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Sample records for nuclear hot cell

  1. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hot cell services. 952.225-70 Section 952.225-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  2. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hot cell services. 952.225-70 Section 952.225-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  3. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hot cell services. 952.225-70 Section 952.225-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  4. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting for nuclear....225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  5. 48 CFR 952.225-70 - Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services. >

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Subcontracting for nuclear... Clauses 952.225-70 Subcontracting for nuclear hot cell services.> As prescribed in 925.7004, insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts: Subcontracting for Nuclear Hot Cell Services (MAR 1993)...

  6. Hot cell remote nuclear scanning of tank core samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Blewett, G.R.; Troyer, G.L.; Keele, B.D.; Addleman, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    A Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-designed remote measurement system has been constructed for gamma and beta isotopic characterization of Hanford Site high-level waste tank core sample materials in a hot cell. A small, collimated, planar CdZnTe detector is used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Spectral resolution of 2% full-width-at-maximum at 662 kiloelectronvolts (keV) has been obtained remotely using risetime compensation and limited pulse shape discrimination (PSD). Isotopic measurement of high-energy beta emitters was accomplished with a ruggedly made, deeply depleted, surface barrier silicon detector. The primary function of the remote nuclear screening system is to provide a fast, qualitative stratigraphic assessment (with isotopic information) of high-level radioactive material. Both gamma spectroscopy and beta measurements have been performed on actual core segments. Differences in radionuclide content, which correspond with color or texture variations, have been seen in constant cross section core samples, although for many samples the activity variation can be ascribed to geometry and/or mass factors. Discussion of the design, implementation, results and potential benefits will be presented.

  7. Reliable Wireless Data Acquisition and Control Techniques within Nuclear Hot Cell Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.L.; Tulenko, J.

    2000-09-20

    On this NEER project the University of Florida has investigated and applied advanced communications techniques to address data acquisition and control problems within the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho Falls. The goals of this project have been to investigate and apply wireless communications techniques to solve the problem of communicating with and controlling equipment and systems within a nuclear hot cell facility with its attendant high radiation levels. Different wireless techniques, including radio frequency, infrared and power line communications were reviewed. For each technique, the challenges of radiation-hardened implementation were addressed. In addition, it has been a project goal to achieve the highest level of system reliability to ensure safe nuclear operations. Achievement of these goals would allow the eventual elimination of through-the-wall, hardwired cabling that is currently employed in the hot cell, along wit h all of the attendant problems that limit measurement mobility and flexibility.

  8. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Rodriquez

    2009-03-01

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the “Nuclear Renaissance”. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very

  9. Hot cell examination table

    DOEpatents

    Gaal, Peter S.; Ebejer, Lino P.; Kareis, James H.; Schlegel, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A table for use in a hot cell or similar controlled environment for use in examining specimens. The table has a movable table top that can be moved relative to a table frame. A shaft is fixedly mounted to the frame for axial rotation. A shaft traveler having a plurality of tilted rollers biased against the shaft is connected to the table top such that rotation of the shaft causes the shaft traveler to roll along the shaft. An electromagnetic drive is connected to the shaft and the frame for controllably rotating the shaft.

  10. A hot-cell titration system

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.

    1988-07-01

    Operation of nuclear fuel reprocessing plant requires an analytical support laboratory capable of meeting the process control, product quality, and nuclear safeguard requirements. Because of the radioactivity accompanying many of the samples, the analytical instruments must be selected, modified, or specifically developed for use in hot cells. Titrimetric procedures have been successfully used in hot cells and are generally immune to radiation induced bias. This report describes a titration system designed for operation in a hot-cell environment. The potentiometric titration system has operated successfully for four years in support of nuclear fuel reprocessing research and development activities. Details of the hardware, electronic, and software control and data analysis systems are presented. Interchangeable burets with a capacity of 5, 10, and 25 mL are available; the means of the absolute error in delivered volume for these burets are 0.9, 1.1, and 1.8 ..mu..L, respectively. Results of evaluation studies how that the accuracy and precision of analysis results obtained with the potentiometric system are limited by statistical uncertainties associated with the standard titrant, sample preparation procedure, and the equilibrium constant of the titration reaction and not by titrator performance factors. The system is also capable of performing amperometric titrations. Changing between the potentiometric and amperometric modes of operation involves changing the in-cell transducers, the in-cell electronics, and the titrator control program. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  12. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  13. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan; Rahman, Anwar Abdul; Hamzah, Mohd Arif; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  14. Hot electron plasmon-protected solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Rose, A H; Yang, C; Wu, X; Merlo, J M; Burns, M J; Naughton, M J; Kempa, K

    2015-09-21

    A solar cell based on a hot electron plasmon protection effect is proposed and made plausible by simulations, non-local modeling of the response, and quantum mechanical calculations. In this cell, a thin-film, plasmonic metamaterial structure acts as both an efficient photon absorber in the visible frequency range and a plasmonic resonator in the IR range, the latter of which absorbs and protects against phonon emission the free energy of the hot electrons in an adjacent semiconductor junction. We show that in this structure, electron-plasmon scattering is much more efficient than electron-phonon scattering in cooling-off hot electrons, and the plasmon-stored energy is recoverable as an additional cell voltage. The proposed structure could become a prototype of a new generation of high efficiency solar cells. PMID:26406739

  15. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS IN OPEN POSITION. DOOR SLIDES SHUT WITH HELP OF MANUALLY OPERATED CHAIN. STAIRWAY TO MEZZANINE IN VIEW AT LEFT. CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9000. Unknown Photographer, 10/28/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN633) interior under construction. Hot cells ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN-633) interior under construction. Hot cells and their doors are along concrete wall. Note side wall of pumice block. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: October 28, 1957. INEEL negative no. 57-5335 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF HOT CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF HOT CELL NO. 2 FROM STAIRWAY ALONG NORTH WALL. OBSERVATION WINDOW ALONG WEST SIDE BENEATH "CELL 2" SIGN. DOORWAY IN LEFT OF VIEW LEADS TO CELL 1 WORK AREA OR TO EXIT OUTDOORS TO NORTH. RADIATION DETECTION MONITOR TO RIGHT OF DOOR. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  19. WESF hot cells waste minimization criteria hot cells window seals evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Walterskirchen, K.M.

    1997-03-31

    WESF will decouple from B Plant in the near future. WESF is attempting to minimize the contaminated solid waste in their hot cells and utilize B Plant to receive the waste before decoupling. WESF wishes to determine the minimum amount of contaminated waste that must be removed in order to allow minimum maintenance of the hot cells when they are placed in ''laid-up'' configuration. The remaining waste should not cause unacceptable window seal deterioration for the remaining life of the hot cells. This report investigates and analyzes the seal conditions and hot cell history and concludes that WESF should remove existing point sources, replace cerium window seals in F-Cell and refurbish all leaded windows (except for A-Cell). Work should be accomplished as soon as possible and at least within the next three years.

  20. 1. View of rmad from jr. hot cell, facing north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of r-mad from jr. hot cell, facing north - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE FIRST BUILT) IN LABORATORY 101. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS ARE ON LEFT (NORTH) SIDE. OBSERVATION WINDOW IS AT LEFT OF VIEW (ON WEST SIDE). PLASTIC COVERS SHROUD MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATORS AT WINDOWS IN LEFT OF VIEW. NOTE MINERAL OIL RESERVOIR ABOVE "CELL 1" SIGN, INDICATING LEVEL OF THE FLUID INSIDE THE THICK WINDOWS. HOT CELL HAS BEVELED CORNER BECAUSE A SQUARED CORNER WOULD HAVE SUPPLIED UNNECESSARY SHIELDING. NOTE PUMICE BLOCK WALL AT LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  3. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. 2 SHOWS MANIPULATION INSTRUMENTS AND SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS. PENETRATIONS FOR OPERATING INSTRUMENTS GO THROUGH SHIELDING ABOVE WINDOWS. CONDUIT FOR UTILITIES AND CONTROLS IS BEHIND METAL CABINET BELOW WINDOWS NEAR FLOOR. CAMERA FACES WEST. WARNING SIGN LIMITS FISSILE MATERIAL TO SPECIFIED NUMBER OF GRAMS OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF HOT CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF HOT CELL BUILDING, IN VIEW AT LEFT, AS YET WITHOUT ROOF. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING LIES BETWEEN IT AND THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE MTR BUILDING AND ITS WING. NOTE CONCRETE DRIVE BETWEEN ROLL-UP DOOR IN MTR BUILDING AND CHARGING FACE OF PLUG STORAGE. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING (TRA-635) WILL COVER THIS DRIVE AND BUTT UP TO CHARGING FACE. DOTTED LINE IS ON ORIGINAL NEGATIVE. TRA PARKING LOT IN LEFT CORNER OF THE VIEW. CAMERA FACING NORTHWESTERLY. INL NEGATIVE NO. 8274. Unknown Photographer, 7/2/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  6. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, L.K.S.

    1990-09-18

    This patent describes an improvement in a pressurized water nuclear reactor system having a reactor pressure vessel, at least one steam generator, a hot leg conduit for charging of hot fluid from the reactor pressure vessel to the steam generator, and at least one cold leg conduit for return of cool fluid from the steam generator back to the reactor pressure vessel. The improvement comprises a residual heat removal device wherein: the hot leg has an inside diameter D{sub 1}; a first section of residual heat removal conduit is provided, having an inside diameter D{sub 2}, a first end for receipt of fluid from the hot leg, and a second end; a second section of residual heat removal conduit is provided connected to the reactor pressure vessel; a pump interconnects the second end of the first section of residual heat removal conduit with the second section of residual heat removal conduit; and a step nozzle of an inside diameter D{sub 3} and a length L interconnects the hot leg to the first end of the first section of residual heat removal conduit, with D{sub 3}/D{sub 1} {ge} 0.55, with D{sub 3}/D{sub 2}1.9 and L/D{sub 3} {ge} 1.44.

  7. Equation of state for {beta}-stable hot nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Panos, C. P.

    2009-04-15

    We provide an equation of state for hot nuclear matter in {beta} equilibrium by applying a momentum-dependent effective interaction. We focus on the study of the equation of state of high-density and high-temperature nuclear matter, containing leptons (electrons and muons) under the chemical equilibrium condition in which neutrinos have left the system. The conditions of charge neutrality and equilibrium under the {beta}-decay process lead first to the evaluation of proton and lepton fractions and then to the evaluation of internal energy, free energy, and pressure, and in total to the equation of state of hot nuclear matter. Thermal effects on the properties and equation of state of nuclear matter are assessed and analyzed in the framework of the proposed effective interaction model. Special attention is given to the study of the contribution of the components of {beta}-stable nuclear matter to the entropy per particle, a quantity of great interest in the study of structure and collapse of supernova.

