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Sample records for nuclear hot cell

  1. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hot cell services. 952.225-70 Section 952.225-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  2. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hot cell services. 952.225-70 Section 952.225-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  3. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hot cell services. 952.225-70 Section 952.225-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  4. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting for nuclear....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  5. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. >

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Subcontracting for nuclear... Clauses 952.225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.> As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  6. Hot cell remote nuclear scanning of tank core samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Blewett, G.R.; Troyer, G.L.; Keele, B.D.; Addleman, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    A Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-designed remote measurement system has been constructed for gamma and beta isotopic characterization of Hanford Site high-level waste tank core sample materials in a hot cell. A small, collimated, planar CdZnTe detector is used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Spectral resolution of 2% full-width-at-maximum at 662 kiloelectronvolts (keV) has been obtained remotely using risetime compensation and limited pulse shape discrimination (PSD). Isotopic measurement of high-energy beta emitters was accomplished with a ruggedly made, deeply depleted, surface barrier silicon detector. The primary function of the remote nuclear screening system is to provide a fast, qualitative stratigraphic assessment (with isotopic information) of high-level radioactive material. Both gamma spectroscopy and beta measurements have been performed on actual core segments. Differences in radionuclide content, which correspond with color or texture variations, have been seen in constant cross section core samples, although for many samples the activity variation can be ascribed to geometry and/or mass factors. Discussion of the design, implementation, results and potential benefits will be presented.

  7. Reliable Wireless Data Acquisition and Control Techniques within Nuclear Hot Cell Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.L.; Tulenko, J.

    2000-09-20

    On this NEER project the University of Florida has investigated and applied advanced communications techniques to address data acquisition and control problems within the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho Falls. The goals of this project have been to investigate and apply wireless communications techniques to solve the problem of communicating with and controlling equipment and systems within a nuclear hot cell facility with its attendant high radiation levels. Different wireless techniques, including radio frequency, infrared and power line communications were reviewed. For each technique, the challenges of radiation-hardened implementation were addressed. In addition, it has been a project goal to achieve the highest level of system reliability to ensure safe nuclear operations. Achievement of these goals would allow the eventual elimination of through-the-wall, hardwired cabling that is currently employed in the hot cell, along wit h all of the attendant problems that limit measurement mobility and flexibility.

  8. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Rodriquez

    2009-03-01

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the “Nuclear Renaissance”. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very

  9. Hot cell examination table

    DOEpatents

    Gaal, Peter S.; Ebejer, Lino P.; Kareis, James H.; Schlegel, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A table for use in a hot cell or similar controlled environment for use in examining specimens. The table has a movable table top that can be moved relative to a table frame. A shaft is fixedly mounted to the frame for axial rotation. A shaft traveler having a plurality of tilted rollers biased against the shaft is connected to the table top such that rotation of the shaft causes the shaft traveler to roll along the shaft. An electromagnetic drive is connected to the shaft and the frame for controllably rotating the shaft.

  10. A hot-cell titration system

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.

    1988-07-01

    Operation of nuclear fuel reprocessing plant requires an analytical support laboratory capable of meeting the process control, product quality, and nuclear safeguard requirements. Because of the radioactivity accompanying many of the samples, the analytical instruments must be selected, modified, or specifically developed for use in hot cells. Titrimetric procedures have been successfully used in hot cells and are generally immune to radiation induced bias. This report describes a titration system designed for operation in a hot-cell environment. The potentiometric titration system has operated successfully for four years in support of nuclear fuel reprocessing research and development activities. Details of the hardware, electronic, and software control and data analysis systems are presented. Interchangeable burets with a capacity of 5, 10, and 25 mL are available; the means of the absolute error in delivered volume for these burets are 0.9, 1.1, and 1.8 ..mu..L, respectively. Results of evaluation studies how that the accuracy and precision of analysis results obtained with the potentiometric system are limited by statistical uncertainties associated with the standard titrant, sample preparation procedure, and the equilibrium constant of the titration reaction and not by titrator performance factors. The system is also capable of performing amperometric titrations. Changing between the potentiometric and amperometric modes of operation involves changing the in-cell transducers, the in-cell electronics, and the titrator control program. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  12. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  13. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan; Rahman, Anwar Abdul; Hamzah, Mohd Arif; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  14. Hot electron plasmon-protected solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Rose, A H; Yang, C; Wu, X; Merlo, J M; Burns, M J; Naughton, M J; Kempa, K

    2015-09-21

    A solar cell based on a hot electron plasmon protection effect is proposed and made plausible by simulations, non-local modeling of the response, and quantum mechanical calculations. In this cell, a thin-film, plasmonic metamaterial structure acts as both an efficient photon absorber in the visible frequency range and a plasmonic resonator in the IR range, the latter of which absorbs and protects against phonon emission the free energy of the hot electrons in an adjacent semiconductor junction. We show that in this structure, electron-plasmon scattering is much more efficient than electron-phonon scattering in cooling-off hot electrons, and the plasmon-stored energy is recoverable as an additional cell voltage. The proposed structure could become a prototype of a new generation of high efficiency solar cells. PMID:26406739

  15. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS IN OPEN POSITION. DOOR SLIDES SHUT WITH HELP OF MANUALLY OPERATED CHAIN. STAIRWAY TO MEZZANINE IN VIEW AT LEFT. CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9000. Unknown Photographer, 10/28/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN633) interior under construction. Hot cells ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN-633) interior under construction. Hot cells and their doors are along concrete wall. Note side wall of pumice block. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: October 28, 1957. INEEL negative no. 57-5335 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF HOT CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF HOT CELL NO. 2 FROM STAIRWAY ALONG NORTH WALL. OBSERVATION WINDOW ALONG WEST SIDE BENEATH "CELL 2" SIGN. DOORWAY IN LEFT OF VIEW LEADS TO CELL 1 WORK AREA OR TO EXIT OUTDOORS TO NORTH. RADIATION DETECTION MONITOR TO RIGHT OF DOOR. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  19. WESF hot cells waste minimization criteria hot cells window seals evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Walterskirchen, K.M.

    1997-03-31

    WESF will decouple from B Plant in the near future. WESF is attempting to minimize the contaminated solid waste in their hot cells and utilize B Plant to receive the waste before decoupling. WESF wishes to determine the minimum amount of contaminated waste that must be removed in order to allow minimum maintenance of the hot cells when they are placed in ''laid-up'' configuration. The remaining waste should not cause unacceptable window seal deterioration for the remaining life of the hot cells. This report investigates and analyzes the seal conditions and hot cell history and concludes that WESF should remove existing point sources, replace cerium window seals in F-Cell and refurbish all leaded windows (except for A-Cell). Work should be accomplished as soon as possible and at least within the next three years.

  20. 1. View of rmad from jr. hot cell, facing north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of r-mad from jr. hot cell, facing north - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE FIRST BUILT) IN LABORATORY 101. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS ARE ON LEFT (NORTH) SIDE. OBSERVATION WINDOW IS AT LEFT OF VIEW (ON WEST SIDE). PLASTIC COVERS SHROUD MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATORS AT WINDOWS IN LEFT OF VIEW. NOTE MINERAL OIL RESERVOIR ABOVE "CELL 1" SIGN, INDICATING LEVEL OF THE FLUID INSIDE THE THICK WINDOWS. HOT CELL HAS BEVELED CORNER BECAUSE A SQUARED CORNER WOULD HAVE SUPPLIED UNNECESSARY SHIELDING. NOTE PUMICE BLOCK WALL AT LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  3. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. 2 SHOWS MANIPULATION INSTRUMENTS AND SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS. PENETRATIONS FOR OPERATING INSTRUMENTS GO THROUGH SHIELDING ABOVE WINDOWS. CONDUIT FOR UTILITIES AND CONTROLS IS BEHIND METAL CABINET BELOW WINDOWS NEAR FLOOR. CAMERA FACES WEST. WARNING SIGN LIMITS FISSILE MATERIAL TO SPECIFIED NUMBER OF GRAMS OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF HOT CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF HOT CELL BUILDING, IN VIEW AT LEFT, AS YET WITHOUT ROOF. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING LIES BETWEEN IT AND THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE MTR BUILDING AND ITS WING. NOTE CONCRETE DRIVE BETWEEN ROLL-UP DOOR IN MTR BUILDING AND CHARGING FACE OF PLUG STORAGE. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING (TRA-635) WILL COVER THIS DRIVE AND BUTT UP TO CHARGING FACE. DOTTED LINE IS ON ORIGINAL NEGATIVE. TRA PARKING LOT IN LEFT CORNER OF THE VIEW. CAMERA FACING NORTHWESTERLY. INL NEGATIVE NO. 8274. Unknown Photographer, 7/2/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, L.K.S.

    1990-09-18

    This patent describes an improvement in a pressurized water nuclear reactor system having a reactor pressure vessel, at least one steam generator, a hot leg conduit for charging of hot fluid from the reactor pressure vessel to the steam generator, and at least one cold leg conduit for return of cool fluid from the steam generator back to the reactor pressure vessel. The improvement comprises a residual heat removal device wherein: the hot leg has an inside diameter D{sub 1}; a first section of residual heat removal conduit is provided, having an inside diameter D{sub 2}, a first end for receipt of fluid from the hot leg, and a second end; a second section of residual heat removal conduit is provided connected to the reactor pressure vessel; a pump interconnects the second end of the first section of residual heat removal conduit with the second section of residual heat removal conduit; and a step nozzle of an inside diameter D{sub 3} and a length L interconnects the hot leg to the first end of the first section of residual heat removal conduit, with D{sub 3}/D{sub 1} {ge} 0.55, with D{sub 3}/D{sub 2}1.9 and L/D{sub 3} {ge} 1.44.

  6. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  7. Equation of state for {beta}-stable hot nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Panos, C. P.

    2009-04-15

    We provide an equation of state for hot nuclear matter in {beta} equilibrium by applying a momentum-dependent effective interaction. We focus on the study of the equation of state of high-density and high-temperature nuclear matter, containing leptons (electrons and muons) under the chemical equilibrium condition in which neutrinos have left the system. The conditions of charge neutrality and equilibrium under the {beta}-decay process lead first to the evaluation of proton and lepton fractions and then to the evaluation of internal energy, free energy, and pressure, and in total to the equation of state of hot nuclear matter. Thermal effects on the properties and equation of state of nuclear matter are assessed and analyzed in the framework of the proposed effective interaction model. Special attention is given to the study of the contribution of the components of {beta}-stable nuclear matter to the entropy per particle, a quantity of great interest in the study of structure and collapse of supernova.

  8. Verification survey of buildings 200 hot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sholeen, C.M.

    1996-03-01

    At the start of this D&D project, the decontamination goals were set at (1) reducing the stack emissions to 10% of the 1991 emissions; (2) reducing the exposure rate in each cell to < 1 mR/h; and (3) reducing the removable contamination to none detectable. Since the contamination can be fixed with paint, the other two goals were given priority. The estimate of the 1995 emissions from K-3 was 20% of the 1991 emissions estimate. However, the 1996 estimates are {approximately}9% of the 1991 emissions estimate. Since in 1991 the K-3 emissions were only 1/2% of the emissions from M-1, even the 20% reduction has little effect on the project reduction. The total emissions have been reduce to {approximately}2 1/4% of the 1991 emissions from the 5 hot cells that were decontaminated. The emissions and exposure rates are presented in Table I below. Cells A-1 and M-1 exceed the exposure rate criteria. For the other cells, the general exposure rate in the middle of the cell meets the criteria. However, near the prefilters, the exposure rates increase. Cell M-1 has extensive floor contamination that penetrated to a 6 inch depth. At 30 cm above the floor, the exposure rate through the lead blanket is 50 mR/h. A more detailed list of acceptance criteria were specified before the final verification survey. Table ii compares the maximum survey results on the wall or floor surface of each cell to these criteria. Cells M-1 and A-1 frequently fail to meet these criteria.

  9. Long Duration Hot Hydrogen Exposure of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Hickman, Robert; Dobson, Chris; Clifton, Scooter

    2007-01-01

    An arc-heater driven hyper-thermal convective environments simulator was recently developed and commissioned for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket materials. This newly established non-nuclear testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to .produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of nuclear reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects, and is intended to serve as a low cost test facility for the purpose of investigating and characterizing candidate fuel/structural materials and improving associated processing/fabrication techniques. Design and engineering development efforts are fully summarized, and facility operating characteristics are reported as determined from a series of baseline performance mapping runs and long duration capability demonstration tests.

  10. Handling of Highly Radioactive Radiation Sources in a Hot Cell Using a Mechanically Driven Cell Crane - 13452

    SciTech Connect

    Klute, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang-Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In 2010, Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH was awarded the contract for design and erection of a Hot Cell for handling and storage of highly radioactive radiation sources. This Hot Cell is part of a new hot cell laboratory, constructed for the NHZ (Neues Handhabungszentrum = New Handling Center) of the Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES). All incurring radioactive materials from Austria are collected in the NHZ, where they are safely conditioned and stored temporarily until their final storage. The main tasks of the NES include, apart from the collection, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste, also the reprocessing and the decontamination of facilities and laboratories originating from 45 years of research and development at the Seibersdorf site as well as the operation of the Hot Cell Laboratory [1]. The new Hot Cell Laboratory inside the NHZ consists of the following room areas: - One hot cell, placed in the center, for remote controlled, radiation protected handling of radioactive materials, including an integrated floor storage for the long-term temporary storage of highly radioactive radiation sources; - An anteroom for the loading and unloading of the hot cell; - One control room for the remote controlling of the hot cell equipment; - One floor storage, placed laterally to the hot cell, for burial, interim storage and removal of fissionable radioactive material in leak-proof packed units in 100 l drums. The specific design activity of the hot cell of 1.85 Pbq relating to 1-Me-Radiator including the integrated floor storage influences realization and design of the components used in the cell significantly. (authors)

  11. Decontamination of Hot Cells and Hot Pipe Tunnel at NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.G.; Halishak, W.F.

    2008-07-01

    The large scale decontamination of the concrete Hot Cells and Hot Pipe Tunnel at NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility demonstrates that novel management and innovative methods are crucial to ensuring that the successful remediation of the most contaminated facilities can be achieved with minimal risk to the project stakeholders. (authors)

  12. 15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring radioactive materials containment box, facing east - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  13. 47. ARAI. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. ARA-I. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell in ARA-626. Note stands for operators at viewing windows. Manipulators with hand grips extend cables and other controls into hot cell through ducts above windows. Ineel photo no. 81-27. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. JINA Workshop Nuclear Physics in Hot Dense Dynamic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Libby, S; Chen, M; Wilson, B; Knauer, J; Mcnabb, D; Caggiano, J; Bleauel, D; Weideking, M; Kozhuharov, C; Brandau, C; Stoehlker, T; Meot, V; Gosselin, G; Morel, P; Schneider, D; Bernstein, L A

    2011-03-07

    Measuring NEET and NEEC is relevant for probing stellar cross-sections and testing atomic models in hot plasmas. Using NEEC and NEET we can excite nuclear levels in laboratory plasmas: (1) NIF: Measure effect of excited nuclear levels on (n,{gamma}) cross-sections, 60% and never been measured; (2) Omega, Test cross-sections for creating these excited levels via NEEC and NEET. Will allow us to test models that estimate resonance overlap of atomic states with the nucleus: (1) Average Atom model (AA) (CEA&LLNL), single average wave-function potential; (2) Super Transition Array (STA) model (LLNL), More realistic individual configuration potentials NEET experimental data is scarce and not in a plasma environment, NEEC has not yet been observed.

  15. Hot-spot durability testing of amorphous cells and modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Charles; Jetter, Elizabeth

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study to determine the hot-spot susceptibility of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) cells and modules, and to provide guidelines for reducing that susceptibility. Amorphous-Si cells are shown to have hot-spot susceptibility levels similar to crystalline-silicon (C-Si) cells. This premise leads to the fact that the same general guidelines must apply to protecting a-Si cells from hot-spot stressing that apply to C-Si cells. Recommendations are made on ways of reducing a-Si module hot-spot susceptibility including the traditional method of using bypass diodes and a new method unique to thin-film cells, limiting the string current by limiting cell area.

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. FIRST FLOOR FOUNDATION PLAN SHOWS SECTIONALIZED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. FIRST FLOOR FOUNDATION PLAN SHOWS SECTIONALIZED FLOOR LOADINGS AND CONCRETE SLAB THICKNESSES, A TYPICAL FEATURE OF NUCLEAR ARCHITECTURE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-2, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-62-396-110561, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voronyuk, V.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2012-06-15

    The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

  18. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Coleman, R.M.

    1996-08-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. To place the facility in compliance with current regulations, all penetrations within the facility were sealed, the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced, the master-slave manipulators were replaced, the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled, all hot cell utilities were replaced, a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductive Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO{sub 2} fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed.

  19. Human factors evaluation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Regina Lee; Whitehurst, Hugh O.

    2003-11-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. Mixed waste may also be handled at the AHCF. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, was required to perform this mission. A checklist procedure was used to perform a human-factors evaluation of the AHCF modifications. This evaluation resulted in two recommendations, both of which have been implemented.

  20. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950`s and 1960`s for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970`s, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled.

  1. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P{sub 0} interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P{sub 1.2} interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  2. Extended Characterization of Chemical Processes in Hot Cells Using Environmental Swipe Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Thomas, M-L; Lepel, Elwood A.; Brunson, Ronald R.; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer

    2012-09-15

    Environmental sampling is used extensively by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verification of information from State declarations or a facility’s design regarding nuclear activities occurring within the country or a specific facility. Environmental sampling of hot cells within a facility under safeguards is conducted using 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm cotton swipe material or cellulose swipes. Traditional target analytes used by the IAEA to verify operations within a facility include a select list of gamma-emitting radionuclides and total and isotopic U and Pu. Analysis of environmental swipe samples collected within a hot-cell facility where chemical processing occurs may also provide information regarding specific chemicals used in fuel processing. However, using swipe material to elucidate what specific chemical processes were/are being used within a hot cell has not been previously evaluated. Staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) teamed to evaluate the potential use of environmental swipe samples as collection media for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. This evaluation was initiated with sample collection during a series of Coupled End-to-End (CETE) reprocessing runs at ORNL. The study included measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides, total and isotopic U and Pu, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. These results allowed us to elucidate what chemical processes used in the hot cells during reprocessing of power reactor and identify other legacy chemicals used in hot cell operations which predate the CETE process.

  3. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  4. Fundamental Limitations to Plasmonic Hot-Carrier Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Schatz, George C

    2016-05-19

    Detailed balance between photon-absorption and energy loss constrains the efficiency of conventional solar cells to the Shockley-Queisser limit. However, if solar illumination can be absorbed over a wide spectrum by plasmonic structures, and the generated hot-carriers can be collected before relaxation, the efficiency of solar cells may be greatly improved. In this work, we explore the opportunities and limitations for making plasmonic solar cells, here considering a design for hot-carrier solar cells in which a conventional semiconductor heterojunction is attached to a plasmonic medium such as arrays of gold nanoparticles. The underlying mechanisms and fundamental limitations of this cell are studied using a nonequilibrium Green's function method, and the numerical results indicate that this cell can significantly improve the absorption of solar radiation without reducing open-circuit voltage, as photons can be absorbed to produce mobile carriers in the semiconductor as long as they have energy larger than the Schottky barrier rather than above the bandgap. However, a significant fraction of the hot-carriers have energies below the Schottky barrier, which makes the cell suffer low internal quantum efficiency. Moreover, quantum efficiency is also limited by hot-carrier relaxation and metal-semiconductor coupling. The connection of these results to recent experiments is described, showing why plasmonic solar cells can have less than 1% efficiency. PMID:27136049

  5. Radioactive hot-cell access-hole decontamination machine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-06

    A radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine is disclosed. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  6. Fundamental limitations of hot-carrier solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A. P.; Fischetti, M. V.

    2012-10-01

    Sunlight-generated hot-carrier transport in strongly absorbing direct band-gap GaAs—among the most optimal of semiconductors for high-efficiency solar cells—is simulated with an accurate full-band structure self-consistent Monte Carlo method, including short- and long-range Coulomb interaction, impact ionization, and optical and acoustic phonon scattering. We consider an ultrapure 100-nm-thick intrinsic GaAs absorber layer designed with quasiballistic carrier transport that achieves complete photon absorption down to the band edge by application of careful light trapping and that has a generous hot-carrier retention time of 10 ps prior to the onset of carrier relaxation. We find that hot-carrier solar cells can be severely limited in performance due to the substantially reduced current density caused by insufficient extraction of the widely distributed hot electrons (holes) through the requisite energy selective contacts.

  7. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. CELL 3, "HEAVY" CELL. CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. CELL 3, "HEAVY" CELL. CAMERA FACES WEST TOWARD BUILDING EXIT. OBSERVATION WINDOW AT LEFT EDGE OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Zirconium Recycle Test Equipment for Hot Cell Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D.; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel; Spencer, Barry B.; Bradley, Eric Craig; Brunson, Ronald Ray

    2015-01-30

    The equipment components and assembly support work were modified for optimized, remote hot cell operations to complete this milestone. The modifications include installation of a charging door, Swagelok connector for the off-gas line between the reactor and condenser, and slide valve installation to permit attachment/replacement of the product salt collector bottle.

  9. Equation of state of hot polarized nuclear matter and heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Gharaei, R.

    2011-08-15

    We employ the equation of state of hot polarized nuclear matter to simulate the repulsive force caused by the incompressibility effects of nuclear matter in the fusion reactions of heavy colliding ions. The results of our studies reveal that temperature effects of compound nuclei have significant importance in simulating the repulsive force on the fusion reactions for which the temperature of the compound nucleus increases up to about 2 MeV. Since the equation of state of hot nuclear matter depends upon the density and temperature of the nuclear matter, it has been suggested that, by using this equation of state, one can simulate simultaneously both the effects of the precompound nucleons' emission and the incompressibility of nuclear matter to calculate the nuclear potential in fusion reactions within a static formalism such as the double-folding (DF) model.

  10. Diffusion of dark matter in a hot and dense nuclear environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Marina; Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the mean free path in a hot and dense nuclear environment for a fermionic dark matter particle candidate in the ˜GeV mass range interacting with nucleons via scalar and vector effective couplings. We focus on the effects of density and temperature in the nuclear medium in order to evaluate the importance of the final state blocking in the scattering process. We discuss qualitatively possible implications for opacities in stellar nuclear scenarios, where dark matter may be gravitationally accreted.

  11. Hot startup experience with electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, R.W.; Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.; Rigg, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    The treatment of spent metal fuel from the EBR-II fast reactor commenced in June of 1996 at the Fuel Conditioning Facility on the Argonne-West site in Idaho, USA. During the first year of hot operations, 20 fuel assemblies entered processing and 6 low enrichment uranium product ingots were produced. Results are presented for the various process steps with decontamination factors achieved and equipment operational history reported.

  12. Nitrogen assimilation by single cells in hot springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poret-peterson, A. T.; Romaniello, S. J.; Bose, M.; Williams, P.; Elser, J. J.; Shock, E.; Anbar, A. D.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    Microorganisms drive biogeochemical cycles and require nutrients, such as ammonium and nitrate, to function. As a result, following nutrient flows provides opportunities to study how microbial activity influences ecosystem-level processes. Most past measurements of microbial nutrient uptake rely on bulk measurements, which are informative but provide little information about heterogeneity among community members involved in elemental transformations, nor about possible effects of physiological state or taxonomic identity. Since microbial communities tend to be phylogenetically and physiologically diverse, it is reasonable to expect that community members will respond differently to nutrient addition. Here, we examine nitrogen assimilation (via addition of 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate) in Yellowstone hot spring microbial communities. Using the NanoSIMS, we imaged cells at a very high spatial resolution (nanometer scale) necessary to determine 15N enrichments in single micron-sized cells. We compare the N isotopic enrichments observed in single cells to that determined in bulk sediments by standard isotope ratio mass spectrometry. NanoSIMS imaging of 56 individual cells from sediments of an acidic hot spring (pH 4.7, T=67oC) incubated with 15N-ammonium shows that about two-thirds of the cells (38) exhibited 15N-enrichment. Most cells had 15N enrichments from 0.39 to 0.91 atom %, while some cells were much more significantly enriched. Bulk analyses of sediments show that ammonium assimilation and nitrate assimilation readily occurred at this spring. These findings show that microbes in this hot spring may differentially take up ammonium, which may arise from a number of factors including differences in cellular N requirements, growth rates, and the ability to transport ammonium. This work represents some of the first single-cell isotopic measurements from an extreme environment. Efforts are underway to image sediment samples from other hot springs and to pair Nano

  13. Decontamination of the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peecook, K.M.

    2008-07-01

    The NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility decommissioning project recently completed a major milestone with the successful decontamination of seven hot cells. The cells included thick concrete walls and leaded glass windows, manipulator arms, inter cell dividing walls, and roof slabs. There was also a significant amount of embedded conduit and piping that had to be cleaned and surveyed. Prior to work starting evaluation studies were performed to determine whether it was more cost effective to do this work using a full up removal approach (rip and ship) or to decontaminate the cells to below required clean up levels, leaving the bulk of the material in place. This paper looks at that decision process, how it was implemented, and the results of that effort including the huge volume of material that can now be used as fill during site restoration rather than being disposed of as LLRW. (authors)

  14. On the road toward a hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. C.; Fields, J. D.; Collins, R. T.

    2015-09-01

    We suggest a new paradigm for solar cells that uses a nanostructured crystalline collector (silicon) in an amorphous absorber matrix (hydrogenated amorphous silicon). Previously amorphous absorbers have received no serious consideration because of their low carrier mobilities. Specifically, we demonstrate that carriers generated in the amorphous region are transported out of this region before losing their energy to heat. This result establishes the possibility of using a wide range of nanostructured amorphous matrices to dramatically increase the efficiencies of solar cells. The use of an amorphous absorber provides a highly desirable and flexible approach to producing low-cost, hot carrier solar cells. Since amorphous materials can be grown over a much wider composition space than crystalline materials, this surprising result greatly broadens the absorbing materials that can be used to dramatically increase the efficiencies of solar cells.

  15. Nuclear fusion in the deuterated cores of inflated hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2016-03-01

    Ouyed et al. (Astrophys. J. 501:367, 1998) proposed Deuterium (DD) fusion at the core-mantle interface of giant planets as a mechanism to explain their observed heat excess. But rather high interior temperatures (˜105 K) and a stratified D layer are needed, making such a scenario unlikely. In this paper, we re-examine DD fusion, with the addition of screening effects pertinent to a deuterated core containing ice and some heavy elements. This alleviates the extreme temperature constraint and removes the requirement of a stratified D layer. As an application, we propose that, if their core temperatures are a few times 104 K and core composition is chemically inhomogeneous, the observed inflated size of some giant exoplanets ("hot Jupiters") may be linked to screened DD fusion occurring deep in the interior. Application of an analytic evolution model suggests that the amount of inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core, making DD fusion an effective extra internal energy source for radius inflation. The mechanism of screened DD fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature T_{eq}, and also depends on planetary mass. Although we do not consider the effect of incident stellar flux, we expect that a minimum level of irradiation is necessary to trigger core erosion and subsequent DD fusion inside the planet. Since DD fusion is quite sensitive to the screening potential inferred from laboratory experiments, observations of inflated hot Jupiters may help constrain screening effects in the cores of giant planets.

  16. Analysis of Material Sample Heated by Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet in a Non-Nuclear Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed and anchored with data obtained from a hot-hydrogen jet heated, non-nuclear materials tester, as a first step towards developing an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective and thermal radiative, and conjugate heat transfers. Predicted hot hydrogen jet and material surface temperatures were compared with those of measurement. Predicted solid temperatures were compared with those obtained with a standard heat transfer code. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  17. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  18. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes. PMID:20336522

  19. Relativistic spectral function of nucleons in hot nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Sourav; Mallik, S.

    2010-10-01

    We present a simple calculation of the nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter at finite temperature in a relativistic framework, using the real-time thermal field theory. The imaginary parts of one-loop graphs are identified with discontinuities across the unitary and the Landau cuts. We find that in general both the cuts contribute significantly to the spectral function in the region of (virtual) nucleon mass usually considered, even though the unitary cut is ignored in the literature. Furthermore, our relativistic spectral function differs from the one in nonrelativistic approximation, used in some earlier calculations.

  20. Hot Cell Examination of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; McCoy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured with weapons-grade MOX and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg. As part of the fuel qualification process, five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This is the first hot cell examination of weapons-grade MOX fuel. The rods have been examined nondestructively with the ADEPT apparatus and are currently being destructively examined. Examinations completed to date include length measurements, visual examination, gamma scanning, profilometry, eddy-current testing, gas measurement and analysis, and optical metallography. Representative results of these examinations are reviewed and found to be consistent with predictions and with prior experience with reactor-grade MOX fuel. The results will be used to support licensing of weapons-grade MOX for batch use in commercial power reactors.

  1. Modified Dihadron Fragmentation Functions in Hot and Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang Enke; Wang Xinnian

    2007-10-12

    Medium modification of dihadron fragmentation functions due to gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple partonic scattering is studied in both deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off large nuclei and high-energy heavy-ion collisions within the same framework of twist expansion. The modification for dihadrons is found to closely follow that for single hadrons, leading to a weak nuclear suppression of their ratios in DIS experiments. A mild enhancement of the near-side correlation of two high transverse momentum hadrons with increasing centrality is found in heavy-ion collisions due to trigger bias and the rise in parton energy loss with centrality. Successful comparisons between theory and experiment for multihadron observables in both confining and deconfined media offer comprehensive evidence for partonic energy loss as the mechanism of jet modification in dense matter.

  2. Formation of hot particles during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kashparov, V.A.; Ivanov, Y.A.; Zvarisch, S.I.; Protsak, V.P.; Khomutinin, Y.V.; Kurepin, A.D.; Pazukhin, E.M.

    1996-05-01

    The oxidation of irradiated Chernobyl nuclear fuel at 670 to 1,170 K for 3 to 21 h resulted in its destruction into fine particles, the dispersal composition of which is well described by lognormal distribution regularity. The median radius of the formed particles does not depend on the annealing temperature and decreases with the increase of the annealing period from 10 to 3 {micro}m. Proceeding from the dispersal composition and matrix composition of the Chernobyl hot fuel particles, it can be concluded that the oxidation of nuclear fuel was one of the basic mechanisms of hot fuel particle formation during the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. With oxidation in air and the dispersal of irradiated oxide nuclear fuel at as low as 670 K, ruthenium, located on the granular borders, is released. Ruthenium is oxidized to volatile RuO{sub 4}, sublimated, and condensed on materials of iron. Nickel and stainless steel can be efficiently used at high temperatures (tested to 1,200 K) for radioruthenium adsorption in accidents and for some technological operations. As the temperature of hot fuel particles annealed in inert media increases from 1,270 to 2,270 K, the relative release of radionuclides increases in the following sequence: cesium isotopes; europium isotopes; cerium isotopes; americium isotopes; and ruthenium, plutonium, and curium isotopes.

  3. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.; Walton, T.

    2003-02-25

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. These technologies offer improved methods for accessing difficult-to-reach spaces and performing tasks such as visual inspection, radiological characterization, decontamination, waste handling, and size reduction. This paper is focused on the application of remote systems in support of deactivation work being performed in several legacy facilities at Hanford (i.e., the 324 and 327 Buildings). These facilities were previously used for fuel fabrication, materials examination, and the development of waste treatment processes. The technologies described in this paper represent significant improvements to Hanford's baseline methods, and may offer benefits to other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and commercial operations.

  4. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  5. 116. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows manipulator openings in operating face of hot cell, start/stop buttons, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961/area/SF-626-E-6. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-10-613-102731. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Mycobacterium avium complex in day care hot water systems, and persistence of live cells and DNA in hot water pipes.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Annette S; Roslev, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic human pathogens that may thrive in engineered water systems. MAC has been shown to occur in drinking water supplies based on surface water, but less is known about the occurrence and persistence of live cells and DNA in public hot water systems based on groundwater. In this study, we examined the occurrence of MAC in hot water systems of public day care centers and determined the persistence of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA in model systems with the modern plumbing material cross-linked polyethylene (PEX). The occurrence of MAC and co-occurrence of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila were determined using cultivation and qPCR. Co-occurrences of MAC and Legionella were detected in water and/or biofilms in all hot water systems at temperatures between 40 and 54 °C. Moderate correlations were observed between abundance of culturable MAC and that of MAC genome copies, and between MAC and total eubacterial genome copies. No quantitative relationship was observed between occurrence of Legionella and that of MAC. Persistence in hot water of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA was studied using PEX laboratory model systems at 44 °C. Naked DNA and DNA in dead M. avium cells persisted for weeks. Live M. avium increased tenfold in water and biofilms on PEX. The results suggest that water and biofilms in groundwater-based hot water systems can constitute reservoirs of MAC, and that amplifiable naked DNA is relatively short-lived, whereas PEX plumbing material supports persistence and proliferation of M. avium. PMID:24272032

  7. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 7, Safety operation procedure for hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for the safety operation procedure for hot cell. It covers the master-slave manipulators, dry waste removal, cell transfers, hoists, cask handling, liquid waste system, and physical characterization of fluids.

  8. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wallmore » allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.« less

  9. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wall allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.

  10. Development of monolithic nuclear fuels for RERTR by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, J.-F.; Park, Blair; Chapple, Michael; Moore, Glenn; Keiser, Dennis

    2008-07-15

    The RERTR Program (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) is developing advanced nuclear fuels for high power test reactors. Monolithic fuel design provides a higher uranium loading than that of the traditional dispersion fuel design. In order to bond monolithic fuel meat to aluminum cladding, several bonding methods such as roll bonding, friction stir bonding and hot isostatic pressing, have been explored. Hot isostatic pressing is a promising process for low cost, batch fabrication of monolithic RERTR fuel plates. The progress on the development of this process at the Idaho National Laboratory will be presented. Due to the relatively high processing temperature used, the reaction between fuel meat and aluminum cladding to form brittle intermetallic phases may be a concern. The effect of processing temperature and time on the fuel/cladding reaction will be addressed. The influence of chemical composition on the reaction will also be discussed. (author)

  11. Signals of Bose Einstein condensation and Fermi quenching in the decay of hot nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Zheng, H.; Boisjoli, M.; Verde, G.; Chbihi, A.; Napolitani, P.; Ademard, G.; Augey, L.; Bhattacharya, C.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Frankland, J. D.; Fable, Q.; Galichet, E.; Gruyer, D.; Kundu, S.; La Commara, M.; Lombardo, I.; Lopez, O.; Mukherjee, G.; Parlog, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Roy, R.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wigg, P. C.; Bonasera, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on first experimental observations of nuclear fermionic and bosonic components displaying different behaviours in the decay of hot Ca projectile-like sources produced in mid-peripheral collisions at sub-Fermi energies. The experimental setup, constituted by the coupling of the INDRA 4π detector array to the forward angle VAMOS magnetic spectrometer, allowed to reconstruct the mass, charge and excitation energy of the decaying hot projectile-like sources. By means of quantum-fluctuation analysis techniques, temperatures and local partial densities of bosons and fermions could be correlated to the excitation energy of the reconstructed system. The results are consistent with the production of dilute mixed systems of bosons and fermions, where bosons experience higher phase-space and energy density as compared to the surrounding fermionic gas. Our findings recall phenomena observed in the study of Bose condensates and Fermi gases in atomic traps despite the different scales.

  12. Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Corletti, M.M.

    1993-11-16

    A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet. 2 figures.

  13. Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Corletti, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet.

  14. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. EAST END OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. EAST END OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING WEST. TRUCK ENCLOSURE (1986) TO THE LEFT, SMALL ADDITION IN ITS SHADOW IS ENCLOSURE OVER METAL PORT INTO HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE OLDEST HOT CELL). NOTE PERSONNEL LADDER AND PLATFORM AT LOFT LEVEL USED WHEN SERVICING AIR FILTERS AND VENTS OF CELL NO. 1. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-32-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Test report for simulation HDR waste compaction at the hot-cell verification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, W.C.

    1982-12-01

    Compaction and shredding of the waste material by the Nuclear Packaging Compactor can achieve compaction ratios of from 3.5 to 1 up to 5.5 to 1. This volume reduction would result in considerable savings in FMEF operational expense. As expected, the springback of the waste material was significant. Elimination of most of the springback could raise the compaction ratio by at least 1. The compactor compacted all types of waste material that was tried. However, this compactor will have to be extensively modified for safe hot cell use in FMEF. Because of the vibration of the compactor itself, the movement of the barrel caused by the downward stroke of the ram and the 9 ton force limit, consideration should be given to the use of another compactor.

  16. Reversible electron-hole separation in a hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limpert, S.; Bremner, S.; Linke, H.

    2015-09-01

    Hot-carrier solar cells are envisioned to utilize energy filtering to extract power from photogenerated electron-hole pairs before they thermalize with the lattice, and thus potentially offer higher power conversion efficiency compared to conventional, single absorber solar cells. The efficiency of hot-carrier solar cells can be expected to strongly depend on the details of the energy filtering process, a relationship which to date has not been satisfactorily explored. Here, we establish the conditions under which electron-hole separation in hot-carrier solar cells can occur reversibly, that is, at maximum energy conversion efficiency. We thus focus our analysis on the internal operation of the hot-carrier solar cell itself, and in this work do not consider the photon-mediated coupling to the Sun. After deriving an expression for the voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell valid under conditions of both reversible and irreversible electrical operation, we identify separate contributions to the voltage from the thermoelectric effect and the photovoltaic effect. We find that, under specific conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a hot-carrier solar cell can exceed the Carnot limit set by the intra-device temperature gradient alone, due to the additional contribution of the quasi-Fermi level splitting in the absorber. We also establish that the open-circuit voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell is not limited by the band gap of the absorber, due to the additional thermoelectric contribution to the voltage. Additionally, we find that a hot-carrier solar cell can be operated in reverse as a thermally driven solid-state light emitter. Our results help explore the fundamental limitations of hot-carrier solar cells, and provide a first step towards providing experimentalists with a guide to the optimal configuration of devices.

  17. Arc-Heater Facility for Hot Hydrogen Exposure of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Wang,Ten-See; Hickman, Robert; Panda, Binayak; Dobson, Chris; Osborne, Robin; Clifton, Scooter

    2006-01-01

    A hyper-thermal environment simulator is described for hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket material specimens and component development. This newly established testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, segmented arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of practical reactor core environments and is intended to serve. as a low cost test facility for the purpose of investigating and characterizing candidate fueUstructura1 materials and improving associated processing/fabrication techniques. Design and development efforts are thoroughly summarized, including thermal hydraulics analysis and simulation results, and facility operating characteristics are reported, as determined from a series of baseline performance mapping tests.

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2012-11-06

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

    2013-12-24

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  2. Post-irradiation-examination of irradiated fuel outside the hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn E. Janney; Adam B. Robinson; Thomas P. O'Holleran; R. Paul Lind; Marc Babcock; Laurence C. Brower; Julie Jacobs; Pamela K. Hoggan

    2007-09-01

    Because of their high radioactivity, irradiated fuels are commonly examined in a hot cell. However, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has recently investigated irradiated U-Mo-Al metallic fuel from the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) project using a conventional unshielded scanning electron microscope outside a hot cell. This examination was possible because of a two-step sample-preparation approach in which a small volume of fuel was isolated in a hot cell and shielding was introduced during later stages of sample preparation. The resulting sample contained numerous sample-preparation artifacts but allowed analysis of microstructures from selected areas.

  3. Description of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Riffle, G.K.; Merdich, J.A. )

    1993-01-15

    Cryogenic and high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen test capabilities are required for component development and qualification for the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. To effectively support the non-nuclear test needs of the SNTP program, as well as other specialized programs that utilize hydrogen as a working fluid, Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, Garrett Fluid Systems Division (GFSD) is currently developing a hydrogen test facility at our remote San Tan test site. The facility is specifically designed to support turbopump, propellant management valves, instrumentation and general materials evaluation testing with hydrogen at pressures and temperatures representative of actual SNTP engine operating conditions. This paper presents a general description of the SNTP hot-hydrogen test facility including test capabilities, technical approach, and technical status.

  4. HOT DIFFUSE EMISSION IN THE NUCLEAR STARBURST REGION OF NGC 2903

    SciTech Connect

    Yukita, Mihoko; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Soria, Roberto

    2012-10-20

    We present a deep Chandra observation of the central regions of the late-type barred spiral galaxy NGC 2903. The Chandra data reveal soft (kT{sub e} {approx} 0.2-0.5 keV) diffuse emission in the nuclear starburst region and extending {approx}2' ({approx}5 kpc) to the north and west of the nucleus. Much of this soft hot gas is likely to be from local active star-forming regions; however, besides the nuclear region, the morphology of hot gas does not strongly correlate with the bar or other known sites of active star formation. The central {approx}650 pc radius starburst zone exhibits much higher surface brightness diffuse emission than the surrounding regions and a harder spectral component in addition to a soft component similar to the surrounding zones. We interpret the hard component as also being of thermal origin with kT{sub e} {approx} 3.6 keV and to be directly associated with a wind fluid produced by supernovae and massive star winds similar to the hard diffuse emission seen in the starburst galaxy M82. The inferred terminal velocity for this hard component, {approx}1100 km s{sup -1}, exceeds the local galaxy escape velocity suggesting a potential outflow into the halo and possibly escape from the galaxy gravitational potential. Morphologically, the softer extended emission from nearby regions does not display an obvious outflow geometry. However, the column density through which the X-rays are transmitted is lower in the zone to the west of the nucleus compared to that from the east and the surface brightness is relatively higher suggesting some of the soft hot gas originates from above the disk: viewed directly from the western zone but through the intervening disk of the host galaxy along sight lines from the eastern zone. There are several point-like sources embedded in the strong diffuse nuclear emission zone. Their X-ray spectra show them to likely be compact binaries. None of these detected point sources are coincident with the mass center of the

  5. Hot compression process for making edge seals for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Dunyak, Thomas J.; Granata, Jr., Samuel J.

    1994-01-01

    A hot compression process for forming integral edge seals in anode and cade assemblies wherein the assemblies are made to a nominal size larger than a finished size, beads of AFLAS are applied to a band adjacent the peripheral margins on both sides of the assemblies, the assemblies are placed in a hot press and compressed for about five minutes with a force sufficient to permeate the peripheral margins with the AFLAS, cooled and cut to finished size.

  6. Robot Work Platform for Large Hot Cell Deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    BITTEN, E.J.

    2000-05-01

    The 324 Building, located at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is being deactivated to meet state and federal cleanup commitments. The facility is currently in its third year of a nine-year project to complete deactivation and closure for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The 324 building contains large hot cells that were used for high-radiation, high-contamination chemical process development and demonstrations. A major obstacle for the 324 deactivation project is the inability to effectively perform deactivation tasks within highly radioactive, contaminated environments. Current strategies use inefficient, resource intensive technologies that significantly impact the cost and schedule for deactivation. To meet mandated cleanup commitments, there is a need to deploy rapid, more efficient remote/robot technologies to minimize worker exposure, accelerate work tasks, and eliminate the need for multiple specialized tool design and procurement efforts. This paper describes the functions and performance requirements for a crane-deployed remote/robot Work Platform possessing full access capabilities. The remote/robot Work Platform will deploy commercially available off-the-shelf tools and end effectors to support Project cleanup goals and reduce overall project risk and cost. The intent of this system is to maximize the use of off-the-shelf technologies that minimize additional new, unproven, or novel designs. This paper further describes procurement strategy, the selection process, the selected technology, and the current status of the procurement and lessons learned. Funding, in part, has been provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area.

  7. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Dickinson, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes. PMID:26287620

  8. Shell effects in hot nuclei and their influence on nuclear composition in supernova matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Suguru; Takano, Masatoshi

    2014-05-02

    We calculate nuclear composition in supernova (SN) matter explicitly taking into account the temperature dependence of nuclear shell effects. The abundance of nuclei in SN matter is important in the dynamics of core-collapse supernovae and, in recently constructed equations of state (EOS) for SN matter, the composition of nuclei are calculated assuming nuclear statistical equilibrium wherein the nuclear internal free energies govern the composition. However, in these EOS, thermal effects on the shell energy are not explicitly taken into account. To address this shortfall, we calculate herein the shell energies of hot nuclei and examine their influence on the composition of SN matter. Following a simplified macroscopic-microscopic approach, we first calculate single-particle (SP) energies by using a spherical Woods-Saxon potential. Then we extract shell energies at finite temperatures using Strutinsky method with the Fermi distribution as the average occupation probability of the SP levels. The results show that at relatively low temperatures, shell effects are still important and magic nuclei are abundant. However, at temperatures above approximately 2 MeV, shell effects are almost negligible, and the mass fractions with shell energies including the thermal effect are close to those obtained from a simple liquid drop model at finite temperatures.

  9. Workshop on instrumentation and analyses for a nuclear fuel reprocessing hot pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, S.M.; Feldman, M.J.; Wymer, R.G.; Hoffman, D.

