressed in germ cells of mouse testis but is not differentially regulated during spermatogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed that RAP80 is localized to the nucleus, where it is distributed in a speckled pattern. Deletion analysis showed that a bipartite nuclear localization signal at the amino terminus is important in mediating nuclear transport of RAP80. Monohybrid analysis showed that RAP80 might function as an active repressor of transcription. Mammalian two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that RAP80 was able to interact with the retinoid-related testis-associated receptor (RTR), an orphan receptor that has been implicated in the control of embryonic development and spermatogenesis. Pull-down analysis showed that RAP80 and RTR physically interact in vitro. Deletion and point mutation analyses revealed that part of the hinge domain of RTR is required for this interaction. RAP80 is able to inhibit the interaction of RTR with the co-repressor N-CoR likely by competing with N-CoR for RTR binding. Our results suggest that RAP80 may be functioning as a modulator of RTR signaling. PMID:12080054

  14. Association of nuclear and mitochondrial genes with audiological examinations in Iranian patients with nonaminoglycoside antibiotics-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Balali, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Farhadi, Mohammad; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh; Ashkezari, Mahmoud Dehghani; Hemami, Mohsen Rezaei; Arabzadeh, Hossein; Falah, Masoumeh; Meng, Goh Yong; Houshmand, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations play an important role in causing sensorineural hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of the mitochondrial genes RNR1, MT-TL1, and ND1 as well as the nuclear genes GJB2 and GJB6 with audiological examinations in nonfamilial Iranians with cochlear implants, using polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and RNA secondary structure analysis. We found that there were no novel mutations in the mitochondrial gene 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) in patients with and without GJB2 mutation (GJB2(+) and GJB2(-), respectively), but a total of six polymorphisms were found. No mutations were observed in tRNA(Leu) (() (UUR) ()) (MT-TL1). Furthermore, eight polymorphisms were found in the mitochondrial ND1 gene. Additionally, no mutations were observed in the nuclear GJB6 gene in patients in the GJB2(-) and GJB2(+) groups. The speech intelligibility rating and category of auditory perception tests were statistically assessed in patients in the GJB2(-) and GJB2(+) groups. The results indicated that there was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the categories of auditory perception score in the GJB2(-) group compared to that in the GJB2(+) group. Successful cochlear implantation was observed among individuals with GJB2 mutations (GJB2(+)) and mitochondrial polymorphisms compared to those without GJB2 mutations (GJB2(-)). In conclusion, the outcome of this study suggests that variation in the mitochondrial and nuclear genes may influence the penetrance of deafness. Therefore, further genetic and functional studies are required to help patients in making the best choice for cochlear implants. PMID:26889084

  15. Accumulation of Heterochromatin Components on the Terminal Repeat Sequence of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Mediated by the Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Shuhei; Ueda, Keiji; Nishimura, Ken; Do, Eunju; Ohsaki, Eriko; Okuno, Toshiomi; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    In the latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), its 160-kb circularized episomal DNA is replicated and maintained in the host nucleus. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is a key factor for maintaining viral latency. LANA binds to the terminal repeat (TR) DNA of the viral genome, leading to its localization to specific dot structures in the nucleus. In such an infected cell, the expression of the viral genes is restricted by a mechanism that is still unclear. Here, we found that LANA interacts with SUV39H1 histone methyltransferase, a key component of heterochromatin formation, as determined by use of a DNA pull-down assay with a biotinylated DNA fragment that contained a LANA-specific binding sequence and a maltose-binding protein pull-down assay. The diffuse localization of LANA on the chromosomes of uninfected cells changed to a punctate one with the introduction of a bacterial artificial chromosome containing most of the TR region, and SUV39H1 clearly colocalized with the LANA-associated dots. Thus, the LANA foci in KSHV-infected cells seemed to include SUV39H1 as well as heterochromatin protein 1. Furthermore, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the TR and the open reading frame (ORF) K1 and ORF50/RTA genes, but not the ORF73/LANA gene, lay within the heterochromatin during KSHV latency. Taken together, these observations indicate that LANA recruits heterochromatin components to the viral genome, which may lead to the establishment of viral latency and govern the transcription program. PMID:15220403

  16. A Polymorphism in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1 Alpha, rs7310409, Is Associated with Left Main Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Hanning; Gu, Haiyong; Teng, Xiao; Nie, Yu; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Shengshou; Zheng, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. Left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD) is a particularly severe phenotypic form of CAD and has a genetic basis. We hypothesized that some inflammation- and hyperhomocysteinemia-related gene polymorphisms may contribute to LMCAD susceptibility in a Chinese population. We studied the association between polymorphisms in the genes hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A; rs7310409, G/A), C-reactive protein (rs1800947 and rs3093059 T/C), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (rs1801133, C/T), and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (rs1076991, A/G) in 402 LMCAD and 804 more peripheral CAD patients in a Chinese population. Genotyping was performed using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry method. When the HNF1A rs7310409 GG homozygote genotype was used as the reference group, both the individual, GA and AA, and combined GA/AA genotypes were associated with an increased risk of LMCAD. This single nucleotide polymorphism (rs7310409) is strongly associated with plasma CRP levels. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that the HNF1A rs7310409 G/A functional polymorphism may contribute to the risk of LMCAD. PMID:25202455

  17. Prolonged induced hypothermia in hemorrhagic shock is associated with decreased muscle metabolism: a nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study.

    PubMed

    Lusczek, Elizabeth R; Lexcen, Daniel R; Witowski, Nancy E; Determan, Charles; Mulier, Kristine E; Beilman, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related death in war and is associated with significant alterations in metabolism. Using archived serum samples from a previous study, the purpose of this work was to identify metabolic changes associated with induced hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Twelve Yorkshire pigs underwent a standardized hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation protocol to simulate battlefield injury with prolonged evacuation to definitive care in cold environments. Animals were randomized to receive either hypothermic (33°C) or normothermic (39°C) limited resuscitation for 8 h, followed by standard resuscitation. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate serum metabolites from these animals at intervals throughout the hypothermic resuscitation period. Animals in the hypothermic group had a significantly higher survival rate (P = 0.02) than normothermic animals. Using random forest analysis, a difference in metabolic response between hypothermic and normothermic animals was identified. Hypothermic resuscitation was characterized by decreased concentrations of several muscle-related metabolites including taurine, creatine, creatinine, and amino acids. This study suggests that a decrease in muscle metabolism as a result of induced hypothermia is associated with improved survival. PMID:24052038

  18. Spatial location of indomethacin associated with unimeric amphiphilic carrier macromolecules as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Orban, David E; Moretti, Alysha; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2016-07-01

    A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including, proton NMR, relaxation analysis, two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy, has been used to demonstrate the spatial location of indomethacin within a unimolecular micelle. Understanding the location of drugs within carrier molecules using such NMR techniques can facilitate rational carrier design. In addition, this information provides insight to encapsulation efficiency of different drugs to determine the most efficient system for a particular bioactive. This study demonstrates that drugs loaded by the unimolecular amphiphile under investigation are not necessarily encapsulated but reside or localize to the periphery or interfacial region of the carrier molecule. The results have further implications as to the features of the unimolecular carrier that contribute to drug loading. In addition, evidence of drug retention associated with the unimolecular surfactant is possible in organic media, as well as in an aqueous environment. Such findings have implications for rational carrier design to correlate the carrier features to the drug of interest and indicate the strong retention capabilities of the unimolecular micelle for delivery applications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26864907

  19. Autoimmune response to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, M M; van Venrooij, W J; Marshall, G S

    2001-01-01

    The induction of autoantibodies to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) complexes is not well understood. We present evidence that healthy individuals with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have an increased frequency and quantity of antibodies to ribonucleoprotein, directed primarily against the U1-70k protein. A significant association between the presence of antibodies to CMV and antibodies to the total RNP targeted by the immune response to the spliceosome (to both the Sm and RNP; Sm/RNP) was found for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but not those with mixed connective-tissue disease. CMV thus may play a role in inducing autoimmune responses in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:11438044

  20. Report of the second meeting of the consultants on coupled processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Mangold, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    The second meeting of the Consultants on Coupled Processes Associated with Geological Disposal of Nuclear Waste occurred on January 15-16, 1985 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). All the consultants were present except Dr. K. Kovari, who presented comments in writing afterward. This report contains a brief summary of the presentations and discussions from the meeting. The main points of the speakers' topics are briefly summarized in the report. Some points that emerged during the discussions of the presentations are included in the text related to the respective talks. These comments are grouped under the headings: Comments on Coupled Processes in Unsaturated Fractured Porous Media, Comments on Overview of Coupled Processes, Presentations by Consultants on Selected Topics of Current Interest in Coupled Processes, and Recommendations for Underground Field Tests with Applications to Three Geologic Environments.

  1. Association of serum Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies and intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pfuhl, Catherina; Oechtering, Johanna; Rasche, Ludwig; Gieß, René M; Behrens, Janina R; Wakonig, Katharina; Freitag, Erik; Pache, Florence C; Otto, Carolin; Hofmann, Jörg; Eberspächer, Bettina; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2015-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. A characteristic feature of MS is an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin (Ig)G. In 90 patients with clinically isolated syndromes/early relapsing-remitting MS, serum antibodies to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1, but not to EBV viral capsid antigen, rubella, or varicella zoster virus, were higher (p=0.03) in those with than those without a calculated intrathecal IgG synthesis >0% and correlated with the percentage (r=0.27, p=0.009) and concentration (r=0.27, p=0.012) of intrathecally produced IgG. These findings suggest a link between EBV infection and the events leading to intrathecal IgG synthesis in patients with MS. PMID:26198934

  2. The association betweeen cancers and low level radiation: An evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J. |

    1993-05-01

    Cancer has traditionally been linked to exposure to high doses of radiation, but there is considerable controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans. Over the past 30 years there have been 14 studies conducted on employees at the Hanford nuclear weapons facility to investigate the relationship between exposure to low doses of radiation and mortality due to cancer (1-14). Interest in this issue was originally stimulated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which was trying to determine whether the linear extrapolation of health effects from high to low dose exposure was accurate. If the risk has been underestimated, then the maximum permissible occupational radiation exposure in the United States had been set too high. Because the health risk associated with low level radiation are unclear and controversial it seems appropriate to review the studies relating to Hanford at this time.

  3. Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-04-05

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made a preliminary assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. Two IHX designs namely, shell and tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in the assessment. Printed circuit heat exchanger, among various compact heat exchanger (HX) designs, was selected for the analysis. Irrespective of the design, the material considerations for the construction of the HX are essentially similar, except may be in the fabrication of the units. As a result, we have reviewed in detail the available information on material property data relevant for the construction of HX and made a preliminary assessment of several relevant factors to make a judicious selection of the material for the IHX. The assessment included four primary candidate alloys namely, Alloy 617 (UNS N06617), Alloy 230 (UNS N06230), Alloy 800H (UNS N08810), and Alloy X (UNS N06002) for the IHX. Some of the factors addressed in this report are the tensile, creep, fatigue, creep fatigue, toughness properties for the candidate alloys, thermal aging effects on the mechanical properties, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code compliance

  4. CUPLIKE NUCLEI (PROMINENT NUCLEAR INVAGINATIONS) IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA ARE HIGHLY ASSOCIATED WITH FLT3-ITD AND NPM1 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weina; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Koeppen, Hartmut; Leventaki, Vasiliki; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Jones, Dan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Falini, Brunangelo; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A small subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases has cuplike nuclei. Others have shown that these neoplasms have distinctive clinicopathologic and molecular features. METHODS We searched for AML cases with cuplike nuclei at our institution over a 10-year interval. We used a strict definition for cuplike nuclei, ≥10% blasts with nuclear invaginations ≥25% of the nuclear area. We reviewed relevant data and compared the results with a control group of AML without cuplike nuclei. RESULTS We identified 22 cases of AML with cuplike nuclei, classified as AML without maturation (FAB AML M1). Compared with a control group AML M1cases, AMLs with cuplike nuclei were significantly associated with FLT3-ITD mutations (86 vs. 38%, p=0.002), NPM1 mutations (86 vs. 19%, p<0.0001), both mutations (77% vs. 14%, p<0.0001), normal karyotype (86 vs. 40%, p=0.003), bone marrow blast count (90% vs. 84%, p=0.016), myeloperoxidase positivity (95% vs. 30% blasts, p=0.001), higher D-dimer levels (>5000 vs. 569 ng/mL, p=0.001), and absence of CD7 (91% vs. 52%, p=0.007), CD34 (82% vs. 5%, p<0.0001), and HLA-DR (59% vs. 10%, p=0.001). There were no differences in age, sex, or peripheral blood counts. The positive predictive value of recognizing AML with cuplike nuclei for FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and both mutations was 81%, 86%, and 77%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Cuplike nuclei in AML are highly associated with the presence of NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations and a number of clinicopathologic and immunophenotypic features. The recognition of AML with cuplike nuclei may be helpful in streamlining the workup of these neoplasms. PMID:19672946

  5. CESAR5.3: An Industrial Tool for Nuclear Fuel and Waste Characterization with Associated Qualification - 12067

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, Jean-Marc; Eschbach, Romain; Launay, Agnes; Binet, Christophe; THRO, Jean-Francois

    2012-07-01

    CEA and AREVA-NC have developed and used a depletion code named CESAR for 30 years. This user-friendly industrial tool provides fast characterizations for all types of nuclear fuel (PWR / UOX or MOX or reprocess Uranium, BWR / UOX or MOX, MTR and SFR) and the wastes associated. CESAR can evaluate 100 heavy nuclides, 200 fission products and 150 activation products (with Helium and Tritium formation). It can also characterize the structural material of the fuel (Zircalloy, stainless steel, M5 alloy). CESAR provides depletion calculations for any reactor irradiation history and from 3 months to 1 million years of cooling time. CESAR5.3 is based on the latest calculation schemes recommended by the CEA and on an international nuclear data base (JEFF-3.1.1). It is constantly checked against the CEA referenced and qualified depletion code DARWIN. CESAR incorporates the CEA qualification based on the dissolution analyses of fuel rod samples and the 'La Hague' reprocessing plant feedback experience. AREVA-NC uses CESAR intensively at 'La Hague' plant, not only for prospective studies but also for characterizations at different industrial facilities all along the reprocessing process and waste conditioning (near 150 000 calculations per year). CESAR is the reference code for AREVA-NC. CESAR is used directly or indirectly with other software, data bank or special equipment in many parts of the La Hague plants. The great flexibility of CESAR has rapidly interested other projects. CESAR became a 'tool' directly integrated in some other softwares. Finally, coupled with a Graphical User Interface, it can be easily used independently, responding to many needs for prospective studies as a support for nuclear facilities or transport. An English version is available. For the principal isotopes of U and Pu, CESAR5 benefits from the CEA experimental validation for the PWR UOX fuels, up to a burnup of 60 GWd/t and for PWR MOX fuels, up to 45 GWd/t. CESAR version 5.3 uses the CEA

  6. Germinal Center B-Cell-Associated Nuclear Protein (GANP) Involved in RNA Metabolism for B Cell Maturation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, N; Maeda, K

    2016-01-01

    Germinal center B-cell-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is upregulated in germinal center B cells against T-cell-dependent antigens in mice and humans. In mice, GANP depletion in B cells impairs antibody affinity maturation. Conversely, its transgenic overexpression augments the generation of high-affinity antigen-specific B cells. GANP associates with AID in the cytoplasm, shepherds AID into the nucleus, and augments its access to the rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region of the genome in B cells, thereby precipitating the somatic hypermutation of V region genes. GANP is also upregulated in human CD4(+) T cells and is associated with APOBEC3G (A3G). GANP interacts with A3G and escorts it to the virion cores to potentiate its antiretroviral activity by inactivating HIV-1 genomic cDNA. Thus, GANP is characterized as a cofactor associated with AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminase family molecules in generating diversity of the IgV region of the genome and genetic alterations of exogenously introduced viral targets. GANP, encoded by human chromosome 21, as well as its mouse equivalent on chromosome 10, contains a region homologous to Saccharomyces Sac3 that was characterized as a component of the transcription/export 2 (TREX-2) complex and was predicted to be involved in RNA export and metabolism in mammalian cells. The metabolism of RNA during its maturation, from the transcription site at the chromosome within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translation apparatus, needs to be elaborated with regard to acquired and innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on GANP as a component of TREX-2 in mammalian cells. PMID:27235683

  7. Association between shortage of energy supply and nuclear gene mutations leading to carcinomatous transformation

    PubMed Central

    DU, JIANPING

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria use glycolysis, an oxygen-independent metabolic pathway, whereas energy metabolism in the evolved eukaryotic cell is performed via oxidative phosphorylation, with all eukaryotic cell activities depending upon high energy consumption. However, in cancer cells evolving from eukaryotic cells, the energy metabolism switches from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The shortage of energy supply induces cancer cells to acquire specific characteristics. Base pair renewal is the most energy-consuming process in the cell, and shortage of energy supply may lead to errors in this process; the more prominent the shortage in energy supply, the more errors are likely to occur in base pair renewal, resulting in gene mutations and expression of cancer cell characteristics. Thus, shortage of energy supply is associated with carcinomatous transformation. PMID:26835010

  8. David's Law

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jackson Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2013-01-03

    01/25/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, And Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. David Abramovich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A. D.

    2013-06-01

    My parents recently found an old letter I had written them shortly before finishing the graduate program at the Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN) and which I myself had long since forgotten. My work was going well, but the future was unclear. I wrote that after graduate school maybe Zeldovich could offer me a job with him, but that "It'd be better if I went to the Food Institute but worked with Kirzhnits."...

  10. Numerical simulations of cloud rise phenomena associated with nuclear bursts: compressible and low Mach approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarska, Y.; Lomov, I.; Antoun, T.

    2008-12-01

    The nuclear cloud rise is a two stage phenomenon. The initial phase (fireball expansion) of the cloud formation is dominated by compressible flow effects and propagation of shock waves. At the later stage, shock waves become weak, the Mach number decreases and the time steps required by an explicit code to model the acoustic waves make simulation of the late time cloud dynamics with a compressible code very expensive. The buoyant cloud rise at this stage can be efficiently simulated by low Mach-number approximation. In this approach acoustic waves are removed analytically, compressible effects are included as a non-zero divergence constraint due to background stratification and the system of equations is solved implicitly using pressure projection methods. Our numerical approach includes fluid mechanical models that are able to simulate both compressible, incompressible and low Mach regimes. Compressible dynamics is simulated with the explicit high order Eulerian code GEODYN (Lomov et al., 2001). It is based on the second-order Godunov method of Colella and Woodward (1984) that is extended for multiple dimensions using operator-splitting. The code includes the material interface tracking based on a volume-of-fluid (VOF) approach of Miller and Puckett (1996). The code we use for the low Mach approximation (LMC) is based on the incompressible solver of Bell et al., (2003). An unsplit second-order Godunov method and the MAC projection method (Bell et al., 2003) are used. An algebraic slip multiphase model is implemented to describe fallout of dust particles. Both codes incorporate adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Additionally, the codes are explicitly coupled via input/output files. First, we compared solutions for an idealized buoyant bubble rise problem, that is characterized by low Mach numbers, in GEODYN and LMC codes. While the cloud evolution process is reproduced in both codes, some differences are found in the cloud rise speed and the cloud interface structure

  11. Overexpression Of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1beta Predicting Poor Prognosis Is Associated With Biliary Phenotype In Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Jing, Ying-Ying; Guo, Shi-Wei; Ye, Fei; Lu, Wen; Li, Quan; Dong, Yu-Long; Gao, Lu; Yang, Yu-Ting; Yang, Yang; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta (HNF-1B) is involved in the hepatobiliary specification of hepatoblasts to cholangiocytes during liver development, and is strongly expressed throughout adult biliary epithelium. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of HNF-1B in different pathologic subtypes of primary liver cancer, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), and the relationship between HNF-1B expression, clinicopathological features and prognosis. We retrospectively investigated 2 cohorts of patients, including 183 HCCs and 69 ICCs. The expression of HNF-1B was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that HNF-1B expression was associated with pathological subtype of primary tumor, and HNF-1B expression in HCC tissue may be associated with the change of phenotype on recurrence. The HNF-1B expression was positively correlated with biliary/HPC (hepatic progenitor cell) markers expression. Further, multivariable analysis showed that HNF-1B expression was an independent prognostic factor for both overall survival and disease-free survival of HCC patients. However, no correlation between HNF-1B expression and survival was found in ICC patients. In summary, HCC with high HNF-1B expression displayed biliary phenotype and tended to show poorer prognosis. HNF-1B-positive malignant cells could be bipotential cells and give rise to both hepatocytic and cholangiocytic lineages during tumorigenesis. PMID:26311117

  12. Using Molecular Initiating Events to Develop a Structural Alert Based Screening Workflow for Nuclear Receptor Ligands Associated with Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Claire L; Steinmetz, Fabian P; Cronin, Mark T D