  8. Verification survey of buildings 200 hot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sholeen, C.M.

    1996-03-01

    At the start of this D&D project, the decontamination goals were set at (1) reducing the stack emissions to 10% of the 1991 emissions; (2) reducing the exposure rate in each cell to < 1 mR/h; and (3) reducing the removable contamination to none detectable. Since the contamination can be fixed with paint, the other two goals were given priority. The estimate of the 1995 emissions from K-3 was 20% of the 1991 emissions estimate. However, the 1996 estimates are {approximately}9% of the 1991 emissions estimate. Since in 1991 the K-3 emissions were only 1/2% of the emissions from M-1, even the 20% reduction has little effect on the project reduction. The total emissions have been reduce to {approximately}2 1/4% of the 1991 emissions from the 5 hot cells that were decontaminated. The emissions and exposure rates are presented in Table I below. Cells A-1 and M-1 exceed the exposure rate criteria. For the other cells, the general exposure rate in the middle of the cell meets the criteria. However, near the prefilters, the exposure rates increase. Cell M-1 has extensive floor contamination that penetrated to a 6 inch depth. At 30 cm above the floor, the exposure rate through the lead blanket is 50 mR/h. A more detailed list of acceptance criteria were specified before the final verification survey. Table ii compares the maximum survey results on the wall or floor surface of each cell to these criteria. Cells M-1 and A-1 frequently fail to meet these criteria.

  9. Long Duration Hot Hydrogen Exposure of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Hickman, Robert; Dobson, Chris; Clifton, Scooter

    2007-01-01

    An arc-heater driven hyper-thermal convective environments simulator was recently developed and commissioned for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket materials. This newly established non-nuclear testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to .produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of nuclear reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects, and is intended to serve as a low cost test facility for the purpose of investigating and characterizing candidate fuel/structural materials and improving associated processing/fabrication techniques. Design and engineering development efforts are fully summarized, and facility operating characteristics are reported as determined from a series of baseline performance mapping runs and long duration capability demonstration tests.

  10. Handling of Highly Radioactive Radiation Sources in a Hot Cell Using a Mechanically Driven Cell Crane - 13452

    SciTech Connect

    Klute, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang-Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In 2010, Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH was awarded the contract for design and erection of a Hot Cell for handling and storage of highly radioactive radiation sources. This Hot Cell is part of a new hot cell laboratory, constructed for the NHZ (Neues Handhabungszentrum = New Handling Center) of the Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES). All incurring radioactive materials from Austria are collected in the NHZ, where they are safely conditioned and stored temporarily until their final storage. The main tasks of the NES include, apart from the collection, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste, also the reprocessing and the decontamination of facilities and laboratories originating from 45 years of research and development at the Seibersdorf site as well as the operation of the Hot Cell Laboratory [1]. The new Hot Cell Laboratory inside the NHZ consists of the following room areas: - One hot cell, placed in the center, for remote controlled, radiation protected handling of radioactive materials, including an integrated floor storage for the long-term temporary storage of highly radioactive radiation sources; - An anteroom for the loading and unloading of the hot cell; - One control room for the remote controlling of the hot cell equipment; - One floor storage, placed laterally to the hot cell, for burial, interim storage and removal of fissionable radioactive material in leak-proof packed units in 100 l drums. The specific design activity of the hot cell of 1.85 Pbq relating to 1-Me-Radiator including the integrated floor storage influences realization and design of the components used in the cell significantly. (authors)

  11. Decontamination of Hot Cells and Hot Pipe Tunnel at NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.G.; Halishak, W.F.

    2008-07-01

    The large scale decontamination of the concrete Hot Cells and Hot Pipe Tunnel at NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility demonstrates that novel management and innovative methods are crucial to ensuring that the successful remediation of the most contaminated facilities can be achieved with minimal risk to the project stakeholders. (authors)

  12. 15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring radioactive materials containment box, facing east - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  13. 47. ARAI. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. ARA-I. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell in ARA-626. Note stands for operators at viewing windows. Manipulators with hand grips extend cables and other controls into hot cell through ducts above windows. Ineel photo no. 81-27. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. JINA Workshop Nuclear Physics in Hot Dense Dynamic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Libby, S; Chen, M; Wilson, B; Knauer, J; Mcnabb, D; Caggiano, J; Bleauel, D; Weideking, M; Kozhuharov, C; Brandau, C; Stoehlker, T; Meot, V; Gosselin, G; Morel, P; Schneider, D; Bernstein, L A

    2011-03-07

    Measuring NEET and NEEC is relevant for probing stellar cross-sections and testing atomic models in hot plasmas. Using NEEC and NEET we can excite nuclear levels in laboratory plasmas: (1) NIF: Measure effect of excited nuclear levels on (n,{gamma}) cross-sections, 60% and never been measured; (2) Omega, Test cross-sections for creating these excited levels via NEEC and NEET. Will allow us to test models that estimate resonance overlap of atomic states with the nucleus: (1) Average Atom model (AA) (CEA&LLNL), single average wave-function potential; (2) Super Transition Array (STA) model (LLNL), More realistic individual configuration potentials NEET experimental data is scarce and not in a plasma environment, NEEC has not yet been observed.

  15. Hot-spot durability testing of amorphous cells and modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Charles; Jetter, Elizabeth

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study to determine the hot-spot susceptibility of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) cells and modules, and to provide guidelines for reducing that susceptibility. Amorphous-Si cells are shown to have hot-spot susceptibility levels similar to crystalline-silicon (C-Si) cells. This premise leads to the fact that the same general guidelines must apply to protecting a-Si cells from hot-spot stressing that apply to C-Si cells. Recommendations are made on ways of reducing a-Si module hot-spot susceptibility including the traditional method of using bypass diodes and a new method unique to thin-film cells, limiting the string current by limiting cell area.

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. FIRST FLOOR FOUNDATION PLAN SHOWS SECTIONALIZED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. FIRST FLOOR FOUNDATION PLAN SHOWS SECTIONALIZED FLOOR LOADINGS AND CONCRETE SLAB THICKNESSES, A TYPICAL FEATURE OF NUCLEAR ARCHITECTURE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-2, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-62-396-110561, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voronyuk, V.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2012-06-15

    The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

  18. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Coleman, R.M.

    1996-08-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. To place the facility in compliance with current regulations, all penetrations within the facility were sealed, the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced, the master-slave manipulators were replaced, the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled, all hot cell utilities were replaced, a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductive Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO{sub 2} fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed.

  19. Human factors evaluation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Regina Lee; Whitehurst, Hugh O.

    2003-11-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. Mixed waste may also be handled at the AHCF. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, was required to perform this mission. A checklist procedure was used to perform a human-factors evaluation of the AHCF modifications. This evaluation resulted in two recommendations, both of which have been implemented.

  20. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950`s and 1960`s for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970`s, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled.

  1. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P{sub 0} interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P{sub 1.2} interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant.

  2. Extended Characterization of Chemical Processes in Hot Cells Using Environmental Swipe Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Thomas, M-L; Lepel, Elwood A.; Brunson, Ronald R.; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer

    2012-09-15

    Environmental sampling is used extensively by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verification of information from State declarations or a facility’s design regarding nuclear activities occurring within the country or a specific facility. Environmental sampling of hot cells within a facility under safeguards is conducted using 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm cotton swipe material or cellulose swipes. Traditional target analytes used by the IAEA to verify operations within a facility include a select list of gamma-emitting radionuclides and total and isotopic U and Pu. Analysis of environmental swipe samples collected within a hot-cell facility where chemical processing occurs may also provide information regarding specific chemicals used in fuel processing. However, using swipe material to elucidate what specific chemical processes were/are being used within a hot cell has not been previously evaluated. Staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) teamed to evaluate the potential use of environmental swipe samples as collection media for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. This evaluation was initiated with sample collection during a series of Coupled End-to-End (CETE) reprocessing runs at ORNL. The study included measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides, total and isotopic U and Pu, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. These results allowed us to elucidate what chemical processes used in the hot cells during reprocessing of power reactor and identify other legacy chemicals used in hot cell operations which predate the CETE process.

  3. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  4. Fundamental Limitations to Plasmonic Hot-Carrier Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Schatz, George C

    2016-05-19

    Detailed balance between photon-absorption and energy loss constrains the efficiency of conventional solar cells to the Shockley-Queisser limit. However, if solar illumination can be absorbed over a wide spectrum by plasmonic structures, and the generated hot-carriers can be collected before relaxation, the efficiency of solar cells may be greatly improved. In this work, we explore the opportunities and limitations for making plasmonic solar cells, here considering a design for hot-carrier solar cells in which a conventional semiconductor heterojunction is attached to a plasmonic medium such as arrays of gold nanoparticles. The underlying mechanisms and fundamental limitations of this cell are studied using a nonequilibrium Green's function method, and the numerical results indicate that this cell can significantly improve the absorption of solar radiation without reducing open-circuit voltage, as photons can be absorbed to produce mobile carriers in the semiconductor as long as they have energy larger than the Schottky barrier rather than above the bandgap. However, a significant fraction of the hot-carriers have energies below the Schottky barrier, which makes the cell suffer low internal quantum efficiency. Moreover, quantum efficiency is also limited by hot-carrier relaxation and metal-semiconductor coupling. The connection of these results to recent experiments is described, showing why plasmonic solar cells can have less than 1% efficiency. PMID:27136049

  5. Radioactive hot-cell access-hole decontamination machine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-06

    A radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine is disclosed. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  6. Fundamental limitations of hot-carrier solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A. P.; Fischetti, M. V.

    2012-10-01

    Sunlight-generated hot-carrier transport in strongly absorbing direct band-gap GaAs—among the most optimal of semiconductors for high-efficiency solar cells—is simulated with an accurate full-band structure self-consistent Monte Carlo method, including short- and long-range Coulomb interaction, impact ionization, and optical and acoustic phonon scattering. We consider an ultrapure 100-nm-thick intrinsic GaAs absorber layer designed with quasiballistic carrier transport that achieves complete photon absorption down to the band edge by application of careful light trapping and that has a generous hot-carrier retention time of 10 ps prior to the onset of carrier relaxation. We find that hot-carrier solar cells can be severely limited in performance due to the substantially reduced current density caused by insufficient extraction of the widely distributed hot electrons (holes) through the requisite energy selective contacts.

  7. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. CELL 3, "HEAVY" CELL. CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. CELL 3, "HEAVY" CELL. CAMERA FACES WEST TOWARD BUILDING EXIT. OBSERVATION WINDOW AT LEFT EDGE OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Zirconium Recycle Test Equipment for Hot Cell Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D.; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel; Spencer, Barry B.; Bradley, Eric Craig; Brunson, Ronald Ray

    2015-01-30

    The equipment components and assembly support work were modified for optimized, remote hot cell operations to complete this milestone. The modifications include installation of a charging door, Swagelok connector for the off-gas line between the reactor and condenser, and slide valve installation to permit attachment/replacement of the product salt collector bottle.

  9. Equation of state of hot polarized nuclear matter and heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Gharaei, R.

    2011-08-15

    We employ the equation of state of hot polarized nuclear matter to simulate the repulsive force caused by the incompressibility effects of nuclear matter in the fusion reactions of heavy colliding ions. The results of our studies reveal that temperature effects of compound nuclei have significant importance in simulating the repulsive force on the fusion reactions for which the temperature of the compound nucleus increases up to about 2 MeV. Since the equation of state of hot nuclear matter depends upon the density and temperature of the nuclear matter, it has been suggested that, by using this equation of state, one can simulate simultaneously both the effects of the precompound nucleons' emission and the incompressibility of nuclear matter to calculate the nuclear potential in fusion reactions within a static formalism such as the double-folding (DF) model.

