Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear cardiology procedures

  1. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements and Joint Society Statements Member Login Enter Forgot your password? Meetings & ...

  2. Diagnostic procedures in cardiology: A clinician's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.V.; Lewis, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 papers. Some of the titles are: Cardiovascular radiology; Nuclear cardiology; echocardiography; The use and conduct of exercise tests; Lipid studies in cardiology; and The practice of cardiology in an era of high technology.

  3. Recent Advances in Nuclear Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Woo

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine. PMID:27540423

  4. Patient Radiation Doses in Interventional Cardiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Pantos, Ioannis; Patatoukas, Georgios; Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios

    2009-01-01

    Interventional cardiology procedures result in substantial patient radiation doses due to prolonged fluoroscopy time and radiographic exposure. The procedures that are most frequently performed are coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary interventions, diagnostic electrophysiology studies and radiofrequency catheter ablation. Patient radiation dose in these procedures can be assessed either by measurements on a series of patients in real clinical practice or measurements using patient-equivalent phantoms. In this article we review the derived doses at non-pediatric patients from 72 relevant studies published during the last 22 years in international scientific literature. Published results indicate that patient radiation doses vary widely among the different interventional cardiology procedures but also among equivalent studies. Discrepancies of the derived results are patient-, procedure-, physician-, and fluoroscopic equipmentrelated. Nevertheless, interventional cardiology procedures can subject patients to considerable radiation doses. Efforts to minimize patient exposure should always be undertaken. PMID:20066141

  5. Privileging and credentialing for interventional cardiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, James C; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Jennings, Henry S

    2015-10-01

    Local institutional-specific credentialing and privileging for procedures is an important process for ensuring the quality of care provided by interventional cardiologists. Recently revised standards for coronary intervention and the blossoming of structural heart disease programs have generated controversy over these processes. How standards are set for credentialing and privileging is poorly understood by most interventional cardiologists, including those responsible for credentialing and privileging. Requirements from The Joint Commission dictate how credentialing and privileging is performed at hospitals they accredit. Physicians must be recredentialed every 2 years at each hospital, with privileges renewed at that time. Hospitals must review quality of physicians even more frequently using Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluations. Hospitals must also evaluate the performance of physicians when they join a hospital staff or when they begin performing new procedures using Focused Professional Practice Evaluations. Cardiology department directors and catheterization laboratory directors are responsible for recredentialing and reprivileging members of their departments. Individual physicians are responsible for cooperating with these processes, and for periodic recertification with specialty boards and governmental agencies. We provide specific guidance to help physicians navigate these processes. PMID:25534235

  6. Recent Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bong-Il

    2013-01-01

    Over the past three decades, radionuclide myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) has become established as the main functional cardiac imaging technique for ischemic heart disease. It is currently appropriate for all aspects of detecting and managing ischemic heart disease, including diagnosis, risk assessment and stratification, assessment of myocardial viability, and evaluation of left ventricular function. The purpose of this article was to review recent trends in nuclear cardiology practice, excluding positron emission tomography. The past few years have brought several rapid developments that have increased photon sensitivity in nuclear cardiology scanner hardware. Additionally, software applying new methods of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) reconstruction on conventional and dedicated systems has preserved or even improved SPECT image quality with lower count statistics. On the other hand, much interest has been shown in lowering the radiation dose by the stakeholders of MPS. PMID:24010067

  7. Nuclear cardiology: 2014 innovations and developments.

    PubMed

    Mahmarian, John J; Chang, SuMin; Nabi, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is acknowledged as a robust technique for clinically assessing patients with a wide spectrum of cardiac illnesses. Recent technical, radiotracer, and stressor advancements continue to expand the role of nuclear cardiology for the accurate diagnosis and prognostication of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. The introduction of I-123 MIBG represents another advance for assessing risk in patients with congestive heart failure and depressed left ventricular (LV) function. Software and hardware innovations and recent shifts in acquisition protocols have greatly improved image quality, reduced cost and radiation exposure, and continue to promote patient and physician satisfaction. The following article will highlight recent achievements in the field that continue to foster a patient-centered imaging approach. PMID:25574344

  8. Nuclear Cardiology: 2014 Innovations and Developments

    PubMed Central

    Mahmarian, John J.; Chang, SuMin; Nabi, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is acknowledged as a robust technique for clinically assessing patients with a wide spectrum of cardiac illnesses. Recent technical, radiotracer, and stressor advancements continue to expand the role of nuclear cardiology for the accurate diagnosis and prognostication of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. The introduction of I-123 MIBG represents another advance for assessing risk in patients with congestive heart failure and depressed left ventricular (LV) function. Software and hardware innovations and recent shifts in acquisition protocols have greatly improved image quality, reduced cost and radiation exposure, and continue to promote patient and physician satisfaction. The following article will highlight recent achievements in the field that continue to foster a patient-centered imaging approach. PMID:25574344

  9. Role of nuclear cardiology in advancing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Abidov, Aiden; Hachamovitch, Rory; Berman, Daniel S

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac surgeons are commonly faced with issues regarding the balance between the potential risk and the potential benefit of a surgical procedure. Nuclear cardiology procedures [myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) and positron emission tomography (PET)] provide the surgeon with objective information that augments standard clinical and angiographic assessments with respect to diagnosis, prognosis, and potential benefit from intervention. Development of the technology and methodology of gated MPS acquisition and interpretation allows assessment of the extent and severity of hypoperfused but viable myocardium, as well as global LVEF and LV volume measurements, diastolic function, and LV geometry. With PET, myocardial metabolism and blood flow reserve can also be measured. This chapter provides insight into the current evidence regarding settings in which nuclear cardiology procedures are helpful to the surgeon in assessment of patients having or being considered for cardiac surgery in the setting of coronary artery disease (CAD). Overall, a risk-benefit approach to MPS results is proposed, with principal focus on identifying patients at risk for major cardiac events who may benefit from a surgical procedure. PMID:15619195

  10. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  11. Robotic surgery in Cardiology: a safe and effective procedure

    PubMed Central

    Poffo, Robinson; Toschi, Alisson Parrilha; Pope, Renato Bastos; Celullare, Alex Luiz; Benício, Anderson; Fischer, Claudio Henrique; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Teruya, Alexandre; Hatanaka, Dina Mie; Rusca, Gabriel Franzin; Makdisse, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the short and medium-term outcomes of patients undergoing robotic-assisted minimally invasive cardiac surgery. Methods: From March 2010 to March 2013, 21 patients underwent robotic-assisted cardiac surgery. The procedures performed were: mitral valve repair, mitral valve replacement, surgical correction of atrial fibrillation, surgical correction of atrial septal defect, intracardiac tumor resection, totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery and pericardiectomy. Results: The mean age was 48.39±18.05 years. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 151.7±99.97 minutes, and the mean aortic cross-clamp time was 109.94±81.34 minutes. The mean duration of intubation was 7.52±15.2 hours, and 16 (76.2%) patients were extubated in the operating room immediately after the procedure. The mean length of intensive care unit stay was 1.67±1.46 days. There were no conversions to sternotomy. There was no in-hospital death or deaths during the medium-term follow-up. Patients mean follow up time was 684±346 days, ranging from 28 to 1096 days. Conclusion: Robotic-assisted cardiac surgery proved to be feasible, safe and effective and can be applied in the correction of various intra and extracardiac pathologies. PMID:24136755

  12. Status of radiation protection in various interventional cardiology procedures in the Asia Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Tsapaki, Virginia; Faruque Ghulam, Mohammed; Lim, Soo Teik; Ngo Minh, Hung; Nwe, Nwe; Sharma, Anil; Sim, Kui-Hian; Srimahachota, Suphot; Rehani, Madan Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Increasing use of interventional procedures in cardiology with unknown levels of radiation protection in many countries of Asia-Pacific region necessitates the need for status assessment. The study was part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project for achieving improved radiation protection in interventional cardiology (IC) in developing countries. Design The survey covers 18 cardiac catheterisation laboratories in seven countries (Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam). An important step was the creation of the ‘Asian network of Cardiologists in Radiation Protection’ and a newsletter. Data were collected on: radiation protection tools, number of IC laboratories, and annual number of various IC paediatric and adult procedures in the hospital and in the country. Patient radiation dose data were collected in terms of Kerma Area Product (KAP) and cumulative dose (CD). Results It is encouraging that protection devices for staff are largely used in the routine practice. Only 39% of the angiographic machines were equipped with a KAP meter. Operators' initial lack of awareness on radiation-protection optimisation improved significantly after participation in IAEA radiation-protection training. Only two out of five countries reporting patient percutaneous coronary intervention radiation-dose data were fully within the international guidance levels. Data from 51 patients who underwent multiple therapeutic procedures (median 2–3) indicated a total KAP reaching 995 Gy.cm2 (range 10.1–995) and CD 15.1 Gy (range 0.4–15.1), stressing the importance of dose monitoring and optimisation. Conclusions There is a need for interventional cardiology societies to play an active role in training actions and implementation of radiation protection. PMID:27325974

  13. Assessment of the occupational exposure in real time during interventional cardiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Baptista, M; Figueira, C; Teles, P; Cardoso, G; Zankl, M; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    Interventional cardiology (IC) procedures can be complex, requiring the operators to work near the patient, during long exposure times. Owing to scattered radiation in the patient and the fluoroscopic equipment, the medical staff are exposed to a non-uniform radiation field and can receive high radiation doses. In this study, it is proposed to analyse staff doses obtained in real time, during IC procedures. A system for occupational dosimetry in real time was used. In order to identify some parameters that may affect the staff doses, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, using MCNPX v.2.7.0 code and voxel phantoms, were performed. The data obtained from measurements, together with MC simulations, allowed the identification of actions and behaviours of the medical staff that could be considered a risk under routine working conditions. The implementation of this monitoring system for exposure of personnel may have a positive effect on optimisation of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures. PMID:25848113

  14. Reporting nuclear cardiology: a joint position paper by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    PubMed

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Hacker, Marcus; Verberne, Hein J; Edenbrandt, Lars; Delgado, Victoria; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Galderisi, Maurizio; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Agostini, Denis; Gimelli, Alessia; Lindner, Oliver; Slart, Riemert; Ubleis, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The report of an imaging procedure is a critical component of an examination, being the final and often the only communication from the interpreting physician to the referring or treating physician. Very limited evidence and few recommendations or guidelines on reporting imaging studies are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed in this paper (myocardial perfusion, viability, innervation, and function as acquired by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography or hybrid imaging), headings cover laboratory and patient demographics, clinical indication, tracer administration and image acquisition, findings, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical outcome. PMID:25618478

  15. Overall measurements of dose to patients in common interventional cardiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weipeng; Zhang, Menglong; Zhang, Yi

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to measure peak skin dose (PSD), dose-area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and fluoroscopy time (FT) for interventional cardiology procedures and to evaluate whether patient doses were higher than that in other published data. Three cardiac procedure types, including coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and radio frequency (RF) ablation, were entered into the study. Data of four special metrics (PSD, DAP, CD and FT) for these procedures were collected and measured. A total of 238 patients who underwent interventional radiology procedures participated in this study. For every procedure, data about PSD were resulted from six TLD arrays and DAP, CD and FT were collected from the displayed monitor. The mean, standard deviation (SD), range and third quartile of the distribution of PSD, DAP, CD and FT recorded and measured on spot were calculated for all procedures. High-dose cases were specifically recorded. There was wide variation in the doses observed for different instances of the same procedure. PSD for PTCA and RF ablation ranged from 0.1 Gy to more than 3 Gy. Of 238 instances, there were 22 (9.2 %) with PSDs greater than 2 Gy and 4 (1.7 %) than 3 Gy. The third quartile of the distribution for PTCA had exceeded the DIMOND preliminary reference levels by 41.1 % in DAP and 25.0 % in FT. Mean DAP was in the range of reported values for CAG procedure, but higher than all data obtained in literatures for PTCA. Data from this study are in the range of most reported values for CAG and RF ablation procedure, while higher than that obtained in some literatures for PTCA. In case of a constant delivering of high doses to patient and physician himself, thorough training of interventionalists and staff is necessary, and the legislation has to be revised and set dose constrains especially for the interventional high-dose procedures. PMID:23770572

  16. The current and future status of nuclear cardiology: a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Stephen Richard; de Bondt, Pieter; Flotats, Albert; Marcasa, Claudio; Pinto, Fausto; Schaefer, Wolfgang; Verberne, Hein Jan

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac imaging now provides a range of anatomical and functional information with some overlap in the ability of individual techniques to guide diagnosis and management. This report summarizes the conclusions of a panel of cardiac imagers who assembled to discuss the current state of the field. It focuses principally on options for nuclear cardiology, the choice between individual techniques, and areas where further advances would benefit patient management. PMID:24819850

  17. Nuclear cardiology patient tracking using a palm-based device: methods and clinician satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khan M; Butcher, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Handheld personal computers are popular, easy to use, inexpensive, portable, and can share data among different operating systems. In our institution, nuclear cardiology testing is performed in the nuclear medicine department and jointly reported by radiologists and cardiologists. The objective of this article is to describe a system for recording nuclear cardiology data and to assess clinician satisfaction using handheld computers with the Palm Operating System. We devised a Palm-based relational database/ using commercially available software (HanDBase) that requires minimal computer expertise to implement and maintain. Data are collected by the cardiologist and synchronized to a single central relational database compatible with Microsoft Access. We assessed cardiologists' satisfaction with this system. Cardiologists unanimously agreed that this system had a positive impact on patient management and cardiology fellow education. They were satisfied with ease of data input, sharing, retrieval, and clarity of data display. The cardiologist with the least experience in using the software took longer to input data and thought that it prolonged the nuclear cardiology rounds. The idea to develop this software was to ease data entry using shortcuts and lists, limiting data stored to that essential for patient management and also to transmit data easily between staff. The cardiologist with the most experience in using the software felt more comfortable and satisfied with it. This was perhaps due to his continuous involvement in the development of this system. Like any new system, there is a learning curve in using this software. The software was easy to customize, and support and tutorials were found on the manufacturer's Web site. The system of collecting data using handheld computers with the Palm Operating System is easy to use, relatively inexpensive, accurate, and secure. The user-friendly system provides prompt, complete, and accurate data, enhancing the education

  18. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. PMID:25848117

  19. Occupational radiation doses to the extremities and the eyes in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures

    PubMed Central

    Efstathopoulos, E P; Pantos, I; Andreou, M; Gkatzis, A; Carinou, E; Koukorava, C; Kelekis, N L; Brountzos, E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine occupational dose levels in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Methods The study covered a sample of 25 procedures and monitored occupational dose for all laboratory personnel. Each individual wore eight thermoluminescent dosemeters next to the eyes, wrists, fingers and legs during each procedure. Radiation protection shields used in each procedure were recorded. Results The highest doses per procedure were recorded for interventionists at the left wrist (average 485 μSv, maximum 5239 μSv) and left finger (average 324 μSv, maximum 2877 μSv), whereas lower doses were recorded for the legs (average 124 μSv, maximum 1959 μSv) and the eyes (average 64 μSv, maximum 1129 μSv). Doses to the assisting nurses during the intervention were considerably lower; the highest doses were recorded at the wrists (average 26 μSv, maximum 41 μSv) and legs (average 18 μSv, maximum 22 μSv), whereas doses to the eyes were minimal (average 4 μSv, maximum 16 μSv). Occupational doses normalised to kerma area product (KAP) ranged from 11.9 to 117.3 μSv/1000 cGy cm2 and KAP was poorly correlated to the interventionists' extremity doses. Conclusion Calculation of the dose burden for interventionists considering the actual number of procedures performed annually revealed that dose limits for the extremities and the lenses of the eyes were not exceeded. However, there are cases in which high doses have been recorded and this can lead to exceeding the dose limits when bad practices are followed and the radiation protection tools are not properly used. PMID:21172967

  20. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD <1 Gy were measured in 72 % and PSD >2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia. PMID:19880413

  1. Low dose in nuclear cardiology: state of the art in the era of new cadmium-zinc-telluride cameras.

    PubMed

    Acampa, Wanda; Buechel, Ronny R; Gimelli, Alessia

    2016-06-01

    The use of myocardial perfusion imaging has seen a tremendous growth during the last decade and has become the most commonly used non-invasive imaging tool for risk stratification in patients with suspected and known coronary artery disease. Adherence to radiation safety best practices varied significantly between laboratories but the possibility to use the new cameras in nuclear cardiology can reduce dramatically the radiation dose without losing accuracy. Moreover, the physical characteristics of ultrafast technology could be able to open new doors for the evaluation of old parameters, changing the impact of nuclear cardiology in the diagnostic strategies. PMID:26985078

  2. Nuclear cardiology.

    PubMed

    Penkava, R R

    1985-05-01

    Radionuclide cardiac imaging is a safe, noninvasive alternative to cardiac catheterization for observation and evaluation of cardiac wall motion and calculation of ejection fraction. Nuclide imaging offers a greater degree of sensitivity and specificity in detecting myocardial ischemia and infarction than do conventional electrocardiographic and cardiac enzyme studies. It is especially useful in problem cases. Myocardial infarction can usually be evaluated with respect to size and relative age of infarction. PMID:2986439

  3. Noninvasive Identification of ATTRwt Cardiac Amyloid: The Re-emergence of Nuclear Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Mathew S

    2015-12-01

    More than half of all subjects with chronic heart failure are older adults with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Effective therapy for this condition is yet to be delineated by clinical trials, suggesting that a greater understanding of underlying biologic mechanisms is needed, especially for the purpose of clinical intervention and future clinical trials. Amyloid infiltration of the myocardium is an underappreciated contributing factor to HFpEF that is often caused by misfolded monomers or oligomers of the protein transthyretin. While previously called senile cardiac amyloidosis and traditionally requiring endomyocardial biopsy for diagnosis, advances in our pathophysiologic understanding of this condition, coupled with nuclear imaging techniques using bone isotopes that can diagnose this condition noninvasively and the development of potential therapies, have resulted in a renewed interest in this previously considered "rare" condition. This reviewer focuses on the re-emergence of nuclear cardiology using pyrophosphate agents that hold promise for early, noninvasive identification of affected individuals. PMID:26091765

  4. Diagnostic radiology and nuclear cardiology. Their use in assessment of equine cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Koblik, P D; Hornof, W J

    1985-08-01

    Survey thoracic radiography, although limited by physical considerations in the adult horse, can supply clinically useful information about changes in cardiac size and function. The radiographic features of cardiomegaly, altered pulmonary circulation, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusion as manifested in the horse are discussed. Nuclear cardiology can be performed in the standing horse. The initial transit of a radioactive tracer through the central circulation provides information about cardiac chamber size, efficiency of ventricular contraction, valvular competence, and presence of intracardiac or extracardiac shunts. Computer analysis of similar studies allows quantitation of several useful cardiac parameters including ventricular ejection fraction and shunt size (QP/QS). Gated blood pool nuclear studies are better suited to evaluate cardiac response to stress but are difficult to perform in the conscious horse with standard imaging equipment. PMID:2934115

  5. Current worldwide nuclear cardiology practices and radiation exposure: results from the 65 country IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Cross-Sectional Study (INCAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Mercuri, Mathew; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Mahmarian, John J.; Better, Nathan; Bouyoucef, Salah E.; Hee-Seung Bom, Henry; Lele, Vikram; Magboo, V. Peter C.; Alexánderson, Erick; Allam, Adel H.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Flotats, Albert; Jerome, Scott; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Luxenburg, Osnat; Shaw, Leslee J.; Underwood, S. Richard; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Dondi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims To characterize patient radiation doses from nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and the use of radiation-optimizing ‘best practices’ worldwide, and to evaluate the relationship between laboratory use of best practices and patient radiation dose. Methods and results We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of protocols used for all 7911 MPI studies performed in 308 nuclear cardiology laboratories in 65 countries for a single week in March–April 2013. Eight ‘best practices’ relating to radiation exposure were identified a priori by an expert committee, and a radiation-related quality index (QI) devised indicating the number of best practices used by a laboratory. Patient radiation effective dose (ED) ranged between 0.8 and 35.6 mSv (median 10.0 mSv). Average laboratory ED ranged from 2.2 to 24.4 mSv (median 10.4 mSv); only 91 (30%) laboratories achieved the median ED ≤ 9 mSv recommended by guidelines. Laboratory QIs ranged from 2 to 8 (median 5). Both ED and QI differed significantly between laboratories, countries, and world regions. The lowest median ED (8.0 mSv), in Europe, coincided with high best-practice adherence (mean laboratory QI 6.2). The highest doses (median 12.1 mSv) and low QI (4.9) occurred in Latin America. In hierarchical regression modelling, patients undergoing MPI at laboratories following more ‘best practices’ had lower EDs. Conclusion Marked worldwide variation exists in radiation safety practices pertaining to MPI, with targeted EDs currently achieved in a minority of laboratories. The significant relationship between best-practice implementation and lower doses indicates numerous opportunities to reduce radiation exposure from MPI globally. PMID:25898845

  6. Comparison of procedural complications with versus without interventional cardiology fellows-in-training during contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Stolker, Joshua M; Allen, Drew S; Cohen, David J; Kennedy, Kevin F; Laster, Steven B; Frutkin, Andrew D; Mehta, Sameer K; O'Neal, Kelly R; Marso, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing complexity of contemporary procedures at tertiary care hospitals, the relationship between interventional cardiology fellows-in-training (ICFITs) and complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has not been reported. We compiled logbooks of 6 ICFITs at an academic hospital and evaluated patient and procedural characteristics of PCIs performed with and without presence of an ICFIT. The primary end point was the composite of all in-hospital PCI complications defined by the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry: (1) catheterization laboratory events such as no-reflow and dissection/perforation, (2) general clinical events such as stroke or cardiogenic shock, (3) vascular and bleeding complications, and (4) miscellaneous complications such as peak troponin or creatinine levels. Logistic regression adjusted for differences in measured confounders between patients treated with and without presence of an ICFIT. All analyses were repeated after excluding PCI for ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Of 2,605 PCI procedures at the academic hospital between July 2007 and April 2010, an ICFIT was present for 1,638 procedures (63%). Despite having worse clinical and procedural characteristics, patients in the ICFIT group experienced similar rates of the composite end point (12.9% vs 14.5% without ICFIT, p = 0.27). Longer mean fluoroscopy times and greater number of stents were noted in the ICFIT group; however, hospital length of stay was shorter and no individual adverse events were increased in the ICFIT procedures. Presence of an ICFIT remained unrelated to the composite end point after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.71 to 1.20; p = 0.53), and findings were similar after excluding PCI for ST-elevation myocardial infarction. In conclusion, in contemporary practice at a large academic medical center, PCI complication rates were not adversely affected by the presence of an

  7. Cardiovascular imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity: cardiovascular magnetic resonance and nuclear cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Alessia; Pizzino, Fausto; Gargiulo, Paola; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Cadeddu, Christian; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Zito, Concetta; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity (CTX) is a determining factor for the quality of life and mortality of patients administered potentially cardiotoxic drugs and in long-term cancer survivors. Therefore, prevention and early detection of CTX are highly desirable, as is the exploration of alternative therapeutic strategies and/or the proposal of potentially cardioprotective treatments. In recent years, cardiovascular imaging has acquired a pivotal role in this setting. Although echocardiography remains the diagnostic method most used to monitor cancer patients, the need for more reliable, reproducible and accurate detection of early chemotherapy-induced CTX has encouraged the introduction of second-line advanced imaging modalities, such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques, into the clinical setting. This review of the Working Group on Drug Cardiotoxicity and Cardioprotection of the Italian Society of Cardiology aims to afford an overview of the most important findings from the literature about the role of CMR and nuclear techniques in the management of chemotherapy-treated patients, describe conventional and new parameters for detecting CTX from both diagnostic and prognostic perspectives and provide integrated insight into the role of CMR and nuclear techniques compared with other imaging tools and versus the positions of the most important international societies. PMID:27183525

  8. Changing from image intensifier to flat detector technology for interventional cardiology procedures: a practical point of view.