    2016-02-15

    In silico models are essential for the development of integrated alternative methods to identify organ level toxicity and lead toward the replacement of animal testing. These models include (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ((Q)SARs) and, importantly, the identification of structural alerts associated with defined toxicological end points. Structural alerts are able both to predict toxicity directly and assist in the formation of categories to facilitate read-across. They are particularly important to decipher the myriad mechanisms of action that result in organ level toxicity. The aim of this study was to develop novel structural alerts for nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that are associated with inducing hepatic steatosis and to show the vast number of existing data that are available. Current knowledge on NR agonists was extended with data from the ChEMBL database (12,713 chemicals in total) of bioactive molecules and from studying NR ligand-binding interactions within the protein database (PDB, 624 human NR structure files). A computational structural alert based workflow was developed using KNIME from these data using molecular fragments and other relevant chemical features. In total, 214 structural features were recorded computationally as SMARTS strings, and therefore, they can be used for grouping and screening during drug development and hazard assessment and provide knowledge to anchor adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) via their molecular initiating events (MIEs). PMID:26787004

  13. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstmeier, Jana; Newcomer, Marcia E; Dennhardt, Sophie; Romp, Erik; Fischer, Jana; Werz, Oliver; Garscha, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are proinflammatory lipid mediators formed from arachidonic acid in a 2-step reaction catalyzed by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) requiring the formation of 5-HPETE [5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid] and its subsequent transformation to LTA4 5-LOX is thought to receive arachidonic acid from the nuclear membrane-embedded 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed an active site concealed by F177 and Y181 (FY cork). We examined the influence of the FY cork on 5-LOX activity and membrane binding in HEK293 cells in the absence and presence of FLAP. Uncapping the 5-LOX active site by mutation of F177 and/or Y181 to alanine (5-LOX-F177A, 5-LOX-Y181A, 5-LOX-F177/Y181A) resulted in delayed and diminished 5-LOX membrane association in A23187-stimulated cells. For 5-LOX-F177A and 5-LOX-F177/Y181A, formation of 5-LOX products was dramatically reduced relative to 5-LOX-wild type (wt). Strikingly, coexpression of FLAP in A23187-activated HEK293 cells effectively restored formation of 5-H(p)ETE (5-hydroxy- and 5-peroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) by these same 5-LOX mutants (≈60-70% 5-LOX-wt levels) but not of LTA4 hydrolysis products. Yet 5-LOX-Y181A generated 5-H(p)ETE at levels comparable to 5-LOX-wt but reduced LTA4 hydrolysis products. Coexpression of FLAP partially restored LTA4 hydrolysis product formation by 5-LOX-Y181A. Together, the data suggest that the concealed FY cork impacts membrane association and that FLAP may help shield an uncapped active site.-Gerstmeier, J., Newcomer, M. E., Dennhardt, S., Romp, E., Fischer, J., Werz, O., Garscha, U. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation. PMID:26842853

  14. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  15. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Conflict in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Is Associated with Nuclear and Plastidic Candidate Genes Encoding Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Vera S.; Zaytseva, Olga O.; Mglinets, Anatoliy V.; Shatskaya, Natalia V.; Kosterin, Oleg E.; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized. PMID:25789472

  16. Nuclear C-MYC expression level is associated with disease progression and potentially predictive of two year overall survival in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wen; Sun, Hanying; Meng, Fankai; Liu, Zeming; Xiong, Jing; Zhou, Sheng; Li, Fan; Hu, Jia; Hu, Zhiquan; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Upregulation of nuclear C-MYC protein has been reported to be an early event in prostate cancer (PCa); however, its clinicopathological and prognostic significance remain controversial. We determined the association of nuclear C-MYC protein expression with clinicopathological parameters, prognosis, ETS-related gene (ERG) expression, and TMPRSS2-ERG status in PCa. Methods: Nuclear C-MYC and ERG expression by immunohistochemistry and TMPRSS2-ERG status by triple-color probe fluorescence in situ hybridization assay were determined in 50 hormone-naïve PCa patients and 31 radical prostatectomy specimens. Results: Nuclear C-MYC immunostaining was negative, positive, and strong positive in 27.5%, 32.5%, and 40.0% of cases, respectively. C-MYC immunostaining was significantly associated with clinical T stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis (P < 0.001) and TMPRSS2-ERG status (P = 0.001) but not with ERG immunostaining (P = 0.818). In the Kaplan-Meier analysis, C-MYC positive cases were found to have worse 2-year OS compared with C-MYC negative cases (P = 0.027). However, in the univariate Cox analysis, only TMPRSS2-ERG status (hazard ratio [HR] 0.189, 95% CI 0.057-0.629; P = 0.007) and distant metastasis (HR 3.545, 95% CI 1.056-11.894; P = 0.040) were significantly associated with 2-year OS. After adjusting for these two factors, TMPRSS2-ERG status still impacted 2-year OS (HR 0.196, 95% CI 0.049-0.778; P = 0.020). Conclusions: Nuclear C-MYC overexpression may be associated with disease progression and potentially predictive of 2-year OS in PCa. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between nuclear C-MYC immunostaining and TMPRSS2-ERG status in PCa. PMID:25973080

  17. OBITUARY: Eur.Ing. Professor David Dew-Hughes in memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Archie; Dew-Hughes, Denise; Donaldson, Gordon; Palmer, Richard

    2007-06-01

    We regret to announce the death of David Dew-Hughes, the second Honorary Editor of Superconductor Science and Technology, in Autumn 2006. He was born in Manchester, the eldest of three children, attended Manchester Grammar School and took his first degree in metallurgy at Birmingham, before undertaking a Doctorate of Engineering at Yale University. After initial work for IBM on semiconductors, he returned to England as a lecturer in metallurgy at Cambridge University. There he devoted his career to superconductivity long before it became fashionable, starting a group on the properties of what we now know as type II materials, with his students Jan Evetts, Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. Between them they paved the way to our understanding of the magnetic vortex properties of these materials, and thus to the development of modern practical materials for superconducting magnets. Eur.Ing. Professor David Dew-Hughes 1932-2006 In 1965 he became a founding Senior Lecturer in physics at Lancaster University, moving to Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974. His final academic post was in engineering science at Oxford University where he also held a University College Tutorial Fellowship. As long ago as 1971 David wrote an authoritative review for Reports on Progress in Physics on 'The metallurgical enhancement of type II superconductors'. Following the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity, IOP Publishing launched Superconductor Science and Technology in 1988 and he was a founder member of its Editorial Board. When Jan Evetts retired as Honorary Editor in 1992, David was the natural choice as his successor. He served a five year term and remained on the Board as Deputy Editor until the end of 2000. To mark the 10th anniversary of high-temperature superconductivity in 1997, David edited a special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology in which past and present members of the Editorial Board contributed reviews of their specialities. He noted that at that time

  18. Fluxes of radiocaesium associated with suspended sediment in rivers impacted by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh; Blake, Will; Onda, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Yamashiki, Yosuke; Matsuura, Yuki; Taylor, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which followed the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of Cs-134 and Cs-137 into the surrounding environment, where highly elevated levels are reported. There is considerable concern about the redistribution of these radioactive contaminants from the atmosphere to vegetation, soil and aquatic systems. Fluvial redistribution of radiocaesium may contaminate downstream areas that were subject to low fallout and deliver significant quantities of highly contaminated fine sediment to the coastal zone. This study reports on the magnitude of fluvial transfer of Cs-134 and Cs-137 through river networks located across the fallout region. Initially six nested river monitoring stations were established within the Abukuma River basin from June 2011. Subsequently, an additional 23 stations were established between October 2012 and January 2013, which included stations within the Abukuma basin as well as smaller coastal catchments north and south of the power plant. Combined, these 29 sites represent a globally-unique river monitoring network designed to quantify sediment-associated transfer of radiocaesium from headwaters to the Pacific Coast of Japan. The catchments range in area from 8 to 5,172 km2 and span a large range in spatially-averaged radiocaesium inventories. Flow and turbidity (converted to suspended sediment concentration) were measured at each station while bulk suspended sediment samples were collected at regular intervals using time-integrated samplers to allow measurement of Cs-134 and Cs-137 activity concentrations by gamma spectrometry. Preliminary monitoring data showed highly elevated but also highly variable fluxes of radiocaesium in rivers across the fallout region. High magnitude flows in response to typhoon events exported large quantities of radiocaesium. Rivers are an important and continuing source of radiocaesium input to the coastal environment and the Pacific Ocean in

  19. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    SciTech Connect

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  20. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    sufficiently close to any corrugated—and/or any smooth—surface and thus enforce a strong vdW-type adhesion; it exploits what is then essentially a contact force (dominated by the attraction exerted in the near-surface regions) to defy the pull of gravity on its own bulk. This Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter special issue is dedicated to the memory of David C Langreth. David is a dearly missed friend and mentor who inspired many of us. He was an outstanding condensed matter theorist and a scholar who greatly influenced us through his many-particle-physics based insights into density functional theory (DFT), surface science and related areas. His seminal works range from conserving formulations of interacting nonequilibrium transport [1] and formal-scattering theory [2] to an explicit formulation [3] of the exact DFT exchange-correlation energy in the adiabatic connection formula (ACF), the latter also being derived independently by Gunnarsson and Lundqvist [4]. David's portfolio also includes an analysis [5] that helped catalyze and guide the development of DFT from the local-density approximation (LDA) to the formulations of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs). Another salient contribution of David's is in the area of vdW interactions in materials. He was a key architect of the vdW density functional (vdW-DF) method [6, 7]. This method was developed in a long-standing Rutgers-Chalmers collaboration between David's group and that of Bengt I Lundqvist, later extending to a wider group of researchers on both sides of the Atlantic. Plasmons are collective excitations that depend on electron-density variation. The plasmon response can be seen as defining the nature of the LDA [4] and their description can thus also be seen as contributing to the success of GGA. The vdW-DF method is a regular constraint-based density functional (for ground-state DFT) which is derived within the ACF framework and which emphasizes the electrodynamical nature of the coupling between

  1. Estimated association between dwelling soil contamination and internal radiation contamination levels after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nomura, Shuhei; Sakaihara, Kikugoro; Kato, Shigeaki; Leppold, Claire; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Morita, Tomohiro; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Measurement of soil contamination levels has been considered a feasible method for dose estimation of internal radiation exposure following the Chernobyl disaster by means of aggregate transfer factors; however, it is still unclear whether the estimation of internal contamination based on soil contamination levels is universally valid or incident specific. Methods To address this issue, we evaluated relationships between in vivo and soil cesium-137 (Cs-137) contamination using data on internal contamination levels among Minamisoma (10–40 km north from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant), Fukushima residents 2–3 years following the disaster, and constructed three models for statistical analysis based on continuous and categorical (equal intervals and quantiles) soil contamination levels. Results A total of 7987 people with a mean age of 55.4 years underwent screening of in vivo Cs-137 whole-body counting. A statistically significant association was noted between internal and continuous Cs-137 soil contamination levels (model 1, p value <0.001), although the association was slight (relative risk (RR): 1.03 per 10 kBq/m2 increase in soil contamination). Analysis of categorical soil contamination levels showed statistical (but not clinical) significance only in relatively higher soil contamination levels (model 2: Cs-137 levels above 100 kBq/m2 compared to those <25 kBq/m2, RR=1.75, p value <0.01; model 3: levels above 63 kBq/m2 compared to those <11 kBq/m2, RR=1.45, p value <0.05). Conclusions Low levels of internal and soil contamination were not associated, and only loose/small associations were observed in areas with slightly higher levels of soil contamination in Fukushima, representing a clear difference from the strong associations found in post-disaster Chernobyl. These results indicate that soil contamination levels generally do not contribute to the internal contamination of residents in Fukushima; thus, individual

  2. Deceptive single-locus taxonomy and phylogeography: Wolbachia-associated divergence in mitochondrial DNA is not reflected in morphology and nuclear markers in a butterfly species

    PubMed Central

    Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa; Simonsen, Thomas J; Bromilow, Sean; Wahlberg, Niklas; Sperling, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The satyrine butterfly Coenonympha tullia (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) displays a deep split between two mitochondrial clades, one restricted to northern Alberta, Canada, and the other found throughout Alberta and across North America. We confirm this deep divide and test hypotheses explaining its phylogeographic structure. Neither genitalia morphology nor nuclear gene sequence supports cryptic species as an explanation, instead indicating differences between nuclear and mitochondrial genome histories. Sex-biased dispersal is unlikely to cause such mito-nuclear differences; however, selective sweeps by reproductive parasites could have led to this conflict. About half of the tested samples were infected by Wolbachia bacteria. Using multilocus strain typing for three Wolbachia genes, we show that the divergent mitochondrial clades are associated with two different Wolbachia strains, supporting the hypothesis that the mito-nuclear differences resulted from selection on the mitochondrial genome due to selective sweeps by Wolbachia strains. PMID:24455146

  3. Astronaut David Scott watching hammer and feather fall to lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, Apollo 15 commander, watches a geological hammer and a feather hit the lunar surface simultaneously in a test of Galileo's law of motion concerning falling bodies, as seen in this color reproduction taken from a transmission made by the RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Scott released the hammer from his right hand and the feather from his left at the same instant. This experiment occured toward the end of the third and final lunar surface extravehicular activity.

  4. Johannes Kepler and David Fabricius: Their Discussion on the Nova of 1604

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, Miguel A.

    David Fabricius (1564-1617) was one of the most important astronomers in the period between 1596, the year of publication of Kepler's Mysterium cosmographicum, and 1609, the year of publication of the Astronomia nova.1 Kepler praised Fabricius as the most accurate observational astronomer after Tycho Brahe's death in 1601.2 Fabricius was a Reformed pastor in Ostfriesland (East Frisia), his remote natal region, and a vocational astronomer. He published nothing in the field of astronomy except for the short treatises between 1604 and 1606 concerning the nova that appeared in October 1604 in Serpentarius.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Père David's Vole, Eothenomys melanogaster (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shunde; Chen, Guiying; Wei, Haixue; Wang, Qiong

    2016-07-01

    The Père David's Vole, Eothenomys melanogaster belongs to subfamily Arvicolinae. It is widespread in south China, and ranges into northern Southeast Asia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eothenomys melanogaster was determined. The mitogenome is 16,331 base pairs in length. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of E. melanogaster and other 17 rodents were used for phylogenetic analyses. Tree constructed using Bayesian phylogenetic methods demonstrated that E. melanogaster as a sister to E. chinensis, was clustered in subfamily Arvicolinae. The monophyly of the genus Eothenomys was supported as well with Eothenomys sister to the genus Myodes. PMID:26024146

  6. Memorial tribute to astrobiology pioneers Dr. David S. Mckay and academician Georgy A. Zavarzin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Rozhnov, Sergei V.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2013-09-01

    During the past two years, the world has lost two great pioneers of the field of Astrobiology-Dr. David Stewart McKay who worked at the NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, USA and Academician Georgy Alexandrovich Zavarzin of the Institute of Microbiology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Professor of the Moscow State University in Moscow, Russia. The Volume of the Proceedings of the 2013 SPIE Instruments, Methods, and Missions for Astrobiology XVI is dedicated to the memory of these great scientists. We remember our dear friends and review some of their many important contributions to Planetary Science, Geology, Meteoritics, Microbiology and Astrobiology.

  7. Astronaut David Scott gives salute beside U.S. flag during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, gives a military salute while standing beside the deployed U.S. flag during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. The flag was deployed toward the end of EVA-2. The Lunar Module 'Falcon' is partially visible on the right. Hadley Delta in the background rises approximately 4,000 meters (about 13,124 feet) above the plain. The base of the mountain is approximately 5 kilometers (about 3 statute miles) away. This photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot.

  8. STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown arrives at KSC for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown arrives at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. Other crew members are Commander Rick Husband, Pilot William 'Willie' McCool, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla and Laurel Clark and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon (the first Israeli astronaut). STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is scheduled for Jan. 16, 2003.

  9. Sit Down with Sabin: David Schlegel: Hunting Dark Energy (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Sabin; Schlegel, David

    2011-06-22

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory physicist and dark energy hunter David Schlegel chats with Sabin Russell, former San Francisco Chronicle reporter turned Berkeley Lab science writer, June 22, 2011. Their conversation is the first installment of "Sit Down With Sabin," a weekly conversation hosted by Russell. Over the course of five conversations with Berkeley Lab staff this summer, Russell will explore the ups and downs of innovative science — all without the aid of PowerPoint slides. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  10. STS-57 PLC G. David Low, in LES, listens to egress briefing at JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Payload Commander (PLC) and Mission Specialist (MS) G. David Low, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), smiles for the photographer during an emergency egress briefing. Low, along with the other STS-57 crewmembers, will participate in an emergency egress simulation in JSC's Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) to familiarize himself with the procedures necessary in the event of an emergency during launch or landing aboard the space shuttle. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  11. Dr. David Brown poses with students at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Brown (right), a NASA astronaut, poses with students in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. From left, the students are Kristin Rexford, Danitra Anderson, Dominique Smith, Fallon Davis, and Qiana Taylor. Brown was at the school to attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair. The school had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut who was one of a crew of seven, who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  12. Pictures of microbiology -- the biofilm imaging facility under Dr. David C. White.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Robert J

    2008-07-01

    This contribution honoring David C. White (DC) summarizes the five years I interacted with him on a daily basis in his laboratory. Over this time we worked on many different projects all tied together by the unifying principle now recognized as central to bacterial life in nature: biofilms. My goal is to convey some of the excitement and joy of working with DC and, from my perspective, that means telling how the Biofilm Imaging Facility at the Center for Environmental Biotechnology (CEB) came into existence and describing some of the projects on which DC and I worked. PMID:17698230

  13. Best Practices Case Study: David Weekley Homes - Eagle Springs and Waterhaven, Houston, TX

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study describing David Weekley Homes, Houston Division, has qualified more than 1,240 homes for the DOE Builders Challenge. Advanced framed 2x6 walls with open headers and two-stud corners allow more room for R-20 damp sprayed cellulose wall cavity insulation that is covered with R-5 rigid XPS foam. A radiant barrier cuts heat gain in the R-38 insulated vented attics. Draft stopping at fireplace and duct chases and behind tubs, gluing sheetrock to framing, and extensive caulking make for air-tight homes at 3.0 ACH50.

  14. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal

  15. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  16. NEW MATERIALS DEVELOPED TO MEET REGULATORY AND TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-18

    For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m{sup 3} (250,000 yd{sup 3}) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent industrial worker

  17. Nuclear Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 Is Highly Associated with Better Prognosis of Human Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma through the Suppression of Cell Proliferation, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang-Liang; Zhao, Jin-Long; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Jun-Zheng; Liu, Yan-Pu; Yu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) overexpression is a well acknowledged predictor of poor response to chemotherapy, but MRP1 also correlated to better prognosis in some reports, especially for patients not pretreated with chemotherapy. In our previous study, we found nuclear translocation of MRP1 in mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) for the first time. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the function of nuclear MRP1 in MEC. Materials and Methods Human MEC tissue samples of 125 patients were selected and stained using immunohistochemistry. The expression level of total MRP1/nuclear MRP1 of each sample was evaluated by expression index (EI) which was scored using both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The correlations between the clinicopathologic parameters and the EI of nuclear MRP1 were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation analysis, respectively. The effects of RNAi-mediated downregulation of nuclear MRP1 on MEC cells were assessed using flow cytometric analysis, MTT assay, plate colony formation assay, transwell invasion assay and monolayer wound healing assay. Results In this study, we found the EI of nuclear MRP1 was negatively correlated to the pathologic grading (r = -0.498, P<0.01) / clinical staging (r = -0.41, P<0.01) / tumor stage (r = -0.28, P = 0.02) / nodal stage (r = -0.29, P<0.01) of MEC patients. The RNAi-mediated downregulation of nuclear MRP1 further proved that the downregulation of nuclear MRP1 could increase the cell replication, growth speed, colony formation efficiency, migration and invasion ability of MEC cells. Conclusion Our results suggested that nuclear MRP1 is highly associated with better prognosis of human mucoepidermoid carcinoma and further study of its function mechanism would provide clues in developing new treatment modalities of MEC. PMID:26829120

  18. 77 FR 66581 - Notice of Renewal of the Civil Nuclear Trade Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... International Trade Administration Notice of Renewal of the Civil Nuclear Trade Advisory Committee AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Renewal of the Civil Nuclear Trade Advisory... September 16, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Kincaid, Office of Energy and...