  10. Diffusion of dark matter in a hot and dense nuclear environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Marina; Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the mean free path in a hot and dense nuclear environment for a fermionic dark matter particle candidate in the ˜GeV mass range interacting with nucleons via scalar and vector effective couplings. We focus on the effects of density and temperature in the nuclear medium in order to evaluate the importance of the final state blocking in the scattering process. We discuss qualitatively possible implications for opacities in stellar nuclear scenarios, where dark matter may be gravitationally accreted.

  11. Hot startup experience with electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, R.W.; Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.; Rigg, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    The treatment of spent metal fuel from the EBR-II fast reactor commenced in June of 1996 at the Fuel Conditioning Facility on the Argonne-West site in Idaho, USA. During the first year of hot operations, 20 fuel assemblies entered processing and 6 low enrichment uranium product ingots were produced. Results are presented for the various process steps with decontamination factors achieved and equipment operational history reported.

  12. Nitrogen assimilation by single cells in hot springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poret-peterson, A. T.; Romaniello, S. J.; Bose, M.; Williams, P.; Elser, J. J.; Shock, E.; Anbar, A. D.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    Microorganisms drive biogeochemical cycles and require nutrients, such as ammonium and nitrate, to function. As a result, following nutrient flows provides opportunities to study how microbial activity influences ecosystem-level processes. Most past measurements of microbial nutrient uptake rely on bulk measurements, which are informative but provide little information about heterogeneity among community members involved in elemental transformations, nor about possible effects of physiological state or taxonomic identity. Since microbial communities tend to be phylogenetically and physiologically diverse, it is reasonable to expect that community members will respond differently to nutrient addition. Here, we examine nitrogen assimilation (via addition of 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate) in Yellowstone hot spring microbial communities. Using the NanoSIMS, we imaged cells at a very high spatial resolution (nanometer scale) necessary to determine 15N enrichments in single micron-sized cells. We compare the N isotopic enrichments observed in single cells to that determined in bulk sediments by standard isotope ratio mass spectrometry. NanoSIMS imaging of 56 individual cells from sediments of an acidic hot spring (pH 4.7, T=67oC) incubated with 15N-ammonium shows that about two-thirds of the cells (38) exhibited 15N-enrichment. Most cells had 15N enrichments from 0.39 to 0.91 atom %, while some cells were much more significantly enriched. Bulk analyses of sediments show that ammonium assimilation and nitrate assimilation readily occurred at this spring. These findings show that microbes in this hot spring may differentially take up ammonium, which may arise from a number of factors including differences in cellular N requirements, growth rates, and the ability to transport ammonium. This work represents some of the first single-cell isotopic measurements from an extreme environment. Efforts are underway to image sediment samples from other hot springs and to pair Nano

  13. On the road toward a hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. C.; Fields, J. D.; Collins, R. T.

    2015-09-01

    We suggest a new paradigm for solar cells that uses a nanostructured crystalline collector (silicon) in an amorphous absorber matrix (hydrogenated amorphous silicon). Previously amorphous absorbers have received no serious consideration because of their low carrier mobilities. Specifically, we demonstrate that carriers generated in the amorphous region are transported out of this region before losing their energy to heat. This result establishes the possibility of using a wide range of nanostructured amorphous matrices to dramatically increase the efficiencies of solar cells. The use of an amorphous absorber provides a highly desirable and flexible approach to producing low-cost, hot carrier solar cells. Since amorphous materials can be grown over a much wider composition space than crystalline materials, this surprising result greatly broadens the absorbing materials that can be used to dramatically increase the efficiencies of solar cells.

  14. Decontamination of the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peecook, K.M.

    2008-07-01

    The NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility decommissioning project recently completed a major milestone with the successful decontamination of seven hot cells. The cells included thick concrete walls and leaded glass windows, manipulator arms, inter cell dividing walls, and roof slabs. There was also a significant amount of embedded conduit and piping that had to be cleaned and surveyed. Prior to work starting evaluation studies were performed to determine whether it was more cost effective to do this work using a full up removal approach (rip and ship) or to decontaminate the cells to below required clean up levels, leaving the bulk of the material in place. This paper looks at that decision process, how it was implemented, and the results of that effort including the huge volume of material that can now be used as fill during site restoration rather than being disposed of as LLRW. (authors)

  15. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  16. Nuclear fusion in the deuterated cores of inflated hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2016-03-01

    Ouyed et al. (Astrophys. J. 501:367, 1998) proposed Deuterium (DD) fusion at the core-mantle interface of giant planets as a mechanism to explain their observed heat excess. But rather high interior temperatures (˜105 K) and a stratified D layer are needed, making such a scenario unlikely. In this paper, we re-examine DD fusion, with the addition of screening effects pertinent to a deuterated core containing ice and some heavy elements. This alleviates the extreme temperature constraint and removes the requirement of a stratified D layer. As an application, we propose that, if their core temperatures are a few times 104 K and core composition is chemically inhomogeneous, the observed inflated size of some giant exoplanets ("hot Jupiters") may be linked to screened DD fusion occurring deep in the interior. Application of an analytic evolution model suggests that the amount of inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core, making DD fusion an effective extra internal energy source for radius inflation. The mechanism of screened DD fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature T_{eq}, and also depends on planetary mass. Although we do not consider the effect of incident stellar flux, we expect that a minimum level of irradiation is necessary to trigger core erosion and subsequent DD fusion inside the planet. Since DD fusion is quite sensitive to the screening potential inferred from laboratory experiments, observations of inflated hot Jupiters may help constrain screening effects in the cores of giant planets.

  17. Analysis of Material Sample Heated by Impinging Hot Hydrogen Jet in a Non-Nuclear Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    A computational conjugate heat transfer methodology was developed and anchored with data obtained from a hot-hydrogen jet heated, non-nuclear materials tester, as a first step towards developing an efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective and thermal radiative, and conjugate heat transfers. Predicted hot hydrogen jet and material surface temperatures were compared with those of measurement. Predicted solid temperatures were compared with those obtained with a standard heat transfer code. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  18. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes. PMID:20336522

  19. Relativistic spectral function of nucleons in hot nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Sourav; Mallik, S.

    2010-10-01

    We present a simple calculation of the nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter at finite temperature in a relativistic framework, using the real-time thermal field theory. The imaginary parts of one-loop graphs are identified with discontinuities across the unitary and the Landau cuts. We find that in general both the cuts contribute significantly to the spectral function in the region of (virtual) nucleon mass usually considered, even though the unitary cut is ignored in the literature. Furthermore, our relativistic spectral function differs from the one in nonrelativistic approximation, used in some earlier calculations.

  20. Hot Cell Examination of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; McCoy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured with weapons-grade MOX and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg. As part of the fuel qualification process, five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This is the first hot cell examination of weapons-grade MOX fuel. The rods have been examined nondestructively with the ADEPT apparatus and are currently being destructively examined. Examinations completed to date include length measurements, visual examination, gamma scanning, profilometry, eddy-current testing, gas measurement and analysis, and optical metallography. Representative results of these examinations are reviewed and found to be consistent with predictions and with prior experience with reactor-grade MOX fuel. The results will be used to support licensing of weapons-grade MOX for batch use in commercial power reactors.

  1. Modified Dihadron Fragmentation Functions in Hot and Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang Enke; Wang Xinnian

    2007-10-12

    Medium modification of dihadron fragmentation functions due to gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple partonic scattering is studied in both deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off large nuclei and high-energy heavy-ion collisions within the same framework of twist expansion. The modification for dihadrons is found to closely follow that for single hadrons, leading to a weak nuclear suppression of their ratios in DIS experiments. A mild enhancement of the near-side correlation of two high transverse momentum hadrons with increasing centrality is found in heavy-ion collisions due to trigger bias and the rise in parton energy loss with centrality. Successful comparisons between theory and experiment for multihadron observables in both confining and deconfined media offer comprehensive evidence for partonic energy loss as the mechanism of jet modification in dense matter.

  2. Formation of hot particles during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kashparov, V.A.; Ivanov, Y.A.; Zvarisch, S.I.; Protsak, V.P.; Khomutinin, Y.V.; Kurepin, A.D.; Pazukhin, E.M.

    1996-05-01

    The oxidation of irradiated Chernobyl nuclear fuel at 670 to 1,170 K for 3 to 21 h resulted in its destruction into fine particles, the dispersal composition of which is well described by lognormal distribution regularity. The median radius of the formed particles does not depend on the annealing temperature and decreases with the increase of the annealing period from 10 to 3 {micro}m. Proceeding from the dispersal composition and matrix composition of the Chernobyl hot fuel particles, it can be concluded that the oxidation of nuclear fuel was one of the basic mechanisms of hot fuel particle formation during the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. With oxidation in air and the dispersal of irradiated oxide nuclear fuel at as low as 670 K, ruthenium, located on the granular borders, is released. Ruthenium is oxidized to volatile RuO{sub 4}, sublimated, and condensed on materials of iron. Nickel and stainless steel can be efficiently used at high temperatures (tested to 1,200 K) for radioruthenium adsorption in accidents and for some technological operations. As the temperature of hot fuel particles annealed in inert media increases from 1,270 to 2,270 K, the relative release of radionuclides increases in the following sequence: cesium isotopes; europium isotopes; cerium isotopes; americium isotopes; and ruthenium, plutonium, and curium isotopes.

  3. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.; Walton, T.

    2003-02-25

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. These technologies offer improved methods for accessing difficult-to-reach spaces and performing tasks such as visual inspection, radiological characterization, decontamination, waste handling, and size reduction. This paper is focused on the application of remote systems in support of deactivation work being performed in several legacy facilities at Hanford (i.e., the 324 and 327 Buildings). These facilities were previously used for fuel fabrication, materials examination, and the development of waste treatment processes. The technologies described in this paper represent significant improvements to Hanford's baseline methods, and may offer benefits to other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and commercial operations.

  4. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  5. 116. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows manipulator openings in operating face of hot cell, start/stop buttons, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961/area/SF-626-E-6. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-10-613-102731. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Mycobacterium avium complex in day care hot water systems, and persistence of live cells and DNA in hot water pipes.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Annette S; Roslev, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic human pathogens that may thrive in engineered water systems. MAC has been shown to occur in drinking water supplies based on surface water, but less is known about the occurrence and persistence of live cells and DNA in public hot water systems based on groundwater. In this study, we examined the occurrence of MAC in hot water systems of public day care centers and determined the persistence of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA in model systems with the modern plumbing material cross-linked polyethylene (PEX). The occurrence of MAC and co-occurrence of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila were determined using cultivation and qPCR. Co-occurrences of MAC and Legionella were detected in water and/or biofilms in all hot water systems at temperatures between 40 and 54 °C. Moderate correlations were observed between abundance of culturable MAC and that of MAC genome copies, and between MAC and total eubacterial genome copies. No quantitative relationship was observed between occurrence of Legionella and that of MAC. Persistence in hot water of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA was studied using PEX laboratory model systems at 44 °C. Naked DNA and DNA in dead M. avium cells persisted for weeks. Live M. avium increased tenfold in water and biofilms on PEX. The results suggest that water and biofilms in groundwater-based hot water systems can constitute reservoirs of MAC, and that amplifiable naked DNA is relatively short-lived, whereas PEX plumbing material supports persistence and proliferation of M. avium. PMID:24272032

  7. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 7, Safety operation procedure for hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for the safety operation procedure for hot cell. It covers the master-slave manipulators, dry waste removal, cell transfers, hoists, cask handling, liquid waste system, and physical characterization of fluids.