    1980-05-01

    In order to assist in the study of instrumentation and analytical needs for reprocessing plants, a workshop addressing these needs was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from May 5 to 7, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to incorporate the knowledge of chemistry and of advanced measurement techniques held by the nuclear and radiochemical community into ideas for improved and new plant designs for both process control and inventory and safeguards measurements. The workshop was athended by experts in nuclear and radiochemistry, in fuel recycle plant design, and in instrumentation and analysis. ORNL was a particularly appropriate place to hold the workshop since the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is centered there. Requirements for safeguarding the special nuclear materials involved in reprocessing, and for their timely measurement within the process, within the reprocessing facility, and at the facility boundaries are being studied. Because these requirements are becoming more numerous and stringent, attention is also being paid to the analytical requirements for these special nuclear materials and to methods for measuring the physical parameters of the systems containing them. In order to provide a focus for the consideration of the workshop participants, the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) being designed conceptually by the CFRP was used as a basis for consideration and discussions.

  10. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells (for WM'03 - abstract included)

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2003-01-28

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. This paper highlights the application of several remotely deployed technologies enabling the deactivation tasks.

  11. Evaluation of Alternatives for Hanford 327 Building Hot Cell Removal and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ray W.; Jasen, William G.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site 327 Building, built in 1953, played a key role in reactor material and fuel research programs. The facility includes nine shielded hot cells, a fuel storage basin, dry sample storage, and a large inerted hot (SERF) cell. In 1996, the 327 Building was transferred from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to Fluor Hanford, Inc., to begin the transition from the mission of irradiated fuel examination to stabilization and deactivation. In 2001, a multi-contractor team conducted a review of the concept of intact (one piece) removal, packaging, and disposal of the 327 hot cells. This paper focuses on challenges related to preparing the 327 Building hot cells for intact one-piece disposal as Low Level Waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site. These challenges, described in this paper, are threefold and include: Sampling and characterization of the cells for low level waste designation; Packaging of the cells for transportation and waste disposal; Transportation from the facility to the disposal site. The primary technical challenges in one-piece removal, packaging, and disposal of the hot cells involve the techniques required to characterize, remove, handle, package and transport a large (approximately up to 12-feet long and 8-feet high) contaminated object that weighs 35 to 160 tons. Specific characterization results associated with two hot cells, G and H cells will be reported. A review of the activities and plans to stabilize and deactivate the 327 Building provides insight into the technical challenges faced by this project and identifies a potential opportunity to modify the baseline strategy by removing the hot cells in one piece instead of decontaminating and dismantling the cells.

  12. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS OF THE BUILDING, SHEET STEEL DEFINES THE HOT CELL "BOX" ITSELF. THREE OPERATING WINDOWS ON LEFT; ONE VIEWING WINDOW ON RIGHT. TUBES WILL CONTAIN SERVICE AND CONTROL LEADS. SPACE BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER BOX WALLS WILL BE FILLED WITH SHIELDED WINDOWS AND BARETES CONCRETE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7933. Unknown Photographer, ca. 5/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 113. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building wall sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building wall sections and details of radio chemistry lab. Shows high-bay roof over hot cells and isolation rooms below grade storage pit for fuel elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102724. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Lee

    2006-02-06

    This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

  15. A&M. Hot cell addition (TAN633). Floor plan, elevations. Arrangement of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell addition (TAN-633). Floor plan, elevations. Arrangement of monorail along corridor, four hot cells, plug access openings, viewing windows, photo darkroom. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-13-ANP/GE-3-633-A-1. Date: December 1956 as redrawn in August 1998. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0633-00-693-107315 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Evaluation of a Mobile Hot Cell Technology for Processing Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; R.P. Miklos; F. Yapuncich; L. Care

    2009-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) currently does not have the necessary capabilities to process all remote-handled wastes resulting from the Laboratory’s nuclear-related missions. Over the years, various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored programs undertaken at the INL have produced radioactive wastes and other materials that are categorized as remote-handled (contact radiological dose rate > 200 mR/hr). These materials include Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), transuranic (TRU) waste, waste requiring geological disposal, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (both radioactive and hazardous per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]), and activated and/or radioactively-contaminated reactor components. The waste consists primarily of uranium, plutonium, other TRU isotopes, and shorter-lived isotopes such as cesium and cobalt with radiological dose rates up to 20,000 R/hr. The hazardous constituents in the waste consist primarily of reactive metals (i.e., sodium and sodium-potassium alloy [NaK]), which are reactive and ignitable per RCRA, making the waste difficult to handle and treat. A smaller portion of the waste is contaminated with other hazardous components (i.e., RCRA toxicity characteristic metals). Several analyses of alternatives to provide the required remote-handling and treatment capability to manage INL’s remote-handled waste have been conducted over the years and have included various options ranging from modification of existing hot cells to construction of new hot cells. Previous analyses have identified a mobile processing unit as an alternative for providing the required remote-handled waste processing capability; however, it was summarily dismissed as being a potentially viable alternative based on limitations of a specific design considered. In 2008 INL solicited expressions of interest from Vendors who could provide existing, demonstrated technology that could be applied to the retrieval, sorting, treatment (as required), and

  17. Quantitative “Hot Spot” Imaging of Transplanted Stem Cells using Superparamagnetic Tracers and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, J.W.M.; Walczak, P.; Janowski, M.; Krishnan, K.M.; Arami, H.; Halkola, A.; Gleich, B.; Rahmer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic labeling of stem cells enables their non-invasive detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Practically, most MRI studies have been limited to visualization of local engraftment as other sources of endogenous hypointense contrast complicate the interpretation of systemic (whole body) cell distribution. In addition, MRI cell tracking is inherently non-quantitative in nature. We report here on the potential of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) as a novel tomographic technique for non-invasive hot spot imaging and quantification of stem cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) tracers. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells, representing small and larger cell bodies, were labeled with three different SPIO tracer formulations, including two preparations that have previously been used in clinical MRI cell tracking studies (Feridex® and Resovist®). Magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) measurements demonstrated a linear correlation between MPI signal and iron content, for both homogeneous solutions of free particles in solution and for internalized and aggregated particles in labeled cells over a wide range of concentrations. The overall MP signal ranged from 1×10-3 - 3×10-4 Am2/g Fe, which was equivalent to 2×10-14 – 1×10-15 Am2 per cell, indicating that cell numbers can be quantified with MPI analogous to the use of radiotracers in nuclear medicine or fluorine tracers in 19F MRI. When SPIO-labeled cells were transplanted in mouse brain, they could be readily detected by MPI at a detection threshold of about 5×104 cells, with MPI/MRI overlays showing an excellent agreement between the hypointense MRI areas and MPI hot spots. The calculated tissue MPI signal ratio for 100,000 vs. 50,000 implanted cells was 2.08. Hence, MPI has potential to be further developed for quantitative and easy-to-interpret, tracer-based non-invasive imaging of cells, preferably with MRI as an adjunct anatomical imaging modality. PMID:26740972

  18. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Venta, Patrick J; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-10-01

    We developed a method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish using laser-ablated metaphase II eggs as recipients, the micropyle for transfer of the nucleus and an egg activation protocol after nuclear reconstruction. We produced clones from cells of both embryonic and adult origins, although the latter did not give rise to live adult clones. PMID:19718031

  19. Temperature and momentum dependence of single-particle properties in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.

    2008-11-15

    We have studied the effects of momentum-dependent interactions on the single-particle properties of hot asymmetric nuclear matter. In particular, the single-particle potential of protons and neutrons as well as the symmetry potential have been studied within a self-consistent model using a momentum-dependent effective interaction. In addition, the isospin splitting of the effective mass has been derived from the above model. In each case temperature effects have been included and analyzed. The role of the specific parametrization of the effective interaction used in the present work has been investigated. It has been concluded that the behavior of the symmetry potential depends strongly on the parametrization of the interaction part of the energy density and the momentum dependence of the regulator function. The effects of the parametrization have been found to be less pronounced on the isospin mass splitting.

  20. Fused-salt-liquid-metal corrosion of refractory alloys in the presence of hot cell impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.; Raraz, A.G.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1997-09-01

    The pyrochemical conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of final disposal is currently being demonstrated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). One aspect of this program is to develop a lithium preprocessing stage for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF). Furthermore, a pilot scale of this preprocessing stage is being designed by ANL-W to demonstrate the in situ hot cell capability of this process. In this pilot scale system, fused lithium chloride salt is saturated with molten lithium to form a powerful fluxing compound with a vigorous reducing agent. During this stage of the fuel conditioning, the reduction will take place at a nominal temperature of 650 C in an argon-cell atmosphere contaminated with up to 10,000 ppm nitrogen, 100 ppm oxygen and 100 ppm of moisture. The maximum local temperature was calculated to be 725 C on the inner shell of the reduction vessel during operation. One of the significant concerns of this project is the system`s corrosion response in the presence of irradiated commercial fuel as well as atmospheric impurities. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the potential corrosivity of the salt matrix in a worse case environment as well as provide a boundary for allowable impurities in the system during operation.

  1. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Additive Manufactured Hot Fire Planning and Testing in GRC Cell 32 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to hot fire test an additively manufactured thrust chamber assembly TCA (injector and thrust chamber). GRC will install the additively manufactured Inconel 625 injector, two additively manufactured (SLM) water cooled Cu-Cr thrust chamber barrels and one additively manufactured (SLM) water cooled Cu-Cr thrust chamber nozzle on the test stand in Cell 32 and perform hot fire testing of the integrated TCA.

  2. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. FLOOR PLAN OF EXPANSION SHOWS LOCATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. FLOOR PLAN OF EXPANSION SHOWS LOCATION OF NEW CELLS, "HEAVY" CELL AT WEST END, "LIGHT" CELLS AT EAST. MOCK-UP AND STORAGE AREAS IN SOUTH HALF OF FLOOR. H.K. FERGUSON 895-MTR-ETR-632-A1, 12/1958. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-279-101924, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WRIGHT 3TON HOIST ON EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WRIGHT 3-TON HOIST ON EAST SIDE OF CELL 2. SIGN AT LEFT OF VIEW SAYS, "...DO NOT BRING FISSILE MATERIAL INTO AREA WITHOUT APPROVAL." CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Reversible electron-hole separation in a hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Heiner

    Hot-carrier solar cells are envisioned to utilize energy filtering to extract power from photogenerated electron-hole pairs before they thermalize with the lattice, and thus potentially offer higher power conversion efficiency compared to conventional, single absorber solar cells. The efficiency of hot-carrier solar cells can be expected to strongly depend on the details of the energy filtering process, a relationship which to date has not been satisfactorily explored. Here, we establish the conditions under which electron-hole separation in hot-carrier solar cells can occur reversibly, that is, at maximum energy conversion efficiency. We find that, under specific conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a hot-carrier solar cell can exceed the Carnot limit set by the intra-device temperature gradient alone, due to the additional contribution of the quasi-Fermi level splitting in the absorber. To achieve this, we consider a highly selective energy filter such as a quantum dot embedded into a one-dimensional conductor. We also establish that the open-circuit voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell is not limited by the band gap of the absorber, due to the additional thermoelectric contribution to the voltage. Additionally, we find that a hot-carrier solar cell can be operated in reverse as a thermally driven solid-state light emitter. In addition this theoretical analysis, I will also report on first experimental results in a nanowire-based energy filter device. Ref: S Limpert, S Bremner, and H Linke, New J. Phys 17, 095004 (2015)

  5. Submerged RadBall® deployments in Hanford Site hot cells containing 137CsCl capsules.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Coleman, J Rusty; Stanley, Steven; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate that a new technology, known as RadBall®, could locate submerged radiological hazards. RadBall® is a novel, passive, radiation detection device that provides a 3-D visualization of radiation from areas where measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access or extremely high radiation doses. This technology has been under development during recent years, and all of its previous tests have included dry deployments. This study involved, for the first time, underwater RadBall® deployments in hot cells containing 137CsCl capsules at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. RadBall® can be used to characterize a contaminated room, hot cell, or glovebox by providing the locations of the radiation sources and hazards, identifying the radionuclides present within the cell, and determining the radiation sources' strength (e.g., intensities or dose rates). These parameters have been previously determined for dry deployments; however, only the location of radiation sources and hazards can be determined for an underwater RadBall® deployment. The results from this study include 3-D images representing the location of the radiation sources within the Hanford Site cells. Due to RadBall®'s unique deployability and non-electrical nature, this technology shows significant promise for future characterization of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities. PMID:22647921

  6. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%. PMID:24694838

  7. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  8. Remote maintenance for a new generation of hot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; Grant, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    For several years the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing facility concepts, designing specialized equipment, and testing prototypical hardware for reprocessing spent fuel from fast breeder reactors. The major facility conceptual design, the Hot Experimental Facility, was based on total remote maintenance to increase plant availability and to reduce radiation exposure. This thrust included designing modular equipment to facilitate maintenance and the manipulation necessary to accomplish maintenance. Included in the design repetoire was the development effort in advanced servomanipulator systems, a remote sampling system, television viewing, and a transporter for manipulator positioning. Demonstration of these developed items is currently ongoing, and the technology is available for applications where production operations in highly radioactive environments are required.

  9. A new avenue for high efficiency solar cells: interaction of hot electrons with plasmons (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Hot electrons rapidly dissipate their extra free energy, typically into heat. This is the origin of the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit of the single junction solar cells. An even faster mechanism of electron-plasmon scattering is available in metals. We demonstrate by detailed simulations, that an ultra-thin solar cell with a composite metamaterial/plasmonic collector could yield efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Quasar limit. The composite collector has a double function: firstly, it is designed to participate in efficiently trapping light, and secondly, it is a plasmonic resonator tuned to absorb the energy of hot electrons, thus protecting them from phonon losses.

  10. Spin-polarized lithium diffusion in a glass hot-vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    We report diffusion coefficients of optically pumped lithium atoms in helium buffer gas. The free-induction decay and the spin-echo signals of ground-state atoms were optically detected in an external magnetic field with the addition of field gradient. Lithium hot vapor was produced in a borosilicate-glass cell at a temperature between 290 and 360°C. The simple setup using the glass cells enabled lithium atomic spectroscopy in a similar way to other alkali-metal atoms and study of the collisional properties of lithium atoms in a hot-vapor phase.

  11. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ALONG WALLEYE AVENUE, CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ALONG WALLEYE AVENUE, CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. HOT CELL BUILDING IS AT CENTER LEFT OF VIEW; THE LOW-BAY PROJECTION WITH LADDER IS THE TEST TRAIN ASSEMBLY FACILITY, ADDED IN 1968. MTR BUILDING IS IN LEFT OF VIEW. HIGH-BAY BUILDING AT RIGHT IS THE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR BUILDING, TRA-642. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-32-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. A micro hot test of the Chalmers-GANEX extraction system on used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bauhn, L.; Hedberg, M.; Aneheim, E.; Ekberg, C.; Loefstroem-Engdahl, E.; Skarnemark, G.

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, a 'micro hot test' has been performed using the Chalmers-GANEX (Group Actinide Extraction) system for partitioning of used nuclear fuel. The test included a pre-extraction step using N,N-di-2- ethylhexyl-butyramide (DEHBA) in n-octanol to remove the bulk part of the uranium. This pre-extraction was followed by a group extraction of actinides using the mixture of TBP and CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP in cyclohexanone as suggested in the Chalmers-GANEX process, and a three stage stripping of the extracted actinides. Distribution ratios for the extractions and stripping were determined based on a combination of γ- and α-spectrometry, as well as ICP-MS measurements. Successful extraction of uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides neptunium, americium and curium was achieved. However, measurements also indicated that co-extraction of europium occurs to some extent during the separation. These results were expected based on previous experiments using trace concentrations of actinides and lanthanides. Since this test was only performed in one stage with respect to the group actinide extraction, it is expected that multi stage tests will give even better results. (authors)

  13. Antistrange meson-baryon interaction in hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, D.; Tolós, L.; Aichelin, J.; Bratkovskaya, E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of in-medium cross sections and (off-shell) transition rates for the most relevant binary reactions for strange pseudoscalar meson production close to threshold in heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research. Our results rely on a chiral unitary approach in coupled channels which incorporates the s and p waves of the kaon-nucleon interaction. The formalism, which is modified in the hot and dense medium to account for Pauli blocking effects, mean-field binding on baryons, and pion and kaon self-energies, has been improved to implement unitarization and self-consistency for both the s - and the p -wave interactions at finite temperature and density. This gives access to in-medium amplitudes in several elastic and inelastic coupled channels with strangeness content S =-1 . The obtained total cross sections mostly reflect the fate of the Λ (1405 ) resonance, which melts in the nuclear environment, whereas the off-shell transition probabilities are also sensitive to the in-medium properties of the hyperons excited in the p -wave amplitudes [Λ ,Σ , and Σ*(1385 ) ]. The single-particle potentials of these hyperons at finite momentum, density, and temperature are also discussed in connection with the pertinent scattering amplitudes. Our results are the basis for future implementations in microscopic transport approaches accounting for off-shell dynamics of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  14. A&M. TAN607. Special service cubicle (hot cell). Details include Zpipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Special service cubicle (hot cell). Details include Z-pipe and stepped plug penetrations through shielding wall. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-A116. Date: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-693-106767 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN633) contextual view also showing east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN-633) contextual view also showing east facade. Camera facing west. Note corridor connecting annex to pool area of TAN-607. Pumice block walls. Date: March 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-39-2-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND FILTER LOFT PLATFORM AND LADDER ON EAST SIDE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-4, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-396-110563, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS FOR SOUTH, NORTH AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS FOR SOUTH, NORTH AND WEST SIDES OF 1958 EXTENSION. H.K. FERGUSON CO. 895-MTR-ETR-632-A3, 12/1958. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-279-101926, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 115. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows location of high density concrete, viewing windows, filters, monorail crane, bridge crane, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-626-MS-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-40-613-102737. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS AWAIT ATTACHMENT TO HAND CONTROLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9001. Unknown Photographer, photo is identified as taken 10/28/1953, but it may be an error as it shows progress since ID-33-G-266 of same date. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. VIEW OF FECF HOT CELL OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP603). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF FECF HOT CELL OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORHTWEST. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-18-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 111. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building elevations of north, south, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building elevations of north, south, east, and west sides. Includes details of personnel decontamination area, dark room, and other features. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102723. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 114. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building details of fuel storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building details of fuel storage pit in plan and section. Spaces shown for 20 elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-S-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-60-613-102752. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 112. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building roof plan and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building roof plan and details of roof ventilating equipment and parapet. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-2. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102722. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  5. Plant Cell Nucleolus as a Hot Spot for Iron*

    PubMed Central

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Grillet, Louis; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Ortega, Richard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Many central metabolic processes require iron as a cofactor and take place in specific subcellular compartments such as the mitochondrion or the chloroplast. Proper iron allocation in the different organelles is thus critical to maintain cell function and integrity. To study the dynamics of iron distribution in plant cells, we have sought to identify the different intracellular iron pools by combining three complementary imaging approaches, histochemistry, micro particle-induced x-ray emission, and synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence. Pea (Pisum sativum) embryo was used as a model in this study because of its large cell size and high iron content. Histochemical staining with ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine (Perls/diaminobenzidine) strongly labeled a unique structure in each cell, which co-labeled with the DNA fluorescent stain DAPI, thus corresponding to the nucleus. The unexpected presence of iron in the nucleus was confirmed by elemental imaging using micro particle-induced x-ray emission. X-ray fluorescence on cryo-sectioned embryos further established that, quantitatively, the iron concentration found in the nucleus was higher than in the expected iron-rich organelles such as plastids or vacuoles. Moreover, within the nucleus, iron was particularly accumulated in a subcompartment that was identified as the nucleolus as it was shown to transiently disassemble during cell division. Taken together, our data uncover an as yet unidentified although abundant iron pool in the cell, which is located in the nuclei of healthy, actively dividing plant tissues. This result paves the way for the discovery of a novel cellular function for iron related to nucleus/nucleolus-associated processes. PMID:21719700

  6. Plant cell nucleolus as a hot spot for iron.

    PubMed

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Grillet, Louis; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Ortega, Richard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2011-08-12

    Many central metabolic processes require iron as a cofactor and take place in specific subcellular compartments such as the mitochondrion or the chloroplast. Proper iron allocation in the different organelles is thus critical to maintain cell function and integrity. To study the dynamics of iron distribution in plant cells, we have sought to identify the different intracellular iron pools by combining three complementary imaging approaches, histochemistry, micro particle-induced x-ray emission, and synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence. Pea (Pisum sativum) embryo was used as a model in this study because of its large cell size and high iron content. Histochemical staining with ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine (Perls/diaminobenzidine) strongly labeled a unique structure in each cell, which co-labeled with the DNA fluorescent stain DAPI, thus corresponding to the nucleus. The unexpected presence of iron in the nucleus was confirmed by elemental imaging using micro particle-induced x-ray emission. X-ray fluorescence on cryo-sectioned embryos further established that, quantitatively, the iron concentration found in the nucleus was higher than in the expected iron-rich organelles such as plastids or vacuoles. Moreover, within the nucleus, iron was particularly accumulated in a subcompartment that was identified as the nucleolus as it was shown to transiently disassemble during cell division. Taken together, our data uncover an as yet unidentified although abundant iron pool in the cell, which is located in the nuclei of healthy, actively dividing plant tissues. This result paves the way for the discovery of a novel cellular function for iron related to nucleus/nucleolus-associated processes. PMID:21719700

  7. Optoelectronic characterization of carrier extraction in a hot carrier photovoltaic cell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, James A. R.; Kauer, Matthias; Smith, Katherine; Liu, Huiyun; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Ekins-Daukes, Nicholas J.

    2016-07-01

    A hot carrier photovoltaic cell requires extraction of electrons on a timescale faster than they can lose energy to the lattice. We optically and optoelectronically characterize two resonant tunneling structures, showing their compatability with hot carrier photovoltaic operation, demonstrating structural and carrier extraction properties necessary for such a device. In particular we use time resolved and temperature dependent photoluminescence to determine extraction timescales and energy levels in the structures and demonstrate fast carrier extraction by tunneling. We also show that such devices are capable of extracting photo-generated electrons at high carrier densities, with an open circuit voltage in excess of 1 V.

  8. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  9. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state. PMID:23683578

  10. Study of LO-phonon decay in semiconductors for hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, Hugo; Vidal, Julien; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of phonon decay is of crucial importance when studying basic properties of semiconductors, since they are closely related to Raman linewidth and non-equilibrium-hot-carriers cooling. The latter indeed cools down to the bottom of the conduction band within a picosecond range because of electron-phonon interaction. The eventual emitted hot phonons then decay in few picoseconds. The hot carriers cooling can be slowed down by considering the decay rate dependence of phonon on conservation rules, whose tuning may reduce the allowed two-phonon final states density. This is of direct interest for the third generation photovoltaic devices that are Hot Carrier Solar Cells (HCSC), in which the photoexcited carriers are extracted at an energy higher than thermal equilibrium. One of the HCSC main challenges then is to find an absorber material in which the hot phonons has a relaxation time longer than the carriers cooling time, so that we can expect the electron to ``reabsorb'' a phonon, slowing down the electronic cooling. HCSC yield is ultimately limited by LO phonon decay, though. In this work, we present theoretical results obtained from ab initio calculations of phonon lifetime in III-V and IV-IV semiconductors through a three-phonon process. Common approximations in the literature are questioned. In particular, we show that the usual ``zone-center approximation'' is not valid in some specific semiconductors. The analysis allows to correctly investigate phonon decay mechanisms in bulk and nanostructured materials.

  11. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  12. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-S.; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-20

    The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  13. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  14. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension.

    PubMed

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  15. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  16. Hot-Wire CVD Amorphous Si Materials for Solar Cell Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films and their application to solar cells fabricated using the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) or (CAT)-CVD will be reviewed. This review will focus on the comparison to the standard plasma enhance (PE) CVD in the terms of deposition technique, film properties, and solar cell performance. The advantages of using HWCVD for a-Si:H solar cell research as well as the criteria for industry's adaptation of this technique for mass production will be addressed.

  17. Hot carrier solar cell absorbers: investigation of carrier cooling properties of candidate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conibeer, G.; Shrestha, Santosh; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Xia, Hongze; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Gupta, Neeti; Smyth, Suntrana; Liao, Yuanxun; Lin, Shu; Wang, Pei; Dai, Xi; Chung, Simon; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The hot carrier cell aims to extract the electrical energy from photo-generated carriers before they thermalize to the band edges. Hence it can potentially achieve a high current and a high voltage and hence very high efficiencies up to 65% under 1 sun and 86% under maximum concentration. To slow the rate of carrier thermalisation is very challenging, but modification of the phonon energies and the use of nanostructures are both promising ways to achieve some of the required slowing of carrier cooling. A number of materials and structures are being investigated with these properties and test structures are being fabricated. Initial measurements indicate slowed carrier cooling in III-Vs with large phonon band gaps and in multiple quantum wells. It is expected that soon proof of concept of hot carrier devices will pave the way for their development to fully functioning high efficiency solar cells.

  18. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT DOOR WAS DARKROOM, AND THIRD DOOR LED TO ANOTHER OFFICE. ALL ARE ALONG NORTH WALL OF BUILDING (ETR EXTENSION OF 1958). CAMERA FACES NORTHEAST. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  20. Evaluation of Tritium Behavior in the Epoxy Painted Concrete Wall of ITER Hot Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-07-15

    Tritium behavior released in the ITER hot cell has been investigated numerically using a combined analytical methods of a tritium transport analysis in the multi-layer wall (concrete and epoxy paint) with the one dimensional diffusion model and a tritium concentration analysis in the hot cell with the complete mixing model by the ventilation. As the results, it is revealed that tritium concentration decay and permeation issues are not serious problem in a viewpoint of safety, since it is expected that tritium concentration in the hot cell decrease rapidly within several days just after removing the tritium release source, and tritium permeation through the epoxy painted concrete wall will be negligible as long as the averaged realistic diffusion coefficient is ensured in the concrete wall. It is also revealed that the epoxy paint on the concrete wall prevents the tritium inventory increase in the concrete wall greatly (two orders of magnitudes), but still, the inventory in the wall is estimated to reach about 0.1 PBq for 20 years operation.

  1. The Hanford spent nuclear metal fuel multi-canister overpack and vacuum drying {ampersand} hot conditioning process

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1996-05-15

    Nuclear production reactors operated at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site from 1944 until 1988 to produce plutonium. Most of the irradiated fuel from these reactors was processed onsite to separate and recover the plutonium. When the processing facilities were closed in 1992, about 1,900 metric tons of unprocessed irradiated fuel remained in storage. Additional fuel was irradiated for research purposes or was shipped to the Hanford Site from offsite reactor facilities for storage or recovery of nuclear materials. The fuel inventory now in storage at the Hanford Site is predominantly N Reactor irradiated fuel, a metallic uranium alloy that is coextruded into zircaloy-2 cladding. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has rommitted to an accelerated schedule for removing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford Site K Basins to a new interim storage facility in the 200 Area. Under the current proposed accelerated schedule, retrieval of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K East and West Basins must begin by December 1997 and be completed by December 1999. A key part of this action is retrieving fuel canisters from the water-filled K Basin storage pools and transferring them into multi@ister overpacks (MCOS) that will be used to handle and process the fuel, then store it after conditioning. The Westinghouse Hanford Company has developed an integrated process to deal with the K Basin spent fuel inventory. The process consists of cleaning the fuel, packaging it into MCOS, vacuum drying it at the K Basins, then transporting it to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) for staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage. This presentation dekribes the MCO function, design, and life-cycle, including an overview of the vacuum drying and hot conditioning processes.

  2. Remotex: a new concept for efficient remote operation and maintenance in nuclear fuel reprocessing. [Hot Experimental Facility (HEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; White, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Remotex is a concept of remote operation and maintenance that utilizes advanced manipulator design to improve plant operating efficiency, reduce personnel exposure, and improve safeguards and diversion resistance. It is a concept developed over the past two years in the conceptual design of the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF), a mechanically intense pilot plant facility designed to demonstrate reprocessng technology for early US breeder demonstration reactors. The Remotex concept is directly applicable to all segments of nuclear and nonnuclear industries where work tasks or conditions exist that are hazardous to the health of man.

  3. Connecting the "Hot Fusion Island" to the Nuclear Mainland: Search for 283,284,285Fl Decay Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, K. P.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Miernik, K.; Roberto, J. B.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Polyakov, A. N.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Voinov, A. A.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Sabelnikov, A. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Stoyer, M. A.

    The program of studies on superheavy nuclei to identify new isotopes anchoring the decay chains from the Hot Fusion Island to the Nuclear Mainland has been started at the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS, JINR Dubna) in collaboration between Russia, US and Poland. These studies are performed with new detection and digital data acquisition system developed at ORNL (Oak Ridge) and UT (Knoxville). The evidence for fast fission of the new isotope 284Fl is presented. The low cross section for the 3n channel of 239Pu + 48Ca reaction is attributed to lower than expected fission barriers in 287-284Fl.

  4. Experimental demonstration of hot-carrier photo-current in an InGaAs quantum well solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L. C.; Walters, R. J.; Führer, M. F.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.

    2014-06-09

    An unambiguous observation of hot-carrier photocurrent from an InGaAs single quantum well solar cell is reported. Simultaneous photo-current and photoluminescence measurements were performed for incident power density 0.04–3 kW cm{sup −2}, lattice temperature 10 K, and forward bias 1.2 V. An order of magnitude photocurrent increase was observed for non-equilibrium hot-carrier temperatures >35 K. This photocurrent activation temperature is consistent with that of equilibrium carriers in a lattice at elevated temperature. The observed hot-carrier photo-current is extracted from the well over an energy selective GaAs barrier, thus integrating two essential components of a hot-carrier solar cell: a hot-carrier absorber and an energy selective contact.

  5. 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene mutagenesis in mammalian cells: sequence-specific hot spot.

    PubMed Central

    Gentil, A; Margot, A; Sarasin, A

    1986-01-01

    Mutations induced by 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene were studied using temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 (SV40) mutants as probe in monkey kidney cells. In vitro treatment of the SV40 virions with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene increased mutagenesis and decreased survival in the viral progeny. A lethal hit of approximately 85 acetylaminofluorene adducts per SV40 genome was calculated. UV irradiation of cells prior to infection did not modify the results. Molecular analysis of independent SV40 revertants showed that 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene induces base substitutions that are located not opposite putative acetylaminofluorene adducts but next to them. Moreover, a hot spot of mutation restoring a true wild-type genotype was observed in 10 of the 16 revertants analyzed. This hot spot, not targeted opposite a major DNA lesion, was not observed using UV light as damaging agent in the same genetic assay. Two models involving the stabilization, by acetylaminofluorene adducts, of the secondary structure of a specific quasipalindromic SV40 sequence are proposed to explain this sequence-specific hot spot. PMID:3025845

  6. Precision Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Hotband Transition at 4.3 Micron Using a Hot Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Tian, Jyun-Yu; Chen, Hshan-Chen; Lien, Yu-Hung; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2011-06-01

    We report a mid-IR spectrometer based on a difference frequency generation (DFG). This tunable CW DFG source covers the spectral range from 2.6 {μ}m to 4.7 {μ}m with an output power of a few mW. The saturation spectrum of the 12C16O2 hot band 0111 - 0110 P(30) transition is greatly enhanced by using a 40 cm long hot cell. The saturated absorption S/N ratio of over 1000 at 1 Hz bandwidth is achieved. We investigate the linewidth analysis and absolute frequency measurement of this transition. This transition center frequency of 69,267,228.761(15) MHz and the transition linewidth of 3.040(36) MHz are accurately measured.

  7. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  8. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  9. Thermodynamics of Hot Nuclear Matter: 1978 in the Statistical Bootstrap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann; Hagedorn, Rolf

    We formulate the statistical bootstrap model for nuclear matter, and study its resulting thermodynamic properties at nuclear densities below the saturation density. We discuss the relevance of limiting temperature and the phase transition gas-`liquid' when the volume of the fireball grows with its energy.

  10. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  11. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  12. Investigation of the basic physics of high efficiency semiconductor hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, R. R.; Wang, W. B.; Mohaidat, J. M.; Cavicchia, M. A.; Raisky, O. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The main purpose of this research program is to investigate potential semiconductor materials and their multi-band-gap MQW (multiple quantum wells) structures for high efficiency solar cells for aerospace and commercial applications. The absorption and PL (photoluminescence) spectra, the carrier dynamics, and band structures have been investigated for semiconductors of InP, GaP, GaInP, and InGaAsP/InP MQW structures, and for semiconductors of GaAs and AlGaAs by previous measurements. The barrier potential design criteria for achieving maximum energy conversion efficiency, and the resonant tunneling time as a function of barrier width in high efficiency MQW solar cell structures have also been investigated in the first two years. Based on previous carrier dynamics measurements and the time-dependent short circuit current density calculations, an InAs/InGaAs - InGaAs/GaAs - GaAs/AlGaAs MQW solar cell structure with 15 bandgaps has been designed. The absorption and PL spectra in InGaAsP/InP bulk and MQW structures were measured at room temperature and 77 K with different pump wavelength and intensity, to search for resonant states that may affect the solar cell activities. Time-resolved IR absorption for InGaAsP/InP bulk and MQW structures has been measured by femtosecond visible-pump and IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. This, with the absorption and PL measurements, will be helpful to understand the basic physics and device performance in multi-bandgap InAs/InGaAs - InGaAs/InP - InP/InGaP MQW solar cells. In particular, the lifetime of the photoexcited hot electrons is an important parameter for the device operation of InGaAsP/InP MQW solar cells working in the resonant tunneling conditions. Lastly, time evolution of the hot electron relaxation in GaAs has been measured in the temperature range of 4 K through 288 K using femtosecond pump-IR-probe absorption technique. The temperature dependence of the hot electron relaxation time in the X valley has been measured.

  13. TERT promoter hot spot mutations are frequent in Indian cervical and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Vilvanathan; Arunkumar, Ganesan; Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy; Arun, Kanagaraj; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Rao, Arunagiri Kuha Deva Magendhra; Rajkumar, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam; Ajay, Chandrasekar; Rajaraman, Ramamurthy; Ramani, Rajendren; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix and oral cavity are most common cancers in India. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) overexpression is one of the hallmarks for cancer, and activation through promoter mutation C228T and C250T has been reported in variety of tumors and often shown to be associated with aggressive tumors. In the present study, we analyzed these two hot spot mutations in 181 primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity by direct DNA sequencing and correlated with patient's clinicopathological characteristics. We found relatively high frequency of TERT hot spot mutations in both cervical [21.4 % (30/140)] and oral [31.7 % (13/41)] squamous cell carcinomas. In cervical cancer, TERT promoter mutations were more prevalent (25 %) in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative cases compared to HPV-positive cases (20.6 %), and both TERT promoter mutation and HPV infection were more commonly observed in advanced stage tumors (77 %). Similarly, the poor and moderately differentiated tumors of the uterine cervix had both the TERT hot spot mutations and HPV (16 and 18) at higher frequency (95.7 %). Interestingly, we observed eight homozygous mutations (six 228TT and two 250TT) only in cervical tumors, and all of them were found to be positive for high-risk HPV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting high prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity. Our results suggest that TERT reactivation through promoter mutation either alone or in association with the HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) could play an important role in the carcinogenesis of cervical and oral cancers. PMID:26700669

  14. Hot Hydrogen Testing of Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide (W-UO2) CERMET Fuel Materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Broadway, Jeramie

    2014-01-01

    CERMET fuel materials are being developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage. Recent work has resulted in the development and demonstration of a Compact Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET) System that is capable of subjecting depleted uranium fuel material samples to hot hydrogen. A critical obstacle to the development of an NCPS engine is the high-cost and safety concerns associated with developmental testing in nuclear environments. The purpose of this testing capability is to enable low-cost screening of candidate materials, fabrication processes, and further validation of concepts. The CERMET samples consist of depleted uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel particles in a tungsten metal matrix, which has been demonstrated on previous programs to provide improved performance and retention of fission products1. Numerous past programs have utilized hot hydrogen furnace testing to develop and evaluate fuel materials. The testing provides a reasonable simulation of temperature and thermal stress effects in a flowing hydrogen environment. Though no information is gained about radiation damage, the furnace testing is extremely valuable for development and verification of fuel element materials and processes. The current work includes testing of subscale W-UO2 slugs to evaluate fuel loss and stability. The materials are then fabricated into samples with seven cooling channels to test a more representative section of a fuel element. Several iterations of testing are being performed to evaluate fuel mass loss impacts from density, microstructure, fuel particle size and shape, chemistry, claddings, particle coatings, and stabilizers. The fuel materials and forms being evaluated on this effort have all been demonstrated to control fuel migration and loss. The objective is to verify performance improvements of the various materials and process options prior to expensive full scale fabrication and testing. Post test analysis will

  15. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  16. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since "Dolly," the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories. PMID:19085136

  17. Nuclear Star Formation in the Hot-Spot Galaxy NGC 2903

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Ryder, S. D.; Knapen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution near-infrared imaging obtained using adaptive optics and HST/NICMOS and ground-based spectroscopy of the hot-spot galaxy NGC 2903. Our near-infrared resolution imaging enables us to resolve the infrared hot spots into individual young stellar clusters or groups of these. The spatial distribution of the stellar clusters is not coincident with that of the bright H II regions, as revealed by the HST/NICMOS Pace image. Overall, the circumnuclear star formation in NGC 2903 shows a ring-like morphology with an approximate diameter of 625 pc. The SF properties of the stellar clusters and H II regions have been studied using the photometric and spectroscopic information in conjunction with evolutionary synthesis models. The population of bright stellar clusters shows a very narrow range of ages, 4 to 7 x 10(exp 6) yr after the peak of star formation, or absolute ages 6.5 to 9.5 x 10(exp 6) yr (for the assumed short-duration Gaussian bursts), and luminosities similar to the clusters found in the Antennae interacting galaxy. This population of young stellar clusters accounts for some 7 - 12% of the total stellar mass in the central 625 pc of NGC 2903. The H II regions in the ring of star formation have luminosities close to that of the super-giant H II region 30 Doradus, they are younger than the stellar clusters, and will probably evolve into bright infrared stellar clusters similar to those observed today. We find that the star formation efficiency in the central regions of NGC 2903 is higher than in normal galaxies, approaching the lower end of infrared luminous galaxies.

  18. Probing charge transfer and hot carrier dynamics in organic solar cells with terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Lane, Paul A.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Esenturk, Okan; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) was used to explore charge generation, transfer, and the role of hot carriers in organic solar cell materials. Two model molecular photovoltaic systems were investigated: with zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or alpha-sexathiophene (α-6T) as the electron donors and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as the electron acceptor. TRTS provides charge carrier conductivity dynamics comprised of changes in both population and mobility. By using time-resolved optical spectroscopy in conjunction with TRTS, these two contributions can be disentangled. The sub-picosecond photo-induced conductivity decay dynamics of C60 were revealed to be caused by auto-ionization: the intrinsic process by which charge is generated in molecular solids. In donor-acceptor blends, the long-lived photo-induced conductivity is used for weight fraction optimization of the constituents. In nanoscale multilayer films, the photo-induced conductivity identifies optimal layer thicknesses. In films of ZnPc/C60, electron transfer from ZnPc yields hot charges that localize and become less mobile as they thermalize. Excitation of high-lying Franck Condon states in C60 followed by hole-transfer to ZnPc similarly produces hot charge carriers that self-localize; charge transfer clearly precedes carrier cooling. This picture is contrasted to charge transfer in α-6T/C60, where hole transfer takes place from a thermalized state and produces equilibrium carriers that do not show characteristic signs of cooling and self-localization. These results illustrate the value of terahertz spectroscopic methods for probing charge transfer reactions.

  19. Crystal Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells by Hot-Wire CVD: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y. Q.; Roybal, L.; Bauer, R.; To, B.; Yuan, H. C.; Duda, A.; Yan, Y. F.

    2008-05-01

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) is a promising technique for fabricating Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. In this paper we describe our efforts to increase the open circuit voltage (Voc) while improving the efficiency of these devices. On p-type c-Si float-zone wafers, we used a double heterojunction structure with an amorphous n/i contact to the top surface and an i/p contact to the back surface to obtain an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 679 mV in a 0.9 cm2 cell with an independently confirmed efficiency of 19.1%. This is the best reported performance for a cell of this configuration. We also made progress on p-type CZ wafers and achieved 18.7% independently confirmed efficiency with little degradation under prolong illumination. Our best Voc for a p-type SHJ cell is 0.688 V, which is close to the 691 mV we achieved for SHJ cells on n type c-Si wafers.

  20. Quantum statistical thermodynamics of hot finite nuclear systems: Temperatures and isotopic yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Majka, Z.; Staszel, P.; Cibor, J.; Natowitz, J.B.; Hagel, K.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Wada, R.; Zhao, Y.

    1997-06-01

    We investigate the importance of the quantum statistics and deexcitation of primary fragments on the isotope yield ratio temperature determination. A phenomenological formula is presented which allows derivation of the temperature of the decaying nuclear system at the freeze-out time from the measured double yield ratios of two isotope pairs. This prescription is applied to the recent ALADIN and EOS Collaboration data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Hard photons and neutral pions as probes of hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Y.; Martínez, G.; Marqués, F. M.; Marín, A.; Matulewicz, T.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Bożek, P.; Delagrange, H.; Díaz, J.; Franke, M.; Gudima, K. K.; Hlaváč, S.; Holzmann, R.; Lautridou, P.; Lefèvre, F.; Löhner, H.; Mittig, W.; Płoszajczak, M.; van Pol, J. H. G.; Québert, J.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Schubert, A.; Siemssen, R. H.; Simon, R. S.; Sujkowski, Z.; Toneev, V. D.; Wagner, V.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wolf, Gy.

    1997-02-01

    The dynamics of heavy-ion collisions is studied in an energy domain in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. The early history of the collision is analyzed from the theoretical and experimental point of view in which the message conveyed by bremsstrahlung photons and neutral pions is exploited. The Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model and the Dubna Cascade Model, both based on similar principles but each adopting different computation technics, are briefly described and their respective predictions are discussed. In particular the emission pattern of bremsstrahlung photons is discussed. The photon production has been measured in the systems 86Kr+ 58Ni at 60 A MeV, 181Ta+ 197Au at 40 A MeV and 208Pb+ 197Au at 30 A MeV and energy spectra, angular distributions and two-photon correlations have been analyzed. We find that bremsstrahlung photons are emitted from two distinct sources that can be correlated with nuclear-matter density oscillations. The properties of photon emission are discussed in terms of collective properties of nuclear matter. The high energy tail of the photon spectrum is interpreted by π0 and Δ decay but predominantly by radiative capture of pions. The π0 absorption in the nuclear medium is further analyzed by examining their emission pattern.

  2. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture platform

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; Charest, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying the known commercially-viable manufacturing methods to a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) material resulted in a microfluidic device with enhanced 3D gel capabilities, controlled surface properties, and improved potential to serve high-volume applications. Hot embossing and roller lamination molded and sealed the microfluidic device. A combination of oxygen plasma and thermal treatments enhanced the sealing, ensured proper placement of the 3D gel, and created controlled and stable surface properties within the device. Culture of cells in the new device indicated no adverse effects of the COC material or processing as compared to previous PDMS devices. The results demonstrate a methodology to transition microfludic devices for 3D cell culture from scientific research to high-volume applications with broad clinical impact. PMID:21113663

  3. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.

    1994-12-31

    Theories have suggested that there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and sperm fertility. At present, biochemical analyses have only been performed on bulk populations and existing methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. As part of an investigation into male sperm fertility, nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the ratio of Phosphorus to Sulfur the authors have been able to determine the amount of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in individual cells from bulk fertile samples of bull and mouse sperm. Preliminary results show that, for each species, the relative amounts of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in morphologically normal sperm agree well with expected values.

  4. Hot-carrier solar cells using low-dimensional quantum structures

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi

    2014-10-27

    We propose a high-conversion-efficiency solar cell (SC) utilizing the hot carrier (HC) population in an intermediate-band (IB) of a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) structure. The bandgap of the host semiconductor in this device plays an important role as an energy-selective barrier for HCs in the QDSLs. According to theoretical calculation using the detailed balance model with an air mass 1.5 spectrum, the optimum IB energy is determined by a trade-off relation between the number of HCs with energy exceeding the conduction-band edge and the number of photons absorbed by the valence band−IB transition. Utilizing experimental data of HC temperature in InAs/GaAs QDSLs, the maximum conversion efficiency under maximum concentration (45 900 suns) has been demonstrated to increase by 12.6% as compared with that for a single-junction GaAs SC.

  5. Hot-carrier solar cells using low-dimensional quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    We propose a high-conversion-efficiency solar cell (SC) utilizing the hot carrier (HC) population in an intermediate-band (IB) of a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) structure. The bandgap of the host semiconductor in this device plays an important role as an energy-selective barrier for HCs in the QDSLs. According to theoretical calculation using the detailed balance model with an air mass 1.5 spectrum, the optimum IB energy is determined by a trade-off relation between the number of HCs with energy exceeding the conduction-band edge and the number of photons absorbed by the valence band-IB transition. Utilizing experimental data of HC temperature in InAs/GaAs QDSLs, the maximum conversion efficiency under maximum concentration (45 900 suns) has been demonstrated to increase by 12.6% as compared with that for a single-junction GaAs SC.