  19. Mesothelial cell and anti-nuclear autoantibodies associated with pleural abnormalities in an asbestos exposed population of Libby MT.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucas S; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Putnam, Elizabeth A; Serve, Kinta M; Pfau, Jean C

    2012-01-25

    Despite data linking amphibole asbestos exposure with production of autoantibodies, the role of autoantibodies in subsequent disease is unknown. Residents of Libby, Montana have experienced significant exposure to amphibole asbestos due to the mining of asbestos-contaminated vermiculite near the community over several decades. This population predominantly exhibits pleural disease, and an autoimmune-like disorder that has yet to be well defined. This study sought to determine whether autoantibodies from asbestos-exposed subjects were associated with pleural lesions. Serum samples of subjects from Libby were evaluated for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAA) using cell based ELISA. The presence of radiographic abnormalities detected during the time frame of serum collection was determined from screening records. In accord with previous studies, 61.3% (76/124) of the Libby samples were ANA positive, a frequency much higher than expected for a healthy population. The odds of having pleural or interstitial abnormalities in Libby was nearly 3.55 times greater for individuals that tested positive for ANA compared with individuals negative for ANA (p=0.004). MCAA were also detected at a strikingly high frequency (18.5%; 23/124) in samples from Libby. Individuals with MCAA had 4.9 times the risk of having pleural abnormalities compared to MCAA-negative subjects (p=0.044). In conclusion, ANA and MCAA were elevated in a study population that was known to have chronic exposure to asbestos, and these autoantibodies were associated with pleural abnormalities, the predominant finding in the asbestos-exposed population of Libby. Additional research is needed to determine the role these autoantibodies may play in pulmonary disease. PMID:22085844

  20. Factors associated with nurses' intention to leave their jobs after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshinobu; Hayashida, Naomi; Orita, Makiko; Urata, Hideko; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Nakashima, Yumiko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey among nurses who were working at the Fukushima Medical University Hospital at the time of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to clarify the factors associated with their intention to leave their jobs during the radiation emergency. We asked 345 nurses (17 men and 328 women) about their intention to leave their jobs after the accident. We also asked about relevant factors including the participants' demographic factors, living situation, working status, and knowledge of radiation health effects. We found that living with preschoolers (OR = 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.44, p = 0.042), anxiety about life in Fukushima City after the accident (OR = 5.55, 95%CI: 1.18-26.13, p = 0.030), consideration of evacuation from Fukushima after the accident (OR = 2.42, 95%CI: 1.45-4.06, p = 0.001), consideration of the possible radiation health effects in children (OR = 1.90, 95%CI: 1.02-3.44, p = 0.042), and anxiety about relationships with colleagues in the hospital after the accident (OR = 3.23, p = 0.001) were independently associated with the nurses' intention to leave their jobs after the accident. On the other hand, the percentage of nurses with knowledge on radiation health effects was relatively low among those who had the intention to leave the job and among those who did not have the intention to leave the job after the accident, with no significant differences between the two groups. Our results suggest the need for an education program for nurses regarding radiation health effects. PMID:25816345

  1. Cowden syndrome-associated germline SDHD variants alter PTEN nuclear translocation through SRC-induced PTEN oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wanfeng; He, Xin; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the PTEN tumor-suppressor gene and germline variations in succinate dehydrogenase subunit D gene (SDHD-G12S, SDHD-H50R) are associated with a subset of Cowden syndrome and Cowden syndrome-like individuals (CS/CSL) and confer high risk of breast, thyroid and other cancers. However, very little is known about the underlying crosstalk between SDHD and PTEN in CS-associated thyroid cancer. Here, we show SDHD-G12S and SDHD-H50R lead to impaired PTEN function through alteration of its subcellular localization accompanied by resistance to apoptosis and induction of migration in both papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines. Other studies have shown elevated proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (SRC) activity in invasive thyroid cancer cells; so, we explore bosutinib, a specific inhibitor for SRC, to explore SRC as a mediator of SDH-PTEN crosstalk in this context. We show that SRC inhibition could rescue SDHD dysfunction-induced cellular phenotype and tumorigenesis only when wild-type PTEN is expressed, in thyroid cancer lines. Patient lymphoblast cells carrying either SDHD-G12S or SDHD-H50R also show increased nuclear PTEN and more oxidized PTEN after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Like in thyroid cells, bosutinib decreases oxidative PTEN in patient lymphoblast cells carrying SDHD variants, but not in patients carrying both SDHD variants and PTEN truncating mutations. In summary, our data suggest a novel mechanism whereby SDHD germline variants SDHD-G12S or SDHD-H50R induce thyroid tumorigenesis mediated by PTEN accumulation in the nucleus and may shed light on potential treatment with SRC inhibitors like bosutinib in PTEN-wild-type SDHD-variant/mutation positive CS/CSL patients and sporadic thyroid neoplasias. PMID:25149476

  2. Factors Associated with Nurses’ Intention to Leave Their Jobs after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoshinobu; Hayashida, Naomi; Orita, Makiko; Urata, Hideko; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Nakashima, Yumiko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey among nurses who were working at the Fukushima Medical University Hospital at the time of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to clarify the factors associated with their intention to leave their jobs during the radiation emergency. We asked 345 nurses (17 men and 328 women) about their intention to leave their jobs after the accident. We also asked about relevant factors including the participants’ demographic factors, living situation, working status, and knowledge of radiation health effects. We found that living with preschoolers (OR = 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02–3.44, p = 0.042), anxiety about life in Fukushima City after the accident (OR = 5.55, 95%CI: 1.18–26.13, p = 0.030), consideration of evacuation from Fukushima after the accident (OR = 2.42, 95%CI: 1.45–4.06, p = 0.001), consideration of the possible radiation health effects in children (OR = 1.90, 95%CI: 1.02–3.44, p = 0.042), and anxiety about relationships with colleagues in the hospital after the accident (OR = 3.23, p = 0.001) were independently associated with the nurses’ intention to leave their jobs after the accident. On the other hand, the percentage of nurses with knowledge on radiation health effects was relatively low among those who had the intention to leave the job and among those who did not have the intention to leave the job after the accident, with no significant differences between the two groups. Our results suggest the need for an education program for nurses regarding radiation health effects. PMID:25816345

  3. Nuclear envelope-associated dynein drives prophase centrosome separation and enables Eg5-independent bipolar spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Raaijmakers, Jonne A; van Heesbeen, Roy G H P; Meaders, Johnathan L; Geers, Erica F; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Medema, René H; Tanenbaum, Marvin E

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule motor protein kinesin-5 (Eg5) provides an outward force on centrosomes, which drives bipolar spindle assembly. Acute inhibition of Eg5 blocks centrosome separation and causes mitotic arrest in human cells, making Eg5 an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. Using in vitro directed evolution, we show that human cells treated with Eg5 inhibitors can rapidly acquire the ability to divide in the complete absence of Eg5 activity. We have used these Eg5-independent cells to study alternative mechanisms of centrosome separation. We uncovered a pathway involving nuclear envelope (NE)-associated dynein that drives centrosome separation in prophase. This NE-dynein pathway is essential for bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5, but also functions in the presence of full Eg5 activity, where it pulls individual centrosomes along the NE and acts in concert with Eg5-dependent outward pushing forces to coordinate prophase centrosome separation. Together, these results reveal how the forces are produced to drive prophase centrosome separation and identify a novel mechanism of resistance to kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:23034402

  4. Chloroplast Biogenesis-Associated Nuclear Genes: Control by Plastid Signals Evolved Prior to Their Regulation as Part of Photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Alison C.; Khan, Safina; López-Juez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of photosynthetically competent chloroplasts occurs in angiosperm seedlings when first exposed to light, and is due to the control by light of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs), also dependent upon plastid-to-nucleus “biogenic” communication signals. The relationship between light- and plastid signal-regulation of PhANGs is close but poorly understood. In contrast, many conifers green in the dark and the promoter of a pine PhANG, Lhcb, is active in the dark in tobacco. Here, we show that the activity of this promoter in tobacco is sensitive to plastid photobleaching, or to the inhibition of plastid translation in the light or the dark, and the same interventions reduce expression of the native gene in pine seedlings, demonstrating classic plastid biogenic signaling in gymnosperms. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutations causing defective plastid biogenesis suppress the effect in darkness of mutations in COP1 and DET1, repressors of photomorphogenesis, for the expression of several PhANGs but not a photosynthesis-unrelated, light-regulated gene. GLK transcriptional regulators mediate the response of LHCB but not of other tested PhANGs. We propose the ability to suppress PhANG response to positive plastid biogenic signals in the dark may have contributed to the evolution of light-controlled chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:26697036

  5. Dinner at Orazio's--David Triggle the model of a mentor.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan L

    2015-11-15

    What does it mean to be a mentor in science? Definitions of mentorship are freely spouted in publications and include concepts such as academic support, professional development, role modeling, interaction, impartment of knowledge, evaluation of work, demonstration of methodology, etc. Perhaps most of us would agree with the duties listed. But just what does it mean, for example, to offer academic support? How might one facilitate professional development for a mentee? While we may agree to the general obligations of a mentor the specifics of what these entail would prove more controversial. This article will illustrate how easy it is to pick out a bad mentor. There are certain elements of conduct that, if practiced, undoubtedly put you in the "bad mentor" category. However, it is very difficult to explain just what it means to be not only an adequate mentor but also a stellar one. It may be easy to list the roles and responsibilities of a mentor but just how should they be performed/carried out? David Triggle is the model of an extraordinary mentor. The conclusion of this paper will focus on some specific mentorship activities David Triggle carried out that illustrate some of the intangible aspects of excellence in mentorship. PMID:26206190

  6. Recovery of handwritten text from the diaries and papers of David Livingstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.; Easton, Roger L., Jr.; Christens-Barry, William A.; Boydston, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    During his explorations of Africa, David Livingstone kept a diary and wrote letters about his experiences. Near the end of his travels, he ran out of paper and ink and began recording his thoughts on leftover newspaper with ink made from local seeds. These writings suffer from fading, from interference with the printed text and from bleed through of the handwriting on the other side of the paper, making them hard to read. New image processing techniques have been developed to deal with these papers to make Livingstone's handwriting available to the scholars to read. A scan of the David Livingstone's papers was made using a twelve-wavelength, multispectral imaging system. The wavelengths ranged from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. In these wavelengths, the three different types of writing behave differently, making them distinguishable from each other. So far, three methods have been used to recover Livingstone's handwriting. These include pseudocolor (to make the different writings distinguishable), spectral band ratios (to remove text that does not change), and principal components analysis (to separate the different writings). In initial trials, these techniques have been able to lift handwriting off printed text and have suppressed handwriting that has bled through from the other side of the paper.

  7. David Weston--Ocean science of invariant principles, total accuracy, and appropriate precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebuck, Ian

    2002-11-01

    David Weston's entire professional career was as a member of the Royal Navy Scientific Service, working in the field of ocean acoustics and its applications to maritime operations. The breadth of his interests has often been remarked upon, but because of the sensitive nature of his work at the time, it was indeed much more diverse than his published papers showed. This presentation, from the successors to the laboratories he illuminated for many years, is an attempt to fill in at least some of the gaps. The presentation also focuses on the underlying scientific philosophy of David's work, rooted in the British tradition of applicable mathematics and physics. A deep appreciation of the role of invariants and dimensional methods, and awareness of the sensitivity of any models to changes to the input assumptions, was at the heart of his approach. The needs of the Navy kept him rigorous in requiring accuracy, and clear about the distinction between it and precision. Examples of these principles are included, still as relevant today as they were when he insisted on applying them 30 years ago.

  8. Zoonotic Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes in Pere David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) in Henan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Huang, Jianying; Karim, Md Robiul; Zhao, Jinfeng; Dong, Haiju; Ai, Weichang; Li, Fuhuang; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Rongjun

    2015-08-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a zoonotic pathogen of the phylum Microspora that infects humans as well as a variety of animal species worldwide. While molecular epidemiologic studies have characterized this parasite in various hosts, isolates from many susceptible hosts have not yet been examined. In this study, E. bieneusi was isolated from 47 Pere David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) in Henan, China and characterized via PCR analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene. E. bieneusi was detected in 16 out of 47 (34.0%) fecal specimens examined. Sequence analysis of the ITS revealed six known genotypes: type IV (4), EbpC (4), EbpA (4), BEB6 (2), COS-I (1), and COS-II (1). Of these, type IV, EbpC, and EbpA are known to cause human microsporidiosis worldwide, whereas the remaining genotypes are generally specific to ruminants. The present study indicated that Pere David's deer are naturally infected with E. bieneusi, predominantly with zoonotic genotypes, and may pose a risk for human transmission. PMID:25982030

  9. NVL2, a nucleolar AAA-ATPase, is associated with the nuclear exosome and is involved in pre-rRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikatsu, Yuki; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Sudo, Haruka; Yuasa, Keizo; Tsuji, Akihiko; Nagahama, Masami

    2015-08-28

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a member of the chaperone-like AAA-ATPase family and is involved in the biosynthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in mammalian cells. We previously showed the interaction of NVL2 with a DExD/H-box RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1, which is a known cofactor for an exoribonuclease complex, the exosome. This finding implicated NVL2 in RNA metabolic processes during ribosome biogenesis. In the present study, we found that a series of mutations within the ATPase domain of NVL2 causes a defect in pre-rRNA processing into mature 28S and 5.8S rRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that NVL2 was associated with the nuclear exosome complex, which includes RRP6 as a nucleus-specific catalytic subunit. This interaction was prevented by depleting either MTR4 or RRP6, indicating their essential role in mediating this interaction with NVL2. Additionally, knockdown of MPP6, another cofactor for the nuclear exosome, also prevented the interaction by causing MTR4 to dissociate from the nuclear exosome. These results suggest that NVL2 is involved in pre-rRNA processing by associating with the nuclear exosome complex and that MPP6 is required for maintaining the integrity of this rRNA processing complex. - Highlights: • ATPase-deficient mutants of NVL2 have decreased pre-rRNA processing. • NVL2 associates with the nuclear exosome through interactions with MTR4 and RRP6. • MPP6 stabilizes MTR4-RRP6 interaction and allows NVL2 to interact with the complex.

  10. P53 nuclear stabilization is associated with FHIT loss and younger age of onset in squamous cell carcinoma of oral tongue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma of tongue (SCCT) is expected to harbor unique clinico-pathological and molecular genetic features since a significant proportion of patients are young and exhibit no association with tobacco or alcohol. Methods We determined P53, epidermal growth factor receptor, microsatellite instability, human papilloma virus infection and loss of heterozygosity status at several tumor suppressor loci in one hundred and twenty one oral SCCT (SSCOT) samples and analyzed their association with clinico-pathological features and patient survival. Results Our results revealed a significantly higher incidence of p53 nuclear stabilization in early (as against late) onset SCCOT. FHIT loss was significantly associated with p53 nuclear stabilization and the association was stronger in patients with no history of tobacco use. Samples harboring mutation in p53 DNA binding domain or exhibiting p53 nuclear stabilization, were significantly associated with poor survival. Conclusion Our study has therefore identified distinct features in SCCOT tumorigenesis with respect to age and tobacco exposure and revealed possible prognostic utility of p53. PMID:25152695

  11. The translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3K interacts with PML and associates with PML nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Salsman, Jayme; Pinder, Jordan; Tse, Brenda; Corkery, Dale; Dellaire, Graham

    2013-10-15

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor protein that regulates a variety of important cellular processes, including gene expression, DNA repair and cell fate decisions. Integral to its function is the ability of PML to form nuclear bodies (NBs) that serve as hubs for the interaction and modification of over 90 cellular proteins. There are seven canonical isoforms of PML, which encode diverse C-termini generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Recruitment of specific cellular proteins to PML NBs is mediated by protein–protein interactions with individual PML isoforms. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen employing peptide sequences unique to PML isoform I (PML-I), we identified an interaction with the eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit K (eIF3K), and in the process identified a novel eIF3K isoform, which we term eIF3K-2. We further demonstrate that eIF3K and PML interact both in vitro via pull-down assays, as well as in vivo within human cells by co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunofluorescence. In addition, eIF3K isoform 2 (eIF3K-2) colocalizes to PML bodies, particularly those enriched in PML-I, while eIF3K isoform 1 associates poorly with PML NBs. Thus, we report eIF3K as the first known subunit of the eIF3 translation pre-initiation complex to interact directly with the PML protein, and provide data implicating alternative splicing of both PML and eIF3K as a possible regulatory mechanism for eIF3K localization at PML NBs. - Highlights: • The PML-I C-terminus, encoded by exon 9, interacts with translation factor eIF3K. • We identify a novel eIF3K isoform that excludes exon 2 (eIF3K-2). • eIF3K-2 preferentially associates with PML bodies enriched in PML-I vs. PML-IV. • Alternative splicing of eIF3K regulates association with PML bodies.

  12. Study of the sharing/purchasing method of providing radiation therapy services at Dwight David Eisenhower Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia. Master's thesis, July 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.H.

    1982-08-01

    In 1982 Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center (DDEAMC) was providing radiation therapy support to authorized beneficiaries by referral to a local civilian proprietary firm. This was financed by supplemental care funds for active duty personnel and through CHAMPUS for other authorized beneficiaries. The establishment of an in-house radiation therapy center at DDEAMC was being considered when Congress directed the Department of Defense to implement a program to test the sharing of specialized services. This study devises a methodology for the analysis of costs associated with purchasing radiation-therapy services, and compares them with the costs for providing the cancer treatments in-house. The utilization of a decision matrix showed that the establishment of an in-house capability at DDEAMC which provides radiation therapy services for the surrounding region (26 military hospitals and clinics) is the alternative of choice.

  13. Nuclear inclusions mimicking poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 inclusions in a case of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia with a novel mutation in the valosin-containing protein gene.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Shiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Takashi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Minami, Narihiro; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2016-07-01

    A middle-aged Japanese man presented with slowly progressive asymmetric weakness of legs and arm but had neither ptosis nor dysphagia. He had a family history of similar condition suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. A muscle biopsy showed mixture of neurogenic atrophy and myopathy with rimmed vacuoles. Furthermore we found intranuclear inclusions that had a fine structure mimicking that of inclusions reported in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Immunohistochemical staining for polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1, which is identified within the nuclear inclusions of OPMD, demonstrated nuclear positivity in this case. However, OPMD was thought unlikely based on the clinical features and results of genetic analyses. Instead, a novel mutation in valosin-containing protein, c.376A>T (p.Ile126Phe), was revealed. A diagnosis of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia was made. This is the first report of polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1-positive nuclear inclusions in the muscle of this condition. PMID:27209344

  14. 36th Annual David W. Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis: Abstracts of the 2015 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Gripp, Karen W; Adam, Margaret P; Hudgins, Louanne; Carey, John C

    2016-07-01

    The 36th Annual David W Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis was held on August 14-19, 2015 at the Harbourtowne Conference Center in St. Michaels Maryland. The Workshop, which honors the legacy of David W Smith, brought together over 120 clinicians and researchers interested in congenital malformations and their underlying mechanisms of morphogenesis. As is the tradition of the meeting, the Workshop highlighted five themes besides mechanisms of morphogenesis: Rasopathies, Eye Malformations, Therapeutics, Prenatal Diagnosis, and Disorders of Sex Development. This Conference Report includes the abstracts presented at the 2015 Workshop. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27119594

  15. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on PET imaging of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bucerius, Jan; Hyafil, Fabien; Verberne, Hein J; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lindner, Oliver; Sciagra, Roberto; Agostini, Denis; Übleis, Christopher; Gimelli, Alessia; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death not only in Europe but also in the rest of the World. Preventive measures, however, often fail and cardiovascular disease may manifest as an acute coronary syndrome, stroke or even sudden death after years of silent progression. Thus, there is a considerable need for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the quality of care and limit the burden of cardiovascular diseases. During the past 10 years, several retrospective and prospective clinical studies have been published using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. However, the current variety of imaging protocols used for vascular (arterial) imaging with FDG PET considerably limits the ability to compare results between studies and to build large multicentre imaging registries. Based on the existing literature and the experience of the Members of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Cardiovascular Committee, the objective of this position paper was to propose optimized and standardized protocols for imaging and interpretation of PET scans in atherosclerosis. These recommendations do not, however, replace the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions in the circumstances of the individual study protocols used and the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and, where appropriate and necessary, the patient's guardian or carer. These recommendations suffer from the absence of conclusive evidence on many of the recommendations. Therefore, they are not intended and should not be used as "strict guidelines" but should, as already mentioned, provide a basis for standardized clinical atherosclerosis PET imaging protocols, which are subject to further and continuing evaluation and improvement. However, this EANM position paper might indeed be a first step towards "official" guidelines on

  16. ELEVATED EXPRESSION OF CANCER-ASSOCIATED PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN IN HIGH-GRADE PROSTATIC INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA AND PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.; Koch, Michael O.; Li, Lang; Zhang, Shaobo; Sandusky, George E.; Grignon, David J; Eble, John N.; Cheng, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA replication and repair. The expression and potential utility of this marker in prostatic neoplasia is uncertain. With the development of this new caPCNA selective antibody, we explored the potential utility of this marker in prostate cancer. Methods Using a traditional primary Fab2′ rabbit anti-caPCNA antibody-HRP conjugated secondary anti-Fab2′ antibody format, the expression of the caPCNA was analyzed in prostate tissue from 89 radical prostatectomy specimens. The caPCNA expression was correlated with clinicopathologic characteristics. Results The fraction of cells staining positively with caPCNA antibody in prostatic adenocarcinoma (mean, 23%) was significantly higher than that in benign prostatic epithelium (mean, 2%; p < 0.001) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (mean, 6%; p < 0.05). Moreover, the intensity of caPCNA expression in prostatic adenocarcinoma (mean, 2.9) was significantly higher than that in benign prostatic tissue (mean, 0.7; p < 0.001) or high-grade PIN (mean, 2.0; p < 0.001). Benign prostatic epithelium showed only minimal or negative reactivity. There was significant correlation between the percentage of caPCNA expression and primary Gleason grade (p = 0.01), and with Gleason score (p = 0.02). Adenocarcinomas with positive vascular invasion had a significantly higher percentage of cells staining with caPCNA antibody (p < 0.0001) and a higher intensity of caPCNA expression (p = 0.04). Conclusions Our data indicate that increased expression of the cancer-associated isoform of PCNA is common in prostatic adenocarcinoma and its precursor and may be a useful biomarker. PMID:21031434

  17. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Feucht, Walter; Polster, Juergen; Trnková, Lucie; Burgos, Pierre; Parker, Anthony W; Botchway, Stanley W

    2012-03-16

    Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were ~1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime (τ(2)=1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there is significant nuclear absorption of flavanols. This advanced imaging using two-photon excitation and biophysical techniques described here will prove valuable for probing the intracellular trafficking and functions of flavanols, such as EGCG, which is the major flavanol of green tea. PMID:22340533

  18. Investigating the degree of "stigma" associated with nuclear energy technologies: A cross-cultural examination of the case of fusion power.