  8. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wallmore » allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.« less

  9. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wall allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.

  10. Development of monolithic nuclear fuels for RERTR by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, J.-F.; Park, Blair; Chapple, Michael; Moore, Glenn; Keiser, Dennis

    2008-07-15

    The RERTR Program (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) is developing advanced nuclear fuels for high power test reactors. Monolithic fuel design provides a higher uranium loading than that of the traditional dispersion fuel design. In order to bond monolithic fuel meat to aluminum cladding, several bonding methods such as roll bonding, friction stir bonding and hot isostatic pressing, have been explored. Hot isostatic pressing is a promising process for low cost, batch fabrication of monolithic RERTR fuel plates. The progress on the development of this process at the Idaho National Laboratory will be presented. Due to the relatively high processing temperature used, the reaction between fuel meat and aluminum cladding to form brittle intermetallic phases may be a concern. The effect of processing temperature and time on the fuel/cladding reaction will be addressed. The influence of chemical composition on the reaction will also be discussed. (author)

  11. Signals of Bose Einstein condensation and Fermi quenching in the decay of hot nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Zheng, H.; Boisjoli, M.; Verde, G.; Chbihi, A.; Napolitani, P.; Ademard, G.; Augey, L.; Bhattacharya, C.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Frankland, J. D.; Fable, Q.; Galichet, E.; Gruyer, D.; Kundu, S.; La Commara, M.; Lombardo, I.; Lopez, O.; Mukherjee, G.; Parlog, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Roy, R.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wigg, P. C.; Bonasera, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on first experimental observations of nuclear fermionic and bosonic components displaying different behaviours in the decay of hot Ca projectile-like sources produced in mid-peripheral collisions at sub-Fermi energies. The experimental setup, constituted by the coupling of the INDRA 4π detector array to the forward angle VAMOS magnetic spectrometer, allowed to reconstruct the mass, charge and excitation energy of the decaying hot projectile-like sources. By means of quantum-fluctuation analysis techniques, temperatures and local partial densities of bosons and fermions could be correlated to the excitation energy of the reconstructed system. The results are consistent with the production of dilute mixed systems of bosons and fermions, where bosons experience higher phase-space and energy density as compared to the surrounding fermionic gas. Our findings recall phenomena observed in the study of Bose condensates and Fermi gases in atomic traps despite the different scales.

  12. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. EAST END OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. EAST END OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING WEST. TRUCK ENCLOSURE (1986) TO THE LEFT, SMALL ADDITION IN ITS SHADOW IS ENCLOSURE OVER METAL PORT INTO HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE OLDEST HOT CELL). NOTE PERSONNEL LADDER AND PLATFORM AT LOFT LEVEL USED WHEN SERVICING AIR FILTERS AND VENTS OF CELL NO. 1. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-32-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Test report for simulation HDR waste compaction at the hot-cell verification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, W.C.

    1982-12-01

    Compaction and shredding of the waste material by the Nuclear Packaging Compactor can achieve compaction ratios of from 3.5 to 1 up to 5.5 to 1. This volume reduction would result in considerable savings in FMEF operational expense. As expected, the springback of the waste material was significant. Elimination of most of the springback could raise the compaction ratio by at least 1. The compactor compacted all types of waste material that was tried. However, this compactor will have to be extensively modified for safe hot cell use in FMEF. Because of the vibration of the compactor itself, the movement of the barrel caused by the downward stroke of the ram and the 9 ton force limit, consideration should be given to the use of another compactor.

  14. Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Corletti, M.M.

    1993-11-16

    A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet. 2 figures.

  15. Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Corletti, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet.

  16. Reversible electron-hole separation in a hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limpert, S.; Bremner, S.; Linke, H.

    2015-09-01

    Hot-carrier solar cells are envisioned to utilize energy filtering to extract power from photogenerated electron-hole pairs before they thermalize with the lattice, and thus potentially offer higher power conversion efficiency compared to conventional, single absorber solar cells. The efficiency of hot-carrier solar cells can be expected to strongly depend on the details of the energy filtering process, a relationship which to date has not been satisfactorily explored. Here, we establish the conditions under which electron-hole separation in hot-carrier solar cells can occur reversibly, that is, at maximum energy conversion efficiency. We thus focus our analysis on the internal operation of the hot-carrier solar cell itself, and in this work do not consider the photon-mediated coupling to the Sun. After deriving an expression for the voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell valid under conditions of both reversible and irreversible electrical operation, we identify separate contributions to the voltage from the thermoelectric effect and the photovoltaic effect. We find that, under specific conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a hot-carrier solar cell can exceed the Carnot limit set by the intra-device temperature gradient alone, due to the additional contribution of the quasi-Fermi level splitting in the absorber. We also establish that the open-circuit voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell is not limited by the band gap of the absorber, due to the additional thermoelectric contribution to the voltage. Additionally, we find that a hot-carrier solar cell can be operated in reverse as a thermally driven solid-state light emitter. Our results help explore the fundamental limitations of hot-carrier solar cells, and provide a first step towards providing experimentalists with a guide to the optimal configuration of devices.

  17. Arc-Heater Facility for Hot Hydrogen Exposure of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Wang,Ten-See; Hickman, Robert; Panda, Binayak; Dobson, Chris; Osborne, Robin; Clifton, Scooter

    2006-01-01

    A hyper-thermal environment simulator is described for hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket material specimens and component development. This newly established testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, segmented arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of practical reactor core environments and is intended to serve. as a low cost test facility for the purpose of investigating and characterizing candidate fueUstructura1 materials and improving associated processing/fabrication techniques. Design and development efforts are thoroughly summarized, including thermal hydraulics analysis and simulation results, and facility operating characteristics are reported, as determined from a series of baseline performance mapping tests.

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2012-11-06

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

    2013-12-24

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  2. Post-irradiation-examination of irradiated fuel outside the hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn E. Janney; Adam B. Robinson; Thomas P. O'Holleran; R. Paul Lind; Marc Babcock; Laurence C. Brower; Julie Jacobs; Pamela K. Hoggan

    2007-09-01

    Because of their high radioactivity, irradiated fuels are commonly examined in a hot cell. However, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has recently investigated irradiated U-Mo-Al metallic fuel from the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) project using a conventional unshielded scanning electron microscope outside a hot cell. This examination was possible because of a two-step sample-preparation approach in which a small volume of fuel was isolated in a hot cell and shielding was introduced during later stages of sample preparation. The resulting sample contained numerous sample-preparation artifacts but allowed analysis of microstructures from selected areas.

  3. Hot compression process for making edge seals for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Dunyak, Thomas J.; Granata, Jr., Samuel J.

    1994-01-01

    A hot compression process for forming integral edge seals in anode and cade assemblies wherein the assemblies are made to a nominal size larger than a finished size, beads of AFLAS are applied to a band adjacent the peripheral margins on both sides of the assemblies, the assemblies are placed in a hot press and compressed for about five minutes with a force sufficient to permeate the peripheral margins with the AFLAS, cooled and cut to finished size.

  4. Description of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Riffle, G.K.; Merdich, J.A. )

    1993-01-15

    Cryogenic and high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen test capabilities are required for component development and qualification for the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. To effectively support the non-nuclear test needs of the SNTP program, as well as other specialized programs that utilize hydrogen as a working fluid, Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, Garrett Fluid Systems Division (GFSD) is currently developing a hydrogen test facility at our remote San Tan test site. The facility is specifically designed to support turbopump, propellant management valves, instrumentation and general materials evaluation testing with hydrogen at pressures and temperatures representative of actual SNTP engine operating conditions. This paper presents a general description of the SNTP hot-hydrogen test facility including test capabilities, technical approach, and technical status.

  5. HOT DIFFUSE EMISSION IN THE NUCLEAR STARBURST REGION OF NGC 2903

    SciTech Connect

    Yukita, Mihoko; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Soria, Roberto

    2012-10-20

    We present a deep Chandra observation of the central regions of the late-type barred spiral galaxy NGC 2903. The Chandra data reveal soft (kT{sub e} {approx} 0.2-0.5 keV) diffuse emission in the nuclear starburst region and extending {approx}2' ({approx}5 kpc) to the north and west of the nucleus. Much of this soft hot gas is likely to be from local active star-forming regions; however, besides the nuclear region, the morphology of hot gas does not strongly correlate with the bar or other known sites of active star formation. The central {approx}650 pc radius starburst zone exhibits much higher surface brightness diffuse emission than the surrounding regions and a harder spectral component in addition to a soft component similar to the surrounding zones. We interpret the hard component as also being of thermal origin with kT{sub e} {approx} 3.6 keV and to be directly associated with a wind fluid produced by supernovae and massive star winds similar to the hard diffuse emission seen in the starburst galaxy M82. The inferred terminal velocity for this hard component, {approx}1100 km s{sup -1}, exceeds the local galaxy escape velocity suggesting a potential outflow into the halo and possibly escape from the galaxy gravitational potential. Morphologically, the softer extended emission from nearby regions does not display an obvious outflow geometry. However, the column density through which the X-rays are transmitted is lower in the zone to the west of the nucleus compared to that from the east and the surface brightness is relatively higher suggesting some of the soft hot gas originates from above the disk: viewed directly from the western zone but through the intervening disk of the host galaxy along sight lines from the eastern zone. There are several point-like sources embedded in the strong diffuse nuclear emission zone. Their X-ray spectra show them to likely be compact binaries. None of these detected point sources are coincident with the mass center of the

  6. Robot Work Platform for Large Hot Cell Deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    BITTEN, E.J.

    2000-05-01

    The 324 Building, located at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is being deactivated to meet state and federal cleanup commitments. The facility is currently in its third year of a nine-year project to complete deactivation and closure for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The 324 building contains large hot cells that were used for high-radiation, high-contamination chemical process development and demonstrations. A major obstacle for the 324 deactivation project is the inability to effectively perform deactivation tasks within highly radioactive, contaminated environments. Current strategies use inefficient, resource intensive technologies that significantly impact the cost and schedule for deactivation. To meet mandated cleanup commitments, there is a need to deploy rapid, more efficient remote/robot technologies to minimize worker exposure, accelerate work tasks, and eliminate the need for multiple specialized tool design and procurement efforts. This paper describes the functions and performance requirements for a crane-deployed remote/robot Work Platform possessing full access capabilities. The remote/robot Work Platform will deploy commercially available off-the-shelf tools and end effectors to support Project cleanup goals and reduce overall project risk and cost. The intent of this system is to maximize the use of off-the-shelf technologies that minimize additional new, unproven, or novel designs. This paper further describes procurement strategy, the selection process, the selected technology, and the current status of the procurement and lessons learned. Funding, in part, has been provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area.

  7. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Dickinson, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes. PMID:26287620

  8. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells (for WM'03 - abstract included)

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2003-01-28

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. This paper highlights the application of several remotely deployed technologies enabling the deactivation tasks.