    PubMed

    Bokou, C; Schreiner-Karoussou, A; Breisch, R; Beissel, J

    2008-01-01

    A small-scale internal audit has been used to evaluate the impact of the use of a dynamic flat panel detector in the clinical routine in the National Interventional Cardiology Centre in Luxembourg. The parameters tested during commissioning and constancy control of an X-ray system, the introduction of new clinical protocols, the patient and the personal staff dosimetry were considered. The technical parameters tested by the hospital physicist stay the same as for the image intensifier. No innovative protocols have been adopted due to the existence of the flat panel detector. A reduction in dose was noted after the installation of a flat detector, due mostly to the continuing education of the interventional cardiologists as well as the initial calibration of the radiological system. The understanding of the X-ray system and its possibilities is vital for the optimisation of clinical procedures in patient and staff exposure. PMID:18448437

  9. Appropriate use criteria in clinical routine practice: implications in a nuclear cardiology lab.

    PubMed

    Gimelli, Alessia; Rovai, Ilaria; Liga, Riccardo; Pasanisi, Emilio Maria; Marzullo, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The efforts for a broad application of the appropriate use criteria to reduce inappropriate nuclear stress testing have frequently been unsuccessful and the reported rates of inappropriateness have varied widely between studies. We sought to analyze the criteria of clinical appropriateness of a cohort of consecutive patients referred to our nuclear cardiology laboratory to perform stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and to assess the relationships between test appropriateness and the evaluation of ischaemia. A cohort of 251 consecutive patients, admitted to our Institute from January to March 2015, who underwent stress/rest MPI on a dedicated cardiac camera equipped with cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors, was selected. The level of clinical appropriateness of each MPI test was categorized in each patient according to the AUC criteria. According to the accepted criteria, the majority of the MPI stress-tests could be classified as clinically appropriate (218 of 251, 87 % of the tests), while only 16 (6 %) and 17 (7 %) resulted of uncertain appropriateness or clearly inappropriate, respectively. Of the 251 appropriate tests, 22 (10 %), 65 (30 %), and 131 (60 %) showed the presence of a mild (SDS < 4), moderate (4 ≥ SDS < 7), and severe (SDS ≥ 7) ischemic burden, respectively, while none of the inappropriate test showed moderate-to-severe ischaemia (P < 0.001 for comparisons). The rate of inappropriate MPI tests is considerably low in a high-volume laboratory. Appropriate and inappropriate studies identify patients at high and low probability of significant ischemia, respectively, providing insights on the effects of the level of appropriateness on stress-test results. PMID:26961179

  10. Review of Cardiovascular Imaging in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology in 2015-Part 2 of 2: Myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Hage, Fadi G; AlJaroudi, Wael A

    2016-06-01

    In 2015, the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology (®) published many high-quality articles. In this series, we will summarize key articles that have appeared in the Journal last year to provide for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that have recently occurred in the field. In the first article of this 2-part series, we concentrated on publications dealing with plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance. This review will focus on myocardial perfusion imaging summarizing advances in the field including in diagnosis, prognosis, and appropriate use. PMID:26892251

  11. Normal values for nuclear cardiology: Japanese databases for myocardial perfusion, fatty acid and sympathetic imaging and left ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial normal databases for stress myocardial perfusion study have been created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Working Group. The databases comprised gender-, camera rotation range- and radiopharmaceutical-specific data-sets from multiple institutions, and normal database files were created for installation in common nuclear cardiology software. Based on the electrocardiography-gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), left ventricular function, including ventricular volumes, systolic and diastolic functions and systolic wall thickening were also analyzed. Normal databases for fatty acid imaging using 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid and sympathetic imaging using 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine were also examined. This review provides lists and overviews of normal values for myocardial SPECT and ventricular function in a Japanese population. The population-specific approach is a key factor for proper diagnostic and prognostic evaluation. PMID:20108130

  12. Normal values for nuclear cardiology: Japanese databases for myocardial perfusion, fatty acid and sympathetic imaging and left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi

    2010-04-01

    Myocardial normal databases for stress myocardial perfusion study have been created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Working Group. The databases comprised gender-, camera rotation range- and radiopharmaceutical-specific data-sets from multiple institutions, and normal database files were created for installation in common nuclear cardiology software. Based on the electrocardiography-gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), left ventricular function, including ventricular volumes, systolic and diastolic functions and systolic wall thickening were also analyzed. Normal databases for fatty acid imaging using (123)I-beta-methyl-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid and sympathetic imaging using (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine were also examined. This review provides lists and overviews of normal values for myocardial SPECT and ventricular function in a Japanese population. The population-specific approach is a key factor for proper diagnostic and prognostic evaluation. PMID:20108130

  13. Cardiology Mannequin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Education of medical students in cardiology requires access to patients having a variety of different forms of heart disease. But bringing together student, instructor and patient is a difficult and expensive process that does not benefit the patient. An alternate approach is substitution of a lifelike mannequin capable of simulating many conditions of heart disease. The mannequin pictured below, together with a related information display, is an advanced medical training system whose development benefited from NASA visual display technology and consultative input from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The mannequin system represents more than 10 years of development effort by Dr. Michael S. Gordon, professor of cardiology at the University of Miami (Florida) School of Medicine.

  14. Tele-cardiology.

    PubMed

    Molefi, M; Fortuin, J; Wynchank, S

    2006-01-01

    After defining tele-medicine, we describe its situation in the public health service of South Africa and its application to cardiology. Methods of communication relevant to tele-cardiology are outlined, together with their bearing on primary healthcare. The range of tele-cardiological applications to electrocardiology, echocardiology, auscultation, imaging and pathology are indicated. Tele-cardiology's contributions to a range of cardiological problems and types of management are described briefly. Finally, a mention is made of the relevance of tele-medicine to education and the costs related to cardiology, with an indication of some future needs for tele-cardiology. PMID:16547558

  15. University cardiology clinic.

    PubMed

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  16. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  17. [Over diagnostic imaging in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Carpeggiani, Clara

    2014-03-01

    Medical imaging is one of the major cause of rising health care costs. Diagnostic imaging has increased more rapidly than any other component of medical care. About 5 billion imaging tests are performed worldwide each year. According to recent estimates, at least one-third of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Two out of 3 imaging tests employ ionizing radiations with radiology or nuclear medicine. The medical use of radiation is the largest man-made source of radiation exposure. Medical X-rays and γ-rays are a proven human carcinogen. The attributable long-term extra-risk of cancer due to diagnostic testing is around 10% in industrialized countries. Cardiologists prescribe and/or directly perform >50% of all imaging examinations, accounting for about two-thirds of the total effective dose given to patients. The dose of common cardiological examinations may be significant: 500 chest X-rays= a stress scintigraphy with sestamibi, 750 chest X-rays= a Multislice Computed Tomography, 1,000 chest X-rays= a coronary angiography and stenting. Unfortunately, few doctors are aware of the level of radiation their patients are exposed to during radiological tests and more intensive use of ionizing testing was not associated with greater awareness. Also as a consequence of unawareness, the rate of inappropriate examinations is unacceptably high in cardiology, even for procedures with high radiation load. Higher exposure doses correspond to higher long-term risks; there are no safe doses, and all doses add up in determining the cumulative risks over a lifetime. Doctors should make every effort so that «each patient should get the right imaging exam, at the right time, with the right radiation dose», as suggested by US Food and Drug Administration in the 2010 initiative to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure from medical imaging. This is best obtained through a systematic implementation of the "3 A's strategy" proposed by the International Atomic Energy

  18. Safe sedation in modern cardiological practice.

    PubMed

    Furniss, Stephen S; Sneyd, J Robert

    2015-10-01

    Safe sedation is fundamental to many modern cardiological procedures, and following the publication of the report on safe sedation by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, this report discusses sedation specifically in cardiological practice. The major areas within cardiology that use sedation are cardioversion, catheter ablation particularly of atrial fibrillation, transoesophageal echocardiography, implantable device (cardiovascular implantable electronic device) procedures and other procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. There is increasing demand for cardiological sedation but there is wide geographical variation in its use and there are also growing data to support non-anaesthetists giving sedation. The use of benzodiazepines, particularly for short procedures, is common, but even here good record-keeping and audit together with an understanding of the continuum of sedation and having appropriately trained staff and the necessary facilities are vital. Nurse administration of propofol may be appropriate for some procedures in cardiology that require at least moderate sedation. Appropriate training is essential and the use of capnography and target controlled infusion pumps for propofol administration is recommended. PMID:26085525

  19. [Advances in geriatric cardiology].

    PubMed

    Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Bañuelos de Lucas, Camino; Ribera Casado, José M; Pérez Casar, Feliciano

    2006-01-01

    The continued aging of the population is an acknowledged fact. The proportion of individuals in the European Union aged over 65 years will reach 29.9% by 2050, almost double the present figure of 16.4%. Approximately one third of people in this age-group has clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Physicians dealing with cardiology in older patients have to be aware of the specific clinical and prognostic features of cardiovascular disease in the elderly, and with its treatment. Consequently, it is clear that continuing medical education in geriatric cardiology is essential, and that is one of the tasks of the Working Group on Geriatric Cardiology. This special issue provides a magnificent opportunity for presenting an update on important topics in geriatric cardiology, such as the aging of the cardiovascular system, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. PMID:16540026

  20. [Radiation protection in interventional cardiology].

    PubMed

    Durán, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    INTERVENTIONAL: cardiology progress makes each year a greater number of procedures and increasing complexity with a very good success rate. The problem is that this progress brings greater dose of radiation not only for the patient but to occupationally exposed workers as well. Simple methods for reducing or minimizing occupational radiation dose include: minimizing fluoroscopy time and the number of acquired images; using available patient dose reduction technologies; using good imaging-chain geometry; collimating; avoiding high-scatter areas; using protective shielding; using imaging equipment whose performance is controlled through a quality assurance programme; and wearing personal dosimeters so that you know your dose. Effective use of these methods requires both appropriate education and training in radiation protection for all interventional cardiology personnel, and the availability and use of appropriate protective tools and equipment. Regular review and investigation of personnel monitoring results, accompanied as appropriate by changes in how procedures are performed and equipment used, will ensure continual improvement in the practice of radiation protection in the interventional suite. PMID:26169040

  1. 2014 update on interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Hernández Hernández, Felipe; de la Torre Hernández, José M; Rumoroso Cuevas, José R; García del Blanco, Bruno; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Trillo Nouche, Ramiro

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews the most relevant publications and studies in the field of interventional cardiology in 2014. In the area of coronary interventional procedures, integrated treatment of acute coronary syndrome continues to be the subject of numerous studies that evaluate different devices and pharmacological and mechanical strategies that can be used without increasing the risk of hemorrhage or the need for reintervention. Certain anatomical substrates continue to generate a considerable number of publications, both on the outcomes with different stents and on the use of specific techniques. Bioabsorbable drug-eluting stents are used in increasingly complex lesions with promising results. The development of interventional procedures for structural heart disease continues to advance, with new evidence on percutaneously placed aortic valve prostheses, the outcome of percutaneous mitral valve repair, and the safety and efficacy of left atrial appendage occlusion. Finally, renal denervation has generated one of the major debates of the year. PMID:25749393

  2. Radiation safety and nuclear medicine policies and procedures.

    PubMed

    Berman, C G

    1999-07-01

    There is a growing concern over possible adverse effects from medical applications of ionizing radiation. Hospital personnel must be educated in procedures to minimize exposure to themselves and their patients. Basic radiation safety procedures to protect personnel and patients are discussed. Examples of the nuclear medicine policies and procedures used for lymphatic mapping are provided. PMID:10448699

  3. Women in interventional cardiology: Is there a problem?

    PubMed

    Safian, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    In the United States, women account for 4% of interventional cardiologists and perform 3% of interventional procedures. Male and female cardiology fellows share concerns that dissuade them from careers in interventional cardiology; unique issues for women include professional isolation and childbearing. Interventional fellowships should enhance female mentorship and develop friendly policies regarding maternity leave; other issues require comprehensive solutions to medical school debt, duration of training, and balancing professional goals with lifestyle. PMID:26994976

  4. [Epistemology in cardiology].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    1988-01-01

    The probabilistic character of several scientific laws, is emphasized. Some considerations are formulated about epistemology: the critical study of the principles, hypotheses and results of sciences. The evolution of medical epistemology and its implications in the field of cardiology is also described from the hippocratic treatises to the present. In former works the oldest use of the word hypothesis with the sense of supposition, is found. Finally remains to be established the relationship between the individual and general field i.e. between a patient, the isolated object of study, and the disease as an abstraction of the human mind. PMID:3063225

  5. Onco-cardiology: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Sueta, Daisuke; Hokimoto, Seiji

    2016-07-15

    "Onco-cardiology" is a term that indicates cardiotoxicity during treatment of malignant diseases. Many studies have demonstrated that chemotherapy agents induce cardiotoxicity in certain ratios. In clinical settings, active malignant diseases or a history thereof are often encountered in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD); it is not uncommon for a patient to struggle with a prior treatment. We have previously demonstrated a close association between malignant diseases and coronary calcifications in coronary artery disease. The concurrence of arteriosclerotic diseases, including CVD, with malignant diseases should be carefully considered in clinical settings, particularly with regard to scheduled surgical procedures. Moreover, it is essential that all medical professionals associated with cancer care understand these associations. Our advocacy will provide new insight into onco-cardiology. PMID:27107544

  6. Procedures manual for the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.R.

    1987-10-01

    This manual is a collection of various notes, memoranda and instructions on procedures for the evaluation of data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). They were distributed at different times over the past few years to the evaluators of nuclear structure data and some of them were not readily avaialble. Hence, they have been collected in this manual for ease of reference by the evaluators of the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network contribute mass-chains to the ENSDF. Some new articles were written specifically for this manual and others are reivsions of earlier versions.

  7. Computational Cardiology: The Heart of the Matter

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the newest developments in computational cardiology. It focuses on the contribution of cardiac modeling to the development of new therapies as well as the advancement of existing ones for cardiac arrhythmias and pump dysfunction. Reviewed are cardiac modeling efforts aimed at advancing and optimizing existent therapies for cardiac disease (defibrillation, ablation of ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac resynchronization therapy) and at suggesting novel treatments, including novel molecular targets, as well as efforts to use cardiac models in stratification of patients likely to benefit from a given therapy, and the use of models in diagnostic procedures. PMID:23213566

  8. Automating Nuclear-Safety-Related SQA Procedures with Custom Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear safety-related procedures are rigorous for good reason. Small design mistakes can quickly turn into unwanted failures. Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory worked with COMSOL to define a simulation app that automates the software quality assurance (SQA) verification process and provides results in less than 24 hours.

  9. Advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    McNeice, Andrew H; McAleavey, Neil M; Menown, Ian B A

    2014-08-01

    Multiple, potentially practice-changing cardiology trials have been presented or published over the past year. In this paper, we summarize and place in clinical context, new data regarding management of acute coronary syndrome and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (copeptin assessment, otamixaban, cangrelor, prasugrel, sodium nitrite, inclacumab, ranolazine, preventive coronary intervention of non-culprit lesions, immediate thrombolytic therapy versus transfer for primary intervention), new coronary intervention data (thrombectomy, radial access, pressure wire fractional flow reserve, antiplatelet therapy duration and gene-guidance, permanent and biodegradable polymers, coronary bifurcation and strategies), and coronary artery bypass data (off pump vs. on pump). Latest trials in trans-aortic valve implantation, heart failure (eplerenone, aliskiren, spironolactone, sildenafil, dopamine, nesiritide, omecamtiv mecarbil, the algisyl left ventricular augmentation device, and echo-guided cardiac resynchronization), atrial fibrillation (edoxaban, dabigatran, and ablation), cardiac arrest (hypothermia, LUCAS™ mechanical chest compression), and cardiovascular prevention (vitamins, renal denervation for resistant hypertension, renal artery stenting, saxagliptin, alogliptin, and gastric banding) are also discussed. PMID:25074280

  10. [First annual report of practitioners of interventional cardiology in private practice in Germany. Results of procedures of left heart catheterization and coronary interventions in the year 1996].

    PubMed

    Silber, S; Albrecht, A; Göhring, S; Kaltenbach, M; Kneissl, D; Kokott, N; Levenson, B; Mathey, D; Pöhler, E; Reifart, N; Sauer, G; Schofer, J; Schwarzbach, F

    1998-02-01

    The German Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions in Private Practice has started a registry of cardiac procedures since 1996 in order to establish a standard for performance. Although quality management for the cath lab makes sense and is also legally required, there is no generally recommended infrastructure for quality assurance existing in Germany at this time. Therefore, the German Society of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) initiated a project in 1994 to develop a computer program for paperless documentation of diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and coronary interventions (PTCA) using a minimal data set. In 1996, 8 private associated groups participated in this project. The (anonymous) analysis of 10,316 diagnostic cardiac catheterizations and 2597 PTCA yielded the following results: In 95% of the patients, diagnostic cardiac catheterization was performed using the femoral and in 5% the brachial/radial approach. The mean volume of administered contrast medium was 164 +/- 138 ml/patient. The mean LV-EF was greater than 50% in 58.4% of the patients and between 30% and 50% in 10.1%. Coronary artery disease was diagnosed in 69.6% of the patients and valvular/congenital heart disease in 8.5%. In 18.4% of the patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterizations no significant heart disease was identified. Mortality in the cath lab as well as the rate of cerebral insults was 0.05%. In 22.9% and 19% of the patients PTCA and cardiac surgery respectively was recommended. In patients undergoing PTCA, stable angina was present in 74.4% and unstable angina in 13.1%. Of the total number of PTCA procedures, 5.8% were performed in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. The PTCA lesion success rate was 96%, the mean diameter stenosis was 81% pre and 6% post-intervention. The mortality rate at 1 month post-PTCA was 0.4%, and myocardial infarction 1.0%. An acute occlusion occurred in 1.3% of the PTCA patients; 0.6% had to be transferred for emergency

  11. Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Description and Evaluation of a Novel Intensive Training Program for Pediatric Cardiology Trainees.

    PubMed

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2016-06-01

    The transition from residency to subspecialty fellowship in a procedurally driven field such as pediatric cardiology is challenging for trainees. We describe and assess the educational value of a pediatric cardiology "boot camp" educational tool designed to help prepare trainees for cardiology fellowship. A two-day intensive training program was provided for pediatric cardiology fellows in July 2015 at a large fellowship training program. Hands-on experiences and simulations were provided in: anatomy, auscultation, echocardiography, catheterization, cardiovascular intensive care (CVICU), electrophysiology (EP), heart failure, and cardiac surgery. Knowledge-based exams as well as surveys were completed by each participant pre-training and post-training. Pre- and post-exam results were compared via paired t tests, and survey results were compared via Wilcoxon rank sum. A total of eight participants were included. After boot camp, there was a significant improvement between pre- and post-exam scores (PRE 54 ± 9 % vs. POST 85 ± 8 %; p ≤ 0.001). On pre-training survey, the most common concerns about starting fellowship included: CVICU emergencies, technical aspects of the catheterization/EP labs, using temporary and permanent pacemakers/implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), and ECG interpretation. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, there was a statistically significant improvement in the participants comfort level in 33 of 36 (92 %) areas of assessment. All participants (8/8, 100 %) strongly agreed that the boot camp was a valuable learning experience and helped to alleviate anxieties about the start of fellowship. A pediatric cardiology boot camp experience at the start of cardiology fellowship can provide a strong foundation and serve as an educational springboard for pediatric cardiology fellows. PMID:26961569

  12. Supporting the future nuclear workforce with computer-based procedures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya

    2016-05-01

    Here we see that computer-based tools have dramatically increased ease and efficiency of everyday tasks. Gone are the days of paging through a paper catalog, transcribing product numbers, and calculating totals. Today, a consumer can find a product online with a simple search engine, and then purchase it in a matter of a few clicks. Paper catalogs have their place, but it is hard to imagine life without on-line shopping sites. All tasks conducted in a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures, which helps ensure safe and reliable operation of the plants. One prominent goal of the nuclear industrymore » is to minimize the risk of human errors. To achieve this goal one has to ensure tasks are correctly and consistently executed. This is partly achieved by training and by a structured approach to task execution, which is provided by procedures and work instructions. Procedures are used in the nuclear industry to direct workers' actions in a proper sequence. The governing idea is to minimize the reliance on memory and choices made in the field. However, the procedure document may not contain sufficient information to successfully complete the task. Therefore, the worker might have to carry additional documents such as turnover sheets, operation experience, drawings, and other procedures to the work site. The nuclear industry is operated with paper procedures like paper catalogs of the past. A field worker may carry a large stack of documents needed to complete a task to the field. Even though the paper process has helped keep the industry safe for decades, there are limitations to using paper. Paper procedures are static (i.e., the content does not change after the document is printed), difficult to search, and rely heavily on the field worker’s situational awareness and ability to consistently meet the high expectation of human performance excellence. With computer-based procedures (CBPs) that stack of papers may be reduced to the size of a small tablet or even

  13. [Cost analysis of twenty-nine nuclear medicine procedures].