    PubMed

    Horlick-Jones, Tom; Prades, Ana; Espluga, Josep

    2012-07-01

    The extent to which nuclear energy technologies are, in some sense, "stigmatised" by historical environmental and military associations is of particular interest in contemporary debates about sustainable energy policy. Recent claims in the literature suggest that despite such stigmatisation, lay views on such technologies may be shifting towards a "reluctant acceptance," in the light of concerns about issues like anthropogenic climate change. In this paper, we report on research into learning and reasoning processes concerned with a largely unknown nuclear energy technology; namely fusion power. We focus on the role of the nuclear label, or "brand," in informing how lay citizens make sense of the nature of this technology. Our findings derive from a comparative analysis of data generated in Spain and Britain, using the same methodology. PMID:23823163

  19. Sequence Variation Analysis of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 Gene in the Virus Associated Lymphomas of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingling; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Song; Liu, Xia; Sun, Zhifu; Luo, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein expressed in all EBV-positive tumors as it is essential for the maintenance, replication and transcription of the virus genome. According to the polymorphism of residue 487 in EBNA1 gene, EBV isolates can be classified into five subtypes: P-ala, P-thr, V-val, V-leu and V-pro. Whether these EBNA1 subtypes contribute to different tissue tropism of EBV and are consequently associated with certain malignancies remain to be determined. To elucidate the relationship, one hundred and ten EBV-positive lymphoma tissues of different types from Northern China, a non-NPC endemic area, were tested for the five subtypes by nested-PCR and DNA sequencing. In addition, EBV type 1 and type 2 classification was typed by using standard PCR assays across type-specific regions of the EBNA3C genes. Four EBNA1 subtypes were identified: V-val (68.2%, 75/110), P-thrV (15.5%, 17/110), V-leuV (3.6%, 4/110) and P-ala (10.9%, 12/110). The distribution of the EBNA1 subtypes in the four lymphoma groups was not significantly different (p = 0.075), neither was that of the EBV type 1/type 2 (p = 0.089). Compared with the previous data of gastric carcinoma (GC), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and throat washing (TW) from healthy donors, the distribution of EBNA1 subtypes in lymphoma differed significantly (p = 0.016), with a little higher frequency of P-ala subtype. The EBV type distribution between lymphoma and the other three groups was significantly different (p = 0.000, p = 0.000, p = 0.001, respectively). The proportion of type 1 and type 2 mixed infections was higher in lymphoma than that in GC, NPC and TW. In lymphomas, the distribution of EBNA1 subtypes in the three EBV types was not significantly different (p = 0.546). These data suggested that the variation patterns of EBNA1 gene may be geographic-associated rather than tumor-specific and the role of EBNA1 gene variations in tumorigenesis needs more extensive and

  20. The leukemia associated nuclear corepressor ETO homologue genes MTG16 and MTGR1 are regulated differently in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MTG16, MTGR1 and ETO are nuclear transcriptional corepressors of the human ETO protein family. MTG16 is implicated in hematopoietic development and in controlling erythropoiesis/megakaryopoiesis. Furthermore, ETO homologue genes are 3'participants in leukemia fusions generated by chromosomal translocations responsible of hematopoietic dysregulation. We tried to identify structural and functional promoter elements of MTG16 and MTGR1 genes in order to find associations between their regulation and hematopoiesis. Results 5' deletion examinations and luciferase reporter gene studies indicated that a 492 bp sequence upstream of the transcription start site is essential for transcriptional activity by the MTG16 promoter. The TATA- and CCAAT-less promoter with a GC box close to the start site showed strong reporter activity when examined in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. Mutation of an evolutionary conserved GATA -301 consensus binding site repressed promoter function. Furthermore, results from in vitro antibody-enhanced electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated binding of GATA-1 to the GATA -301 site. A role of GATA-1 was also supported by transfection of small interfering RNA, which diminished MTG16 expression. Furthermore, expression of the transcription factor HERP2, which represses GATA-1, produced strong inhibition of the MTG16 promoter reporter consistent with a role of GATA-1 in transcriptional activation. The TATA-less and CCAAT-less MTGR1 promoter retained most of the transcriptional activity within a -308 to -207 bp region with a GC-box-rich sequence containing multiple SP1 binding sites reminiscent of a housekeeping gene with constitutive expression. However, mutations of individual SP1 binding sites did not repress promoter function; multiple active SP1 binding sites may be required to safeguard constitutive MTGR1 transcriptional activity. The observed repression of MTG16/MTGR1 promoters by the

  1. Genetic analysis of polyomavirus large T nuclear localization: nuclear localization is required for productive association with pRb family members.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, S H; Bockus, B J; Schaffhausen, B S

    1996-01-01

    Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) is a multifunctional nuclear protein. LT has two nuclear localization signals (NLS2), one spanning residues 189 to 195 (NLS1) and another spanning residues 280 to 286 (NLS2). Site-directed mutagenesis showed that each signal contains at least two critical residues. The possibility of connections between NLSs and adjacent phosphorylations has attracted much attention. Cytoplasmic LT (CyT) mutants were underphosphorylated, particularly at sites adjacent to NLS2. However, since a nuclear LT bearing an inactivated NLS2 was phosphorylated normally at adjacent sites, the signal was not directly required for phosphorylation. Conversely, LT could be translocated to the nucleus via NLS2 even when the adjacent phosphorylation sites were deleted. CyT was examined to probe the importance of LT localization. CyT was unable to perform LT functions related to interactions with retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (pRb) family members. Hence, CyT was unable to immortalize primary cells or to transactivate an E2F-responsive promoter. Consistent with these findings, CyT, though capable of binding pRb in vitro, did not cause relocalization of pRb in cells. Assays of transactivation of the simian virus 40 late promoter and of the human c-fos promoter showed that defects of CyT were not limited to functions dependent on pRb interactions. PMID:8648692

  2. Comparison of David V valve-sparing root replacement and bioprosthetic valve conduit for aortic root aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    DeNino, Walter F.; Toole, John Matthew; Rowley, Christopher; Stroud, Martha R.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an attractive option for the management of aortic root aneurysms with a normal native aortic valve. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with a modification of the David V VSRR and compared it with stented pericardial bioprosthetic valve conduit (BVC) root replacement in an age-matched cohort of older patients. Methods A total of 48 VSRRs were performed at our institution, excluding those on bicuspid aortic valves. We compared these cases with 15 aortic root replacements performed using a BVC during the same period. Subgroup analysis was performed comparing 16 VSRR cases and 15 age-matched BVC cases. Results The greatest disparity between the VSRR and BVC groups was age (53 vs 69 years, respectively; P < .0005). The matched patients were similar in terms of baseline demographics and differed only in concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (2 VSRR vs 7 BVC patients; P = .036). None of the VSRR and 3 of the BVC procedures were performed for associated dissection (P = .101). Postoperative aortic insufficiency grade was significantly different between the 2 groups (P = .004). The cardiopulmonary bypass, crossclamp, and circulatory arrest times were not different between the VSRR and BVC groups (174 vs 187 minutes, P = .205; 128 vs 133 minutes, P = .376; and 10 vs 13 minutes, respectively; P = .175). No differences were found between the 2 groups with respect to postoperative complications. One postoperative death occurred in the BVC group and none in the VSRR group. The postoperative length of stay and aortic valve gradients were less in the VSRR group (6 vs 8 days, P = .038; 6 vs 11.4 mm Hg, P = .001). The intensive care unit length of stay was significantly less in the VSRR group (54 vs 110 hours, P = .001). Conclusions VSRR is an effective alternative to the BVC for aortic root aneurysm. PMID:25173127

  3. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    sufficiently close to any corrugated—and/or any smooth—surface and thus enforce a strong vdW-type adhesion; it exploits what is then essentially a contact force (dominated by the attraction exerted in the near-surface regions) to defy the pull of gravity on its own bulk. This Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter special issue is dedicated to the memory of David C Langreth. David is a dearly missed friend and mentor who inspired many of us. He was an outstanding condensed matter theorist and a scholar who greatly influenced us through his many-particle-physics based insights into density functional theory (DFT), surface science and related areas. His seminal works range from conserving formulations of interacting nonequilibrium transport [1] and formal-scattering theory [2] to an explicit formulation [3] of the exact DFT exchange-correlation energy in the adiabatic connection formula (ACF), the latter also being derived independently by Gunnarsson and Lundqvist [4]. David's portfolio also includes an analysis [5] that helped catalyze and guide the development of DFT from the local-density approximation (LDA) to the formulations of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs). Another salient contribution of David's is in the area of vdW interactions in materials. He was a key architect of the vdW density functional (vdW-DF) method [6, 7]. This method was developed in a long-standing Rutgers-Chalmers collaboration between David's group and that of Bengt I Lundqvist, later extending to a wider group of researchers on both sides of the Atlantic. Plasmons are collective excitations that depend on electron-density variation. The plasmon response can be seen as defining the nature of the LDA [4] and their description can thus also be seen as contributing to the success of GGA. The vdW-DF method is a regular constraint-based density functional (for ground-state DFT) which is derived within the ACF framework and which emphasizes the electrodynamical nature of the coupling between

  4. NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian Space Station Mir since late September 1997, greets his friend, Tammy Kruse, shortly after his return to Earth on Jan. 31. Dr. Wolf returned aboard the orbiter Endeavour with the rest of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded Dr. Wolf on Mir and is scheduled to remain on the Russian space station until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts.

  5. Work plan for the radiological survey for the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This work plan establishes the methods and requirements for performing a radiological survey at the David Witherspoon, Incorporated, Landfill-1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee (DWI 1630 Site) in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The radiological survey will identify the radiological contamination level of the equipment and debris stored at the DWI 1630 Site. The data generated from the survey activities will support the decisions for characterization of the equipment/debris and aid in subsequent disposition and waste handling. The survey activities to be performed under this work plan include an equipment radiological survey, a walkover survey, and an immunoassay testing for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This work plan includes a quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) project plan, a health and safety (H&S) plan, and a waste management plan.

  6. Section 1: Monitoring the global carbon cycle: A tribute to Charles David Keeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The CO2 concentration of our atmosphere is increasing. This fact was detected by Charles David Keeling after he designed and deployed his program of CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa and Antarctica in the 1950s. These measurements continue to this day in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Their cumulative display—updated regularly—is often known as the Keeling Curve. More than any other scientific record, this graph has motivated the growing level of public concern that has now made carbon sequestration a commonly-known concept. Can carbon sequestration help reverse the trend shown in the Keeling Curve? The challenge of this question is the reason this book was assembled.

  7. Poor Little Ritz Boy David "does" Hawaii or: lucky Davy salutes lucky Lindy.

    PubMed

    Bittner, David

    2010-12-01

    In this article, David Bittner explodes the myth, restated in Brideshead Revisited (1945), that Polynesians are "happy and harmless." He does so for the same reason that Evelyn Waugh does: "the grim invasion of trader, administrator, missionary, and tourist" has changed all that (p. 174). Touring Hawaii in July of '09, Bittner was interested to discover some unusual bits of American heritage, but saddened to see how "civilization" and "Americanization" actually seem to have eroded the Hawaiian people's rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Bittner's dual religious heritage-Judaism by birth and upbringing and Catholicism by choice in mid-life-has given him the perspective to apply the lessons of Hawaiian history to his own personal issues, particularly forgiveness. PMID:20803074

  8. Work plan addendum for David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Building Characterization, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This building characterization plan was developed as an addendum to the existing site characterization work plan documents, which are in Appendix B of the David Witherspoon, Inc., (DWI) preliminary remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS). All building characterization activities will be conducted in accordance with the rules of the Hazardous Substance Remedial Action Program under the direction of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Superfund (TN Rules 1200-1-3) and its implementing regulations. Additional rules of the state of Tennessee, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance were consulted during development of this plan. Activities at the DWI site were concerned with scrap metal processing and scrap metal resale.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS) supports the selection of remedial actions for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 901 Maryville Pike Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. Operations at the site, used as a recycling center, have resulted in past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances in to the environment. This Site is a Tennessee Superfund site. A phased approach was planned to (1) gather existing data from previous investigations managed by the Tenn. Dept. of Environment and Conservation; (2) perform a preliminary RI, including risk assessments, and an FS with existing data to identify areas where remedial action may be necessary; (3) gather additional field data to adequately define the nature and extent of risk-based contaminants that present identifiable threats to human and/or ecological receptors; and (4) develop remedial action alternatives to reduce risks to acceptable levels.

  10. Astronaut David Brown talks with team members from Lake Buena Vista, Fla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown chats with members of the Explorers team, from Lake Buena Vista, Fla., during the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held March 9-11 in the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students from all over the country are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  11. Modifier Genes as Therapeutics: The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Rev Erb Alpha (Nr1d1) Rescues Nr2e3 Associated Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Nelly M.; Yuan, Yang; Leehy, Barrett D.; Baid, Rinku; Kompella, Uday; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Escher, Pascal; Haider, Neena B.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors play a major role in many important biological processes. Most nuclear hormone receptors are ubiquitously expressed and regulate processes such as metabolism, circadian function, and development. They function in these processes to maintain homeostasis through modulation of transcriptional gene networks. In this study we evaluate the effectiveness of a nuclear hormone receptor gene to modulate retinal degeneration and restore the integrity of the retina. Currently, there are no effective treatment options for retinal degenerative diseases leading to progressive and irreversible blindness. In this study we demonstrate that the nuclear hormone receptor gene Nr1d1 (Rev-Erbα) rescues Nr2e3-associated retinal degeneration in the rd7 mouse, which lacks a functional Nr2e3 gene. Mutations in human NR2E3 are associated with several retinal degenerations including enhanced S cone syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa. The rd7 mouse, lacking Nr2e3, exhibits an increase in S cones and slow, progressive retinal degeneration. A traditional genetic mapping approach previously identified candidate modifier loci. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo delivery of the candidate modifier gene, Nr1d1 rescues Nr2e3 associated retinal degeneration. We observed clinical, histological, functional, and molecular restoration of the rd7 retina. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of rescue at the molecular and functional level is through the re-regulation of key genes within the Nr2e3-directed transcriptional network. Together, these findings reveal the potency of nuclear receptors as modulators of disease and specifically of NR1D1 as a novel therapeutic for retinal degenerations. PMID:24498227

  12. Induction of transcription within chromosomal DNA loops flanked by MAR elements causes an association of loop DNA with the nuclear matrix

    PubMed Central

    Iarovaia, Olga V.; Akopov, Sergey B.; Nikolaev, Lev G.; Sverdlov, Eugene D.; Razin, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of an ∼170 kb region of human chromosome 19, including CD22 and GPR40–GPR43 genes, was studied using in situ hybridization of a set of cosmid and PAC probes with nuclear halos prepared from proliferating and differentiated HL60 cells. The whole region under study was found to be looped out into the nuclear halo in proliferating cells. It is likely that the loop observed was attached to the nuclear matrix via MAR elements present at the flanks of the area under study. Upon dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiation of the cells the looped fragment became associated with the nuclear matrix. This change in the spatial organization correlated with the activation of transcription of at least two (CD22 and GPR43) genes present within the loop. The data obtained are discussed in the framework of the hypothesis postulating that the spatial organization of chromosomal DNA is maintained via constitutive (basic) and facultative (transcription-related) interactions of the latter with the nuclear matrix. PMID:16049024

  13. Induction of transcription within chromosomal DNA loops flanked by MAR elements causes an association of loop DNA with the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Iarovaia, Olga V; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Razin, Sergey V

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of an approximately 170 kb region of human chromosome 19, including CD22 and GPR40-GPR43 genes, was studied using in situ hybridization of a set of cosmid and PAC probes with nuclear halos prepared from proliferating and differentiated HL60 cells. The whole region under study was found to be looped out into the nuclear halo in proliferating cells. It is likely that the loop observed was attached to the nuclear matrix via MAR elements present at the flanks of the area under study. Upon dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiation of the cells the looped fragment became associated with the nuclear matrix. This change in the spatial organization correlated with the activation of transcription of at least two (CD22 and GPR43) genes present within the loop. The data obtained are discussed in the framework of the hypothesis postulating that the spatial organization of chromosomal DNA is maintained via constitutive (basic) and facultative (transcription-related) interactions of the latter with the nuclear matrix. PMID:16049024

  14. A cancer-associated RING finger protein, RNF43, is a ubiquitin ligase that interacts with a nuclear protein, HAP95

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, Takeyuki Yamaguchi, Aya; Miyamoto, Kentaro

    2008-04-15

    RNF43 is a recently discovered RING finger protein that is implicated in colon cancer pathogenesis. This protein possesses growth-promoting activity but its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, to gain insight into the biological action of RNF43 we characterized it biochemically and intracellularly. A combination of indirect immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation experiments suggests that RNF43 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nuclear envelope. Sucrose density gradient fractionation demonstrates that RNF43 co-exists with emerin, a representative inner nuclear membrane protein in the nuclear subcompartment. The cell-free system with pure components reveals that recombinant RNF43 fused with maltose-binding protein has autoubiquitylation activity. By the yeast two-hybrid screening we identified HAP95, a chromatin-associated protein interfacing the nuclear envelope, as an RNF43-interacting protein and substantiated this interaction in intact cells by the co-immunoprecipitation experiments. HAP95 is ubiquitylated and subjected to a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway, however, the experiments in which 293 cells expressing both RNF43 and HAP95 were treated with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, show that HAP95 is unlikely to serve as a substrate of RNF43 ubiquitin ligase. These results infer that RNF43 is a resident protein of the ER and, at least partially, the nuclear membrane, with ubiquitin ligase activity and may be involved in cell growth control potentially through the interaction with HAP95.

  15. SEPT9_i1 is required for the association between HIF-1α and importin-α to promote efficient nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Maya; Mabjeesh, Nicola J

    2013-01-01

    Septin 9 isoform 1 (SEPT9_i1) protein associates with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α to augment HIF-1 transcriptional activity. The first 25 amino acids of SEPT9_i1 (N25) are unique compared with other members of the mammalian septin family. This N25 domain is critical for HIF-1 activation by SEPT9_i1 but not essential for the protein-protein interaction. Here, we show that expression of N25 induces a significant dose-dependent inhibition of HIF-1 transcriptional activity under normoxia and hypoxia without influencing cellular HIF-1α protein levels. In vivo, N25 expression inhibits proliferation, tumor growth and angiogenesis concomitant with decreased expression levels of intratumoral HIF-1 downstream genes. Depletion of endogenous SEPT9_i1 or the exogenous expression of N25 fragment reduces nuclear HIF-1α levels accompanied by reciprocal accumulation of HIF-1α in the cytoplasm. Mechanistically, SEPT9_i1 binds to importin-α through N25 depending on its bipartite nuclear localization signal, to scaffold the association between HIF-1α and importin-α, which leads to facilitating HIF-1α nuclear translocation. Our data explore a new and a previously unrecognized role of a septin protein in the cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation process. This new level in the regulation of HIF-1α translocation is critical for efficient HIF-1 transcriptional activation that could be targeted for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24067372

  16. Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

    2010-03-16

    This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of

  17. Nonmyofilament-Associated Troponin T3 Nuclear and Nucleolar Localization Sequence and Leucine Zipper Domain Mediate Muscle Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Troponin T (TnT) plays a major role in striated muscle contraction. We recently demonstrated that the fast skeletal muscle TnT3 isoform is localized in the muscle nucleus, and either its full-length or COOH-terminus leads to muscle cell apoptosis. Here, we further explored the mechanism by which it enters the nucleus and promotes cytotoxicity. Amino acid truncation and substitution showed that its COOH-terminus contains a dominant nuclear/nucleolar localization sequence (KLKRQK) and the basic lysine and arginine residues might play an important role in the nuclear retention and nucleolar enrichment of KLKRQK-DsRed fusion proteins. Deleting this domain or substituting lysine and arginine residues (KLAAQK) resulted in a dramatic loss of TnT3 nuclear and nucleolar localization. In contrast, the GATAKGKVGGRWK domain-DsRed construct localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, indicating that a nuclear exporting sequence is possibly localized in this region. Additionally, we identified a classical DNA-binding Leucine Zipper Domain (LZD) which is conserved among TnT isoforms and species. Deletion of LZD or KLKRQK sequence significantly reduced cell apoptosis compared to full-length TnT3. We conclude that TnT3 contains both a nuclear localization signal and a DNA binding domain, which may mediate nuclear/nucleolar signaling and muscle cell apoptosis. PMID:23378072

  18. Teacher as Actor--Henry David Thoreau--From Room One-Eleven to Walden Pond and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barto, David

    To help maintain class interest in the important themes addressed in "Walden" and "The Duties of Civil Disobedience," a high school English teacher has presented a dramatic monologue as Henry David Thoreau to his students. After much library research, the teacher used some of the props characteristic of the author, such as a walking stick and a…

  19. Interview with M. David Merrill: Half a Century of Experience in the Field of Educational Technology and Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Ali

    2010-01-01

    M. David Merrill is a leading figure in the field of educational technology and instructional design. He has been contributing to our field for about half a century. His contributions have particularly focused on instructional strategies and fundamental learning principles more than the use of educational media and their influences. He has devised…

  20. Teaching Family Communication Concepts through Family Stories: An Analysis of Stories and Rituals in David Bradley's "Harvest Home"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixson, Marcia D.