  9. Shell effects in hot nuclei and their influence on nuclear composition in supernova matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Suguru; Takano, Masatoshi

    2014-05-02

    We calculate nuclear composition in supernova (SN) matter explicitly taking into account the temperature dependence of nuclear shell effects. The abundance of nuclei in SN matter is important in the dynamics of core-collapse supernovae and, in recently constructed equations of state (EOS) for SN matter, the composition of nuclei are calculated assuming nuclear statistical equilibrium wherein the nuclear internal free energies govern the composition. However, in these EOS, thermal effects on the shell energy are not explicitly taken into account. To address this shortfall, we calculate herein the shell energies of hot nuclei and examine their influence on the composition of SN matter. Following a simplified macroscopic-microscopic approach, we first calculate single-particle (SP) energies by using a spherical Woods-Saxon potential. Then we extract shell energies at finite temperatures using Strutinsky method with the Fermi distribution as the average occupation probability of the SP levels. The results show that at relatively low temperatures, shell effects are still important and magic nuclei are abundant. However, at temperatures above approximately 2 MeV, shell effects are almost negligible, and the mass fractions with shell energies including the thermal effect are close to those obtained from a simple liquid drop model at finite temperatures.

  10. Workshop on instrumentation and analyses for a nuclear fuel reprocessing hot pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, S.M.; Feldman, M.J.; Wymer, R.G.; Hoffman, D.

    1980-05-01

    In order to assist in the study of instrumentation and analytical needs for reprocessing plants, a workshop addressing these needs was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from May 5 to 7, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to incorporate the knowledge of chemistry and of advanced measurement techniques held by the nuclear and radiochemical community into ideas for improved and new plant designs for both process control and inventory and safeguards measurements. The workshop was athended by experts in nuclear and radiochemistry, in fuel recycle plant design, and in instrumentation and analysis. ORNL was a particularly appropriate place to hold the workshop since the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is centered there. Requirements for safeguarding the special nuclear materials involved in reprocessing, and for their timely measurement within the process, within the reprocessing facility, and at the facility boundaries are being studied. Because these requirements are becoming more numerous and stringent, attention is also being paid to the analytical requirements for these special nuclear materials and to methods for measuring the physical parameters of the systems containing them. In order to provide a focus for the consideration of the workshop participants, the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) being designed conceptually by the CFRP was used as a basis for consideration and discussions.

  11. Evaluation of Alternatives for Hanford 327 Building Hot Cell Removal and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ray W.; Jasen, William G.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site 327 Building, built in 1953, played a key role in reactor material and fuel research programs. The facility includes nine shielded hot cells, a fuel storage basin, dry sample storage, and a large inerted hot (SERF) cell. In 1996, the 327 Building was transferred from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to Fluor Hanford, Inc., to begin the transition from the mission of irradiated fuel examination to stabilization and deactivation. In 2001, a multi-contractor team conducted a review of the concept of intact (one piece) removal, packaging, and disposal of the 327 hot cells. This paper focuses on challenges related to preparing the 327 Building hot cells for intact one-piece disposal as Low Level Waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site. These challenges, described in this paper, are threefold and include: Sampling and characterization of the cells for low level waste designation; Packaging of the cells for transportation and waste disposal; Transportation from the facility to the disposal site. The primary technical challenges in one-piece removal, packaging, and disposal of the hot cells involve the techniques required to characterize, remove, handle, package and transport a large (approximately up to 12-feet long and 8-feet high) contaminated object that weighs 35 to 160 tons. Specific characterization results associated with two hot cells, G and H cells will be reported. A review of the activities and plans to stabilize and deactivate the 327 Building provides insight into the technical challenges faced by this project and identifies a potential opportunity to modify the baseline strategy by removing the hot cells in one piece instead of decontaminating and dismantling the cells.

  12. 113. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building wall sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building wall sections and details of radio chemistry lab. Shows high-bay roof over hot cells and isolation rooms below grade storage pit for fuel elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102724. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS OF THE BUILDING, SHEET STEEL DEFINES THE HOT CELL "BOX" ITSELF. THREE OPERATING WINDOWS ON LEFT; ONE VIEWING WINDOW ON RIGHT. TUBES WILL CONTAIN SERVICE AND CONTROL LEADS. SPACE BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER BOX WALLS WILL BE FILLED WITH SHIELDED WINDOWS AND BARETES CONCRETE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7933. Unknown Photographer, ca. 5/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. DQO Summary Report for 324 and 327 Building Hot Cells D4 Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Lee

    2006-02-06

    This data quality objective (DQO) summary report provides the results of the DQO process conducted for waste characterization activities for the 324 and 327 Building hot cells decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities. This DQO summary report addresses the systems and processes related to the hot cells, air locks, vaults, tanks, piping, basins, air plenums, air ducts, filters, an adjacent elements that have high dose rates, high contamination levels, and/or suspect transuranic waste, which will require nonstandard D4 techniques.

  15. A&M. Hot cell addition (TAN633). Floor plan, elevations. Arrangement of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell addition (TAN-633). Floor plan, elevations. Arrangement of monorail along corridor, four hot cells, plug access openings, viewing windows, photo darkroom. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-13-ANP/GE-3-633-A-1. Date: December 1956 as redrawn in August 1998. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0633-00-693-107315 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Evaluation of a Mobile Hot Cell Technology for Processing Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; R.P. Miklos; F. Yapuncich; L. Care

    2009-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) currently does not have the necessary capabilities to process all remote-handled wastes resulting from the Laboratory’s nuclear-related missions. Over the years, various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored programs undertaken at the INL have produced radioactive wastes and other materials that are categorized as remote-handled (contact radiological dose rate > 200 mR/hr). These materials include Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), transuranic (TRU) waste, waste requiring geological disposal, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (both radioactive and hazardous per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]), and activated and/or radioactively-contaminated reactor components. The waste consists primarily of uranium, plutonium, other TRU isotopes, and shorter-lived isotopes such as cesium and cobalt with radiological dose rates up to 20,000 R/hr. The hazardous constituents in the waste consist primarily of reactive metals (i.e., sodium and sodium-potassium alloy [NaK]), which are reactive and ignitable per RCRA, making the waste difficult to handle and treat. A smaller portion of the waste is contaminated with other hazardous components (i.e., RCRA toxicity characteristic metals). Several analyses of alternatives to provide the required remote-handling and treatment capability to manage INL’s remote-handled waste have been conducted over the years and have included various options ranging from modification of existing hot cells to construction of new hot cells. Previous analyses have identified a mobile processing unit as an alternative for providing the required remote-handled waste processing capability; however, it was summarily dismissed as being a potentially viable alternative based on limitations of a specific design considered. In 2008 INL solicited expressions of interest from Vendors who could provide existing, demonstrated technology that could be applied to the retrieval, sorting, treatment (as required), and

  17. Quantitative “Hot Spot” Imaging of Transplanted Stem Cells using Superparamagnetic Tracers and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, J.W.M.; Walczak, P.; Janowski, M.; Krishnan, K.M.; Arami, H.; Halkola, A.; Gleich, B.; Rahmer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic labeling of stem cells enables their non-invasive detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Practically, most MRI studies have been limited to visualization of local engraftment as other sources of endogenous hypointense contrast complicate the interpretation of systemic (whole body) cell distribution. In addition, MRI cell tracking is inherently non-quantitative in nature. We report here on the potential of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) as a novel tomographic technique for non-invasive hot spot imaging and quantification of stem cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) tracers. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells, representing small and larger cell bodies, were labeled with three different SPIO tracer formulations, including two preparations that have previously been used in clinical MRI cell tracking studies (Feridex® and Resovist®). Magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) measurements demonstrated a linear correlation between MPI signal and iron content, for both homogeneous solutions of free particles in solution and for internalized and aggregated particles in labeled cells over a wide range of concentrations. The overall MP signal ranged from 1×10-3 - 3×10-4 Am2/g Fe, which was equivalent to 2×10-14 – 1×10-15 Am2 per cell, indicating that cell numbers can be quantified with MPI analogous to the use of radiotracers in nuclear medicine or fluorine tracers in 19F MRI. When SPIO-labeled cells were transplanted in mouse brain, they could be readily detected by MPI at a detection threshold of about 5×104 cells, with MPI/MRI overlays showing an excellent agreement between the hypointense MRI areas and MPI hot spots. The calculated tissue MPI signal ratio for 100,000 vs. 50,000 implanted cells was 2.08. Hence, MPI has potential to be further developed for quantitative and easy-to-interpret, tracer-based non-invasive imaging of cells, preferably with MRI as an adjunct anatomical imaging modality. PMID:26740972

  18. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Venta, Patrick J; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-10-01

    We developed a method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish using laser-ablated metaphase II eggs as recipients, the micropyle for transfer of the nucleus and an egg activation protocol after nuclear reconstruction. We produced clones from cells of both embryonic and adult origins, although the latter did not give rise to live adult clones. PMID:19718031

  19. Temperature and momentum dependence of single-particle properties in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.

    2008-11-15

    We have studied the effects of momentum-dependent interactions on the single-particle properties of hot asymmetric nuclear matter. In particular, the single-particle potential of protons and neutrons as well as the symmetry potential have been studied within a self-consistent model using a momentum-dependent effective interaction. In addition, the isospin splitting of the effective mass has been derived from the above model. In each case temperature effects have been included and analyzed. The role of the specific parametrization of the effective interaction used in the present work has been investigated. It has been concluded that the behavior of the symmetry potential depends strongly on the parametrization of the interaction part of the energy density and the momentum dependence of the regulator function. The effects of the parametrization have been found to be less pronounced on the isospin mass splitting.

  20. Fused-salt-liquid-metal corrosion of refractory alloys in the presence of hot cell impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.; Raraz, A.G.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1997-09-01

    The pyrochemical conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of final disposal is currently being demonstrated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). One aspect of this program is to develop a lithium preprocessing stage for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF). Furthermore, a pilot scale of this preprocessing stage is being designed by ANL-W to demonstrate the in situ hot cell capability of this process. In this pilot scale system, fused lithium chloride salt is saturated with molten lithium to form a powerful fluxing compound with a vigorous reducing agent. During this stage of the fuel conditioning, the reduction will take place at a nominal temperature of 650 C in an argon-cell atmosphere contaminated with up to 10,000 ppm nitrogen, 100 ppm oxygen and 100 ppm of moisture. The maximum local temperature was calculated to be 725 C on the inner shell of the reduction vessel during operation. One of the significant concerns of this project is the system`s corrosion response in the presence of irradiated commercial fuel as well as atmospheric impurities. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the potential corrosivity of the salt matrix in a worse case environment as well as provide a boundary for allowable impurities in the system during operation.

  1. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Additive Manufactured Hot Fire Planning and Testing in GRC Cell 32 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to hot fire test an additively manufactured thrust chamber assembly TCA (injector and thrust chamber). GRC will install the additively manufactured Inconel 625 injector, two additively manufactured (SLM) water cooled Cu-Cr thrust chamber barrels and one additively manufactured (SLM) water cooled Cu-Cr thrust chamber nozzle on the test stand in Cell 32 and perform hot fire testing of the integrated TCA.