  6. Experimental evidence of hot carriers solar cell operation in multi-quantum wells heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodière, Jean; Lombez, Laurent; Le Corre, Alain; Durand, Olivier; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2015-05-04

    We investigated a semiconductor heterostructure based on InGaAsP multi quantum wells (QWs) using optical characterizations and demonstrate its potential to work as a hot carrier cell absorber. By analyzing photoluminescence spectra, the quasi Fermi level splitting Δμ and the carrier temperature are quantitatively measured as a function of the excitation power. Moreover, both thermodynamics values are measured at the QWs and the barrier emission energy. High values of Δμ are found for both transition, and high carrier temperature values in the QWs. Remarkably, the quasi Fermi level splitting measured at the barrier energy exceeds the absorption threshold of the QWs. This indicates a working condition beyond the classical Shockley-Queisser limit.

  7. Assays to measure nuclear mechanics in interphase cells

    PubMed Central

    Isermann, Philipp; Davidson, Patricia M.; Sliz, Josiah D.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus is the characteristic hallmark of all eukaryotic cells. The physical properties of the nucleus reflect important biological characteristics, such as chromatin organization or nuclear envelope composition; they can also directly affect cellular function, for example, when cells pass through narrow constrictions, where the stiff nucleus may present a limiting factor. We present two complementary techniques to probe the mechanical properties of the nucleus. In the first, nuclear stiffness relative to the surrounding cytoskeleton is inferred from induced nuclear deformations during strain application to cells on an elastic substrate. In the second approach, nuclear deformability is deduced from the transit time through a perfusion-based microfabricated device with constrictions smaller than the size of the nucleus. These complementary methods, which can be applied to measure nuclear stiffness in large numbers of living adherent or suspended cells, can help identify important changes in nuclear mechanics associated with disease or development. PMID:22968843

  8. Thermal and stress analysis of hot isostatically pressed, alumina ceramic, nuclear waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yun; Hoenig, C.L.

    1990-03-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is studying design and fabrication options for a safe durable container in which to store nuclear waste underground at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The ceramic container discussed here is an alternative to using a metal container. This ceramic alternative would be selected if site conditions prove too corrosive to use metals for nuclear waste storage. Some of the engineering problems addressed in this study were: the stress generated in the alumina container by compressive loads when 4000 to 40,000 psi of external pressure is applied; the thermal stress in the container during the heating and cooling processes; the temperature histories of the container in various production scenarios and the power required for typical heaters; the fastest possible turnaround time to heat, seal, and cool the container commensurate with preserving the structural integrity of the ceramic and the closure; the testing of some commercial heating elements to determine the maximum available heat output; and the trade-offs between the minimization in thermal stress and cycle time for closure. 2 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Probing the {rho} spectral function in hot and dense nuclear matter by dileptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Rapp, R.; Wambach, J.

    1998-02-01

    We present a dynamical study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN-SPS energies on the basis of the covariant transport approach HSD employing a momentum-dependent {rho}-meson spectral function that includes the pion modifications in the nuclear medium as well as the polarization of the {rho} meson due to resonant {rho}-N scattering. We find that the experimental data from the CERES and HELIOS-3 Collaborations can be described equally well as within the dropping {rho}-mass scenario. Whereas corresponding dilepton q{sub T} spectra are found to be very similar, the inclusive dilepton yield in the invariant mass range 0.85{le}M{le}1.0 GeV should allow us to disentangle the two scenarios experimentally. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Epitaxial Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Below 750 ..deg..C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Alberi, K.; Martin, I. T.; Shub, M.; Teplin, C. W.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; duda, A.; Stradin, P.; Johnston, S. W.; Romero, M. J.; Branz, H. M.; Young, D. L.

    2009-06-01

    We report on fabricating film c-Si solar cells on Si wafer templates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. These devices, grown at glass-compatible temperatures < 750..deg..C, demonstrate open-circuit voltages > 500 mV and efficiencies > 5%.

  11. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  12. Indications for a critical end point in the phase diagram for hot and dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Roy A

    2015-04-10

    Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference (R_{out}^{2}-R_{side}^{2}) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au+Au (sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7-200  GeV) and Pb+Pb (sqrt[s_{NN}]=2.76  TeV) collisions are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed nonmonotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential (T,μ_{B}) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of these data suggests a second order phase transition with the estimates T^{cep}∼165  MeV and μ_{B}^{cep}∼95  MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents (ν≈0.66 and γ≈1.2) extracted via the same FSS analysis place this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class. PMID:25910113

  13. Observation of the critical end point in the phase diagram for hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy

    2015-10-01

    Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference (Rout2 -Rside2) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au+Au (√{sNN} = 7 . 7 - 200 GeV) and Pb+Pb (√{sNN} = 2 . 76 TeV) collisions, are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed non-monotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature vs. baryon chemical potential (T ,μB) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A Dynamic Finite-Size Scaling (DFSS) analysis of these data suggests a second order phase transition with the estimates Tcep 165 MeV and μBcep 95 MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents (ν 0 . 66 and γ 1 . 2) extracted via the same DFSS analysis, places this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class. This research is supported by the US DOE under Contract DE-FG02-87ER40331.A008.

  14. Indications for a Critical End Point in the Phase Diagram for Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy A.

    2015-04-01

    Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference (Rout2-Rside2) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au +Au (√{sN N }=7.7 - 200 GeV ) and Pb +Pb (√{sN N }=2.76 TeV ) collisions are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed nonmonotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential (T ,μB) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of these data suggests a second order phase transition with the estimates Tcep˜165 MeV and μBcep˜95 MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents (ν ≈0.66 and γ ≈1.2 ) extracted via the same FSS analysis place this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class.

  15. Route Planning and Estimate of Heat Loss of Hot Water Transportation Piping for Fuel Cell Local Energy Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shinya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    The method of supplying the electric power and heat energy for the energy demand of buildings by Centralized system type and distributed system type of fuel cell network is studied. The hot-water piping route planning program of fuel cell network was developed by using genetic algorithm based on the view of TSP ( Traveling salesman problem) . In this program, the piping route planning which minimizes the quantity of heat loss in hot-water piping can be performed. The residential section model of Sapporo city of 74 buildings was analyzed, and the quantity of heat loss from the hot-water piping of both systems was estimated. Consequently, the ratio of the quantity of heat loss of a distributed system to a centralized system was about 50% in the full year average. This program is introduced into the route planning of hot- Water piping system of the fuel cell network, and plan to reduce the quantity of heat loss in a distributed system will be made.

  16. The feasibility study of hot cell decontamination by the PFC spray method

    SciTech Connect

    Hui-Jun Won; Chong-Hun Jung; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2008-01-15

    module. A performance test on each module was executed and the results have been reported. A combined test of the four modules, however, has not been performed as yet. The main objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of the full PFC spray decontamination process. Decontamination of the inside of the IMEF hot cell by the PFC spray method was also performed. PFC spray decontamination process was demonstrated by using a surrogate wall contaminated with Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The spray pressure was 41 kgf/cm{sup 2}, the orifice diameter was 0.2 mm and the spray velocity was 0.2 L/min. And, the decontaminated area was 100 cm{sup 2}. From previous test results, we found that the decontamination factor of the PFC spray method was in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. When the decontamination efficiency of Co-60 was high, then the decontamination efficiency of Cs-137 was also high. As the surface roughness of the specimen increased, the PFC spray decontamination efficiency decreased. Inferring from the previous results, the surface of the surrogate wall was cleaned by the PFC spray method. The vacuum cup of the collection module operated well and gathered more than 99 % of the PFC solution. Also, filtration and distillation modules operated well. All the filtered PFC solution flowed to the storage chamber where some of the PFC solution was distilled. The coolant of the distillation module was a dry ice. And, the recycled solution was transferred to the spray module by a high pressure pump. To evaluate the PFC spray decontamination efficiency, a smear device was fabricated and operated by a manipulator. Before and after decontamination, a smear test was performed. The tested area was 100 cm{sup 2} and the radioactivity was estimated indirectly by measuring the radioactivity of the filter paper. The average decontamination factor was in the range between 10 and 15. One application time was 2 minutes. The sprayed PFC solution was collected by the vacuum cup and

  17. Nuclear transfer preserves the nuclear genome of freeze-dried mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Eiji; Li, Chong; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-12-01

    Mouse spermatozoa can be freeze dried without losing genetic integrity and reproductive potential. However, it is not known if freeze-dried mouse cells similarly maintain their genetic integrity and developmental potential following nuclear transfer. Here, we investigated the developmental capacity and embryonic stem (ES) cell derivation of reconstructed oocytes by nuclear transfer using freeze-dried cumulus or ES cells. Cumulus and ES cells were lyophilized overnight and stored at 4 C for up to 1 week. After rehydration, all cells showed membrane damage and were unviable. However, following nuclear transfer, 1-4% of the reconstructed oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage. A total of five nuclear transfer ES (ntES) cell lines were generated from blastocysts and morulae. All ntES cell lines had normal karyotypes and were positive for the ES-cell-specific markers (alkaline phosphatase, Oct3/4 and Nanog). After aggregation of ntES cells with fertilized embryos, chimeric mice with a high level of coat color chimerism were generated. Our findings show that the genomic integrity of cells can be maintained after freeze-drying and that it is possible to produce offspring from the cells using nuclear transfer techniques. PMID:18854641

  18. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  19. Nuclear F-actin formation and reorganization upon cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  20. The nuclear pore complex acts as a master switch for nuclear and cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with the functional differentiation of the nucleus, in which alteration of the expression profiles of transcription factors occurs to destine cell fate. Nuclear transport machineries, such as importin-α, have also been reported as critical factors that induce cell differentiation. Using various fluorescence live cell imaging methods, including time-lapse imaging, FRAP analysis and live-cell imaging associated correlative light and electron microscopy (Live CLEM) of Tetrahymena, a unicellular ciliated protozoan, we have recently discovered that type switching of the NPC is the earliest detectable event of nuclear differentiation. Our studies suggest that this type switching of the NPC directs the fate of the nucleus to differentiate into either a macronucleus or a micronucleus. Our findings in this organism may provide new insights into the role of the NPC in controlling nuclear functions in general in eukaryotes, including controlling cell fate leading to cell differentiation in multicellular metazoa. PMID:26479399

  1. The nuclear pore complex acts as a master switch for nuclear and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with the functional differentiation of the nucleus, in which alteration of the expression profiles of transcription factors occurs to destine cell fate. Nuclear transport machineries, such as importin-α, have also been reported as critical factors that induce cell differentiation. Using various fluorescence live cell imaging methods, including time-lapse imaging, FRAP analysis and live-cell imaging associated correlative light and electron microscopy (Live CLEM) of Tetrahymena, a unicellular ciliated protozoan, we have recently discovered that type switching of the NPC is the earliest detectable event of nuclear differentiation. Our studies suggest that this type switching of the NPC directs the fate of the nucleus to differentiate into either a macronucleus or a micronucleus. Our findings in this organism may provide new insights into the role of the NPC in controlling nuclear functions in general in eukaryotes, including controlling cell fate leading to cell differentiation in multicellular metazoa. PMID:26479399

  2. Methods for Assessing Nuclear Rotation and Nuclear Positioning in Developing Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Meredith H; Bray, Matthew G; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle cells are large syncytia, containing hundreds of nuclei positioned regularly along the length of the fiber. During development, nuclei are actively distributed throughout the myotube by the microtubule motor proteins, kinesin-1, and cytoplasmic dynein. Nuclear movement consists of translocation along the long axis of the cell concurrent with three-dimensional rotation of nuclei. In this chapter we describe methods for quantitatively assessing the speed of nuclear rotation in cultured myotubes using live-cell imaging techniques coupled with rigid body kinematic analyses. Additionally, we provide protocols for analyzing nuclear distribution in myotubes. PMID:27147049

  3. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well.

    PubMed

    Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-06-01

    In this issue, Chung et al. (2014) generate human embryonic stem cells by fusing an adult somatic cell to a previously enucleated human oocyte, in agreement with recent reports by the Mitalipov and Egli groups. We can now safely say that human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well. PMID:24905159

  4. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Buck, Taraz E.; Sullivan, Devin P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  5. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko; Ichiki, Akihisa; Kusano, Yuya; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  6. Hot-gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells-dechlorination and soot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D.; Gelb, A.; Lord, G.; Simons, G.

    1984-01-01

    Two separate aspects of hot-gas conditioning for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) were investigated: potential high temperature chloride sorbent materials were screened and tested and carbon deposition on MCFC components was studied experimentally to determine guidelines for maximizing MCFC efficiency while avoiding carbon fouling. Natural minerals containing sodium carbonate were identified as the most promising candidates for economical removal of chlorides from coal gasifier effluents at temperatures of about 800 K (980 F). The mineral Shortite was tested in a fixed bed and found to perform remarkably well with no calcination. Measurements showed that carbon deposition can occur in the equilibrium carbon free region because of the relative rates of the relevant reactions. On all surfaces tested, the Boudouard carbon formation reaction is much faster than the water-gas shift reaction which is much faster than the methanation reaction. This means that the normal practice of adding steam to prevent carbon formation will only succeed if flows are slow enough for the water shift reaction to go substantially to completion. More direct suppression of carbon formation can be achieved by CO2 addition through anode recycle to force the Boudouard reaction backward.

  7. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Yasuhiko Sugimoto, Noriaki; Ichiki, Akihisa; Kusano, Yuya; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-28

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  8. Development of remote crane system for use inside small argon hot-cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yu, Seung-Nam; Kim, Kiho; Cho, Ilje

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a novel crane system for the use in a small argon hot-cell where only a pair of master-slave manipulators (MSM) is available for the remote maintenance of the crane. To increase the remote maintainability in the space-limited environment, we devised a remote actuation mechanism in which electrical parts consisting of a servo-motor, a position sensor, and two limit switches located inside the workspace of the MSM transmit power to the mechanical parts located in the ceiling. Even though the design concept does not provide thoroughly sufficient solution because the mechanical parts are placed out of the MSM's workspace, the durability of mechanical parts can be easily increased if they have a high safety margin. Therefore, the concept may be one of the best solutions for our special crane system. In addition, we developed a servo-control system based on absolute positioning technology; therefore, it is possible for us to perform the given tasks more safely through an automatic operation. (authors)

  9. Hot Cell Liners Category of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Robert Wesley; Hargis, Kenneth Marshall

    2014-09-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is an agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Hot Cell Liners category; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and the justification to reclassify the five containers as LLW rather than TRU waste.

  10. Regulation of nuclear transport in proliferating and quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Feldherr, C M; Akin, D

    1993-03-01

    Previously, we compared signal-mediated nuclear transport in proliferating and quiescent BALB/c 3T3 cells and found that both the relative rate of nuclear uptake and the functional size of the transport channels were significantly greater in proliferating cells. In this study, the possible causes of these permeability differences were investigated. To determine if the decrease in transport capacity in quiescent cells was due to a reduction in the availability of soluble cytoplasmic factors (i.e., ATP or receptors for nuclear location sequences), or changes in the properties of the pores themselves, proliferating and quiescent cells were fused, and nuclear import of nucleoplasmin-coated gold (NP-gold) particles was assayed in the heterokaryons 50-60 min later. Significant differences in nuclear uptake were maintained following fusion, even though the two nuclei shared a common cytoplasm, consistent with the view that permeability is regulated at the level of the pores. Cell shape also influenced signal-mediated nuclear import. This was demonstrated by studying transport in rounded and flattened cells attached to different-size palladium domains that were deposited on a nonadhesive substrate. Based on analysis of the nuclear uptake rates of large (110-270 A in diameter) and small (50-80 A in diameter) coated gold particles, it was determined that the functional size of the pores was significantly greater in flattened cells. The effect of growth factors on recovery of nuclear transport capacity following serum depletion was also analyzed. Partial recovery was achieved by treating cells with physiological concentrations of EGF, IGF-1, or PDGF; however, complete recovery required both EGF and IGF-1. PMID:8453991

  11. Nanotopographical Modulation of Cell Function through Nuclear Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Bruce, Allison; Mezan, Ryan; Kadiyala, Anand; Wang, Liying; Dawson, Jeremy; Rojanasakul, Yon; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Although nanotopography has been shown to be a potent modulator of cell behavior, it is unclear how the nanotopographical cue, through focal adhesions, affects the nucleus, eventually influencing cell phenotype and function. Thus, current methods to apply nanotopography to regulate cell behavior are basically empirical. We, herein, engineered nanotopographies of various shapes (gratings and pillars) and dimensions (feature size, spacing and height), and thoroughly investigated cell spreading, focal adhesion organization and nuclear deformation of human primary fibroblasts as the model cell grown on the nanotopographies. We examined the correlation between nuclear deformation and cell functions such as cell proliferation, transfection and extracellular matrix protein type I collagen production. It was found that the nanoscale gratings and pillars could facilitate focal adhesion elongation by providing anchoring sites, and the nanogratings could orient focal adhesions and nuclei along the nanograting direction, depending on not only the feature size but also the spacing of the nanogratings. Compared with continuous nanogratings, discrete nanopillars tended to disrupt the formation and growth of focal adhesions and thus had less profound effects on nuclear deformation. Notably, nuclear volume could be effectively modulated by the height of nanotopography. Further, we demonstrated that cell proliferation, transfection, and type I collagen production were strongly associated with the nuclear volume, indicating that the nucleus serves as a critical mechanosensor for cell regulation. Our study delineated the relationships between focal adhesions, nucleus and cell function and highlighted that the nanotopography could regulate cell phenotype and function by modulating nuclear deformation. This study provides insight into the rational design of nanotopography for new biomaterials and the cell–substrate interfaces of implants and medical devices. PMID:26844365

  12. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  13. Fascin Regulates Nuclear Movement and Deformation in Migrating Cells.

    PubMed

    Jayo, Asier; Malboubi, Majid; Antoku, Susumu; Chang, Wakam; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Groen, Christopher; Pfisterer, Karin; Tootle, Tina; Charras, Guillaume; Gundersen, Gregg G; Parsons, Maddy

    2016-08-22

    Fascin is an F-actin-bundling protein shown to stabilize filopodia and regulate adhesion dynamics in migrating cells, and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis and increased metastatic potential in a number of cancers. Here, we identified the nuclear envelope protein nesprin-2 as a binding partner for fascin in a range of cell types in vitro and in vivo. Nesprin-2 interacts with fascin through a direct, F-actin-independent interaction, and this binding is distinct and separable from a role for fascin within filopodia at the cell periphery. Moreover, disrupting the interaction between fascin and nesprin-2 C-terminal domain leads to specific defects in F-actin coupling to the nuclear envelope, nuclear movement, and the ability of cells to deform their nucleus to invade through confined spaces. Together, our results uncover a role for fascin that operates independently of filopodia assembly to promote efficient cell migration and invasion. PMID:27554857

  14. Hot nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S.

    1992-11-01

    The goal in this thesis is thus twofold: The first is to investigate the feasibility of using heavy ion collisions to create conditions in the laboratory which are ripe for the formation of a quark-gluon plasma. The second is to develop a technique for studying some of the many non-perturbative features of this novel phase of matter.

  15. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  16. A simple polymeric model describes cell nuclear mechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Stephens, Andrew; Marko, John

    The cell nucleus must continually resist inter- and intracellular mechanical forces, and proper mechanical response is essential to basic cell biological functions as diverse as migration, differentiation, and gene regulation. Experiments probing nuclear mechanics reveal that the nucleus stiffens under strain, leading to two characteristic regimes of force response. This behavior depends sensitively on the intermediate filament protein lamin A, which comprises the outer layer of the nucleus, and the properties of the chromatin interior. To understand these mechanics, we study a simulation model of a polymeric shell encapsulating a semiflexible polymer. This minimalistic model qualitatively captures the typical experimental nuclear force-extension relation and observed nuclear morphologies. Using a Flory-like theory, we explain the simulation results and mathematically estimate the force-extension relation. The model and experiments suggest that chromatin organization is a dominant contributor to nuclear mechanics, while the lamina protects cell nuclei from large deformations.

  17. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  18. Endothelial Cells Derived From Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wing Tak; Huang, Ngan F.; Botham, Crystal M.; Sayed, Nazish; Cooke, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The endothelium plays a pivotal role in vascular homeostasis, regulating the tone of the vascular wall, and its interaction with circulating blood elements. Alterations in endothelial functions facilitate the infiltration of inflammatory cells and permit vascular smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Therefore, endothelial dysfunction is an early event in disease processes including atherosclerosis, and because of its critical role in vascular health the endothelium is worthy of the intense focus it has received. However, there are limitations to studying human endothelial function in vivo, or human vascular segments ex vivo. Thus, methods for endothelial cell culture have been developed and refined. More recently, methods to derive endothelial cells from pluripotent cells have extended the scientific range of human endothelial cell studies. Pluripotent stem cells may be generated, expanded and then differentiated into endothelial cells for in vitro studies. Constructs for molecular imaging can also be employed to facilitate tracking these cells in vivo. Furthermore, one can generate patient-specific endothelial cells to study the effects of genetic or epigenetic alterations on endothelial behavior. Finally, there is the opportunity to apply these cells for vascular therapy. This review focuses on the generation of endothelial cells from stem cells; their characterization by genetic, histological and functional studies; and their translational applications. PMID:23104878

  19. The nuclear membranes in hypertrophied human cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrans, V. J.; Jones, M.; Maron, B. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear membranes of cardiac muscle cells were studied in 134 patients with cardiac hypertrophy of various causes. Abnormalities observed consisted of: a) increased foldings and convolutions; b) nuclear pseudoinclusions formed by cytoplasmic organelles protruding into saccular invaginations of the nuclear membranes, and c) intranuclear tubules. The increased foldings and convolutions of the nuclear membranes and the nuclear pseudoinclusions appear to result from synthesis of nuclear membranes in excess of that needed to accommodate the increase in nuclear volume which occurs in hypertrophy. Intranuclear tubules were found in 6 patients and consisted of tubular invaginations, 400 to 650 A in diameter, of the inner nuclear membranes into the nucleoplasm. Some of these tubules were straight and cylindrical, and were associated with a peripheral layer of marginated chromatin; others were not associated with chromatin, appeared coiled and followed irregular courses. Intranuclear tubules in cardiac muscle cells probably represent an extreme cellular response to the stimulus of hypertrophy. Images Fig 21 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 Fig 14 Fig 1 Fig 15 Fig 2 Figs 3 and 4 Fig 5 Fig 16 Fig 17 Fig 6 Fig 18 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 19 Fig 20 PMID:164122

  20. Hot gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells. A zinc oxide reactor model, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1980-09-16

    Utilization of coal gasifiers to power MCFC requires a cleanup system to remove sulfur and particulates. Of the two near term options available for desulfurization of gasifier effluent, namely low temperature cleanup utilizing absorber/stripper technology, and hot gas cleanup utilizing metal oxides, there is a clear advantage to using hot gas cleanup. Since the MCFC will operate at 1200/sup 0/F, and the gasifier effluent could be between 1200 to 1900/sup 0/F, a hot gas cleanup system will require little or no change in process gas temperature, thereby contributing to a high overall system efficiency. A hot gas cleanup system will consist of FeO for bulk H/sub 2/S removal and ZnO for reduction of H/sub 2/S to sub ppM levels. Hot gas cleanup systems at present are not available commercially, and therefore it is the objective of this project to model the components of the system in order to help bring this technology closer to commercialization, by providing simulated operating characteristics to aid in system design, and system simulations of gasifier/MCFC systems. The modeling of the ZnO reactor is presented.

  1. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  2. Semipermeability of the nuclear membrane in the intact cell.

    PubMed

    HARDING, C V; FELDHERR, C

    1959-07-20

    The osmotic properties of nuclei in intact cells were studied by injecting solutions into the cytoplasm of amphibian oocytes. Subsequent changes in nuclear volume were recorded photographically. The injection of solutions containing polyvinylpyrrolidone or bovine serum albumin caused changes in nuclear volume which were related to the colloid osmotic pressure of the solution injected. The concentration in which no significant nuclear volume change occurred (the isotonic range) was 1.0 to 1.5 per cent polyvinylpyrrolidone (2.0 to 3.75 x 10(-4)M). 2 per cent bovine serum albumin had no significant effect on nuclear volume, whereas 4 per cent caused a significant decrease. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the permeability characteristics of the nuclear membrane. PMID:13664918

  3. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  4. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  5. Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Complexes Containing Polyadenylate from Mouse Ascites Cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Thomas J.; Billings, Peter B.; Martin, Terence E.

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-containing RNA of mouse ascites cells can be extracted in the form of 15-17S ribonucleoprotein complexes under conditions in which the bulk of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA is released as 30S complexes. The poly(A)-containing fraction of nuclear extracts has been resolved into two distinct components, 15 and 17 S; neither contains the two polypeptides of 30S ribonucleoprotein. The 17S particle contains approximately six polypeptide species of molecular masses 17,000-30,000 daltons. The 15S complex has four distinct polypeptides of higher molecular mass, including a prominent 80,000-dalton species. PMID:4368966

  6. ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death.

    PubMed

    Raab, M; Gentili, M; de Belly, H; Thiam, H R; Vargas, P; Jimenez, A J; Lautenschlaeger, F; Voituriez, Raphaël; Lennon-Duménil, A M; Manel, N; Piel, M

    2016-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses. PMID:27013426

  7. Nuclear morphometry and chromatin textural characteristics of basal cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Mendaçolli, Paola Jung; Brianezi, Gabrielli; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Histological subtypes of basal cell carcinoma have biological, evolutionary and distinct prognostic behavior. The analysis of characteristics of the nucleus can provide data on their cellular physiology and behavior. The authors of this study evaluated nuclear morphological parameters and textural patterns of chromatin from different subtypes of basal cell carcinoma: nodular (n=37), superficial (n=28) and sclerodermiform (n=28). The parameters were compared between neoplasms' subtypes and with unaffected adjacent basal epithelium. Nuclear area and diameter of sclerodermiform neoplasms were superior to the other subtypes. Chromatin's color intensity and fractal dimension were less intense in superficial subtypes. Nuclear roundness and chromatin's entropy presented lower values in tumors than in normal epithelium. There was significant correlation between morphological and textural variables of normal skin and tumors. Morphometric elements and textural chromatin's homogeneity of basal cell carcinomas may be related to evolutionary, biological and behavior particularities related to each histotype. PMID:26734870

  8. Analyzing Cell Death by Nuclear Staining with Hoechst 33342.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    The nuclei of healthy cells are generally spherical, and the DNA is evenly distributed. During apoptosis the DNA becomes condensed, but this process does not occur during necrosis. Nuclear condensation can therefore be used to distinguish apoptotic cells from healthy cells or necrotic cells. Dyes that bind to DNA, such as Hoechst 33342 or 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), can be used to observe nuclear condensation. These dyes fluoresce at 461 nm when excited by ultraviolet light and can therefore be visualized using conventional fluorescent microscopes equipped with light sources that emit light at ∼350 nm and filter sets that permit the transmission of light at ∼460 nm. This protocol describes staining and visualization of cells stained with Hoechst 33342, but it can be adapted for staining with DAPI or other dyes. PMID:27587774

  9. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  10. Hot-cell design considerations for interfacing eddy-current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, E.M.; Webb, J.P.; Larson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North conducts remote eddy-current examination of irradiated fuel elements. Applications include cladding breach detection and irradiation-induced ferrite examination. The seccussful use of remote eddy-current techniques is achieved by applying basic test parameters and interfacing considerations. These include impedance matching, operating frequency, and feedthrough considerations.

  11. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  12. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors. PMID:27114912

  13. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors. PMID:27114912

  14. Silicon quantum dots in SiOx dielectrics as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of c-Si QDs embedded in a-SiOx dielectric matrix was achieved at a low temperature ˜400°C, from one step process by reactive rf magnetron co-sputtering of c-Si wafer and pure SiO2 targets, in the (H2+Ar)- plasma. Formation of a double-barrier structure has been primarily identified from the SAX data and exclusively confirmed from the resonant tunneling current appearing in the J-E characteristic curve peaks, determined by the discrete energy levels of c-Si QDs, at which it could be used as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells.

  15. Irradiation-induced changes in nuclear shape and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, M.; Sasaki, H.; Kishino, Y.; Tsuboi, T.; Sugishita, T.; Hosokawa, T.

    1982-03-01

    Using human uterine cervical carcinoma cells transplanted in nude mice and mice leukemia L5178Y cells, changes in the cell cycle following irradiation were observed by flow cytometry (FCM), and changes in the cell nuclei during the course of irradiation were measured by FCM. Experiments in vivo as well as in vitro caused accumulation of cells in the G2 to M populations, resulting in the so-called G2 block phenomenon as revealed by FCM analysis of DNA distributions. The radiation-induced changes of nuclear shapes were dependent on abnormal mitoses, which occurred more frequently in the G2 to M phases. Therefore it is suggested that the G2 block phenomenon plays an important role in radiation-induced cell death because the process of cell death by irradiation has been shown to proceed via these abnormal mitoses.

  16. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Huseyin; Liu, Jun; Tat, Pollyanna; Heffernan, Corey; Jones, Karen L; Verma, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Even though the technique of mammalian SCNT is just over a decade old it has already resulted in numerous significant advances. Despite the recent advances in the reprogramming field, SCNT remains the bench-mark for the generation of both genetically unmodified autologous pluripotent stem cells for transplantation and for the production of cloned animals. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of SCNT, drawing comparisons with other reprogramming methods. PMID:20232594

  17. Rabbit embryonic stem cell lines derived from fertilized, parthenogenetic or somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen F.; Gai, Hui; Huang, You Z.; Li, Shan G.; Chen, Xue J.; Shi, Jian J.; Wu, Li; Liu, Ailian; Xu, Ping; Sheng, Hui Z. . E-mail: hzsheng2003@yahoo.com

    2006-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells were isolated from rabbit blastocysts derived from fertilization (conventional rbES cells), parthenogenesis (pES cells) and nuclear transfer (ntES cells), and propagated in a serum-free culture system. Rabbit ES (rbES) cells proliferated for a prolonged time in an undifferentiated state and maintained a normal karyotype. These cells grew in a monolayer with a high nuclear/cytoplasm ratio and contained a high level of alkaline phosphate activity. In addition, rbES cells expressed the pluripotent marker Oct-4, as well as EBAF2, FGF4, TDGF1, but not antigens recognized by antibodies against SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-10 and TRA-1-81. All 3 types of ES cells formed embryoid bodies and generated teratoma that contained tissue types of all three germ layers. rbES cells exhibited a high cloning efficiency, were genetically modified readily and were used as nuclear donors to generate a viable rabbit through somatic cell nuclear transfer. In combination with genetic engineering, the ES cell technology should facilitate the creation of new rabbit lines.

  18. A hot-electron thermophotonic solar cell demonstrated by thermal up-conversion of sub-bandgap photons

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Daniel J.; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Wang, Yunpeng; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The direct conversion of solar energy to electricity can be broadly separated into two main categories: photovoltaics and thermal photovoltaics, where the former utilizes gradients in electrical potential and the latter thermal gradients. Conventional thermal photovoltaics has a high theoretical efficiency limit (84%) but in practice cannot be easily miniaturized and is limited by the engineering challenges of sustaining large (>1,000 K) temperature gradients. Here we show a hot-carrier-based thermophotonic solar cell, which combines the compact nature of photovoltaic devices with the potential to reach the high-efficiency regime of thermal photovoltaics. In the device, a thermal gradient of 500 K is established by hot electrons, under Stokes illumination, rather than by raising the temperature of the material itself. Under anti-Stokes (sub-bandgap) illumination we observe a thermal gradient of ∼20 K, which is maintained by steady-state Auger heating of carriers and corresponds to a internal thermal up-conversion efficiency of 30% between the collector and solar cell. PMID:26541415

  19. Decontamination of hot cells K-1, K-3, M-1, M-3, and A-1, M-Wing, Building 200: Project final report Argonne National Laboratory-East

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to remove radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the hot cells, to decontaminate the hot cells, and to dispose of the radioactive waste. The goal was to reduce stack releases of Rn-220 and to place the hot cells in an emptied, decontaminated condition with less than 10 {micro}Sv/h (1 mrem/h) general radiation background. The following actions were needed: organize and mobilize a decontamination team; prepare decontamination plans and procedures; perform safety analyses to ensure protection of the workers, public, and environment; remotely size-reduce, package, and remove radioactive materials and equipment for waste disposal; remotely decontaminate surfaces to reduce hot cell radiation background levels to allow personnel entries using supplied air and full protective suits; disassemble and package the remaining radioactive materials and equipment using hands-on techniques; decontaminate hot cell surfaces to remove loose radioactive contaminants and to attain a less than 10 {micro}Sv/h (1 mrem/h) general background level; document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste; and conduct a final radiological survey.

  20. State of Washington Department of Health radioactive air emission notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-08-15

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from the operation of the Hot Conditioning System Annex (HCSA). This information will be discussed again in the Phase II NOC, providing additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the HCSA. This Phase I NOC is defined as construct in the substructure, including but limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor; construction of the process pits and exterior walls; making necessary interface connections to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) ventilation and utility systems for personnel comfort; and extending the multi-canister over-pack (MCO) handling machine rails into the HCSA. A Phase II NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installation and is defined as the completion of the HCSA, which will consist of installation of Hot Conditioning System Equipment (HCSA), air emissions control equipment, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2,300 MT (2,530 tons) of N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The HCSA will be constructed as an addition to the CSB and will contain the HCSA. The hot conditioning system (HCS) will remove chemically-bound water and will passivate the exposed uranium surfaces associated,with the SNF. The HCSA will house seven hot

  1. Cell-by-Cell Dissection of Gene Expression and Chromosomal Interactions Reveals Consequences of Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The functional consequences of long-range nuclear reorganization were studied in a cell-by-cell analysis of gene expression and long-range chromosomal interactions in the Drosophila eye and eye imaginal disk. Position-effect variegation was used to stochastically perturb gene expression and probe nuclear reorganization. Variegating genes on rearrangements of Chromosomes X, 2, and 3 were probed for long-range interactions with heterochromatin. Studies were conducted only in tissues known to express the variegating genes. Nuclear structure was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes to the variegating gene and heterochromatin. Gene expression was determined alternately by immunofluorescence against specific proteins and by eye pigment autofluorescence. This allowed cell-by-cell comparisons of nuclear architecture between cells in which the variegating gene was either expressed or silenced. Very strong correlations between heterochromatic association and silencing were found. Expressing cells showed a broad distribution of distances between variegating genes and their own centromeric heterochromatin, while silenced cells showed a very tight distribution centered around very short distances, consistent with interaction between the silenced genes and heterochromatin. Spatial and temporal analysis of interactions with heterochromatin indicated that variegating genes primarily associate with heterochromatin in cells that have exited the cell cycle. Differentiation was not a requirement for association, and no differences in association were observed between cell types. Thus, long-range interactions between distal chromosome regions and their own heterochromatin have functional consequences for the organism. PMID:15737020

  2. Control of hot-carrier relaxation for realizing ideal quantum-dot intermediate-band solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tex, David M.; Kamiya, Itaru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    For intermediate-band solar cells, the broad absorption spectrum of quantum dots (QDs) offers a favorable conversion efficiency, and photocurrent generation via efficient two-step two-photon-absorption (TS-TPA) in QDs is essential for realizing high-performance solar cells. In the last decade, many works were dedicated to improve the TS-TPA efficiency by modifying the QD itself, however, the obtained results are far from the requirements for practical applications. To reveal the mechanisms behind the low TS-TPA efficiency in QDs, we report here on two- and three-beam photocurrent measurements of InAs quantum structures embedded in AlGaAs. Comparison of two- and three-beam photocurrent spectra obtained by subbandgap excitation reveals that the QD TS-TPA efficiency is improved significantly by suppressing the relaxation of hot TS-TPA carriers to unoccupied shallow InAs quantum structure states. PMID:24535195

  3. Preliminary development of thermal nuclear cell homogenization code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Z.; Shafii, M. A.; Yudha, S. P.; Waris, A.; Rijal, K.

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear fuel cell homogenization for thermal reactors usually include three main parts, i.e., fast energy resonance part which usually adopt narrow resonance approximation to treat the resonance, low (intermediate) energy region in which the resonance can not be treated accurately using NR approximation and therefore we should use intermediate resonance treatment, and thermal energy region (very low) in which the effect of thermal must be treated properly. In n this study the application of the intermediate resonance approximation treatment for low energy nuclear resonance is discussed. The method is iterative based. As a sample the method is applied in U-235 low lying resonance and the result is presented and discussed.

  4. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Cross Talk in Cell Death: Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein first described to facilitate DNA base excision repair. Recent work has expanded the physiologic functions of PARP-1 and it is clear that the full range of biologic actions of this important protein are not yet fully understood. Regulation of the product of PARP-1, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), is a dynamic process with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) playing a major role in the degradation of the polymer. Under pathophysiologic situations, over activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) results in unregulated PAR synthesis and widespread neuronal cell death. Once thought to be necrotic cell death due to energy failure, we recently found that PARP-1 dependent cell death is dependent on the generation of PAR that triggers nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to result in caspase-independent cell death. This form of cell death is distinct from apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy and is termed Parthanatos. PARP-1 dependent cell death has been implicated in tissues throughout the body and in diseases afflicting hundreds of millions world wide including stroke, Parkinson's disease, heart attack, diabetes, and ischemia reperfusion injury in numerous tissues. The breadth of indications for PARP-1 injury make Parthanatos a clinically important form of cell death to understand and control. PMID:19076445

  5. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  6. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  7. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  8. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  9. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Commitment is Inhibited by Nuclear Akt Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Wu, Weitao; Quijada, Pearl; Sussman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Stem cell therapies to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue represent a novel approach to treat heart disease. However, the majority of adoptively transferred stem cells delivered to damaged myocardium do not survive long enough to impart protective benefits, resulting in modest functional improvements. Strategies to improve survival and proliferation of stem cells show promise for significantly enhancing cardiac function and regeneration. Objective Determine if injected cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) genetically modified to overexpress nuclear Akt (CPCeA) increase structural and functional benefits to infarcted myocardium relative to control CPCs. Methods and Results CPCeA exhibit significantly increased proliferation and secretion of paracrine factors compared to CPCs. However, CPCeA exhibit impaired capacity for lineage commitment in vitro. Infarcted hearts receiving intramyocardial injection of CPCeA have increased recruitment of endogenous c-kit cells compared to CPCs, but neither population provides long-term functional and structural improvements compared to saline injected controls. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt alleviated blockade of lineage commitment in CPCeA. Conclusions Although overexpression of nuclear Akt promotes rapid proliferation and secretion of protective paracrine factors, the inability of CPCeA to undergo lineage commitment hinders their capacity to provide functional or structural benefits to infarcted hearts. Despite enhanced recruitment of endogenous CPCs, lack of functional improvement in CPCeA treated hearts demonstrates CPC lineage commitment is essential to the regenerative response. Effective stem cell therapies must promote cellular survival and proliferation without inhibiting lineage commitment. Since CPCeA exhibit remarkable proliferative potential, an inducible system mediating nuclear Akt expression could be useful to augment cell therapy approaches. PMID:21350213

  10. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor Regulates Gametogenesis in Developing Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Sabour, Davood; Xu, Xueping; Chung, Arthur C. K.; Le Menuet, Damien; Ko, Kinarm; Tapia, Natalia; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Gentile, Luca; Greber, Boris; Hübner, Karin; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Guangming; Schöler, Hans R.; Cooney, Austin J.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF; Nr6a1), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor gene family of transcription factors, during gastrulation and neurulation is critical for normal embryogenesis in mice. Gcnf represses the expression of the POU-domain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) during mouse post-implantation development. Although Gcnf expression is not critical for the embryonic segregation of the germ cell lineage, we found that sexually dimorphic expression of Gcnf in germ cells correlates with the expression of pluripotency-associated genes, such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, as well as the early meiotic marker gene Stra8. To elucidate the role of Gcnf during mouse germ cell differentiation, we generated an ex vivo Gcnf-knockdown model in combination with a regulated CreLox mutation of Gcnf. Lack of Gcnf impairs normal spermatogenesis and oogenesis in vivo, as well as the derivation of germ cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. Inactivation of the Gcnf gene in vivo leads to loss of repression of Oct4 expression in both male and female gonads. PMID:25140725

  11. AFC-1 Transmutation Fuels Post-Irradiation Hot Cell Examination 4-8 at.% - Final Report (Irradiation Experiments AFC-1B, -1F and -1Æ)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Hilton; Douglas Porter; Steven Hayes

    2006-09-01

    The AFC-1B, AFC-1F and AFC-1Æ irradiation tests are part of a series of test irradiations designed to evaluate the feasibility of the use of actinide bearing fuel forms in advanced fuel cycles for the transmutation of transuranic elements from nuclear waste. The tests were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to an intermediate burnup of 4 to 8 at% (2.7 - 6.8 x 1020 fiss/cm3). The tests contain metallic and nitride fuel forms with non-fertile (i.e., no uranium) and low-fertile (i.e., uranium bearing) compositions. Results of postirradiation hot cell examinations of AFC-1 irradiation tests are reported for eleven metallic alloy transmutation fuel rodlets and five nitride transmutation fuel rodlets. Non-destructive examinations included visual examination, dimensional inspection, gamma scan analysis, and neutron radiography. Detailed examinations, including fission gas puncture and analysis, metallography / ceramography and isotopics and burnup analyses, were performed on five metallic alloy and three nitride transmutation fuels. Fuel performance of both metallic alloy and nitride fuel forms was best correlated with fission density as a burnup metric rather than at.% depletion. The actinide bearing transmutation metallic alloy compositions exhibit irradiation performance very similar to U-xPu-10Zr fuel at equivalent fission densities. The irradiation performance of nitride transmutation fuels was comparable to limited data published on mixed nitride systems.

  12. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  13. The Spatial Predilection for Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Neoplasia: A "Hot Zone" for Endoscopic Screening and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-04-01

    Early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs) are easily missed with conventional white-light endoscopy. This study aimed to assess whether early ESCNs have a spatial predilection and the patterns of recurrence after endoscopic treatment.We analyzed the circumferential and longitudinal location of early ESCNs, as well as their correlations with exposure to carcinogens in a cohort of 162 subjects with 248 early ESCNs; 219 of which were identified by screening and 29 by surveillance endoscopy. The circumferential location was identified using a clock-face orientation, and the longitudinal location was identified according to the distance from the incisor.The most common circumferential and longitudinal distributions of the early ESCNs were found in the 6 to 9 o'clock quadrant (38.5%) and at 26 to 30 cm from the incisor (41.3%), respectively. A total of 163 lesions (75%) were located in the lower hemisphere arc, and 149 (68.4%) were located at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor. One hundred eleven (51%) early ESCNs were centered within the "hot zone" (i.e., lower hemisphere arc of the esophagus at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor), which comprised 20% of the esophageal area. Exposure to alcohol, betel nut, or cigarette was risk factors for the development of early ESCNs in the lower hemisphere. After complete endoscopic treatment, the mean annual incidence of metachronous tumors was 10%. In addition, 43% of the metachronous recurrent neoplasias developed within the "hot zone." Cox regression analysis revealed that the index tumor within the hot zone (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-8.68; P = 0.02) and the presence of numerous Lugol-voiding lesions in the esophageal background mucosa were independent predictors for metachronous recurrence (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.36-15.56; P = 0.01).We identified a hot zone that may be used to enhance the detection of early ESCNs during endoscopic screening and surveillance, especially in areas that lack

  14. Nuclear cysteine cathepsin variants in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tedelind, Sofia; Poliakova, Kseniia; Valeta, Amanda; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Yemanaberhan, Eyoel Lemma; Heldin, Nils-Erik; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Weber, Ekkehard; Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša; Turk, Boris; Bogyo, Matthew; Brix, Klaudia

    2010-08-01

    The cysteine peptidase cathepsin B is important in thyroid physiology by being involved in thyroid prohormone processing initiated in the follicular lumen and completed in endo-lysosomal compartments. However, cathepsin B has also been localized to the extrafollicular space and is therefore suggested to promote invasiveness and metastasis in thyroid carcinomas through, e.g., ECM degradation. In this study, immunofluorescence and biochemical data from subcellular fractionation revealed that cathepsin B, in its single- and two-chain forms, is localized to endo-lysosomes in the papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line KTC-1 and in the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines HTh7 and HTh74. This distribution is not affected by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) incubation of HTh74, the only cell line that expresses a functional TSH-receptor. Immunofluorescence data disclosed an additional nuclear localization of cathepsin B immunoreactivity. This was supported by biochemical data showing a proteolytically active variant slightly smaller than the cathepsin B proform in nuclear fractions. We also demonstrate that immunoreactions specific for cathepsin V, but not cathepsin L, are localized to the nucleus in HTh74 in peri-nucleolar patterns. As deduced from co-localization studies and in vitro degradation assays, we suggest that nuclear variants of cathepsins are involved in the development of thyroid malignancies through modification of DNA-associated proteins. PMID:20536394

  15. Nuclear PI3K signaling in cell growth and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William J.; Lehmann, Peter Z.; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a major driving force in a variety of cellular functions. Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in many human diseases including cancer. While the activity of the cytoplasmic PI3K/Akt pathway has been extensively studied, the functions of these molecules and their effector proteins within the nucleus are poorly understood. Harboring key cellular processes such as DNA replication and repair as well as nascent messenger RNA transcription, the nucleus provides a unique compartmental environment for protein–protein and protein–DNA/RNA interactions required for cell survival, growth, and proliferation. Here we summarize recent advances made toward elucidating the nuclear PI3K/Akt signaling cascade and its key components within the nucleus as they pertain to cell growth and tumorigenesis. This review covers the spatial and temporal localization of the major nuclear kinases having PI3K activities and the counteracting phosphatases as well as the role of nuclear PI3K/Akt signaling in mRNA processing and exportation, DNA replication and repair, ribosome biogenesis, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. PMID:25918701

  16. [Inhibitory effects of a hot water extract from Japanese tea on the cell growth of mutans streptococci].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Loyola, J P; Sobue, S

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of a hot water extract from Japanese tea on the cellular growth of mutans streptococci in vitro. The extract contained polyphenol compounds, mainly catechin derivatives. Few fluoride components were contained in the extract. Streptococcus mutans MT8148R (serotype c) and S. sobrinus MT6715 (serotype g) strains were used in the present study. The organisms (10-10(7) CFU/ml) were cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) and tryptose phosphate (TP) broths containing the tea extract (0-8 mg/ml). After incubation for 24-48 hours the cell numbers in the cultures were determined. Furthermore, cell growth of these strains on BHI agar plates containing the extract (0-2 mg/ml) were examined. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The tea extract (2-8 mg/ml) in BHI broth inhibited remarkably the growth of S. mutans and S. sobrinus (inoculum size; 10(6) CFU/ml). No difference in susceptibility to the tea extract between S. mutans and S. sobrinus was noted. 2. The cell growth of both strains in TP broth was inhibited by the tea extract. However S. sobrinus was found to be more sensitive to the extract than S. mutans. 3. Growth of S. sobrinus cells on the BHI agar plate was suppressed by the tea extract more effectively than that of S. mutans. These results suggest that the tea extract would be useful as an anti-cariogenic agent. PMID:2133962

  17. Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi

    2008-01-15

    Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

  18. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to analyze the thermal field of a non-nuclear tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, radiative and conjugate heat transfers.