    2006-01-01

    In this activity, students will be able to apply the concepts of stories and rituals to an analysis of the ritual in the short story "Harvest Home" by David Bradley, gaining understanding of how stories and rituals affect and reflect family values, power structures and identities. "Harvest Home" talks about the rituals involved in a…

  1. Salvaging "Academic Disaster Areas": The Black College Response to Christopher Jencks and David Riesman's 1967 Harvard Educational Review Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasman, Marybeth

    2006-01-01

    In 1967, the "Harvard Educational Review" published an article entitled "The American Negro College" by Christopher Jencks and David Riesman. The article dealt a stinging blow to Black colleges--labeling them "academic disaster areas." Using a historical methodology, I show the strategic ways in which Black college leaders and the United Negro…

  2. Statement of Facts for 1992 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. United States v. David Jones. MT-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 21 annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a mock rape trial. David Jones and Susan Williams, both students at Capital University, had dated on and off during the previous years and on the night of the incident had attended a party…

  3. The Repositioning of Language Centres: An Appreciation of David Ingram's "Language Centres--Their Roles, Functions and Management"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussex, Roland

    2004-01-01

    David Ingram's "Language Centres" (2001) offers a descriptive and analytical study of meta-centres, their constitution, operation and engagement with their constituencies. This article is a combination of a review and an appreciation of Ingram's study, and--benefiting from the latitude offered by the genre of the review article--a set of…

  4. Theorising "Geo-Identity" and David Harvey's Space: School Choices of the Geographically Bound Middle-Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on David Harvey's theories of absolute and relational space in order to critique geographically bound school choices of the gentrified middle-class in the City of Melbourne, Australia. The paper relies on interviews with inner-city school choosers as generated by a longitudinal ethnographic school choice study. I argue that the…

  5. Preserving Precious Instruments in Mathematics History: The Educational Museum of Teachers College and David Eugene Smith's Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Diane R.

    2011-01-01

    A history is given of the Educational Museum of Teachers College, which began in 1886, and David Eugene Smith's extensive collection of mathematical tools used in the Museum's exhibits is discussed. Historic mathematical instruments including, the astrolabe, abacus and counting rods, and the slide rule are examined. The author uses digitized…

  6. "And This Is How You Shall Ask": Linguistics, Anthropology, and Education in the Work of David Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Perry; McDermott, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This article celebrates the life and work of David M. Smith, former Council on Anthropology and Education president and founder of the University of Pennsylvania Ethnography in Education Research Forum, tracing his contributions to the fields of linguistics, anthropology, and education through the dual lens of his ten research principles and Walt…

  7. A Philosophical Analysis of David Orr's Theory of Ecological Literacy: Biophilia, Ecojustice and Moral Education in School Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Debra B.; Mueller, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In his writings, David Orr claims that the US is in an "ecological crisis" and that this stems from a crisis of education. He outlines a theory of ecological literacy, a mode by which we better learn the ecology of the Earth and live in a sustainable manner. While emphasizing a shock doctrine, the diagnosis of "crisis" may be correct, but it is…

  8. Constructing the Image of Authorial Presence: David O. Selznick and the Marketing of "Since You Went Away."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenster, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes David O. Selznick's marketing campaign for the film "Since You Went Away," focusing on the promotion of the book from which the movie was adapted, and on the production of the film's souvenir program. Examines Selznick's image as author from both the auteurist and cine-structuralist perspectives. (MM)

  9. Rate, Probability and Matching: Comments on "The Identities Hidden in the Matching Laws, and Their Uses" by David Thorne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard; Locey, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    David Thorne's (2010) article, "The Identities Hidden In The Matching Laws, And Their Uses" performs a valuable service in pointing out alternative expressions of matching. However, some identities tend to obscure rather than illuminate empirical relationships. Three such problematic instances are discussed: interresponse time as a function of…

  10. The Eclipse of the Public: A Response to David Elliott's "Music Education as/for Artistic Citizenship"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodford, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an invited response to a one published by David Elliott in The Music Educator in 2012 in which music teachers were enjoined to encourage children to use music's expressive power as a political tool in pursuit of social justice. While in agreement with him that this can be an appropriate use of music, there is a curious avoidance…

  11. hnRNP I, the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein: distinct nuclear localization and association with hnRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, A; Piñol-Roma, S; Michael, W M; Morandi, C; Dreyfuss, G

    1992-01-01

    Many hnRNP proteins and snRNPs interact with hnRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and affect the fate of hnRNA and its processing into mRNA. There are at least 20 abundant proteins in vertebrate cell hnRNP complexes and their structure and arrangement on specific hnRNAs is likely to be important for the processing of pre-mRNAs. hnRNP I, a basic protein of ca. 58,000 daltons by SDS-PAGE, is one of the abundant hnRNA-binding proteins. Monoclonal antibodies to hnRNP I were produced and full length cDNA clones for hnRNP I were isolated and sequenced. The sequence of hnRNP I (59,632 daltons and pI 9.86) demonstrates that it is identical to the previously described polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) and shows that it is highly related to hnRNP L. The sequences of these two proteins, I and L, define a new family of hnRNP proteins within the large superfamily of the RNP consensus RNA-binding proteins. Here we describe experiments which reveal new and unique properties on the association of hnRNP I/PTB with hnRNP complexes and on its cellular localization. Micrococcal nuclease digestions show that hnRNP I, along with hnRNP S and P, is released from hnRNP complexes by nuclease digestion more readily than most other hnRNP proteins. This nuclease hypersensitivity suggests that hnRNP I is bound to hnRNA regions that are particularly exposed in the complexes. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that hnRNP I is found in the nucleoplasm but in addition high concentrations are detected in a discrete perinucleolar structure. Thus, the PTB is one of the major proteins that bind pre-mRNAs; it is bound to nuclease-hypersensitive regions of the hnRNA-protein complexes and shows a novel pattern of nuclear localization. Images PMID:1641332

  12. HIV-1 Nef-associated Factor 1 Enhances Viral Production by Interacting with CRM1 to Promote Nuclear Export of Unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Hai-Bo; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Xiong, Si-Dong; Jin, Xia; Wu, Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-02-26

    HIV-1 depends on host-cell-encoded factors to complete its life cycle. A comprehensive understanding of how HIV-1 manipulates host machineries during viral infection can facilitate the identification of host targets for antiviral drugs or gene therapy. The cellular protein Naf1 (HIV-1 Nef-associated factor 1) is a CRM1-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and has been identified to regulate multiple receptor-mediated signal pathways in inflammation. The cytoplasm-located Naf1 can inhibit NF-κB activation through binding to A20, and the loss of Naf1 controlled NF-κB activation is associated with multiple autoimmune diseases. However, the effect of Naf1 on HIV-1 mRNA expression has not been characterized. In this study we found that the nucleus-located Naf1 could promote nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA. We demonstrated that the association between Naf1 and CRM1 was required for this function as the inhibition or knockdown of CRM1 expression significantly impaired Naf1-promoted HIV-1 production. The mutation of Naf1 nuclear export signals (NESs) that account for CRM1 recruitment for nuclear export decreased Naf1 function. Additionally, the mutation of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Naf1 diminished its ability to promote HIV-1 production, demonstrating that the shuttling property of Naf1 is required for this function. Our results reveal a novel role of Naf1 in enhancing HIV-1 production, and provide a potential therapeutic target for controlling HIV-1 infection. PMID:26733199

  13. Perturbation on hyperfine-enhanced 141Pr nuclear spin dynamics associated with antiferroquadrupolar order in PrV2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T. U.; Higemoto, W.; Sakai, A.; Tsujimoto, M.; Nakatsuji, S.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of multipolar order and hyperfine-enhanced (HE) 141Pr nuclear spin dynamics in PrV2Al20 was investigated using the muon spin relaxation technique. No explicit sign of time-reversal symmetry breaking was found below the multipolar order temperature TQ˜0.6 K in a zero applied field as anticipated on the basis of the antiferroquadrupolar (AFQ) order picture proposed by Sakai and Nakatsuji [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 063701 (2011), 10.1143/JPSJ.80.063701]. Further evidence of the nonmagnetic ground state was obtained from the observation of HE 141Pr nuclear spin fluctuations in the MHz scale. A marked increase in the muon spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ,μ) was observed below 1 K with decreasing temperature, which was attributed to the perturbation on the HE 141Pr nuclear spin dynamics associated with the development of AFQ correlations. The longitudinal field dependence of 1 /T1 ,μ revealed that the enhanced 141Pr nuclear spin accidentally has an effective gyromagnetic ratio close to that of the muon.

  14. Death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) mediated apoptosis in hantavirus infection is counter-balanced by activation of interferon-stimulated nuclear transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Morzunov, Sergey P.; Boichuk, Sergei V.; Palotás, András; Jeor, Stephen St.; Lombardi, Vincent C.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2013-09-01

    Hantaviruses are negative strand RNA species that replicate predominantly in the cytoplasm. They also activate numerous cellular responses, but their involvement in nuclear processes is yet to be established. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study investigates the molecular finger-print of nuclear transcription factors during hantavirus infection. The viral-replication-dependent activation of pro-myelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was followed by subsequent localization in nuclear bodies (NBs). PML was also found in close proximity to activated Sp100 nuclear antigen and interferon-stimulated gene 20 kDa protein (ISG-20), but co-localization with death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) was not observed. These data demonstrate that hantavirus triggers PML activation and localization in NBs in the absence of DAXX-PLM-NB co-localization. The results suggest that viral infection interferes with DAXX-mediated apoptosis, and expression of interferon-activated Sp100 and ISG-20 proteins may indicate intracellular intrinsic antiviral attempts.

  15. The risk of cancer among nuclear workers at the {open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes} production association: Preliminary results of an epidemiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Koshurnikova, N.A.; Shilnikova, N.S.; Okatenko, P.V.

    1997-03-01

    Studies of nuclear workers can provide useful supplementary information on radiation risks, since these studies have a number of advantages. Availability of measured individual doses, standardized medical care provided for nuclear workers, long-term preservation of archival medical and personnel documents are among these advantages. The authors are presenting preliminary results of an epidemiological study of workers at the {open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes} Production Association (PA). {open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes} PA, which started operations in 1948, and was the first military nuclear complex in Russia. It is located in what was once called Chelyabinsk-65 and is now called Ozyorsk in the Southern Urals. From the beginning of its operation, the {open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes} PA included nuclear reactors, a radiochemical plant and a plant for standard plutonium production. Working conditions at these plants in the first years of their operation resulted in a considerable proportion of workers being exposed to high doses of radiation. A wide range of radiation doses, both external and internal delivered at low dose rate, makes the cohort of Mayak`s workers potentially important for the purpose of radiation risk assessment.

  16. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S. Satcher); (3) "Peer Supervision: A…

  17. Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of humanmammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated proteinTIN2

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminker, Patrick; Plachot, Cedric; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Chung, Peter; Crippen, Danielle; Petersen, Ole W.; Bissell, Mina J.; Campisi, Judith; Lelievre, Sophie A.

    2004-12-15

    Nuclear organization, such as the formation of specific nuclear subdomains, is generally thought to be involved in the control of cellular phenotype; however, there are relatively few specific examples of how mammalian nuclei organize during radical changes in phenotype, such as those which occur during differentiation and growth arrest. Using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in which growth arrest is essential for morphological differentiation, we show that the arrest of cell proliferation is accompanied by a reorganization of the telomere-associated protein, TIN2, into one to three large nuclear subdomains. The large TIN2 domains do not contain telomeres and occur concomitant with the continued presence of TIN2 at telomeres. The TIN2 domains were sensitive to DNAse, but not RNAse, occurred frequently, but not exclusively near nucleoli, and overlapped often with dense domains containing heterochromatin protein l{gamma}. Expression of truncated forms of TIN2 simultaneously prevented the formation of TIN2 domains and relaxed the stringent morphogenesis-induced growth arrest in HMECs. Our findings reveal a novel extra-telomeric organization of TIN2 associated with the control of cell proliferation and identify TIN2 as an important regulator of mammary epithelial differentiation.

  18. Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement (David procedure) is safe

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Heike; Umminger, Julia; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Beckmann, Erik; Haverich, Axel; Martens, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Even though minimally invasive cardiac surgery may reduce morbidity, this approach is not routinely performed for aortic root replacements. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the safety and feasibility of valve sparing aortic root replacement via an upper mini-sternotomy up to the 3rd intercostal space. Methods Between April 2011 and March 2014, 26 patients (22 males, age 47.6±13 years) underwent elective minimally invasive aortic valve sparing root replacement (David procedure, group A). Twelve patients underwent additional leaflet repair. Concomitant procedures were: four proximal aortic arch replacements and one coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to the proximal right coronary artery (RCA). During the same time period, 14 patients (ten males, age 64.2±9.5 years) underwent elective David procedure via median full sternotomy (group B). Concomitant procedures included six proximal aortic arch replacements. Although the patient cohorts were small, the results of these two groups were compared. Results In group A, there were no intra-operative conversions to full sternotomy. The aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times were 115.6±30.3 and 175.8±41.9 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (via same access) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.5±0.3 and 10.4±6.8 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. The patient questionnaire showed that the convalescence time was approximately two weeks. In group B: the cross-clamp and CPB times were 114.1±19.9 and 163.0±24.5 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (7.1%) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.6±0.7 and 14.2±16.7 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. Conclusions Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement can be safely performed in selected patients. The results are comparable to those operated via a full

  19. Association of TUSC3 gene polymorphisms with non-syndromic mental retardation based on nuclear families in the Qinba mountain area of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M J; Xing, L X; Cui, M; Yang, X; Shi, J G; Li, J; Zhang, K J; Zheng, Z J; Zhang, F C; Li, J L; Gao, X C

    2015-01-01

    TUSC3 interacts with the protein phosphatase 1 and magnesium ion transport system, which plays an important role in learning and memory. Abnormal conditions of learning and memory are common clinical characteristics of mental retardation (MR). However, the association of TUSC3 genetic polymorphisms with MR remains unknown. A total of 456 DNA samples including 174 nuclear families containing MR were collected in the Qinba mountain area of China. The genotypes of eight tag single nucleotide polymorphisms of TUSC3 were evaluated with traditional genetic methods. Family-based association tests, transmission disequilibrium tests (TDTs), and haplotype relative risk (HRR) analyses were performed to investigate the association between genetic variants of the TUSC3 gene and MR. The genetic polymorphisms rs10093881, rs6530893, and rs6994908 were associated with MR (all P values <0.05) based upon the results of single-site TDT and HRR analyses. The haplotype block consisting of rs6530893 and rs6994908, harboring the sixth exon of TUSC3, was also associated with MR (all P values <0.05). This study demonstrated an association between genetic polymorphisms of the TUSC3 gene and MR in the Qinba mountain area, the sixth exon of which might contribute to the risk of MR. However, further studies are needed on the causal mechanisms in this association. PMID:25966277

  20. Response to the Point of View of Gregory B. Pauly, David M. Hillis, and David C. Cannatella, by the Anuran Subcommittee of the SSAR/HL/ASIH Scientific and Standard English Names List

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, Darrel R.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III

    2009-01-01

    The Point of View by Gregory Pauly, David Hillis, and David Cannatella misrepresents the motives and activities of the anuran subcommittee of the Scientific and Standard English Names Committee, contains a number of misleading statements, omits evidence and references to critical literature that have already rejected or superseded their positions, and cloaks the limitations of their nomenclatural approach in ambiguous language. Their Point of View is not about promoting transparency in the process of constructing the English Names list, assuring that its taxonomy is adequately reviewed, or promoting nomenclatural stability in any global sense. Rather, their Point of View focuses in large part on a single publication, The Amphibian Tree of Life, which is formally unrelated to the Standard English Names List, and promotes an approach to nomenclature mistakenly asserted by them to be compatible with both the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and one of its competitors, the PhyloCode.

  1. David J. Triggle: Medicinal chemistry, to pharmacology, calcium channels, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J A

    2015-11-15

    David Triggle's scientific career began as a chemist, went through medicinal chemistry into pharmacology, and finally on to somewhat more philosophical interests in later years. It was a career marked by many contributions to all of those aspects of science. Chief amongst his many contributions, in addition to those in medicinal chemistry, was his work on the drugs known as calcium ion channel blockers or (calcium antagonists). In the calcium ion channel field he was a particularly instrumental figure in sorting out the mechanisms, actions and roles of the class of calcium channel blockers, known chemical and pharmacologically as the dihydropyridines (DHPs) in particular, as well as other calcium blockers of diverse structures. During the course of a long career, and extensive journeys into medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, he published voluminously in terms of papers, reviews, conference proceedings and books. Notably, many of his papers often had limited authorship where, as senior author it reflected his deep involvement in all aspects of the reported work. His work always helped clarify the field while his incisive reviews, together with his role in coordinating and running scientific meetings, were a great help in clarifying and organizing various fields of study. He has had a long and illustrious career, and is wellknown in the world of biomedical science; his contributions are appreciated, and well recognized everywhere. The following article attempts to chart a path through his work and contributions to medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, science, academia and students. PMID:26206197

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of David's myotis, Myotis davidii (Myotis, Vespertilionidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Qi; Li, Yan-Jiao; Yin, An-Guo; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Wen-Lin; Hu, Min

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of David's myotis, Myotis davidii. The genome is found to be 17,531 bp in length and has a base composition of A (33.8%), G (13.2%), C (23.2%), and T (29.8%). Similar to other bats, it contains a typically conserved structure including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region (D-loop). Most of the genes are encoded on H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and 8 tRNA genes. All protein-coding genes start with an ATG codon except for ND2, ND3 and ND5, which initiate with ATT or ATA instead, and terminate with the typical stop codon (TAA/TAG) or a single T (T-) or an unexpected codon of AGA. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence provided here would be useful for further phylogenetic analysis and population genetic studies in M. davidii. PMID:25208182

  3. Evidence-based medicine has been hijacked: a report to David Sackett.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-05-01

    This is a confession building on a conversation with David Sackett in 2004 when I shared with him some personal adventures in evidence-based medicine (EBM), the movement that he had spearheaded. The narrative is expanded with what ensued in the subsequent 12 years. EBM has become far more recognized and adopted in many places, but not everywhere, for example, it never acquired much influence in the USA. As EBM became more influential, it was also hijacked to serve agendas different from what it originally aimed for. Influential randomized trials are largely done by and for the benefit of the industry. Meta-analyses and guidelines have become a factory, mostly also serving vested interests. National and federal research funds are funneled almost exclusively to research with little relevance to health outcomes. We have supported the growth of principal investigators who excel primarily as managers absorbing more money. Diagnosis and prognosis research and efforts to individualize treatment have fueled recurrent spurious promises. Risk factor epidemiology has excelled in salami-sliced data-dredged articles with gift authorship and has become adept to dictating policy from spurious evidence. Under market pressure, clinical medicine has been transformed to finance-based medicine. In many places, medicine and health care are wasting societal resources and becoming a threat to human well-being. Science denialism and quacks are also flourishing and leading more people astray in their life choices, including health. EBM still remains an unmet goal, worthy to be attained. PMID:26934549