    PubMed

    Kastanioti, Catherine K; Alphalbouharali, Gihand; Fotopoulos, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare actual cost estimates for diagnostic procedures as applied in the nuclear medicine department of our University Hospital, with cost estimates obtained through an analytical activity-based costing methodology. Activity data on the use of twenty-nine nuclear medicine procedures were collected. The actual hospital prices for the fiscal years of 2003-2004 were obtained from the Accounting Department of the Hospital. Cost estimates were calculated per patient. Activity-based data were compared with hospital prices and also with unit costs from the activity-based costing methodology. Our results showed a significant statistical difference between unit cost estimates per patient based on hospital prices, as compared with those based on unit costs. This study shows that in our university hospital, reliance on generic hospital prices for nuclear medicine procedures, considerable underestimates their real cost by a mean value of 40% as derived through the activity-based costing methodology and can lead to substantial financial hospital deficits. PMID:15841290

  14. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  15. Mobile Apps in Cardiology: Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are the deadliest diseases worldwide, with 17.3 million deaths in 2008 alone. Among them, heart-related deaths are of the utmost relevance; a fact easily proven by the 7.25 million deaths caused by ischemic heart disease alone in that year. The latest advances in smartphones and mHealth have been used in the creation of thousands of medical apps related to cardiology, which can help to reduce these mortality rates. Objective The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then classify the results to see what is available and what is missing, focusing particularly on commercial apps. Methods Two reviews have been developed. One is a literature review of mobile systems and applications, retrieved from several databases and systems such as Scopus, PubMed, IEEE Xplore, and Web of Knowledge. The other is a review of mobile apps in the leading app stores, Google play for Android and Apple’s App Store for iOS. Results Search queries up to May 2013 located 406 papers and 710 apps related to cardiology and heart disease. The most researched section in the literature associated with cardiology is related to mobile heart (and vital signs) monitoring systems and the methods involved in the classification of heart signs in order to detect abnormal functions. Other systems with a significant number of papers are mobile cardiac rehabilitation systems, blood pressure measurement, and systems for the detection of heart failure. The majority of apps for cardiology are heart monitors and medical calculators. Other categories with a high number of apps are those for ECG education and interpretation, cardiology news and journals, blood pressure tracking, heart rate monitoring using an external device, and CPR instruction. There are very few guides on cardiac rehabilitation and apps for the management of the

  16. History of German pediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Heintzen, P

    2002-01-01

    Due to the isolation of German medicine in World War II accompanied by the destruction of many hospitals, German pediatricians did not show any serious interest in the treatment of children with congenital heart diseases, nor did they take notice of the progress achieved by Helen Taussig, Alfred Blalock and other cardiologists and surgeons in the western world. This problem was even worse in East Germany. Only a few German internists and forward-looking surgeons were able and ready to take care of this group of principally operable children in places like Bonn/Düsseldorf, Marburg/Munich, Berlin, and Hamburg. However, in the early 1950s some directors of pediatrics at university hospitals--largely motivated by the cardiac surgeons--allowed or even encouraged younger colleagues to concentrate on pediatric cardiology and to begin application of heart catheterization and angiocardiography. In 1960 a group of colleagues interested in pediatric cardiology met for the first time in Frankfurt and became the nucleus of the future "working group" (1969) and finally the "German Society of Pediatric Cardiology" (1974). By 1972 pediatric cardiology had been approved as an independent (sub)specialty. Colleagues and friends from surrounding countries (Austria, Great Britain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the Netherlands) and also from the US and some eastern countries were either members or regular guests during or between the meetings. Pediatric cardiology is now represented in Germany by specialized practitioners, trainees and assistants who work in both community and university hospitals, and in specialized departments. Due to the foresightedness of the Chief of Pediatrics, Prof. G. Joppich, the first Chair of Pediatric Cardiology was founded in Göttingen in 1960 under the direction of A. Beuren. Another model of interdisciplinary cooperation between pediatric cardiologists, bioengineers, mathematicians and computer scientists was established in Kiel in 1966. In other places

  17. History of Cardiology in India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. PMID:26071301

  18. Routine Quality Control of Clinical Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation: A Brief Review*

    PubMed Central

    Zanzonico, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews routine quality-control (QC) procedures for current nuclear medicine instrumentation, including the survey meter, dose calibrator, well counter, intraoperative probe, organ (“thyroid”) uptake probe, γ-camera, SPECT and SPECT/CT scanner, and PET and PET/CT scanner. It should be particularly useful for residents, fellows, and other trainees in nuclear medicine, nuclear cardiology, and radiology. The procedures described and their respective frequencies are presented only as general guidelines. PMID:18587088

  19. [Circulatory assist devices in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Figulla, H R

    2005-03-24

    One out of 13 patients with an acute myocardial infarction is endangered of cardiogenic shock. In addition, acute valvular leakage, shunt vitiae, and acute myocarditis can lead to acute myocardial failure. As a therapeutic option, mechanical assist devices offer cardiac support and hemodynamic stabilization under these circumstances. The following minimal-invasive devices are used in cardiology and intensive care medicine: intra-aortic balloon pulsation (IABP), intra-vascular axial screw pumps, extra-corporal centrifugal pumps with and without additional membrane oxygenator. The IABP improves left ventricular function by a systolic reduction of the after-load, and an increase of diastolic blood pressure dependent on myocardial function. In contrast, axial screw pumps and centrifugal pumps can provide circulatory support independently of myocardial function. Mechanical assist devices can prevent irreversible damage not only by offering a reduction of myocardial work load, but also by improving organ perfusion in cardiogenic shock situations. Another indication for mechanical circulatory support depicts high-risk coronary angioplasty if the left ventricular ejection fraction is severely reduced or the target vessel supplies more than 50 % of vital myocardium. In case of irreversible heart failure, turbine pumps or centrifugal pumps offer a stabilization for the patient's transfer to a cardiac surgery center. They can also be used for bridging to heart transplantation in acute situations. Technical improvements will enhance the use of mechanical assist devices in the near future. Especially the development of portable emergency devices will enrich therapeutic possibilities in cardiology and intensive care medicine. PMID:15776348

  20. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  1. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  2. 48 CFR 1850.403 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1850.403 Section 1850.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Residual Powers 1850.403 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  3. 48 CFR 1450.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1450.104-3 Section 1450.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. The...

  4. 48 CFR 1450.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1450.104-3 Section 1450.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. The...

  5. 48 CFR 1850.403 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1850.403 Section 1850.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Residual Powers 1850.403 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  6. 48 CFR 1450.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1450.104-3 Section 1450.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. The...

  7. 48 CFR 1450.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1450.104-3 Section 1450.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. The...

  8. 48 CFR 1450.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1450.104-3 Section 1450.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 1450.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. The...

  9. 48 CFR 50.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 50.104-3 Section 50.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. (a... nuclear risks should be submitted to the contracting officer and shall include the following...

  10. 48 CFR 50.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 50.104-3 Section 50.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. (a... nuclear risks should be submitted to the contracting officer and shall include the following...

  11. 48 CFR 50.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 50.104-3 Section 50.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. (a... nuclear risks should be submitted to the contracting officer and shall include the following...

  12. 48 CFR 50.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 50.104-3 Section 50.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104-3 Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. (a... nuclear risks should be submitted to the contracting officer and shall include the following...

  13. Cardiology education using hypermedia and digital imagery.

    PubMed

    Klingler, J W; Andrews, L T; Leighton, R F

    1992-07-01

    A computer-based educational system for the study of cardiovascular imaging is described. This system, based on HyperCard * and a standard Macintosh II, integrates hypertext retrieval, computer graphics, sound, and medical images into a single interactive environment stored on a standard hard disk. This 'hypermedia' approach allows arbitrary complexity coupled with direct, immediate, easy traversal of the images and related text, which provides the opportunity for students to move at their own pace, choose their own direction through the material and repeat as often as desired. Storage on magnetic medium allows for easy updating with new studies and material in order to keep pace with advances in medical imaging technology. The system could be mastered onto CD-ROM for ease of distribution if so desired. The system includes a tutorial on the basics of digital image representation and example studies from cineangiography, nuclear medicine, echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the heart. Quantitative techniques for evaluation of left ventricular function are explained using computer graphics overlays on the original medical images. Color encoded functional images are also included as an aid to visualization of ventricular performance data. The system has proven useful as a primer for digital imaging in cardiology prior to specific case study in a traditional mentor relationship. PMID:1458869

  14. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  15. Improving Performance in a Nuclear Cardiology Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFleur, Doug; Smalley, Karolyn; Austin, John

    2005-01-01

    Improving performance in the medical industry is an area that is ideally suited for the tools advocated by the International Society of Performance Improvement (ISPI). This paper describes an application of the tools that have been developed by Dale Brethower and Geary Rummler, two pillars of the performance improvement industry. It allows the…

  16. Advances in interventional cardiology: beyond the balloon.

    PubMed

    Nickolaus, M J; Chambers, C E; Ettinger, S M; Gilchrist, I C; Kozak, M

    2000-12-01

    The world of interventional cardiology has changed dramatically since the advent of balloon angioplasty. New therapies have evolved over the past decade as knowledge of the pathophysiology of heart disease has increased. Nurses who have an understanding of this pathophysiology will be better equipped to manage and educate their patients, teaching them about current and future interventional therapies. This article reviews the pathophysiology of heart disease, current interventional therapies, and the future directions for interventional cardiology nursing practice. PMID:11072277

  17. The Paediatric Cardiology Hall of Fame – Donald Nixon Ross.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October 1922 to 7 July 2014) was a South African-born British cardiothoracic surgeon, who developed the pulmonary autograft, known as the Ross procedure, for the treatment of aortic valve disease, and also performed the first heart transplant in the United Kingdom in 1968. This paper, written by Jane Somerville, Professor of Cardiology [Retired], Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, provides the personal recollections about Donald Ross from Jane Somerville, and thus provides a unique snapshot of cardiac surgical history. PMID:26574617

  18. Eye lens dose in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Delgado Soler, C; Ginjaume, M; Beltran Vilagrasa, M; Rovira Escutia, J J; Duch, M A

    2015-07-01

    The ICRP has recently recommended reducing the occupational exposure dose limit for the lens of the eye to 20 mSv y(-1), averaged over a period of 5 y, with no year exceeding 50 mSv, instead of the current 150 mSv y(-1). This reduction will have important implications for interventional cardiology and radiology (IC/IR) personnel. In this work, lens dose received by a staff working in IC is studied in order to determine whether eye lens dose monitoring or/and additional radiological protection measures are required. Eye lens dose exposure was monitored in 10 physicians and 6 nurses. The major IC procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The personnel were provided with two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): one calibrated in terms of Hp(3) located close to the left ear of the operator and a whole-body dosemeter calibrated in terms of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) positioned on the lead apron. The estimated annual eye lens dose for physicians ranged between 8 and 60 mSv, for a workload of 200 procedures y(-1). Lower doses were collected for nurses, with estimated annual Hp(3) between 2 and 4 mSv y(-1). It was observed that for nurses the Hp(0.07) measurement on the lead apron is a good estimate of eye lens dose. This is not the case for physicians, where the influence of both the position and use of protective devices such as the ceiling shield is very important and produces large differences among doses both at the eyes and on the thorax. For physicians, a good correlation between Hp(3) and dose area product is shown. PMID:25809107

  19. Echocardiography: frontier imaging in cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments in echocardiography that have maintained this technology at the forefront of day-to-day imaging in clinical cardiology. The primary reason for most requests for imaging in cardiovascular medicine is to assess left ventricular structure and function. As our understanding of left ventricular mechanics has become more intricate, tissue Doppler and speckle tracking modalities have been developed that deliver greater insights into diagnosis of cardiomyopathy and earlier warning of ventricular dysfunction. Increased accuracy has been achieved with the dissemination of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography, which has also acquired a central role in the pre-operative assessment of patients prior to reparative valvular surgery. The use of contrast has broadened the indications for transthoracic echocardiography and has increased the accuracy of stress echocardiography, while reducing the number of patients who cannot be scanned because of a limited acoustic window. Finally, echocardiography will be seen in the future not only as a diagnostic tool in those affected by cardiovascular disease but also as a method for prediction of risk and perhaps activation of targeted treatment. PMID:22723531

  20. Cardiology in a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Michael; Huggett, Isabel

    1982-01-01

    During 1975-81 a non-invasive cardiac unit was established at St Peter's Hospital, Chertsey, a district hospital serving a population of 202 000. There was a progressive increase in outpatient referrals in cardiology, and in 1981 non-invasive investigations included 424 echocardiograms, 305 exercise electrocardiograms, 275 ambulatory electrocardiograms, and 147 thallium-201 studies. Between 1979 and 1981, 151 patients were admitted directly to major centres for further investigation; 74% of those with ischaemic heart disease and 68% of those with valvular heart disease subsequently underwent surgery, a ratio of investigation to surgery that is half the norm for the four metropolitan regions. Based on the 1981 figures, which were substantially above those for 1980, there is a need for a minimum of 270 open heart operations per million of the population including 180 vein bypass operations. This figure for bypass grafting is 230% higher than in the United Kingdom as a whole in 1978 and has substantial implications. PMID:6811004

  1. Paediatric cardiology programs in countries with limited resources: how to bridge the gap

    PubMed Central

    Sulafa, K.M. Ali

    2010-01-01

    Establishing paediatric cardiology service in a country with limited resources like Sudan is a challenging task. A paediatric cardiac team was formed then the services in different disciplines were gradually established. Echocardiography (echo) clinics were founded in tertiary and peripheral hospitals. Cardiac catheterization (cath) was established at the Sudan Heart Centre (SHC) in 2004 and over 400 procedures had been performed including interventional catheterization like pulmonary valve dilatation, patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defect device closure. Congenital heart surgery started in 2001, currently 200 cases are done each year including closed procedures as well as open heart procedures for patients weighing more than 8 kg. Cardiology-cardiac surgery as well as adult congenital heart disease meetings were held and contributed positively to the services. The cardiology-cardiac surgery scientific club meeting was founded as a forum for academic discussions. A fellowship program was established in 2004 and included seven candidates trained in paediatric cardiology and intensive care. Two training courses had been established: congenital heart disease echo and paediatric electrocardiogram interpretation. Links with regional and international cardiac centres had important roles in consolidating our program. Significant obstacles face our service due to the small number of trained personnel, high cost of procedures, the lack of regular supplies and lack of cardiac intensive care facilities for young infants. Bridging the huge gap needs extensive official as well as non-governmental efforts, training more staff, supporting families and collaboration with regional and international centres. PMID:23960607

  2. Paediatric cardiology programs in countries with limited resources: how to bridge the gap.

    PubMed

    Sulafa, K M Ali

    2010-07-01

    Establishing paediatric cardiology service in a country with limited resources like Sudan is a challenging task. A paediatric cardiac team was formed then the services in different disciplines were gradually established. Echocardiography (echo) clinics were founded in tertiary and peripheral hospitals. Cardiac catheterization (cath) was established at the Sudan Heart Centre (SHC) in 2004 and over 400 procedures had been performed including interventional catheterization like pulmonary valve dilatation, patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defect device closure. Congenital heart surgery started in 2001, currently 200 cases are done each year including closed procedures as well as open heart procedures for patients weighing more than 8 kg. Cardiology-cardiac surgery as well as adult congenital heart disease meetings were held and contributed positively to the services. The cardiology-cardiac surgery scientific club meeting was founded as a forum for academic discussions. A fellowship program was established in 2004 and included seven candidates trained in paediatric cardiology and intensive care. Two training courses had been established: congenital heart disease echo and paediatric electrocardiogram interpretation. Links with regional and international cardiac centres had important roles in consolidating our program. Significant obstacles face our service due to the small number of trained personnel, high cost of procedures, the lack of regular supplies and lack of cardiac intensive care facilities for young infants. Bridging the huge gap needs extensive official as well as non-governmental efforts, training more staff, supporting families and collaboration with regional and international centres. PMID:23960607

  3. 48 CFR 250.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 250.104-3 Section 250.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  4. 48 CFR 250.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 250.104-3 Section 250.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  5. 48 CFR 250.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 250.104-3 Section 250.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  6. 48 CFR 1850.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1850.104-3 Section 1850.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... nuclear risks. (a) Indemnification requests. (1) Contractor indemnification requests must be submitted...

  7. 48 CFR 1850.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1850.104-3 Section 1850.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... nuclear risks. (a) Indemnification requests. (1) Contractor indemnification requests must be submitted...

  8. 48 CFR 250.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 250.104-3 Section 250.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  9. 48 CFR 250.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 250.104-3 Section 250.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... unusually hazardous or nuclear risks....

  10. Procedure for evaluating nuclear power plant relay seismic functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Betlack, J.; Carritte, R.; Schmidt, W. )

    1990-12-01

    This procedure has been prepared for use in evaluating relays as part of plant specific resolution of USI A-46. It is also expected to be generally applicable in other seismic evaluations, such as seismic margins determinations. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  12. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. PMID:25758161

  13. Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers in Nuclear Power Plants: Development of a Model of Procedure Usage and Identification of Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been looking at replacing the current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedure systems. The concept of computer-based procedures is not new by any means; however most research has focused on procedures used in the main control room. Procedures reviewed in these efforts are mainly emergency operating procedures and normal operating procedures. Based on lessons learned for these previous efforts we are now exploring a more unknown application for computer based procedures - field procedures, i.e. procedures used by nuclear equipment operators and maintenance technicians. The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. commercial nuclear industry are collaborating in an applied research effort with the objective of developing requirements and specifications for a computer-based procedure system to be used by field workers. The goal is to identify the types of human errors that can be mitigated by using computer-based procedures and how to best design the computer-based procedures to do so. This paper describes the development of a Model of Procedure Use and the qualitative study on which the model is based. The study was conducted in collaboration with four nuclear utilities and five research institutes. During the qualitative study and the model development requirements and for computer-based procedures were identified.

  14. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  15. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  16. Year in review 2010: Critical Care - cardiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We review key research papers in cardiology and intensive care published during 2010 in Critical Care and quote related studies published in other journals if appropriate. Papers were grouped into the following categories: cardiovascular therapies, biomarkers, hemodynamic monitoring, cardiovascular diseases, and microcirculation. PMID:22152086

  17. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Cataract in Interventional Cardiology Staff

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Noohi, Feridoun; Hashemi, Hassan; Haghjoo, Majid; Miraftab, Mohammad; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Rastgou, Fereydon; Malek, Hadi; Faghihi, Hoshang; Firouzabadi, Hassan; Asgari, Soheila; Rezvan, Farhad; Khosravi, Hamidreza; Soroush, Sara; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of ionizing radiation has led to advances in medical diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of radiation cataractogenesis in the interventionists and staff performing various procedures in different interventional laboratories. Patients and Methods: This cohort study included 81 interventional cardiology staff. According to the working site, they were classified into 5 groups. The control group comprised 14 professional nurses who did not work in the interventional sites. Participants were assigned for lens assessment by two independent trained ophthalmologists blinded to the study. Results: The electrophysiology laboratory staff received higher doses of ionizing radiation (17.2 ± 11.9 mSv; P < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between the years of working experience and effective dose in the lens (P < 0.001). In general, our findings showed that the incidence of lens opacity was 79% (95% CI, 69.9-88.1) in participants with exposure (the case group) and our findings showed that the incidence of lenses opacity was 7.1% (95% CI:2.3-22.6) with the relative risk (RR) of 11.06 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: We believe that the risk of radiation-induced cataract in cardiology interventionists and staff depends on their work site. As the radiation dose increases, the prevalence of posterior eye changes increases. PMID:25789258

  18. Business process re-engineering a cardiology department.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Syed Murtuza Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The health care sector is the world's third largest industry and is facing several problems such as excessive waiting times for patients, lack of access to information, high costs of delivery and medical errors. Health care managers seek the help of process re-engineering methods to discover the best processes and to re-engineer existing processes to optimize productivity without compromising on quality. Business process re-engineering refers to the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical, contemporary measures of performance, such as cost, quality and speed. The present study is carried out at a tertiary care corporate hospital with 1000-plus-bed facility. A descriptive study and case study method is used with intensive, careful and complete observation of patient flow, delays, short comings in patient movement and workflow. Data is collected through observations, informal interviews and analyzed by matrix analysis. Flowcharts were drawn for the various work activities of the cardiology department including workflow of the admission process, workflow in the ward and ICCU, workflow of the patient for catheterization laboratory procedure, and in the billing and discharge process. The problems of the existing system were studied and necessary suggestions were recommended to cardiology department module with an illustrated flowchart. PMID:26502490

  19. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  20. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2012-02-28

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  1. Radiation exposure and adverse health effects of interventional cardiology staff.

    PubMed

    Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Haamann, Frank; Nienhaus, Albert

    2013-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this chapter constitutes the first systematic review of radiation exposure to eyes, thyroid, and hands for Interventional Cardiology (IC) staff. We have concluded from our review that these anatomical locations are likely to be exposed to radiation as a result of the limited use of personal protective equipment (PPE) among IC staff as shown in Fig. 8. Our review also reveals that, with the exception of three eye exposure cases, the annual radiation dose to eyes, thyroid, and hands among IC staff was within recommended levels and limits. The As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) limit was not achieved in three cases for fingers/hands and four cases for eyes. However, an increased incidence of cataracts were reported for IC staff, and this gives rise to the concern that low-dose or unnoticed exposures may increase the risk of developing cataracts among cardiology staff. Clearly, the formation of cataracts among IC staff may be an issue and should be studied in more depth. Our review also disclosed that the two groups who receive excessive radiation doses (i.e., exceed the recommended limit) are physicians-in-training and junior staff physicians who work in cardiac catheterization laboratories. In particular, more attention should be given to assessing the effects of radiation exposure among IC staff who work in the Asia Pacific countries, because our review indicates that the number of IC procedures performed by IC staff in these countries is higher than for other continents. There is a huge demand for procedures conducted by IC staff in the Asia-Pacific area, for both treating patients and consulting with specialists. Our review also disclosed that recommended limits for per-procedure radiation doses are needed for IC staff. We recommend that such limits be established by the appropriate national and international agencies that are responsible for occupational radiation exposure. Although our review indicates that the current

  2. Diagnostic cardiology: Noninvasive imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Come, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The chest x-ray and cardiac series; Computed tomographic scanning of the heart, coronary arteries, and great vessels; Digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of cardiovascular disease; Magnetic resonance: technique and cardiac applications; Basics of radiation physics and instrumentation; and Nuclear imaging: the assessment of cardiac performance.

  3. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children. PMID:24647992

  4. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (I) Methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    A new procedure for probabilistic seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is proposed. This procedure modifies the current procedures using tools developed recently for performance-based earthquake engineering of buildings. The proposed procedure uses (a) response-based fragility curves to represent the capacity of structural and nonstructural components of NPPs, (b) nonlinear response-history analysis to characterize the demands on those components, and (c) Monte Carlo simulations to determine the damage state of the components. The use of response-rather than ground-motion-based fragility curves enables the curves to be independent of seismic hazard and closely related to component capacity. The use of Monte Carlo procedure enables the correlation in the responses of components to be directly included in the risk assessment. An example of the methodology is presented in a companion paper to demonstrate its use and provide the technical basis for aspects of the methodology. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. 48 CFR 1850.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 1850.104-3 Section 1850.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary...

  6. 48 CFR 50.104-3 - Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for unusually hazardous or nuclear risks. 50.104-3 Section 50.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions...