  19. Silicon quantum dots in SiO{sub x} dielectrics as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-06-24

    Thin films of c-Si QDs embedded in a-SiO{sub x} dielectric matrix was achieved at a low temperature ∼400°C, from one step process by reactive rf magnetron co-sputtering of c-Si wafer and pure SiO{sub 2} targets, in the (H{sub 2}+Ar)- plasma. Formation of a double-barrier structure has been primarily identified from the SAX data and exclusively confirmed from the resonant tunneling current appearing in the J-E characteristic curve peaks, determined by the discrete energy levels of c-Si QDs, at which it could be used as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells.

  20. Effect of microstructure of carbon steel on magnetite formation in simulated Hot Conditioning environment of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Prafful Kumar; Kiran Kumar, M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2015-09-01

    The objective of present investigation is to establish the role of starting microstructure of carbon steel on the magnetite formation behaviour in Hot Conditioning simulated environment. Two grades of carbon steel (low and high carbon) were subjected to selective heat-treatments to generate different microstructures: martensite, tempered martensite and modified ferrite-pearlite. Oxidation was carried out in lithiated water of pH 10-10.2 in a static autoclave at 270 °C. The results of the investigation clearly establish that: (a) high carbon steel (0.63% C) showed a relatively higher rate of oxidation over the low carbon (0.08% C) grade at all the test durations and (b) the oxidation rates for both the grades were sensitive to microstructural differences at initial stages of oxidation while the differences narrowed down after 72 h of exposure. The oxide formed was established to be magnetite on all the specimens.

  1. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  2. Somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cell lines in humans: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Langerova, Alena; Fulka, Helena; Fulka, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The recent paper, published by Mitalipov's group in Cell (Tachibana et al., 2013 ), reporting the production of human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), opens again the debate if, in the era of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the production of these cells is indeed necessary and, if so, whether they are different from ESCs produced from spare embryos and iPSCs. It is our opinion that these questions are very difficult to answer because it is still unclear whether and how normal ESCs differ from iPSCs. PMID:24180743

  3. Viscum Album Var Hot Water Extract Mediates Anti-cancer Effects through G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in SK-Hep1 Human Hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Joseph Flores; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lumbera, Wenchie Marie Lara; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2015-01-01

    Viscum album var (VAV) also known as mistletoe, has long been categorized as a traditional herbal medicine in Asia. In addition to its immunomodulating activities, mistletoe has also been used in the treatment of chronic hepatic disorders in China and Korea. There are numerous reports showing that VAV possesses anti-cancer effects, however influence on human hepatocarcinoma has never been elucidated. In the present study, hot water extracts of VAV was evaluated for its potential anti-cancer effect in vitro. SK-Hep1 cells were treated with VAV (50-400 ug/ml) for both 24 and 48 hours then cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the proportion of SK-Hep1 in the different stages of cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted to measure expression of cell cycle arrest related genes and proteins respectively. VAV dose dependently inhibited the proliferation of SK-Hep1 cells without any cytotoxicity with normal Chang liver cell (CCL-13). Flow cytometry analysis showed that VAV extract inhibited the cell cycle of SK-Hep1 cells via G1 phase arrest. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis both revealed that cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclin D1 gene expression were significantly down regulated while p21 was upregulated dose dependently by VAV treatment. Combined down regulation of Cdk2, Cyclin D1 and up regulation of p21 can result in cell death. These results indicate that VAV showed evidence of anti-cancer activity through G1 phase cell cycle arrest in SK-Hep1 cells. PMID:26434853

  4. Nuclear anomalies in the buccal cells of calcite factory workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The micronucleus (MN) assay on exfoliated buccal cells is a useful and minimally invasive method for monitoring genetic damage in humans. To determine the genotoxic effects of calcite dust that forms during processing, MN assay was carried out in exfoliated buccal cells of 50 (25 smokers and 25 non-smokers) calcite factory workers and 50 (25 smokers and 25 non-smokers) age- and sex-matched control subjects. Frequencies of nuclear abnormalities (NA) other than micronuclei, such as binucleates, karyorrhexis, karyolysis and ‘broken eggs', were also evaluated. Micronuclei and the other aforementioned anomalies were analysed by two way analysis of covariance. The linear correlations between the types of micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities were determined by Spearman's Rho. There was a positive correlation between micronuclei and other types of nuclear abnormalities in accordance with the Spearman's Rho test. Results showed statistically significant difference between calcite fabric workers and control groups. MN and NA frequencies in calcite fabric workers were significantly higher than those in control groups (p < 0.05). The results of this study indicate that calcite fabric workers are under risk of significant cytogenetic damage. PMID:21637497

  5. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  6. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  7. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  8. Structural and functional analysis of cell adhesion and nuclear envelope nano-topography in cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The cell death mechanisms of necrosis and apoptosis generate biochemical and morphological changes in different manners. However, the changes that occur in cell adhesion and nuclear envelope (NE) topography, during necrosis and apoptosis, are not yet fully understood. Here, we show the different alterations in cell adhesion function, as well as the topographical changes occurring to the NE, during the necrotic and apoptotic cell death process, using the xCELLigence system and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Studies using xCELLigence technology and AFM have shown that necrotic cell death induced the expansion of the cell adhesion area, but did not affect the speed of cell adhesion. Necrotic nuclei showed a round shape and presence of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Moreover, we found that the process of necrosis in combination with apoptosis (termed nepoptosis here) resulted in the reduction of the cell adhesion area and cell adhesion speed through the activation of caspases. Our findings showed, for the first time, a successful characterization of NE topography and cell adhesion during necrosis and apoptosis, which may be of importance for the understanding of cell death and might aid the design of future drug delivery methods for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26490051

  9. Structural and functional analysis of cell adhesion and nuclear envelope nano-topography in cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The cell death mechanisms of necrosis and apoptosis generate biochemical and morphological changes in different manners. However, the changes that occur in cell adhesion and nuclear envelope (NE) topography, during necrosis and apoptosis, are not yet fully understood. Here, we show the different alterations in cell adhesion function, as well as the topographical changes occurring to the NE, during the necrotic and apoptotic cell death process, using the xCELLigence system and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Studies using xCELLigence technology and AFM have shown that necrotic cell death induced the expansion of the cell adhesion area, but did not affect the speed of cell adhesion. Necrotic nuclei showed a round shape and presence of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Moreover, we found that the process of necrosis in combination with apoptosis (termed nepoptosis here) resulted in the reduction of the cell adhesion area and cell adhesion speed through the activation of caspases. Our findings showed, for the first time, a successful characterization of NE topography and cell adhesion during necrosis and apoptosis, which may be of importance for the understanding of cell death and might aid the design of future drug delivery methods for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26490051

  10. Micronuclei Frequencies and Nuclear Abnormalities in Oral Exfoliated Cells of Nuclear Power Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Babannavar, Roopa; Lohra, Abhishek; Kodgi, Ashwin; Bapure, Sunil; Rao, Yogesh; J., Arun; Malghan, Manjunath

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequencies of Micronuclei (MN) and other Nuclear abnormalities (NA) from exfoliated oral mucosal cells in Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers. Materials and Methods: Micronucleus frequencies in oral exfoliated cells were done from individuals not known to be exposed to either environmental or occupational carcinogens (Group I). Similarly samples were obtained from full-time Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers with absence of Leukemia and any malignancy (Group II) and workers diagnosed as leukemic patients and undergoing treatment (Group III). Results: There was statistically significant difference between Group I, Group II & Group III. MN and NA frequencies in Leukemic Patients were significantly higher than those in exposed workers &control groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion: MN and other NA reflect genetic changes, events associated with malignancies. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work in NPS about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures. PMID:25654022

  11. Nuclear microscopy of single whole cultured cells: Preparation and analysis of human Chang liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, P. S. P.; Watt, F.; Paramanantham, R.; Bay, B. H.; Sit, K. H.

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear microscopy is a powerful tool for the measurement of elemental concentrations in single cells. Six methods involving the use of various fixing agents, rinsing agents and drying methods were tried in the preparation of cultured human Chang liver cells for nuclear microscopy and the suitability of each method was evaluated by monitoring the {K}/{Na} ratios and shapes of individual cells. The {K}/{Na} ratio is a commonly used criteria for the ionic integrity of cells; {K}/{Na} ratios well above 1 indicates minimal perturbation of the intracellular ionic composition. Non-stimulated human Chang liver cells in a resting state are usually polygonal in shape and flattened in firm anchorage to the substrate, while dividing or stimulated cells appear rounded. Therefore the shapes of the cells can be used as an indicator of whether the cells are in a resting or stimulated state. It is not desirable for cells to be in a stimulated state since then the effects of other external stimuli cannot be observed independently. Of the six methods tested, chemical fixation, as expected, was considered non-ideal for the preparation of human cultured Chang liver cells. Ice-cold 150 mM sucrose was found to be the most suitable rinsing solution for the preparation of cultured human Chang liver cells. Both freeze-drying and air-drying were used as drying methods and cells processed by either method were found to have {K}/{Na} ratios well above 1. Hence both drying methods were found to be suitable although membrane blotting followed by air-drying was preferred as excess rinsing solution can be very quickly removed during the blotting process. The {K}/{Na} ratios of cells on the same target holder but from different regions were found to be dependent on the local cell density. Cells which are locally dense-packed were found to have a much higher {K}/{Na} ratio than cells in a less dense region.

  12. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) : ringmaster of the genome.

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Mittal, S.; Protic, M.; Oryhon, J.; Korolev, S. V.; Joachimiak, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; Biosciences Division

    2001-10-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein is one of the central molecules responsible for decisions of life and death of the cell. The PCNA gene is induced by p53, while PCNA protein interacts with p53-controlled proteins Gadd45, MyD118, CR6 and, most importantly, p21, in the process of deciding cell fate. If PCNA protein is present in abundance in the cell in the absence of p53, DNA replication occurs. On the other hand, if PCNA protein levels are high in the cell in the presence of p53, DNA repair takes place. If PCNA is rendered non-functional or is absent or present in low quantities in the cell, apoptosis occurs. The evolution from prokaryotes to eukaryotes involved a change of function of PCNA from a 'simple' sliding clamp protein of the DNA polymerase complex to an executive molecule controlling critical cellular decision pathways. The evolution of multicellular organisms led to the development of multicellular processes such as differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. PCNA, already an essential molecule in the life of single cellular organisms, then became a protein critical for the survival of multicellular organisms.

  13. Antiproliferative Activities of Hot Water Extracts from Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms, Ganoderma tsugae and Agrocybe cylindracea (Higher Basidiomycetes) on Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Rao-Chi; Tsai, Shu-Yao; Lai, Eric Yih-Cherng; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2015-01-01

    Using anticancer agents to progress chemotherapy to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells is an effective means. Two medicinal mushrooms, Ganoderma tsugae and Agrocybe cylindracea, exhibited various physiological effects, and the antiproliferation effect on HL-60, Hep 3B, and C6 cells was studied. The viability of different cancer cells was decreased significantly by hot water extracts from different forms of G. tsugae and A. cylindracea. The hot water extracts from the fruit body, mycelium, and filtrate of A. cylindracea were less effective in inhibiting the antiproliferation of C6, Hep 3B, and HL-60 cells than were those from G. tsugae, as evidenced by their IC50 values. The IC50 values of G. tsugae on C6, Hep 3B, and HL-60 cells were 1.13, 2.73, and 2.60 mg/mL, respectively, whereas those of baby G. tsugae were 1.87, 2.63, and 3.12 mg/mL, respectively. In addition, the filtrates of G. tsugae on C6 and Hep 3B cells were 2.81 and 2.80 mg/mL, respectively. The morphological transformation of 3 cancer cells was observed clearly, and the possible mechanism would be necrosis, apoptosis, or differentiation. Owing to the noticeable effect on antiproliferation of hot water extracts, especially those from G. tsugae, the extract could be of great potential to be used as an alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26082984

  14. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-03-26

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  15. Nuclear organization of DNA replication in primary mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B K; Barbie, D A; Classon, M; Dyson, N; Harlow, E

    2000-11-15

    Using methods that conserve nuclear architecture, we have reanalyzed the spatial organization of the initiation of mammalian DNA synthesis. Contrary to the commonly held view that replication begins at hundreds of dispersed nuclear sites, primary fibroblasts initiate synthesis in a limited number of foci that contain replication proteins, surround the nucleolus, and overlap with previously identified internal lamin A/C structures. These foci are established in early G(1)-phase and also contain members of the retinoblastoma protein family. Later, in S-phase, DNA replication sites distribute to regions located throughout the nucleus. As this progression occurs, association with the lamin structure and pRB family members is lost. A similar temporal progression is found in all the primary cells we have examined but not in most established cell lines, indicating that the immortalization process modifies spatial control of DNA replication. These findings indicate that in normal mammalian cells, the onset of DNA synthesis is coordinately regulated at a small number of previously unrecognized perinucleolar sites that are selected in early G(1)-phase. PMID:11090133

  16. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  17. Nuclear remodeling in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos using MG132-treated recipient oocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, Daniel; Beaujean, Nathalie; Ruffini, Sylvie; Vignon, Xavier; Gall, Laurence

    2010-12-01

    The early events in the nuclear reprogramming process during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) consist of morphological remodeling of the donor nucleus including premature chromosome condensation (PCC). In the present study, the objective was to increase oocyte M-Phase Promoting Factor (MPF) kinase activity and to examine the fate of the donor nucleus and the development of SCNT embryos thereafter. Indeed, in controls, recipient oocytes activated upon nuclear transfer, undergo a decrease in MPF activity, responsible for the inability to promote PCC in 77.8% of reconstituted embryos. Here we showed that exposure of the recipient oocyte to the proteasome inhibitor MG132 prior to fusion inhibited the degradation of cyclin B, which normally occurred immediately after activation by electro stimulation, and therefore sustained a high level of MPF. Treatment with MG132 also significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos with PCC when compared to the nontreated SCNT control embryos (94.1 vs. 22.2%, respectively, p < 0.01). The frequency of development to the blastocyst stage did not differ between MG132-treated or untreated recipient oocytes. However, we observed a significant increase of the total cells number in embryos produced after MG132 treatment. Investigation of the global nuclear organization by immunodetection of heterochromatin protein 1 (CBX1) showed that SCNT embryos derived from MG132-treated recipient oocytes displayed organization patterns similar to the ones observed in IVF embryos in contrast to the nontreated SCNT controls. Taken together, these results suggest that the PCC induced by MG132 treatment allows reorganization of the chromatin at an appropriate time potentially, leading to better reprogramming. PMID:21108537

  18. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos. PMID:27459580

  19. An open-end burst test method to obtain uniaxial hoop tensile properties of fuel cladding in a hot cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Aita, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kan; Higuchi, Toru

    2013-03-01

    The hoop stress-hoop strain relationship of fuel cladding is one of the essential input parameters for safety analysis of fuel rods. The three objectives of this paper were: to propose a burst test method for open-end tube specimens with the uniaxial hoop stress condition; to develop the necessary in-cell high temperature open-end burst (OEB) techniques to implement the method; and to determine the optimum specimen length for the proposed OEB test method. Silicone oil was selected as the pressurization medium, and it was sealed inside the specimens not by welding but by O-rings so that no axial tensile stress was induced in the specimens. The specimens with combined end plugs and O-rings were successfully assembled by manipulators in a hot cell, and a high temperature (⩽350 °C), high pressure (⩽100 MPa) seal was achieved. The optimum specimen length was determined by using ductile and embrittled tubes with various lengths of 30-60 mm and was found to be around 45 mm for typical BWR fuel rods. During the OEB test, internal pressure and diametral expansion were monitored to obtain the basic mechanical performance properties of the fuel cladding such as yield stress, ultimate strength, as well as the true hoop stress-hoop strain curve.

  20. Method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Cibelli, Jose B

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been a well-known technique for decades and widely applied to generate identical animals, including ones with genetic alterations. The system has been demonstrated successfully in zebrafish. The elaborated requirements of SCNT, however, limit reproducibility of the established model to a few groups in zebrafish research community. In this chapter, we meticulously outline each step of the published protocol as well as preparations of equipments and reagents used in zebrafish SCNT. All describable detailed-tips are elaborated in texts and figures. PMID:21924165

  1. X-ray observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 --- II. Extended emission from hot gas in the nuclear area, disk, and halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Vogler, A.; Klein, U.; Zinnecker, H.

    2000-08-01

    Spatial and spectral analysis of deep ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations of the near edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 253 reveal diffuse soft X-ray emission, which contributes 80% to its total X-ray luminosity (LX = 5 1039 erg s-1, corrected for foreground absorption). The nuclear area, disk, and halo contribution to the luminosity is about equal. The starburst nucleus itself is highly absorbed and not visible in the ROSAT band. The emission from the nuclear area stems from a heavily absorbed source with an extent of 250 pc (FWHM) about 100 pc above the nucleus along the SE minor axis ("nuclear source", X34), and the "X-ray plume". The nuclear source is best described as having a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with a temperature of T = 1.2 keV (NH = 3 1021 cm-2) and LXexgal = 3 1038 erg s-1 (corrected for Galactic foreground absorption). The spectrum of the hollow-cone shaped plume (opening angle of 32̂ and extent of ~ 700 pc along the SE minor axis) is best modeled by a composite of a thermal bremsstrahlung (NH = 3 1020 cm-2, T = 1.2 keV, LXexgal = 4.6 1038 erg s-1) and a thin thermal plasma (Galactic foreground absorption, T = 0.33 keV, LXexgal = 4 1038 erg s-1). The diffuse nuclear emission components trace interactions between the galactic super-wind emitted by the starburst nucleus, and the dense interstellar medium of the disk. Diffuse emission from the disk is heavily absorbed and follows the spiral structure. It can be described by a thin thermal plasma spectrum (T = 0.7 keV, intrinsic luminosity LXintr = 1.2 1039 erg s-1), and most likely reflects a mixture of sources (X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and emission from H II regions) and the hot interstellar medium. The surface brightness profile reveals a bright inner and a fainter outer component along the major axis with extents of ∓3.4 kpc and ∓7.5 kpc. We analysed the total halo emission separated into two geometrical areas; the "corona" (scale height ~ 1 kpc) and the "outer halo". The coronal

  2. Cell nuclear features for classification from fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heynen, Susanne; Hunter, Edward; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2000-04-01

    In clinical cytology, nuclear features play an important role in cell and tissue classification. To increase efficiency and decrease subjectivity of cytological results, automation of the analytic process has been proposed and discussed by many authors. This automation can be achieved by estimating the probability of occurrence of a certain class given particular features of a microscope specimen. In this paper, feature sets that might be used as inputs for mathematical cytological classification algorithms are reviewer. The primary goal was to determine the important properties of these features sets, i.e., are there mathematically efficient features that provide a more or less compete description of the cell. Under what conditions will these feature then result in optimal classification of the cells using quantitative fluorescence staining. And how would these mathematical features relate to conventional features that a human observer understands. Example human observer features are size, shape, and chromaticity o the cell nucleus while example mathematical features are image moments. If the cell image can be completely reconstructed from the feature set, then it should be possible to derive the conventional features used by human observers from the mathematical feature set for presentation to clinicians. Finally, the suitability of different mathematical decision making algorithms like probabilistic reasoning, clustering or neural networks are also briefly evaluated in the context of a mathematically complete feature set.

  3. Characterization of Aes nuclear foci in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Okawa, Katsuya; Stifani, Stefano; Itoh, Hideaki; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M Mark

    2016-01-01

    Amino-terminal enhancer of split (Aes) is a member of Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer (TLE) family. Aes is a recently found metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) that inhibits Notch signalling, and forms nuclear foci together with TLE1. Although some Notch-associated proteins are known to form subnuclear bodies, little is known regarding the dynamics or functions of these structures. Here, we show that Aes nuclear foci in CRC observed under an electron microscope are in a rather amorphous structure, lacking surrounding membrane. Investigation of their behaviour during the cell cycle by time-lapse cinematography showed that Aes nuclear foci dissolve during mitosis and reassemble after completion of cytokinesis. We have also found that heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) is an essential component of Aes foci. Pharmacological inhibition of the HSC70 ATPase activity with VER155008 reduces Aes focus formation. These results provide insight into the understanding of Aes-mediated inhibition of Notch signalling. PMID:26229111

  4. Method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, K; Prukudom, S; Cibelli, J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a detailed methodology for somatic cell nuclear transfer-cloning of zebrafish. We aim to place the reader in a virtual lab experience to assist acquisition of the technical skills required for reproducing the published protocol. All materials, including catalog numbers for reagents and techniques for their preparation, are provided. Our protocols describe laser inactivation of egg chromosomes, the transfer of a cell through the oocyte micropyle, and spontaneous activation of the reconstructed embryo. High-quality eggs are the key to cloning success, and Chinook salmon ovarian fluid is indispensable for keeping eggs arrested at the metaphase of meiosis II. This protocol continues to be refined by our laboratory. However, naive investigators should be able to apply it in its present form to generate cloned zebrafish. PMID:27443929

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

    2011-10-01

    Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

  6. Assessment of the radionuclide composition of "hot particles" sampled in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant fourth reactor unit.

    PubMed

    Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Zheltonozhsky, Viktor A; Zheltonozhskaya, Maryna V; Kulich, Nadezhda V; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy; Marra, James C

    2011-10-01

    Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified, and the fuel burn-up in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burn-up values based on the cesium isotopes in comparison with other radionuclides was observed. The studies conducted were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of 242Cm and 243Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from 241Am (and going higher) in comparison with the theoretical calculations. PMID:21878762

  7. Literature review of metal corrosion sensitivity in high temperature, high impurity hot cell atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.

    1997-09-01

    The pyrochemical conditions of spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of final disposal is being demonstrated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). One aspect of this program is to develop a lithium preprocessing stage for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF). One of the design considerations under investigation in this program is the system`s corrosion response in the presence of irradiated commercial fuel as well as atmospheric impurities. Static corrosion coupon tests have been completed which demonstrate the potential corrosivity of the salt matrix in a worse case environment as well as provide a boundary for allowable impurities in the system during operation. The literature concerning corrosion of either fused salts or molten metals consistently emphasizes three similar features which are common to both systems: (1) the overall corrosion rate is strongly dependent on temperature, impurity concentration and flow velocity; (2) many different mechanisms can be involved in a specific corrosion process; and (3) corrosion rates will significantly increase as all three of these independent variables are increased. The qualitative and quantitative understanding of these corrosion results is important for this spent fuel program since all of these variables will increase as the process scale increases. The purpose of this work was to determine if any data existed which could provide a quantitative expectation for corrosion rates of refractory metals in a lithium chloride salt bath.

  8. Nuclear Localization of Flavivirus RNA Synthesis in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchil, Pradeep Devappa; Kumar, Anil V. A.; Satchidanandam, Vijaya

    2006-01-01

    Flaviviral replication is believed to be exclusively cytoplasmic, occurring within virus-induced membrane-bound replication complexes in the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a significant proportion (20%) of the total RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity from cells infected with West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and dengue virus is resident within the nucleus. Consistent with this, the major replicase proteins NS3 and NS5 of JEV also localized within the nucleus. NS5 was found distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but NS3 was present at sites of active flaviviral RNA synthesis, colocalizing with NS5, and visible as distinct foci along the inner periphery of the nucleus by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Both these viral replicase proteins were also present in the nuclear matrix, colocalizing with the peripheral lamina, and revealed a well-entrenched nuclear location for the viral replication complex. In keeping with this observation, antibodies to either NS3 or NS5 coimmunoprecipitated the other protein from isolated nuclei along with newly synthesized viral RNA. Taken together these data suggest an absolute requirement for both of the replicase proteins for nucleus-localized synthesis of flavivirus RNA. Thus, we conclusively demonstrate for the first time that the host cell nucleus functions as an additional site for the presence of functionally active flaviviral replicase complex. PMID:16699025

  9. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells. PMID:25984833

  10. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  11. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-07-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  12. Las1 Is an Essential Nuclear Protein Involved in Cell Morphogenesis and Cell Surface Growth

    PubMed Central

    Doseff, A. I.; Arndt, K. T.

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutations that cause a requirement for SSD1-v for viability were isolated, yielding one new gene, LAS1, and three previously identified genes, SIT4, BCK1/SLK1, and SMP3. Three of these genes, LAS1, SIT4, and BCK1/SLK1, encode proteins that have roles in bud formation or morphogenesis. LAS1 is essential and loss of LAS1 function causes the cells to arrest as 80% unbudded cells and 20% large budded cells that accumulate many vesicles at the mother-daughter neck. Overexpression of LAS1 results in extra cell surface projections in the mother cell, alterations in actin and SPA2 localization, and the accumulation of electron-dense structures along the periphery of both the mother cell and the bud. The nuclear localization of LAS1 suggests a role of LAS1 for regulating bud formation and morphogenesis via the expression of components that function directly in these processes. PMID:8582632

  13. Identification of nuclear. tau. isoforms in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, P.A.; Howard, T.H.; Castleberry, R.P.; Binder, L.I. )

    1990-11-01

    The {tau} proteins have been reported only in association with microtubules and with ribosomes in situ, in the normal central nervous system. In addition, {tau} has been shown to be an integral component of paired helical filaments, the principal constituent of the neurofibrillary tangles found in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and of most aged individuals with Down syndrome (trisomy 21). The authors report here the localization of the well-characterized Tau-1 monoclonal antibody to the nucleolar organizer regions of the acrocentric chromosomes and to their interphase counterpart, the fibrillar component of the nucleolus, in human neuroblastoma cells. Similar localization to the nucleolar organizer regions was also observed in other human cell lines and in one monkey kidney cell line but was not seen in non-primate species. Immunochemically, they further demonstrated the existence of the entire {tau} molecule in the isolated nuclei of neuroblastoma cells. Nuclear {tau} proteins, like the {tau} proteins of the paired helical filaments, cannot be extracted in standard SDS-containing electrophoresis sample buffer but require pretreatment with formic acid prior to immunoblot analysis. This work indicates that {tau} may function in processes not directly associated with microtubules and that highly insoluble complexes of {tau} may also play a role in normal cellular physiology.

  14. GHz Rabi Flopping to Rydberg States in Hot Atomic Vapor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, B.; Baluktsian, T.; Schlagmueller, M.; Koelle, A.; Kuebler, H.; Loew, R.; Pfau, T.

    2011-12-09

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a time scale below 1 ns in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of {approx}4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor, thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room-temperature quantum devices. Furthermore, the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single-atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by 3 orders of magnitude.

  15. Nuclear anomalies in exfoliated buccal cells in Pakistani cotton weavers.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Wali; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Moshammer, Hanns; Kundi, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Cotton workers in small weaving household factories (power looms) in Pakistan are typically exposed to high levels of cotton dusts. Working in the textile manufacturing industry has been classified as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The study set out to determine potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of occupational exposure to cotton dusts in exfoliated buccal cells of exposed cotton workers. Nuclear anomalies reflecting cytotoxic and genotoxic effects were evaluated in a representative sample of 51 exposed male cotton weavers and in the same number of age-matched male non-exposed subjects applying the micronucleus cytome assay. Nuclear anomalies reflecting cytotoxicity (karyolysis, karyorrhexis, condensed chromatin and pyknosis) were significantly elevated in exposed cotton workers. The frequency of micronucleated cells increased significantly with increasing years of work in power looms (odds ratio = 1.043 per year; 95% confidence interval: 1.012-1.076, P = 0.007). Results were consistent with the typical inflammatory pattern and injury in epithelia due to unprotected occupational exposure to cotton dusts and other toxic, allergic and infectious substances in the working areas of the cotton industry. Occupational exposure in power looms induces cytotoxic effects and, upon chronic exposure, DNA damage. This may eventually result in typical obstructive patterns of pulmonary symptoms and in a clinical condition called byssinosis in exposed cotton workers. Long exposure may lead to chronic inflammation and cumulative damage of DNA in buccal stem cells that may indicate an increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25805022

  16. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells by Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Dilip; Evans, Gregory R. D.

    2011-01-01

    During embryonic development pluripotency is progressively lost irreversibly by cell division, differentiation, migration and organ formation. Terminally differentiated cells do not generate other kinds of cells. Pluripotent stem cells are a great source of varying cell types that are used for tissue regeneration or repair of damaged tissue. The pluripotent stem cells can be derived from inner cell mass of blastocyte but its application is limited due to ethical concerns. The recent discovery of iPS with defined reprogramming factors has initiated a flurry of works on stem cell in various laboratories. The pluripotent cells can be derived from various differentiated adult cells as well as from adult stem cells by nuclear reprogramming, somatic cell nuclear transfer etc. In this review article, different aspects of nuclear reprogramming are discussed. PMID:22007240

  17. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the “Yamanaka method.” However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning. PMID:25692793

  18. Total and Viable Legionella pneumophila Cells in Hot and Natural Waters as Measured by Immunofluorescence-Based Assays and Solid-Phase Cytometry ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Parthuisot, N.; Binet, M.; Touron-Bodilis, A.; Pougnard, C.; Lebaron, P.; Baudart, J.

    2011-01-01

    A new method was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of viable Legionella pneumophila. The method combines specific immunofluorescence (IF) staining using monoclonal antibodies with a bacterial viability marker (ChemChrome V6 cellular esterase activity marker) by means of solid-phase cytometry (SPC). IF methods were applied to the detection and enumeration of both the total and viable L. pneumophila cells in water samples. The sensitivity of the IF methods coupled to SPC was 34 cells liter−1, and the reproducibility was good, with the coefficient of variation generally falling below 30%. IF methods were applied to the enumeration of total and viable L. pneumophila cells in 46 domestic hot water samples as well as in cooling tower water and natural water samples, such as thermal spring water and freshwater samples. Comparison with standard plate counts showed that (i) the total direct counts were always higher than the plate counts and (ii) the viable counts were higher than or close to the plate counts. With domestic hot waters, when the IF assay was combined with the viability test, SPC detected up to 3.4 × 103 viable but nonculturable L. pneumophila cells per liter. These direct IF methods could be a powerful tool for high-frequency monitoring of domestic hot waters or for investigating the occurrence of viable L. pneumophila in both man-made water systems and environmental water samples. PMID:21742913

  19. Total and viable Legionella pneumophila cells in hot and natural waters as measured by immunofluorescence-based assays and solid-phase cytometry.

    PubMed

    Parthuisot, N; Binet, M; Touron-Bodilis, A; Pougnard, C; Lebaron, P; Baudart, J

    2011-09-01

    A new method was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of viable Legionella pneumophila. The method combines specific immunofluorescence (IF) staining using monoclonal antibodies with a bacterial viability marker (ChemChrome V6 cellular esterase activity marker) by means of solid-phase cytometry (SPC). IF methods were applied to the detection and enumeration of both the total and viable L. pneumophila cells in water samples. The sensitivity of the IF methods coupled to SPC was 34 cells liter(-1), and the reproducibility was good, with the coefficient of variation generally falling below 30%. IF methods were applied to the enumeration of total and viable L. pneumophila cells in 46 domestic hot water samples as well as in cooling tower water and natural water samples, such as thermal spring water and freshwater samples. Comparison with standard plate counts showed that (i) the total direct counts were always higher than the plate counts and (ii) the viable counts were higher than or close to the plate counts. With domestic hot waters, when the IF assay was combined with the viability test, SPC detected up to 3.4 × 10(3) viable but nonculturable L. pneumophila cells per liter. These direct IF methods could be a powerful tool for high-frequency monitoring of domestic hot waters or for investigating the occurrence of viable L. pneumophila in both man-made water systems and environmental water samples. PMID:21742913

  20. Quantification of nanoscale nuclear refractive index changes during the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, Rajan K.; Uttam, Shikhar; Wang, Pin; Staton, Kevin; Choi, Serah; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2011-07-01

    Intrigued by our recent finding that the nuclear refractive index is significantly increased in malignant cells and histologically normal cells in clinical histology specimens derived from cancer patients, we sought to identify potential biological mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena. The cell cycle is an ordered series of events that describes the intervals of cell growth, DNA replication, and mitosis that precede cell division. Since abnormal cell cycles and increased proliferation are characteristic of many human cancer cells, we hypothesized that the observed increase in nuclear refractive index could be related to an abundance or accumulation of cells derived from cancer patients at a specific point or phase(s) of the cell cycle. Here we show that changes in nuclear refractive index of fixed cells are seen as synchronized populations of cells that proceed through the cell cycle, and that increased nuclear refractive index is strongly correlated with increased DNA content. We therefore propose that an abundance of cells undergoing DNA replication and mitosis may explain the increase in nuclear refractive index observed in both malignant and histologically normal cells from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that nuclear refractive index may be a novel physical parameter for early cancer detection and risk stratification.

  1. XPO1 Inhibition Preferentially Disrupts the 3D Nuclear Organization of Telomeres in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Kashton, Cheryl; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Baloglu, Erkan; Senapedis, William; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G; Kotb, Rami; Mai, Sabine

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has shown that the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization of telomeres is altered in cancer cells and the degree of alterations coincides with aggressiveness of disease. Nuclear pores are essential for spatial genome organization and gene regulation and XPO1 (exportin 1/CRM1) is the key nuclear export protein. The Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds developed by Karyopharm Therapeutics (KPT-185, KPT-330/selinexor, and KPT-8602) inhibit XPO1 nuclear export function. In this study, we investigated whether XPO1 inhibition has downstream effects on the 3D nuclear organization of the genome. This was assessed by measuring the 3D telomeric architecture of normal and tumor cells in vitro and ex vivo. Our data demonstrate for the first time a rapid and preferential disruption of the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in tumor cell lines and in primary cells ex vivo derived from treatment-naïve newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Normal primary cells in culture as well as healthy lymphocyte control cells from the same patients were minimally affected. Using both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tumor cell lines, we found that the downstream effects on the 3D nuclear telomere structure are independent of tumor type. We conclude that the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres is a sensitive indicator of cellular response when treated with XPO1 inhibitors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2711-2719, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991404

  2. Global Reorganization of the Nuclear Landscape in Senescent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Tamir; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Wingett, Steven William; Kirschner, Kristina; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Andrews, Simon; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence has been implicated in tumor suppression, development, and aging and is accompanied by large-scale chromatin rearrangements, forming senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF). However, how the chromatin is reorganized during SAHF formation is poorly understood. Furthermore, heterochromatin formation in senescence appears to contrast with loss of heterochromatin in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. We mapped architectural changes in genome organization in cellular senescence using Hi-C. Unexpectedly, we find a dramatic sequence- and lamin-dependent loss of local interactions in heterochromatin. This change in local connectivity resolves the paradox of opposing chromatin changes in senescence and progeria. In addition, we observe a senescence-specific spatial clustering of heterochromatic regions, suggesting a unique second step required for SAHF formation. Comparison of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), somatic cells, and senescent cells shows a unidirectional loss in local chromatin connectivity, suggesting that senescence is an endpoint of the continuous nuclear remodelling process during differentiation. PMID:25640177

  3. A comprehensive nuclear receptor network for breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kittler, Ralf; Zhou, Jie; Hua, Sujun; Ma, Lijia; Liu, Yuwen; Pendleton, Elisha; Cheng, Chao; Gerstein, Mark; White, Kevin P

    2013-02-21

    In breast cancer, nuclear receptors (NRs) play a prominent role in governing gene expression, have prognostic utility, and are therapeutic targets. We built a regulatory map for 24 NRs, six chromatin state markers, and 14 breast-cancer-associated transcription factors (TFs) that are expressed in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The resulting network reveals a highly interconnected regulatory matrix where extensive crosstalk occurs among NRs and other breast -cancer-associated TFs. We show that large numbers of factors are coordinately bound to highly occupied target regions throughout the genome, and these regions are associated with active chromatin state and hormone-responsive gene expression. This network also provides a framework for stratifying and predicting patient outcomes, and we use it to show that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta binds to a set of genes also regulated by the retinoic acid receptors and whose expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. PMID:23375374

  4. Nuclear transition between the conjunction cells of Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin (Bacillariophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si; Pan, Kehou; Zhu, Baohua; Zhang, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Phaeodactylum tricornutum is one of the important marine diatoms for oceanic primary production. Its reproduction has profound significance in the life cycle; however, the nuclear behavior during its sexual reproduction was not clear. In this study, we observed the nuclear transition and determined its correlation with cell conjunction. It was found that two cells jointed at their apices first and swung and aligned each other immediately, and nucleus from one cell was able to transfer into another one during cell conjugation. The cell pairs conjugated for nuclear transition were different from those formed in mitosis in hypovalve thickness and cellular arrangement. Our findings proved the existence of sexual reproduction in P. tricornutum.

  5. Characterization of tumor cells and stem cells by differential nuclear methylation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian; Wawrowsky, Kolja A.; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Bar-Nur, Ori; Vishnevsky, Eugene; Lindsley, Erik H.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2008-02-01

    DNA methylation plays a key role in cellular differentiation. Aberrant global methylation patterns are associated with several cancer types, as a result of changes in long-term activation status of up to 50% of genes, including oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, which are regulated by methylation and demethylation of promoter region CpG dinucleotides (CpG islands). Furthermore, DNA methylation also occurs in nonisland CpG sites (> 95% of the genome), present once per 80 dinucleotides on average. Nuclear DNA methylation increases during the course of cellular differentiation while cancer cells usually show a net loss in methylation. Given the large dynamic range in DNA methylation load, the methylation pattern of a cell can provide a valuable distinction as to its status during differentiation versus the disease state. By applying immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy and 3D image analysis we assessed the potential of differential nuclear distribution of methylated DNA to be utilized as a biomarker to characterize cells during development and when diseased. There are two major fields that may immediately benefit from this development: (1) the search for factors that contribute to pluripotency and cell fate in human embryonic stem cell expansion and differentiation, and (2) the characterization of tumor cells with regard to their heterogeneity in molecular composition and behavior. We performed topological analysis of the distribution of methylated CpG-sites (MeC) versus heterochromatin. This innovative approach revealed significant differences in colocalization patterns of MeC and heterochromatin-derived signals between undifferentiated and differentiated human embryonic stem cells, as well as untreated AtT20 mouse pituitary tumor cells compared to a subpopulation of these cells treated with 5-azacytidine for 48 hours.

  6. Waste reduction efforts through evaluation and procurement of a digital camera system for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East.

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, T. S.; Cohen, A. B.; Tsai, H.; Kettman, W. C.; Trychta, K.

    1999-11-08

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-East is a research facility where sample examinations involve traditional photography. The AGHCF documents samples with photographs (both Polaroid self-developing and negative film). Wastes generated include developing chemicals. The AGHCF evaluated, procured, and installed a digital camera system for the Leitz metallograph to significantly reduce labor, supplies, and wastes associated with traditional photography with a return on investment of less than two years.

  7. Homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells coincides with nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 activity.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Jessica A; Hahn, Nynke; van den Brand, Carlien S; Meischl, Christof; Cillessen, Saskia A G M; Smith, Desirée E C; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Musters, René J P; Roos, Dirk; Jakobs, Cornelis; Blom, Henk J; Smulders, Yvo M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Rauwerda, Jan A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M

    2013-11-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells related to homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported in several studies. In this study, we evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing signaling pathways contribute to Hcy-induced apoptosis induction, with specific emphasis on NADPH oxidases. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 0.01-2.5 mM Hcy. We determined the effect of Hcy on caspase-3 activity, annexin V positivity, intracellular NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and p47(phox) expression and localization, nuclear nitrotyrosine accumulation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m). Hcy induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis; this effect was concentration dependent and maximal after 6-h exposure to 2.5 mM Hcy. It was accompanied by a significant increase in ΔΨ m. Cysteine was inactive on these parameters excluding a reactive thiol group effect. Hcy induced an increase in cellular NOX2, p47(phox), and NOX4, but not that of NOX1. 3D digital imaging microscopy followed by image deconvolution analysis showed nuclear accumulation of NOX2 and p47(phox) in endothelial cells exposed to Hcy, but not in control cells, which coincided with accumulation of nuclear nitrotyrosine residues. Furthermore, Hcy enhanced peri-nuclear localization of NOX4 coinciding with accumulation of peri-nuclear nitrotyrosine residues, a reflection of local ROS production. p47(phox) was also increased in the peri-nuclear region. The Hcy-induced increase in caspase-3 activity was prevented by DPI and apocynin, suggesting involvement of NOX activity. The data presented in this article reveal accumulation of nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 accumulation as potential source of ROS production in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells. PMID:22038300

  8. Nuclear vasohibin-2 promotes cell proliferation by inducing G0/G1 to S phase progression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qianqian; Zhou, Jia; Tu, Min; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhanjun; Lu, Zipeng; Wei, Jishu; Song, Guoxin; Chen, Jianmin; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi; Gao, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    As a member of the vasohibin (VASH2) family, VASH2 is localized intracellularly as a nuclear and cytoplasmic type. Cytoplasmic VASH2 is associated with carcinoma angiogenesis and malignant transformation and promotes cancer growth. However, the function of nuclear VASH2 has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to detect the nuclear VASH2 expression profile in human organs and tissues by protein microarray technique. To examine the function of nuclear VASH2, we analyzed the relationship between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, and stably constructed VASH2 overexpression and knockdown in LO2 and HepG2 cell lines, based on a previous study in hepatic cells. The study was conducted using bromodeoxyuridine, immunofluorescent staining, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Nuclear VASH2 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells in normal and cancer tissues. There was a significant positive correlation between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, indicating that nuclear VASH2 positively correlated with cell proliferation in normal and cancer tissues. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation test showed that nuclear VASH2 increased the S-phase population and promoted cell proliferation, while VASH2 knockdown reduced BrdU absorbance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that nuclear VASH2 overexpression increased the S-phase population in LO2 and HepG2 cells, while nuclear VASH2 knockdown reduced the S-phase population and increased the G0/G1 population. The findings of this study challenge the classic view of VASH2, which was previously reported as an angiogenesis factor. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, these results are the first clinical data indicating that nuclear VASH2, but not cytoplasmic VASH2, promotes cell proliferation by driving the cell cycle from the G0/G1 to S phase. PMID:26177649

  9. Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen in Premalignancy and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poosarla, Chandrashekar; Ramesh, K.; Gudiseva, Swetha; Bala, Sekar; Sundar, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cancer has multifactorial aetiology and is a multistep process involving initiation, promotion and tumour progression. Cellular proliferation is one of the important indicators for the biologic aggressiveness of a malignant lesion. The dysregulated proliferation may be a significant change to determine the potential prognosis of various malignant tumours. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as an indicator for clinical aggressiveness in oral premalignancy and squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 50 blocks were taken from the Department of Oral Pathology which was diagnosed previously histopathologically. It comprised of normal oral mucosa (10), dysplasia (10) and grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (30) of patients between the age group of 40–60 years. From each block, sections of 4 micro metre thicknesses were prepared and placed on poly- L lysine coated slides. These sections were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal proliferating cell antibody (PC10). The stained slides were evaluated by a single examiner for cell count. Results A comparison between study groups and controls showed a probability value (p-value) < 0.05. Significant increase in the proliferative index from the normal to oral squamous cell carcinoma was noticed. Poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed maximum proliferative index followed by moderately differentiated, well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, dysplasia and normal mucosa. Conclusion Present study concluded that PCNA index can be used to assess the proliferation and aggressiveness in dysplasia and different grades oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26266215

  10. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  11. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  12. Propagation of elite rescue dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of two oocyte activation culture media to produce cloned dogs from an elite rescue dog and to analyze their behavioral tendencies. In somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure, fused couplets were activated by calcium ionophore treatment for 4 min, cultured in two media: modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) with 1.9 mmol/L 6-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) (SOF-DMAP) or porcine zygote medium (PZM-5) with 1.9 mmol/L DMAP (PZM-DMAP) for 4 h, and then were transferred into recipients. After embryo transfer, pregnancy was detected in one out of three surrogate mothers that received cloned embryos from the PZM-DMAP group (33.3%), and one pregnancy (25%) was detected in four surrogate mothers receiving cloned embryos from the SOF-DMAP group. Each pregnant dog gave birth to one healthy cloned puppy by cesarean section. We conducted the puppy aptitude test with two cloned puppies; the two cloned puppies were classified as the same type, accepting humans and leaders easily. The present study indicated that the type of medium used in 6-DMAP culture did not increase in cloning efficiency and dogs cloned using donor cells derived from one elite dog have similar behavioral tendencies. PMID:26387964

  13. The ability of mouse nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Vahid; Salehi, Mohammad; Nourozian, Mohsen; Fadaei, Fatemeh; Farahani, Reza Mastery; Piryaei, Abbas; Delbari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) show stem cell characteristics such as pluripotency but cause no immunological disorders. Although ntESCs are able to differentiate into somatic cells, the ability of ntESCs to differentiate into primordial germ cells (PGCs) has not been examined. In this work, we examined the capacity of mouse ntESCs to differentiate into PGCs in vitro. ntESCs aggregated to form embryoid bodies (EB) in EB culture medium supplemented with bone morphogenetic protein 4(BMP4) as the differentiation factor. The expression level of specific PGC genes was compared at days 4 and 8 using real time PCR. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical staining were used to detect Mvh as a specific PGC marker. ntESCs expressed particular genes related to different stages of PGC development. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical staining confirmed the presence of Mvh protein in a small number of cells. There were significant differences between cells that differentiated into PGCs in the group treated with Bmp4 compared to non-treated cells. These findings indicate that ntESCs can differentiate into putative PGCs. Improvement of ntESC differentiation into PGCs may be a reliable means of producing mature germ cells. PMID:26273226

  14. Nuclear actin is partially associated with Cajal bodies in human cells in culture and relocates to the nuclear periphery after infection of cells by adenovirus 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gedge, L.J.E.; Morrison, E.E.; Blair, G.E.; Walker, J.H. . E-mail: J.H.Walker@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-02-15

    Cajal bodies are intra-nuclear structures enriched in proteins involved in transcription and mRNA processing. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy experiments using a highly specific antibody to actin revealed nuclear actin spots that colocalized in part with p80 coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Actin remained associated with Cajal bodies in cells extracted to reveal the nuclear matrix. Adenovirus infection, which is known to disassemble Cajal bodies, resulted in loss of actin from these structures late in infection. In infected cells, nuclear actin was observed to relocate to structures at the periphery of the nucleus, inside the nuclear envelope. Based on these findings, it is suggested that actin may play an important role in the organization or function of the Cajal body.