  4. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting during David procedure complicated with coronary insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Suguru; Doi, Kiyoshi; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 47-year-old woman diagnosed with Marfan syndrome underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement for aortic regurgitation and annulo-aortic ectasia. Her cardiac function was normal. Preoperative coronary angiography did not demonstrate any stenosis. The David reimplantation procedure with a 28-mm Valsalva graft was performed. Both coronary orifices were reconstructed in a button fashion with Teflon felt reinforcement. After aortic declamping, marked bleeding was noted from the left coronary button, requiring a second pump run. Graft interposition using the great saphenous vein was performed for left coronary artery reconstruction. The reconstructed right coronary button was also damaged due to the fragile tissue, and interposed by the vein graft in the same fashion. After the aorta was declamped, the global left ventricular wall motion was significantly impaired, and did not improve with time. Coronary insufficiency was considered. Beating-heart coronary artery bypass grafting with the in-situ bilateral internal thoracic arteries was performed. After revascularization, the left ventricular function was improved. In certain emergent situations compromised with coronary insufficiency, this procedure could be an option to revascularize the coronary arteries. PMID:26412900

  5. David Price--Pioneer of digital ICP monitoring, neurosurgeon and teacher.

    PubMed

    Czosnyka, Marek; Kirollos, Ramez; van Hille, Philip

    2015-06-01

    In early 1970s first personal desk-top computers started to be available in hospitals. Mr Price was one of the pioneers introducing his own software to identify Marmarou's model of CSF space during infusion studies to diagnose patients suffering from hydrocephalus. His closed-loop control system for infusion of mannitol to manage patients at risk of intracranial hypertension was designed in 1977. The system worked successfully for 10 years in Pinderfields Hospital in Wakefield, UK. In the middle 1980's he initiated international cooperation with Children's Health Centre in Poland in long-term computer-assisted monitoring and analysis of ICP. Software designed in a course of this cooperation paved the way for contemporary package of ICM+ (Intensive Care Monitor, University of Cambridge, UK). Our scientific portfolio from these years (1985-1995) contains hundreds of head injured patients with waveform ICP analysis, introduction of compensatory reserve index RAP, few highly cited papers. Now, we understand ICP much better thanks to David's personal passion and extremely friendly support. PMID:25721034

  6. Plasticity, stability, and yield: the origins of Anthony David Bradshaw's model of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Peirson, B R Erick

    2015-04-01

    Plant ecologist Anthony David Bradshaw's account of the evolution of adaptive phenotypic plasticity remains central to contemporary research aimed at understanding how organisms persist in heterogeneous environments. Bradshaw suggested that changes in particular traits in response to specific environmental factors could be under direct genetic control, and that natural selection could therefore act directly to shape those responses: plasticity was not "noise" obscuring a genetic signal, but could be specific and refined just as any other adaptive phenotypic trait. In this paper, I document the contexts and development of Bradshaw's investigation of phenotypic plasticity in plants, including a series of unreported experiments in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Contrary to the mythology that later emerged around Bradshaw's ideas, Bradshaw was engaged in a serious and sustained empirical research program concerning plasticity in the 1950s and 1960s that went far beyond a single review paper. Moreover, that work was not isolated, but was surrounded by an already rich theoretical discourse and a substantial body of empirical research concerning the evolution of developmental plasticity and stability. Bradshaw recast the problem of how to understand (and control) plasticity and stability within an epistemic framework focused on genetic differences and natural selection. PMID:25641217

  7. Naturally occurring germline and tumor-associated mutations within the ATP-binding motifs of PTEN lead to oxidative damage of DNA associated with decreased nuclear p53

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Ni, Ying; Wang, Yu; Romigh, Todd; Eng, Charis

    2011-01-01

    Somatic and germline mutations in PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) are found in sporadic cancers and Cowden syndrome patients, respectively. Recent identification of naturally occurring cancer and germline mutations within the ATP-binding motifs of PTEN (heretofore referred to as PTEN ATP-binding mutations) has revealed that these mutations disrupted the subcellular localization and tumor-suppressor activity of PTEN. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of PTEN ATP-binding mutations in tumorigenesis. Here we show that these mutations impair PTEN's function both qualitatively and quantitatively. On the one hand, PTEN ATP-binding mutants lose their phosphatase activity and the effect of downregulation of cyclin D1. On the other, the mislocalized mutant PTEN results in a significantly decreased nuclear p53 protein level and transcriptional activity, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, induction of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase as well as dramatically increased DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When compared with wild-type PTEN, the ATP-binding mutant PTEN has reduced half-life in vitro and decreased protein expression levels in vivo. Our data, thus, reveal a novel mechanism of tumorigenesis in patients with germline or somatic mutations affecting PTEN ATP-binding motifs, i.e. qualitative and quantitative impairment of PTEN due to the loss of its phosphatase activity, and nuclear mislocalization, resulting in rapid PTEN protein degradation, suppression of p53-mediated transcriptional activity, loss of protection against oxidative stress as well as accumulation of spontaneous DNA DSBs. PMID:20926450

  8. Nuclear APC.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Kristi L

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) is thought to be an initiating step in the progression of the vast majority ofcolorectal cancers. Attempts to understand APC function have revealed more than a dozen binding partners as well as several subcellular localizations including at cell-cell junctions, associated with microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells, at the apical membrane, in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The present chapter focuses on APC localization and functions in the nucleus. APC contains two classical nuclear localization signals, with a third domain that can enhance nuclear import. Along with two sets of nuclear export signals, the nuclear localization signals enable the large APC protein to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear APC can oppose beta-catenin-mediated transcription. This down-regulation of nuclear beta-catenin activity by APC most likely involves nuclear sequestration of beta-catenin from the transcription complex as well as interaction of APC with transcription corepressor CtBP. Additional nuclear binding partners for APC include transcription factor activator protein AP-2alpha, nuclear export factor Crm1, protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL and perhaps DNA itself. Interaction of APC with polymerase beta and PCNA, suggests a role for APC in DNA repair. The observation that increases in the cytoplasmic distribution of APC correlate with colon cancer progression suggests that disruption of these nuclear functions of APC plays an important role in cancer progression. APC prevalence in the cytoplasm of quiescent cells points to a potential function for nuclear APC in control of cell proliferation. Clear definition of APC's nuclear function(s) will expand the possibilities for early colorectal cancer diagnostics and therapeutics targeted to APC. PMID:19928349

  9. A Fungal Sarcolemmal Membrane-Associated Protein (SLMAP) Homolog Plays a Fundamental Role in Development and Localizes to the Nuclear Envelope, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Nordzieke, Steffen; Zobel, Thomas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein (SLMAP) is a tail-anchored protein involved in fundamental cellular processes, such as myoblast fusion, cell cycle progression, and chromosomal inheritance. Further, SLMAP misexpression is associated with endothelial dysfunctions in diabetes and cancer. SLMAP is part of the conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex required for specific signaling pathways in yeasts, filamentous fungi, insects, and mammals. In filamentous fungi, STRIPAK was initially discovered in Sordaria macrospora, a model system for fungal differentiation. Here, we functionally characterize the STRIPAK subunit PRO45, a homolog of human SLMAP. We show that PRO45 is required for sexual propagation and cell-to-cell fusion and that its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is essential for these processes. Protein-protein interaction studies revealed that PRO45 binds to STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and SmMOB3, which are also required for sexual propagation. Superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) further established that PRO45 localizes to the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. SIM also showed that localization to the nuclear envelope requires STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and PRO22, whereas for mitochondria it does not. Taken together, our study provides important insights into fundamental roles of the fungal SLMAP homolog PRO45 and suggests STRIPAK-related and STRIPAK-unrelated functions. PMID:25527523

  10. ERA—European Radiochemists Association: Report on the activities of the Working Party for Nuclear and Radiochemistry of the Federation of European Chemical Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolar, Z. I.; Ware, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Radiochemists Association started almost simultaneously with the appearance of the first issue of the Radiochemistry in Europe newsletter in August 1995. The objective of the European Radiochemists Association (ERA) is to extend and improve communication between radiochemists in Europe through a newsletter. Liaison persons within each country or group exchange details of their activities, set up a diary of relevant international events and exchange details of specialist equipment, facilities and technology. In the year 2000 the Federation of European Chemical Societies decided to form a working party on nuclear and radiochemistry. It is a formalisation of the European Radiochemists Association. Each chemical society is allowed to nominate a member to the Working Party on Nuclear and Radiochemistry. Currently we have 12 nominated members plus two invited and one observer. In addition to the ERA aims and objectives it proposes to put together a syllabus of radiochemistry for undergraduate and post-graduate students—this aspect has been a part of our support of the International Atomic Energy Agency initiative. Also the aim of the working party is to support other working parties and divisions, to press the Federation of the European Chemical Societies for financial structure. To this end an Expression of Interest has been tabled with the Framework 6 Programme for networking within radiochemistry in Europe. The WP will liaise with the International Isotope Society and the International Society on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and Biology to seek to communicate and to consider ways of working together.

  11. Behavioral differences of irradiated persons associated with the Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk, and Chernobyl Nuclear Accidents. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    Three nuclear accidents besides Chernobyl have occurred in the former Soviet Union. The accidents occurred around Kyshtym and Chelyabinsk in the Ural Mountains between 1949 and 1967 and contaminated over one-half million people. The health ministries are now interested in the data previously collected on these irradiated populations in order to examine the health (e.g., psychological, hereditary, genome damage, etc.) implications of long-term radiation exposure.

  12. Qualification issues associated with the use of advanced instrumentation and control systems hardware in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-10-01

    The instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and Tiber-optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I&C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying I&C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I&C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light water reactor. The template was then used to address reliability issues for microprocessor-based protection systems. Standards (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I&C systems were also identified. This approach addresses in part issues raised in Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy document SECY-91-292. which recognizes that advanced I&C systems for the nuclear industry are ``being developed without consensus standards, as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.``

  13. Nuclear localization of glutamate-cysteine ligase is associated with proliferation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DEQUANTER, DIDIER; VAN DE VELDE, MAUREEN; BAR, ISABELLE; NUYENS, VINCENT; ROUSSEAU, ALEXANDRE; NAGY, NATHALIE; VANHAMME, LUC; VANHAEVERBEEK, MICHEL; BROHÉE, DANY; DELRÉE, PAUL; BOUDJELTIA, KARIM; LOTHAIRE, PHILIPPE; UZUREAU, PIERRICK

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the keystone of the cellular response toward oxidative stress. Elevated GSH content correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck (HN) tumors. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to evaluate whether the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) accounts for the increased GSH availability observed in HN squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). For that purpose, the messenger (m)RNA levels of the modifier (M) and catalytic (C) subunits of GCL and its putative regulators (namely, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1 and nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha) were monitored in 35 surgical resections of untreated HNSCC. The localization of GCLM was evaluated using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GCLM expression was significantly increased in tumor samples, compared with normal mucosa, both at the mRNA and protein level (P=0.029), but the pathway of GCLM activation remains to be elucidated. Protein expression of GCLM was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus. GCLM and the proliferation marker Ki-67 displayed a similar distribution, being both mainly expressed at the periphery of tumor lobules. The present study reported increased expression of GCL and the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis, within HNSCC. The nuclear localization of GCLM and the concomitant expression of Ki-67 suggested that the localization of GSH synthesis contributes to the protection against oxidative stress within hotspots of cell proliferation. PMID:27284370

  14. Role of nuclear factor-κB in oxidative stress associated with rabies virus infection of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kammouni, Wafa; Hasan, Leena; Saleh, Ali; Wood, Heidi; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies in an experimental model of rabies showed major structural changes in the brain involving neuronal processes that are associated with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons infected with the challenge virus standard-11 strain of rabies virus (CVS) showed axonal swellings and immunostaining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), indicating evidence of lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress and reduced axonal growth compared to that of mock-infected DRG neurons. We have evaluated whether nuclear factor (NF)-κB might act as a critical bridge linking CVS infection and oxidative stress. On Western immunoblotting, CVS infection induced expression of the NF-κB p50 subunit compared to that of mock infection. Ciliary neurotrophic factor, a potent activator of NF-κB, had no effect on mock-infected rat DRG neurons and reduced the number of 4-HNE-labeled puncta. SN50, a peptide inhibitor of NF-κB, and CVS infection had an additive effect in producing axonal swellings, indicating that NF-κB is neuroprotective. The fluorescent signal for subunit p50 was quantitatively evaluated in the nucleus and cytoplasm of mock- and CVS-infected rat DRG neurons. At 24 h postinfection (p.i.), there was a significant increase in the nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, indicating increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB, perhaps as a response to stress. At both 48 and 72 h p.i., there was significantly reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB. CVS infection may induce oxidative stress by inhibiting nuclear activation of NF-κB. A rabies virus protein may directly inhibit NF-κB activity. Further investigations are needed to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in the oxidative damage associated with rabies virus infection. PMID:22623795

  15. David Blackwell’s Forty Years in the Idaho Desert, The Foundation for 21st Century Geothermal Research

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; McCurry, Mike; Cannon, Cody; Neupane, Ghanashyam; Wood, Thomas; Podgorney, Robert; Welhan, John; Mines, Greg; Mattson, Earl; Wood, Rachel; Palmer, Carl

    2015-04-01

    Dr. David Blackwell has had a profound influence on geo-thermal exploration and R&D in Idaho. Forty years have elapsed since the first Southern Methodist University (SMU) temperature logging truck rolled onto the high desert in Southern Idaho, yet even after so much time has elapsed, most recent and ongoing geothermal R&D can trace its roots to the foundational temperature studies led by Dr. Blackwell. We believe that the best way to honor any scientist is to see their work carried forward by others. As this paper demonstrates, it has been an easy task to find a host of Idaho researchers and students eager to contribute to this tribute paper. We organize this paper by ongoing or recent projects that continue to benefit left to Idaho by Dr. David Blackwell.

  16. Stable isotopes of paleosols and fossil teeth as paleoecology and paleoclimate indicators: An example from the St. David Formation, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Cerling, T. E.; Quade, J.; Bowman, J. R.; Smith, G. A.; Lindsay, E. H.

    Stable isotopes of paleosol carbonates from the St. David Formation in Arizona indicate a major change in δ18O and δ13C from ˜3.4 to 2.8 Ma ago, approximately the time of the onset of global cooling postulated from the deep-sea oxygen record. Another major shift in isotopic signature occurred at ˜2.4 to 1.8 Ma ago. δ13C values of paleosol carbonates also indicate that grasses were an important component of the local ecosystems at least since 3.4 Ma. δ13C values of fossil herbivorous mammal teeth from the St. David Formation also indicate that grasses had been available to support these C4 eaters (grazers) from 3.4 to 0.6 Ma, which is consistent with the paleosol carbonate results.

  17. Affirming Psychological Science--For Students, Teachers, and the Larger World: An Interview With David G. Myers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jr., Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    David G. Myers received a BA in chemistry, magna cum laude from Whitworth College and an MA and PhD in psychology from the University of Iowa. Since 1982 he has been the John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Hope College. He is best known for his authorship of Psychology (2004), now in its 7th edition, and Social Psychology (2005a), now in…

  18. Reconstructing Henry: Or, Why Everything You Needed to Know about Wilderness Philosophy You Could Have Learned from Henry David Thoreau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Henry David Thoreau has gotten a bad rap lately. He's been pigeon-holed as a "romantic" by resource managers who do not have a tiny fragment of his wisdom and don't know anything about him. He's been accused of hypocrisy because his cabin at Walden Pond was not, after all, very remote. His wilderness trips, in this age of fly-in mountaineering,…

  19. STS-57 MS and PLC G. David Low examines CGBA pack in OV-105's SPACEHAB module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low examines Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) group activation pack (GAP) incubator while in front of the SPACEHAB-01 (Commercial Middeck Augmentation Module (CMAM)) aft lockers. Low has temporarily removed the GAP from its locker location. Crewmembers are conducting a variety of experiments inside SPACEHAB-01 module which is positioned in the payload bay (PLB) of the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105.

  20. Evaluation of MLC leaf positioning accuracy for static and dynamic IMRT treatments using DAVID in vivo dosimetric system.

    PubMed

    Karagoz, Gulay; Zorlu, Faruk; Yeginer, Mete; Yildiz, Demet; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy and precision of leaf positioning in multileaf collimators (MLCs) are significant factors for the accuracy of IMRT treatments. This study aimed to inves-tigate the accuracy and repeatability of the MLC leaf positioning via the DAVID invivo dosimetric system for dynamic and static MLC systems. The DAVID system was designed as multiwire transmission ionization chamber which is placed in accessory holder of linear accelerators. Each wire of DAVID system corresponds to a MLC leaf-pair to verify the leaf positioning accuracy during IMRT treatment and QA. In this study, verifications of IMRT plans of five head and neck (H&N) and five prostate patients treated in a Varian DHX linear accelerator with 80-leaf MLC were performed using DAVID system. Before DAVID-based dosimetry, Electronics Portal Imaging Device (EPID) and PTW 2D ARRAY dosimetry system were used for 2D verification of each plan. The measurements taken by DAVID system in the first day of the treatments were used as reference for the following measurements taken over the next four weeks. The deviations in leaf positioning were evaluated by "Total Deviation (TD)" parameter calculated by DAVID software. The delivered IMRT plans were originally prepared using dynamic MLC method. The same plans were subsequently calculated based on static MLC method with three different intensity levels of five (IL5), 10 (IL10) and 20 (IL20) in order to compare the performances of MLC leaf positioning repeatability for dynamic and static IMRT plans. The leaf positioning accuracy is also evaluated by analyzing DynaLog files based on error histograms and root mean square (RMS) errors of leaf pairs' positions. Moreover, a correlation analysis between simultaneously taken DAVID and EPID measurements and DynaLog file recordings was subsequently performed. In the analysis of DAVID outputs, the overall deviations of dynamic MLC-based IMRT calculated from the deviations of the four weeks were found as 0.55% ± 0.57% and 1.48% ± 0

  1. Reduced nuclear and ectopic cytoplasmic expression of lysyl oxidase-like 2 is associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Yu; Xu, Li-Yan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Liao, Lian-Di; Shen, Jin-Hui; Xu, Xiu-E; Du, Ze-Peng; Zhao, Qing; Li, En-Min

    2012-07-01

    Lysyl oxidase family members have various roles in cancer progression. The aim of this study was to investigate their expression and clinical significance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We examined messenger RNA expression of lysyl oxidase family members including lysyl oxidase and lysyl oxidase-like proteins (lysyl oxidase L) in 10 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and 83 pairs of tumor samples by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All except lysyl oxidase L3 were expressed at high levels in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but only lysyl oxidase L2 was associated with lymph node metastasis (P = .034). We examined lysyl oxidase L2 protein further by immunohistochemistry staining in 178 surgically resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissue samples. The protein manifested decreased nuclear expression and increased cytoplasmic expression. Moreover, these 2 events both had significant correlation with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P = .001 and P < .001). Overall survival rates of the patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with decreased nuclear expression or increased cytoplasmic expression of lysyl oxidase L2 were significantly lower than those of the patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with the reverse expression pattern (P = .040 or P = .022). Multivariate analyses revealed that nuclear expression of lysyl oxidase L2 was an independent prognostic factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. These results suggest that lysyl oxidase L2 exerts a critical effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma progression and can be a predictive marker of lymph node metastasis and outcome. PMID:22204712

  2. The nuclear pore complex–associated protein, Mlp2p, binds to the yeast spindle pole body and promotes its efficient assembly

    PubMed Central

    Niepel, Mario; Strambio-de-Castillia, Caterina; Fasolo, Joseph; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    The two yeast proteins Mlp1p and Mlp2p (homologues of the vertebrate protein Tpr) are filamentous proteins attached to the nuclear face of nuclear pore complexes. Here we perform a proteomic analysis, which reveals that the two Mlps have strikingly different interacting partners, testifying to their different roles within the cell. We find that Mlp2p binds directly to Spc110p, Spc42p, and Spc29p, which are three core components of the spindle pole body (SPB), the nuclear envelope–associated yeast spindle organizer. We further show that SPB function is compromised in mlp2 mutants. Cells lacking Mlp2p form significantly smaller SPBs, accumulate aberrant SPB component-containing structures inside the nucleus, and have stochastic failures of cell division. In addition, depletion of Mlp2p is synthetically lethal with mutants impaired in SPB assembly. Based on these data, we propose that Mlp2p links the SPB to the peripheral Mlp assembly, and that this linkage is required for efficient incorporation of components into the SPB. PMID:16027220

  3. A Novel Toxoplasma gondii Nuclear Factor TgNF3 Is a Dynamic Chromatin-Associated Component, Modulator of Nucleolar Architecture and Parasite Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Olguin-Lamas, Alejandro; Madec, Edwige; Hovasse, Agnes; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Callebaut, Isabelle; Slomianny, Christian; Delhaye, Stephane; Mouveaux, Thomas; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2011-01-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, cis-acting elements present in promoter sequences of genes that are stage-specifically regulated have been described. However, the nuclear factors that bind to these cis-acting elements and regulate promoter activities have not been identified. In the present study, we performed affinity purification, followed by proteomic analysis, to identify nuclear factors that bind to a stage-specific promoter in T. gondii. This led to the identification of several nuclear factors in T. gondii including a novel factor, designated herein as TgNF3. The N-terminal domain of TgNF3 shares similarities with the N-terminus of yeast nuclear FK506-binding protein (FKBP), known as a histone chaperone regulating gene silencing. Using anti-TgNF3 antibodies, HA-FLAG and YFP-tagged TgNF3, we show that TgNF3 is predominantly a parasite nucleolar, chromatin-associated protein that binds specifically to T. gondii gene promoters in vivo. Genome-wide analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified promoter occupancies by TgNF3. In addition, TgNF3 has a direct role in transcriptional control of genes involved in parasite metabolism, transcription and translation. The ectopic expression of TgNF3 in the tachyzoites revealed dynamic changes in the size of the nucleolus, leading to a severe attenuation of virulence in vivo. We demonstrate that TgNF3 physically interacts with H3, H4 and H2A/H2B assembled into bona fide core and nucleosome-associated histones. Furthermore, TgNF3 interacts specifically to histones in the context of stage-specific gene silencing of a promoter that lacks active epigenetic acetylated histone marks. In contrast to virulent tachyzoites, which express the majority of TgNF3 in the nucleolus, the protein is exclusively located in the cytoplasm of the avirulent bradyzoites. We propose a model where TgNF3 acts essentially to coordinate nucleolus and nuclear functions by modulating nucleosome

  4. Association of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Polymorphisms with Diabetes and Obesity in Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica Saraí; González-Reyes, Susana; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha Eunice; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Barquera, Rodrigo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear factor-erythroid 2- (NF-E2-) related factor 2 (Nrf2) is abated and its ability to reduce oxidative stress is impaired in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore if polymorphisms in Nrf2 and target genes are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican mestizo subjects. The rs1800566 of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene, rs7211 of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) gene, rs2071749 of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene, and the rs6721961 and the rs2364723 from Nrf2 gene were genotyped in 627 diabetic subjects and 1020 controls. The results showed that the rs7211 polymorphism is a protective factor against obesity in nondiabetic subjects (CC + CT versus TT, OR = 0.40, P = 0.005) and in women (CC versus CT + TT, OR = 0.7, P = 0.016). TT carriers had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower body mass index. The rs2071749 was positively associated with obesity (AA versus AG + GG, OR = 1.25, P = 0.026). Finally, the rs6721961 was negatively associated with diabetes in men (CC versus CA + AA, OR = 0.62, P = 0.003). AA carriers showed lower glucose concentrations. No association was found for rs1800566 and rs2364723 polymorphisms. In conclusion, the presence of Nrf2 and related genes polymorphisms are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican patients. PMID:27274779

  5. Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Garner, Daniel C.; Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof.