  7. Medico-legal issues in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Ryan; Cohen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to educate physicians about the current litigation climate in cardiology and cardiac surgery, with a focus on the most frequently litigated areas of practice, including failure to diagnose and treat myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention, and the use of tissue plasminogen activator. Empirical research on cardiology malpractice is presented, along with a sampling of up-to-date cases designed to illustrate common issues and important themes. The principles for reducing legal liability are also discussed, including the informed consent process, spoliation of records, and the role of documentation. Finally, practical recommendations are provided for cardiologists and cardiac surgeons to limit their legal liability. PMID:23422021

  8. Use of smartphone technology in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang H; Silva, Jennifer N A

    2016-05-01

    Smartphone-based technologies along with broadband connectivity are changing the way modern cardiology is practiced. The ever broadening connectivity and increasing capabilities of smartphone-based technologies can better monitor, diagnose, and prevent cardiovascular diseases. Researchers can leverage the ubiquitous use of smartphone-based technologies and their constant stream of biometric data to establish large community-based clinical research studies. Patient engagement is enhanced with constant and on-demand access to physicians, daily self-monitoring, and expanding social networks. On the other hand, the exponential growth of smartphone-based technologies invariably disrupts the traditional healthcare model and leaves a vacuum in the infrastructure, medico-legal apparatus, and reimbursement systems that need to be addressed. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion of the various applications utilizing smartphone-based technologies in cardiology. PMID:26686266

  9. [Update on preventive cardiology and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Fernández de Bobadilla Osorio, Jaime; Fernández-Bobadilla, Esteban; García-Porrero, Esteban; Luengo-Fernández, Emilio; Casasnovas-Lenguas, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation Section of the Spanish Society of Cardiology is to promote knowledge about and adoption of the lifestyle, therapy and rehabilitation program guidelines that are best able to improve cardiovascular health in the Spanish population. To achieve this aim, a number of working groups have carried out research into and provided education about the latest developments in cardiovascular prevention, and have provided information about these developments to all those affected, including physicians, healthcare workers, healthcare administrators and the general public. This year, the working group on smoking produced an key document that was presented to cardiologists in our Society; its intention was to provide a simple algorithm to help patients give up smoking that could be applied in only 3 minutes. The working group on cardiac rehabilitation gave a presentation on the true impact of rehabilitation on survival after percutaneous coronary intervention and heart failure. Also this year, the European Society of Cardiology published a major revision of guidelines on the treatment of dyslipidemia, which was welcomed by many but criticized by others. Our correspondent at the European Society reflects on the role and usefulness of these guidelines in practice. PMID:22269841

  10. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  11. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram

  12. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in cardiological patients].

    PubMed

    Braun, G; Messmann, H

    2013-11-01

    Oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. GI bleeding-especially lower GI bleeding-seems to be associated with a poorer outcome. With the introduction of dabigatrane and rivaroxaban, difficulties in the management of bleeding complications arose. Thus, the goal of the authors was to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the treatment of severe GI bleeding associated with rivaroxaban, dabigatrane, and antiplatelet therapy. Bleeding complications during phenprocoumon treatment should be treated with prothrombin complex concentrates and vitamin K1. Dabigatrane elimination is highly dependent to the renal function. The measurement of drug concentrations of dabigatrane and rivaroxaban is useful to indicate an increased risk of bleeding complications. Severe bleeding associated with dabigatrane or rivaroxaban therapy should trigger prothrombin complex therapy, whereby in cases with severe bleeding associated with antiplatelet therapy platelet transfusion should be initiated. Low-dose aspirin should be continued after 24 h. PMID:24150711

  13. The interventionalism of medicine: interventional radiology, cardiology, and neuroradiology

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Kaplan, Anna; Laird, Cyndi; Leiter, Yaacov

    2009-01-01

    Interventional medical practitioners are specialists who do minimally invasive procedures instead of surgery or other treatment. Most often, these procedures utilize various imaging and catheterization techniques in order to diagnose and treat vascular issues in the body. Interventionalist techniques, including injecting arteries with dye, visualizing these via x-ray, and opening up blockages, developed from early pioneers' bold and sometimes controversial experiments which aimed to find safer and better ways to treat coronary artery and other atherosclerotic vascular disease. Currently, the major interventional specialties are interventional (or vascular) radiology, interventional cardiology, and endovascular surgical (interventional) neuroradiology. All three are perfecting the use of stents and other procedures to keep diseased arteries open, while also evaluating the application these procedures. The rapid new development of imaging technologies, mechanical devices, and types of treatment, while certainly beneficial to the patient, can also lead to ambiguity regarding specific specialty claims on certain techniques and devices. While these practitioners can be in competition with each other, cooperation and communication are the most advantageous methods to deal with these "turf wars." All of the interventionalists are needed to deliver the best medical care to patients, now and in the future. PMID:19740425

  14. Computer–Based Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers: Preliminary Results from Two Evaluation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna H Oxstrand

    2013-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. nuclear industry are collaborating on a research effort aimed to augment the existing guidance on computer-based procedure (CBP) design with specific guidance on how to design CBP user interfaces such that they support procedure execution in ways that exceed the capabilities of paper-based procedures (PBPs) without introducing new errors. Researchers are employing an iterative process where the human factors issues and interface design principles related to CBP usage are systematically addressed and evaluated in realistic settings. This paper describes the process of developing a CBP prototype and the two studies conducted to evaluate the prototype. The results indicate that CBPs may improve performance by reducing errors, but may increase the time it takes to complete procedural tasks.

  15. Comparison of Safety of Radial and Femoral Approaches for Coronary Catheterization in Interventional Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Samul, Wojciech; Turowska, Anna; Kwasiborski, Przemysław Jerzy; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Cwetsch, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Background The femoral approach has been the preferably used access in interventional cardiology as well for coronary diagnostics as for percutaneous coronary intervention, being perceived as easy and facilitating quick access with relatively low risk. Due to the results of the latest studies, however, the radial approach has become increasingly popular. The aim of this study was a safety analysis of cardiological interventional procedures (i.e., coronarography and PCI) according to the vessel approach. Material/Methods The 204 coronary interventions done in our Department of Interventional Cardiology were retrospectively analyzed. All the procedures were classified according to femoral or radial access. The incidence of local complications (e.g., major bleedings and hematomas) was assessed as well as the volume of contrast agent administered during the procedure and the radiation dose. Results It has been shown that radial approach, which is obviously more comfortable for patients, reduces the risk of local complications (0 vs. 2.97% and 0 vs. 3.96%) and does not lead to increased radiation exposure (p=0.88). However, there could be a larger volume of contrast agent administered (p=0.029), which in some cases could increase the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy. Conclusions The radial approach should be recommended as a first choice because it is safer than the classical femoral approach, but one must be cautious in choosing radial approach patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:25996689

  16. ACCF/ASNC/ACR/AHA/ASE/SCCT/SCMR/SNM 2009 appropriate use criteria for cardiac radionuclide imaging: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Robert C; Berman, Daniel S; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Heidenreich, Paul A; Henkin, Robert E; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pohost, Gerald M; Williams, Kim A

    2009-06-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac radionuclide imaging (RNI) is frequently considered. This document is a revision of the original Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (SPECT MPI) Appropriateness Criteria, published 4 years earlier, written to reflect changes in test utilization and new clinical data, and to clarify RNI use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine appropriate use criteria (AUC) on a frequent basis. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Sixty-seven clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of cardiac RNI for diagnosis and risk assessment in intermediate- and high-risk patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while testing in low-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Additionally, use for perioperative testing was found to be inappropriate except for high selected groups of patients. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making, test performance, and reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research. PMID:19451357

  17. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  18. Sources and magnitude of occupational and public exposures from nuclear medicine procedures

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-11

    This Report addresses the sources of exposures incurred in the practice of nuclear medicine and provides the necessary data to evaluate the magnitude of exposures to those directly associated with that practice and to those who provide nursing care to the patients containing radiopharmaceuticals. Exposure to members of the public are also addressed. The primary emphasis of this Report is on these individuals and not on the patient, since the patient receives the direct benefit from the nuclear medicine procedure. It is recognized that the patient also receives the bulk of any potential radiation decrement.

  19. [German Society of Nuclear Medicine procedure guideline on beta-amyloid brain PET imaging].

    PubMed

    Barthel, Henryk; Meyer, Philipp T; Drzezga, Alexander; Bartenstein, Peter; Boecker, Henning; Brust, Peter; Buchert, Ralph; Coenen, Heinz H; la Fougère, Christian; Gründer, Gerhard; Grünwald, Frank; Krause, Bernd J; Kuwert, Torsten; Schreckenberger, Matthias; Tatsch, Klaus; Langen, Karl-Josef; Sabri, Osama

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a number of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been approved for clinical use. These tracers target cerebral beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Increasing use of this method implies the need for respective standards. This German Society of Nuclear Medicine guideline describes adequate procedures for Aβ plaque PET imaging. It not only discusses the tracers used for that purpose, but also lists measures for correct patient preparation, image data generation, processing, analysis and interpretation. With that, this "S1" category (according to the German Association of the Scientific Medical Societies standard) guideline aims at contributing to quality assurance of nuclear imaging in Germany. PMID:27080914

  20. Procedure for conducting a human-reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.J.; Swain, A.D.

    1983-05-01

    This document describes in detail a procedure to be followed in conducting a human reliability analysis as part of a probabilistic risk assessment when such an analysis is performed according to the methods described in NUREG/CR-1278, Handbook for Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications. An overview of the procedure describing the major elements of a human reliability analysis is presented along with a detailed description of each element and an example of an actual analysis. An appendix consists of some sample human reliability analysis problems for further study.

  1. [Informed consent in cardiology. The Committee on Informed Consent of the Commission on Professional Matters of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología].

    PubMed

    de los Reyes López, M; Iñíguez Romo, A; Goicolea de Oro, A; Funes López, B; Castro Beiras, A

    1998-10-01

    In the last thirty years, the clinical relationship between physicians and patients has been rather modified. There are several factors that have contributed to this change: a) New ways to execute medical practises, specially referred to the development of new techniques; b) Cultural changes in our western society, mainly in the mediterranean area, where there has been progress in the recognition of patients' autonomy to decide about their own lives, health and their own bodies; c) The increasing number of lawsuits, complaints and judgements about the problems that clinical information involves, particularly the informed consent in clinical practise. We consider it necessary to make an extensive and deep discussion from all of the areas in Medicine and Law, to analyze the different ethical and legal parts of the informed consent. For that reason the Spanish Society of Cardiology offers their members a basic document in order to reflect about these facts, developing arguments, justifications and supports. This document has also considered models, conditions to their applicability according to Spanish law, and the experience we have had. Finally, there is a list of diagnostic procedures and interventional practises in cardiology that might be preceded by a written informed consent document. We considered them by the name of Spanish Society of Cardiology recommendations. PMID:9834627

  2. Using cost/risk procedures to establish recovery criteria following a nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Tawil, J J; Strenge, D L

    1987-02-01

    In the event of a major accidental release of radionuclides at a nuclear power plant, large populated areas could become seriously contaminated. Local officials would be responsible for establishing radiation recovery criteria that would permit the evacuated population to return safely to their jobs and homes. The range of acceptable criteria could imply variations in property losses in the billions of dollars. Given the likely public concern over the health consequences and the enormity of the potential property losses, a cost/risk analysis can provide important input to establishing the recovery criteria. This paper describes procedures for conducting a cost/risk analysis of a site radiologically contaminated by a nuclear power plant accident. The procedures are illustrated by analyzing a hypothetically contaminated site, using software developed for determining the property and health effects of major reactor accidents. PMID:3818283

  3. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  4. Cardiological telemonitoring in rehabilitation and sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Vainoras, Alfonsas; Marozas, Vaidotas; Korsakas, Stasys; Gargasas, Liudas; Siupsinskas, Laimonas; Miskinis, Vytenis

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the development results of teleconsultative cardiology systems and their application in rehabilitation and sport medicine. The first teleconsultative cardiology (TELECARD) system was developed for outpatient departments in the city of Kaunas, using Internet links. It was based on the CompCardioSignal terminal. One branch of the TELECARD system with a mobile CompCardioSignal terminal was used for functional state evaluation of Lithuanian sportsmen during the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. The examined results have shown that every sportsman responded differently to acclimatization and the TELECARD system provided support to physicians and coaches for making optimal decisions regarding the sportsmen's adaptation and other situations. The final telemetry system was used for rower monitoring. It was based on the new CompCardioSignal terminal with three EASI ECG leads and synchronously recorded motion signals for evaluation of human reaction to physical load. The developed telemonitoring systems were a useful tool for evaluation of human reaction to physical load in rehabilitation and sports activities. PMID:15718601

  5. [The origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology and of Czech cardiology].

    PubMed

    Widimský, J

    2013-06-01

    The paper presents the origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology on the one hand, and the origins of Czech cardiology on the other. The Czech Society of Cardiology is the third oldest in the world (after the American and German Societies). It was founded in 1929 by Prof. Libenský. As early as in 1933, the Society organised the first international congress of cardiologists in Prague, which was attended by 200 doctors, out of which 50 were from abroad. The most participants came from France and Poland. Other participants came from England, Argentina, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Romania, Spain and Switzerland. The worldwide importance of this congress is apparent from the fact that both the World Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology (EKS) were founded after World War II in the years 1950 and 1952, i.e. almost 20 years after the first international congress of cardiology in Prague. In 1964, the Fourth Congress of European Society of Cardiology was held in Prague with the participation of 1,500 specialists from 31 countries and chaired by Prof. Pavel Lukl, the later president of EKS (1964- 1968). The paper also presents the work of our specialists in WHO and the history of the international journal Cor et Vasa issued by the Avicenum publishing house in Prague in English and Russian in the years 1958- 1992. An important role in the development of our cardiology was played by certain departments and clinics. In 1951, the Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ÚCHOK) was founded in PrahaKrč, thanks to the initiative of MU Dr. František Kriegl, the Deputy Minister of Health. Its first director was Klement Weber, who published, as early as in 1929, a monograph on arrhythmias -  50 years earlier than arrhythmias started to be at the centre of attention of cardiologists. Klement Weber was one of the doctors of President T. G. Masaryk during his serious disease towards the end of his life. Jan Brod was the deputy of Klement Weber in the

  6. Current global and Korean issues in radiation safety of nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Song, H C

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the management of patient doses in medical imaging has evolved as concern about radiation exposure has increased. Efforts and techniques to reduce radiation doses are focussed not only on the basis of patient safety, but also on the fundamentals of justification and optimisation in cooperation with international organisations such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. The Image Gently campaign in children and Image Wisely campaign in adults to lower radiation doses have been initiated in the USA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine paediatric dosage card, North American consensus guidelines, and Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative have recommended the activities of radiopharmaceuticals that should be administered in children. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), developed predominantly in Europe, may be an important tool to manage patient doses. In Korea, overexposure to radiation, even from the use of medical imaging, has become a public issue, particularly since the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. As a result, the Korean Nuclear Safety and Security Commission revised the technical standards for radiation safety management in medical fields. In parallel, DRLs for nuclear medicine procedures have been collected on a nationwide scale. Notice of total effective dose from positron emission tomography-computed tomography for cancer screening has been mandatory since mid-November 2014. PMID:26960820

  7. Collective effective dose in Europe from X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Bly, R; Jahnen, A; Järvinen, H; Olerud, H; Vassileva, J; Vogiatzi, S

    2015-07-01

    Population doses from radiodiagnostic (X-ray and nuclear medicine) procedures in Europe were estimated based on data collected from 36 European countries. For X-ray procedures in EU and EFTA countries (except Liechtenstein) the collective effective dose is 547,500 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 605,000 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.05 mSv per caput. For nuclear medicine procedures in EU countries and EFTA (except Liechtenstein) countries the collective effective dose is 30,700 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 31,100 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.05 mSv per caput. PMID:25848115

  8. Final report on repair procedure of strong ground motion data from underground nuclear tests

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.

    1995-04-01

    Certain difficulties arise when recording close-in around motion from underground nuclear explosions. Data quality can be compromised by a variety of factors, including electromagnetic pulse, noise spikes, direct current effect, and gauge clipping and gauge tilt. From March 1988 through September 1994, EG&G Energy Measurements repaired strong round-motion data (acceleration data) from underground nuclear tests for the Los Alamos National Laboratory using, an automated repair procedure. The automated repair determined and implemented the required repairs based on user input and a consistent set of criteria. A log was kept of each repair so that the repair procedure could be duplicated. This relaxed the requirement to save the repaired data. Developed for the VAX system, the procedure allowed the user to stack up a large number of repairs, plot the repaired data, and obtain hard copies. The plotted data could then be reviewed for a given test to determine the consistency of repair for a given underground test. This feature released the user to perform other tasks while the data were being repaired.

  9. REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS

    SciTech Connect

    David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

    2011-09-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

  10. Advances in cardiology: clinical trial update.

    PubMed

    Howe, Andrew J; Shand, James A; Menown, Ian B A

    2011-05-01

    Multiple key cardiology trials have been presented or published over recent months, several with the potential to change clinical practice. In this article, we summarize and place in clinical context new trial findings regarding anticoagulation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (enoxaparin, fondaparinux and unfractionated heparin), the implications of genetic polymorphisms and functional testing for antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and ticagrelor), new oral anticoagulants for use in atrial fibrillation (apixiban and rivaroxaban), optimal pacing strategies and pharmacological agents in heart failure (ivabradine, eplerenone, cardiac resynchronization therapy, telemonitoring and intracoronary bone marrow stem cell infusion). Clinical trials in percutaneous structural intervention (transcatheter aortic valve implantation, MONARC™ mitral annular implant, STARFlex(®) patent foramen ovale device) and advanced percutaneous coronary intervention (everolimus-eluting stents, biodegradable polymer/polymer-free technologies and contemporary use of intravascular ultrasound) are also discussed. PMID:21627472

  11. Preliminary clinical experience in cardiology with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Marelli, C

    2000-08-17

    Sonazoid (formerly NC100100) is a new ultrasound contrast agent for intravenous injection developed by Nycomed-Amersham. It consists of perfluorocarbon microbubbles that are stabilized with a surfactant and are within a well-defined size range (median diameter approximately 3 microm). Due to the low diffusibility and blood solubility of the gas, the controlled size distribution of the microbubbles, and the flexibility of the shell, Sonazoid is a free-flowing tracer capable of crossing the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. It is stable enough for the duration of the ultrasound examination and provides echo enhancement useful for clinical requirements. The preliminary clinical experience in cardiology indications, including its use in reducing the frequency of inadequate echocardiographic studies in patients with suboptimal echocardiograms, and its use as a myocardial perfusion agent in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia is briefly discussed. PMID:10997345

  12. [Cardiology in the Morgagni's anatomo pathological work].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde, Pedro; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In the XVIII century, under the influence of the "systematic spirit", characteristic of the Enlightenment age, pathological anatomy was systematized in the Morgagni's fundamental treatise De sedibus et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis, published as letters in 1761. Certain biographical data of the author are reported here as well as some his more important contributions to cardiology such as the Morgagni's, Adams', Stokes' syndrome. His points of view on sudden death and his observations on post-infarct myocardial rupture, are related also. In his global evaluation of these facts, the speculative approach always predominates. Indeed, in these anatomist's works, we find a good example of the application of epistemologic principles to the medical field. PMID:25862292

  13. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID:22578925

  14. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development? 770.7 Section 770.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7...

  15. OCCUPATIONAL DOSE ASSESSMENT IN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY IN SERBIA.

    PubMed

    Kaljevic, J; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Stankovic, J; Arandjic, D; Bozovic, P; Antic, V

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the occupational dose in interventional cardiology in a large hospital in Belgrade, Serbia. A double-dosimetry method was applied for the estimation of whole-body dose, using thermoluminescent dosemeters, calibrated in terms of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). Besides the double-dosimetry method, eye dose was also estimated by means of measuring ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and doses per procedure were reported. Doses were assessed for 13 physicians, 6 nurses and 10 radiographers, for 2 consequent years. The maximum annual effective dose assessed was 4.3, 2.1 and 1.3 mSv for physicians, nurses and radiographers, respectively. The maximum doses recorded by the dosemeter worn at the collar level (over the apron) were 16.8, 11.9 and 4.5 mSv, respectively. This value was used for the eye lens dose assessment. Estimated doses are in accordance with or higher than annual dose limits for the occupational exposure. PMID:26464526

  16. The development of protocols to cover clinical care in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Duwel, C M; Kruijssen, H A

    1995-01-01

    PROCAS (PRofiles Of CAre System) is one of the AIM projects whose objectives are to improve the quality and efficiency of medical treatment. These will be realised in establishing a methodology for defining and developing what are termed "Profiles of Care". These are sets of options for clinicians which are meant to create acceptable ways of managing patients with similar conditions and which represent good clinical practice. Moreover, a prototype system will be realised by the application of informatics and telematics, to enhance the provision of efficient and effective care in both hospitals and outpatient departments. Because of the retrospective nature of the ICD-9-CM system for the classification of cardiological patients, a draft for a Prospective Patient Data Model, which involves the assessment of somatic, psychosocial, environmental and demographic axes, is being presented. This multi-axial evaluation allows for the generation of the smallest unit of diagnostic-therapeutic procedures, based on the definition of the patient's health problem; that is: the patient-orientated diagnosis or the appropriate indication. PMID:10163708

  17. An unusual complication after interventional cardiology reveals and infrequent condition: Idiopathic CD4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fica, Alberto; Verdugo, Fernando; Landaeta, María V; Flores, Alfredo; Roessler, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is of rare occurrence after interventional procedures with few events reported until now. A 74 year-old man with a past medical history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, splenectomy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and polymyalgia rheumatica developed HZ on the right median nerve 7 days after he underwent a coronariography for managing an acute coronary syndrome. He evolved with cutaneous dissemination and required intravenous acyclovir therapy. Laboratory evaluation disclosed a previously unknown idiophatic CD4 lymphocytopenia. HZ should be added to the list of complications after interventional cardiology and associated immunosuppressive factors ruled out. PMID:26768667

  18. Processes and Procedures for Application of CFD to Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz; Patrick J. Roache; Ismail B. Celik; William D. Pointer; Yassin A. Hassan

    2006-09-01

    Traditionally, nuclear reactor safety analysis has been performed using systems analysis codes such as RELAP5, which was developed at the INL. However, goals established by the Generation IV program, especially the desire to increase efficiency, has lead to an increase in operating temperatures for the reactors. This increase pushes reactor materials to operate towards their upper temperature limits relative to structural integrity. Because there will be some finite variation of the power density in the reactor core, there will be a potential for local hot spots to occur in the reactor vessel. Hence, it has become apparent that detailed analysis will be required to ensure that local ‘hot spots’ do not exceed safety limits. It is generally accepted that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are intrinsically capable of simulating fluid dynamics and heat transport locally because they are based on ‘first principles.’ Indeed, CFD analysis has reached a fairly mature level of development, including the commercial level. However, CFD experts are aware that even though commercial codes are capable of simulating local fluid and thermal physics, great care must be taken in their application to avoid errors caused by such things as inappropriate grid meshing, low-order discretization schemes, lack of iterative convergence and inaccurate time-stepping. Just as important is the choice of a turbulence model for turbulent flow simulation. Turbulence models model the effects of turbulent transport of mass, momentum and energy, but are not necessarily applicable for wide ranges of flow types. Therefore, there is a well-recognized need to establish practices and procedures for the proper application of CFD to simulate flow physics accurately and establish the level of uncertainty of such computations. The present document represents contributions of CFD experts on what the basic practices, procedures and guidelines should be to aid CFD analysts to obtain accurate

  19. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:20975004

  20. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:21087721

  1. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research. PMID:21232696

  2. Helio-geomagnetic influence in cardiological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Ch.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Apostolou, Th.; Theodoropoulou, A.; Papadima, Th.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the energetic phenomena of the Sun, flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere, through the solar wind, are the sources of the geomagnetic disturbances and storms collectively known as Space Weather. The research on the influence of Space Weather on biological and physiological systems is open. In this work we study the Space Weather impact on Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) distinguishing between ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (STE-ACS) and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) cases. We compare detailed patient records from the 2nd Cardiologic Department of the General Hospital of Nicaea (Piraeus, Greece) with characteristics of geomagnetic storms (DST), solar wind speed and statistics of flares and CMEs which cover the entire solar cycle 23 (1997-2007). Our results indicate a relationship of ACS to helio-geomagnetic activity as the maximum of the ACS cases follows closely the maximum of the solar cycle. Furthermore, within very active periods, the ratio NSTE-ACS to STE-ACS, which is almost constant during periods of low to medium activity, changes favouring the NSTE-ACS. Most of the ACS cases exhibit a high degree of association with the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storms; a smaller, yet significant, part was found associated with periods of fast solar wind without a storm.