  2. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. FLOOR PLAN OF EXPANSION SHOWS LOCATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. FLOOR PLAN OF EXPANSION SHOWS LOCATION OF NEW CELLS, "HEAVY" CELL AT WEST END, "LIGHT" CELLS AT EAST. MOCK-UP AND STORAGE AREAS IN SOUTH HALF OF FLOOR. H.K. FERGUSON 895-MTR-ETR-632-A1, 12/1958. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-279-101924, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WRIGHT 3TON HOIST ON EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WRIGHT 3-TON HOIST ON EAST SIDE OF CELL 2. SIGN AT LEFT OF VIEW SAYS, "...DO NOT BRING FISSILE MATERIAL INTO AREA WITHOUT APPROVAL." CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Reversible electron-hole separation in a hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Heiner

    Hot-carrier solar cells are envisioned to utilize energy filtering to extract power from photogenerated electron-hole pairs before they thermalize with the lattice, and thus potentially offer higher power conversion efficiency compared to conventional, single absorber solar cells. The efficiency of hot-carrier solar cells can be expected to strongly depend on the details of the energy filtering process, a relationship which to date has not been satisfactorily explored. Here, we establish the conditions under which electron-hole separation in hot-carrier solar cells can occur reversibly, that is, at maximum energy conversion efficiency. We find that, under specific conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a hot-carrier solar cell can exceed the Carnot limit set by the intra-device temperature gradient alone, due to the additional contribution of the quasi-Fermi level splitting in the absorber. To achieve this, we consider a highly selective energy filter such as a quantum dot embedded into a one-dimensional conductor. We also establish that the open-circuit voltage of a hot-carrier solar cell is not limited by the band gap of the absorber, due to the additional thermoelectric contribution to the voltage. Additionally, we find that a hot-carrier solar cell can be operated in reverse as a thermally driven solid-state light emitter. In addition this theoretical analysis, I will also report on first experimental results in a nanowire-based energy filter device. Ref: S Limpert, S Bremner, and H Linke, New J. Phys 17, 095004 (2015)

  5. Submerged RadBall® deployments in Hanford Site hot cells containing 137CsCl capsules.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Coleman, J Rusty; Stanley, Steven; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate that a new technology, known as RadBall®, could locate submerged radiological hazards. RadBall® is a novel, passive, radiation detection device that provides a 3-D visualization of radiation from areas where measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access or extremely high radiation doses. This technology has been under development during recent years, and all of its previous tests have included dry deployments. This study involved, for the first time, underwater RadBall® deployments in hot cells containing 137CsCl capsules at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. RadBall® can be used to characterize a contaminated room, hot cell, or glovebox by providing the locations of the radiation sources and hazards, identifying the radionuclides present within the cell, and determining the radiation sources' strength (e.g., intensities or dose rates). These parameters have been previously determined for dry deployments; however, only the location of radiation sources and hazards can be determined for an underwater RadBall® deployment. The results from this study include 3-D images representing the location of the radiation sources within the Hanford Site cells. Due to RadBall®'s unique deployability and non-electrical nature, this technology shows significant promise for future characterization of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities. PMID:22647921

  6. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%. PMID:24694838

  7. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  8. Remote maintenance for a new generation of hot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; Grant, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    For several years the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing facility concepts, designing specialized equipment, and testing prototypical hardware for reprocessing spent fuel from fast breeder reactors. The major facility conceptual design, the Hot Experimental Facility, was based on total remote maintenance to increase plant availability and to reduce radiation exposure. This thrust included designing modular equipment to facilitate maintenance and the manipulation necessary to accomplish maintenance. Included in the design repetoire was the development effort in advanced servomanipulator systems, a remote sampling system, television viewing, and a transporter for manipulator positioning. Demonstration of these developed items is currently ongoing, and the technology is available for applications where production operations in highly radioactive environments are required.

  9. A new avenue for high efficiency solar cells: interaction of hot electrons with plasmons (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Hot electrons rapidly dissipate their extra free energy, typically into heat. This is the origin of the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit of the single junction solar cells. An even faster mechanism of electron-plasmon scattering is available in metals. We demonstrate by detailed simulations, that an ultra-thin solar cell with a composite metamaterial/plasmonic collector could yield efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Quasar limit. The composite collector has a double function: firstly, it is designed to participate in efficiently trapping light, and secondly, it is a plasmonic resonator tuned to absorb the energy of hot electrons, thus protecting them from phonon losses.

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ALONG WALLEYE AVENUE, CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ALONG WALLEYE AVENUE, CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. HOT CELL BUILDING IS AT CENTER LEFT OF VIEW; THE LOW-BAY PROJECTION WITH LADDER IS THE TEST TRAIN ASSEMBLY FACILITY, ADDED IN 1968. MTR BUILDING IS IN LEFT OF VIEW. HIGH-BAY BUILDING AT RIGHT IS THE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR BUILDING, TRA-642. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-32-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Spin-polarized lithium diffusion in a glass hot-vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    We report diffusion coefficients of optically pumped lithium atoms in helium buffer gas. The free-induction decay and the spin-echo signals of ground-state atoms were optically detected in an external magnetic field with the addition of field gradient. Lithium hot vapor was produced in a borosilicate-glass cell at a temperature between 290 and 360°C. The simple setup using the glass cells enabled lithium atomic spectroscopy in a similar way to other alkali-metal atoms and study of the collisional properties of lithium atoms in a hot-vapor phase.

  12. Antistrange meson-baryon interaction in hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, D.; Tolós, L.; Aichelin, J.; Bratkovskaya, E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of in-medium cross sections and (off-shell) transition rates for the most relevant binary reactions for strange pseudoscalar meson production close to threshold in heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research. Our results rely on a chiral unitary approach in coupled channels which incorporates the s and p waves of the kaon-nucleon interaction. The formalism, which is modified in the hot and dense medium to account for Pauli blocking effects, mean-field binding on baryons, and pion and kaon self-energies, has been improved to implement unitarization and self-consistency for both the s - and the p -wave interactions at finite temperature and density. This gives access to in-medium amplitudes in several elastic and inelastic coupled channels with strangeness content S =-1 . The obtained total cross sections mostly reflect the fate of the Λ (1405 ) resonance, which melts in the nuclear environment, whereas the off-shell transition probabilities are also sensitive to the in-medium properties of the hyperons excited in the p -wave amplitudes [Λ ,Σ , and Σ*(1385 ) ]. The single-particle potentials of these hyperons at finite momentum, density, and temperature are also discussed in connection with the pertinent scattering amplitudes. Our results are the basis for future implementations in microscopic transport approaches accounting for off-shell dynamics of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  13. A micro hot test of the Chalmers-GANEX extraction system on used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bauhn, L.; Hedberg, M.; Aneheim, E.; Ekberg, C.; Loefstroem-Engdahl, E.; Skarnemark, G.

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, a 'micro hot test' has been performed using the Chalmers-GANEX (Group Actinide Extraction) system for partitioning of used nuclear fuel. The test included a pre-extraction step using N,N-di-2- ethylhexyl-butyramide (DEHBA) in n-octanol to remove the bulk part of the uranium. This pre-extraction was followed by a group extraction of actinides using the mixture of TBP and CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP in cyclohexanone as suggested in the Chalmers-GANEX process, and a three stage stripping of the extracted actinides. Distribution ratios for the extractions and stripping were determined based on a combination of γ- and α-spectrometry, as well as ICP-MS measurements. Successful extraction of uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides neptunium, americium and curium was achieved. However, measurements also indicated that co-extraction of europium occurs to some extent during the separation. These results were expected based on previous experiments using trace concentrations of actinides and lanthanides. Since this test was only performed in one stage with respect to the group actinide extraction, it is expected that multi stage tests will give even better results. (authors)

  14. A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN633) contextual view also showing east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot cell annex (TAN-633) contextual view also showing east facade. Camera facing west. Note corridor connecting annex to pool area of TAN-607. Pumice block walls. Date: March 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-39-2-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND FILTER LOFT PLATFORM AND LADDER ON EAST SIDE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-4, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-396-110563, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. A&M. TAN607. Special service cubicle (hot cell). Details include Zpipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Special service cubicle (hot cell). Details include Z-pipe and stepped plug penetrations through shielding wall. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-A116. Date: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-693-106767 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS AWAIT ATTACHMENT TO HAND CONTROLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9001. Unknown Photographer, photo is identified as taken 10/28/1953, but it may be an error as it shows progress since ID-33-G-266 of same date. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. VIEW OF FECF HOT CELL OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP603). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF FECF HOT CELL OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORHTWEST. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-18-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  20. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS FOR SOUTH, NORTH AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS FOR SOUTH, NORTH AND WEST SIDES OF 1958 EXTENSION. H.K. FERGUSON CO. 895-MTR-ETR-632-A3, 12/1958. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-279-101926, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 115. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows location of high density concrete, viewing windows, filters, monorail crane, bridge crane, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-626-MS-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-40-613-102737. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 111. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building elevations of north, south, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building elevations of north, south, east, and west sides. Includes details of personnel decontamination area, dark room, and other features. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102723. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 114. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building details of fuel storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building details of fuel storage pit in plan and section. Spaces shown for 20 elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-S-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-60-613-102752. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 112. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building roof plan and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building roof plan and details of roof ventilating equipment and parapet. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-2. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102722. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Plant Cell Nucleolus as a Hot Spot for Iron*

    PubMed Central

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Grillet, Louis; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Ortega, Richard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Many central metabolic processes require iron as a cofactor and take place in specific subcellular compartments such as the mitochondrion or the chloroplast. Proper iron allocation in the different organelles is thus critical to maintain cell function and integrity. To study the dynamics of iron distribution in plant cells, we have sought to identify the different intracellular iron pools by combining three complementary imaging approaches, histochemistry, micro particle-induced x-ray emission, and synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence. Pea (Pisum sativum) embryo was used as a model in this study because of its large cell size and high iron content. Histochemical staining with ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine (Perls/diaminobenzidine) strongly labeled a unique structure in each cell, which co-labeled with the DNA fluorescent stain DAPI, thus corresponding to the nucleus. The unexpected presence of iron in the nucleus was confirmed by elemental imaging using micro particle-induced x-ray emission. X-ray fluorescence on cryo-sectioned embryos further established that, quantitatively, the iron concentration found in the nucleus was higher than in the expected iron-rich organelles such as plastids or vacuoles. Moreover, within the nucleus, iron was particularly accumulated in a subcompartment that was identified as the nucleolus as it was shown to transiently disassemble during cell division. Taken together, our data uncover an as yet unidentified although abundant iron pool in the cell, which is located in the nuclei of healthy, actively dividing plant tissues. This result paves the way for the discovery of a novel cellular function for iron related to nucleus/nucleolus-associated processes. PMID:21719700

  6. Plant cell nucleolus as a hot spot for iron.

    PubMed

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Grillet, Louis; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Ortega, Richard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2011-08-12

    Many central metabolic processes require iron as a cofactor and take place in specific subcellular compartments such as the mitochondrion or the chloroplast. Proper iron allocation in the different organelles is thus critical to maintain cell function and integrity. To study the dynamics of iron distribution in plant cells, we have sought to identify the different intracellular iron pools by combining three complementary imaging approaches, histochemistry, micro particle-induced x-ray emission, and synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence. Pea (Pisum sativum) embryo was used as a model in this study because of its large cell size and high iron content. Histochemical staining with ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine (Perls/diaminobenzidine) strongly labeled a unique structure in each cell, which co-labeled with the DNA fluorescent stain DAPI, thus corresponding to the nucleus. The unexpected presence of iron in the nucleus was confirmed by elemental imaging using micro particle-induced x-ray emission. X-ray fluorescence on cryo-sectioned embryos further established that, quantitatively, the iron concentration found in the nucleus was higher than in the expected iron-rich organelles such as plastids or vacuoles. Moreover, within the nucleus, iron was particularly accumulated in a subcompartment that was identified as the nucleolus as it was shown to transiently disassemble during cell division. Taken together, our data uncover an as yet unidentified although abundant iron pool in the cell, which is located in the nuclei of healthy, actively dividing plant tissues. This result paves the way for the discovery of a novel cellular function for iron related to nucleus/nucleolus-associated processes. PMID:21719700

  7. Optoelectronic characterization of carrier extraction in a hot carrier photovoltaic cell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, James A. R.; Kauer, Matthias; Smith, Katherine; Liu, Huiyun; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Ekins-Daukes, Nicholas J.