  15. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  16. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  17. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-03-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  18. Differential nuclear remodeling of mammalian somatic cells by Xenopus laevis oocyte and egg cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Alberio, Ramiro; Johnson, Andrew D.; Stick, Reimer; Campbell, Keith H.S. . E-mail: keith.campbell@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-07-01

    The mechanisms governing nuclear reprogramming have not been fully elucidated yet; however, recent studies show a universally conserved ability of both oocyte and egg components to reprogram gene expression in somatic cells. The activation of genes associated with pluripotency by oocyte/egg components may require the remodeling of nuclear structures, such that they can acquire the features of early embryos and pluripotent cells. Here, we report on the remodeling of the nuclear lamina of mammalian cells by Xenopus oocyte and egg extracts. Lamin A/C is removed from somatic cells incubated in oocyte and egg extracts in an active process that requires permeable nuclear pores. Removal of lamin A/C is specific, since B-type lamins are not changed, and it is not dependent on the incorporation Xenopus egg specific lamin III. Moreover, transcriptional activity is differentially regulated in somatic cells incubated in the extracts. Pol I and II transcriptions are maintained in cells in oocyte extracts; however, both activities are abolished in egg extracts. Our study shows that components of oocyte and egg extracts can modify the nuclear lamina of somatic cells and that this nuclear remodeling induces a structural change in the nucleus which may have implications for transcriptional activity. These experiments suggest that modifications in the nuclear lamina structure by the removal of somatic proteins and the incorporation of oocyte/egg components may contribute to the reprogramming of somatic cell nuclei and may define a characteristic configuration of pluripotent cells.

  19. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  20. Quantification of the Spatial Organization of the Nuclear Lamina as a Tool for Cell Classification

    PubMed Central

    Righolt, Christiaan H.; Zatreanu, Diana A.; Raz, Vered

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope that plays multiple regulatory roles in chromatin organization and gene expression as well as a structural role in nuclear stability. The lamina proteins, also referred to as lamins, determine nuclear lamina organization and define the nuclear shape and the structural integrity of the cell nucleus. In addition, lamins are connected with both nuclear and cytoplasmic structures forming a dynamic cellular structure whose shape changes upon external and internal signals. When bound to the nuclear lamina, the lamins are mobile, have an impact on the nuclear envelop structure, and may induce changes in their regulatory functions. Changes in the nuclear lamina shape cause changes in cellular functions. A quantitative description of these structural changes could provide an unbiased description of changes in cellular function. In this review, we describe how changes in the nuclear lamina can be measured from three-dimensional images of lamins at the nuclear envelope, and we discuss how structural changes of the nuclear lamina can be used for cell classification. PMID:27335676

  1. Structural and Functional Insight into Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Jeong, Mi Suk; Han, Chang Woo; Yu, Hak Sun; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-04-28

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a critical eukaryotic replication accessory factor that supports DNA binding in DNA processing, such as DNA replication, repair, and recombination. PCNA consists of three toroidal-shaped monomers that encircle doublestranded DNA. The diverse functions of PCNA may be regulated by its interactions with partner proteins. Many of the PCNA partner proteins generally have a conserved PCNAinteracting peptide (PIP) motif, located at the N- or C- terminal region. The PIP motif forms a 310 helix that enters into the hydrophobic groove produced by an interdomain-connecting loop, a central loop, and a C-terminal tail in the PCNA. Post-translational modification of PCNA also plays a critical role in regulation of its function and binding partner proteins. Structural and biochemical studies of PCNA-protein will be useful in designing therapeutic agents, as well as estimating the outcome of anticancer drug development. This review summarizes the characterization of eukaryotic PCNA in relation to the protein structures, functions, and modifications, and interaction with proteins. PMID:26699741

  2. Cytoplasmic Accumulation of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K Strongly Promotes Tumor Invasion in Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Otoshi, Taiyo; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Morimoto, Kazuya; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a part of the ribonucleoprotein complex which regulates diverse biological events. While overexpression of hnRNP K has been shown to be related to tumorigenesis in several cancers, both the expression patterns and biological mechanisms of hnRNP K in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells remain unclear. In this study, we showed that hnRNP K protein was strongly expressed in selected RCC cell lines (ACHN, A498, Caki-1, 786–0), and knock-down of hnRNP K expression by siRNA induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Based on immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of hnRNP K expression in human clear cell RCC specimens, we demonstrated that there was a significant positive correlation between hnRNP K staining score and tumor aggressiveness (e.g., Fuhrman grade, metastasis). Particularly, the rate of cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP K in primary RCC with distant metastasis was significantly higher than that in RCC without metastasis. Additionally, our results indicated that the cytoplasmic distribution of hnRNP K induced by TGF-β stimulus mainly contributed to TGF-β-triggered tumor cell invasion in RCC cells. Dominant cytoplasmic expression of ectopic hnRNP K markedly suppressed the inhibition of invasion by knock-down of endogenous hnRNP K. The expression level of matrix metalloproteinase protein-2 was decreased by endogenous hnRNP K knock-down, and restored by ectopic hnRNP K. Therefore, hnRNP K may be a key molecule involved in cell motility in RCC cells, and molecular mechanism associated with the subcellular localization of hnRNP K may be a novel target in the treatment of metastatic RCC. PMID:26713736

  3. Mitotic chromosome length scales in response to both cell and nuclear size

    PubMed Central

    Ladouceur, Anne-Marie; Dorn, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular development requires that cells reduce in size as a result of consecutive cell divisions without increase in embryo volume. To maintain cellular integrity, organelle size adapts to cell size throughout development. During mitosis, the longest chromosome arm must be shorter than half of the mitotic spindle for proper chromosome segregation. Using high-resolution time-lapse microscopy of living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we have quantified the relation between cell size and chromosome length. In control embryos, chromosome length scaled to cell size. Artificial reduction of cell size resulted in a shortening of chromosome length, following a trend predicted by measurements from control embryos. Disturbing the RAN (Ras-related nuclear protein)-GTP gradient decoupled nuclear size from cell size and resulted in chromosome scaling to nuclear size rather than cell size; smaller nuclei contained shorter chromosomes independent of cell size. In sum, quantitative analysis relating cell, nuclear, and chromosome size predicts two levels of chromosome length regulation: one through cell size and a second in response to nuclear size. PMID:26033258

  4. Update on the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bacca, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) Complex continues to provide primary postirradiation handling and examination support for the US, US/Japanese, and US/United Kingdom Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuels and materials development and reactor safety programs. For the last several years, such support has also been provided for other US nuclear programs. These include the Light Water Reactor Safety Program, the Three Mile Island No. 2 (TMI-2) reactor accident-recovery programs, the Light Water Breeder Reactor Program, the US Air Force Neutron Radiography Program, and Defense Nuclear Programs. The HFEF facilities have been refurbished and upgraded and capabilities have been added to accommodate these programs and to maintain the HFEF Complex as a world-class, state-of-the-art hot-cell complex.

  5. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  6. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Annulate Lamellae Pore Complexes in Nuclear Transport in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raghunayakula, Sarita; Subramonian, Divya; Dasso, Mary; Kumar, Rita; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Annulate lamellae are cytoplasmic organelles containing stacked sheets of membranes embedded with pore complexes. These cytoplasmic pore complexes at annulate lamellae are morphologically similar to nuclear pore complexes at the nuclear envelope. Although annulate lamellae has been observed in nearly all types of cells, their biological functions are still largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO1-modification of the Ran GTPase-activating protein RanGAP1 not only target RanGAP1 to its known sites at nuclear pore complexes but also to annulate lamellae pore complexes through interactions with the Ran-binding protein RanBP2 and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 in mammalian cells. Furthermore, upregulation of annulate lamellae, which decreases the number of nuclear pore complexes and concurrently increases that of annulate lamellae pore complexes, causes a redistribution of nuclear transport receptors including importin α/β and the exportin CRM1 from nuclear pore complexes to annulate lamellae pore complexes and also reduces the rates of nuclear import and export. Moreover, our results reveal that importin α/β-mediated import complexes initially accumulate at annulate lamellae pore complexes upon the activation of nuclear import and subsequently disassociate for nuclear import through nuclear pore complexes in cells with upregulation of annulate lamellae. Lastly, CRM1-mediated export complexes are concentrated at both nuclear pore complexes and annulate lamellae pore complexes when the disassembly of these export complexes is inhibited by transient expression of a Ran GTPase mutant arrested in its GTP-bound form, suggesting that RanGAP1/RanBP2-activated RanGTP hydrolysis at these pore complexes is required for the dissociation of the export complexes. Hence, our findings provide a foundation for further investigation of how upregulation of annulate lamellae decreases the rates of nuclear transport and also for elucidation of the biological significance of the

  7. Atypical nuclear localization of CD133 plasma membrane glycoprotein in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nunukova, Alena; Neradil, Jakub; Skoda, Jan; Jaros, Josef; Hampl, Ales; Sterba, Jaroslav; Veselska, Renata

    2015-07-01

    CD133 (also known as prominin-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that is widely used for the identification of stem cells. Furthermore, its glycosylated epitope, AC133, has recently been discussed as a marker of cancer stem cells in various human malignancies. During our recent experiments on rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS), we unexpectedly identified an atypical nuclear localization of CD133 in a relatively stable subset of cells in five RMS cell lines established in our laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, this atypical localization of CD133 has not yet been proven or analyzed in detail in cancer cells. In the present study, we verified the nuclear localization of CD133 in RMS cells using three independent anti-CD133 antibodies, including both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy followed by software cross-section analysis, transmission electron microscopy and cell fractionation with immunoblotting were also employed, and all the results undeniably confirmed the presence of CD133 in the nuclei of stable minor subpopulations of all five RMS cell lines. The proportion of cells showing an exclusive nuclear localization of CD133 ranged from 3.4 to 7.5%, with only minor differences observed among the individual anti-CD133 antibodies. Although the role of CD133 in the cell nucleus remains unclear, these results clearly indicate that this atypical nuclear localization of CD133 in a minor subpopulation of cancer cells is a common phenomenon in RMS cell lines. PMID:25977066

  8. Identification of a novel RNA giant nuclear body in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xiaoxian; Gan, Yichao; Zheng, Weiwei; Kim, Byung-Wook; Xu, Xiaohua; Lu, Xiaoya; Dong, Qi; Zheng, Shu; Huang, Wendong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive synthesis of oncogenic mRNAs is essential for maintaining the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. However, little is known about how these mRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Here, we report the identification of a RNA giant nuclear body (RNA-GNB) that is abundant in cancer cells but rare in normal cells. The RNA-GNB contains a RNA core surrounded by a protein shell. We identify 782 proteins from cancer-associated RNA-GNBs, 40% of which are involved in the nuclear mRNA trafficking. RNA-GNB is required for cell proliferation, and its abundance is positively associated with tumor burden and outcome of therapies. Our findings suggest that the RNA-GNB is a novel nuclear RNA trafficking organelle that may contribute to the nuclear mRNA exporting and proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26678034

  9. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  10. Nuclear F-actin Formation and Reorganization upon Cell Spreading*♦

    PubMed Central

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  11. A disposable, roll-to-roll hot-embossed inertial microfluidic device for size-based sorting of microbeads and cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Liedert, Christina; Liedert, Ralph; Papautsky, Ian

    2016-05-21

    Inertial microfluidics has been a highly active area of research in recent years for high-throughput focusing and sorting of synthetic and biological microparticles. However, existing inertial microfluidic devices always rely on microchannels with high-aspect-ratio geometries (channel width w < channel height h) and small cross-sections (w×h < 50 × 100 μm(2)). Such deep and small structures increase fabrication difficulty and can limit manufacturing by large-scale and high-throughput production approaches such as roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing. In this work, we present a novel inertial microfluidic device using only a simple and low-aspect-ratio (LAR) straight microchannel (w > h) to achieve size-based sorting of microparticles and cells. The simple LAR geometry of the device enables successful high-throughput fabrication using R2R hot embossing. With optimized flow conditions and channel dimensions, we demonstrate continuous sorting of a mixture of 15 μm and 10 μm diameter microbeads with >97% sorting efficiency using the low-cost and disposable R2R chip. We further demonstrate size-based sorting of bovine white blood cells, demonstrating the ability to process real cellular samples in our R2R chip. We envision that this R2R hot-embossed inertial microfluidic chip will serve as a powerful yet low-cost and disposable tool for size-based sorting of synthetic microparticles in industrial applications or cellular samples in cell biology research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27050341

  12. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  13. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  14. The Depletion of Nuclear Glutathione Impairs Cell Proliferation in 3t3 Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Markovic, Jelena; Mora, Nancy J.; Broseta, Ana M.; Gimeno, Amparo; de-la-Concepción, Noelia; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutathione is considered essential for survival in mammalian cells and yeast but not in prokaryotic cells. The presence of a nuclear pool of glutathione has been demonstrated but its role in cellular proliferation and differentiation is still a matter of debate. Principal Findings We have studied proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts for a period of 5 days. Cells were treated with two well known depleting agents, diethyl maleate (DEM) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), and the cellular and nuclear glutathione levels were assessed by analytical and confocal microscopic techniques, respectively. Both agents decreased total cellular glutathione although depletion by BSO was more sustained. However, the nuclear glutathione pool resisted depletion by BSO but not with DEM. Interestingly, cell proliferation was impaired by DEM, but not by BSO. Treating the cells simultaneously with DEM and with glutathione ethyl ester to restore intracellular GSH levels completely prevented the effects of DEM on cell proliferation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the importance of nuclear glutathione in the control of cell proliferation in 3T3 fibroblasts and suggest that a reduced nuclear environment is necessary for cells to progress in the cell cycle. PMID:19641610

  15. VEGFR-1 Expression Relates to Fuhrman Nuclear Grade of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Oh, Sung Soo; Lee, Mi-Ra; Jung, Jae Hung; Chung, Hyun Chul; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Eom, Minseob

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 1 signaling may play an important role in the progression of pathological angiogenesis that occurs in many tumors, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therapeutic targeting directed against VEGF and VEGFR-2 has been proven to be successful for metastatic clear cell RCC (CCRCC). However, the expression of VEGFR-1 and its association with prognostic parameters of CCRCC in the tumorigenesis of renal cancer remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the expression of VEGFR-1 and its prognostic significance in CCRCC. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for VEGFR-1 was performed on 126 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded CCRCC tissue samples. Six of these cases were available for Western blot analyses. The results were compared with various clinicopathologic parameters of CCRCC and patients’ survival. Results: VEGFR-1 expression was detected in 59 cases (46.8%) of CCRCC. Higher VEGFR-1 expression was significantly correlated with a lower Fuhrman nuclear grade and the absence of renal pelvis invasion, although it was not related to patients’ survival. Western blot analyses showed higher VEGFR-1 expression in low grade tumors. Conclusion: VEGFR-1 expression may be associated with favorable prognostic factors, particularly a lower Fuhrman nuclear grade in CCRCC. PMID:26064856

  16. Anti-proliferative effects of Salacia reticulata leaves hot-water extract on interleukin-1β-activated cells derived from the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis model mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Salacia reticulata (SR) is a plant native to Sri Lanka. In ayurvedic medicine, SR bark preparations, taken orally, are considered effective in the treatment of rheumatism and diabetes. We investigated the ability of SR leaves (SRL) to inhibit in vitro the interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-activated proliferation of synoviocyte-like cells derived from rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Findings Inflammatory synovial tissues were harvested from type II collagen antibody-induced arthritic mice. From these tissues, a synoviocyte-like cell line was established and named MTS-C H7. To determine whether SRL can suppress cell proliferation and gene expression in MTS-C H7 cells, fractionation of the SRL hot-water extract was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid-liquid extraction, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and protease digestion. The 50% inhibitory concentration of the SRL hot-water extract against MTS-C H7 cells proliferation was ~850 μg/mL. Treatment with a low dose (25 μg dry matter per millilitre) of the extract inhibited IL-1β-induced cell proliferation and suppressed the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) genes in MTS-C H7 cells. Various polyphenolic fractions obtained from HPLC and the fractions from liquid-liquid extraction did not affect cell proliferation. Only the residual water sample from liquid-liquid extraction significantly affected cell proliferation and the expression of MMP genes. The results of SDS-PAGE and protease digestion experiment showed that low molecular weight proteins present in SRL inhibited the IL-1β-activated cell proliferation. Conclusions We surmised that the residual water fraction of the SRL extract was involved in the inhibition of IL-1β-activated cell proliferation and regulation of mRNA expression in MTS-C H7 cells. In addition, we believe that the active ingredients in the extract are low molecular weight proteins. PMID:22537486

  17. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  18. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  19. Longitudinal tracking of single live cancer cells to understand cell cycle effects of the nuclear export inhibitor, selinexor

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Joshua M.; Burke, Russell T.; DeSisto, John A.; Landesman, Yosef; Orth, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal tracking is a powerful approach to understand the biology of single cells. In cancer therapy, outcome is determined at the molecular and cellular scale, yet relationships between cellular response and cell fate are often unknown. The selective inhibitor of nuclear export, selinexor, is in development for the treatment of various cancers. Selinexor covalently binds exportin-1, causing nuclear sequestration of cargo proteins, including key regulators of the cell cycle and apoptosis. The cell cycle effects of selinexor and the relationships between cell cycle effects and cell fates, has not been described for individual cells. Using fluorescent cell cycle indicators we report the majority of cell death after selinexor treatment occurs from a protracted G1-phase and early S-phase. G1- or early S-phase treated cells show the strongest response and either die or arrest, while those treated in late S- or G2-phase progress to mitosis and divide. Importantly, the progeny of cell divisions also die or arrest, mostly in the next G1-phase. Cells that survive selinexor are negative for multiple proliferation biomarkers, indicating a penetrant, arrested state. Selinexor acts quickly, shows strong cell cycle selectivity, and is highly effective at arresting cell growth and inducing death in cancer-derived cells. PMID:26399741

  20. Hot photocarrier dynamics in organic solar cells measured by transient absorption and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Paul A.; Cunningham, Paul D.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a study of charge transfer and carrier dynamics in films of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and buckmisnsterfullerene (C60) by investigated by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS). We compare terahertz photoconductivity dynamics in composite and multi-layered films of C60 and ZnPc. The few picosecond terahertz photoconductivity dynamics arise from autoionization and recombination between C60 molecules and cooling of hot photocarriers following from charge transfer between C60 and ZnPc.

  1. Passive permeability and effective pore size of HeLa cell nuclear membranes.

    PubMed

    Samudram, Arunkarthick; Mangalassery, Bijeesh M; Kowshik, Meenal; Patincharath, Nandakumar; Varier, Geetha K

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane act as the sole gateway of transport of molecules from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and vice versa. Studies on biomolecular transport through nuclear membranes provide vital data on the nuclear pore complexes. In this work, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran molecules as a model system and study the passive nuclear import of biomolecules through nuclear pore complexes in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. Experiments are carried out under transient conditions in the time lapse imaging scheme using an in-house constructed confocal laser scanning microscope. Transport rates of dextran molecules having molecular weights of 4-70 kDa corresponding to Stokes radius of 1.4-6 nm are determined. Analyzing the permeability of the nuclear membrane for different sizes the effective pore radius of HeLa cell nuclear membrane is determined to be 5.3 nm, much larger than the value reported earlier using proteins as probe molecules. The range of values reported for the nuclear pore radius suggest that they may not be rigid structures and it is quite probable that the effective pore size of nuclear pore complexes is critically dependent on the probe molecules and on the environmental factors. PMID:27338984

  2. A cell cycle-dependent co-repressor mediates photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Okada, Maiko; Fujiki, Ryoji; Iriyama, Aya; Yanagi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroaki; Takada, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Masahiko; Miyajima, Atsushi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Umesono, Kazuhiko; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki

    2007-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor (PNR) (NR2E3) acts as a sequence-specific repressor that controls neuronal differentiation in the developing retina. We identified a novel PNR co-repressor, Ret-CoR, that is expressed in the developing retina and brain. Biochemical purification of Ret-CoR identified a multiprotein complex that included E2F/Myb-associated proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and NCoR/HDAC complex-related components. Ret-CoR appeared to function as a platform protein for the complex, and interacted with PNR via two CoRNR motifs. Purified Ret-CoR complex exhibited HDAC activity, co-repressed PNR transrepression function in vitro, and co-repressed PNR function in PNR target gene promoters, presumably in the retinal progenitor cells. Notably, the appearance of Ret-CoR protein was cell-cycle-stage-dependent (from G1 to S). Therefore, Ret-CoR appears to act as a component of an HDAC co-repressor complex that supports PNR repression function in the developing retina, and may represent a co-regulator class that supports transcriptional regulator function via cell-cycle-dependent expression. PMID:17255935

  3. Intracellular lysyl oxidase: Effect of a specific inhibitor on nuclear mass in proliferating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Fawzy A.; Torres, Marie; Wang, Hao; Graham, Lila

    2010-06-11

    LOX, the principal enzyme involved in crosslinking of collagen, was the first of several lysyl oxidase isotypes to be characterized. Its active form was believed to be exclusively extracellular. Active LOX was later reported to be present in cell nuclei; its function there is unknown. LOX expression opposes the effect of mutationally activated Ras, which is present in about 30% of human cancers. The mechanism of LOX in countering the action of Ras is also unknown. In the present work, assessment of nuclear protein for possible effects of lysyl oxidase activity led to the discovery that proliferating cells dramatically increase their nuclear protein content when exposed to BAPN ({beta}-aminopropionitrile), a highly specific lysyl oxidase inhibitor that reportedly blocks LOX inhibition of Ras-induced oocyte maturation. In three cell types (PC12 cells, A7r5 smooth muscle cells, and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts), BAPN caused a 1.8-, 1.7-, and 2.1-fold increase in total nuclear protein per cell, respectively, affecting all major components in both nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. Since nuclear size is correlated with proliferative status, enzyme activity restricting nuclear growth may be involved in the lysyl oxidase tumor suppressive effect. Evidence is also presented for the presence of apparent lysyl oxidase isotype(s) containing a highly conserved LOX active site sequence in the nuclei of PC12 cells, which do not manufacture extracellular lysyl oxidase substrates. Results reported here support the hypothesis that nuclear lysyl oxidase regulates nuclear growth, and thereby modulates cell proliferation.

  4. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7. PMID:26746137

  5. Inhibitory effect of hot-water extract of quince (Cydonia oblonga) on immunoglobulin E-dependent late-phase immune reactions of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takeshi; Iizuka, Tatsuhiro

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of a crude hot-water extract (HW) of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) fruit on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent late-phase immune reactions of mast cells using in vitro system. Mast cell-like RBL-2H3 cells were treated with quince HW and late-phase reaction was then induced by stimulation with IgE + Antigen. Quince HW reduced the elevation of interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α expression level. Furthermore, quince HW suppressed these cytokine expressions of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), a normal mast cell model. Leukotriene C(4) and prostaglandin D(2) production in BMMCs after 1 and 6 h of stimulation, respectively, were also reduced by treating the cells with quince HW. We found that the induction of intracellular cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression but not COX-1 expression in BMMCs was reduced by quince HW. These results suggest that quince HW has an inhibitory effect on broad range of the late-phase immune reactions of mast cells. PMID:21264509

  6. Angiomotin promotes renal epithelial and carcinoma cell proliferation by retaining the nuclear YAP

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Meng; Li, Shuting; Luo, Changqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Shen, Yanwei; Sui, YanXia; Wang, Fan; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jiao; Liu, Peijun; Yang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the common tumors in the urinary system without effective therapies. Angiomotin (Amot) can interact with Yes-associated protein (YAP) to either stimulate or inhibit YAP activity, playing a potential role in cell proliferation. However, the role of Amot in regulating the proliferation of renal epithelial and RCC cells is unknown. Here, we show that Amot is expressed predominantly in the nucleus of RCC cells and tissues, and in the cytoplasm and nucleus of renal epithelial cells and paracancerous tissues. Furthermore, Amot silencing inhibited proliferation of HK-2 and 786-O cells while Amot upregulation promoted proliferation of ACHN cells. Interestingly, the location of Amot and YAP in RCC clinical samples and cells was similar. Amot interacted with YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells, particularly in the nucleus. Moreover, Amot silencing mitigated the levels of nuclear YAP in HK-2 and 786-O cells and reduced YAP-related CTGF and Cyr61 expression in 786-O cells. Amot upregulation slightly increased the nuclear YAP and YAP-related gene expression in ACHN cells. Finally, enhanced YAP expression restored proliferation of Amot-silencing 786-O cells. Together, these data indicate that Amot is crucial for the maintenance of nuclear YAP to promote renal epithelial and RCC proliferation. PMID:26848622

  7. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A.; Madson, Christian J.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Belshan, Michael

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  8. Improving the development of early bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos by treating adult donor cells with vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zekun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Rongjun; Qin, Yumin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin C (Vc) has been widely studied in cell and embryo culture, and has recently been demonstrated to promote cellular reprogramming. The objective of this study was to identify a suitable Vc concentration that, when used to treat adult bovine fibroblasts serving as donor cells for nuclear transfer, improved donor-cell physiology and the developmental potential of the cloned embryos that the donor nuclei were used to create. A Vc concentration of 0.15 mM promoted cell proliferation and increased donor-cell 5-hydroxy methyl cytosine levels 2.73-fold (P < 0.05). The blastocyst rate was also significantly improved after nuclear transfer (39.6% treated vs. 26.0% control, P < 0.05); the average number of apoptotic cells in cloned blastocysts was significantly reduced (2.2 vs. 4.4, P < 0.05); and the inner cell mass-to-trophectoderm ratio (38.25% vs. 30.75%, P < 0.05) and expression of SOX2 (3.71-fold, P < 0.05) and POU5F1 (3.15-fold, P < 0.05) were significantly increased. These results suggested that Vc promotes cell proliferation, decreases DNA methylation levels in donor cells, and improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos. PMID:26212732

  9. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  10. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  11. Nuclear deformability constitutes a rate-limiting step during cell migration in 3-D environments

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Patricia M.; Denais, Celine; Bakshi, Maya C.; Lammerding, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cell motility plays a critical role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from wound healing to cancer metastasis. While cell migration on 2-dimensional (2-D) substrates has been studied for decades, the physical challenges cells face when moving in 3-D environments are only now emerging. In particular, the cell nucleus, which occupies a large fraction of the cell volume and is normally substantially stiffer than the surrounding cytoplasm, may impose a major obstacle when cells encounter narrow constrictions in the interstitial space, the extracellular matrix, or small capillaries. Using novel microfluidic devices that allow observation of cells moving through precisely defined geometries at high spatial and temporal resolution, we determined nuclear deformability as a critical factor in the cells’ ability to pass through constrictions smaller than the size of the nucleus. Furthermore, we found that cells with reduced levels of the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A/C, which are the main determinants of nuclear stiffness, passed significantly faster through narrow constrictions during active migration and passive perfusion. Given recent reports that many human cancers have altered lamin expression, our findings suggest a novel biophysical mechanism by which changes in nuclear structure and composition may promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:25436017

  12. Nuclear trafficking of EGFR by Vps34 represses Arf expression to promote lung tumor cell survival.

    PubMed

    Dayde, D; Guerard, M; Perron, P; Hatat, A-S; Barrial, C; Eymin, B; Gazzeri, S

    2016-07-28

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cell surface receptor that has an essential role in cell proliferation and survival, and overexpression of EGFR is a common feature of human cancers. In Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), activating mutations of EGFR have also been described. We recently showed that mutant EGFR-L858R inhibits the expression of the p14ARF tumor-suppressor protein to promote cell survival. In this study, we defined the molecular bases by which EGFR controls Arf expression. Using various lung tumor models, we showed that EGF stimulation inhibits Arf transcription by a mechanism involving the nuclear transport and recruitment of EGFR to the Arf promoter. We unraveled the vesicular trafficking protein Vps34 as a mediator of EGFR nuclear trafficking and showed that its neutralization prevents the accumulation of EGFR to the Arf promoter in response to ligand activation. Finally, in lung tumor cells that carry mutant EGFR-L858R, we demonstrated that inhibition of Vps34 using small interfering RNA restrains nuclear EGFR location and restores Arf expression leading to apoptosis. These findings identify the Arf tumor suppressor as a new transcriptional target of nuclear EGFR and highlight Vps34 as an important regulator of the nuclear EGFR/Arf survival pathway. As a whole, they provide a mechanistic explanation to the inverse correlation between nuclear expression of EGFR and overall survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:26686095

  13. Characterization of a beta-catenin nuclear localization defect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Cara; Mills, Kate M; Lui, Christina; Semaan, Crystal; Molloy, Mark P; Sharma, Manisha; Forwood, Jade K; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-02-15

    Beta-catenin plays a key role in transducing Wnt signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Here we characterize an unusual subcellular distribution of beta-catenin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, wherein beta-catenin localizes to the cytoplasm and membrane but atypically did not relocate to the nucleus after Wnt treatment. The inability of Wnt or the Wnt agonist LiCl to induce nuclear localization of beta-catenin was not due to defective nuclear transport, as the transport machinery was intact and ectopic GFP-beta-catenin displayed rapid nuclear entry in living cells. The mislocalization is explained by a shift in the retention of beta-catenin from nucleus to cytoplasm. The reduced nuclear retention is caused by unusually low expression of lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) transcription factors. The reconstitution of LEF-1 or TCF4 expression rescued nuclear localization of beta-catenin in Wnt treated cells. In the cytoplasm, beta-catenin accumulated in recycling endosomes, golgi and beta-COP-positive coatomer complexes. The peripheral association with endosomes diminished after Wnt treatment, potentially releasing β-catenin into the cytoplasm for nuclear entry. We propose that in MCF-7 and perhaps other breast cancer cells, beta-catenin may contribute to cytoplasmic functions such as ER-golgi transport, in addition to its transactivation role in the nucleus. PMID:26844628

  14. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  15. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  16. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W. David; Carmack, Jon; Werner, James E.; Pink, Robert J.; Haggard, DeLon C.; Johnson, Ryan

    2007-01-30

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISP. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 deg. C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test low activity uranium containing materials but is also suited for testing cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  17. Targeting endogenous nuclear antigens by electrotransfer of monoclonal antibodies in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Guillaume; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Desplancq, Dominique; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Gannon, Julian; Van Regenmortel, Marc H.; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are valuable tools for functional studies in vitro, but their use in living cells remains challenging because they do not naturally cross the cell membrane. Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for the intracytoplasmic delivery of any antibody into cultured cells. By following the fate of monoclonal antibodies that bind to nuclear antigens, it was possible to image endogenous targets and to show that inhibitory antibodies are able to induce cell growth suppression or cell death. Our electrotransfer system allowed the cancer cells we studied to be transduced without loss of viability and may have applications for a variety of intracellular immuno-interventions. PMID:23765067

  18. The nuclear lamina regulates germline stem cell niche organization via modulation of EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiyang; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yixian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Stem cell-niche interactions have been studied extensively with regard to cell polarity and extracellular signaling. Less is known about the way in which signals and polarity cues integrate with intracellular structures to ensure appropriate niche organization and function. Here we report that nuclear lamins function in the cyst stem cells (CySCs) of Drosophila testis to control the interaction of CySCs with the hub. This interaction is important for regulation of CySC differentiation and organization of the niche that supports the germline stem cells (GSCs). Lamin promotes nuclear retention of phosphorylated ERK in the CySC lineage by regulating the distribution of specific nucleoporins within the nuclear pores. Lamin-regulated nuclear EGFR signaling in the CySC lineage is essential for proliferation and differentiation of the GSCs and the transient amplifying germ cells. Thus, we have uncovered a role for the nuclear lamina in integration of EGF signaling to regulate stem cell niche function. PMID:23827710

  19. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L.; Han, Jessica H.; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H.; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an ‘epigenetic’ drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat’s differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action. PMID:27503568

  20. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L; Han, Jessica H; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H; Bussey, Kimberly J; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an 'epigenetic' drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat's differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action. PMID:27503568

  1. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom).

    PubMed

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F

    2014-11-01

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. PMID:25368422

  2. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom)

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. PMID:25368422

  3. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  4. Identification and Ultrastructural Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Degradation Complex in Differentiating Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M. Joseph; Brennan, Lisa A.; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Johnsen, Sönke; Kantorow, Marc

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved issue in structural biology is how the encapsulated lens removes membranous organelles to carry out its role as a transparent optical element. In this ultrastructural study, we establish a mechanism for nuclear elimination in the developing chick lens during the formation of the organelle-free zone. Day 12–15 chick embryo lenses were examined by high-resolution confocal light microscopy and thin section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following fixation in 10% formalin and 4% paraformaldehyde, and then processing for confocal or TEM as described previously. Examination of developing fiber cells revealed normal nuclei with dispersed chromatin and clear nucleoli typical of cells in active ribosome production to support protein synthesis. Early signs of nuclear degradation were observed about 300 μm from the lens capsule in Day 15 lenses where the nuclei display irregular nuclear stain and prominent indentations that sometimes contained a previously undescribed macromolecular aggregate attached to the nuclear envelope. We have termed this novel structure the nuclear excisosome. This complex by confocal is closely adherent to the nuclear envelope and by TEM appears to degrade the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope, then the inner leaflet up to 500 μm depth. The images suggest that the nuclear excisosome separates nuclear membrane proteins from lipids, which then form multilamellar assemblies that stain intensely in confocal and in TEM have 5 nm spacing consistent with pure lipid bilayers. The denuded nucleoplasm then degrades by condensation and loss of structure in the range 600 to 700 μm depth producing pyknotic nuclear remnants. None of these stages display any classic autophagic vesicles or lysosomes associated with nuclei. Uniquely, the origin of the nuclear excisosome is from filopodial-like projections of adjacent lens fiber cells that initially contact, and then appear to fuse with the outer nuclear membrane. These filopodial

  5. Identification and Ultrastructural Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Degradation Complex in Differentiating Lens Fiber Cells.

    PubMed

    Costello, M Joseph; Brennan, Lisa A; Mohamed, Ashik; Gilliland, Kurt O; Johnsen, Sönke; Kantorow, Marc

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved issue in structural biology is how the encapsulated lens removes membranous organelles to carry out its role as a transparent optical element. In this ultrastructural study, we establish a mechanism for nuclear elimination in the developing chick lens during the formation of the organelle-free zone. Day 12-15 chick embryo lenses were examined by high-resolution confocal light microscopy and thin section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following fixation in 10% formalin and 4% paraformaldehyde, and then processing for confocal or TEM as described previously. Examination of developing fiber cells revealed normal nuclei with dispersed chromatin and clear nucleoli typical of cells in active ribosome production to support protein synthesis. Early signs of nuclear degradation were observed about 300 μm from the lens capsule in Day 15 lenses where the nuclei display irregular nuclear stain and prominent indentations that sometimes contained a previously undescribed macromolecular aggregate attached to the nuclear envelope. We have termed this novel structure the nuclear excisosome. This complex by confocal is closely adherent to the nuclear envelope and by TEM appears to degrade the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope, then the inner leaflet up to 500 μm depth. The images suggest that the nuclear excisosome separates nuclear membrane proteins from lipids, which then form multilamellar assemblies that stain intensely in confocal and in TEM have 5 nm spacing consistent with pure lipid bilayers. The denuded nucleoplasm then degrades by condensation and loss of structure in the range 600 to 700 μm depth producing pyknotic nuclear remnants. None of these stages display any classic autophagic vesicles or lysosomes associated with nuclei. Uniquely, the origin of the nuclear excisosome is from filopodial-like projections of adjacent lens fiber cells that initially contact, and then appear to fuse with the outer nuclear membrane. These filopodial

  6. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edith E; Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Feichtinger, René G; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 ρ(0) cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in ρ(0) cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:22222373

  7. Response of sheep lymphocytes to PHA: quantitation by nuclear volume measurement and cell counts (40764)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.

    1980-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of sheep was studied. Assessment of proliferative response was performed by determination of nuclear volumes and cell counts in cultures from 14 sheep and by incorporation of tritiated thymidine in cultures in four additional sheep. PBL of sheep were found to transform and proliferate with PHA similarly to human peripheral blood lymphocytes with minor differences. Quantitation of the proliferative response by determining the cell count and nuclear volumes provided more information on cell kinetics in culture than the commonly used isotope-labeled thymidine incorporation method.

  8. A study of proliferative activity, angiogenesis and nuclear grading in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, N K; Chatterjee, U; Sarkar, S; Kundu, A K

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the role of proliferative marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and microvessel density (MVD) as prognostic markers in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to see their relationship with the clinical stage and nuclear grades, we studied 30 cases of RCC for nuclear grading (Fuhrman's nuclear grade), MVD (using anti CD-34 antibody), and PCNA labeling index (using anti-PCNA antibody) over a period of 2.5 years. Staging was assessed by peroperative and radiologic findings. The area of highest MVD within the tumor was selected for microvessel count (MVC) per high-power field (0.1885 mm 2 area). PCNA labeling index was determined by counting percentage of positively stained tumor cell nuclei. PCNA labeling index above 60% was taken as high PCNA index and up to 60% was considered low. There was significant positive correlation between PCNA labeling index with both nuclear grade and clinical stage using Spearman's correlation coefficient. No association was noted between MVC with PCNA, nuclear grade, and clinical stages. Evaluation of proliferative status of RCC is a useful adjunct as a prognostic parameter as it is seen to correlate well with both clinical stage and nuclear grade. In our study, MVD was not seen to correlate with either of these. PMID:18417843

  9. Nuclear size as a cell-kinetic marker for osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. E.; Mozsary, P. G.; Klingler, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear morphometric assay for preosteoblasts is introduced as a cell-kinetic technique, applicable to routine histological preparations of mineralized tissue. Because this method is a morphological marker for osteoblast precursor cell differentiation, it provides a new dimension for determining the mechanism of osteoblast histogenesis. Osteoblast precursors of the periodontal ligament are a mixed population of progenitors, kinetically separable into two distinct groups according to nuclear size. Preosteoblasts, the immediate proliferating precursors of osteoblasts, have large nuclei (greater than 170 micrometers3) and are derived from relatively undifferentiated fibroblastlike cells, which have smaller nuclei (less than 80 micrometers3). Increase in nuclear volume, during G1 phase of the cell cycle, is apparently a morphological manifestation of change in genomic expression. This key event in preosteoblast differentiation is related to mechanical stress/strain and may be an important rate-limiting step in osteoblast histogenesis.

  10. Nuclear Phosphatidylcholine and Sphingomyelin Metabolism of Thyroid Cells Changes during Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    PubMed Central

    Albi, Elisabetta; Cataldi, Samuela; Villani, Maristella; Perrella, Giuseppina

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine metabolism is involved in the response to ultraviolet radiation treatment in different ways related to the physiological state of cells. To evaluate the effects of low levels of radiation from the stratosphere on thyroid cells, proliferating and quiescent FRTL-5 cells were flown in a stratospheric balloon (BIRBA mission). After recovery, the activity of neutral sphingomyelinase, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelin synthase, and reverse sphingomyelin synthase was assayed in purified nuclei and the nuclei-free fraction. In proliferating FRTL-5, space radiation stimulate nuclear neutral sphingomyelinase and reverse sphingomyelin synthase activity, whereas phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and sphingomyelin synthase were inhibited, thus inducing sphingomyelin degradation and phosphatidylcholine synthesis. This effect was lower in quiescent cells. The possible role of nuclear lipid metabolism in the thyroid damage induced by space radiations is discussed. PMID:20011661

  11. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Soni, Shivani; Sinha, Sudha; Hanspal, Manjit . E-mail: manjit.hanspal@tufts.edu

    2006-04-21

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division.

  12. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    PubMed Central

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; De Vos, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development. PMID:27461848

  13. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells.

    PubMed

    Robijns, J; Molenberghs, F; Sieprath, T; Corne, T D J; Verschuuren, M; De Vos, W H

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development. PMID:27461848

  14. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; de Vos, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development.

  15. Use of a CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility.

  16. The influence of donor nucleus source on the outcome of zebrafish somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Chang, Eun-Ah; Muñoz, Juan D; Kawakami, Koichi; Cibelli, José B

    2010-01-01

    The success of nuclear reprogramming following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is thought to depend on factors present in the egg. Little is known about the role - if any - played by the somatic cell type on the outcome of the procedure. We tested whether cells of different lineages might have different capacities for reprogramming following SCNT, comparing cells isolated from five different tissues of transgenic zebrafish for their developmental potential when used as SCNT donor cells. We used transgenic zebrafish lines expressing green fluorescence protein under an endogenous tissue-specific promoter: HGn62A-skin, HGn28A-skin, HGn8E-heart, HG21C-fin and notochord and HGn30A-hatch gland. We analyzed the efficiency of cloning, as measured by reconstructed embryos that developed up to the hatched-fry stage. Specifically, donor cells of fin and notochord origin yielded the best rate of cloned fish production. All of the other cell types used were capable of producing cloned fish, albeit with significantly lower efficiency. These results indicate that the type of zebrafish cells used for SCNT can influence the outcome of the procedure. Future epigenetic analysis of these cells will help determine specific chromatin profiles in somatic cells that have an impact on nuclear reprogramming procedures. PMID:21404188

  17. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Park, Jin-Ki; Sorrell, Alice M.; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Woo, Jae-Seok; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Chang, Won-Kyong; Shim, Hosup

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  18. Hot spot and trench volcano separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    It is suggested that the distribution of separations between trench volcanos located along subduction zones reflects the depth of partial melting, and that the separation distribution for hot spot volcanoes near spreading centers provides a measure of the depth of mantle convection cells. It is further proposed that the lateral dimensions of mantle convection cells are also represented by the hot-spot separations (rather than by ridge-trench distances) and that a break in the distribution of hot spot separations at 3000 km is evidence for both whole mantle convection and a deep thermal plume origin of hot spots.