  3. Toward a personal health society in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Fayn, Jocelyne; Rubel, Paul

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new generation of health services that has emerged due to the development of advanced information and communication technology (ICT) solutions, like the Enhanced Personal, Intelligent, and Mobile system for Early Detection and Interpretation of Cardiac Syndromes (EPI-MEDICS). It is a personal self-care system that allows any citizen to self-record high-quality ECGs on demand with a smart portable device, which is endowed with powerful ICT capabilities: self-adaptive embedded intelligence, mobile health record management support on SmartMedia card, embedded Web server, and wireless communication. The EPI-MEDICS solution design also provides ambient, intelligent, and pervasive computing services offering any citizen a ubiquitous, reliable, and efficient management of his/her own cardiac status. A multicentric evaluation performed in Europe with a series of device prototypes and the performance assessment of the original methods of signal synthesis that were designed to guarantee a high interoperability level of the recorded data within the clinical practice, as well as of the decision-support methodologies that were developed for an early detection of life-threatening myocardial ischemia and arrhythmia, at home or anywhere, demonstrate the pertinence of going toward a personal health society in cardiology, which still yields the highest mortality rate in industrialized countries. PMID:20007033

  4. The contributions of Carl Ludwig to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, H G

    1999-03-01

    The basic instruments for measuring functional cardiovascular parameters and the most important discoveries made by Carl Ludwig and his disciples in cardiovascular physiology are described and put into perspective in regard to the further development of his methods and ideas. The most important apparatus was the kymograph, which, for the first time, made recording and documenting of functional parameters possible. This instrument was also used for the functional evaluation of the isolated perfused frog heart that was developed by Elias Cyon in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. In the isolated frog heart, important phenomena were discovered such as the staircase ('Treppe'), the absolute refractory period and the all-or-none law of the heart. The isolated dog heart was used to determine the origin of the first heart sound, which was characterized as a muscle tone. To measure regional blood flow and eventually cardiac output, a flowmeter ('Stromuhr') was designed. Precise measurements of cardiac output became possible only when Adolf Fick had developed his principle, which served as the basis for the modern indicator methods. Cyon and Ludwig also discoverd the depressor nerve, which constitutes the basis of the baroreceptor reflex. Finally, the precise localization of the vasomotor centre in the ventrolateral medulla was achieved in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. This was confirmed more than 100 years later with modern neuroanatomical methods making use of retrograde axonal transport. Thus, Ludwig and his scholars made major substantial contributions to cardiovascular knowledge that can be considered to constitute the basis of modern cardiology. PMID:10202196

  5. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (II) Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of intensity- and time-based seismic risk assessments of a sample nuclear power plant (NPP) to demonstrate the risk-assessment methodology proposed in its companion paper. The intensity-based assessments include three sets of sensitivity studies to identify the impact of the following factors on the seismic vulnerability of the sample NPP, namely: (1) the description of fragility curves for primary and secondary components of NPPs, (2) the number of simulations of NPP response required for risk assessment, and (3) the correlation in responses between NPP components. The time-based assessment is performed as a series of intensity-based assessments. The studies illustrate the utility of the response-based fragility curves and the inclusion of the correlation in the responses of NPP components directly in the risk computation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology: Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2009-03-10

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  7. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization : a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Brindis, Ralph G; Beckman, Karen J; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Peterson, Eric D

    2009-02-15

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  8. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization: a report by the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2009-02-10

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  9. ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR 2011 Appropriate Use Criteria for Echocardiography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance American College of Chest Physicians.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Garcia, Mario J; Haines, David E; Lai, Wyman W; Manning, Warren J; Patel, Ayan R; Picard, Michael H; Polk, Donna M; Ragosta, Michael; Parker Ward, R; Weiner, Rory B

    2011-03-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), in partnership with the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where echocardiography is frequently considered. This document combines and updates the original transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2007 (1) and the original stress echocardiography appropriateness criteria published in 2008 (2). This revision reflects new clinical data, reflects changes in test utilization patterns,and clarifies echocardiography use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria.The indications (clinical scenarios)were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of the original appropriate use criteria (AUC).The 202 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9,to designate appropriate use(median 7 to 9), uncertain use(median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Ninety-seven indications were rated as appropriate, 34 were rated as uncertain, and 71 were rated as inappropriate. In general,the use of echocardiography for initial diagnosis when there is a change in clinical status or when the results of the echocardiogram are anticipated to change patient management were rated appropriate. Routine testing when there was no change in clinical status or when results of testing were unlikely to modify management were more likely to be inappropriate than appropriate/uncertain.The AUC for echocardiography have the potential to impact physician decision making,healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore,recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. PMID

  10. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional cardiology using OSL and electronic dosemeters†.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, R M; Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Ginjaume, M; Duch, M A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the appropriateness of OSL and electronic dosemeters to estimate eye lens doses at interventional cardiology environment. Using TLD as reference detectors, personal dose equivalent was measured in phantoms and during clinical procedures. For phantom measurements, OSL dose values resulted in an average difference of -15 % vs. TLD. Tests carried out with other electronic dosemeters revealed differences up to ±20 % versus TLD. With dosemeters positioned outside the goggles and when TLD doses were >20 μSv, the average difference OSL vs. TLD was -9 %. Eye lens doses of almost 700 μSv per procedure were measured in two cases out of a sample of 33 measurements in individual clinical procedures, thus showing the risk of high exposure to the lenses of the eye when protection rules are not followed. The differences found between OSL and TLD are acceptable for the purpose and range of doses measured in the survey. PMID:24464819

  11. Development of the preliminary procedure for a national nuclear safety authority staff acting during the PWR NPP accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinov, V.

    1997-12-01

    We present the development of the new preliminary procedure for a National Nuclear Safety Authority staff preparedness for action in the case of a Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant accident. The procedures are generic and equally applicable for advanced nuclear plants. The basic goal of the procedure is systematic determination of the responsibilities of the staff expert group(s) members for accident analysis and consequences prediction. Moreover, the procedure describes anticipated practices of an expert group acting during a plant accident. Different sources will define the state(s) of the plant as: the plant form for initial notification of an accident, the particular form for specific plant information, etc. By this procedure we propose three expert groups successively to work up to eight hours each, in the circumstances of an accident. We suppose the expert group to have mostly five members each. The members should have different tasks for resolution, defined by the procedure. The head of the group will coordinate group members work during an accident. Group members have to be qualified and acquainted with all adequate references. In the paper we present a newly devised agenda with presumed duties of each member of the group. Furthermore, we also composed a special form for information exchange between the utility and regulatory staff member during an accident. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  13. Application of EPRI risk-based inservice inspection procedure to combustion engineering design of nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, B.T.; Fourgerousse, R.

    1996-12-01

    The EPRI developed risk-based inservice inspection procedure is used to select the elements for inservice inspection on a section of the high pressure safety injection system of the Entergy Operations ANO2 nuclear plant. This plant is the pilot plant in a six utility-eleven plant EPRI tailored collaboration program to apply the general EPRI procedures to Combustion Engineering NSSS designs. The procedure results in a reduction of candidate inspection locations from 14, based on current ASME Section XI rules for B-J welds to 3, based on the risk-based selection criteria.

  14. Improving Access to Pediatric Cardiology in Cape Verde via a Collaborative International Telemedicine Service.

    PubMed

    Lapão, Luís Velez; Correia, Artur

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of international telemedicine services in supporting the evacuation procedures from Cape Verde to Portugal, enabling better quality and cost reductions in the management of the global health system. The Cape Verde, as other African countries, health system lacks many medical specialists, like pediatric cardiologists, neurosurgery, etc. In this study, tele-cardiology shows good results as diagnostic support to the evacuation decision. Telemedicine services show benefits while monitoring patients in post-evacuation, helping to address the lack of responsive care in some specialties whose actual use will help save resources both in provision and in management of the evacuation procedures. Additionally, with tele-cardiology collaborative service many evacuations can be avoided whereas many cases will be treated and followed locally in Cape Verde with remote technical support from Portugal. This international telemedicine service enabled more efficient evacuations, by reducing expenses in travel and housing, and therefore contributed to the health system's improvement. This study provides some evidence of how important telemedicine really is to cope with both the geography and the shortage of physicians. PMID:25980705

  15. Comparison of abomasal emptying in neonatal calves with a nuclear scintigraphic procedure.

    PubMed

    Nappert, G; Lattimer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate that nuclear medicine technology allows observation of the effect that milk clotting has on abomasal emptying in the living neonatal calf. Scintigraphic evaluation of abomasal emptying was carried out in 6 healthy male Holstein calves. The calves were fed 10% of their body weight daily as whole cow's milk that was divided equally and consumed as 2 feedings via a nipple bottle. One day before the nuclear scintigraphic procedure, the calves were randomly fed whole cow's milk, or an oral rehydration solution (ORS) containing bicarbonate and high levels of soluble fibre was fed for 3 consecutive feedings an hour before the portion of milk. For each calf, both feeding programs were repeated twice at a one-week interval. Immediately following administration of the 99mTC-sulfur-colloid-containing milk, the calves were imaged with the gamma camera positioned lateral and ventral to the abomasum. Additional right lateral and ventral views of the abomasum were collected at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, and 240 min after administration of the radionuclide. Blood glucose determination were performed at one-hour intervals for 7 h after feeding milk to evaluate milk digestibility in both feeding programs. No significant differences in the results of the glucose absorption test or in the radionuclide counts of the abomasum were found between both feeding programs. Scintigraphic evaluation of abomasal emptying was found to be a useful technique for visualization of milk clotting and to test the effect of an ORS on milk digestibility. PMID:11227195

  16. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  17. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  18. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  19. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  20. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  1. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L S

    2011-04-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented. PMID:21731225

  2. Potential Uses, Limitations, and Basic Procedures of Micronuclei and Nuclear Abnormalities in Buccal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Nava, Arnulfo; Flores-García, Aurelio; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as tools to evaluate genotoxicity is increasing recently. Methods that have been used previously to evaluate genomic instability are frequently expensive, complicated, and invasive. The micronuclei (MN) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) technique in buccal cells offers a great opportunity to evaluate in a clear and precise way the appearance of genetic damage whether it is present as a consequence of occupational or environmental risk. This technique is reliable, fast, relatively simple, cheap, and minimally invasive and causes no pain. So, it is well accepted by patients; it can also be used to assess the genotoxic effect derived from drug use or as a result of having a chronic disease. Furthermore the beneficial effects derived from changes in life style or taking additional supplements can also be evaluated. In the present paper, we aim to focus on the explanation of MN test and its usefulness as a biomarker; we further give details about procedures to perform and interpret the results of the test and review some factors that could have an influence on the results of the technique. PMID:24778463

  3. Simulation of beta radiator handling procedures in nuclear medicine by means of a movable hand phantom.

    PubMed

    Blunck, Ch; Becker, F; Urban, M

    2011-03-01

    In nuclear medicine therapies, people working with beta radiators such as (90)Y may be exposed to non-negligible partial body doses. For radiation protection, it is important to know the characteristics of the radiation field and possible dose exposures at relevant positions in the working area. Besides extensive measurements, simulations can provide these data. For this purpose, a movable hand phantom for Monte Carlo simulations was developed. Specific beta radiator handling scenarios can be modelled interactively with forward kinematics or automatically with an inverse kinematics procedure. As a first investigation, the dose distribution on a medical doctor's hand injecting a (90)Y solution was measured and simulated with the phantom. Modelling was done with the interactive method based on five consecutive frames from a video recorded during the injection. Owing to the use of only one camera, not each detail of the radiation scenario is visible in the video. In spite of systematic uncertainties, the measured and simulated dose values are in good agreement. PMID:21044994

  4. Evaluation criteria and procedure for nuclear power plant temporary loads/temporary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.T.; Minichiello, J.C.; Olson, D.E.

    1996-12-01

    Operating nuclear power plants frequently encounter temporary loads/temporary conditions in plant normal operation and maintenance (O and M). The most obvious examples are installation of temporary shielding and scaffolding, or removal of certain supports, to facilitate plant refueling and maintenance outage activities. Short-term operability calls such as those due to snubber failures or unanticipated transients also create temporary loads/temporary conditions. These temporary situations often generate loads that are outside the original plant design basis. Consequently, separate evaluations are needed to ensure that plant structures, systems and components (SSCs) maintain their integrity and functionality while these temporary loads are active. Also, the temporary structures and components need to be evaluated to ensure their integrity during the temporary duration of use. Three types of approaches are normally adopted either individually or in combination to perform needed evaluations: relax the design allowables, use a more refined analysis model but retain the design basis acceptance criteria, or offset temporary loads by eliminating or reducing part of the design basis loads based on short duration considerations. This paper reviews temporary loading/temporary condition issues and the current industry criteria and procedures proposed in dealing with these issues. Where appropriate, regulatory positions on temporary loads/temporary conditions are discussed.

  5. [Fundamental bases of digital information processing in nuclear cardiology (III)].

    PubMed

    Cuarón, A; González, C; García Moreira, C

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the transformation of the gamma-camera images into digital form. The incidence of a gamma photon on the detector, produces two voltage pulses, which are proportional to the coordinates of the incidence points, and a digital pulse, indicative of the occurrence of the event. The coordinate pulses passes through a analog-digital converter, that is activated by the pulse. The result is the appearance of a digital number at the out-put of the converter, which is proportional to the voltage at its in-put. This number, is stored on the accumulation memory of the system, either on a list mode or on a matrix mode. Static images can be stored on a single matrix. Dynamic data can be stored on a series of matrixes, each representing a different period of acquisition. It is also possible to capture information on a series of matrixes syncronized with the electrocardiogram of the patient. In this instance, each matrix represents a distinct period of the cardiac cycle. Data stored on the memory, can be used to process and display images and quantitative histograms on a video screen. In order to do that, it is necessary to translate the digital data on the memory to voltage levels, and to transform these on light levels on the screen. This, is achieved through a digital analog converter. The reading of the digital memory must be syncronic with the electronic scanning of the video screen. PMID:6466002

  6. Historical Patterns in the Types of Procedures Performed and Radiation Safety Practices Used in Nuclear Medicine From 1945-2009.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Miriam E; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Doody, Michele M; Lim, Hyeyeun; Bolus, Norman E; Simon, Steven L; Alexander, Bruce H; Kitahara, Cari M

    2016-07-01

    The authors evaluated historical patterns in the types of procedures performed in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine and the associated radiation safety practices used from 1945-2009 in a sample of U.S. radiologic technologists. In 2013-2014, 4,406 participants from the U.S. Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Study who previously reported working with medical radionuclides completed a detailed survey inquiring about the performance of 23 diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide procedures and the use of radiation safety practices when performing radionuclide procedure-related tasks during five time periods: 1945-1964, 1965-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, and 2000-2009. An overall increase in the proportion of technologists who performed specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures was observed across the five time periods. Between 1945-1964 and 2000-2009, the median frequency of diagnostic procedures performed substantially increased (from 5 wk to 30 wk), attributable mainly to an increasing frequency of cardiac and non-brain PET scans, while the median frequency of therapeutic procedures performed modestly decreased (from 4 mo to 3 mo). Also a notable increase was observed in the use of most radiation safety practices from 1945-1964 to 2000-2009 (e.g., use of lead-shielded vials during diagnostic radiopharmaceutical preparation increased from 56 to 96%), although lead apron use dramatically decreased (e.g., during diagnostic imaging procedures, from 81 to 7%). These data describe historical practices in nuclear medicine and can be used to support studies of health risks for nuclear medicine technologists. PMID:27218293

  7. Automatic management system for dose parameters in interventional radiology and cardiology.

    PubMed

    Ten, J I; Fernandez, J M; Vaño, E

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an automatic management system to archive and analyse the major study parameters and patient doses for fluoroscopy guided procedures performed in cardiology and interventional radiology systems. The X-ray systems used for this trial have the capability to export at the end of the procedure and via e-mail the technical parameters of the study and the patient dose values. An application was developed to query and retrieve from a mail server, all study reports sent by the imaging modality and store them on a Microsoft SQL Server data base. The results from 3538 interventional study reports generated by 7 interventional systems were processed. In the case of some technical parameters and patient doses, alarms were added to receive malfunction alerts so as to immediately take appropriate corrective actions. PMID:21831869

  8. Procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities in nuclear power plant operations. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Seaver, D.A.; Stillwell, W.G.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes and evaluates several procedures for using expert judgment to estimate human-error probabilities (HEPs) in nuclear power plant operations. These HEPs are currently needed for several purposes, particularly for probabilistic risk assessments. Data do not exist for estimating these HEPs, so expert judgment can provide these estimates in a timely manner. Five judgmental procedures are described here: paired comparisons, ranking and rating, direct numerical estimation, indirect numerical estimation and multiattribute utility measurement. These procedures are evaluated in terms of several criteria: quality of judgments, difficulty of data collection, empirical support, acceptability, theoretical justification, and data processing. Situational constraints such as the number of experts available, the number of HEPs to be estimated, the time available, the location of the experts, and the resources available are discussed in regard to their implications for selecting a procedure for use.

  9. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  10. Weekly Interdisciplinary Colloquy on Cardiology: A Decade of Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehrmacher, William H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An experimental, continuing, weekly interdisciplinary colloquy on cardiology is described. It is organized between the departments of medicine and physiology of Loyola University Medical Center to promote interaction between basic scientists and practicing physicians in the medical school. (Author/MLW)

  11. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  12. [A federal project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Beyrle, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports in detail on a project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology at the federal level in Germany. Information on the structure of the contract, the participants, the agreed claiming of benefits and provision of services are provided as well as relevant figures and contact data. PMID:16598581

  13. [The Sociedad Española de Cardiología on the Internet: current resources and future prospects. The Internet Committee of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología].

    PubMed

    Arribas, F; Elízaga, J; Bosch, X

    1998-10-01

    The Internet can help physicians to identify needed clinical information quickly providing continued medical education. Internet also improves medical information of the non-medical population. Researchers have quick access to library catalogs, Medline and other important databases from the most recognized research centers. Furthermore, it can put physicians in ready contact with other specialists for communication and consultation, facilitates administrative procedures of multicenter studies and accelerates editorial processes of biomedical journals. Since its creation, the website of the Spanish Society of Cardiology has evolved rapidly to the present model, providing different kinds of services to its members including faster communication, information from national and international societies and congresses, earlier access to the full content of Revista Española de Cardiología and to a variety of graphic resources and of continuing education. Nowadays, the website of the Spanish Society of Cardiology is consulted by one thousand visitors a week, even at weekends. The degree of activity increases from 3 h P.M. with a peak from 11 h P.M. to 1 h A.M. In the near future, our website will incorporate its own courses of continuing medical education with on-line evaluation and credit granting, will give support to multicenter studies and will initiate the publication and discussion of clinical cases of interest. PMID:9834626

  14. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes. PMID:24775619

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  16. Inverse sampled Bernoulli (ISB) procedure for estimating a population proportion, with nuclear material applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.

    1982-01-01

    A new sampling procedure is introduced for estimating a population proportion. The procedure combines the ideas of inverse binomial sampling and Bernoulli sampling. An unbiased estimator is given with its variance. The procedure can be viewed as a generalization of inverse binomial sampling.

  17. Study of on-line computerized procedures system of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhijian; Peng Minjun

    2006-07-01

    An on-line computerized procedures system (OCPS) for normal operation is developed. The system makes use of the advantages of computerized procedures system and provides the detailed and comprehensible procedures. The configuration is introduced. OCPS has been built on Embedded real-time operation system VxWorks using C language. Computerized procedures are described exampled with cold start-up in this paper, helping operators to know about the state of plants during the complex operating course. After adopting the computerized procedures, the labor intensity and mental pressure of operators will be reduced. (authors)

  18. Dose reduction through automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy`s Pantex Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    With the end of the Cold War and the subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need. To compensate for this excess an estimated 20,000 nuclear warheads have been earmarked for dismantlement and storage at the Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It is anticipated that the majority of these warheads will arrive at the Pantex facility by the year 2000. At that time, it is estimated that current dismantlement and inventory procedures will not be adequate to control worker radiation exposure within administrative and federal dose limits. To control these exposures alternate approaches to dismantlement and inventory must be developed. One attractive approach is to automate as many activities as possible, thus reducing worker exposure. To facilitate automation of dismantlement and storage procedures, current procedures were investigated in terms of collective dose to workers, time to completion, ease of completion, and cost of automation for each task. A cost-benefit comparison was then performed in order to determine which procedures would be most cost-effective to automate.