    2016-07-01

    A hot carrier photovoltaic cell requires extraction of electrons on a timescale faster than they can lose energy to the lattice. We optically and optoelectronically characterize two resonant tunneling structures, showing their compatability with hot carrier photovoltaic operation, demonstrating structural and carrier extraction properties necessary for such a device. In particular we use time resolved and temperature dependent photoluminescence to determine extraction timescales and energy levels in the structures and demonstrate fast carrier extraction by tunneling. We also show that such devices are capable of extracting photo-generated electrons at high carrier densities, with an open circuit voltage in excess of 1 V.

  8. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  9. Study of LO-phonon decay in semiconductors for hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, Hugo; Vidal, Julien; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of phonon decay is of crucial importance when studying basic properties of semiconductors, since they are closely related to Raman linewidth and non-equilibrium-hot-carriers cooling. The latter indeed cools down to the bottom of the conduction band within a picosecond range because of electron-phonon interaction. The eventual emitted hot phonons then decay in few picoseconds. The hot carriers cooling can be slowed down by considering the decay rate dependence of phonon on conservation rules, whose tuning may reduce the allowed two-phonon final states density. This is of direct interest for the third generation photovoltaic devices that are Hot Carrier Solar Cells (HCSC), in which the photoexcited carriers are extracted at an energy higher than thermal equilibrium. One of the HCSC main challenges then is to find an absorber material in which the hot phonons has a relaxation time longer than the carriers cooling time, so that we can expect the electron to ``reabsorb'' a phonon, slowing down the electronic cooling. HCSC yield is ultimately limited by LO phonon decay, though. In this work, we present theoretical results obtained from ab initio calculations of phonon lifetime in III-V and IV-IV semiconductors through a three-phonon process. Common approximations in the literature are questioned. In particular, we show that the usual ``zone-center approximation'' is not valid in some specific semiconductors. The analysis allows to correctly investigate phonon decay mechanisms in bulk and nanostructured materials.

  10. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state. PMID:23683578

  11. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  12. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  13. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-S.; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-20

    The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  14. Hot-Wire CVD Amorphous Si Materials for Solar Cell Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films and their application to solar cells fabricated using the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) or (CAT)-CVD will be reviewed. This review will focus on the comparison to the standard plasma enhance (PE) CVD in the terms of deposition technique, film properties, and solar cell performance. The advantages of using HWCVD for a-Si:H solar cell research as well as the criteria for industry's adaptation of this technique for mass production will be addressed.

  15. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension.

    PubMed

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  16. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  17. Hot carrier solar cell absorbers: investigation of carrier cooling properties of candidate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conibeer, G.; Shrestha, Santosh; Huang, Shujuan; Patterson, Robert; Xia, Hongze; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Pengfei; Gupta, Neeti; Smyth, Suntrana; Liao, Yuanxun; Lin, Shu; Wang, Pei; Dai, Xi; Chung, Simon; Yang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The hot carrier cell aims to extract the electrical energy from photo-generated carriers before they thermalize to the band edges. Hence it can potentially achieve a high current and a high voltage and hence very high efficiencies up to 65% under 1 sun and 86% under maximum concentration. To slow the rate of carrier thermalisation is very challenging, but modification of the phonon energies and the use of nanostructures are both promising ways to achieve some of the required slowing of carrier cooling. A number of materials and structures are being investigated with these properties and test structures are being fabricated. Initial measurements indicate slowed carrier cooling in III-Vs with large phonon band gaps and in multiple quantum wells. It is expected that soon proof of concept of hot carrier devices will pave the way for their development to fully functioning high efficiency solar cells.

  18. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT DOOR WAS DARKROOM, AND THIRD DOOR LED TO ANOTHER OFFICE. ALL ARE ALONG NORTH WALL OF BUILDING (ETR EXTENSION OF 1958). CAMERA FACES NORTHEAST. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Evaluation of Tritium Behavior in the Epoxy Painted Concrete Wall of ITER Hot Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-07-15

    Tritium behavior released in the ITER hot cell has been investigated numerically using a combined analytical methods of a tritium transport analysis in the multi-layer wall (concrete and epoxy paint) with the one dimensional diffusion model and a tritium concentration analysis in the hot cell with the complete mixing model by the ventilation. As the results, it is revealed that tritium concentration decay and permeation issues are not serious problem in a viewpoint of safety, since it is expected that tritium concentration in the hot cell decrease rapidly within several days just after removing the tritium release source, and tritium permeation through the epoxy painted concrete wall will be negligible as long as the averaged realistic diffusion coefficient is ensured in the concrete wall. It is also revealed that the epoxy paint on the concrete wall prevents the tritium inventory increase in the concrete wall greatly (two orders of magnitudes), but still, the inventory in the wall is estimated to reach about 0.1 PBq for 20 years operation.

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  1. The Hanford spent nuclear metal fuel multi-canister overpack and vacuum drying {ampersand} hot conditioning process

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1996-05-15

    Nuclear production reactors operated at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site from 1944 until 1988 to produce plutonium. Most of the irradiated fuel from these reactors was processed onsite to separate and recover the plutonium. When the processing facilities were closed in 1992, about 1,900 metric tons of unprocessed irradiated fuel remained in storage. Additional fuel was irradiated for research purposes or was shipped to the Hanford Site from offsite reactor facilities for storage or recovery of nuclear materials. The fuel inventory now in storage at the Hanford Site is predominantly N Reactor irradiated fuel, a metallic uranium alloy that is coextruded into zircaloy-2 cladding. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has rommitted to an accelerated schedule for removing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford Site K Basins to a new interim storage facility in the 200 Area. Under the current proposed accelerated schedule, retrieval of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K East and West Basins must begin by December 1997 and be completed by December 1999. A key part of this action is retrieving fuel canisters from the water-filled K Basin storage pools and transferring them into multi@ister overpacks (MCOS) that will be used to handle and process the fuel, then store it after conditioning. The Westinghouse Hanford Company has developed an integrated process to deal with the K Basin spent fuel inventory. The process consists of cleaning the fuel, packaging it into MCOS, vacuum drying it at the K Basins, then transporting it to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) for staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage. This presentation dekribes the MCO function, design, and life-cycle, including an overview of the vacuum drying and hot conditioning processes.

  2. Connecting the "Hot Fusion Island" to the Nuclear Mainland: Search for 283,284,285Fl Decay Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, K. P.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Miernik, K.; Roberto, J. B.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Polyakov, A. N.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Voinov, A. A.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Sabelnikov, A. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Stoyer, M. A.

    The program of studies on superheavy nuclei to identify new isotopes anchoring the decay chains from the Hot Fusion Island to the Nuclear Mainland has been started at the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS, JINR Dubna) in collaboration between Russia, US and Poland. These studies are performed with new detection and digital data acquisition system developed at ORNL (Oak Ridge) and UT (Knoxville). The evidence for fast fission of the new isotope 284Fl is presented. The low cross section for the 3n channel of 239Pu + 48Ca reaction is attributed to lower than expected fission barriers in 287-284Fl.

  3. Remotex: a new concept for efficient remote operation and maintenance in nuclear fuel reprocessing. [Hot Experimental Facility (HEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; White, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Remotex is a concept of remote operation and maintenance that utilizes advanced manipulator design to improve plant operating efficiency, reduce personnel exposure, and improve safeguards and diversion resistance. It is a concept developed over the past two years in the conceptual design of the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF), a mechanically intense pilot plant facility designed to demonstrate reprocessng technology for early US breeder demonstration reactors. The Remotex concept is directly applicable to all segments of nuclear and nonnuclear industries where work tasks or conditions exist that are hazardous to the health of man.

  4. Experimental demonstration of hot-carrier photo-current in an InGaAs quantum well solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L. C.; Walters, R. J.; Führer, M. F.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.

    2014-06-09

    An unambiguous observation of hot-carrier photocurrent from an InGaAs single quantum well solar cell is reported. Simultaneous photo-current and photoluminescence measurements were performed for incident power density 0.04–3 kW cm{sup −2}, lattice temperature 10 K, and forward bias 1.2 V. An order of magnitude photocurrent increase was observed for non-equilibrium hot-carrier temperatures >35 K. This photocurrent activation temperature is consistent with that of equilibrium carriers in a lattice at elevated temperature. The observed hot-carrier photo-current is extracted from the well over an energy selective GaAs barrier, thus integrating two essential components of a hot-carrier solar cell: a hot-carrier absorber and an energy selective contact.

  5. 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene mutagenesis in mammalian cells: sequence-specific hot spot.

    PubMed Central

    Gentil, A; Margot, A; Sarasin, A

    1986-01-01

    Mutations induced by 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene were studied using temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 (SV40) mutants as probe in monkey kidney cells. In vitro treatment of the SV40 virions with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene increased mutagenesis and decreased survival in the viral progeny. A lethal hit of approximately 85 acetylaminofluorene adducts per SV40 genome was calculated. UV irradiation of cells prior to infection did not modify the results. Molecular analysis of independent SV40 revertants showed that 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)fluorene induces base substitutions that are located not opposite putative acetylaminofluorene adducts but next to them. Moreover, a hot spot of mutation restoring a true wild-type genotype was observed in 10 of the 16 revertants analyzed. This hot spot, not targeted opposite a major DNA lesion, was not observed using UV light as damaging agent in the same genetic assay. Two models involving the stabilization, by acetylaminofluorene adducts, of the secondary structure of a specific quasipalindromic SV40 sequence are proposed to explain this sequence-specific hot spot. PMID:3025845

  6. Precision Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Hotband Transition at 4.3 Micron Using a Hot Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Tian, Jyun-Yu; Chen, Hshan-Chen; Lien, Yu-Hung; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2011-06-01

    We report a mid-IR spectrometer based on a difference frequency generation (DFG). This tunable CW DFG source covers the spectral range from 2.6 {μ}m to 4.7 {μ}m with an output power of a few mW. The saturation spectrum of the 12C16O2 hot band 0111 - 0110 P(30) transition is greatly enhanced by using a 40 cm long hot cell. The saturated absorption S/N ratio of over 1000 at 1 Hz bandwidth is achieved. We investigate the linewidth analysis and absolute frequency measurement of this transition. This transition center frequency of 69,267,228.761(15) MHz and the transition linewidth of 3.040(36) MHz are accurately measured.