  19. Involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (cyclin) in DNA replication in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, M; Tan, E M; Ryoji, M

    1989-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (also called cyclin) is known to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase delta but not the other DNA polymerases in vitro. We injected a human autoimmune antibody against PCNA into unfertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis and examined the effects of this antibody on the replication of injected plasmid DNA as well as egg chromosomes. The anti-PCNA antibody inhibited plasmid replication by up to 67%, demonstrating that PCNA is involved in plasmid replication in living cells. This result further implies that DNA polymerase delta is necessary for plasmid replication in vivo. Anti-PCNA antibody alone did not block plasmid replication completely, but the residual replication was abolished by coinjection of a monoclonal antibody against DNA polymerase alpha. Anti-DNA polymerase alpha alone inhibited plasmid replication by 63%. Thus, DNA polymerase alpha is also required for plasmid replication in this system. In similar studies on the replication of egg chromosomes, the inhibition by anti-PCNA antibody was only 30%, while anti-DNA polymerase alpha antibody blocked 73% of replication. We concluded that the replication machineries of chromosomes and plasmid differ in their relative content of DNA polymerase delta. In addition, we obtained evidence through the use of phenylbutyl deoxyguanosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, that the structure of DNA polymerase alpha holoenzyme for chromosome replication is significantly different from that for plasmid replication. Images PMID:2564636

  20. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  1. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape. PMID:26976044

  2. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  3. Cellular and Nuclear Alignment Analysis for Determining Epithelial Cell Chirality.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Michael J; Ray, Poulomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Singh, Ajay V; Wan, Leo Q

    2016-05-01

    Left-right (LR) asymmetry is a biologically conserved property in living organisms that can be observed in the asymmetrical arrangement of organs and tissues and in tissue morphogenesis, such as the directional looping of the gastrointestinal tract and heart. The expression of LR asymmetry in embryonic tissues can be appreciated in biased cell alignment. Previously an in vitro chirality assay was reported by patterning multiple cells on microscale defined geometries and quantified the cell phenotype-dependent LR asymmetry, or cell chirality. However, morphology and chirality of individual cells on micropatterned surfaces has not been well characterized. Here, a Python-based algorithm was developed to identify and quantify immunofluorescence stained individual epithelial cells on multicellular patterns. This approach not only produces results similar to the image intensity gradient-based method reported previously, but also can capture properties of single cells such as area and aspect ratio. We also found that cell nuclei exhibited biased alignment. Around 35% cells were misaligned and were typically smaller and less elongated. This new imaging analysis approach is an effective tool for measuring single cell chirality inside multicellular structures and can potentially help unveil biophysical mechanisms underlying cellular chiral bias both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26294010

  4. Mitoxantrone resistance in HL-60 leukemia cells: Reduced nuclear topoisomerase II catalytic activity and drug-induced DNA cleavage in association with reduced expression of the topoisomerase II. beta. isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, W.G.; Slade, D.L.; Parr, R.L. ); Drake, F.H. )

    1991-10-15

    Mitoxantrone-resistant variants of the human HL-60 leukemia cell line are cross-resistant to several natural product and synthetic antineoplastic agents. The resistant cells (HL-60/MX2) retain sensitivity to the Vinca alkaloids vincristine and vinblastine, drugs that are typically associated with the classical multidrug resistance phenotype. Mitoxantrone accumulation and retention are equivalent in the sensitive and resistant cell types, suggesting that mitoxantrone resistance inn HL-60/MX2 cells might be associated with an alteration in the type II DNA topoisomerases. The authors discovered that topoisomerase II catalytic activity in 1.0 M NaCl nuclear extracts from the HL-60/MX2 variant was reduced 4- to 5-fold compared to that in the parental HL-60 cells. Studies were designed to minimize the proteolytic degradation of the topoisomerase II enzymes by extraction of whole cells with hot SDS. When nuclear extracts from the two cell types were normalized for equivalent catalytic activity, mitoxantrone inhibited the decatenation of kDNA by these extracts to an equal extent but levels of mitoxantrone-induced cleavage of {sup 32}P-labeled pBR322 DNA by nuclear extracts from HL-60/MX2 cells were 3- to 4-fold lower than in comparable HL-60 extracts. Resistance to the topoisomerase II inhibitor mitoxantrone in HL-60/MX2 is associated with reduced nuclear and whole cell topoisomerase II catalytic activity, immunologically undetectable levels of the 180-kDa topoisomerase II isozyme, and reduced mitoxantrone-induced cleavage of radiolabeled DNA by topoisomerase II in nuclear extracts from these cells.

  5. Evaluating cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of inflammatory cytokines in cancer cells by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Gatla, Himavanth R; Singha, Bipradeb; Persaud, Valerie; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression and cellular release of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8), and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) are associated with increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis during cancer progression. In prostate and ovarian cancer cells, increased levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 correlate with poor prognosis. We have recently shown that proteasome inhibition by bortezomib (BZ) specifically increases IL-8 release from metastatic prostate and ovarian cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 in prostate and ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. IL-8 is localized in the cytoplasm in both cell types, and its protein levels are significantly increased by BZ. In contrast, HMGB1 is localized in the nucleus, and BZ increases its nuclear levels only in ovarian cancer cells. The protocol includes isolation of cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts, followed by SDS electrophoresis and western blotting, and can be easily modified to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine levels in other cell types. PMID:24908314

  6. Solar Hot Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  7. Epigenetic re-programming of the Germ Cell Nuclear Factor gene is required for proper differentiation of induced pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Zwaka, Thomas P.; Cooney, Austin J.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cells have been reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that recapitulate the pluripotent nature of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Reduced pluripotency and variable differentiation capacities have hampered progress with this technology for applications in regeneration medicine. We have previously shown that Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (Gcnf) is required for the repression of pluripotency genes during ES cell differentiation and embryonic development. Here we report that iPS cell lines, in which the Gcnf gene was properly re-programmed, allowing expression of Gcnf, repress pluripotency genes during subsequent differentiation. In contrast, iPS clones in which the Gcnf gene was not re-programmed maintained pluripotency gene expression during differentiation and did not differentiate properly either in vivo or in vitro. These mal-reprogrammed cells re-capitulated the phenotype of Gcnf knock out (Gcnf−/−) ES cells. Re-introduction of Gcnf into either the Gcnf negative iPS cells or the Gcnf−/− ES cells, rescued repression of Oct4 during differentiation. Our findings establish a key role for Gcnf as a regulator of iPS cell pluripotency gene expression. It also demonstrates that reactivation of the Gcnf gene may serve as a marker to distinguish completely re-programmed iPS cells from incompletely pluripotent cells, which would make therapeutic use of iPS cells safer and more practical as it would reduce the oncogenic potential of iPS cells. PMID:23495137

  8. High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Metastatic Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountford, Carolyn E.; Wright, Lesley C.; Holmes, Kerry T.; MacKinnon, Wanda B.; Gregory, Patricia; Fox, Richard M.

    1984-12-01

    High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of intact cancer cells revealed differences between cells with the capacity to metastasize and those that produce locally invasive tumors. The NMR resonances that characterize the metastatic cells were associated with an increased ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid and an increased amount of plasma membrane--bound cholesterol ester. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy could therefore be used to assess the metastatic potential of primary tumors.

  9. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Cell Cycle Regulates Nuclear Stability of AID and Determines the Cellular Response to AID

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quy; Maizels, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    AID (Activation Induced Deaminase) deaminates cytosines in DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification and to reprogram CpG methylation in early development. AID is potentially highly mutagenic, and it causes genomic instability evident as translocations in B cell malignancies. Here we show that AID is cell cycle regulated. By high content screening microscopy, we demonstrate that AID undergoes nuclear degradation more slowly in G1 phase than in S or G2-M phase, and that mutations that affect regulatory phosphorylation or catalytic activity can alter AID stability and abundance. We directly test the role of cell cycle regulation by fusing AID to tags that destabilize nuclear protein outside of G1 or S-G2/M phases. We show that enforced nuclear localization of AID in G1 phase accelerates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, and is well-tolerated; while nuclear AID compromises viability in S-G2/M phase cells. We identify AID derivatives that accelerate somatic hypermutation with minimal impact on viability, which will be useful tools for engineering genes and proteins by iterative mutagenesis and selection. Our results further suggest that use of cell cycle tags to regulate nuclear stability may be generally applicable to studying DNA repair and to engineering the genome. PMID:26355458

  11. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  12. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  13. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  14. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Imagesbased on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-09-05

    Background: The distribution of the chromatin-associatedproteins plays a key role in directing nuclear function. Previously, wedeveloped an image-based method to quantify the nuclear distributions ofproteins and showed that these distributions depended on the phenotype ofhuman mammary epithelial cells. Here we describe a method that creates ahierarchical tree of the given cell phenotypes and calculates thestatistical significance between them, based on the clustering analysisof nuclear protein distributions. Results: Nuclear distributions ofnuclear mitotic apparatus protein were previously obtained fornon-neoplastic S1 and malignant T4-2 human mammary epithelial cellscultured for up to 12 days. Cell phenotype was defined as S1 or T4-2 andthe number of days in cultured. A probabilistic ensemble approach wasused to define a set of consensus clusters from the results of multipletraditional cluster analysis techniques applied to the nucleardistribution data. Cluster histograms were constructed to show how cellsin any one phenotype were distributed across the consensus clusters.Grouping various phenotypes allowed us to build phenotype trees andcalculate the statistical difference between each group. The resultsshowed that non-neoplastic S1 cells could be distinguished from malignantT4-2 cells with 94.19 percent accuracy; that proliferating S1 cells couldbe distinguished from differentiated S1 cells with 92.86 percentaccuracy; and showed no significant difference between the variousphenotypes of T4-2 cells corresponding to increasing tumor sizes.Conclusion: This work presents a cluster analysis method that canidentify significant cell phenotypes, based on the nuclear distributionof specific proteins, with high accuracy.

  15. Mitochondrial Telomerase Protects Cancer Cells from Nuclear DNA Damage and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Singhapol, Chatchawan; Pal, Deepali; Czapiewski, Rafal; Porika, Mahendar; Nelson, Glyn; Saretzki, Gabriele C.

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer cells express high levels of telomerase and proliferate indefinitely. In addition to its telomere maintenance function, telomerase also has a pro-survival function resulting in an increased resistance against DNA damage and decreased apoptosis induction. However, the molecular mechanisms for this protective function remain elusive and it is unclear whether it is connected to telomere maintenance or is rather a non-telomeric function of the telomerase protein, TERT. It was shown recently that the protein subunit of telomerase can shuttle from the nucleus to the mitochondria upon oxidative stress where it protects mitochondrial function and decreases intracellular oxidative stress. Here we show that endogenous telomerase (TERT protein) shuttles from the nucleus into mitochondria upon oxidative stress in cancer cells and analyzed the nuclear exclusion patterns of endogenous telomerase after treatment with hydrogen peroxide in different cell lines. Cell populations excluded TERT from the nucleus upon oxidative stress in a heterogeneous fashion. We found a significant correlation between nuclear localization of telomerase and high DNA damage, while cells which excluded telomerase from the nucleus displayed no or very low DNA damage. We modeled nuclear and mitochondrial telomerase using organelle specific localization vectors and confirmed that mitochondrial localization of telomerase protects the nucleus from inflicted DNA damage and apoptosis while, in contrast, nuclear localization of telomerase correlated with higher amounts of DNA damage and apoptosis. It is known that nuclear DNA damage can be caused by mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). We demonstrate here that mitochondrial localization of telomerase specifically prevents nuclear DNA damage by decreasing levels of mitochondrial ROS. We suggest that this decrease of oxidative stress might be a possible cause for high stress resistance of cancer cells and could be especially

  16. Transient Expression of WNT2 Promotes Somatic Cell Reprogramming by Inducing β-Catenin Nuclear Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mizuki; Nakajima-Koyama, May; Lee, Joonseong; Nishida, Eisuke

    2016-06-14

    Treatment with several Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulators can change the cellular reprogramming efficiency; however, the dynamics and role of endogenous Wnt/β-catenin signaling in reprogramming remain largely unanswered. Here we identify the upregulation of WNT2 and subsequent β-catenin nuclear accumulation as key events in reprogramming. Transient nuclear accumulation of β-catenin occurs early in MEF reprogramming. Wnt2 is strongly expressed in the early stage of reprogramming. Wnt2 knockdown suppresses the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and reduces the reprogramming efficiency. WNT2 overexpression promotes β-catenin nuclear accumulation and enhances the reprogramming efficiency. WNT2 contributes to the promotion of cell proliferation. Experiments with several drugs that control the Wnt pathway also indicate the importance of β-catenin nuclear accumulation in reprogramming. Our findings reveal the role of WNT2/β-catenin signaling in reprogramming. PMID:27211212

  17. Visualizing the molecular sociology at the HeLa cell nuclear periphery.

    PubMed

    Mahamid, Julia; Pfeffer, Stefan; Schaffer, Miroslava; Villa, Elizabeth; Danev, Radostin; Cuellar, Luis Kuhn; Förster, Friedrich; Hyman, Anthony A; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-02-26

    The molecular organization of eukaryotic nuclear volumes remains largely unexplored. Here we combined recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) to produce three-dimensional snapshots of the HeLa cell nuclear periphery. Subtomogram averaging and classification of ribosomes revealed the native structure and organization of the cytoplasmic translation machinery. Analysis of a large dynamic structure-the nuclear pore complex-revealed variations detectable at the level of individual complexes. Cryo-ET was used to visualize previously elusive structures, such as nucleosome chains and the filaments of the nuclear lamina, in situ. Elucidation of the lamina structure provides insight into its contribution to metazoan nuclear stiffness. PMID:26917770

  18. Amorphous-silicon module hot-spot testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hot spot heating occurs when cell short-circuit current is lower than string operating current. Amorphous cell hot spot are tested to develop the techniques required for performing reverse bias testing of amorphous cells. Also, to quantify the response of amorphous cells to reverse biasing. Guidelines are developed from testing for reducing hot spot susceptibility of amorphous modules and to develop a qualification test for hot spot testing of amorphous modules. It is concluded that amorphous cells undergo hot spot heating similarly to crystalline cells. Comparison of results obtained with submodules versus actual modules indicate heating levels lower in actual modules. Module design must address hot spot testing and hot spot qualification test conducted on modules showed no instabilities and minor cell erosion.

  19. Nuclear respiratory factor-1 and bioenergetics in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Ivanova, Margarita M; Mai, Huy Xuan; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Piell, Kellianne; Van Hoose, Patrick; Cole, Marsha P; Muluhngwi, Penn; Kalbfleisch, Ted S; Rouchka, Eric C; Hill, Bradford G; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-09-10

    Acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is a significant clinical problem in treating patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ breast cancer. We reported that ERα increases nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), which regulates nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene transcription, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and NRF-1 knockdown stimulates apoptosis. Whether NRF-1 and target gene expression is altered in endocrine resistant breast cancer cells is unknown. We measured NRF-1and metabolic features in a cell model of progressive TAM-resistance. NRF-1 and its target mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were higher in TAM-resistant LCC2 and LCC9 cells than TAM-sensitive MCF-7 cells. Using extracellular flux assays we observed that LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells showed similar oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but lower mitochondrial reserve capacity which was correlated with lower Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit B in LCC1 and LCC2 cells. Complex III activity was lower in LCC9 than MCF-7 cells. LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells had higher basal extracellular acidification (ECAR), indicating higher aerobic glycolysis, relative to MCF-7 cells. Mitochondrial bioenergetic responses to estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were reduced in the endocrine-resistant cells compared to MCF-7 cells. These results suggest the acquisition of altered metabolic phenotypes in response to long term antiestrogen treatment may increase vulnerability to metabolic stress. PMID:27515002

  20. AIRWAY CELL AND NUCLEAR DEPTH DISTRIBUTION IN HUMAN RAT LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To predict the critical cells that are subject to injury from inhaled radon and other alpha particle sources it is necessary to calculate the dose absorbed by the different cells in the lungs. n order to provide information necessary to make these dose determinations, the airway ...

  1. Homotypic cell cannibalism, a cell-death process regulated by the nuclear protein 1, opposes to metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Carla E; Sandí, María José; Hamidi, Tewfik; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Turrini, Olivier; Bartholin, Laurent; Loncle, Céline; Secq, Véronique; Garcia, Stéphane; Lomberk, Gwen; Kroemer, Guido; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely deadly disease for which all treatments available have failed to improve life expectancy significantly. This may be explained by the high metastatic potential of PDAC cells, which results from their dedifferentiation towards a mesenchymal phenotype. Some PDAC present cell-in-cell structures whose origin and significance are currently unknown. We show here that cell-in-cells form after homotypic cell cannibalism (HoCC). We found PDAC patients whose tumours display HoCC develop less metastasis than those without. In vitro, HoCC was promoted by inactivation of the nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), and was enhanced by treatment with transforming growth factor β. HoCC ends with death of PDAC cells, consistent with a metastasis suppressor role for this phenomenon. Hence, our data indicates a protective role for HoCC in PDAC and identifies Nupr1 as a molecular regulator of this process. PMID:22821859

  2. Hot gas cleanup using solid supported molten salt for integrated coal gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Topical report, October 1982-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyke, S.E.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Roberts, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories is developing a solid supported molten salt (SSMS) hot gas cleanup process for integrated coal gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plants. Exploratory and demonstration experiments have been completed to select a salt composition and evaluate its potential for simultaneous hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) removal under the conditions projected for the MCFC plants. Results to date indicate that equilibrium capacity and removal efficiencies may be adequate for one step H/sub 2/S and HCl removal. Regeneration produced a lower H/sub 2/S concentration than expected, but one from which sulfur could be recovered. Bench scale experiments will be designed to confirm laboratory results, check carbonyl sulfide removal, refine dual cycle (sulfide-chloride) regeneration techniques and obtain data for engineering/economic evaluation and scale-up. 8 references, 24 figures, 7 tables.

  3. Changes in distribution of nuclear matrix antigens during the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Chaly, N; Bladon, T; Setterfield, G; Little, J E; Kaplan, J G; Brown, D L

    1984-08-01

    We examined the distribution of nonlamin nuclear matrix antigens during the mitotic cell cycle in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Four monoclonal antibodies produced against isolated nuclear matrices were used to characterize antigens by the immunoblotting of isolated nuclear matrix preparations, and were used to localize the antigens by indirect immunofluorescence. For comparison, lamins and histones were localized using human autoimmune antibodies. At interphase, the monoclonal antibodies recognized non-nucleolar and nonheterochromatin nuclear components. Antibody P1 stained the nuclear periphery homogeneously, with some small invaginations toward the interior of the nucleus. Antibody I1 detected an antigen distributed as fine granules throughout the nuclear interior. Monoclonals PI1 and PI2 stained both the nuclear periphery and interior, with some characteristic differences. During mitosis, P1 and I1 were chromosome-associated, whereas PI1 and PI2 dispersed in the cytoplasm. Antibody P1 heavily stained the periphery of the chromosome mass, and we suggest that the antigen may play a role in maintaining interphase and mitotic chromosome order. With antibody I1, bright granules were distributed along the chromosomes and there was also some diffuse internal staining. The antigen to I1 may be involved in chromatin/chromosome higher-order organization throughout the cell cycle. Antibodies PI1 and PI2 were redistributed independently during prophase, and dispersed into the cytoplasm during prometaphase. Antibody PI2 also detected antigen associated with the spindle poles. PMID:6378926

  4. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    his research and we spent an entire week talking physics and having fun from breakfast in the morning until late at night. A symbolic award was instituted for the best presentation at the workshop, dedicated to the memory of Klaus Kinder-Geiger, a sharp and brilliant young theorist who perished in the crash of Swissair Flight 111 on 2 September 1998 off the coast of Nova Scotia. It went to Denesh Molnar from Ohio State University for his outstanding talk on parton coalescence. The organizers wish to extend their gratitude to all participants for the high quality presentations making Hot Quarks 2004 a notable event. We are also very grateful for the superb hospitality of the staff of the Snakedance Inn, in particular Mitch Daniels who worked sheer miracles. Given the success of the first Hot Quarks workshop we decided to organize a second one, possibly even turning Hot Quarks into a series. The next meeting will be held in the late spring of 2006, probably in Italy. We hope it will be as memorable as the first one! Last but not least, we wish to thank all the generous sponsors of the conference: Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gesellschaft fA~ 1/4 r Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Institute of Physics Publishing, Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Science Foundation, and Vanderbilt University. We are grateful for their support and are particularly happy that this support came from institutions both in the US and in Europe and from all the main experimental facilities that pursue a prominent heavy-ion program. Their support was essential for the success of a workshop targeting young scientists.

  5. Bipartite nuclear localization signal of matrin 3 is essential for vertebrate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisada-Ishii, Shoji; Ebihara, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Nao; Kitagawa, Yasuo . E-mail: yasuok@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-02

    Matrin 3, a nuclear matrix protein has potential (1) to withhold promiscuously edited RNAs within the nucleus in cooperation with p54{sup nrb} and PSF (2) to mediate NMDA-induced neuronal death, and (3) to modulate promoter activity of genes proximal to matrix/scaffold attachment region (MAR/SAR). We identified a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) of chicken matrin 3 (cmatr3) at residues 583-602. By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the NLS mutant in chicken DT40 cells, we showed an essential role of the NLS for cell proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that both clusters of basic amino acids and a linker of the bipartite NLS were essential and sufficient for the nuclear import of GFP. Exogenous cmatr3 rescued the HeLa cells where human matrin 3 was suppressed by RNA interference, but cmatr3 containing deletions at either of the basic amino acid clusters or the linker could not.

  6. Red Light-Regulated Reversible Nuclear Localization of Proteins in Mammalian Cells and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes M; Juillot, Samuel; Herbst, Kathrin; Samodelov, Sophia L; Müller, Konrad; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Römer, Winfried; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc; Strähle, Uwe; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-09-18

    Protein trafficking in and out of the nucleus represents a key step in controlling cell fate and function. Here we report the development of a red light-inducible and far-red light-reversible synthetic system for controlling nuclear localization of proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish. First, we synthetically reconstructed and validated the red light-dependent Arabidopsis phytochrome B nuclear import mediated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 in a nonplant environment and support current hypotheses on the import mechanism in planta. On the basis of this principle we next regulated nuclear import and activity of target proteins by the spatiotemporal projection of light patterns. A synthetic transcription factor was translocated into the nucleus of mammalian cells and zebrafish to drive transgene expression. These data demonstrate the first in vivo application of a plant phytochrome-based optogenetic tool in vertebrates and expand the repertoire of available light-regulated molecular devices. PMID:25803699

  7. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  8. Analysis of Nuclear RNA Interference (RNAi) in Human Cells by Subcellular Fractionation and Argonaute Loading

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Li, Liande; Janowski, Bethany A.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known for its ability to regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In mammalian cell nuclei, however, the impact of RNAi has remained more controversial. A key technical hurdle has been a lack of optimized protocols for the isolation and analysis of cell nuclei. Here we describe a simplified protocol for nuclei isolation from cultured cells that incorporates a method for obtaining nucleoplasmic and chromatin fractions and removing cytoplasmic contamination. Cell fractions can then be used to detect the presence and activity of RNAi factors in the nucleus. We present a protocol for investigating an early step in RNAi, Argonaute protein loading with small RNAs, which is enabled by our improved extract preparations. These protocols facilitate characterization of nuclear RNAi and can be applied to the analysis of other nuclear proteins and pathways. From cellular fractionation to analysis of Argonaute loading results, this protocol takes 4–6 d to complete. PMID:25079428

  9. Computational image analysis of colony and nuclear morphology to evaluate human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Kazuaki; Saitoh, Noriko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of cell reprogramming by advanced image analysis is required to maintain the quality of cells intended for regenerative medicine. Here, we constructed living and unlabelled colony image libraries of various human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines for supervised machine learning pattern recognition to accurately distinguish bona fide iPSCs from improperly reprogrammed cells. Furthermore, we found that image features for efficient discrimination reside in cellular components. In fact, extensive analysis of nuclear morphologies revealed dynamic and characteristic signatures, including the linear form of the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML)-defined structure in iPSCs, which was reversed to a regular sphere upon differentiation. Our data revealed that iPSCs have a markedly different overall nuclear architecture that may contribute to highly accurate discrimination based on the cell reprogramming status. PMID:25385348

  10. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell-cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  11. A novel single cell method to identify the genetic composition at a single nuclear body.

    PubMed

    Anchel, David; Ching, Reagan W; Cotton, Rachel; Li, Ren; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2016-01-01

    Gene loci make specific associations with compartments of the nucleus (e.g. the nuclear envelope, nucleolus, and transcription factories) and this association may determine or reflect a mechanism of genetic control. With current methods, it is not possible to identify sets of genes that converge to form a "gene hub" as there is a reliance on loci-specific probes, or immunoprecipitation of a particular protein from bulk cells. We introduce a method that will allow for the identification of loci contained within the vicinity of a single nuclear body in a single cell. For the first time, we demonstrate that the DNA sequences originating from a single sub-nuclear structure in a single cell targeted by two-photon irradiation can be determined, and mapped to a particular locus. Its application to single PML nuclear bodies reveals ontologically related loci that frequently associate with each other and with PML bodies in a population of cells, and a possible nuclear body targeting role for specific transcription factor binding sites. PMID:27389808

  12. A novel single cell method to identify the genetic composition at a single nuclear body

    PubMed Central

    Anchel, David; Ching, Reagan W.; Cotton, Rachel; Li, Ren; Bazett-Jones, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Gene loci make specific associations with compartments of the nucleus (e.g. the nuclear envelope, nucleolus, and transcription factories) and this association may determine or reflect a mechanism of genetic control. With current methods, it is not possible to identify sets of genes that converge to form a “gene hub” as there is a reliance on loci-specific probes, or immunoprecipitation of a particular protein from bulk cells. We introduce a method that will allow for the identification of loci contained within the vicinity of a single nuclear body in a single cell. For the first time, we demonstrate that the DNA sequences originating from a single sub-nuclear structure in a single cell targeted by two-photon irradiation can be determined, and mapped to a particular locus. Its application to single PML nuclear bodies reveals ontologically related loci that frequently associate with each other and with PML bodies in a population of cells, and a possible nuclear body targeting role for specific transcription factor binding sites. PMID:27389808

  13. Response of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dipole giant resonance is reviewed, as it is the only vibration which has been experimentally identified in the decay of hot nuclei. The mechanism of exciting the resonance and the mode of the resonance are described. The methods used to calculate the vibrations from the shell model are discussed, including the Hartree-Fock approximation and random phase approximation. Nuclei formed by compound nuclear reactions, which possess high excitation energy and angular momentum, are considered. It is argued that the stability of the dipole may be used to advantage in the study of other properties of nuclei at high excitation. It is also considered possible that the discussion of the dipole giant resonance may be extended to the gamma decay of the isovector quadrupole vibration. 26 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  14. Nuclear TRAF3 is a negative regulator of CREB in B cells.

    PubMed

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W; Stunz, Laura L; Hanson, Brett M; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Bishop, Gail A

    2016-01-26

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) regulates signaling through B-lymphocyte receptors, including CD40, BAFF receptor, and Toll-like receptors, and also plays a critical role inhibiting B-cell homoeostatic survival. Consistent with these findings, loss-of-function human TRAF3 mutations are common in B-cell cancers, particularly multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma. B cells of B-cell-specific TRAF3(-/-) mice (B-Traf3(-/-)) display remarkably enhanced survival compared with littermate control (WT) B cells. The mechanism for this abnormal homeostatic survival is poorly understood, a key knowledge gap in selecting optimal treatments for human B-cell cancers with TRAF3 deficiency. We show here for the first time to our knowledge that TRAF3 is a resident nuclear protein that associates with the transcriptional regulator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in both mouse and human B cells. The TRAF-C domain of TRAF3 was necessary and sufficient to localize TRAF3 to the nucleus via a functional nuclear localization signal. CREB protein was elevated in TRAF3(-/-) B cells, without change in mRNA, but with a decrease in CREB ubiquitination. CREB-mediated transcriptional activity was increased in TRAF3-deficient B cells. Consistent with these findings, Mcl-1, an antiapoptotic target of CREB-mediated transcription, was increased in the absence of TRAF3 and enhanced Mcl-1 was suppressed with CREB inhibition. TRAF3-deficient B cells were also preferentially sensitive to survival inhibition with pharmacologic CREB inhibitor. Our results identify a new mechanism by which nuclear TRAF3 regulates B-cell survival via inhibition of CREB stability, information highly relevant to the role of TRAF3 in B-cell malignancies. PMID:26755589

  15. Nuclear envelope lamin-A as a coordinator of T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; González-Granado, José M

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear lamins A/C control several critical cellular functions, e.g., chromatin organization, gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA damage responses, cell cycle progression, cell differentiation, and cell polarization during migration. However, few studies have addressed the role of lamins A/C in the control of the functions of immune cells. Recently, we have demonstrated that lamins A/C are induced in T cells upon antigen recognition. Lamins A/C enhance T cell responses by coupling the plasma membrane to the nucleus via the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we discuss the possible physiological relevance and functional context of lamin A/C in T cell activation and propose a model in which lamins A/C are key modulators of immune cell functions. PMID:25482193

  16. [Free radical damage of the nuclear genetic apparatus of cells].

    PubMed

    Levytskyĭ, E L; Gubskyĭ, Iu Y

    1994-01-01

    Data which prove the important role of the lipid (as well as chromatin-bound lipids) peroxidation free radical reactions in the mechanisms of nuclear genome components damages are presented. Free radical nature of chromatin damages is proved in case of effects of ionising radiation and heavy metals ions. The role of lipid peroxidation reactions in the effects of the natural aging process, chlor- and phosphororganic chemicals intoxications is less investigated. The importance of the research of this scientific problem is discussed because of the unfavorable chemical and radiation situations. PMID:7879284

  17. The Role of Ect2 Nuclear RhoGEF Activity in Ovarian Cancer Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Lauren P.; DeCristo, Molly J.; Trembath, Dimitri; Kuan, Pei Fen; Yim, Margaret; Liu, Jinsong; Cook, Danielle R.; Miller, C. Ryan; Der, Channing J.

    2013-01-01

    Ect2, a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF), is atypical among RhoGEFs in its predominantly nuclear localization in interphase cells. One current model suggests that Ect2 mislocalization drives cellular transformation by promoting aberrant activation of cytoplasmic Rho family GTPase substrates. However, in ovarian cancers, where Ect2 is both amplified and overexpressed at the mRNA level, we observed that the protein is highly expressed and predominantly nuclear and that nuclear but not cytoplasmic Ect2 increases with advanced disease. Knockdown of Ect2 in ovarian cancer cell lines impaired their anchorage-independent growth without affecting their growth on plastic. Restoration of Ect2 expression rescued the anchorage-independent growth defect, but not if either the DH catalytic domain or the nuclear localization sequences of Ect2 were mutated. These results suggested a novel mechanism whereby Ect2 could drive transformation in ovarian cancer cells by acting as a RhoGEF specifically within the nucleus. Interestingly, Ect2 had an intrinsically distinct GTPase specificity profile in the nucleus versus the cytoplasm. Nuclear Ect2 bound preferentially to Rac1, while cytoplasmic Ect2 bound to RhoA but not Rac. Consistent with nuclear activation of endogenous Rac, Ect2 overexpression was sufficient to recruit Rac effectors to the nucleus, a process that required a functional Ect2 catalytic domain. Furthermore, expression of active nuclearly targeted Rac1 rescued the defect in transformed growth caused by Ect2 knockdown. Our work suggests a novel mechanism of Ect2-driven transformation, identifies subcellular localization as a regulator of GEF specificity, and implicates activation of nuclear Rac1 in cellular transformation. PMID:24386507

  18. Cytoskeletal to Nuclear Strain Transfer Regulates YAP Signaling in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Tristan P.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Heo, Su-Jin; Shurden, Zach E.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces transduced to cells through the extracellular matrix are critical regulators of tissue development, growth, and homeostasis, and can play important roles in directing stem cell differentiation. In addition to force-sensing mechanisms that reside at the cell surface, there is growing evidence that forces transmitted through the cytoskeleton and to the nuclear envelope are important for mechanosensing, including activation of the Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) pathway. Moreover, nuclear shape, mechanics, and deformability change with differentiation state and have been likewise implicated in force sensing and differentiation. However, the significance of force transfer to the nucleus through the mechanosensing cytoskeletal machinery in the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiologic response remains unclear. Here we report that actomyosin-generated cytoskeletal tension regulates nuclear shape and force transmission through the cytoskeleton and demonstrate the differential short- and long-term response of mesenchymal stem cells to dynamic tensile loading based on the contractility state, the patency of the actin cytoskeleton, and the connections it makes with the nucleus. Specifically, we show that while some mechanoactive signaling pathways (e.g., ERK signaling) can be activated in the absence of nuclear strain transfer, cytoskeletal strain transfer to the nucleus is essential for activation of the YAP/TAZ pathway with stretch. PMID:26083918

  19. Elevated NCOR1 disrupts a network of dietary-sensing nuclear receptors in bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, S. Asad; Thorne, James L.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Hornung, Laura B.; Doherty, Alan P.; Mills, Ian G.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly invasive bladder cancer cells lines displayed insensitivity toward a panel of dietary-derived ligands for members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Insensitivity was defined through altered gene regulatory actions and cell proliferation and reflected both reduced receptor expression and elevated nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR1) expression. Stable overexpression of NCOR1 in sensitive cells (RT4) resulted in a panel of clones that recapitulated the resistant phenotype in terms of gene regulatory actions and proliferative responses toward ligand. Similarly, silencing RNA approaches to NCOR1 in resistant cells (EJ28) enhanced ligand gene regulatory and proliferation responses, including those mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and vitamin D receptor (VDR) receptors. Elevated NCOR1 levels generate an epigenetic lesion to target in resistant cells using the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, in combination with nuclear receptor ligands. Such treatments revealed strong-additive interactions toward the PPARγ, VDR and Farnesoid X-activated receptors. Genome-wide microarray and microfluidic quantitative real-time, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction approaches, following the targeting of NCOR1 activity and expression, revealed the selective capacity of this corepressor to govern common transcriptional events of underlying networks. Combined these findings suggest that NCOR1 is a selective regulator of nuclear receptors, notably PPARγ and VDR, and contributes to their loss of sensitivity. Combinations of epigenetic therapies that target NCOR1 may prove effective, even when receptor expression is reduced. PMID:19126649

  20. Significance of Nuclear Accumulation of Foxo3a in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F. Fang, F.-M.; Lu, C.-H.; Lu, M.-S.; Chen, W.-C.; Lee, K.-D.; Lin, P.-Y.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the value of Foxo3a in predicting the response to neoadjuvant treatment of, and prognosis for, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining was performed in a retrospective series of 60 biopsied esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, and the correlation between nuclear accumulation of Foxo3a and clinicopathologic features was analyzed, including patient survival. In addition, in vitro biologic changes, radiosensitivity, and in vivo tumorigenicity of esophageal carcinoma cells after experimental manipulation of Foxo3a expression levels were determined. Results: Clinical findings point to a significant correlation between the nuclear accumulation of Foxo3a and the survival rate of esophageal cancer patients. In addition, Foxo3a is a significant predictor for the response to neoadjuvant therapy. In cell culture, irradiation and oxidative stress seemed to result in nuclear accumulation of Foxo3a. Down-regulation of Foxo3a significantly decreased radiosensitivity but had no obvious effect on tumor growth, as measured by a clonogenic assay in vitro and growth delay in vivo. Conclusions: Nuclear accumulation of Foxo3a in tumor cells was correlated with increased radiosensitivity and with improved patient survival. Thus, it is suggested that Foxo3a may be a potential marker for esophageal cancer.

  1. Extensive Nuclear Reprogramming Underlies Lineage Conversion into Functional Trophoblast Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Benchetrit, Hana; Herman, Shay; van Wietmarschen, Niek; Wu, Tao; Makedonski, Kirill; Maoz, Noam; Yom Tov, Nataly; Stave, Danielle; Lasry, Rachel; Zayat, Valery; Xiao, Andrew; Lansdorp, Peter M; Sebban, Shulamit; Buganim, Yosef

    2015-11-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) undergo extensive nuclear reprogramming and are generally indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in their functional capacity and transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles. However, direct conversion of cells from one lineage to another often yields incompletely reprogrammed, functionally compromised cells, raising the question of whether pluripotency is required to achieve a high degree of nuclear reprogramming. Here, we show that transient expression of Gata3, Eomes, and Tfap2c in mouse fibroblasts induces stable, transgene-independent trophoblast stem-like cells (iTSCs). iTSCs possess transcriptional profiles highly similar to blastocyst-derived TSCs, with comparable methylation and H3K27ac patterns and genome-wide H2A.X deposition. iTSCs generate trophoectodermal lineages upon differentiation, form hemorrhagic lesions, and contribute to developing placentas in chimera assays, indicating a high degree of nuclear reprogramming, with no evidence of passage through a transient pluripotent state. Together, these data demonstrate that extensive nuclear reprogramming can be achieved independently of pluripotency. PMID:26412562

  2. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa; Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna; Kallioniemi, Anne

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  3. Concise Review: Plasma and Nuclear Membranes Convey Mechanical Information to Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Uzer, Gunes; Fuchs, Robyn K; Rubin, Janet; Thompson, William R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous factors including chemical, hormonal, spatial, and physical cues determine stem cell fate. While the regulation of stem cell differentiation by soluble factors is well-characterized, the role of mechanical force in the determination of lineage fate is just beginning to be understood. Investigation of the role of force on cell function has largely focused on "outside-in" signaling, initiated at the plasma membrane. When interfaced with the extracellular matrix, the cell uses integral membrane proteins, such as those found in focal adhesion complexes to translate force into biochemical signals. Akin to these outside-in connections, the internal cytoskeleton is physically linked to the nucleus, via proteins that span the nuclear membrane. Although structurally and biochemically distinct, these two forms of mechanical coupling influence stem cell lineage fate and, when disrupted, often lead to disease. Here we provide an overview of how mechanical coupling occurs at the plasma and nuclear membranes. We also discuss the role of force on stem cell differentiation, with focus on the biochemical signals generated at the cell membrane and the nucleus, and how those signals influence various diseases. While the interaction of stem cells with their physical environment and how they respond to force is complex, an understanding of the mechanical regulation of these cells is critical in the design of novel therapeutics to combat diseases associated with aging, cancer, and osteoporosis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1455-1463. PMID:26891206

  4. Nuclear CD38 in retinoic acid-induced HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcintepe, Leman . E-mail: lemany@istanbul.edu.tr; Albeniz, Isil; Adin-Cinar, Suzan; Tiryaki, Demir; Bermek, Engin; Graeff, Richard M.; Lee, Hon Cheung

    2005-02-01

    The cell surface antigen, CD38, is a 45-kDa transmembrane protein which is predominantly expressed on hematopoietic cells during differentiation. As a bifunctional ectoenzyme, it catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD{sup +} and hydrolysis of either NAD{sup +} or cADPR to ADP-ribose. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a potent and specific inducer of CD38 in myeloid cells. In this report, we demonstrate that the nuclei of RA-treated human HL-60 myeloblastic cells reveal enzymatic activities inherent to CD38. Thus, GDP-ribosyl cyclase and NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase activities in the nuclear fraction increased very significantly in response to incubation with RA. With Western blotting, we detected in the nuclear protein fraction from RA-treated cells a {approx}43-kDa protein band which was reactive with the CD38-specific monoclonal antibody OKT10. The expression of CD38 in HL-60 nuclei was also shown with FACScan analysis. RA treatment gave rise to an increase in in vitro ADP ribosylation of the {approx}43-kDa nuclear protein. Moreover, nuclei isolated from RA-treated HL-60 cells revealed calcium release in response to cADPR, whereas a similar response was not observed in control nuclei. These results suggest that CD38 is expressed in HL-60 cell nuclei during RA-induced differentiation.

  5. Nuclear deformability and telomere dynamics are regulated by cell geometric constraints

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Ekta; Jokhun, D. S.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Forces generated by the cytoskeleton can be transmitted to the nucleus and chromatin via physical links on the nuclear envelope and the lamin meshwork. Although the role of these active forces in modulating prestressed nuclear morphology has been well studied, the effect on nuclear and chromatin dynamics remains to be explored. To understand the regulation of nuclear deformability by these active forces, we created different cytoskeletal states in mouse fibroblasts using micropatterned substrates. We observed that constrained and isotropic cells, which lack long actin stress fibers, have more deformable nuclei than elongated and polarized cells. This nuclear deformability altered in response to actin, myosin, formin perturbations, or a transcriptional down-regulation of lamin A/C levels in the constrained and isotropic geometry. Furthermore, to probe the effect of active cytoskeletal forces on chromatin dynamics, we tracked the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterochromatin foci and telomeres. We observed increased dynamics and decreased correlation of the heterochromatin foci and telomere trajectories in constrained and isotropic cell geometry. The observed enhanced dynamics upon treatment with actin depolymerizing reagents in elongated and polarized geometry were regained once the reagent was washed off, suggesting an inherent structural memory in chromatin organization. We conclude that active forces from the cytoskeleton and rigidity from lamin A/C nucleoskeleton can together regulate nuclear and chromatin dynamics. Because chromatin remodeling is a necessary step in transcription control and its memory, genome integrity, and cellular deformability during migration, our results highlight the importance of cell geometric constraints as critical regulators in cell behavior. PMID:26699462

  6. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  7. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:26148352

  8. Deposition of microcrystalline silicon prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition: The influence of the deposition parameters on the material properties and solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Stefan; Finger, Friedhelm; Carius, Reinhard; Stutzmann, Martin

    2005-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) of superior quality can be prepared using the hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition method (HWCVD). At a low substrate temperature (TS) of 185 °C excellent material properties and solar cell performance were obtained with spin densities of 6×1015cm-3 and solar cell efficiencies up to 9.4%, respectively. In this study we have systematically investigated the influence of various deposition parameters on the deposition rate and the material properties. For this purpose, thin films and solar cells were prepared at specific substrate and filament temperatures and deposition pressures (pD), covering the complete range from amorphous to highly crystalline material by adjusting the silane concentration. The influence of these deposition parameters on the chemical reactions at the filament and in the gas phase qualitatively explains the behavior of the structural composition and the formation of defects. In particular, we propose that the deposition rate is determined by the production of reactive species at the filament and a particular atomic-hydrogen-to-silicon ratio is found at the microcrystalline/amorphous transition. The structural, optical, and electronic properties were studied using Raman and infrared spectroscopies, optical-absorption measurements, electron-spin resonance, and dark and photoconductivities. These experiments show that higher TS and pD lead to a deterioration of the material quality, i.e., much higher defect densities, oxygen contaminations, and SiH absorption at 2100cm-1. Similar to plasma enhanced chemical-vapor deposition material, μc-Si:H solar cells prepared with HW i layers show increasing open circuit voltages (Voc) with increasing silane concentration and best performance is achieved near the transition to amorphous growth. Such solar cells prepared at low TS exhibit very high Voc up to 600 mV and fill factors above 70% with i layers prepared by HWCVD.

  9. State of Washington Department of Ecology criteria pollutants and toxic air pollutants phase 1 notice of construction for the Hanford site spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-08-15

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the air toxic and criteria pollutants resulting from operation of the Hot: Conditioning System Annex (HCSA). Additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the HCSA will be, discussed again in the Phase 11 NOC. This Phase I NOC is defined as, constructing the substructure, including but not limited to pouring the concrete for the floor; construction of the process pits and `exterior walls; making necessary interface connections to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) ventilation and utility systems for personnel comfort; and extending the multi-canister overpack (MCO) handling machine rails into the HCSA. A Phase 11 NOC, will be submitted for approval prior to installing and is defined as the completion of the HCSA, which will consist of installation of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment (HCSE), air emissions control equipment and emissions monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the !U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins; spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K Basin water. Storage in the K Basins was `originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2,300 MT (2,530 tons) of N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing.

  10. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  11. Activation of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos by PLCZ cRNA injection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Rodriguez, Ramon M; Iager, Amy E; Beyhan, Zeki; Wang, Kai; Ragina, Neli P; Yoon, Sook-Young; Fissore, Rafael A; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-03-01

    The production of cloned animals by the transfer of a differentiated somatic cell into an enucleated oocyte circumvents fertilization. During fertilization, the sperm delivers a sperm-specific phospholipase C (PLCZ) that is responsible for triggering Ca(2)(+) oscillations and oocyte activation. During bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), oocyte activation is artificially achieved by combined chemical treatments that induce a monotonic rise in intracellular Ca(2)(+) and inhibit either phosphorylation or protein synthesis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that activation of bovine nuclear transfer embryos by PLCZ improves nuclear reprogramming. Injection of PLCZ cRNA into bovine SCNT units induced Ca(2)(+) oscillations similar to those observed after fertilization and supported high rates of blastocyst development similar to that seen in embryos produced by IVF. Furthermore, gene expression analysis at the eight-cell and blastocyst stages revealed a similar expression pattern for a number of genes in both groups of embryos. Lastly, levels of trimethylated lysine 27 at histone H3 in blastocysts were higher in bovine nuclear transfer embryos activated using cycloheximide and 6-dimethylaminopurine (DMAP) than in those activated using PLCZ or derived from IVF. These results demonstrate that exogenous PLCZ can be used to activate bovine SCNT-derived embryos and support the hypothesis that a fertilization-like activation response can enhance some aspects of nuclear reprogramming. PMID:19074500

  12. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS. PMID:27177968

  13. X-ray microscopic studies of labeled nuclear cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, S.; Schneider, G.; Steuernagel, A.; Lucchesi, J.; Schulze, E.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2000-05-01

    In X-ray microscopy different proteins are not readily distinguishable. However, in cell biology it is often desirable to localize single proteins, e.g., inside the cell nucleus. This can be achieved by immunogold labeling. Colloidal gold conjugated antibodies are used to mark the protein specifically. With silver solution these are enlarged so as to heighten their contrast. The strong absorption of silver allows easy visualization of the label in the nuclei. In this study male specific lethal 1 protein in male Drosophila melanogaster cells was labeled. This protein forms, together with four other proteins, a complex that is associated with the male X chromosome. It regulates dosage compensation by enhancing X-linked gene transcription in males. Room temperature and cyro transmission X-ray microscopic images (taken with the Göttingen TXM at BESSY) of these labeled cells are shown. Confocal laser scan microscopy ascertains the correct identification of the label in the X-ray micrographs, and allows comparison of the structural information available from both instruments.