  19. Staff lens doses in interventional urology. A comparison with interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery values.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Resel, L E; Moreno, J; Sanchez, R M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate radiation doses to the lens of urologists during interventional procedures and to compare them with values measured during interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery. The measurements were carried out in a surgical theatre using a mobile C-arm system and electronic occupational dosimeters (worn over the lead apron). Patient and staff dose measurements were collected in a sample of 34 urology interventions (nephrolithotomies). The same dosimetry system was used in other medical specialties for comparison purposes. Median and 3rd quartile values for urology procedures were: patient doses 30 and 40 Gy cm(2); personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the apron (μSv/procedure): 393 and 848 (for urologists); 21 and 39 (for nurses). Median values of over apron dose per procedure for urologists resulted 18.7 times higher than those measured for radiologists and cardiologists working with proper protection (using ceiling suspended screens) in catheterisation laboratories, and 4.2 times higher than the values measured for vascular surgeons at the same hospital. Comparison with passive dosimeters worn near the eyes suggests that dosimeters worn over the apron could be a reasonable conservative estimate for ocular doses for interventional urology. Authors recommend that at least the main surgeon uses protective eyewear during interventional urology procedures. PMID:26583458

  20. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress Report from London 2015.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in London from 29 August to 2 September 2015. It is the leading conference in cardiology in the world, with presentations on the latest scientific discoveries, innovations, technology, education, and clinical practices. More than 32,000 delegates and 5,000 exhibitors from 140 countries participated, sharing a number of scientific presentations, including 28 clinical hot lines, 18 clinical trial updates, 20 registry studies, 12 basic and translational science hot line studies, and 4,533 abstract studies. Japan had the highest number of accepted abstracts at the Congress, indicating the great contribution of Japanese scientists and the Japanese Circulation Society. PMID:26459395

  1. A framework for clinical reasoning in adult cardiology

    PubMed Central

    de la Calzada, Carlos S

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that an expert clinician formulates a diagnostic hypothesis with little clinical data. In comparison, students have difficulties in doing so. The mental mechanism of diagnostic reasoning is almost unconscious and therefore difficult to teach. The purpose of this essay (devoted to 2nd-year medical students) is to present an integrating framework to teach clinical reasoning in cardiology. By analyzing cardiology with a synthetic mind, it becomes apparent that although there are many diseases, the heart, as an organ, reacts to illness with only six basic responses. The clinical manifestations of heart diseases are the direct consequence of these cardiac responses. Considering the six cardiac responses framework, diagnostic reasoning is done in three overlapping steps. With the presented framework, the process of reasoning becomes more visual and needs less clinical data, resembling that of the expert clinician. PMID:26203294

  2. Estimation of initiating event distribution at nuclear power plants by Bayesian procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guangming; Chu, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Initiating events at nuclear power plants such as human errors or components failures may lead to a nuclear accident. The study of the frequency of these events or the distribution of the failure rate is necessary in probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power plants. This paper presents Bayesian modelling methods for the analysis of the distribution of the failure rate. The method can also be utilized in other related fields especially where the data is sparse. An application of the Bayesian modelling in the analysis of distribution of the time to recover Loss of Off-Site Power ( LOSP) is discussed in the paper.

  3. Requirements for Computer Based-Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Operators Results from a Qualitative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

    2012-05-01

    Although computer-based procedures (CBPs) have been investigated as a way to enhance operator performance on procedural tasks in the nuclear industry for almost thirty years, they are not currently widely deployed at United States utilities. One of the barriers to the wide scale deployment of CBPs is the lack of operational experience with CBPs that could serve as a sound basis for justifying the use of CBPs for nuclear utilities. Utilities are hesitant to adopt CBPs because of concern over potential costs of implementation, and concern over regulatory approval. Regulators require a sound technical basis for the use of any procedure at the utilities; without operating experience to support the use CBPs, it is difficult to establish such a technical basis. In an effort to begin the process of developing a technical basis for CBPs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are partnering with industry to explore CBPs with the objective of defining requirements for CBPs and developing an industry-wide vision and path forward for the use of CBPs. This paper describes the results from a qualitative study aimed at defining requirements for CBPs to be used by field operators and maintenance technicians.

  4. Advanced Pipe Replacement Procedure for a Defective CRDM Housing Nozzle Enables Continued Normal Operation of a Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Geoff; Becker, Andrew

    2006-07-01

    During the 2003 outage at the Ringhals Nuclear Plant in Sweden, a leak was found in the vicinity of a Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) housing nozzle at Unit 1. Based on the ALARA principle for radioactive contamination, a unique repair process was developed. The repair system includes utilization of custom, remotely controlled GTAW-robots, a CNC cutting and finishing machine, snake-arm robots and NDE equipment. The success of the repair solution was based on performing the machining and welding operations from the inside of the SCRAM pipe through the CRDM housing since accessibility from the outside was extremely limited. Before the actual pipe replacement procedure was performed, comprehensive training programs were conducted. Training was followed by certification of equipment, staff and procedures during qualification tests in a full scale mock-up of the housing nozzle. Due to the ingenuity of the overall repair solution and training programs, the actual pipe replacement procedure was completed in less than half the anticipated time. As a result of the successful pipe replacement, the nuclear power plant was returned to normal operation. (authors)

  5. The pediatric cardiology pharmacopeia: 2013 update.

    PubMed

    Severin, Paul Nicholas; Awad, Sawsan; Shields, Beth; Hoffman, Joan; Bonney, William; Cortez, Edmundo; Ganesan, Rani; Patel, Aloka; Barnes, Steve; Barnes, Sean; Al-Anani, Shada; Gupta, Umang; Cheddar, Yolandee Bell; Gonzalez, Ismael E; Mallula, Kiran; Ghawi, Hani; Kazmouz, Suhaib; Gendi, Salwa; Abdulla, Ra-id

    2013-01-01

    The use of medications plays a pivotal role in the management of children with heart diseases. Most children with increased pulmonary blood flow require chronic use of anticongestive heart failure medications until more definitive interventional or surgical procedures are performed. The use of such medications, particularly inotropic agents and diuretics, is even more amplified during the postoperative period. Currently, children are undergoing surgical intervention at an ever younger age with excellent results aided by advanced anesthetic and postoperative care. The most significant of these advanced measures includes invasive and noninvasive monitoring as well as a wide array of pharmacologic agents. This review update provides a medication guide for medical practitioners involved in care of children with heart diseases. PMID:23192622

  6. Mortality and Treatment Patterns Among Patients Hospitalized With Acute Cardiovascular Conditions During Dates of National Cardiology Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Prasad, Vinay; Goldman, Dana P.; Romley, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Thousands of physicians attend scientific meetings annually. Although hospital physician staffing and composition may be affected by meetings, patient outcomes and treatment patterns during meeting dates are unknown. OBJECTIVE To analyze mortality and treatment differences among patients admitted with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings compared with nonmeeting dates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of 30-day mortality among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or cardiac arrest from 2002 through 2011 during dates of 2 national cardiology meetings compared with identical nonmeeting days in the 3 weeks before and after conferences (AMI, 8570 hospitalizations during 82 meeting days and 57 471 during 492 nonmeeting days; heart failure, 19 282 during meeting days and 11 4591 during nonmeeting days; cardiac arrest, 1564 during meeting days and 9580 during nonmeeting days). Multivariable analyses were conducted separately for major teaching hospitals and nonteaching hospitals and for low-and high-risk patients. Differences in treatment utilization were assessed. EXPOSURES Hospitalization during cardiology meeting dates. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day mortality, procedure rates, charges, length of stay. RESULTS Patient characteristics were similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates. In teaching hospitals, adjusted 30-day mortality was lower among high-risk patients with heart failure or cardiac arrest admitted during meeting vs nonmeeting dates (heart failure, 17.5% [95% CI, 13.7%–21.2%] vs 24.8% [95% CI, 22.9%–26.6%]; P < .001; cardiac arrest, 59.1% [95% CI, 51.4%–66.8%] vs 69.4% [95% CI, 66.2%–72.6%]; P = .01). Adjusted mortality for high-risk AMI in teaching hospitals was similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates (39.2% [95% CI, 31.8%–46.6%] vs 38.5% [95% CI, 35.0%–42.0%]; P = .86), although adjusted percutaneous

  7. A practical method for skin dose estimation in interventional cardiology based on fluorographic DICOM information.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lucy; Dixon, Matthew; Rowles, Nick; Stevens, Greg

    2016-03-01

    A practical method for skin dose estimation for interventional cardiology patients has been developed to inform pre-procedure planning and post-procedure patient management. Absorbed dose to the patient skin for certain interventional radiology procedures can exceed thresholds for deterministic skin injury, requiring documentation within the patient notes and appropriate patient follow-up. The primary objective was to reduce uncertainty associated with current methods, particularly surrounding field overlap. This was achieved by considering rectangular field geometry incident on a spherical patient model in a polar coordinate system. The angular size of each field was quantified at surface of the sphere, i.e. the skin surface. Computer-assisted design software enabled the modelling of a sufficient dataset that was subsequently validated with radiochromic film. Modelled overlap was found to agree with overlap measured using film to within 2.2° ± 2.0°, showing that the overall error associated with the model was < 1 %. Mathematical comparison against exposure data extracted from procedural Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine files was used to generate a graphical skin dose map, demonstrating the dose distribution over a sphere centred at the interventional reference point. Dosimetric accuracy of the software was measured as between 3.5 and 17 % for different variables. PMID:25994848

  8. Patient doses in interventional cardiology in Bosnia and Herzegovina: first results.

    PubMed

    Beganović, Adnan; Kulić, Mehmed; Spuzić, Muhamed; Gazdić-Santić, Maja; Skopljak-Beganović, Amra; Drljević, Advan; Dzanić, Suad; Basić, Begzada; Lincender, Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Cardiologists at the Cardiac Centre of the Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University performed invasive cardiology procedures in one room equipped with a Siemens Coroskop (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) unit with the possibility of digital cine imaging. The number of procedures performed with this unit is 1126 per year. The number of adults performing only diagnostic procedures is 816, therapeutic procedures 62 and both diagnostic and therapeutic 228. Twenty diagnostic examinations but no therapeutic procedure are performed on children per year. The workload is increasing year by year, with an average increase of 26 % per year. The X-ray system does not have a kerma area product (KAP) meter installed; therefore an external KAP meter was mounted on the X-ray tube. Gafchromic dosimetry films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, USA) were placed under the patient to record the skin dose distribution. The peak skin dose (PSD) was calculated from the maximum optical density of the dosimetry films. Dose measurements were performed on 51 patients undergoing therapeutic procedures (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement). Two patients received doses (KAP) larger than 100 Gycm(2). The PSD was higher than 1 Gy in 3 out of 16 evaluations, and one of these patients received a skin dose >2 Gy. No deterministic skin effects were recorded. The dosimetry results are similar to results reported in other countries. Invasive cardiac procedures deliver high doses to the skin that could cause deterministic effects (erythema). Physicians performing these procedures should be aware of these risks. More efforts should be put into the training of cardiologists in radiation protection. PMID:20223846

  9. C-arm rotation as a method for reducing peak skin dose in interventional cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Jones, A Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged interventional cardiology (IC) procedures may result in radiation-induced skin injury, a potentially preventable cause of patient morbidity. Rotating the C-arm during an IC procedure may reduce this risk, although the methods by which the technique can be practically applied remains unexplored. A previous study demonstrated that C-arm rotation often increases peak skin dose (PSD) in interventional radiology procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether C-arm rotation reduces the PSD in IC procedures and, if so, under what circumstances. Materials and methods Simulations were performed using a numerical ray-tracing algorithm to analyse the effect of C-arm rotation on PSD across a range of patient sizes, C-arm configurations and procedure types. Specific data from modern fluoroscopes and patient dimensions were used as inputs to the simulations. Results In many cases, modest C-arm rotation angles completely eliminated overlap between X-ray field sites on the skin. When overlap remained, PSD increases were generally small. One exception was craniocaudal rotation, which tended to increase PSD. C-arm rotation was most effective for large patients and small X-ray field sizes. Small patients may not benefit from C-arm rotation as a procedural modification. The use of a prophylactic method where the C-arm was rotated between small opposing oblique angles was effective in reducing PSD. Conclusions With the exception of rotation to steep craniocaudal angles, rotating the C-arm reduces PSD in IC procedures when used as either a procedural modification or a prophylactic strategy. Tight collimation increases the benefit of C-arm rotation. PMID:25568803

  10. Intraocular Lens-Shell Technique: Adjustment of the Surgical Procedure Leads to Greater Safety When Treating Dense Nuclear Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weirong; Qu, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Lin, Zhuoling; Chen, Jingjing; Liu, Yizhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of the intraocular lens (IOL)-shell procedure versus conventional phacoemulsification for the surgical treatment of dense cataracts. Methods Eighty eyes with dense nuclear cataracts were enrolled in a prospective, randomized controlled study. Patients were assigned to two groups. In Group I, the IOL was traditionally implanted after all nuclear fragments were completely removed, and in Group II, the IOL was innovatively implanted in the bag before the last residual nuclear fragment was removed. This novel adjusted surgical procedure, named the “IOL-shell technique”, features use of the IOL as a protective barrier rather than simply as a refractive alternative, and it is conceptually different from the traditional step-by-step procedure. Clinical examinations, including uncorrected visual acuity, central corneal thickness (CCT), temporal clear corneal incision thickness and corneal endothelial cell density, were carried out. Results The inter-group difference in temporal corneal thickness was found to be of no statistical significance at any of the visits. Compared to eyes in Group I, those in Group II were shown to have significantly less corneal endothelial cell loss on both the 7th and 30th day following surgery. At 7 days after surgery, the mean corneal endothelial cell loss in Group II was 10.29%, compared to 14.37% in Group I (P<0.05). The mean endothelial cell loss measured on postoperative day 30 was 16.88% in Group II compared to 23.32% in Group I (P<0.05). On the 1st day after surgery, the mean CCT of eyes in Group II was significantly smaller compared to Group I (Group I vs. Group II: 19.42% vs. 13.50%, P<0.05). Conclusions Compared to conventional phacoemulsification, the IOL-shell technique was shown to be a relatively safer procedure without compromised efficiency for dense cataracts, and it caused less corneal endothelial cell loss and milder postoperative corneal edema (Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT

  11. [Transradial approach in interventional cardiology: "quod licet femoralisti, non licet radialisti"].

    PubMed

    Lukenda, Josip

    2012-01-01

    Transradial approach has been used in invasive cardiology since 1989 and since 1995 for PCI. Croatia is late in using this technique for about one whole decade. The advantage of transradial approach over femoral approach are serious local complications of (2.6-2.8%), more frequent with modem therapy (7.4%), occasionally requiring surgical repair (2.4%). Major adverse cardiovascular events are significantly more occurring with femoral (3.8-6.55%) compared to transradial approach (2.5-3.7%), while in the MORTAL study total mortality is higher as well. Patients prefer transradial approach due to it being less painful and uncomfortable, and also because of greater mobility after the procedure. Time spent for patient care by nurses is shortened by half than what it used to be, and the final savings per patient is $290. An unfavorable aspect of transradial approach is clinically insignificant radial artery occlusion (0.6%-1.4%), as well as higher radiation exposure, for 12% in practice. Procedural time is similar, but it could take up to 3 minutes longer. Access site crossover is more often with transradial (4.7-7.6%), compared to femoral procedure (1.4-2.0%), but PCI failure is independent of approach. All unfavorable aspects are diminishing with experience of a cardiologist. Now, some of the Croatian centers, such as General Hospital Zadar, use transradial approach in 67% of catheterizations, 64% of PCI, and 38% of all primary PCIs. PMID:22930938

  12. [Criteria catalogue for Integrated Health Care in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Frantz, E

    2006-01-01

    This paper comprises criteria for projects of Integrated Health Care in cardiology. With these criteria, projects can be assessed for their congruence with essentials that have been assigned by the German Cardiac Society, the Association of German Hospital Cardiologists and the Association of German Practice Cardiologists. The main purpose is to ensure that evidence-based medicine is the basis for the contracts and that all valid guidelines have been observed when services have been agreed. Possibly this paper may be the basis to award an approval to projects that meet all the criteria. This paper is no model contract. PMID:16598573

  13. Nuclear cardiograph and scintigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Extensive advances in the technology of detectors, data analysis systems, and tracers used have resulted in greatly expanded applications of radioisotopes to the assessment of cardiac function and disease. The development of nuclear cardiology has proceeded along four lines: (1) radionuclide angiography, (2) myocardial perfusion imaging, (3) intracoronary microsphere imaging, and (4) regional myocardial blood flow determination using inert gases.

  14. Hanford spent nuclear fuel cold vacuum drying proof of performance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.

    1998-06-10

    This document provides the test procedure for cold testing of the first article skids for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) process at the Facility. The primary objective of this testing is to confirm design choices and provide data for the initial start-up parameters for the process. The current scope of testing in this document includes design verification, drying cycle determination equipment performance testing of the CVD process and MCC components, heat up and cool-down cycle determination, and thermal model validation.

  15. Impact of a Preventive Cardiology Curriculum on Knowledge and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veitia, Marie C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 54 first-year Marshall University (West Virginia) medical students found that a preventive cardiology curriculum improved both knowledge of and attitudes about preventive cardiology in general and on all 4 subscales (epidemiological evidence, risk factor characteristics, pathophysiology, primary interventions). (Author/MSE)

  16. Nuclear transfer procedures in the ovine can induce early embryo fragmentation and compromise cloned embryo development.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian; Cheng, Lei; Su, Guanghua; Kang, Feng; Wu, Xia; Bai, Chunling; Zhang, Li; Li, Guang-Peng

    2011-07-01

    Cytoplasmic fragmentations are frequently observed in early mammalian embryos, and especially in the human. In our research we have observed subtle clues that the occurrence of fragmentation was most likely a result of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) protocols, and in particular, the in vitro culture system. In this study we examined various putative factors that might induce early embryo fragmentation in the ovine. The results indicate that nuclear transfer protocols such as the fusion parameter, activation treatment, and especially the choice of culture medium affected embryo cleavage rates and resulted in a higher incidence of fragmented embryos. Upon using the same fusion parameter, activation parameters that were based upon amino acids containing synthetic oviduct fluids (SOFaa) culture system resulted in significantly lower fragmentation rates than when utilizing a Charles Rosenkrans 1 (CR1aa) culture system. Fragmented embryos typically exhibited irregular numbers of blastomeres with the majority of blastomeres devoid of chromatin. Factors such as fusion DC pulse, activation treatment and culture system led to higher fragmentation and also affected in vitro and in vivo embryo development. The SOFaa based culture system produced a higher number of quality NT embryos resulting in higher pregnancy rates and the birth of live lambs as compared to the CR1aa based system (P<0.05). We conclude that early embryo fragmentation in the ovine is caused by suboptimal cloning protocols, and NT embryo development is especially affected by the culture system used. PMID:21700405

  17. ENDF-102 DATA FORMATS AND PROCEDURES FOR THE EVALUATION NUCLEAR DATA FILE ENDF-6.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.

    2001-05-15

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) formats and libraries are decided by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), a cooperative effort of national laboratories, industry, and universities in the U.S. and Canada, and are maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). Earlier versions of the ENDF format provided representations for neutron cross sections and distributions, photon production from neutron reactions, a limited amount of charged-particle production from neutron reactions, photo-atomic interaction data, thermal neutron scattering data, and radionuclide production and decay data (including fission products). Version 6 (ENDF-6) allows higher incident energies, adds more complete descriptions of the distributions of emitted particles, and provides for incident charged particles and photonuclear data by partitioning the ENDF library into sub-libraries. Decay data, fission product yield data, thermal scattering data, and photo-atomic data have also been formally placed in sub-libraries. In addition, this rewrite represents an extensive update to the Version V manual.

  18. Analyzing astrophysical neutrino signals using realistic nuclear structure calculations and the convolution procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Convoluted differential and total cross sections of inelastic ν scattering on 128,130Te isotopes are computed from the original cross sections calculated previously using the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We adopt various spectral distributions for the neutrino energy spectra such as the common two-parameter Fermi-Dirac and power-law distributions appropriate to explore nuclear detector responses to supernova neutrino spectra. We also concentrate on the use of low-energy β-beam neutrinos, originating from boosted β--radioactive 6He ions, to decompose original supernova (anti)neutrino spectra that are subsequently employed to simulate total cross sections of the reactions 130Te(ν˜,ν˜')130Te*. The concrete nuclear regimes selected, 128,130Te, are contents of the multipurpose CUORE and COBRA rare event detectors. Our present investigation may provide useful information about the efficiency of the Te detector medium of the above experiments in their potential use in supernova neutrino searches.

  19. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: New Evidence Since the 2011 American Cardiology of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association Guideline.

    PubMed

    Fraiche, Ariane; Wang, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Since publication of the 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), more recent studies offer greater insights about this condition. With increased recognition of the role of sarcomere protein mutations and myocardial structural abnormalities in the pathophysiology of this disease, new evidence offers potential improvements for the management of patients with HCM. In this review of studies published since 2011, we highlight several studies that may impact diagnostic considerations, risk stratification, and treatment of symptoms in HCM. PMID:27294414

  20. Speeding up coeliac disease diagnosis in cardiological settings

    PubMed Central

    Chicco, Daniela; Taddio, Andrea; Sinagra, Gianfranc; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Ferrara, Fortunato; Moretti, Michele; Martelossi, Stefano; Di Toro, Nicola; Ventura, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Introduction High prevalence of coeliac disease (CD) has been reported among patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We evaluated the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of screening for CD by rapid test of anti-transglutaminase antibodies in the cardiology outpatients’ clinic. Material and methods We screened the blood samples of 104 patients with DCM, 44 of their first-degree relatives, 63 diseased controls and 101 healthy controls for the presence of anti-transglutaminase antibodies in a drop of whole blood using a rapid assay. This test was compared to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the anti-endomysium antibody test. Results Our rapid test was positive in three (2.9%) DCM patients, in one (2%) relative and in one (1%) healthy control. These subjects were positive at both control assays. Two DCM patients had iron-deficient anaemia. The healthy relative was asymptomatic, while the healthy control experienced extreme asthenia. The relative refused intestinal biopsy, while the others showed histological evidence of CD. During the gluten-free diet, the patient with the worst left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) underwent heart transplant, and LVEF values improved in the other two. Anaemia and tiredness resolved in all patients. Conclusion Early detection of CD in a cardiological setting allows prompt treatment with a gluten-free diet of gluten-dependent complaints with potential benefits for the course of DCM. PMID:22419932

  1. Simulation-based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy observed in congenital heart disease patients. While medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians currently have limited knowledge of important fluid mechanical parameters. Treatment decisions are therefore often made using anatomical information alone, despite the known links between fluid mechanics and disease progression. Patient-specific simulations now offer the means to provide this missing information, and, more importantly, to perform in-silico testing of new surgical designs at no risk to the patient. In this talk, we will outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We will then present new methodology for coupling optimization with simulation and uncertainty quantification to customize treatments for individual patients. Finally, we will present examples in pediatric cardiology that illustrate the potential impact of these tools in the clinical setting.

  2. Simulation based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, while medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians often have limited access to hemodynamic data that may be crucial to patient risk assessment and treatment planning. Computational simulations can now provide detailed hemodynamic data to augment clinical knowledge in both adult and pediatric applications. There is a particular need for simulation tools in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease patients, necessitating individualized treatment plans. Despite great strides in medical imaging, enabling extraction of flow information from magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, simulations offer predictive capabilities that imaging alone cannot provide. Patient specific simulations can be used for in silico testing of new surgical designs, treatment planning, device testing, and patient risk stratification. Furthermore, simulations can be performed at no direct risk to the patient. In this paper, we outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We then step through pressing challenges in the field, including multiscale modeling, boundary condition selection, optimization, and uncertainty quantification. Finally, we summarize simulation results of two representative examples from pediatric cardiology: single ventricle physiology, and coronary aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. These examples illustrate the potential impact of computational modeling tools in the clinical setting.