  6. Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Garner, D.C.; Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.

    1993-11-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof. 3 figures.

  7. A rendezvous with the queen of ion channels: Three decades of ion channel research by David T Yue and his Calcium Signals Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Ivy E; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Issa, John B; Ben-Johny, Manu; Adams, Paul J; Kang, Po Wei; Lee, Shin Rong; Sang, Lingjie; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer; Zhang, Manning; Bazazzi, Hojjat; Yue, Nancy C; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2016-01-01

    David T. Yue was a renowned biophysicist who dedicated his life to the study of Ca2+ signaling in cells. In the wake of his passing, we are left not only with a feeling of great loss, but with a tremendous and impactful body of work contributed by a remarkable man. David's research spanned the spectrum from atomic structure to organ systems, with a quantitative rigor aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying biological function. Along the way he developed new tools and approaches, enabling not only his own research but that of his contemporaries and those who will come after him. While we cannot hope to replicate the eloquence and style we are accustomed to in David's writing, we nonetheless undertake a review of David's chosen field of study with a focus on many of his contributions to the calcium channel field. PMID:26176690

  8. David L. Parkhurst as the recipient of the 2012 O.E. Meinzer Award of the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2012-01-01

    Describes the impact of USGS scientist David Parkhurst's influential contributions to the fields of aqueous geochemistry and hydrogeology. Parkhurst is the recipient of the 2012 O.E. Meinzer award of the Geological Society of America's Hydrogeology Division.

  9. Association of Nuclear PIM1 Expression with Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Richeng; Wang, Xinyue; Jin, Ziliang; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that aberrant expression of PIM1, p-STAT3 and c-MYC is involved in the pathogenesis of various solid tumors, but its prognostic value is still unclear in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we sought to evaluate the expression and prognostic role of these markers in patients with lung adenocarcinoma (AD) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Real time RT-PCR and Western blotting was used to analyze the mRNA and protein expression of PIM1 in NSCLC cell lines, respectively. The expression of PIM1, p-STAT3, and c-MYC was immunohistochemically tested in archival tumor samples from 194 lung AD and SCC patients. High nuclear PIM1 expression was detected in 43.3% of ADs and SCCs, and was significantly correlated with lymph node (LN) metastasis (P = 0.028) and histology (P = 0.003). High nuclear PIM1 expression (P = 0.034), locally advanced stage (P < 0.001), AD (P = 0.007) and poor pathologic differentiation (P = 0.002) were correlated with worse disease-free survival (DFS). High nuclear PIM1 expression (P = 0.009), advanced clinical stage (P < 0.001) and poor pathologic differentiation (P = 0.004) were independent unfavorable prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). High p-STAT3 expression was not associated with OS but significantly correlated with LN metastasis, while c-MYC was not significantly correlated with any clinicopathological parameter or survival. Therefore, in AD and SCC patients, nuclear PIM1 expression level is an independent factor for DFS and OS and it might serve as a predictive biomarker for outcome. PMID:26918046

  10. Novel inhibitors of nuclear transport cause cell cycle arrest and decrease cyst growth in ADPKD associated with decreased CDK4 levels.

    PubMed

    Tan, Matthew; Wettersten, Hiromi I; Chu, Kristy; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Friedlander, Sharon; Landesman, Yosef; Weiss, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a progressive, proliferative renal disease. Kidneys from ADPKD patients are characterized by the presence of cysts that are marked by enhanced proliferation and apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells. Current treatment of this disease is supportive, as there are few if any clinically validated targeted therapeutics. Given the parallels between cystic disease and cancer, and in light of our findings of the efficacy of the nuclear transport inhibitors in kidney cancer, which has similarities to ADPKD, we asked whether such inhibitors show utility in ADPKD. In this study, we tested selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) in two human ADPKD cell lines and in an in vivo mouse model of ADPKD. After effective downregulation of a nuclear exporter, exportin 1 (XPO1), with KPT-330, both cell lines showed dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation through G₀/G₁ arrest associated with downregulation of CDK4, with minimal apoptosis. To analyze mechanisms of CDK4 decrease by XPO1 inhibition, localization of various XPO1 target proteins was examined, and C/EBPβ was found to be localized in the nucleus by XPO1 inhibition, resulting in an increase of C/EBPα, which activates degradation of CDK4. Furthermore, inhibition of XPO1 with the parallel inhibitor KPT-335 attenuated cyst growth in vivo in the PKD1 mutant mouse model Pkd1(v/v). Thus, inhibition of nuclear export by KPT-330, which has shown no adverse effects in renal serum chemistries and urinalyses in animal models, and which is already in phase 1 trials for cancers, will be rapidly translatable to human ADPKD. PMID:25234309

  11. Mastering the value chain. An interview with Mark Levin of Millennium Pharmaceuticals. Interview by David Champion.

    PubMed

    Levin, M

    2001-06-01

    As today's business leaders are all too aware, a new scientific or technological break-through can quickly transform an industry's competitive landscape. The upheaval is often traumatic for the companies involved, forcing them to rethink their strategies and redefine their boundaries. But an industry in flux also creates vast opportunities. To seize them, companies must see how the current upheavals will affect the future distribution of profits--and then reinvent themselves to capitalize on the new sources of value. In this interview with HBR senior editor David Champion, Mark Levin, the founder and CEO of Millennium Pharmaceuticals, describes his vision of the future of the pharmaceutical industry in the wake of the genetics revolution and new technologies that have altered the economics of drug development. No company, he argues, will create serious long-term value by staying in just one or two stages of the value of chain. That's why Millennium, which started out doing basis research into genes and proteins and selling its findings to pharmaceutical giants, has moved downstream - toward the patients who actually use and pay for the drugs. He explains why the research end has become less lucrative than the more mechanical tasks of identifying, testing, and manufacturing molecules. Levin talks about the changes Millennium has undergone since its inception in 1993-from 30 workers to more than 1,000, and from one end of the value chain to the other. He discusses the company's cultural transformations as well as the partnerships and acquisitions that have helped millennium become involved in every stage of the chain-from gene to patient. Levin's vigorous approach to balancing long-term strategy with short-term tactics offers important lessons to any executive facing an industry upheaval. PMID:11408971

  12. BamHI E region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome encodes three transformation-associated nuclear proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ricksten, A; Kallin, B; Alexander, H; Dillner, J; Fåhraeus, R; Klein, G; Lerner, R; Rymo, L

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant vectors carrying DNA fragments from the BamHI E region of the B95-8 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome were transfected into COS-1 cells, and the transient expression of EBV-encoded nuclear antigens (EBNAs) was analyzed by using polyvalent human antisera and rabbit antibodies to synthetic peptides. Vector DNA containing two rightward open reading frames in the BamHI E fragment, BERF2a and BERF2b, induced the expression of a nuclear antigen identical serologically and with respect to size to the larger of the two polypeptides previously designated as EBNA4 in B95-8 cells. An antigen corresponding to the smaller polypeptide was induced in cells transfected with constructs that contained two neighboring reading frames, BERF3 and BERF4. This antigen also reacted with a rabbit antiserum to the synthetic peptide 203, deduced from BERF4. Thus, the findings show that the two components of the EBNA4 doublet in B95-8 cells are encoded by separate genes. The antigen encoded by BERF2a and/or BERF2b has been designated as EBNA4 and the antigen encoded by BERF3 and/or BERF4 has been designated as EBNA6. Polyvalent human antisera detected EBNA4 and EBNA6 in 9 of 11 lymphoid cell lines carrying independent EBV isolates. In the remaining two lines, either EBNA4 or EBNA6 was not detectable. Images PMID:2829223

  13. A review of literature pertaining to the leaching and sorption of radionuclides associated with nuclear explosive melt glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.K.

    1993-05-01

    For the purposes of groundwater characterization, environmental remediation and health risk assessment, the mechanism and rate by which radionuclides bound within nuclear device melt glass are manifest in Nevada Test Site groundwaters must be known. Exchange between radionuclides and groundwater is dominated by the kinetics of leaching and the resultant sorption of derivative nuclides by minerals along the flow-path. In this context, a survey of the report literature has been conducted to review work related to these subjects. This report provides a representative, although not exhaustive, summary of the literature; because of the specialized nature of nuclear melt glass, emphasis was given to the report literature available from Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies and pertinent contractors. Where data is corroborated in journal literature, those references are also included. Before the risk to ground waters is estimated with any accuracy, recommendations for continued future work integrate systematic characterization of melt glass with leaching studies of these heterogeneous matrices.

  14. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  15. Cell-specific regulation of a Brassica napus CMS-associated gene by a nuclear restorer with related effects on a floral homeotic gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Geddy, Rachel; Mahé, Laetitia; Brown, Gregory G

    2005-02-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a maternally inherited defect in pollen production specified by novel mitochondrial genes. It can be suppressed by nuclear restorer (Rf) genes which normally downregulate expression of a CMS-associated novel mitochondrial gene. Two forms of Brassica napus CMS, nap and pol, are associated with related chimeric genes, orf222 and orf224, respectively. We show that in pol and nap CMS, anther locule development is asynchronous and asymmetric, that one or more locules within each anther may fail to develop entirely and that CMS anthers display polarity in locule development. We show, by in situ hybridization, that orf222 transcripts accumulate in sterile anthers prior to development of morphological differences between CMS and restored stamens, and remain preferentially localized to microsporangia. In fertility-restored anthers, however, orf222 transcript levels remain low throughout development. Some sporogenous and meiotic cells differentiate within CMS anthers and form functional pollen despite retaining high orf222 transcript levels, suggesting that the effect of orf222 expression in blocking pollen development is limited to an early and specific stage. Transcripts of other mitochondrial genes, exemplified by atp6 and cob, and of the nuclear-encoded ATP synthase gamma subunit, accumulate preferentially in the microsporangia of both sterile and fertile anthers. Thus nuclear fertility restoration reduces orf222 transcript levels in a gene and tissue-specific manner. We observe differences between CMS and fertile plants in the timing and patterning of APETALA3 promoter activity that suggest a possible basis for the developmental abnormalities of CMS flowers. PMID:15659093

  16. Production of CFTR-null and CFTR-ΔF508 heterozygous pigs by adeno-associated virus–mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Hao, Yanhong; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Samuel, Melissa; Stoltz, David A.; Li, Yuhong; Petroff, Elena; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Kabel, Amanda C.; Yan, Ziying; Spate, Lee; Wax, David; Murphy, Clifton N.; Rieke, August; Whitworth, Kristin; Linville, Michael L.; Korte, Scott W.; Engelhardt, John F.; Welsh, Michael J.; Prather, Randall S.

    2008-01-01

    Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and developing effective therapies has been hampered by lack of a relevant animal model. CF mice fail to develop the lung and pancreatic disease that cause most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Pigs may be better animals than mice in which to model human genetic diseases because their anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics are more similar to those of humans. However, to date, gene-targeted mammalian models of human genetic disease have not been reported for any species other than mice. Here we describe the first steps toward the generation of a pig model of CF. We used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors to deliver genetic constructs targeting the CF transmembrane conductance receptor (CFTR) gene to pig fetal fibroblasts. We generated cells with the CFTR gene either disrupted or containing the most common CF-associated mutation (ΔF508). These cells were used as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer to porcine oocytes. We thereby generated heterozygote male piglets with each mutation. These pigs should be of value in producing new models of CF. In addition, because gene-modified mice often fail to replicate human diseases, this approach could be used to generate models of other human genetic diseases in species other than mice. PMID:18324337

  17. Production of CFTR-null and CFTR-DeltaF508 heterozygous pigs by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Hao, Yanhong; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Samuel, Melissa; Stoltz, David A; Li, Yuhong; Petroff, Elena; Vermeer, Daniel W; Kabel, Amanda C; Yan, Ziying; Spate, Lee; Wax, David; Murphy, Clifton N; Rieke, August; Whitworth, Kristin; Linville, Michael L; Korte, Scott W; Engelhardt, John F; Welsh, Michael J; Prather, Randall S

    2008-04-01

    Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and developing effective therapies has been hampered by lack of a relevant animal model. CF mice fail to develop the lung and pancreatic disease that cause most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Pigs may be better animals than mice in which to model human genetic diseases because their anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics are more similar to those of humans. However, to date, gene-targeted mammalian models of human genetic disease have not been reported for any species other than mice. Here we describe the first steps toward the generation of a pig model of CF. We used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors to deliver genetic constructs targeting the CF transmembrane conductance receptor (CFTR) gene to pig fetal fibroblasts. We generated cells with the CFTR gene either disrupted or containing the most common CF-associated mutation (DeltaF508). These cells were used as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer to porcine oocytes. We thereby generated heterozygote male piglets with each mutation. These pigs should be of value in producing new models of CF. In addition, because gene-modified mice often fail to replicate human diseases, this approach could be used to generate models of other human genetic diseases in species other than mice. PMID:18324337

  18. Functional dissection of latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus involved in latent DNA replication and transcription of terminal repeats of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chunghun; Sohn, Hekwang; Lee, Daeyoup; Gwack, Yousang; Choe, Joonho

    2002-10-01

    Latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is implicated in the maintenance of the viral genome during latent infection. LANA1 colocalizes with KSHV episomes on the host chromosome and mediates their maintenance by attaching these viral structures to host chromosomes. Data from long-term selection of drug resistance in cells conferred by plasmids containing the terminal repeat (TR) sequence of KSHV revealed that KSHV TRs and LANA1 act as cis and trans elements of viral latent replication, respectively. In this study, we further characterized the cis- and trans-acting elements of KSHV latent replication by using a transient replication assay with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme, DpnI. Transient reporter and replication assays disclosed that the orientation and basal transcriptional activity of TR constructs did not significantly affect the efficiency of replication. However, at least two TR units were necessary for efficient replication. The N-terminal 90 amino acids comprising the chromosome-binding domain of LANA1 were required for the mediation of LANA1 C-terminal DNA-binding and dimerization domains to support the transient replication of KSHV TRs. LANA1 interacted with components of the origin recognition complexes (ORCs), similar to Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1. Our data suggest that LANA1 recruits ORCs to KSHV TRs for latent replication of the viral genome. PMID:12239308

  19. Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou

    2013-01-01

    Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12-30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers' resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309-1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1-18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10(-2) mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10(-2)-4.1 x 10(-2) mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure. PMID:24312602

  20. Limited Internal Radiation Exposure Associated with Resettlements to a Radiation-Contaminated Homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou

    2013-01-01

    Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12–30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers’ resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309–1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1–18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10-2 mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10-2-4.1 x 10-2 mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure. PMID:24312602

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen and Angiogenin Interact with Common Host Proteins, Including Annexin A2, Which Is Essential for Survival of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Nitika; Sadagopan, Sathish; Balasubramanian, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA-1) upregulate the multifunctional protein angiogenin (ANG). Our studies demonstrate that silencing ANG or inhibiting its nuclear translocation downregulates KSHV LANA-1 expression and ANG is necessary for KSHV latency, anti-apoptosis and angiogenesis (Sadagopan et al., J. Virol. 83:3342–3364, 2009; Sadagopan et al., J Virol. 85:2666–2685, 2011). Here we show that LANA-1 interacts with ANG and colocalizes in latently infected endothelial telomerase-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial (TIVE-LTC) cells. Mass spectrometric analyses of TIVE-LTC proteins immunoprecipitated by anti-LANA-1 and ANG antibodies identified 28 common cellular proteins such as ribosomal proteins, structural proteins, tRNA synthetases, metabolic pathway enzymes, chaperons, transcription factors, antioxidants, and ubiquitin proteosome proteins. LANA-1 and ANG interaction with one of the proteins, annexin A2, was validated. Annexin A2 has been shown to play roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, plasmin generation, exocytosis, endocytosis, and cytoskeleton reorganization. It is also known to associate with glycolytic enzyme 3-phosphoglyceratekinase in the primer recognition protein (PRP) complex that interacts with DNA polymerase α in the lagging strand of DNA during replication. A higher level of annexin A2 is expressed in KSHV+ but not in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ B-lymphoma cell lines. Annexin A2 colocalized with several LANA-1 punctate spots in KSHV+ body cavity B-cell lymphoma (BCBL-1) cells. In triple-staining analyses, we observed annexin A2-ANG-LANA-1, annexin A2-ANG, and ANG-LANA-1 colocalizations. Annexin A2 appeared as punctate nuclear dots in LANA-1-positive TIVE-LTC cells. In LANA-1-negative TIVE-LTC cells, annexin A2 was detected predominately in the cytoplasm, with some nuclear spots, and colocalization with ANG was observed mostly in the cytoplasm. Annexin A2

  2. Sialyl-Tn antigen expression occurs early during human mammary carcinogenesis and is associated with high nuclear grade and aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Cho, S H; Sahin, A; Hortobagyi, G N; Hittelman, W N; Dhingra, K

    1994-12-15

    Sialyl-Tn (STn) antigen represents an aberrant glycosylation product of cell surface mucin in adenocarcinomas. We studied its expression in 40 breast carcinomas (35 of which included in situ carcinomas) by performing immunostaining with B72.3 monoclonal antibody. STn expression was observed in 50% of cases and was equally frequent in in situ and in invasive carcinomas. Positive STn staining significantly correlated with high nuclear grade (P = 0.001), aneuploidy (P < 0.001) and high S-phase fraction (P = 0.02). No correlation was observed between STn staining and age, menopausal status, presence of invasive component, or hormone receptor positivity. STn staining may provide an objective marker of dedifferentiation of breast tumors and should be investigated further for its prognostic value in breast cancers and as a biomarker of malignant transformation of breast epithelium. PMID:7987817

  3. Alanine Expansions Associated with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome Impair PHOX2B Homeodomain-mediated Dimerization and Nuclear Import*

    PubMed Central

    Di Lascio, Simona; Belperio, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the human PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of autonomic nervous system development, lead to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a failure in the autonomic control of breathing. Polyalanine expansions in the 20-residues region of the C terminus of PHOX2B are the major mutations responsible for CCHS. Elongation of the alanine stretch in PHOX2B leads to a protein with altered DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and nuclear localization and the possible formation of cytoplasmic aggregates; furthermore, the findings of various studies support the idea that CCHS is not due to a pure loss of function mechanism but also involves a dominant negative effect and/or toxic gain of function for PHOX2B mutations. Because PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimers with its paralogue PHOX2A in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant negative effects of the mutated proteins are due to non-functional interactions with the wild-type protein or PHOX2A using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and the mammalian two-hybrid system. Our findings show that PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimerizes weakly with mutated proteins, exclude the direct involvement of the polyalanine tract in dimer formation, and indicate that mutated proteins retain partial ability to form heterodimers with PHOX2A. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the effects of the longest polyalanine expansions on the homeodomain-mediated nuclear import, and our data clearly show that the expanded C terminus interferes with this process. These results provide novel insights into the effects of the alanine tract expansion on PHOX2B folding and activity. PMID:27129232