  14. CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation regulates p27Kip1 stability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ying-Lin; Li, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jing-Bo; Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Zhen-Xiong; Feng, Shan-Shan; Hu, Jian-Guo; Zhai, Hui-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of calcyclin binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) nuclear translocation in promoting the proliferation of gastric cancer (GC) cells. METHODS: The effect of CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation on cell cycle was investigated by cell cycle analysis. Western blot analysis was used to assess the change in expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proteasome-mediated degradation of p27Kip1. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) analysis was performed to examine the binding of CacyBP/SIP with Skp1. A CacyBP/SIP truncation mutant which lacked the Skp1 binding site was constructed and fused to a fluorescent protein. Subsequently, the effect on Skp1 binding with the fusion protein was examined by co-IP, while localization of fluorescent fusion protein observed by confocal laser microscopy, and change in p27Kip1 protein expression assessed by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation induced by gastrin promoted progression of GC cells from G1 phase. However, while CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation was inhibited using siRNA to suppress CacyBP/SIP expression, cell cycle was clearly inhibited. CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation significantly decreased the level of cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1, increased Cyclin E protein expression whereas the levels of Skp1, Skp2, and CDK2 were not affected. Upon inhibition of CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation, there were no changes in protein levels of p27Kip1 and Cyclin E, while p27Kip1 decrease could be prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Moreover, CacyBP/SIP was found to bind to Skp1 by immunoprecipitation, an event that was abolished by mutant CacyBP/SIP, which also failed to stimulate p27Kip1 degradation, even though the mutant could still translocate into the nucleus. CONCLUSION: CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation contributes to the proliferation of GC cells, and CacyBP/SIP exerts this effect, at least in part, by stimulating ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27

  15. Methods to Characterize Vapor Cell Performance for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirijanian, James; Larsen, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The Advanced Sensors Development team at Northrop Grumman, Navigation Systems Division is developing a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG). Various methods to measure atomic spin lifetimes in vapor cells for predicting NMRG performance have been investigated. Certain methods show clear advantages over others by reducing required testing times and improving test data resolution. New modifications of methods were also developed to study and improve the precision and repeatability of test results. These methods help correlate vapor cell performance to cell filling and sealing methods for cell fabrication process improvement. The vapor cells produced in conjunction with these techniques have exhibited significant and consistent increases in both the noble gas spin lifetimes and the NMR signal strengths compared to previous cell fabrication processes, providing more precise insight into cell development techniques.

  16. What is going on between defibrotide and endothelial cells? Snapshots reveal the hot spots of their romance.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Marta; Mir, Enrique; Rovira, Montse; Escolar, Ginés; Carreras, Enric; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel

    2016-03-31

    Defibrotide (DF) has received European Medicines Agency authorization to treat sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, an early complication after hematopoietic cell transplantation. DF has a recognized role as an endothelial protective agent, although its precise mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction of DF with endothelial cells (ECs). A human hepatic EC line was exposed to different DF concentrations, previously labeled. Using inhibitory assays and flow cytometry techniques along with confocal microscopy, we explored: DF-EC interaction, endocytic pathways, and internalization kinetics. Moreover, we evaluated the potential role of adenosine receptors in DF-EC interaction and if DF effects on endothelium were dependent of its internalization. Confocal microscopy showed interaction of DF with EC membranes followed by internalization, though DF did not reach the cell nucleus even after 24 hours. Flow cytometry revealed concentration, temperature, and time dependent uptake of DF in 2 EC models but not in other cell types. Moreover, inhibitory assays indicated that entrance of DF into ECs occurs primarily through macropinocytosis. Our experimental approach did not show any evidence of the involvement of adenosine receptors in DF-EC interaction. The antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties of DF seem to be caused by the interaction of the drug with the cell membrane. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the precise mechanisms of action of DF as a therapeutic and potential preventive agent on the endothelial damage underlying different pathologic situations. PMID:26755708

  17. What is going on between defibrotide and endothelial cells? Snapshots reveal the hot spots of their romance

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Enrique; Rovira, Montse; Escolar, Ginés; Carreras, Enric; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel

    2016-01-01

    Defibrotide (DF) has received European Medicines Agency authorization to treat sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, an early complication after hematopoietic cell transplantation. DF has a recognized role as an endothelial protective agent, although its precise mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction of DF with endothelial cells (ECs). A human hepatic EC line was exposed to different DF concentrations, previously labeled. Using inhibitory assays and flow cytometry techniques along with confocal microscopy, we explored: DF-EC interaction, endocytic pathways, and internalization kinetics. Moreover, we evaluated the potential role of adenosine receptors in DF-EC interaction and if DF effects on endothelium were dependent of its internalization. Confocal microscopy showed interaction of DF with EC membranes followed by internalization, though DF did not reach the cell nucleus even after 24 hours. Flow cytometry revealed concentration, temperature, and time dependent uptake of DF in 2 EC models but not in other cell types. Moreover, inhibitory assays indicated that entrance of DF into ECs occurs primarily through macropinocytosis. Our experimental approach did not show any evidence of the involvement of adenosine receptors in DF-EC interaction. The antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties of DF seem to be caused by the interaction of the drug with the cell membrane. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the precise mechanisms of action of DF as a therapeutic and potential preventive agent on the endothelial damage underlying different pathologic situations. PMID:26755708

  18. MicroRNA-34c Expression in Donor Cells Influences the Early Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Man; Du, Yue; Zhang, Yijun; Xing, Xupeng; Zhang, Lei; Su, JianMin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The essence of the reprogramming activity of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is to produce normal fertilized embryos. However, reprogramming of somatic cells is not as efficient as the reprogramming of sperm. In this report, we describe the effect of an inducible, specific miR-34 microRNA expression in donor cells that enables a similar level of sperm:transgene expression on the early development of SCNT embryos. Our results showed that donor cells with doxycycline (dox)-induced miR-34c expression for the preparation of SCNT embryos resulted in altered developmental rates, histone modification (H3K9ac and H3K4me3), and extent of apoptosis. The cleavage rate and blastocyst formation of the induced nuclear transfer (NT) group were significantly increased. The immunofluorescence signal of H3K9ac in embryos in the induced NT group significantly increased in two-cell- and eight-cell-stage embryos; that of H3K4me3 increased significantly in eight-cell-stage embryos. Although significant differences in staining signals of apoptosis were not detected between groups, lower apoptosis levels were observed in the induced NT group. In conclusion, miR-34c expression induced by dox treatment enhances the developmental potential of SCNT embryos, modifies the epigenetic status, and changes blastocyst quality. PMID:25437869

  19. Nuclear Kaiso Indicates Aggressive Prostate Cancers and Promotes Migration and Invasiveness of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jacqueline; Wang, Honghe; Zhou, Jianjun; Hardy, Shana; Turner, Timothy; Austin, David; He, Qinghua; Wells, Alan; Grizzle, William E.; Yates, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    Kaiso, a p120 catenin-binding protein, is expressed in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of cells; however, the biological consequences and clinical implications of a shift between these compartments have yet to be established. Herein, we report an enrichment of nuclear Kaiso expression in cells of primary and metastatic prostate tumors relative to the normal prostate epithelium. Nuclear expression of Kaiso correlates with Gleason score (P < 0.001) and tumor grade (P < 0.001). There is higher nuclear expression of Kaiso in primary tumor/normal matched samples and in primary tumors from African American men (P < 0.0001). We further found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor up-regulates Kaiso at the RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cell lines, but more interestingly causes a shift of cytoplasmic Kaiso to the nucleus that is reversed by the EGF receptor–specific kinase inhibitor, PD153035. In both DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, Kaiso inhibition (short hairpin RNA-Kaiso) decreased cell migration and invasion even in the presence of EGF. Further, Kaiso directly binds to the E-cadherin promoter, and inhibition of Kaiso in PC-3 cells results in increased E-cadherin expression, as well as re-establishment of cell–cell contacts. In addition, Kaiso-depleted cells show more epithelial morphology and a reversal of the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and fibronectin. Our findings establish a defined oncogenic role of Kaiso in promoting the progression of prostate cancer. PMID:22974583

  20. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruochan; Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  1. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-04-18

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating insidents involving redioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  2. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-02

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating incidents involving radioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  3. Role of HDACs in optic nerve damage-induced nuclear atrophy of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Heather M; Schlamp, Cassandra L; Nickells, Robert W

    2016-06-20

    Optic neuropathies are characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, resulting in the loss of vision. In glaucoma, the most common optic neuropathy, RGC death is initiated by axonal damage, and can be modeled by inducing acute axonal trauma through procedures such as optic nerve crush (ONC) or optic nerve axotomy. One of the early events of RGC death is nuclear atrophy, and is comprised of RGC-specific gene silencing, histone deacetylation, heterochromatin formation, and nuclear shrinkage. These early events appear to be principally regulated by epigenetic mechanisms involving histone deacetylation. Class I histone deacetylases HDACs 1, 2, and 3 are known to play important roles in the process of early nuclear atrophy in RGCs, and studies using both inhibitors and genetic ablation of Hdacs also reveal a critical role in the cell death process. Select inhibitors, such as those being developed for cancer therapy, may also provide a viable secondary treatment option for optic neuropathies. PMID:26733303

  4. Hot stage and sample cell design for the solidification of transparent materials with and without forced convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    A temperature gradient stage design for optical microscopy is described. Exceptional thermal stability is the major feature. The stage is used to study crystal growth phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid interface. The apparatus is designed to use transparent organic solutions as models for the study of metal-like solidification. The stage provides a controlled thermal environment for unidirectional solidification of low melting temperature materials. Freezing rate is regulated by mechanically sliding in the stage a thin glass cell containing the materials being studied. Two cell assemblies are described. One type is used for convection-free and the other for controlled forced convection studies of the solidification interface.

  5. Synroc-D Type Ceramics Produced by Hot Isostatic Pressing and Cold Crucible Melting for Immobilisation of (Al, U) Rich Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Eric R.; La Robina, Michael; Li, Huijun; Davis, Joel

    2007-07-01

    A synroc-D ceramic consisting mostly of spinel, hollandite, pyrochlore-structured CaUTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, UO{sub 2}, and Ti-rich regions shows promise for immobilisation of a HLW containing mainly Al and U, together with fission products. Ceramics with virtually zero porosities and waste loadings of 50-60 wt% on an oxide basis were prepared by cold crucible melting (CCM) at {approx}1500 deg. C, and also by subsolidus hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1100 deg. C to prevent volatile losses. PCT leaching test values for Cs were < 13 g/L, with all other normalised elemental extractions being well below 1 g/L. (authors)

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Proteins Ectopically Expressed in the Heterologous Environment of Plant Cells are Strictly Targeted to the Nuclear Envelope.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Christian E; Link, Katrin; Wagner, Sabrina; Milbradt, Jens; Marschall, Manfred; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleus forms a prominent cellular compartment containing the cell's nuclear genome. Although structurally similar, animal and plant nuclei differ substantially in details of their architecture. One example is the nuclear lamina, a layer of tightly interconnected filament proteins (lamins) underlying the nuclear envelope of metazoans. So far no orthologous lamin genes could be detected in plant genomes and putative lamin-like proteins are only poorly described in plants. To probe for potentially conserved features of metazoan and plant nuclear envelopes, we ectopically expressed the core nuclear egress proteins of human cytomegalovirus pUL50 and pUL53 in plant cells. pUL50 localizes to the inner envelope of metazoan nuclei and recruits the nuclear localized pUL53 to it, forming heterodimers. Upon expression in plant cells, a very similar localization pattern of both proteins could be determined. Notably, pUL50 is specifically targeted to the plant nuclear envelope in a rim-like fashion, a location to which coexpressed pUL53 becomes strictly corecruited from its initial nucleoplasmic distribution. Using pUL50 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening, the cytoplasmic re-initiation supporting protein RISP could be identified. Interaction of pUL50 and RISP could be confirmed by coexpression and coimmunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and by confocal laser scanning microscopy in plant cells, demonstrating partial pUL50-RISP colocalization in areas of the nuclear rim and other intracellular compartments. Thus, our study provides strong evidence for conserved structural features of plant and metazoan nuclear envelops and identifies RISP as a potential pUL50-interacting plant protein. PMID:26978388

  7. Nuclear Expression of Renin-Angiotensin System Components in NRK-52E Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alzayadneh, Ebaa M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Isolated nuclei of sheep proximal tubules express angiotensin receptors as well as angiotensinogen (AGT) and renin. The present study characterized the NRK-52E tubular epithelial cell line for the intracellular expression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components. Methods RAS components were visualized by immunofluorescent staining in intact cells and protein expression in isolate nuclei. Results An antibody to the Ang I sequence of AGT (AI-AGT) revealed only cytosolic staining, while an antibody to an internal epitope of AGT (Int-AGT) revealed primarily nuclear staining. Immunoblots of nuclear and cytosolic fractions confirmed the differential cell staining of AGT. Immunostaining for renin was present on nuclei of intact cells. Nuclear renin activity averaged 0.77 ± 0.05 nmol/mg protein/hr that was reduced by aliskiren (0.13 ± 0.01 nmol/mg/hr, n=3, p<0.01); trypsin activation increased activity 3-fold. Peptide staining localized Ang II and Ang-(1–7) to the nucleus and peptide content averaged 59 ± 2 and 57 ± 22 fmol/mg (n=4), respectively. Peptide metabolism in isolated nuclei revealed the processing of Ang I to Ang-(1–7) by thimet oligopeptidase. Conclusion We conclude that the NRK-52E cells express an intracellular RAS localized to the nucleus and may be an appropriate cell model to elucidate the functional relevance of this system. PMID:24961503

  8. Cyclic AMP regulates the expression and nuclear translocation of RFC40 in MCF7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupte, Rakhee S. . E-mail: rakhee_gupte@nymc.edu; Sampson, Valerie; Traganos, Frank; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Lee, Marietta Y.W.T.

    2006-04-01

    We have previously shown that the regulatory subunit of PKA, RI{alpha}, functions as a nuclear transport protein for the second subunit of the replication factor C complex, RFC40, and that this transport appears to be crucial for cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. In this study, we found that N {sup 6}-monobutyryl cAMP significantly up-regulates the expression of RFC40 mRNA by 1.8-fold and its endogenous protein by 2.3-fold with a subsequent increase in the RI{alpha}-RFC40 complex formation by 3.2-fold. Additionally, the nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of RFC40 increased by 26% followed by a parallel increase in the percentage of S phase cells by 33%. However, there was reduction in the percentage of G1 cells by 16% and G2/M cells by 43% with a concurrent accumulation of cells in S phase. Interestingly, the higher percentage of S phase cells did not correlate with a parallel increase in DNA replication. Moreover, although cAMP did not affect the expression of the other RFC subunits, there was a significant decrease in the RFC40-37 complex formation by 81.3%, substantiating the decrease in DNA replication rate. Taken together, these findings suggest that cAMP functions as an upstream modulator that regulates the expression and nuclear translocation of RFC40.

  9. Acridine Orange Conjugated Polymersomes for Simultaneous Nuclear Delivery of Gemcitabine and Doxorubicin to Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Anajafi, Tayebeh; Scott, Michael D; You, Seungyong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Choi, Yongki; Qian, Steven Y; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-03-16

    Considering the systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents, there is an urgent need to develop new targeted drug delivery systems. Herein, we have developed a new nuclear targeted, redox sensitive, drug delivery vehicle to simultaneously deliver the anticancer drugs gemcitabine and doxorubicin to the nuclei of pancreatic cancer cells. We prepared polymeric bilayer vesicles (polymersomes), and actively encapsulated the drug combination by the pH gradient method. A redox-sensitive polymer (PEG-S-S-PLA) was incorporated to sensitize the formulation to reducing agent concentration. Acridine orange (AO) was conjugated to the surface of the polymersomes imparting nuclear localizing property. The polymersomes' toxicity and efficacy were compared with those of a free drug combination using monolayer and three-dimensional spheroid cultures of pancreatic cancer cells. We observed that the redox sensitive, nuclear-targeted polymersomes released more than 60% of their encapsulated contents in response to 50 mM glutathione. The nanoparticles are nontoxic; however, the drug encapsulated vesicles have significant toxicity. The prepared formulation can increase the drug's therapeutic index by delivering the drugs directly to the cells' nuclei, one of the key organelles in the cells. This study is likely to initiate research in targeted nuclear delivery using other drug formulations in other types of cancers. PMID:26848507

  10. Control of Protein Activity and Cell Fate Specification via Light-Mediated Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Seth P.; Bear, James E.; Goldstein, Bob; Hahn, Klaus; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Light-activatable proteins allow precise spatial and temporal control of biological processes in living cells and animals. Several approaches have been developed for controlling protein localization with light, including the conditional inhibition of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) with the Light Oxygen Voltage (AsLOV2) domain of phototropin 1 from Avena sativa. In the dark, the switch adopts a closed conformation that sterically blocks the NLS motif. Upon activation with blue light the C-terminus of the protein unfolds, freeing the NLS to direct the protein to the nucleus. A previous study showed that this approach can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins in mammalian tissue culture cells. Here, we extend this result by characterizing the binding properties of a LOV/NLS switch and demonstrating that it can be used to control gene transcription in yeast. Additionally, we show that the switch, referred to as LANS (light-activated nuclear shuttle), functions in the C. elegans embryo and allows for control of nuclear localization in individual cells. By inserting LANS into the C. elegans lin-1 locus using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination, we demonstrated control of cell fate via light-dependent manipulation of a native transcription factor. We conclude that LANS can be a valuable experimental method for spatial and temporal control of nuclear localization in vivo. PMID:26083500

  11. AUTOGRAPHA CALIFORNICA NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS EFFICIENTLY ENTERS BUT DOES NOT REPLICATE IN POIKILOTHERMIC VERTEBRATE CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The host range of the insect virus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) was examined. AcMNPV could not initiate a productive infection in frog, turtle, trout, or moth cell lines. After exposure to AcMNPV, neither viral DNA nor RNA synthesis could be detected...

  12. The nuclear translocation of endostatin is mediated by its receptor nucleolin in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Nan; Ding, Yanping; Zhuo, Wei; He, Ting; Fu, Zhiguang; Chen, Yang; Song, Xiaomin; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2012-12-01

    Endostatin, the C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is a potent anti-angiogenic factor that significantly modulates the gene expression pattern in endothelial cells. Upon cell surface binding, endostatin can not only function extracellularly, but also translocate to the nucleus within minutes. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is partially understood. Here we systematically investigated the nuclear translocation mechanism of endostatin. By chemical inhibition and RNA interference, we firstly observed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but not caveolae-dependent endocytosis or macropinocytosis, is essential for the nuclear translocation of endostatin. We then indentified that nucleolin and integrin α5β1, two widely accepted endostatin receptors, mediate this clathrin-dependent uptake process, which also involves urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Either mutagenesis study, fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, or fluorescence cell imaging demonstrates that nucleolin and integrin α5β1 interact with uPAR simultaneously upon endostatin stimulation. Blockade of uPAR decreases not only the interaction between nucleolin and integrin α5β1, but also the uptake process, suggesting that the nucleolin/uPAR/integrin α5β1 complex facilitates the internalization of endostatin. After endocytosis, nucleolin further regulates the nuclear transport of endostatin. RNA interference and mutational analysis revealed that the nuclear translocation of endostatin involves the association of nucleolin with importin α1β1 via the nuclear localization sequence. Taken together, this study reveals the pathway by which endostatin translocates to the nucleus and the importance of nucleolin in this process, providing a new perspective for the functional investigation of the nuclear-translocated endostatin in endothelial cells. PMID:22711211

  13. Quantitative Differences in Nuclear β-catenin and TCF Pattern Embryonic Cells in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Amanda L.; Walton, Travis; Preston, Elicia; Murray, John Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a conserved role during animal development in transcriptional regulation of distinct targets in different developmental contexts but it remains unclear whether quantitative differences in the nuclear localization of effector proteins TCF and β-catenin contribute to context-specific regulation. We investigated this question in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos by quantifying nuclear localization of fluorescently tagged SYS-1/β-catenin and POP-1/TCF and expression of Wnt ligands at cellular resolution by time-lapse microscopy and automated lineage tracing. We identified reproducible, quantitative differences that generate a subset of Wnt-signaled cells with a significantly higher nuclear concentration of the TCF/β-catenin activating complex. Specifically, β-catenin and TCF are preferentially enriched in nuclei of daughter cells whose parents also had high nuclear levels of that protein, a pattern that could influence developmental gene expression. Consistent with this, we found that expression of synthetic reporters of POP-1-dependent activation is biased towards cells that had high nuclear SYS-1 in consecutive divisions. We identified new genes whose embryonic expression patterns depend on pop-1. Most of these require POP-1 for either transcriptional activation or repression, and targets requiring POP-1 for activation are more likely to be expressed in the cells with high nuclear SYS-1 in consecutive divisions than those requiring POP-1 for repression. Taken together, these results indicate that SYS-1 and POP-1 levels are influenced by the parent cell’s SYS-1/POP-1 levels and this may provide an additional mechanism by which POP-1 regulates distinct targets in different developmental contexts. PMID:26488501

  14. Isotropic 3D Nuclear Morphometry of Normal, Fibrocystic and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Reveals New Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Hernandez, Kathryn F.; Lintecum, Kelly M.; Senechal, Patti; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Grading schemes for breast cancer diagnosis are predominantly based on pathologists' qualitative assessment of altered nuclear structure from 2D brightfield microscopy images. However, cells are three-dimensional (3D) objects with features that are inherently 3D and thus poorly characterized in 2D. Our goal is to quantitatively characterize nuclear structure in 3D, assess its variation with malignancy, and investigate whether such variation correlates with standard nuclear grading criteria. Methodology We applied micro-optical computed tomographic imaging and automated 3D nuclear morphometry to quantify and compare morphological variations between human cell lines derived from normal, benign fibrocystic or malignant breast epithelium. To reproduce the appearance and contrast in clinical cytopathology images, we stained cells with hematoxylin and eosin and obtained 3D images of 150 individual stained cells of each cell type at sub-micron, isotropic resolution. Applying volumetric image analyses, we computed 42 3D morphological and textural descriptors of cellular and nuclear structure. Principal Findings We observed four distinct nuclear shape categories, the predominant being a mushroom cap shape. Cell and nuclear volumes increased from normal to fibrocystic to metastatic type, but there was little difference in the volume ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C ratio) between the lines. Abnormal cell nuclei had more nucleoli, markedly higher density and clumpier chromatin organization compared to normal. Nuclei of non-tumorigenic, fibrocystic cells exhibited larger textural variations than metastatic cell nuclei. At p<0.0025 by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests, 90% of our computed descriptors statistically differentiated control from abnormal cell populations, but only 69% of these features statistically differentiated the fibrocystic from the metastatic cell populations. Conclusions Our results provide a new perspective on nuclear structure variations

  15. Process Optimization for High Efficiency Heterojunction c-Si Solar Cells Fabrication Using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Y.; Yuan, H. C.; Page, M.; Nemeth, W.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The researchers extensively studied the effects of annealing or thermal history of cell process on the minority carrier lifetimes of FZ n-type c-Si wafers with various i-layer thicknesses from 5 to 60 nm, substrate temperatures from 100 to 350 degrees C, doped layers both p- and n-types, and transparent conducting oxide (TCO).

  16. Mapping translation 'hot-spots' in live cells by tracking single molecules of mRNA and ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Zachary B; English, Brian P; Lionnet, Timothée; Yoon, Young J; Monnier, Nilah; Ovryn, Ben; Bathe, Mark; Singer, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Messenger RNA localization is important for cell motility by local protein translation. However, while single mRNAs can be imaged and their movements tracked in single cells, it has not yet been possible to determine whether these mRNAs are actively translating. Therefore, we imaged single β-actin mRNAs tagged with MS2 stem loops colocalizing with labeled ribosomes to determine when polysomes formed. A dataset of tracking information consisting of thousands of trajectories per cell demonstrated that mRNAs co-moving with ribosomes have significantly different diffusion properties from non-translating mRNAs that were exposed to translation inhibitors. These data indicate that ribosome load changes mRNA movement and therefore highly translating mRNAs move slower. Importantly, β-actin mRNA near focal adhesions exhibited sub-diffusive corralled movement characteristic of increased translation. This method can identify where ribosomes become engaged for local protein production and how spatial regulation of mRNA-protein interactions mediates cell directionality. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10415.001 PMID:26760529

  17. Characterization of baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi . E-mail: hiroshi.takaku@it-chiba.ac.jp

    2006-05-05

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is used as a vector in many gene therapy studies. Wild-type AcMNPV infects many mammalian cell types in vitro, but does not replicate. We investigated the dynamics of AcMNPV genomic DNA in infected mammalian cells and used flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that recombinant baculovirus containing a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed high levels of GFP in Huh-7 cells, but not B16, Raw264.7, or YAC-1 cells. The addition of butyrate, a deacetylase inhibitor, markedly enhanced the percentage of GFP-expressing Huh-7 and B16 cells, but not Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, had no enhancing effect. Polymerase chain reaction analysis using AcMNPV-gp64-specific primers indicated that AcMNPV infected not only Huh-7 and B16 cells, but also Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells in vitro. The genomic DNA was detected in Huh-7 and B16 cells 96 h after infection. Genomic AcMNPV DNA in YAC-1 cells was not transported to the nucleus. Luciferase assay indicated that AcMNPV p35 gene mRNA and p35 promoter activity were clearly expressed only in Huh-7 and B16 cells. These results suggest that viral genomic DNA expression is restricted by different host cell factors, such as degradation, deacetylation, and inhibition of nuclear transport, depending on the mammalian cell type.

  18. Characterization of baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is used as a vector in many gene therapy studies. Wild-type AcMNPV infects many mammalian cell types in vitro, but does not replicate. We investigated the dynamics of AcMNPV genomic DNA in infected mammalian cells and used flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that recombinant baculovirus containing a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed high levels of GFP in Huh-7 cells, but not B16, Raw264.7, or YAC-1 cells. The addition of butyrate, a deacetylase inhibitor, markedly enhanced the percentage of GFP-expressing Huh-7 and B16 cells, but not Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, had no enhancing effect. Polymerase chain reaction analysis using AcMNPV-gp64-specific primers indicated that AcMNPV infected not only Huh-7 and B16 cells, but also Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells in vitro. The genomic DNA was detected in Huh-7 and B16 cells 96 h after infection. Genomic AcMNPV DNA in YAC-1 cells was not transported to the nucleus. Luciferase assay indicated that AcMNPV p35 gene mRNA and p35 promoter activity were clearly expressed only in Huh-7 and B16 cells. These results suggest that viral genomic DNA expression is restricted by different host cell factors, such as degradation, deacetylation, and inhibition of nuclear transport, depending on the mammalian cell type. PMID:16545777

  19. Process and equipment development for hot isostatic pressing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Ken; Wahlquist, Dennis; Malewitz, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), LLC, has developed processes and equipment for a pilot-scale hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatability study to stabilize and volume reduce radioactive calcine stored at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy signed a Record of Decision with the state of Idaho selecting HIP technology as the method to treat 5,800 yd^3 (4,400 m^3) of granular zirconia and alumina calcine produced between 1953 and 1992 as a waste byproduct of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Since the 1990s, a variety of radioactive and hazardous waste forms have been remotely treated using HIP within INL hot cells. To execute the remote process at INL, waste is loaded into a stainless-steel or aluminum can, which is evacuated, sealed, and placed into a HIP furnace. The HIP simultaneously heats and pressurizes the waste, reducing its volume and increasing its durability. Two 1 gal cans of calcine waste currently stored in a shielded cask were identified as candidate materials for a treatability study involving the HIP process. Equipment and materials for cask-handling and calcine transfer into INL hot cells, as well as remotely operated equipment for waste can opening, particle sizing, material blending, and HIP can loading have been designed and successfully tested. These results demonstrate BEA’s readiness for treatment of INL calcine.

  20. Nuclear Envelope Lamin-A Couples Actin Dynamics with Immunological Synapse Architecture and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, José María; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando Garcia; Freije, José María Pérez; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins have been implicated in structural and functional activities, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction. However, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we showed that the abundance of A-type lamins is almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but that it is substantially increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR), and is an early event that accelerates formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. We found that lamin-A enhanced the polymerization of F-actin in T cells, a critical step for immunological synapse formation, by physically connecting the nucleus to the plasma membrane through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We also showed that lamin-A played a key role in other membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear events related to TCR activation, including receptor-clustering, downstream signaling, and target gene expression. Notably, the presence of lamin-A was associated with enhanced extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 signaling, and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway reduced the extent of lamin-A–dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice deficient in lamin-A exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation, and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response. PMID:24757177

  1. Gentamicin arrests cancer cell growth: the intriguing involvement of nuclear sphingomyelin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Codini, Michela; Cataldi, Samuela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Lazzarini, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Lazzarini, Remo; Curcio, Francesco; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    The use of gentamicin for the treatment of bacterial infection has always been an interesting and highly speculated issue for the scientific community. Conversely, its effect on cancer cells has been very little investigated. We studied the effect of high doses of gentamicin on non-Hodgkin's T-cell human lymphoblastic lymphoma (SUP-T1). We showed that gentamicin delayed cell growth and induced cell death in lymphoma cells with a rather mild effect on lymphocytes. In SUP-T1 cells, GAPDH, B2M, CDKN1A and CDKN1B were down-expressed in comparison with lymphocytes. Gentamicin treatment in SUP-T1 cells restored the expression of GAPDH, B2M and CDKN1A to values similar to those of lymphocytes and caused overexpression of CDKN1B. The drug acted via sphingomyelin metabolism; in whole cells, sphingomyelinase activity was stimulated, whereas in purified nuclei, sphingomyelinase activity was inhibited and that of sphingomyelin-synthase was stimulated, with a consequent high level of nuclear sphingomyelin content. We suggest that the increase of nuclear sphingomyelin might enrich the nucleus of lipid microdomains that act as a platform for active chromatin and, thus, might be responsible for gene expression. It is possible that in lymphoblastic lymphoma, high doses of gentamicin induce a beneficial therapeutic outcome. PMID:25622250

  2. Hyperactivation of nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) in T cells attenuates severity of murine autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srimoyee; Koralov, Sergei B.; Stevanovic, Irena; Sundrud, Mark S.; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rao, Anjana; Müller, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are a group of Ca2+-regulated transcription factors residing in the cytoplasm of resting cells. Dephosphorylation by calcineurin results in nuclear translocation of NFAT and subsequent expression of target genes; rephosphorylation by kinases, including casein kinase 1 (CK1), restores NFAT to its latent state in the cytoplasm. We engineered a hyperactivable version of NFAT1 with increased affinity for calcineurin and decreased affinity for casein kinase 1. Mice expressing hyperactivable NFAT1 in their T-cell compartment exhibited a dramatically increased frequency of both IL-17– and IL-10–producing cells after differentiation under Th17 conditions—this was associated with direct binding of NFAT1 to distal regulatory regions of Il-17 and Il-10 gene loci in Th17 cells. Despite higher IL-17 production in culture, the mice were significantly less prone to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than controls, correlating with increased production of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 and enhanced accumulation of regulatory T cells within the CNS. Thus, NFAT hyperactivation paradoxically leads to decreased susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, supporting previous observations linking defects in Ca2+/NFAT signaling to lymphoproliferation and autoimmune disease. PMID:20696888

  3. Potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer mediated transgenesis in Arbas Cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Wu, Haiqing; Ma, Yuzhen; Yuan, Jianlong; Liang, Hao; Liu, Dongjun

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer is used to generate genetic models for research and new, genetically modified livestock varieties. Goat fetal fibroblast cells (gFFCs) are the predominant nuclear donors in Cashmere goat transgenic cloning, but have disadvantages. We evaluated the potential of goat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (gADSCs) and goat skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells (gMDSCs) for somatic cell nuclear transfer, evaluating their proliferation, pluripotency, transfection efficiency and capacity to support full term development of embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. gADSCs and gMDSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion and differentiated into neurocytes, myotube cells and insulin-producing cells. Neuron-specific enolase, fast muscle myosin and insulin expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer with donor cells derived from gADSCs, gMDSCs and gFFCs, transfection and cloning efficiencies were compared. Red fluorescent protein levels were determined by quantitative PCR and western blotting. 5-Methylcytosine, H4K5, H4K12 and H3K18 were determined immunohistochemically. gADSCs and gMDSCs were maintained in culture for up to 65 passages, whereas gFFCs could be passaged barely more than 15 times. gADSCs and gMDSCs had higher fluorescent colony forming efficiency and greater convergence (20%) and cleavage (10%) rates than gFFCs, and exhibited differing H4K5 histone modification patterns after somatic cell nuclear transfer and in vitro cultivation. After transfection with a pDsRed2-1 expression plasmid, the integrated exogenous genes did not influence the pluripotency of gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1. DsRed2 mRNA expression by cloned embryos derived from gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1 was more than twice that of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 embryos (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates of gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 and gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1 recipients were higher than those of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 recipients (P

  4. Potential of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Skeletal Muscle-Derived Satellite Cells for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Mediated Transgenesis in Arbas Cashmere Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianlong; Liang, Hao; Liu, Dongjun

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer is used to generate genetic models for research and new, genetically modified livestock varieties. Goat fetal fibroblast cells (gFFCs) are the predominant nuclear donors in Cashmere goat transgenic cloning, but have disadvantages. We evaluated the potential of goat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (gADSCs) and goat skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells (gMDSCs) for somatic cell nuclear transfer, evaluating their proliferation, pluripotency, transfection efficiency and capacity to support full term development of embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. gADSCs and gMDSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion and differentiated into neurocytes, myotube cells and insulin-producing cells. Neuron-specific enolase, fast muscle myosin and insulin expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer with donor cells derived from gADSCs, gMDSCs and gFFCs, transfection and cloning efficiencies were compared. Red fluorescent protein levels were determined by quantitative PCR and western blotting. 5-Methylcytosine, H4K5, H4K12 and H3K18 were determined immunohistochemically. gADSCs and gMDSCs were maintained in culture for up to 65 passages, whereas gFFCs could be passaged barely more than 15 times. gADSCs and gMDSCs had higher fluorescent colony forming efficiency and greater convergence (20%) and cleavage (10%) rates than gFFCs, and exhibited differing H4K5 histone modification patterns after somatic cell nuclear transfer and in vitro cultivation. After transfection with a pDsRed2-1 expression plasmid, the integrated exogenous genes did not influence the pluripotency of gADSCs–pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs–pDsRed2-1. DsRed2 mRNA expression by cloned embryos derived from gADSCs–pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs–pDsRed2-1 was more than twice that of gFFCs–pDsRed2-1 embryos (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates of gADSCs–pDsRed2-1 and gMDSCs–pDsRed2-1 recipients were higher than those of gFFCs–pDsRed2

  5. Cytoplasmic and nuclear polyglutamine aggregates in SCA6 Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, K; Owada, K; Ishida, K; Fujigasaki, H; Shun Li, M; Tsunemi, T; Ohkoshi, N; Toru, S; Mizutani, T; Hayashi, M; Arai, N; Hasegawa, K; Kawanami, T; Kato, T; Makifuchi, T; Shoji, S; Tanabe, T; Mizusawa, H

    2001-06-26

    Aggregations of the alpha1A-calcium channel protein have been previously demonstrated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Here the authors show that small aggregates, labeled by a monoclonal antibody 1C2 that preferentially detects expanded polyglutamine larger than that in SCA6 mutation, are present mainly in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus of Purkinje cells. Although the length of expansion is small in SCA6, the current finding might indicate that SCA6 conforms to the pathogenic mechanism(s) in other polyglutamine diseases. PMID:11425948

  6. Nuclear Retention of Multiply Spliced HIV-1 RNA in Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, Kara G; Ramyar, Kasra X; Bailey, Justin R; Zhou, Yan; Siliciano, Robert F

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 latency in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier to virus eradication in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We describe here a novel post-transcriptional block in HIV-1 gene expression in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART. This block involves the aberrant localization of multiply spliced (MS) HIV-1 RNAs encoding the critical positive regulators Tat and Rev. Although these RNAs had no previously described export defect, we show that they exhibit strict nuclear localization in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART. Overexpression of the transcriptional activator Tat from non-HIV vectors allowed virus production in these cells. Thus, the nuclear retention of MS HIV-1 RNA interrupts a positive feedback loop and contributes to the non-productive nature of infection of resting CD4+ T cells. To define the mechanism of nuclear retention, proteomic analysis was used to identify proteins that bind MS HIV-1 RNA. Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) was identified as an HIV-1 RNA-binding protein differentially expressed in resting and activated CD4+ T cells. Overexpression of PTB in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART allowed cytoplasmic accumulation of HIV-1 RNAs. PTB overexpression also induced virus production by resting CD4+ T cells. Virus culture experiments showed that overexpression of PTB in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART allowed release of replication-competent virus, while preserving a resting cellular phenotype. Whether through effects on RNA export or another mechanism, the ability of PTB to reverse latency without inducing cellular activation is a result with therapeutic implications. PMID:16839202

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Proteins Ectopically Expressed in the Heterologous Environment of Plant Cells are Strictly Targeted to the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Christian E.; Link, Katrin; Wagner, Sabrina; Milbradt, Jens; Marschall, Manfred; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleus forms a prominent cellular compartment containing the cell’s nuclear genome. Although structurally similar, animal and plant nuclei differ substantially in details of their architecture. One example is the nuclear lamina, a layer of tightly interconnected filament proteins (lamins) underlying the nuclear envelope of metazoans. So far no orthologous lamin genes could be detected in plant genomes and putative lamin-like proteins are only poorly described in plants. To probe for potentially conserved features of metazoan and plant nuclear envelopes, we ectopically expressed the core nuclear egress proteins of human cytomegalovirus pUL50 and pUL53 in plant cells. pUL50 localizes to the inner envelope of metazoan nuclei and recruits the nuclear localized pUL53 to it, forming heterodimers. Upon expression in plant cells, a very similar localization pattern of both proteins could be determined. Notably, pUL50 is specifically targeted to the plant nuclear envelope in a rim-like fashion, a location to which coexpressed pUL53 becomes strictly corecruited from its initial nucleoplasmic distribution. Using pUL50 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening, the cytoplasmic re-initiation supporting protein RISP could be identified. Interaction of pUL50 and RISP could be confirmed by coexpression and coimmunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and by confocal laser scanning microscopy in plant cells, demonstrating partial pUL50-RISP colocalization in areas of the nuclear rim and other intracellular compartments. Thus, our study provides strong evidence for conserved structural features of plant and metazoan nuclear envelops and identifies RISP as a potential pUL50-interacting plant protein. PMID:26978388

  8. Visualization of the nucleus and nuclear envelope in situ by SEM in tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Allen, T D; Rutherford, S A; Murray, S; Gardiner, F; Kiseleva, E; Goldberg, M W; Drummond, S P

    2007-01-01

    Our previous work characterizing the biogenesis and structural integrity of the nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) has been based on amphibian material but has recently progressed into the analysis of tissue-culture cells. This protocol describes methods for the high resolution visualization, by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), of the nucleus and associated structures in tissue culture cells. Imaging by fluorescence light microscopy shows general nuclear and NPC information at a resolution of approximately 200 nm, in contrast to the 3-5 nm resolution provided by FESEM or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which generates detail at the macromolecular level. The protocols described here are applicable to all tissue culture cell lines tested to date (HeLa, A6, DLD, XTC and NIH 3T3). The processed cells can be stored long term under vacuum. The protocol can be completed in 5 d, including 3 d for cell growth, 1 d for processing and 1 d for imaging. PMID:17546013

  9. Retinoic acid induces nuclear accumulation of Raf1 during differentiation of HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Reiterer, Gudrun; Coder, David; George, Thaddeus; Asaly, Michael; Yen, Andrew

    2009-08-01

    All trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a standard therapeutic agent used in differentiation induction therapy treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). RA and its metabolites use a diverse set of signal transduction pathways during the differentiation program. In addition to the direct transcriptional targets of the nuclear RAR and RXR receptors, signals derived from membrane receptors and the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway are required. Raf1 phosphorylation and the prolonged activation of Raf1 persisting during the entire differentiation process are required for RA-dependent differentiation of HL-60 cells. Here we identify a nuclear redistribution of Raf1 during the RA-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells. In addition, the nuclear accumulation of Raf1 correlates with an increase in Raf1 phosphorylated at serine 621. The serine 621 phosphorylated Raf1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus. The RA-dependent nuclear accumulation of Raf1 suggests a novel nuclear role for Raf1 during the differentiation process.

  10. Visualization and molecular analysis of nuclear import of protein kinase CK2 subunits in living cells.

    PubMed

    Martel, V; Filhol, O; Nueda, A; Gerber, D; Benitez, M J; Cochet, C

    2001-11-01

    We have generated fusion proteins between the subunits of CK2 and GFP and characterized their behaviour in living cells. The expressed fusion proteins were functional and interacted with endogenous CK2. Imaging of NIH3T3 cells expressing low level of GFP-CK2alpha or GFP-CK2beta showed that both proteins were mostly nuclear in interphase. Both CK2 subunits contain nuclear localization domains that target them independently to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, both subunits diffused rapidly in the nucleoplasm. In mitotic cells, CK2 subunits were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and were not associated to chromatin. Our data are compatible with the idea that each subunit can translocate individually to the nucleus to interact with each other or with important cellular partners. Understanding the molecular mechanisms which regulate the dynamic localization of CK2 subunits will be of central importance. PMID:11827178

  11. Probing protein quinary interactions by in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; Xue, Jing; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Historically introduced by McConkey to explain the slow mutation rate of highly abundant proteins, weak protein (quinary) interactions are an emergent property of living cells. The protein complexes that result from quinary interactions are transient and thus difficult to study biochemically in vitro. Cross-correlated relaxation-induced polarization transfer-based in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance allows the characterization of protein quinary interactions with atomic resolution inside live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We show that RNAs are an important component of protein quinary interactions. Protein quinary interactions are unique to the target protein and may affect physicochemical properties, protein activity, and interactions with drugs. PMID:25894651

  12. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  13. Tetrapyrrole signal as a cell-cycle coordinator from organelle to nuclear DNA replication in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Kanesaki, Yu; Tanaka, Ayumi; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Tanaka, Kan

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells arose from an ancient endosymbiotic association of prokaryotes, with plant cells harboring 3 genomes as the remnants of such evolution. In plant cells, plastid and mitochondrial DNA replication [organelle DNA replication (ODR)] occurs in advance of the subsequent cell cycles composed of nuclear DNA replication (NDR) and cell division. However, the mechanism by which replication of these genomes with different origins is coordinated is largely unknown. Here, we show that NDR is regulated by a tetrapyrrole signal in plant cells, which has been suggested as an organelle-to-nucleus retrograde signal. In synchronized cultures of the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, specific inhibition of A-type cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA) prevented NDR but not ODR after onset of the cell cycle. In contrast, inhibition of ODR by nalidixic acid also resulted in inhibition of NDR, indicating a strict dependence of NDR on ODR. The requirement of ODR for NDR was bypassed by addition of the tetrapyrrole intermediates protoporphyrin IX (ProtoIX) or Mg-ProtoIX, both of which activated CDKA without inducing ODR. This scheme was also observed in cultured tobacco cells (BY-2), where inhibition of ODR by nalidixic acid prevented CDKA activation and NDR, and these inhibitions were circumvented by Mg-ProtoIX without inducing ODR. We thus show that tetrapyrrole-mediated organelle–nucleus replicational coupling is an evolutionary conserved process among plant cells. PMID:19141634

  14. Development of porcine tetraploid somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos is influenced by oocyte nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Liu, Di; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Liang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Peng, Fu-Gang; Bai, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Cloning efficiency in mammalian systems remains low because reprogramming of donor cells is frequently incomplete. Nuclear factors in the oocyte are removed by enucleation, and this removal may adversely affect reprogramming efficiency. Here, we investigated the role of porcine oocyte nuclear factors during reprogramming. We introduced somatic cell nuclei into intact MII oocytes to establish tetraploid somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos containing both somatic nuclei and oocyte nuclei. We then examined the influence of the oocyte nucleus on tetraploid SCNT embryo development by assessing characteristics including pronucleus formation, cleavage rate, and blastocyst formation. Overall, tetraploid SCNT embryos have a higher developmental competence than do standard diploid SCNT embryos. Therefore, we have established an embryonic model in which a fetal fibroblast nucleus and an oocyte metaphase II plate coexist. Tetraploid SCNT represents a new research platform that is potentially useful for examining interactions between donor nuclei and oocyte nuclei. This platform should facilitate further understanding of the roles played by nuclear factors during reprogramming. PMID:26503330

  15. Involvement of the Host Cell Nuclear Envelope Membranes in the Replication of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zebovitz, E.; Leong, J. K. L.; Doughty, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) on various cell membrane fractions derived from a porcine kidney cell line infected with Japanese encephalitis virus was investigated. At 40 h postinfection, after virus growth had reached its peak, three viral RNAs, 45S, 27S, and 20S, were associated with the cytoplasmic membranes and intact nuclei. The amount of each RNA associated with the nucleus was two- to fivefold greater than that present with the cytoplasmic membranes. Treatment of washed infected nuclei with 1.0% Triton X-100, which removed the outer nuclear envelope membrane, also removed the viral RNA. When the nucleus was fractionated into nuclear envelope membranes and a large particle fraction which sedimented at 600 × g, nearly all of the viral RNA remained associated with the envelope membranes. The nuclear envelope membranes contained higher viral RNA polymerase activity than the cytoplasmic membranes derived from the same cells. These data suggest that major sites for Japanese encephalitis virus RNA synthesis may be localized on or in very close association with the nuclear envelope membranes. PMID:4842128

  16. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells.