  3. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress Report from Munich 2012.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in Munich from the 26(th) to 29(th) of August 2012. The daily attendance ranged from 26,600 to 27,407 up to the 28(th) and several important issues were presented and discussed, including antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndrome (TRILOGY ACS), transcatheter aortic valve implantation, renal denervation, novel oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation (AFib), AFib ablation, the impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on cardiovascular disease, management of vasospastic angina, plaque rupture and erosion (ESC-JCS [Japanese Circulation Society] joint session), heart failure, and FFR-guided percutaneous coronary intervention outcome. Three ESC "GOLD MEDALS" were awarded, including one to Professor Ryozo Nagai, the first Asian to receive this award. The ESC meeting has become one of the most important for updating not only general cardiologists' education but also specialists' expertise. Japan topped the number of abstracts submitted to ESC 2012 (>1,200 abstracts), while the ESC would like to establish a strong collaboration with the Japanese Cardiology Society. Relations between ESC and JCS will become closer and more favorable year by year. PMID:23075818

  4. Optical fiber distributed temperature sensor in cardiological surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapa, Jan; Látal, Jan; Penhaker, Marek; Koudelka, Petr; Hancek, František; Vasinek, Vladimír

    2010-04-01

    In those days a lot of cardiological surgeries is made every day. It is a matter of very significant importance keeping the temperature of the hearth low during the surgery because it decides whether the cells of the muscle will die or not. The hearth is cooled by the ice placed around the hearth muscle during the surgery and cooling liquid is injected into the hearth also. In these days the temperature is measured only in some points of the hearth using sensors based on the pH measurements. This article describes new method for measurement of temperature of the hearth muscle during the cardiological surgery. We use a multimode optical fiber and distributed temperature sensor (DTS) based on the stimulated Raman scattering in temperature measurements. This principle allows us to measure the temperature and to determine where the temperature changes during the surgery. Resolution in the temperature is about 0.1 degrees of Celsius. Resolution in length is about 1 meter. The resolution in length implies that the fiber must be wound to ensure the spatial resolution about 5 by 5 centimeters.

  5. Simulation based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, while medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians often have limited access to hemodynamic data that may be crucial to patient risk assessment and treatment planning. Computational simulations can now provide detailed hemodynamic data to augment clinical knowledge in both adult and pediatric applications. There is a particular need for simulation tools in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease patients, necessitating individualized treatment plans. Despite great strides in medical imaging, enabling extraction of flow information from magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, simulations offer predictive capabilities that imaging alone cannot provide. Patient specific simulations can be used for in silico testing of new surgical designs, treatment planning, device testing, and patient risk stratification. Furthermore, simulations can be performed at no direct risk to the patient. In this paper, we outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We then step through pressing challenges in the field, including multiscale modeling, boundary condition selection, optimization, and uncertainty quantification. Finally, we summarize simulation results of two representative examples from pediatric cardiology: single ventricle physiology, and coronary aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. These examples illustrate the potential impact of computational modeling tools in the clinical setting. PMID:24255590

  6. Possible helio-geomagnetic activity influence on cardiological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Christos

    Eruptive solar events as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur during solar activ-ity periods. Energetic particles, fast solar wind plasma and electromagnetic radiation pass through interplanetary space, arrive on Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere and produce various disturbances. It is well known the negative influence of geomagnetic substorms on the human technological applications on geospace. During the last 25 years, many studies concerning the possible influence on the human health are published. Increase of the Acute Coronary Syn-dromes and disorders of the Cardiac Rhythm, increase of accidents as well as neurological and psychological disorders (e.g. increase of suicides) during or near to the geomagnetic storms time interval are reported. In this study, we research the problem in Greece, focusing on patients with Acute Myocardial Infraction, hospitalized in the 2nd Cardiological Department of the General Hospital of Nikaea (Piraeus City), for the time interval 1997-2007 (23rd solar cycle) and also to the arrival of emergency cardiological cases to Emergency Department of two greek hospitals, the General Hospital of Lamia City and the General Hospital of Veria City during the selected months, with or without helio-geomagnetic activity, of the 23rd solar cycle. Increase of cases is recorded during the periods with increase helio-geomagnetic activity. The necessity of continuing the research for a longer period and with a bigger sample is high; so as to exact more secure conclusions.

  7. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    SciTech Connect

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  8. [Diagnosis of thyroid diseases using imaging procedures with reference to nuclear magnetic resonance tomography].

    PubMed

    Held, P; Zilch, H G; Baumgartl, W; Maccio, A

    1986-01-01

    Results of MR imaging performed in 74 patients with diseases of the thyroid gland and in normal persons are compared with nuclear medicine (99mTc 04 and 131J scans) and sonography (5 and 7.5 MHz transducers, linear scans) results. The MR-signal intensity of hot nodules--Plummers' disease--is not specific. Therefore scintigraphy combined with sonography remain the methods of choice for the diagnosis of hyperfunctioning nodules. Morphologic alterations within the thyroid gland are detected by MRT as well as by ultrasound. But when lesions are not limited to the thyroid bed MRT will become the imaging examination of choice. Therefore MRT can be useful for scanning retrotracheal and superior mediastinal extent of thyroid lesions. Also clinically inapparent metastases to the cervical and mediastinal nodes may be detected. PMID:3554875

  9. [The QuIK-Registry of the German Society of Cardiologists in private practice: countrywide and benchmarking quality assurance in invasive cardiology].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, A; Levenson, B; Göhring, S; Haerer, W; Reifart, N; Ringwald, G; Troger, B

    2009-10-01

    QuIK is the German acronym for QUality Assurance in Invasive Cardiology. It describes the continuous project of an electronic data collection in Cardiac catheterization laboratories all over Germany. Mainly members of the German Society of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) participate in this computer based project. Since 1996 data of diagnostic and interventional procedures are collected and send to a registry-center where a regular benchmarking analysis of the results is performed. Part of the project is a yearly auditing process including an on-site visit to the cath lab to guarantee for the reliability of information collected. Since 1996 about one million procedures have been documented. PMID:19834845

  10. NUCLEAR MEDICINE PRACTICES IN THE 1950s THROUGH THE mid-1970s AND OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION DOSES TO TECHNOLOGISTS FROM DIAGNOSTIC RADIOISOTOPE PROCEDURES

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B.; Mettler, Fred A.; Beckner, William M.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Gross, Milton D.; Hays, Marguerite T.; Kirchner, Peter T.; Langan, James K.; Reba, Richard C.; Smith, Gary T.; Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Lee, Choonsik; Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Data on occupational radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures for the time period of the 1950s through the 1970s is important for retrospective health risk studies of medical personnel who conducted those activities. However, limited information is available on occupational exposure received by physicians and technologists who performed nuclear medicine procedures during those years. To better understand and characterize historical radiation exposures to technologists, we collected information on nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. To collect historical data needed to reconstruct doses to technologists, a focus group interview was held with experts who began using radioisotopes in medicine in the 1950s and the 1960s. Typical protocols and descriptions of clinical practices of diagnostic radioisotope procedures were defined by the focus group and were used to estimate occupational doses received by personnel, per nuclear medicine procedure, conducted in the 1950s-1960s using radiopharmaceuticals available at that time. The radionuclide activities in the organs of the reference patient were calculated using the biokinetic models described in ICRP Publication 53. Air kerma rates as a function of distance from a reference patient were calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using a hybrid computational phantom. Estimates of occupational doses to nuclear medicine technologists per procedure were found to vary from less than 0.01 μSv (thyroid scan with 1.85 MBq of administered 131I-iodide) to 0.4 μSv (brain scan with 26 MBq of 203Hg-chlormerodin). Occupational doses for the same diagnostic procedures starting in the mid-1960s but using 99mTc were also estimated. The doses estimated in this study show that the introduction of 99mTc resulted in an increase in occupational doses per procedure. PMID:25162420

  11. Nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s through the mid-1970s and occupational radiation doses to technologists from diagnostic radioisotope procedures.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Mettler, Fred A; Beckner, William M; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Kirchner, Peter T; Langan, James K; Reba, Richard C; Smith, Gary T; Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S; Melo, Dunstana R; Lee, Choonsik; Simon, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    Data on occupational radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures for the time period of the 1950s through the 1970s is important for retrospective health risk studies of medical personnel who conducted those activities. However, limited information is available on occupational exposure received by physicians and technologists who performed nuclear medicine procedures during those years. To better understand and characterize historical radiation exposures to technologists, the authors collected information on nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. To collect historical data needed to reconstruct doses to technologists, a focus group interview was held with experts who began using radioisotopes in medicine in the 1950s and the 1960s. Typical protocols and descriptions of clinical practices of diagnostic radioisotope procedures were defined by the focus group and were used to estimate occupational doses received by personnel, per nuclear medicine procedure, conducted in the 1950s to 1960s using radiopharmaceuticals available at that time. The radionuclide activities in the organs of the reference patient were calculated using the biokinetic models described in ICRP Publication 53. Air kerma rates as a function of distance from a reference patient were calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using a hybrid computational phantom. Estimates of occupational doses to nuclear medicine technologists per procedure were found to vary from less than 0.01 μSv (thyroid scan with 1.85 MBq of administered I-iodide) to 0.4 μSv (brain scan with 26 MBq of Hg-chlormerodin). Occupational doses for the same diagnostic procedures starting in the mid-1960s but using Tc were also estimated. The doses estimated in this study show that the introduction of Tc resulted in an increase in occupational doses per procedure. PMID:25162420

  12. Patient radiation doses in interventional cardiology in the U.S.: Advisory data sets and possible initial values for U.S. reference levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Donald L.; Hilohi, C. Michael; Spelic, David C.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To determine patient radiation doses from interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S and to suggest possible initial values for U.S. benchmarks for patient radiation dose from selected interventional cardiology procedures [fluoroscopically guided diagnostic cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)]. Methods: Patient radiation dose metrics were derived from analysis of data from the 2008 to 2009 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey of cardiac catheterization. This analysis used deidentified data and did not require review by an IRB. Data from 171 facilities in 30 states were analyzed. The distributions (percentiles) of radiation dose metrics were determined for diagnostic cardiac catheterizations, PCI, and combined diagnostic and PCI procedures. Confidence intervals for these dose distributions were determined using bootstrap resampling. Results: Percentile distributions (advisory data sets) and possible preliminary U.S. reference levels (based on the 75th percentile of the dose distributions) are provided for cumulative air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), cumulative air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), fluoroscopy time, and number of cine runs. Dose distributions are sufficiently detailed to permit dose audits as described in National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 168. Fluoroscopy times are consistent with those observed in European studies, but P{sub KA} is higher in the U.S. Conclusions: Sufficient data exist to suggest possible initial benchmarks for patient radiation dose for certain interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S. Our data suggest that patient radiation dose in these procedures is not optimized in U.S. practice.

  13. Durability of Class I American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Clinical Practice Guideline Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Mark D.; Goldstein, Jennifer N.; Cirullo, Michael A.; Schwartz, J. Sanford

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known regarding the durability of clinical practice guideline recommendations over time. OBJECTIVE To characterize variations in the durability of class I (“procedure/treatment should be performed/administered”) American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline recommendations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Textual analysis by 4 independent reviewers of 11 guidelines published between 1998 and 2007 and revised between 2006 and 2013. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We abstracted all class I recommendations from the first of the 2 most recent versions of each guideline and identified corresponding recommendations in the subsequent version. We classified recommendations replaced by less determinate or contrary recommendations as having been downgraded or reversed; we classified recommendations for which no corresponding item could be identified as having been omitted. We tested for differences in the durability of recommendations according to guideline topic and underlying level of evidence using bivariable hypothesis tests and conditional logistic regression. RESULTS Of 619 index recommendations, 495 (80.0%; 95%CI, 76.6%–83.1%) were retained in the subsequent guideline version, 57 (9.2%; 95%CI, 7.0%–11.8%) were downgraded or reversed, and 67 (10.8%; 95%CI, 8.4%–13.3%) were omitted. The percentage of recommendations retained varied across guidelines from 15.4%(95%CI, 1.9%–45.4%) to 94.1%(95%CI, 80.3%–99.3%; P < .001). Among recommendations with available information on level of evidence, 90.5%(95%CI, 83.2%–95.3%) of recommendations supported by multiple randomized studies were retained, vs 81.0% (95%CI, 74.8%–86.3%) of recommendations supported by 1 randomized trial or observational data and 73.7%(95% CI, 65.8%–80.5%) of recommendations supported by opinion (P = .001). After accounting for guideline-level factors, the probability of being downgraded, reversed, or omitted was greater for

  14. "Baby Heart Project": the Italian project for accreditation and quality management in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Sonia B; Zannini, Lucio V; Perri, Gianluigi; Crupi, Giancarlo; Turinetto, Bruno; Pongiglione, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    Optimization of the relationship between the supply and the demand for medical services should ideally be taken into consideration for the planning within each national Health System. Although government national health organizations embrace this policy specifically, the contribution of expert committees (under the scientific societies' guarantee in any specific medical field) should be advocated for their capability to collect and analyze the data reported by the various national institutions. In addition, these committees have the competence to analyze the need for the resources necessary to the operation of these centers. The field of pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery may represent a model of clinical governance of particular interest with regard to programming and to a definition of the quality standards that may be extended to highly specialized institutions and ideally to the entire Health System. The "Baby Heart Project," which represents a model of governance and clinical quality in the field of pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, was born from the spontaneous aggregation of a committee of experts, supported by duly appointed Italian Scientific Societies and guided by a national agency for accreditation. The ultimate aim is to standardize both procedures and results for future planning within the national Health System. PMID:24880465

  15. Tracking patient radiation exposure: challenges to integrating nuclear medicine with other modalities.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Mathew; Rehani, Madan M; Einstein, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    The cumulative radiation exposure to the patient from multiple radiological procedures can place some individuals at significantly increased risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. Approaches, such as those in the International Atomic Energy Agency's Smart Card program, have been developed to track cumulative radiation exposures to individuals. These strategies often rely on the availability of structured dose reports, typically found in the DICOM header. Dosimetry information is currently readily available for many individual x-ray-based procedures. Nuclear medicine, of which nuclear cardiology constitutes the majority of the radiation burden in the US, currently lags behind x-ray-based procedures with respect to reporting of radiation dosimetric information. This article discusses qualitative differences between nuclear medicine and x-ray-based procedures, including differences in the radiation source and measurement of its strength, the impact of biokinetics on dosimetry, and the capability of current scanners to record dosimetry information. These differences create challenges in applying, monitoring, and reporting strategies used in x-ray-based procedures to nuclear medicine, and integrating dosimetry information across modalities. A concerted effort by the medical imaging community, dosimetry specialists, and manufacturers of imaging equipment is required to develop strategies to improve the reporting of radiation dosimetry data in nuclear medicine. Some ideas on how to address this issue are suggested. PMID:22695788

  16. Exploiting expert systems in cardiology: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Economou, George-Peter K; Sourla, Efrosini; Stamatopoulou, Konstantina-Maria; Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Sioutas, Spyros; Tsakalidis, Athanasios; Tzimas, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    An improved Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) in the field of critical cardiovascular diseases is presented. The system stems from an earlier application based only on a Sugeno-type Fuzzy Expert System (FES) with the addition of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) computational structure. Thus, inherent characteristics of ANNs, along with the human-like knowledge representation of fuzzy systems are integrated. The ANFIS has been utilized into building five different sub-systems, distinctly covering Coronary Disease, Hypertension, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Failure, and Diabetes, hence aiding doctors of medicine (MDs), guide trainees, and encourage medical experts in their diagnoses centering a wide range of Cardiology. The Fuzzy Rules have been trimmed down and the ANNs have been optimized in order to focus into each particular disease and produce results ready-to-be applied to real-world patients. PMID:25417018

  17. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  18. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country. PMID:24960330

  19. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    PubMed

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313). PMID:27151567

  20. Function Allocation in Complex Socio-Technical Systems: Procedure usage in nuclear power and the Context Analysis Method for Identifying Design Solutions (CAMIDS) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Kara Anne

    This research aims to prove that strict adherence to procedures and rigid compliance to process in the US Nuclear Industry may not prevent incidents or increase safety. According to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, the nuclear power industry has seen a recent rise in events, and this research claims that a contributing factor to this rise is organizational, cultural, and based on peoples overreliance on procedures and policy. Understanding the proper balance of function allocation, automation and human decision-making is imperative to creating a nuclear power plant that is safe, efficient, and reliable. This research claims that new generations of operators are less engaged and thinking because they have been instructed to follow procedures to a fault. According to operators, they were once to know the plant and its interrelations, but organizationally more importance is now put on following procedure and policy. Literature reviews were performed, experts were questioned, and a model for context analysis was developed. The Context Analysis Method for Identifying Design Solutions (CAMIDS) Model was created, verified and validated through both peer review and application in real world scenarios in active nuclear power plant simulators. These experiments supported the claim that strict adherence and rigid compliance to procedures may not increase safety by studying the industry's propensity for following incorrect procedures, and when it directly affects the outcome of safety or security of the plant. The findings of this research indicate that the younger generations of operators rely highly on procedures, and the organizational pressures of required compliance to procedures may lead to incidents within the plant because operators feel pressured into following the rules and policy above performing the correct actions in a timely manner. The findings support computer based procedures, efficient alarm systems, and skill of the craft matrices. The solution to

  1. A rapid dissolution procedure to aid initial nuclear forensics investigations of chemically refractory compounds and particles prior to gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Britton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and effective preparative procedure has been evaluated for the accurate determination of low-energy (40-200 keV) gamma-emitting radionuclides ((210)Pb, (234)Th, (226)Ra, (235)U) in uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The measurement of low-energy gamma photons is complicated in heterogeneous samples containing high-density mineral phases and in such situations activity concentrations will be underestimated. This is because attenuation corrections, calculated based on sample mean density, do not properly correct where dense grains are dispersed within a less dense matrix (analogous to a nugget effect). The current method overcomes these problems using a lithium tetraborate fusion that readily dissolves all components including high-density, self-attenuating minerals/compounds. This is the ideal method for dissolving complex, non-volatile components in soils, rocks, mineral concentrates, and other materials where density reduction is required. Lithium borate fusion avoids the need for theoretical efficiency corrections or measurement of matrix matched calibration standards. The resulting homogeneous quenched glass produced can be quickly dissolved in nitric acid producing low-density solutions that can be counted by gamma spectrometry. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated using uranium-bearing Certified Reference Materials and provides accurate activity concentration determinations compared to the underestimated activity concentrations derived from direct measurements of a bulk sample. The procedure offers an effective solution for initial nuclear forensic studies where complex refractory minerals or matrices exist. It is also significantly faster, safer and simpler than alternative approaches. PMID:26572834

  2. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staffs during 18F-FDG PET/CT procedures at Ramathibodi Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmoon, T.; Chamroonrat, W.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the whole body and finger radiation doses per study received by nuclear medicine staff involved in dispensing, administration of 18F-FDG and interacting with radioactive patients during PET/CT imaging procedures in a PET/CT facility. The whole-body doses received by radiopharmacists, technologists and nurses were measured by electronic dosimeter and the finger doses by ring dosimeter during a period of 4 months. In 70 PET/CT studies, the mean whole-body dose per study to radiopharmacist, technologist, and nurse were 1.07±0.09, 1.77±0.46, μSv, and not detectable respectively. The mean finger doses per study received by radiopharmacist, technologist, and nurse were 265.65±107.55, 4.84±1.08 and 19.22±2.59 μSv, respectively. The average time in contact with 18F-FDG was 5.88±0.03, 39.06±1.89 and 1.21±0.02 minutes per study for radiopharmacist, technologist and nurse respectively. Technologists received highest mean effective whole- body dose per study and radiopharmacist received the highest finger dose per study. When compared with the ICRP dose limit, each individual worker can work with many more 18F- FDG PET/CT studies for a whole year without exceeding the occupational dose limits. This study confirmed that low levels of radiation does are received by our medical personnel involved in 18F-FDG PET/CT procedures.

  3. The foundation and launch of the Melbourne Interventional Group: a collaborative interventional cardiology project.

    PubMed

    Ajani, A E; Szto, G; Duffy, S J; Eccleston, D; Clark, D J; Lefkovits, J; Chew, D P; Warren, R; Black, A; New, G; Walton, A; Lew, R; Shaw, J; Horrigan, M; Sebastian, M; Yan, B P; Brennan, A; Meehan, A; Reid, C; Krum, H

    2006-02-01

    The Melbourne Interventional Group (MIG) is a voluntary collaborative venture of interventional cardiologists practicing at 12 major public and private hospitals in Victoria, designed to record data pertaining to percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and perform long-term follow-up. The potential advantages of collaboration involve large-scale analysis of current interventional strategies (e.g. drug-eluting stents, evaluation of new technologies and cost-effective analysis), provide a basis for multi-centred clinical trials and allow comparison of clinical outcomes with cardiac surgery. The established registry documents demographic, clinical and procedural characteristics of consecutive patients undergoing PCI and permits analysis of those characteristics at 30 days and 12 months. The registry is co-ordinated by the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE), a research body within the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Monash University, Melbourne). The eventual goal of MIG is to provide a contemporary appraisal of Australian interventional cardiology practice, with opportunities to improve in-hospital and long-term outcomes of patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:16473790

  4. 3D-Printing in Congenital Cardiology: From Flatland to Spaceland

    PubMed Central

    Deferm, Sébastien; Meyns, Bart; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Budts, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging has changed to a great extent over the past few decades. It has been revolutionized by three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques. Despite much of modern medicine relying on 3D imaging, which can be obtained accurately, we keep on being limited by visualization of the 3D content on two-dimensional flat screens. 3D-printing of graspable models could become a feasible technique to overcome this gap. Therefore, we printed pre- and postoperative 3D-models of a complex congenital heart defect. With this example, we intend to illustrate that these models hold value in preoperative planning, postoperative evaluation of a complex procedure, communication with the patient, and education of trainees. At this moment, 3D printing only leaves a small footprint, but makes already a big impression in the domain of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. Further studies including more patients and more validated applications are needed to streamline 3D printing in the clinical setting of daily practice. PMID:27195174

  5. 3D-Printing in Congenital Cardiology: From Flatland to Spaceland.