  4. Alanine Expansions Associated with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome Impair PHOX2B Homeodomain-mediated Dimerization and Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Di Lascio, Simona; Belperio, Debora; Benfante, Roberta; Fornasari, Diego

    2016-06-17

    Heterozygous mutations of the human PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of autonomic nervous system development, lead to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a failure in the autonomic control of breathing. Polyalanine expansions in the 20-residues region of the C terminus of PHOX2B are the major mutations responsible for CCHS. Elongation of the alanine stretch in PHOX2B leads to a protein with altered DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and nuclear localization and the possible formation of cytoplasmic aggregates; furthermore, the findings of various studies support the idea that CCHS is not due to a pure loss of function mechanism but also involves a dominant negative effect and/or toxic gain of function for PHOX2B mutations. Because PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimers with its paralogue PHOX2A in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant negative effects of the mutated proteins are due to non-functional interactions with the wild-type protein or PHOX2A using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and the mammalian two-hybrid system. Our findings show that PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimerizes weakly with mutated proteins, exclude the direct involvement of the polyalanine tract in dimer formation, and indicate that mutated proteins retain partial ability to form heterodimers with PHOX2A. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the effects of the longest polyalanine expansions on the homeodomain-mediated nuclear import, and our data clearly show that the expanded C terminus interferes with this process. These results provide novel insights into the effects of the alanine tract expansion on PHOX2B folding and activity. PMID:27129232

  5. The association and nuclear translocation of the PIAS3-STAT3 complex is ligand and time dependent.

    PubMed

    Dabir, Snehal; Kluge, Amy; Dowlati, Afshin

    2009-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor activation of downstream signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. STAT3 transcriptional activity can be negatively regulated by protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3). We investigated the time-dependent PIAS3 shuffling and binding to STAT3 in an EGF-dependent model in lung cancer by using confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, luciferase reporter assay, and protein analysis of segregated cellular components. We also explored the role of phosphorylation at Tyr705 of STAT3 in the formation and intracellular shuffling of the PIAS3-STAT3 complex. In a growth factor-free state, PIAS3 was localized to the cytoplasm and unbound to STAT3 in both H520 and A549 cells. On exposure to EGF, we observed STAT3 phosphorylation and rapid formation of the PIAS3-STAT3 complex. Within 5 minutes, there was a progressive translocation of the complex to the nucleus, and by 10 minutes, PIAS3 was uniquely localized to the nuclear compartment. After 30 minutes, PIAS3 returned to the cytoplasm. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we substituted Tyr705 of STAT3 with a phenylalanine. Despite EGF stimulation, we observed a significant decrease in PIAS3-STAT3 binding and a significant reduction in nuclear translocation of PIAS3. Furthermore, there was a significant reduction in the capacity of PIAS3 to reduce STAT3-mediated gene transcription. In wild-type STAT3 cells, increasing concentrations of PIAS3 resulted in a proportional decrease in STAT3 phosphorylation. These data suggest an important role for the negative regulatory effect of PIAS3 on STAT3 in EGF-driven tumors. PMID:19903771

  6. Biomedical conflicts of interest: a defence of the sequestration thesis-learning from the cases of Nancy Olivieri and David Healy.

    PubMed

    Schafer, A

    2004-02-01

    No discussion of academic freedom, research integrity, and patient safety could begin with a more disquieting pair of case studies than those of Nancy Olivieri and David Healy. The cumulative impact of the Olivieri and Healy affairs has caused serious self examination within the biomedical research community. The first part of the essay analyses these recent academic scandals. The two case studies are then placed in their historical context-that context being the transformation of the norms of science through increasingly close ties between research universities and the corporate world. After a literature survey of the ways in which corporate sponsorship has biased the results of clinical drug trials, two different strategies to mitigate this problem are identified and assessed: a regulatory approach, which focuses on managing risks associated with industry funding of university research, and a more radical approach, the sequestration thesis, which counsels the outright elimination of corporate sponsorship. The reformist approach is criticised and the radical approach defended. PMID:14872066

  7. "implicate Order" and the Good Life: Applying David Bohm's Ontology in Human World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravn, Ib.

    In an attempt to formulate a coherent view of quantum reality, the theoretical physicist David Bohm has proposed a new concept of order to supplement the mechanistic Cartesian order of traditional physics. The "implicate" order is a subtler and deeper order that emphasizes "unbroken wholeness in flowing movement," in contrast to the coarser and more superficial, "explicate" Cartesian order of distinct phenomena. This dissertation attempts to develop a meaning for the idea of implicate order in the world of human experience. First is offered an account of some evolutionary episodes in terms of implicate and explicate order which draws on compatible work in cosmology, embryogenesis, visual perception, brain memory, decision making and phenomenology. Two important characteristics of the implicate order are then identified: in an implicate order, the whole is enfolded (or represented) in its parts; and all parts render different perspectives of the whole. Using arguments from decision making, the study of "flow" in human consciousness, and a model of skill acquisition, it is suggested that these characteristics manifest themselves in the human world as the "unity experience" and the "diversity experience," respectively. The former is the experience that a given part of one's life reveals a larger wholeness or unity; the subject-object distinction is transcended and one becomes absorbed in the flow of whatever activity is pursued. The latter is a deep appreciation of the diversity of ways in which people may seek the unity experience. These experiences are proposed as general values: social and psychological conditions ought to be such that these experiences are enhanced in all people. A two-by-two matrix of the two experiences demonstrates the danger of pursuing one to the exclusion of the other. The experience of unity without diversity turns into absolutism, the insistence that one's chosen activities or beliefs are the only right ones. The experience of diversity

  8. David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1993-04-01

    The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

  9. David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1993-04-01

    The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

  10. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), but not Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor Kappa B Ligand (RANKL), is Associated with Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in HIV-infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Ketlogetswe, Kerunne S; McKibben, Rebeccah; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xuihong; Dobs, Adrian S; Budoff, Matthew; Witt, Mallory D; Palella, Frank J; Kingsley, Lawrence; Margolick, Joseph B.; Post, Wendy S; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Context Abnormalities in the osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) axis have been observed in HIV-infected persons and have been implicated in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis in the general population. Objective To determine associations of serum OPG and RANKL concentrations with HIV infection and subclinical atherosclerosis. Design Cross-sectional study nested within the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study Setting Four US academic medical centers Participants There were 578 HIV-infected and 344 HIV-uninfected men. Main Outcome Measures Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by non-contrast cardiac computed tomography (CT), and coronary stenosis and plaque characteristics (composition, presence and extent) were measured by coronary CT angiography. All statistical models were adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results OPG concentrations were higher and RANKL concentrations were lower among HIV-infected men compared to –uninfected men (p<0.0001 each). Among the HIV-infected men, higher OPG concentrations were associated with the presence of CAC, mixed plaque, and coronary stenosis > 50%, but not with plaque extent. In contrast, among HIV-uninfected men, higher OPG concentrations were associated with extent of both CAC and calcified plaque, but not their presence. RANKL concentrations were not associated with plaque presence or extent among HIV-infected men, but among HIV-uninfected men, lower RANKL concentrations were associated with greater extent of CAC and total plaque. Conclusions OPG and RANKL are dysregulated in HIV-infected men and their relationship to the presence and extent of subclinical atherosclerosis varies by HIV-status. The role of these biomarkers in CVD pathogenesis and risk prediction may be different in HIV-infected men. PMID:26090754

  11. MCF-7 cells expressing nuclear associated lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) exhibit an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and are highly invasive in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Finney, Joel; Xu, Li; Moore, David; Welch, Danny R; Mure, Minae

    2013-10-18

    LOXL2 is a copper- and lysine tyrosylquinone-dependent amine oxidase that has been proposed to function both extracellularly and intracellularly to activate oncogenic signaling pathways leading to EMT and invasion of breast cancer cells. In this study, we selected MCF-7 cells that stably express forms of recombinant LOXL2 differing in their subcellular localizations and catalytic competencies. This enabled us to dissect the molecular functions of intracellular and extracellular LOXL2s and examine their contributions to breast cancer metastasis/invasion. We discovered that secreted LOXL2 (~100-kDa) is N-glycosylated at Asn-455 and Asn-644, whereas intracellular LOXL2 (~75-kDa) is nonglycosylated and N-terminally processed, and is primarily associated with the nucleus. Both forms of LOXL2 can oxidize lysine in solution. However, we found that expression of intracellular LOXL2 is more strongly associated with EMT and invasiveness than secreted LOXL2 in vitro. The results indicate that nuclear associated LOXL2 contributes to the stabilization of Snail1 transcription factor at the protein level to induce EMT and promote invasion in vitro, through repression of E-cadherin, occludin, and estrogen receptor-α, and up-regulation of vimentin, fibronectin, and MT1-MMP. PMID:24014025

  12. The nuclear matrix protein p255 is a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit which associates with spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M; Lauriault, P; Dubois, M F; Lavoie, S; Bensaude, O; Chabot, B

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody CC-3 recognizes a phosphodependent epitope on a 255 kDa nuclear matrix protein (p255) recently shown to associate with splicing complexes as part of the [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP particle [Chabot et al. (1995) Nucleic Acids Res. 23, 3206-3213]. In mouse and Drosophila cultured cells the electrophoretic mobility of p255, faster in the latter species, was identical to that of the hyperphosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (IIo). The CC-3 immunoreactivity of p255 was abolished by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, which is known to cause the dephosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of subunit IIo by inhibiting the TFIIH-associated kinase. The identity of p255 was confirmed by showing that CC-3-immunoprecipitated p255 was recognized by POL3/3 and 8WG16, two antibodies specific to RNA polymerase II largest subunit. Lastly, the recovery of RNA polymerase II largest subunit from HeLa splicing mixtures was compromised by EDTA, which prevents the interaction of p255 with splicing complexes and inhibits splicing. Our results indicate that p255 represents a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit physically associated with spliceosomes and possibly involved in coupling transcription to RNA processing. PMID:8972849

  13. AB248. Expression of EphA2 protein is positively associated with age, tumor size and Fuhrman nuclear grade in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Longxin; Zhou, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase of EphA2 has been shown frequently overexpressed in various types of human carcinomas, but the relationship between the expression of EphA2 protein in clear cell renal cell carcinoma was not well documented. Methods In the present study, using specific anit-EphA2 polyclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated EphA2 protein expression levels in clear cell RCC specimens surgically resected from 90 patients. Results Our results shows that EphA2 protein was positively expressed in all normal renal tubes of 90 samples (100%, 3+), which was expressed at low levels in renal cortex but high levels in the collecting ducts of the renal medulla and papilla. EphA2 was negatively or weakly expressed in 30 out of 90 samples (33.3%, 0/1+), moderately expressed in 24 samples (26.7%, 2+) and strongly expressed in 36 samples (40%, 3+). Expression of EphA2 was positively associated with age (P=0.029), tumor diameters (P<0.001) and Fuhrman nuclear grade (P<0.001). Conclusions Our results indicate that EphA2 variably expressed in clear cell renal cell carci-nomas. High expression of EphA2 was more often found in big size and high nuclear grade tumors, which indicated EphA2 protein may be used as a new marker for the prognosis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  14. Prevalence of Antibodies against Neospora caninum in Père David's Deer ( Elaphurus davidianus ) in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Fangjie; Fu, Yong; Zhang, Changsheng; Liu, Qun; Xu, Jianhai; Liu, Jing

    2016-04-28

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan protozoan and causes neuromuscular disorders in canids and abortions in cattle worldwide. We screened sera samples from 49 free-ranging Père David's deer ( Elaphurus davidianus ) in a nature reserve in Beijing, China, for antibodies against N. caninum using indirect fluorescence antibody tests and western blot tests. Antibodies were found in 27% of the deer. Western blot analysis revealed antibody reactivity against immunodominant N. caninum antigens of 16, 25, and 37 kDa in size together with other visible bands. PMID:27124330

  15. msg1, a novel melanocyte-specific gene, encodes a nuclear protein and is associated with pigmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Shioda, T; Fenner, M H; Isselbacher, K J

    1996-01-01

    Messenger RNA transcripts of the highly pigmented murine melanoma B16-F1 cells were compared with those from their weakly pigmented derivative B16-F10 cells by differential display. A novel gene called msg1 (melanocyte-specific gene) was found to be expressed at high levels in B16-F1 cells but at low levels in B16-F10 cells. Expression of msg1 was undetectable in the amelanotic K1735 murine melanoma cells. The pigmented murine melanocyte cell line melan-a expressed msg1, as did pigmented primary cultures of murine and human melanocytes; however, seven amelanotic or very weakly pigmented human melanoma cell lines were negative. Transformation of murine melanocytes by transfection with v-Ha-ras or Ela was accompanied by depigmentation and led to complete loss of msg1 expression. The normal tissue distribution of msg1 mRNA transcripts in adult mice was confined to melanocytes and testis. Murine msg1 and human MSG1 genes encode a predicted protein of 27 kDa with 75% overall amino acid identity and 96% identity within the C-terminal acidic domain of 54 amino acids. This C-terminal domain was conserved with 76% amino acid identity in another protein product of a novel human gene, MRG1 (msg1-related gene), isolated from normal human melanocyte cDNA by 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends based on the homology to msg1. The msg1 protein was localized to the melanocyte nucleus by immunofluorescence cytochemistry. We conclude that msg1 encodes a nuclear protein, is melanocyte-specific, and appears to be lost in depigmented melanoma cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901575

  16. Evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota and human consumers of seafood.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Nicholas S; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hinton, Thomas G; Baumann, Zofia; Madigan, Daniel J; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2013-06-25

    Radioactive isotopes originating from the damaged Fukushima nuclear reactor in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 were found in resident marine animals and in migratory Pacific bluefin tuna (PBFT). Publication of this information resulted in a worldwide response that caused public anxiety and concern, although PBFT captured off California in August 2011 contained activity concentrations below those from naturally occurring radionuclides. To link the radioactivity to possible health impairments, we calculated doses, attributable to the Fukushima-derived and the naturally occurring radionuclides, to both the marine biota and human fish consumers. We showed that doses in all cases were dominated by the naturally occurring alpha-emitter (210)Po and that Fukushima-derived doses were three to four orders of magnitude below (210)Po-derived doses. Doses to marine biota were about two orders of magnitude below the lowest benchmark protection level proposed for ecosystems (10 µGy⋅h(-1)). The additional dose from Fukushima radionuclides to humans consuming tainted PBFT in the United States was calculated to be 0.9 and 4.7 µSv for average consumers and subsistence fishermen, respectively. Such doses are comparable to, or less than, the dose all humans routinely obtain from naturally occurring radionuclides in many food items, medical treatments, air travel, or other background sources. Although uncertainties remain regarding the assessment of cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation to humans, the dose received from PBFT consumption by subsistence fishermen can be estimated to result in two additional fatal cancer cases per 10,000,000 similarly exposed people. PMID:23733934

  17. Flower-enhanced expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial respiratory protein is associated with changes in mitochondrion number.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Struck, F; Matzinger, D F; Levings, C S

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein is an obligatory component of the respiratory electron transport chain that is encoded by a single-copy gene in mammals and fungi. In contrast, this protein is encoded by a small gene family in dicotyledonous tobacco and monocotyledonous maize. We cloned four cDNAs from tobacco that encode the mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein. These clones, along with a previously isolated cDNA, represent five independent members of the gene family that can be divided into three subfamilies. All of these genes were derived from the two progenitor species and were expressed in amphidiploid tobacco. The proteins encoded by these five genes are probably functional because they all contain the universally conserved hexyl peptides necessary for the 2Fe-2S cluster formation. The expression of the Rieske protein gene family is differentially regulated; a 6- to 11-fold higher level of steady state transcripts was found in flowers than in leaves, stems, and roots. Members of at least two subfamilies were preferentially expressed in flowers, indicating that they share a common cis-regulatory element(s), which can respond to a flower-specific signal(s). Although approximately 10 times more transcripts occurred in flowers than in leaves, flower and leaf mitochondria contained a similar amount of the Rieske protein. Flowers, however, contained seven times more Rieske proteins than leaves. These results indicated an increase in mitochondrion number in flowers. High-energy demands during anther development might bring about an increase in mitochondrion numbers in flowers and the flower-enhanced expression of the Rieske protein gene family. Our results suggested that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory proteins could sense and respond to changes in energy metabolism and/or changes in mitochondrion numbers. PMID:8180500

  18. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the association of basic proteins with multilayers of diacyl phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Cornell, B A; Keniry, M A; Separovic, F

    1983-08-10

    Lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine), myelin basic protein and ribonuclease were used to form multilayer dispersions containing about 50% protein (by weight) with bovine brain diacyl phosphatidylserine (PS). 31P nuclear magnetic resonance shift anisotropies, spin-spin (T2) and spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times for the lipid headgroup phosphorus were measured at 36.44 MHz. At pH 7.5, lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine) and ribonuclease were shown to increase the chemical shift anisotropy of PS by between 12-20%. Myelin basic protein altered the shape of the phosphate resonance, suggesting the presence of two lipid components, one of which had a modified headgroup conformation. The presence of cytochrome c led to the formation of a narrow spike at the isotropic shift position of the spectrum. Of the various proteins or peptides we have studied, only poly(L-lysine) and cytochrome c had any effect on the T1 of PS (1050 ms). Both caused a 20-30% decrease in T1 of the lamellar-phase phosphate peak. The narrow peak in the presence of cytochrome c had a very short T1 of 156 ms. The possibility is considered that the cytochrome Fe3+ contributes to the phosphate relaxation in this case. The effect of all proteins on the T2 of the phosphorus resonance was to cause an increase from the value for pure PS (1.6 ms) to between 2 and 5 ms. The results obtained with proteins are compared with the effects of small ions and intrinsic membrane proteins on the order and motion of the headgroups of lipids in bilayers. PMID:6191774

  19. Evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota and human consumers of seafood

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Nicholas S.; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hinton, Thomas G.; Baumann, Zofia; Madigan, Daniel J.; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive isotopes originating from the damaged Fukushima nuclear reactor in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 were found in resident marine animals and in migratory Pacific bluefin tuna (PBFT). Publication of this information resulted in a worldwide response that caused public anxiety and concern, although PBFT captured off California in August 2011 contained activity concentrations below those from naturally occurring radionuclides. To link the radioactivity to possible health impairments, we calculated doses, attributable to the Fukushima-derived and the naturally occurring radionuclides, to both the marine biota and human fish consumers. We showed that doses in all cases were dominated by the naturally occurring alpha-emitter 210Po and that Fukushima-derived doses were three to four orders of magnitude below 210Po-derived doses. Doses to marine biota were about two orders of magnitude below the lowest benchmark protection level proposed for ecosystems (10 µGy⋅h−1). The additional dose from Fukushima radionuclides to humans consuming tainted PBFT in the United States was calculated to be 0.9 and 4.7 µSv for average consumers and subsistence fishermen, respectively. Such doses are comparable to, or less than, the dose all humans routinely obtain from naturally occurring radionuclides in many food items, medical treatments, air travel, or other background sources. Although uncertainties remain regarding the assessment of cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation to humans, the dose received from PBFT consumption by subsistence fishermen can be estimated to result in two additional fatal cancer cases per 10,000,000 similarly exposed people. PMID:23733934

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTICITY MODEL USING NON ASSOCIATED FLOW RULE FOR HCP MATERIALS INCLUDING ZIRCONIUM FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Jeong-Whan Yoon

    2013-08-01

    In this report (prepared in collaboration with Prof. Jeong Whan Yoon, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia) a research effort was made to develop a non associated flow rule for zirconium. Since Zr is a hexagonally close packed (hcp) material, it is impossible to describe its plastic response under arbitrary loading conditions with any associated flow rule (e.g. von Mises). As a result of strong tension compression asymmetry of the yield stress and anisotropy, zirconium displays plastic behavior that requires a more sophisticated approach. Consequently, a new general asymmetric yield function has been developed which accommodates mathematically the four directional anisotropies along 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and biaxial, under tension and compression. Stress anisotropy has been completely decoupled from the r value by using non associated flow plasticity, where yield function and plastic potential have been treated separately to take care of stress and r value directionalities, respectively. This theoretical development has been verified using Zr alloys at room temperature as an example as these materials have very strong SD (Strength Differential) effect. The proposed yield function reasonably well models the evolution of yield surfaces for a zirconium clock rolled plate during in plane and through thickness compression. It has been found that this function can predict both tension and compression asymmetry mathematically without any numerical tolerance and shows the significant improvement compared to any reported functions. Finally, in the end of the report, a program of further research is outlined aimed at constructing tensorial relationships for the temperature and fluence dependent creep surfaces for Zr, Zircaloy 2, and Zircaloy 4.