    PubMed

    Kupenko, I; Strohm, C; McCammon, C; Cerantola, V; Glazyrin, K; Petitgirard, S; Vasiukov, D; Aprilis, G; Chumakov, A I; Rüffer, R; Dubrovinsky, L

    2015-11-01

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe3C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO3 using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe2O3 using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses. PMID:26628151

  17. Nuclear retention of importin α coordinates cell fate through changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Yoshinari; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Yamashiro, Tomoko; Asally, Munehiro; Masui, Ayumi; Wong, Chin; Loveland, Kate L; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Various cellular stresses including oxidative stress induce a collapse of the Ran gradient, which causes accumulation of importin α in the nucleus and a subsequent block of nuclear protein import. However, it is unknown whether accumulated importin α performs roles in the nucleus after its migration in response to stress. In this study, we found that nuclear-retained importin α2 binds with DNase I-sensitive nuclear component(s) and exhibits selective upregulation of mRNA encoding Serine/threonine kinase 35 (STK35) by microarray analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter analysis demonstrated that importin α2 can access to the promoter region of STK35 and accelerate its transcription in response to hydrogen peroxide exposure. Furthermore, constitutive overexpression of STK35 proteins enhances caspase-independent cell death under oxidative stress conditions. These results collectively reveal that nuclear-localized importin α2 influences gene expression and contributes directly to cell fate outcomes including non-apoptotic cell death. PMID:21964068

  18. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kupenko, I. Strohm, C.; McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Glazyrin, K.; Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  19. Live Cell Dynamics of Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies upon Entry into and Exit from Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Chun M.; Kappel, Constantin; Beaudouin, Joel; Eils, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been proposed to be involved in tumor suppression, viral defense, DNA repair, and/or transcriptional regulation. To study the dynamics of PML NBs during mitosis, we developed several U2OS cell lines stably coexpressing PML-enhanced cyan fluorescent protein with other individual marker proteins. Using three-dimensional time-lapse live cell imaging and four-dimensional particle tracking, we quantitatively demonstrated that PML NBs exhibit a high percentage of directed movement when cells progressed from prophase to prometaphase. The timing of this increased dynamic movement occurred just before or upon nuclear entry of cyclin B1, but before nuclear envelope breakdown. Our data suggest that entry into prophase leads to a loss of tethering between regions of chromatin and PML NBs, resulting in their increased dynamics. On exit from mitosis, Sp100 and Fas death domain-associated protein (Daxx) entered the daughter nuclei after a functional nuclear membrane was reformed. However, the recruitment of these proteins to PML NBs was delayed and correlated with the timing of de novo PML NB formation. Together, these results provide insight into the dynamic changes associated with PML NBs during mitosis. PMID:18480407

  20. Tat Peptide Is Capable of Importing Large Nanoparticles Across Nuclear Membrane in Digitonin Permeabilized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nitin, Nitin; LaConte, Leslie; Rhee, Won Jong; Bao, Gang

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the capabilities and limitations of nuclear import is crucial to efficient delivery of macromolecules and nanoparticles for diagnosis and targeted therapy of diseases. Here we report the Tat peptide-mediated import of different cargos into cell nucleus, including dye-labeled streptavidin protein, 43 and 90 nm fluorescent beads, as well as ∼20 nm quantum dots for kinetic measurements. Our results revealed significant differences between Tat- and NLS-mediated nuclear import: unlike delivery with the NLS, Tat peptide-based delivery is not inhibited by WGA blockage nor does it require ATP. Surprisingly, Tat peptide was able to import 90 nm beads into the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells, suggesting that its interaction with the nuclear envelope follows a mechanism different from that of NLS. The import kinetics was quantified using Tat peptide-conjugated QDs, yielding a kinetic constant of 0.0085 s−1. Taken together, our results suggest that, compared with NLS, Tat peptide-mediated nuclear import is faster, follows a different pathway, and is capable of importing large nanoparticles. These results have significant implications for the development of new approaches for delivery of cargo into the nuclei of living cells. PMID:19657743

  1. A Cell-Free Assay Using Xenopus laevis Embryo Extracts to Study Mechanisms of Nuclear Size Regulation.

    PubMed

    Edens, Lisa J; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how cell and organelle sizes are regulated. It has long been recognized that the size of the nucleus generally scales with the size of the cell, notably during embryogenesis when dramatic reductions in both cell and nuclear sizes occur. Mechanisms of nuclear size regulation are largely unknown and may be relevant to cancer where altered nuclear size is a key diagnostic and prognostic parameter. In vivo approaches to identifying nuclear size regulators are complicated by the essential and complex nature of nuclear function. The in vitro approach described here to study nuclear size control takes advantage of the normal reductions in nuclear size that occur during Xenopus laevis development. First, nuclei are assembled in X. laevis egg extract. Then, these nuclei are isolated and resuspended in cytoplasm from late stage embryos. After a 30 - 90 min incubation period, nuclear surface area decreases by 20 - 60%, providing a useful assay to identify cytoplasmic components present in late stage embryos that contribute to developmental nuclear size scaling. A major advantage of this approach is the relative facility with which the egg and embryo extracts can be biochemically manipulated, allowing for the identification of novel proteins and activities that regulate nuclear size. As with any in vitro approach, validation of results in an in vivo system is important, and microinjection of X. laevis embryos is particularly appropriate for these studies. PMID:27584618

  2. Molecular mechanism by which acyclic retinoid induces nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R; Tatsukawa, H; Shrestha, R; Ishibashi, N; Matsuura, T; Kagechika, H; Kose, S; Hitomi, K; Imamoto, N; Kojima, S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear accumulation of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an important step in TG2-dependent cell death. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for nuclear translocation of TG2 are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that acyclic retinoid (ACR) induced nuclear accumulation of TG2 in JHH-7 cells, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) leading to their apoptosis. We further demonstrated molecular mechanism in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TG2 and an effect of ACR on it. We identified a novel 14-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS) 466AEKEETGMAMRIRV479 in the ‘C' domain and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) 657LHMGLHKL664 in the ‘D' domain that allowed TG2 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic milieu. Increased nuclear import of GAPDH myc-HIS fused with the identified NLS was observed, confirming its nuclear import ability. Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of exportin-1 as well as point mutation of all leucine residues to glutamine residues in the NES of TG2 demolished its nuclear export. TG2 formed a trimeric complex with importin-α and importin-β independently from transamidase activity which strongly suggested the involvement of a NLS-based translocation of TG2 to the nucleus. ACR accelerated the formation of the trimeric complex and that may be at least in part responsible for enhanced nuclear localization of TG2 in HCC cells treated with ACR. PMID:26633708

  3. Nuclear lamins are not required for lamina-associated domain organization in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, Mario; van Steensel, Bas

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the nuclear lamina interacts with hundreds of large genomic regions, termed lamina-associated domains (LADs) that are generally in a transcriptionally repressed state. Lamins form the major structural component of the lamina and have been reported to bind DNA and chromatin. Here, we systematically evaluate whether lamins are necessary for the LAD organization in murine embryonic stem cells. Surprisingly, removal of essentially all lamins does not have any detectable effect on the genome-wide interaction pattern of chromatin with emerin, a marker of the inner nuclear membrane. This suggests that other components of the lamina mediate these interactions. PMID:25784758

  4. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  5. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    SciTech Connect

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-06-22

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  6. Protein nanocages for self-triggered nuclear delivery of DNA-targeted chemotherapeutics in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Michela; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Sommaruga, Silvia; Fiandra, Luisa; Truffi, Marta; Rizzuto, Maria A; Colombo, Miriam; Tortora, Paolo; Corsi, Fabio; Prosperi, Davide

    2014-12-28

    A genetically engineered apoferritin variant consisting of 24 heavy-chain subunits (HFn) was produced to achieve a cumulative delivery of an antitumor drug, which exerts its cytotoxic action by targeting the DNA at the nucleus of human cancer cells with subcellular precision. The rationale of our approach is based on exploiting the natural arsenal of defense of cancer cells to stimulate them to recruit large amounts of HFn nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin inside their nucleus in response to a DNA damage, which leads to a programmed cell death. After demonstrating the selectivity of HFn for representative cancer cells compared to healthy fibroblasts, doxorubicin-loaded HFn was used to treat the cancer cells. The results from confocal microscopy and DNA damage assays proved that loading of doxorubicin in HFn nanoparticles increased the nuclear delivery of the drug, thus enhancing doxorubicin efficacy. Doxorubicin-loaded HFn acts as a "Trojan Horse": HFn was internalized in cancer cells faster and more efficiently compared to free doxorubicin, then promptly translocated into the nucleus following the DNA damage caused by the partial release in the cytoplasm of encapsulated doxorubicin. This self-triggered translocation mechanism allowed the drug to be directly released in the nuclear compartment, where it exerted its toxic action. This approach was reliable and straightforward providing an antiproliferative effect with high reproducibility. The particular self-assembling nature of HFn nanocage makes it a versatile and tunable nanovector for a broad range of molecules suitable both for detection and treatment of cancer cells. PMID:25312541

  7. Comparative Analysis of Nuclear Transfer Embryo-Derived Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells. Part I: Cellular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kobolak, Julianna; Mamo, Solomon; Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ujhelly, Olga; Csonka, Erika; Hadlaczky, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells derived from nuclear transfer embryos (ntESCs) are particularly valuable for regenerative medicine, as they are a patient-specific and histocompatible cell source for the treatment of varying diseases. However, currently, little is known about their cellular and molecular profile. In the present study, in a mouse model different donor cell-derived ntESCs from various genetic backgrounds were compared with reference ESCs and analyzed comprehensively at the cellular level. A number of pluripotency marker genes were compared by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry analysis. Significant differences at the protein level were observed for POU5F1, SOX2, FGF4, NANOG, and SSEA-1. However, such differences had no effect on in vitro cell differentiation and cell fate: derivatives of the three germ layers were detected in all ntESC lines. The neural and cardiac in vitro differentiation revealed minor differences between the cell lines, both at the mRNA and protein level. Karyotype analyses and cell growth studies did not reveal any significant variations. Despite some differences observed, the present study revealed that ntESC lines had similar differentiation competences compared to other ESCs. The results indicate that the observed differences may be related to the genotype rather than to the nuclear transfer technology. PMID:22204592

  8. Tanshinone IIA enhances chemosensitivity of colon cancer cells by suppressing nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    BAI, YANGQIU; ZHANG, LIDA; FANG, XINHUI; YANG, YUXIU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of tanshinone IIA (TSA) on colon cancer cells. Cell viability was determined using Cell Counting kit-8 assay and the results demonstrated that TSA treatment significantly decreased the cell viability of HCT1116 and COLO205 cells in a dose-dependent manner. TSA treatment also sensitized HCT1116 and COLO205 cells to fluorouracil therapy in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blotting was performed in order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of TSA action and determine the level of phosporylated p65 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-regulated genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), c-Myc, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). The results revealed that TSA treatment greatly decreased the level of phosphorylated p65 in the nucleus, which indicated the inhibition of NF-κB activation by TSA treatment. TSA also decreased the expression levels of VEGF, c-Myc, COX-2 and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of NF-κB activation with the specific inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, increased the induction of cell death and chemosensitization effect of TSA in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results suggest that TSA induces cell death and chemosensitizes colon cancer cells through the suppression of NF-κB signaling. PMID:26998041

  9. The Zebrafish G12 Gene is required for Nuclear Positioning and Cell Migrations during Early Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinsch, S. S.; Conway, G. C.

    2003-01-01

    After fertilization Zebrafish embryos undergo synchronous cleavage to form a blastula of cells sitting upon a single multinucleate yolk cell. At the beginning of gastrulation these cells undergo extensive cell migrations to form the major body axes. We have discovered a gene, G12, which is required for cell migrations and positioning of nuclei in the large syncytial yolk cell. Overexpression of a G12-GFP fusion protein is not toxic and shows that the protein localizes inside the yolk cell to the yolk nuclei, microtubules, and to the margin between the blastomeres and the large yolk cell. Morpholino (MO) injection into the 1-cell embryo or into just the yolk syncytium conipletely inhibits cell migrations, doming of the yolk cell, and positioning of nuclei around the margin. This effect can be partially rescued by injection of G12-GFP encoding RNA. Given the known role of microtubules in nuclear positioning of yolk nuclei in Zebrafish, we investigated the microtubules in morpholiiio injected and rescued embryos. We find that microtubules are sparse and disorganized in MO-injected embryos and are restored to normal organization upon G12-GFP rescue. G12 plays a pivotal role in organization of inicrotubules during early development. G12 is highly conserved in vertebrates and two homologues exist in the human genome. One of the human hoinologues is amplified in aggressive breast tumors.

  10. Drosophila male and female germline stem cell niches require the nuclear lamina protein Otefin.

    PubMed

    Barton, Lacy J; Lovander, Kaylee E; Pinto, Belinda S; Geyer, Pamela K

    2016-07-01

    The nuclear lamina is an extensive protein network that underlies the inner nuclear envelope. This network includes the LAP2-emerin-MAN1-domain (LEM-D) protein family, proteins that share an association with the chromatin binding protein Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF). Loss of individual LEM-D proteins causes progressive, tissue-restricted diseases, known as laminopathies. Mechanisms associated with laminopathies are not yet understood. Here we present our studies of one of the Drosophila nuclear lamina LEM-D proteins, Otefin (Ote), a homologue of emerin. Previous studies have shown that Ote is autonomously required for the survival of female germline stem cells (GSCs). We demonstrate that Ote is also required for survival of somatic cells in the ovarian niche, with loss of Ote causing a decrease in cap cell number and altered signal transduction. We show germ cell-restricted expression of Ote rescues these defects, revealing a non-autonomous function for Ote in niche maintenance and emphasizing that GSCs contribute to the maintenance of their own niches. Further, we investigate the requirement of Ote in the male fertility. We show that ote mutant males become prematurely sterile as they age. Parallel to observations in females, this sterility is associated with GSC loss and changes in somatic cells of the niche, phenotypes that are largely rescued by germ cell-restricted Ote expression. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that Ote is required autonomously for survival of two stem cell populations, as well as non-autonomously for maintenance of two somatic niches. Finally, our data add to growing evidence that LEM-D proteins have critical roles in stem cell survival and tissue homeostasis. PMID:27174470

  11. Effect of Cell Cycle Interactions and Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases on Development of Porcine Embryos Produced by Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Vitor B; Glanzner, Werner G; Mujica, Lady K S; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the positive effects of inhibiting histone deacetylase enzymes on cell reprogramming and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is affected by the cell cycle stage of nuclear donor cells and host oocytes at the time of embryo reconstruction. SCNT embryos were produced with metaphase II (MII) or telophase II (TII) cytoplasts and nuclear donor cells that were either at the G1-0 or G2/M stages. Embryos reconstructed with the different cell cycle combinations were treated or not with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Scriptaid for 15 h and then cultured in vitro for 7 days. Embryos reconstructed with MII-G1-0 and TII-G2/M developed to the blastocyst stage with a higher frequency compared to the other groups, confirming the importance of cell cycle interactions on cell reprogramming and SCNT embryo development. Treatment with HDACi improved development of SCNT embryos produced with MII but not TII cytoplasts, independently of the cell cycle stage of nuclear donor cells. These findings provide evidence that the positive effect of HDACi treatment on development of SCNT embryos depends upon cell cycle interactions between the host cytoplast and the nuclear donor cells. PMID:27281695

  12. Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

  13. Validation of cell analysis capability using ENDF/B-V nuclear data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the work which resulted in CELL-2 (referred to in this report as the ENDF/B-V version of EPRI-CELL), including the ENDF/B-V data testing, library generation, methods improvements, and code benchmarking. The new ENDF/B-V multigroup library is compared to the original EPRI-CELL library and differences are discussed. The results of a methods validation program are given, in which EPRI-CELL calculations of integral parameters and multigroup cross sections are compared to rigorous transport theory calculations of numerical benchmark problems. EPRI-CELL is used to compute isolated rod resonance integrals based on ENDF/B-V, which are then compared with experimental values. The results of a comprehensive reactor benchmarking study are given for clean UO/sub 2/ and MO/sub 2/ criticals, and for hot zero power PWR cores. Results of depletion calculations are compared with experimentally measured isotopic ratios for three power reactor cores.

  14. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  15. Anti-nuclear antibody screening using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Carol; Bryant, Cassandra; Eslami, Anna; Lakos, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Rheumatology position statement on ANA testing stipulates the use of IIF as the gold standard method for ANA screening(1). Although IIF is an excellent screening test in expert hands, the technical difficulties of processing and reading IIF slides--such as the labor intensive slide processing, manual reading, the need for experienced, trained technologists and the use of dark room--make the IIF method difficult to fit in the workflow of modern, automated laboratories. The first and crucial step towards high quality ANA screening is careful slide processing. This procedure is labor intensive, and requires full understanding of the process, as well as attention to details and experience. Slide reading is performed by fluorescent microscopy in dark rooms, and is done by trained technologists who are familiar with the various patterns, in the context of cell cycle and the morphology of interphase and dividing cells. Provided that IIF is the first line screening tool for SARD, understanding the steps to correctly perform this technique is critical. Recently, digital imaging systems have been developed for the automated reading of IIF slides. These systems, such as the NOVA View Automated Fluorescent Microscope, are designed to streamline the routine IIF workflow. NOVA View acquires and stores high resolution digital images of the wells, thereby separating image acquisition from interpretation; images are viewed an interpreted on high resolution computer monitors. It stores images for future reference and supports the operator's interpretation by providing fluorescent light intensity data on the images. It also preliminarily categorizes results as positive or negative, and provides pattern recognition for positive samples. In summary, it eliminates the need for darkroom, and automates and streamlines the IIF reading/interpretation workflow. Most importantly, it increases consistency between readers and readings. Moreover, with the use of barcoded

  16. Anti-Nuclear Antibody Screening Using HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, Carol; Bryant, Cassandra; Eslami, Anna; Lakos, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Rheumatology position statement on ANA testing stipulates the use of IIF as the gold standard method for ANA screening1. Although IIF is an excellent screening test in expert hands, the technical difficulties of processing and reading IIF slides – such as the labor intensive slide processing, manual reading, the need for experienced, trained technologists and the use of dark room – make the IIF method difficult to fit in the workflow of modern, automated laboratories. The first and crucial step towards high quality ANA screening is careful slide processing. This procedure is labor intensive, and requires full understanding of the process, as well as attention to details and experience. Slide reading is performed by fluorescent microscopy in dark rooms, and is done by trained technologists who are familiar with the various patterns, in the context of cell cycle and the morphology of interphase and dividing cells. Provided that IIF is the first line screening tool for SARD, understanding the steps to correctly perform this technique is critical. Recently, digital imaging systems have been developed for the automated reading of IIF slides. These systems, such as the NOVA View Automated Fluorescent Microscope, are designed to streamline the routine IIF workflow. NOVA View acquires and stores high resolution digital images of the wells, thereby separating image acquisition from interpretation; images are viewed an interpreted on high resolution computer monitors. It stores images for future reference and supports the operator’s interpretation by providing fluorescent light intensity data on the images. It also preliminarily categorizes results as positive or negative, and provides pattern recognition for positive samples. In summary, it eliminates the need for darkroom, and automates and streamlines the IIF reading/interpretation workflow. Most importantly, it increases consistency between readers and readings. Moreover, with the use of

  17. SINC, a type III secreted protein of Chlamydia psittaci, targets the inner nuclear membrane of infected cells and uninfected neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Sergio A.; Hovis, Kelley M.; Frieman, Matthew B.; Tran, Bao; Hsia, Ru-ching; Ravel, Jacques; Jenkins-Houk, Clifton; Wilson, Katherine L.; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2015-01-01

    SINC, a new type III secreted protein of the avian and human pathogen Chlamydia psittaci, uniquely targets the nuclear envelope of C. psittaci–infected cells and uninfected neighboring cells. Digitonin-permeabilization studies of SINC-GFP–transfected HeLa cells indicate that SINC targets the inner nuclear membrane. SINC localization at the nuclear envelope was blocked by importazole, confirming SINC import into the nucleus. Candidate partners were identified by proximity to biotin ligase-fused SINC in HEK293 cells and mass spectrometry (BioID). This strategy identified 22 candidates with high confidence, including the nucleoporin ELYS, lamin B1, and four proteins (emerin, MAN1, LAP1, and LBR) of the inner nuclear membrane, suggesting that SINC interacts with host proteins that control nuclear structure, signaling, chromatin organization, and gene silencing. GFP-SINC association with the native LEM-domain protein emerin, a conserved component of nuclear “lamina” structure, or with a complex containing emerin was confirmed by GFP pull down. Our findings identify SINC as a novel bacterial protein that targets the nuclear envelope with the capability of globally altering nuclear envelope functions in the infected host cell and neighboring uninfected cells. These properties may contribute to the aggressive virulence of C. psittaci. PMID:25788290

  18. Nuclear distribution of eIF3g and its interacting nuclear proteins in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, QIAOLI; LIU, HAO; YE, JINGJIA; ZHANG, HUI; JIA, ZHENYU; CAO, JIANG

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit g (eIF3g) is a core subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, and is important in the initiation of translation. It is also involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and is upregulated in multidrug-resistant cancer cells. In the present study, the nuclear distribution of eIF3g was determined by performing co-immunoprecipitation of proteins that potentially interact with eIF3g in the nucleus. Mass spectrometry characterization showed that three proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U/scaffold attachment factor A, HSZFP36/zinc finger protein 823 and β-actin, were among the candidate eIF3g-interacting proteins in the nucleus. The protein-protein interaction was further confirmed by cross-linking and a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, followed by western blotting. The co-localization of these proteins was determined by confocal microscopy. These findings provide novel insight into the possible functions of eIF3g in the nucleus and serves as an important first step for further investigation of the roles of eIF3g in cancer development. PMID:26935993

  19. Increased expression and activity of nuclear cathepsin L in cancer cells suggests a novel mechanism of cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Brigitte; Sansregret, Laurent; Leduy, Lam; Bogyo, Matthew; Weber, Ekkehard; Chauhan, Shyam S; Nepveu, Alain

    2007-09-01

    It is generally accepted that the role of cathepsin L in cancer involves its activities outside the cells once it has been secreted. However, cathepsin L isoforms that are devoid of a signal peptide were recently shown to be present in the nucleus where they proteolytically process the CCAAT-displacement protein/cut homeobox (CDP/Cux) transcription factor. A role for nuclear cathepsin L in cell proliferation could be inferred from the observation that the CDP/Cux processed isoform can accelerate entry into S phase. Here, we report that in many transformed cells the proteolytic processing of CDP/Cux is augmented and correlates with increased cysteine protease expression and activity in the nucleus. Taking advantage of an antibody that recognizes the prodomain of human cathepsin L, we showed that human cells express short cathepsin L species that do not contain a signal peptide, do not transit through the endoplasmic reticulum, are not glycosylated, and localize to the nucleus. We also showed that transformation by the ras oncogene causes rapid increases both in the production of short nuclear cathepsin L isoforms and in the processing of CDP/Cux. Using a cell-based assay, we showed that a cell-permeable inhibitor of cysteine proteases is able to delay the progression into S phase and the proliferation in soft agar of ras-transformed cells, whereas the non-cell-permeable inhibitor had no effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the role of cathepsin L in cancer might not be limited to its extracellular activities but may also involve its processing function in the nucleus. PMID:17855659

  20. Concentrator hot-spot testing, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the hot-spot susceptibility of concentrator cells, to provide a hot-spot qualification test for concentrator modules, and to provide guidelines for reducing hot-spot susceptibility are presented. Hot-spot heating occurs in a photovoltaic module when the short-circuit current of a cell is lower than the string operating current forcing the cell into reverse bias with a concurrent power dissipation. Although the basis for the concentrator module hot-spot qualification test is the test developed for flat-plate modules, issues, such as providing cell illumination, introduce additional complexities into the testing procedure. The same general guidelines apply for protecting concentrator modules from hot-spot stressing as apply to flat-plate modules. Therefore, recommendations are made on the number of bypass diodes required per given number of series cells per module or source circuit. In addition, a new method for determining the cell temperature in the laboratory or in the field is discussed.

  1. Characterization Method for 3D Substructure of Nuclear Cell Based on Orthogonal Phase Images

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ying; Liang, Minjie; Hua, Tingting; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xin, Zhiduo; Wang, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    A set of optical models associated with blood cells are introduced in this paper. All of these models are made up of different parts possessing symmetries. The wrapped phase images as well as the unwrapped ones from two orthogonal directions related to some of these models are obtained by simulation technique. Because the phase mutation occurs on the boundary between nucleus and cytoplasm as well as on the boundary between cytoplasm and environment medium, the equation of inflexion curve is introduced to describe the size, morphology, and substructure of the nuclear cell based on the analysis of the phase features of the model. Furthermore, a mononuclear cell model is discussed as an example to verify this method. The simulation result shows that characterization with inflexion curve based on orthogonal phase images could describe the substructure of the cells availably, which may provide a new way to identify the typical biological cells quickly without scanning. PMID:26355740

  2. Nuclear glutaredoxin 3 is critical for protection against oxidative stress-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh; Pal, Rituraj; Qu, Ying; Liu, Xi; Yu, Han; Shiao, Stephen L.; Wang, Xinquan; Smith, E. O’Brian; Cui, Xiaojiang; Rodney, George G.; Cheng, Ninghui

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian glutaredoxin 3 (Grx3) has been shown to be critical in maintaining redox homeostasis and regulating cell survival pathways in cancer cells. However, the regulation of Grx3 is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigate the subcellular localization of Grx3 under normal growth and oxidative stress conditions. Both fluorescence imaging of Grx3–RFP fusion and Western blot analysis of cellular fractionation indicate that Grx3 is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm under normal growth conditions, whereas under oxidizing conditions, Grx3 is translocated into and accumulated in the nucleus. Grx3 nuclear accumulation was reversible in a redox-dependent fashion. Further analysis indicates that neither the N-terminal Trx-like domain nor the two catalytic cysteine residues in the active CGFS motif of Grx3 are involved in its nuclear translocation. Decreased levels of Grx3 render cells susceptible to cellular oxidative stress, whereas overexpression of nuclear-targeted Grx3 is sufficient to suppress cells’ sensitivity to oxidant treatments and reduce reactive oxygen species production. These findings provide novel insights into the regulation of Grx3, which is crucial for cell survival against environmental insults. PMID:25975981

  3. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Edith E.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Feichtinger, Rene G.; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined OXPHOS and citrate synthase enzyme activities in HEK293 cells devoid of mtDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes partially encoded by mtDNA show reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also the entirely nuclear encoded complex II and citrate synthase exhibit reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of mtDNA induces a feedback mechanism that downregulates complex II and citrate synthase. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 {rho}{sup 0} cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in {rho}{sup 0} cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  4. ADF and Cofilin1 Control Actin Stress Fibers, Nuclear Integrity, and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kanellos, Georgios; Zhou, Jing; Patel, Hitesh; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Huels, David; Gurniak, Christine B.; Sandilands, Emma; Carragher, Neil O.; Sansom, Owen J.; Witke, Walter; Brunton, Valerie G.; Frame, Margaret C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetic co-depletion of the actin-severing proteins ADF and CFL1 triggers catastrophic loss of adult homeostasis in multiple tissues. There is impaired cell-cell adhesion in skin keratinocytes with dysregulation of E-cadherin, hyperproliferation of differentiated cells, and ultimately apoptosis. Mechanistically, the primary consequence of depleting both ADF and CFL1 is uncontrolled accumulation of contractile actin stress fibers associated with enlarged focal adhesions at the plasma membrane, as well as reduced rates of membrane protrusions. This generates increased intracellular acto-myosin tension that promotes nuclear deformation and physical disruption of the nuclear lamina via the LINC complex that normally connects regulated actin filaments to the nuclear envelope. We therefore describe a pathway involving the actin-severing proteins ADF and CFL1 in regulating the dynamic turnover of contractile actin stress fibers, and this is vital to prevent the nucleus from being damaged by actin contractility, in turn preserving cell survival and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26655907

  5. A peptide nucleic acid targeting nuclear RAD51 sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to melphalan treatment.

    PubMed

    Alagpulinsa, David Abasiwani; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Shmookler Reis, Robert Joseph

    2015-01-01

    RAD51-mediated recombinational repair is elevated in multiple myeloma (MM) and predicts poor prognosis. RAD51 has been targeted to selectively sensitize and/or kill tumor cells. Here, we employed a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to inhibit RAD51 expression in MM cells. We constructed a PNA complementary to a unique segment of the RAD51 gene promoter, spanning the transcription start site, and conjugated it to a nuclear localization signal (PKKKRKV) to enhance cellular uptake and nuclear delivery without transfection reagents. This synthetic construct, (PNArad51_nls), significantly reduced RAD51 transcripts in MM cells, and markedly reduced the number and intensity of de novo and melphalan-induced nuclear RAD51 foci, while increasing the level of melphalan-induced γH2AX foci. Melphalan alone markedly induced the expression of 5 other genes involved in homologous-recombination repair, yet suppression of RAD51 by PNArad51_nls was sufficient to synergize with melphalan, producing significant synthetic lethality of MM cells in vitro. In a SCID-rab mouse model mimicking the MM bone marrow microenvironment, treatment with PNArad51_nls ± melphalan significantly suppressed tumor growth after 2 weeks, whereas melphalan plus control PNArad4µ_nls was ineffectual. This study highlights the importance of RAD51 in myeloma growth and is the first to demonstrate that anti-RAD51 PNA can potentiate conventional MM chemotherapy. PMID:25996477

  6. Role of nesprin-1 in nuclear deformation in endothelial cells under static and uniaxial stretching conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, Toshiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sato, Masaaki

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nesprin-1 knockdown decreases widths of nuclei in ECs under static condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear strain caused by stretching is increased by nesprin-1 knockdown in ECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model mechanical interactions of F-actin with the nucleus in stretched cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer F-actin bound to nesprin-1 may cause sustainable force transmission to the nucleus. -- Abstract: The linker of nucleus and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, including nesprin-1, has been suggested to be crucial for many biological processes. Previous studies have shown that mutations in nesprin-1 cause abnormal cellular functions and diseases, possibly because of insufficient force transmission to the nucleus through actin filaments (F-actin) bound to nesprin-1. However, little is known regarding the mechanical interaction between the nucleus and F-actin through nesprin-1. In this study, we examined nuclear deformation behavior in nesprin-1 knocked-down endothelial cells (ECs) subjected to uniaxial stretching by evaluating nuclear strain from lateral cross-sectional images. The widths of nuclei in nesprin-1 knocked-down ECs were smaller than those in wild-type cells. In addition, nuclear strain in nesprin-1 knocked-down cells, which is considered to be compressed by the actin cortical layer, increased compared with that in wild-type cells under stretching condition. These results indicate that nesprin-1 knockdown releases the nucleus from the tension of F-actin bound to the nucleus, thereby increasing allowance for deformation before stretching, and that F-actin bound to the nucleus through nesprin-1 causes sustainable force transmission to the nucleus.

  7. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are an Attractive Donor Cell Type for Production of Cloned Pigs As Well As Genetically Modified Cloned Pigs by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zicong; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liwen; Shi, Junsong; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique has been widely applied to clone pigs or to produce genetically modified pigs. Currently, this technique relies mainly on using terminally differentiated fibroblasts as donor cells. To improve cloning efficiency, only partially differentiated multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), thought to be more easily reprogrammed to a pluripotent state, have been used as nuclear donors in pig SCNT. Although in vitro–cultured embryos cloned from porcine MSCs (MSCs-embryos) were shown to have higher preimplantation developmental ability than cloned embryos reconstructed from fibroblasts (Fs-embryos), the difference in in vivo full-term developmental rate between porcine MSCs-embryos and Fs-embryos has not been investigated so far. In this study, we demonstrated that blastocyst total cell number and full-term survival abilities of MSCs-embryos were significantly higher than those of Fs-embryos cloned from the same donor pig. The enhanced developmental potential of MSCs-embryos may be associated with their nuclear donors' DNA methylation profile, because we found that the methylation level of imprinting genes and repeat sequences differed between MSCs and fibroblasts. In addition, we showed that use of transgenic porcine MSCs generated from transgene plasmid transfection as donor cells for SCNT can produce live transgenic cloned pigs. These results strongly suggest that porcine bone marrow MSCs are a desirable donor cell type for production of cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs via SCNT. PMID:24033142

  8. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  9. Deficiency of Genomic Reprogramming in Trophoblast Stem Cells Following Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Atsushi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To examine the genomic reprogrammability of trophoblast stem (TS) cells using a nuclear transfer technique, we produced TS cloned embryos using five TS cell lines from three strains of mice (ICR, B6D2F1, and B6CBF1) as donors and observed developmental ability during preimplantation development. The developmental rates of the TS cloned embryos that developed to the two-cell, four- to eight-cell, morula, and blastocyst stages were 58–83%, 0–38.6%, 0–21.3%, and 0–15.9%, respectively, indicating that more than 50% of TS cloned embryos arrested at the two-cell stage. These TS cloned two-cell embryos were expressed low level of Dappa3 (also known as PGC7/Stella), indicating that zygotic gene activation (ZGA) was disrupted in these embryos. However, a small portion of the TS cloned embryos (0–15.9%) reached the blastocyst stage. In these TS cloned blastocysts, the numbers of trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) cells were 31.9±4.6 and 12.1±3.0, respectively, which were not significantly different from those in the fertilized embryos. In addition, the gene expression analysis showed that Oct3/4, and Cdx2, which are ICM- and TE-specific marker genes, respectively, and Dppa3, and Hdac1, which are zygotic gene activation-related genes, were expressed in TS cloned blastocysts at the same levels as in the fertilized blastocysts. These results indicate that although TS cloned embryos are able to differentiate into ICM cells, the genomic reprogrammability of TS cells is very low following nuclear transfer. PMID:25826724

  10. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification.

  11. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  12. Hot atoms in cosmic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossler, K; Jung, H J; Nebeling, B

    1984-01-01

    High energy chemical reactions and atom molecule interactions might be important for cosmic chemistry with respect to the accelerated species in solar wind, cosmic rays, colliding gas and dust clouds and secondary knock-on particles in solids. "Hot" atoms with energies ranging from a few eV to some MeV can be generated via nuclear reactions and consequent recoil processes. The chemical fate of the radioactive atoms can be followed by radiochemical methods (radio GC or HPLC). Hot atom chemistry may serve for laboratory simulation of the reactions of energetic species with gaseous or solid interstellar matter. Due to the effective measurement of 10(8)-10(10) atoms only it covers a low to medium dose regime and may add to the studies of ion implantation which due to the optical methods applied are necessarily in the high dose regime. Experimental results are given for the systems: C/H2O (gas), C/H2O (solid, 77 K), N/CH4 (solid, 77K) and C/NH3 (solid, 77 K). Nuclear reactions used for the generation of 2 to 3 MeV atoms are: N(p,alpha) 11C, 16O(p,alpha pn) 11C and 12C(d,n) 13N with 8 to 45 MeV protons or deuterons from a cyclotron. Typical reactions products are: CO, CO2, CH4, CH2O, CH3OH, HCOOH, NH3, CH3NH2, cyanamide, formamidine, guanidine etc. Products of hot reactions in solids are more complex than in corresponding gaseous systems, which underlines the importance of solid state reactions for the build-up of precursors for biomolecules in space. As one of the major mechanisms for product formation, the simultaneous or fast consecutive reactions of a hot carbon with two target molecules (reaction complex) is discussed. PMID:11537799

  13. A Hot-spot of In-frame Duplications Activates the Oncoprotein AKT1 in Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bessière, Laurianne; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Auguste, Aurélie; Sarnacki, Sabine; Flatters, Delphine; Legois, Bérangère; Sultan, Charles; Kalfa, Nicolas; Galmiche, Louise; Veitia, Reiner A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian granulosa cell tumors are the most common sex-cord stromal tumors and have juvenile (JGCTs) and adult forms. In a previous study we reported the occurrence of activating somatic mutations of Gαs, which transduces mitogenic signals, in 30% of the analyzed JGCTs. Methods We have searched for alterations in other proteins involved in ovarian mitogenic signaling. We focused on the PI3K–AKT axis. As we found mutations in AKT1, we analyzed the subcellular localization of the mutated proteins and performed functional explorations using Western-blot and luciferase assays. Findings We detected in-frame duplications affecting the pleckstrin-homology domain of AKT1 in more than 60% of the tumors occurring in girls under 15 years of age. The somatic status of the mutations was confirmed when peritumoral DNA was available. The JGCTs without duplications carried point mutations affecting highly conserved residues. Several of these substitutions were somatic lesions. The mutated proteins carrying the duplications had a non-wild-type subcellular distribution, with a marked enrichment at the plasma membrane. This led to a striking degree of AKT1 activation demonstrated by a strong phosphorylation level and by reporter assays. Interpretation Our study incriminates somatic mutations of AKT1 as a major event in the pathogenesis of JGCTs. The existence of AKT inhibitors currently tested in clinical trials opens new perspectives for targeted therapies for these tumors, which are currently treated with standard non-specific chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26137586

  14. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  15. Deciphering the Nuclear Import Pathway for the Cytoskeletal Red Cell Protein 4.1R

    PubMed Central

    Gascard, Philippe; Nunomura, Wataru; Lee, Gloria; Walensky, Loren D.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Chasis, Joel A.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    1999-01-01

    The erythroid membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1 is the prototypical member of a genetically and topologically complex family that is generated by combinatorial alternative splicing pathways and is localized at diverse intracellular sites including the nucleus. To explore the molecular determinants for nuclear localization, we transfected COS-7 cells with epitope-tagged versions of natural red cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) isoforms as well as mutagenized and truncated derivatives. Two distant topological sorting signals were required for efficient nuclear import of the 4.1R80 isoform: a basic peptide, KKKRER, encoded by alternative exon 16 and acting as a weak core nuclear localization signal (4.1R NLS), and an acidic peptide, EED, encoded by alternative exon 5. 4.1R80 isoforms lacking either of these two exons showed decreased nuclear import. Fusion of various 4.1R80 constructs to the cytoplasmic reporter protein pyruvate kinase confirmed a requirement for both motifs for full NLS function. 4.1R80 was efficiently imported in the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized COS-7 cells in the presence of recombinant Rch1 (human importin α2), importin β, and GTPase Ran. Quantitative analysis of protein–protein interactions using a resonant mirror detection technique showed that 4.1R80 bound to Rch1 in vitro with high affinity (KD = 30 nM). The affinity decreased at least 7- and 20-fold, respectively, if the EED motif in exon 5 or if 4.1R NLS in exon 16 was lacking or mutated, confirming that both motifs were required for efficient importin-mediated nuclear import of 4.1R80. PMID:10359596

  16. Nuclear Fractal Dimensions as a Tool for Prognostication of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yinti, Shanmukha Raviteja; Boaz, Karen; Lewis, Amitha J; Ashokkumar, Pandya Jay; Kapila, Supriya Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Background Carcinogenesis follows complex molecular alterations, which are triggered by subtle chromatin architectural changes that are imperceptible to the human eye. As the treatment decisions in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) are hindered by the imprecise clinical stage determination and inter-observer variability in histological grading, focus in recent years has shifted to discovering identifiers related to neoplastic cell morphology studied through computer-aided image analysis. One such approach is the assessment of fractal geometry, a technique first described by Mandelbrot, which aids in precise assessment of architecture of natural objects. Assessment and quantification of degree of complexity of these fractal objects (self-similarities in structural complexity at different magnifying scales) is described as fractal dimension (FD). Aim To evaluate the nuclear fractal dimension (NFD) in OSCC using computer-aided image analysis. Materials and Methods Histological sections of 14 selected cases of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and 6 samples of normal buccal mucosa (as control) were stained with Haematoxylin-Eosin and Feulgen stain for histopathological examination and evaluation of nuclear complexity respectively. Fifteen HPF at Invasive Tumour Front (ITF) and Tumour Proper (TP) of Feulgen-stained sections were selected and photographed in test and control samples. At ITF, TP and normal buccal mucosa 200 nuclei each were selected and analyzed using Image J software to quantify FD. The test and control groups were compared statistically using Independent sample t-test and One-way ANOVA. Results Nuclear FD increased progressively towards worst tumour staging as compared to normal buccal mucosa. Conclusion Nuclear FD can be considered for quantification of nuclear architectural changes as a prognostic indicator in OSCC. PMID:26674013

  17. 0610009K11Rik, a testis-specific and germ cell nuclear receptor-interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Heng; Denhard, Leslie A.; Zhou Huaxin; Liu Lanhsin; Lan Zijian

    2008-02-22

    Using an in silico approach, a putative nuclear receptor-interacting protein 0610009K11Rik was identified in mouse testis. We named this gene testis-specific nuclear receptor-interacting protein-1 (Tnrip-1). Tnrip-1 was predominantly expressed in the testis of adult mouse tissues. Expression of Tnrip-1 in the testis was regulated during postnatal development, with robust expression in 14-day-old or older testes. In situ hybridization analyses showed that Tnrip-1 is highly expressed in pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids. Consistent with its mRNA expression, Tnrip-1 protein was detected in adult mouse testes. Immunohistochemical studies showed that Tnrip-1 is a nuclear protein and mainly expressed in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that endogenous Tnrip-1 protein can interact with germ cell nuclear receptor (GCNF) in adult mouse testes. Our results suggest that Tnrip-1 is a testis-specific and GCNF-interacting protein which may be involved in the modulation of GCNF-mediated gene transcription in spermatogenic cells within the testis.

  18. Septins Regulate Actin Organization and Cell Cycle Arrest Through SOCS7-Mediated Nuclear Accumulation of NCK

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Brandon E.; Adang, Laura A.; Macara, Ian G.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian septins are GTP-binding proteins the functions of which are not well understood. Knockdown of Sept2, 6, and 7 causes stress fibers to disintegrate and the cells to lose polarity. We now show that this phenotype is induced by nuclear accumulation of the adapter protein NCK, as the effects can be reversed or induced by cytoplasmic or nuclear NCK, respectively. NCK is carried into the nucleus by SOCS7 (Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling-7), which contains nuclear import/export signals. SOCS7 interacts through distinct domains with septins and NCK. DNA damage induces actin and septin rearrangement and rapid nuclear accumulation of NCK and SOCS7. Moreover, NCK expression is essential for cell-cycle arrest. The septin-SOCS7-NCK axis intersects with the canonical DNA damage cascade downstream of ATM/ATR and is essential for p53 Ser15 phosphorylation. These data illuminate an unanticipated connection between septins, SOCS7, NCK signaling, and the DNA damage response. PMID:17803907

  19. Effect of dietary fat levels on the susceptibility of colonic cells to nuclear-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, R.P.; Bruce, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of two levels and types of dietary fats on the susceptibility of colonic cells to the nuclear-damaging effect of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), and gamma-radiation was investigated. Corn oil and beef tallow were added to the semisynthetic diet at 5% and 20% levels (weight/weight). A diet-related effect was not evident until after two weeks of feeding. Animals (C57BL/6J female mice) that were given the 20% corn oil or beef tallow diets had significantly (p less than 0.05) more nuclear aberrations in their colons 24 hours following treatment with DMH (5 mg or 10 mg/kg body wt or MeIQ (100 mg/kg body weight) than did those given low-fat diets (5% corn oil or beef tallow). The nuclear-damaging effect of gamma radiation was unaffected by dietary treatments. A high-fat diet had the most pronounced effect on DMH-treated animals, and maximum nuclear aberrations were observed 24 hours following the treatment. Thus, we concluded that increased levels of dietary fats elevate the toxicity of DMH and MeIQ to colonic epithelial cells.

  20. Nuclear fractal dimension as a prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goutzanis, L; Papadogeorgakis, N; Pavlopoulos, P M; Katti, K; Petsinis, V; Plochoras, I; Pantelidaki, C; Kavantzas, N; Patsouris, E; Alexandridis, C

    2008-04-01

    Strong theoretical reasons exist for using fractal geometry in measurements of natural objects, including most objects studied in pathology. Indeed, fractal dimension provides a more precise and theoretically more appropriate approximation of their structure properties and especially their shape complexity. The aim of our study was to evaluate the nuclear fractal dimension (FD) in tissue specimens from patients with oral cavity carcinomas in order to assess its potential value as prognostic factor. Relationships between FD and other factors including clinicopathologic characteristics were also investigated. Histological sections from 48 oral squamous cell carcinomas as well as from 17 non-malignant mucosa specimens were stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin for pathological examination and with Feulgen for nuclear complexity evaluation. The sections were evaluated by image analysis using fractal analysis software to quantify nuclear FD by the box-counting method. Carcinomas presented higher mean values of FD compared to normal mucosa. Well differentiated neoplasms had lower FD values than poorly differentiated ones. FD was significantly correlated with the nuclear size. Patients with FD lower than the median value of the sample had statistically significant higher survival rates. Within the sample of patients studied, FD was proved to be an independent prognostic factor of survival in oral cancer patients. In addition this study provides evidence that there are several statistically significant correlations between FD and other morphometric characteristics or clinicopathologic factors in oral squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:17692559