    PubMed

    Deferm, Sébastien; Meyns, Bart; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Budts, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging has changed to a great extent over the past few decades. It has been revolutionized by three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques. Despite much of modern medicine relying on 3D imaging, which can be obtained accurately, we keep on being limited by visualization of the 3D content on two-dimensional flat screens. 3D-printing of graspable models could become a feasible technique to overcome this gap. Therefore, we printed pre- and postoperative 3D-models of a complex congenital heart defect. With this example, we intend to illustrate that these models hold value in preoperative planning, postoperative evaluation of a complex procedure, communication with the patient, and education of trainees. At this moment, 3D printing only leaves a small footprint, but makes already a big impression in the domain of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. Further studies including more patients and more validated applications are needed to streamline 3D printing in the clinical setting of daily practice. PMID:27195174

  6. A set of patient and staff dose data for validation of Monte Carlo calculations in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M; Bartal, G; Canevaro, L; Lykawka, R; Melo, C

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a set of experimental values of patient and staff doses in a cardiac catheterisation laboratory using the range of radiographic and geometric parameters from routine clinical practice. The data obtained will be available for validation of Monte Carlo calculations and for training purposes. They will also help optimise radiation protection for patients and staff. Experimental measurements were made with an anthropomorphic phantom, and a monoplane flat detector-based X-ray system was used for interventional cardiology procedures. Standard operational protocols used in clinical practice were applied. Around 1000 patient dose and 5000 staff dose values were measured for different operational conditions (angulations, distances, collimation and wedge filter, magnification, phantom thicknesses, using Copper absorber, etc.). Uncertainties were also estimated. Increase factors of 3-10 for patients and staff doses were measured for the different C-arm angulations. PMID:25802462

  7. Dutch guidelines for interventional cardiology: institutional and operator competence and requirements for training

    PubMed Central

    Aengevaeren, W.R.M.; Laarman, G.J.; Suttorp, M.J.; ten Berg, J.M.; van Boven, A.J.; de Boer, M.J.; Piek, J.J.; van Ommen, G.V.A.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Smits, P.; Deckers, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional cardiology is an expanding field within cardiovascular medicine and today it is generally accepted that cardiologists require specific training, knowledge and skills. Hospitals where coronary interventions are performed must be properly equipped and able to provide specialised care. Percutaneous coronary interventions are frequently used for coronary revascularisation. The public should have confidence in the uniformity of high quality care. Therefore, such quality of care should be maintained by certification of the individual operators, general guidelines for institutional requirements and formal audits. The Netherlands Society of Cardiology (NVVC) will be implementing a new registration system for cardiologists with a subspecialisation that will include registration for interventional cardiology. The NVVC asked the Working Group of Interventional Cardiology (WIC) to update the 1994 Dutch guidelines on operator and institutional competence, and requirements for training in interventional cardiology in order to incorporate them into the official directives. The present guidelines represent the expert opinion of the Dutch interventional cardiology community and are in accordance with international regulations. After two rounds of discussion, the NVVC approved the guidelines in November 2004 during the autumn meeting. PMID:25696433

  8. An update on radiation absorbed dose to patients from diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in Tehran: A study on four academic centers

    PubMed Central

    Motazedian, Motahareh; Tabeie, F; Vatankhah, P; Shafiei, B; Amoui, M; Atefi, M; Ansari, M; Asli, I Neshandar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures is one of the main sources of radiation exposure. We performed this study with respect to the rapid growth in nuclear medicine in Iran and lack of updated statistics. Materials and Methods: The data were obtained for all active Nuclear Medicine Centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences during 2009 and 2010. Results: The most frequently performed procedures were bone (30.16%), cardiac (28.96%), renal (17.97%), and thyroid (7.93%) scans. There was a significant decrease in the number of thyroid scintigraphies with 131I and 99mTc-sulfur colloid liver/spleen scans and tremendous increase in the frequencies of cardiac and bone scintigraphies compared to one decade ago. Conclusion: Compared to previous studies, there were striking changes in trends of diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in Tehran. This field is still evolving in the country, and this trend will further change with the introduction of positron emission tomography scanners in future. PMID:27095860

  9. Update: Innovation in cardiology (II). Telecardiology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jacob Thorsted; Clemmensen, Peter; Sejersten, Maria

    2013-03-01

    Technological advances over the past decades have allowed improved diagnosis and monitoring of patients with acute coronary syndromes as well as patients with advanced heart failure. High-quality digital recordings transmitted wirelessly by cellular telephone networks have augmented the prehospital use of transportable electrocardiogram machines as well as implantable devices for arrhythmia monitoring and therapy. The impact of prehospital electrocardiogram recording and interpretation in patients suspected of acute myocardial infarction should not be underestimated. It enables a more widespread access to rapid reperfusion therapy, thereby reducing treatment delay, morbidity and mortality. Further, continuous electrocardiogram monitoring has improved arrhythmia diagnosis and dynamic ST-segment changes have been shown to provide important prognostic information in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Likewise, remote recording or monitoring of arrhythmias and vital signs seem to improve outcome and reduce the necessity of re-admissions or outpatient contacts in patients with heart failure or arrhythmias. In the future telemonitoring and diagnosis is expected to further impact the way we practice cardiology and provide better care for the patient with cardiovascular disease. PMID:24775456

  10. Milestones in pediatric cardiology: making possible the impossible.

    PubMed

    Mormile, Raffaella; Quadrini, Ilaria; Squarcia, Umberto

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric Cardiology as a discipline has been proposed to have been born on August 26, 1938, when Robert Gross at the age of 33 years, successfully ligated a patent ductus arteriosus of a 7 years girl at the Children's Hospital in Boston. In November 1944, Helen Taussig convinced Alfred Blalock to anastomose the left subclavian artery to the left pulmonary artery after Robert Gross had declined to cooperate with her. About the 1950s, at the University of Minneapolis, Clarence Walton Lillehei worked on a controlled "crossed circulation" in which the cardiopulmonary bypass machine was another human, generally one of the patient's parents. In 1966 Williams Rashkind introduced ballon septostomy as a palliative approach to complete transposition of the Great Arteries, followed later by Jean Kan's balloon valvuloplasty to open the pulmonary valve. During the 1960s Giancarlo Rastelli developed a new classification of the Atrio Ventricular Canal defect which allowed to have a strikingly better surgical results. Today, even the hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), at one time a fatal condition, is operable. The completion of the Human Genome Project has been an enormous help in the understanding the genetic causes of cardiac anomalies. However, there are very few approved application for stem cells, and stem cells will not likely replace organ transplantation any time soon. Recently, the protein survivin has been described as a novel player in cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. The science needs to be made with love to warrant the humanity of Research. PMID:23280521

  11. Epidemiological studies of CHD and the evolution of preventive cardiology.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nathan D

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) cause nearly one-third of all deaths worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for the greatest proportion of CVDs, and risk factors such as hypertension, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus or elevated glucose level, elevated cholesterol levels, and obesity or being overweight are the top six causes of death globally. Ecological and population-based longitudinal studies, conducted globally or within individual countries, have established the role of traditional and novel risk factors and measures of subclinical disease in the prediction of CHD. Risk assessment with short-term or long-term risk prediction algorithms can help to identify individuals who would benefit most from risk-factor interventions. Evaluation of novel risk factors and screening for subclinical atherosclerosis can also help to identify individuals at highest cardiovascular risk. Prevention of CHD focuses on identifying and managing risk factors at both the population and individual levels through primordial, primary, and secondary prevention. Epidemiological studies have provided the hypotheses for subsequent clinical trials that have documented the efficacy of risk-factor interventions, which are the basis of preventive cardiology. Future research efforts will determine the screening and intervention strategies that have the greatest effect on CHD prevention. PMID:24663092

  12. [About the origin, evolution and irradiation of Mexican cardiology].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican cardioangiology started in the nineteen century thanks to first endeavors of surgeons and physicians related to local academies and to School of Medicine, established in 1833 by Dr. Valentin Gómez Farías. Dr. Manuel Carpio, the future first head of department of physiology in this school, translated to Spanish language and published, in 1823, the article On pectoriloquo of the French physician Marat and later performed some experiments on the heart' motion. During the Secont Empire (1864-1867), the physician Samuel von Basch performed studies to define the arterial hypertension, called by him "latent atherosclerosis", i.e. the "essential hypertension". Once he had returned to his country, he invented in 1880, a sphygmomanometer of mercury column, that was the model for the instrument constructed by the Italian physician Scipione Riva-Rocci and presented in 1896. In our time, Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares systematized a metabolic therapy called "polarizing therapy", i.e. capable of repolarizing the heart's cells partly depolarized due to hypoxia or direct aggressions. These were the first steps in Mexico on the way to a promising medicine starting and the great adventure of Mexican cardiology. PMID:25260577

  13. I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for Americium-240 II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: Plutonium-242(Calcium-48,5n)(285)114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Paul Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Part I discusses the study of a new nuclear reaction and chemical separation procedure for the production of 240Am. Thin 242Pu, natTi, and natNi targets were coincidently activated with protons from the 88-Inch Cyclotron, producing 240Am, 48V, and 57Ni, respectively. The radioactive decay of these isotopes was monitored using high-purity Ge gamma ray detectors in the weeks following irradiation. The excitation function for the 242 Pu(p, 3n)240Am nuclear reaction was measured to be lower than theoretical predictions, but high enough to be the most viable nuclear reaction for the large-scale production of 240 Am. Details of the development of a chemical separation procedure for isolating 240Am from proton-irradiated 242Pu are discussed. The separation procedure, which includes two anion exchange columns and two extraction chromatography columns, was experimentally investi- gated using tracer-level 241Am, 239Pu, and model proton-induced fission products 95Zr, 95Nb, 125Sb, and 152Eu. The separation procedure was shown to have an Am/Pu separation factor of >2x10 7 and an Am yield of ˜70%. The separation procedure was found to purify the Am sample from >99.9% of Eu, Zr, Nb, and Sb. The procedure is well suited for the processing of ˜1 gram of proton-irradiated 242Pu to produce a neutron-induced fission target consisting of tens of nanograms of 240Am. Part II describes the use of the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron for the study of the 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285114 nuclear re- action. The new, neutron-deficient, superheavy element isotope 285114 was produced in 48Ca irradiations of 242Pu targets at a center-of-target beam energy of 256 MeV ( E* = 50 MeV). The alpha decay of 285114 was followed by the sequential alpha decay of four daughter nuclides, 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, and 269 Sg. 265Rf was observed to decay by spontaneous fission. The measured alpha-decay Q-values were compared with those from a macroscopic

  14. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf . PMID:26290421

  15. A review on the Avicenna's contribution to the field of cardiology.

    PubMed

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-03-01

    The cardiology and field of cardiovascular approaches are often mentioned as of the earliest concerns throughout the history of mankind civilization. During the golden ages of Islamic era, 9th to 12th centuries A.D., medical knowledge from various fields including cardiology was flourished by prominent Persian physicians and scholars. Among those outstanding physicians and scientists of the Islamic golden era, Avicenna is known as a famous and pioneer character. To outline the cardiovascular knowledge and contribution of Avicenna, current review compiled all his evidence-based concepts of cardiovascular findings from current medical literatures as well as those mentioned in his important medical encyclopedia, the Canon of Medicine. In this review, Avicenna's findings on cardiovascular anatomy such as his description of Willis circle, capillary circulation and arterial and ventricular contractions in the cardiovascular system have been mentioned. Also, his books and manuscripts on cardiology as well as findings and theories on cardiovascular and allied diseases were discussed. These findings are included in his descriptions on cardiac tamponade, stroke, palpitation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, association of the cardiovascular complications with erection and ejaculation, interaction between the heart and emotions as well as some of his mentioned drugs for cardiological disorders and the early concepts of drug targeting. These results can show Avicenna's great contribution to improve the sciences of cardiology in early medieval era. PMID:25577770

  16. Role Of The Bureau Of Radiological Health In Assessment Of Risks From Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.; Athey, T. W.; Phillips, Robert A.

    1982-12-01

    The 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act provide for the classification of a medical device intended for human use into one of three regulatory classes based on the extent of control necessary to ensure safety and effectiveness: Class I, General Controls; Class II, Performance Standards; Class III, Premarket Approval. Class III devices are those for which there is insufficient information available to ensure safety and effectiveness through General Controls and Performance Standards alone. New devices such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems fall under Class III because they were developed after the date of the law's enactment (28 May 1976). Investigational studies involving human subjects undertaken to develop safety and effectiveness data for a post-enactment Class III device come under the Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Regulation (21 CFR 812). This regulation distinguishes between investigations of devices that pose a significant risk to the human subject and those that do not. A significant risk investigation "presents a potential for serious risk to the health, safety, or welfare of a subject." Procedures for obtaining an IDE differ if the device does or does not pose a significant risk. The sponsor of a clinical trial, and ultimately the Institutional Review Board (IRB), have the primary responsibility to determine whether a certain clinical use of the investigational device represents a significant risk to the subject of the investigation. A finding of significant risk does not mean that a device is too hazardous for clinical studies, but it does mean that a formal application for an IDE must be made to and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before a clinical trial can begin. If the device is deemed not to pose a significant risk, unless otherwise notified by FDA, the sponsor is not required to submit an IDE application to FDA. Instead, the sponsor and investigators must satisfy only

  17. Patient-centered imaging: shared decision making for cardiac imaging procedures with exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Berman, Daniel S; Min, James K; Hendel, Robert C; Gerber, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cullom, S James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal W; Dorbala, Sharmila; Fazel, Reza; Garcia, Ernest V; Gibbons, Raymond J; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R; Raff, Gilbert L; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A; Shaw, Leslee J

    2014-04-22

    The current paper details the recommendations arising from an NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium held in November 2012, aiming to identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Symposium participants, working in 3 tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. The use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3 mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written informed consent. However, a protocol effective dose >20 mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:24530677

  18. HEARTVIEW-A Knowledge Base to Support Clinical Research in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Beatriz de F.; Timmers, Teun; van der Lei, Johan; van Mulligen, Erik M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents HEARTVIEW - a knowledge base (KB) that offers aid for clinical research in cardiology. This KB is an essential component of the medical workstation MW2000, now under development at the department of Medical Informatics at the Erasmus University. HEARTVIEW integrates different types of knowledge: a conceptual model of the medical record in cardiology and knowledge on how to perform data analysis, according to the cardiological sub-domain. The design of HEARTVIEW is based on the assumption of a general structure in the medical record. The KB can be consulted by other modules in the MW2000 and by users through a medically-oriented graphical interface. The prototype is implemented on a Xerox 1100-series workstation. After evaluation, it will be transferred to the Unix environment, where the MW2000 is under development [1,2].

  19. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart failure ... Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  20. A report from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 (August 30-September 3 - Barcelona, Spain).

    PubMed

    Dulsat, C

    2014-09-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Annual Congress is the largest cardiology conference in the world and this year ran in Barcelona from August 30 to September 3. During the meeting, more than 30,000 cardiologists from over 100 countries met to share their knowledge in all cardiovascular fields, from basic science to management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Apart from more than 4,500 interesting abstracts presented in posters and oral sessions, five new ESC Clinical Practice Guidelines were presented among the latest clinical trial results, updates and registries. PMID:25313372

  1. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2015, San Diego.

    PubMed

    Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The 64th Annual Scientific Sessions and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 14-16, 2015. The ACC Scientific Sessions are 1 of 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the United States, with nearly 20,000 attendees, including 15,000 cardiovascular professionals. There were over 2,100 oral and poster abstracts, and more than 15 late-breaking clinical trials (LBCTs) abstructs. This report presents the highlights and several key presentations, especially the LBCTs, from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2015. I hope this review will help cardiologists update to the latest information. PMID:25959559

  2. Radiation exposure benefit of a lead cap in invasive cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Kuon, E; Birkel, J; Schmitt, M; Dahm, J B

    2003-01-01

    Background: Occupational head exposure to radiation in cardiologists may cause radiation induced cataracts and an increased risk of brain cancer. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of 0.5 mm lead equivalent caps, not previously used in invasive cardiology, in comparison with a 1.0 mm lead equivalent ceiling mounted lead glass screen. Design: An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom was used to represent the patient. Scatter entrance skin air kerma to the operator position (S-ESAK-O) was measured during fluoroscopy for all standard angulations and the S-ESAK-O per dose–area product (DAP) calculated, as applied to the phantom. Results: Measured mean (SD) left/right anterior oblique angulation ratios of S-ESAK-O without lead devices were 23.1 (10.1), and varied as a function of tube angulation, body height, and angle of incidence. S-ESAK-O/DAP decreased with incremental operator body height by 10 (3)% per 10 cm. A 1.0 mm lead glass shield reduced mean S-ESAK-O/DAP originating from coronary angiography from 1089 (764) to 54 (29) nSv/Gy × cm2. A 0.5 mm lead cap was effective in lowering measured levels to 1.8 (1.1) nSv/Gy × cm2. Both devices together enabled attenuation to 0.5 (0.1) nSv/Gy × cm2. The most advantageous line of vision for protection of the operator’s eyes was ⩾ 60° rightward. Conclusions: Use of 0.5 mm lead caps proved highly effective, attenuating S-ESAK-O to 2.7 (2.0) × 10−3 of baseline, and to 1.2 (1.4) × 10−3 of baseline where there was an additional 1.0 mm lead glass shield. These results could vary according to the x ray systems used, catheterisation protocols, and correct use of radiation protection devices. PMID:12975420

  3. The Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section: increasing the opportunities for the congenital heart disease community within the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gerard R; Mitchell, Stephanie; Beekman, Robert H; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Jenkins, Kathy J; Landzberg, Michael; Webb, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (AC/PC) Section was established to develop a clear voice within the American College of Cardiology and address the myriad issues facing the congenital heart disease profession. The Section is governed by the AC/PC Council, which includes pediatric cardiologists, adult congenital cardiologists, a cardiac care associate, and a fellow-in-training member. The Council is responsible for bidirectional communication between the College's Board of Trustees and the AC/PC Section members. Since its founding in 2004, Section objectives have been defined by the College's mission: to advocate for quality cardiovascular care through education, research promotion, and the development and application of standards and guidelines and to influence health care policy. The pillars of the College-advocacy, quality, education, and member engagement-serve as the defining template for the Section's strategy. The Section has developed work groups in advocacy, clinical practice, education and training, quality, and publications. A separate leadership group has been developed for adult congenital heart disease. Work groups are open to all Section members. Recognition of the importance of lifelong care in congenital heart disease led Section leaders to incorporate pediatric cardiology and adult congenital heart disease content into each of the work groups. There are more than 1,200 Section members, with nearly 400 members actively contributing to Section activities. This article outlines Section efforts to date and highlights significant successes to date. PMID:22192673

  4. Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Entine, G.

    1985-05-07

    Uses of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear detectors in medicine are briefly described. They include surgical probes and a system for measuring cerebral blood flow in the intensive care unit. Other uses include nuclear dentistry, x-ray exposure control, cardiology, diabetes, and the testing of new pharmaceuticals. (ACR)

  5. Test of a Cardiology Patient Simulator with Students in Fourth-Year Electives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewy, Gordon A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Students at five medical schools participated in an evaluation of a cardiology patient simulator (CPS), a life-size mannequin capable of simulating a wide variety of cardiovascular conditions. The CPS enhances learning both the knowledge and the skills necessary to perform a bedside cardiovascular evaluation. (Author/MLW)

  6. Use of a reusable shielded marker to enhance the accuracy, safety, and efficacy of nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Hayes, M; Altes, T; Teates, C D; Parekh, J

    2000-05-01

    Three cases illustrate the use of a reusable, shielded marker to identify anatomic structures and mark pathologic lesions. No other nuclear medicine marker is available with a shutter mechanism designed to interrupt radiation, thus protecting the patient and technologist from unnecessary radiation and minimizing image artifacts. PMID:10795694

  7. ENDF-102 data formats and procedures for the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF-6. Revision November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Dunford, C.L.; Rose, P.F.

    1995-11-01

    The ENDF formats and libraries are decided by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), a cooperative effort of national laboratories, industry, and universities in the US and Canada, and are maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). Earlier versions of the ENDF format provided representations for neutron cross sections and distributions, photon production from neutron reactions, a limited amount of charged-particle production from neutron reactions, photo-atomic interaction data, thermal neutron scattering data, and radionuclide production and decay data (including fission products). Version 6 (ENDF-6) allows higher incident energies, adds more complete descriptions of the distributions of emitted particles, and provides for incident charged particles and photo-nuclear data by partitioning the ENDF library into sublibraries. Decay data, fission product yield data, thermal scattering data, and photo-atomic data have also been formally placed in sublibraries. In addition, this rewrite represents an extensive update to the Version V manual.

  8. The Next Step in Deployment of Computer Based Procedures For Field Workers: Insights And Results From Field Evaluations at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya L.; Bly, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human operator interacts with the procedures. One way to achieve these improvements is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping, correct component verification, etc.), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the operator down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the operator’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. The research team at the Idaho National Laboratory has developed a prototype CBP system for field workers, which has been evaluated from a human factors and usability perspective in four laboratory studies. Based on the results from each study revisions were made to the CBP system. However, a crucial step to get the end users' (e.g., auxiliary operators, maintenance technicians, etc.) acceptance is to put the system in their hands and let them use it as a part of their everyday work activities. In the spring 2014 the first field evaluation of the INL CBP system was conducted at a nuclear power plant. Auxiliary operators conduct a functional test of one out of three backup air compressors each week. During the field evaluation activity, one auxiliary operator conducted the test with the paper-based procedure while a second auxiliary operator followed

  9. Gallocyanin chromalum as a nuclear stain in cytology. I. A cytophotometric comparison of the Husain-Watts Gallocyanin chromalum staining protocol with the Feulgen procedure.

    PubMed

    Schulte, E K; Lyon, H; Prento, P

    1991-05-01

    In the present study, the staining characteristics of the Gallocyanin chromalum technique devised by Husain and Watts are compared with the Feulgen reaction. Liver imprints, blood smears, and cervical smears were fixed in ethanol and stained with either the Husain and Watts Gallocyanin chromalum reagent or the Feulgen-Schiff reagent. The slides were then post-treated with 70% ethanol-HCl pH 1.0, or with phosphotungstic acid for 0.5-30 min. The integrated optical density of cell nuclei was measured with a VIDAS image analyzer. In the material stained with the Husain and Watts procedure, some Gallocyanin chromalum was removed from the nuclei in the early phase (5 min) of all the post-treatment steps, followed by a plateau phase where the integrated optical density remained constant for 30 min. In this phase, the nuclear absorbance was highly reproducible and of the same size regardless of the post-treatment. Both the Husain and Watts procedure and the Feulgen-reaction gave quantitative staining of DNA. The Gallocyanin chromalum stain after Husain and Watts is a quick staining procedure for quantitative evaluation of DNA in cytological material. Proper rinsing of the slides is necessary for a good reproducibility of results. PMID:1723725

  10. The history of the German Cardiac Society and the American College of Cardiology and their two founders.

    PubMed

    Lüderitz, Berndt; Holmes, David R; Harold, John

    2013-02-26

    The German Cardiac Society is the oldest national cardiac society in Europe, founded on June 3, 1927, in Bad Nauheim by Dr. Bruno Kisch and Professor Arthur Weber. They were actively supported by Dr. Franz Groedel, who together with Kisch became co-founders of the American College of Cardiology in 1949. Both Groedel and Kisch would be proud to see the fulfillment of their visions and dreams, which was commemorated at the joint session of the two societies held during the 78th annual meeting of the German Cardiac Society in Mannheim, Germany. "It is ironic that their dreadful years in Germany and their loss to German Cardiology helped to contribute to advances in American and international Cardiology," said Dr. Simon Dack, American College of Cardiology president in 1956 and 1957. The legacy of Groedel might be reflected by his own words: "We will meet the future not merely by dreams but by concerned action and inextinguishable enthusiasm". PMID:23428213