  7. Development of Hot Pressing as a Low Cost Processing Technique for Fuel Cell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V

    2003-01-14

    Dependable, plentiful, and economical energy has been the driving force for financial, industrial, and political growth in the US since the mid 19th century. For a country whose progress is so deeply rooted in abundant energy and whose current political agenda involves stabilizing world fossil fuel prices, the development of a reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly power generating source seems compulsory. The maturing of high technology fuel cells may be the panacea the country will find indispensable to free itself from foreign dependence. Fuel cells offer an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions. Fuel cells have few moving parts and run almost silently. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly to electrical energy. Unlike batteries, which store a finite amount of energy, fuel cells will generate electricity continuously, as long as fuel and oxidant are available to the electrodes. Additionally, fuel cells offer clean, efficient, and reliable power and they can be operated using a variety of fuels. Hence, the fuel cell is an extremely promising technology. Over the course of this research, the fundamental knowledge related to ceramic processing, sintering, and hot pressing to successfully hot press a single operational SOFC in one step has been developed. Ceramic powder processing for each of the components of an SOFC has bene tailored towards this goal. Processing parameter for the electrolyte and cathode have been studied and developed until they converted. Several anode fabrication techniques have been developed. Additionally, a novel anode structured has been developed and refined. These individual processes have been cultivated until a single cell SOFC has been fabricated in one step.

  8. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  9. Thermodynamics of Hot Nuclear Matter: 1978 in the Statistical Bootstrap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann; Hagedorn, Rolf

    We formulate the statistical bootstrap model for nuclear matter, and study its resulting thermodynamic properties at nuclear densities below the saturation density. We discuss the relevance of limiting temperature and the phase transition gas-`liquid' when the volume of the fireball grows with its energy.

  10. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  11. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  12. Investigation of the basic physics of high efficiency semiconductor hot carrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, R. R.; Wang, W. B.; Mohaidat, J. M.; Cavicchia, M. A.; Raisky, O. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The main purpose of this research program is to investigate potential semiconductor materials and their multi-band-gap MQW (multiple quantum wells) structures for high efficiency solar cells for aerospace and commercial applications. The absorption and PL (photoluminescence) spectra, the carrier dynamics, and band structures have been investigated for semiconductors of InP, GaP, GaInP, and InGaAsP/InP MQW structures, and for semiconductors of GaAs and AlGaAs by previous measurements. The barrier potential design criteria for achieving maximum energy conversion efficiency, and the resonant tunneling time as a function of barrier width in high efficiency MQW solar cell structures have also been investigated in the first two years. Based on previous carrier dynamics measurements and the time-dependent short circuit current density calculations, an InAs/InGaAs - InGaAs/GaAs - GaAs/AlGaAs MQW solar cell structure with 15 bandgaps has been designed. The absorption and PL spectra in InGaAsP/InP bulk and MQW structures were measured at room temperature and 77 K with different pump wavelength and intensity, to search for resonant states that may affect the solar cell activities. Time-resolved IR absorption for InGaAsP/InP bulk and MQW structures has been measured by femtosecond visible-pump and IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. This, with the absorption and PL measurements, will be helpful to understand the basic physics and device performance in multi-bandgap InAs/InGaAs - InGaAs/InP - InP/InGaP MQW solar cells. In particular, the lifetime of the photoexcited hot electrons is an important parameter for the device operation of InGaAsP/InP MQW solar cells working in the resonant tunneling conditions. Lastly, time evolution of the hot electron relaxation in GaAs has been measured in the temperature range of 4 K through 288 K using femtosecond pump-IR-probe absorption technique. The temperature dependence of the hot electron relaxation time in the X valley has been measured.

  13. TERT promoter hot spot mutations are frequent in Indian cervical and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Vilvanathan; Arunkumar, Ganesan; Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy; Arun, Kanagaraj; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Rao, Arunagiri Kuha Deva Magendhra; Rajkumar, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam; Ajay, Chandrasekar; Rajaraman, Ramamurthy; Ramani, Rajendren; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix and oral cavity are most common cancers in India. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) overexpression is one of the hallmarks for cancer, and activation through promoter mutation C228T and C250T has been reported in variety of tumors and often shown to be associated with aggressive tumors. In the present study, we analyzed these two hot spot mutations in 181 primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity by direct DNA sequencing and correlated with patient's clinicopathological characteristics. We found relatively high frequency of TERT hot spot mutations in both cervical [21.4 % (30/140)] and oral [31.7 % (13/41)] squamous cell carcinomas. In cervical cancer, TERT promoter mutations were more prevalent (25 %) in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative cases compared to HPV-positive cases (20.6 %), and both TERT promoter mutation and HPV infection were more commonly observed in advanced stage tumors (77 %). Similarly, the poor and moderately differentiated tumors of the uterine cervix had both the TERT hot spot mutations and HPV (16 and 18) at higher frequency (95.7 %). Interestingly, we observed eight homozygous mutations (six 228TT and two 250TT) only in cervical tumors, and all of them were found to be positive for high-risk HPV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting high prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity. Our results suggest that TERT reactivation through promoter mutation either alone or in association with the HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) could play an important role in the carcinogenesis of cervical and oral cancers. PMID:26700669

  14. Hot Hydrogen Testing of Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide (W-UO2) CERMET Fuel Materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Broadway, Jeramie

    2014-01-01

    CERMET fuel materials are being developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage. Recent work has resulted in the development and demonstration of a Compact Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET) System that is capable of subjecting depleted uranium fuel material samples to hot hydrogen. A critical obstacle to the development of an NCPS engine is the high-cost and safety concerns associated with developmental testing in nuclear environments. The purpose of this testing capability is to enable low-cost screening of candidate materials, fabrication processes, and further validation of concepts. The CERMET samples consist of depleted uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel particles in a tungsten metal matrix, which has been demonstrated on previous programs to provide improved performance and retention of fission products1. Numerous past programs have utilized hot hydrogen furnace testing to develop and evaluate fuel materials. The testing provides a reasonable simulation of temperature and thermal stress effects in a flowing hydrogen environment. Though no information is gained about radiation damage, the furnace testing is extremely valuable for development and verification of fuel element materials and processes. The current work includes testing of subscale W-UO2 slugs to evaluate fuel loss and stability. The materials are then fabricated into samples with seven cooling channels to test a more representative section of a fuel element. Several iterations of testing are being performed to evaluate fuel mass loss impacts from density, microstructure, fuel particle size and shape, chemistry, claddings, particle coatings, and stabilizers. The fuel materials and forms being evaluated on this effort have all been demonstrated to control fuel migration and loss. The objective is to verify performance improvements of the various materials and process options prior to expensive full scale fabrication and testing. Post test analysis will

  15. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  16. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since "Dolly," the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories. PMID:19085136

  17. Probing charge transfer and hot carrier dynamics in organic solar cells with terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Lane, Paul A.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Esenturk, Okan; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) was used to explore charge generation, transfer, and the role of hot carriers in organic solar cell materials. Two model molecular photovoltaic systems were investigated: with zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or alpha-sexathiophene (α-6T) as the electron donors and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as the electron acceptor. TRTS provides charge carrier conductivity dynamics comprised of changes in both population and mobility. By using time-resolved optical spectroscopy in conjunction with TRTS, these two contributions can be disentangled. The sub-picosecond photo-induced conductivity decay dynamics of C60 were revealed to be caused by auto-ionization: the intrinsic process by which charge is generated in molecular solids. In donor-acceptor blends, the long-lived photo-induced conductivity is used for weight fraction optimization of the constituents. In nanoscale multilayer films, the photo-induced conductivity identifies optimal layer thicknesses. In films of ZnPc/C60, electron transfer from ZnPc yields hot charges that localize and become less mobile as they thermalize. Excitation of high-lying Franck Condon states in C60 followed by hole-transfer to ZnPc similarly produces hot charge carriers that self-localize; charge transfer clearly precedes carrier cooling. This picture is contrasted to charge transfer in α-6T/C60, where hole transfer takes place from a thermalized state and produces equilibrium carriers that do not show characteristic signs of cooling and self-localization. These results illustrate the value of terahertz spectroscopic methods for probing charge transfer reactions.

  18. Crystal Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells by Hot-Wire CVD: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y. Q.; Roybal, L.; Bauer, R.; To, B.; Yuan, H. C.; Duda, A.; Yan, Y. F.

    2008-05-01

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) is a promising technique for fabricating Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. In this paper we describe our efforts to increase the open circuit voltage (Voc) while improving the efficiency of these devices. On p-type c-Si float-zone wafers, we used a double heterojunction structure with an amorphous n/i contact to the top surface and an i/p contact to the back surface to obtain an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 679 mV in a 0.9 cm2 cell with an independently confirmed efficiency of 19.1%. This is the best reported performance for a cell of this configuration. We also made progress on p-type CZ wafers and achieved 18.7% independently confirmed efficiency with little degradation under prolong illumination. Our best Voc for a p-type SHJ cell is 0.688 V, which is close to the 691 mV we achieved for SHJ cells on n type c-Si wafers.

  19. Nuclear Star Formation in the Hot-Spot Galaxy NGC 2903

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Ryder, S. D.; Knapen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution near-infrared imaging obtained using adaptive optics and HST/NICMOS and ground-based spectroscopy of the hot-spot galaxy NGC 2903. Our near-infrared resolution imaging enables us to resolve the infrared hot spots into individual young stellar clusters or groups of these. The spatial distribution of the stellar clusters is not coincident with that of the bright H II regions, as revealed by the HST/NICMOS Pace image. Overall, the circumnuclear star formation in NGC 2903 shows a ring-like morphology with an approximate diameter of 625 pc. The SF properties of the stellar clusters and H II regions have been studied using the photometric and spectroscopic information in conjunction with evolutionary synthesis models. The population of bright stellar clusters shows a very narrow range of ages, 4 to 7 x 10(exp 6) yr after the peak of star formation, or absolute ages 6.5 to 9.5 x 10(exp 6) yr (for the assumed short-duration Gaussian bursts), and luminosities similar to the clusters found in the Antennae interacting galaxy. This population of young stellar clusters accounts for some 7 - 12% of the total stellar mass in the central 625 pc of NGC 2903. The H II regions in the ring of star formation have luminosities close to that of the super-giant H II region 30 Doradus, they are younger than the stellar clusters, and will probably evolve into bright infrared stellar clusters similar to those observed today. We find that the star formation efficiency in the central regions of NGC 2903 is higher than in normal galaxies, approaching the lower end of infrared luminous galaxies.

  20. Quantum statistical thermodynamics of hot finite nuclear systems: Temperatures and isotopic yield ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Majka, Z.; Staszel, P.; Cibor, J.; Natowitz, J.B.; Hagel, K.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Wada, R.; Zhao, Y.

    1997-06-01

    We investigate the importance of the quantum statistics and deexcitation of primary fragments on the isotope yield ratio temperature determination. A phenomenological formula is presented which allows derivation of the temperature of the decaying nuclear system at the freeze-out time from the measured double yield ratios of two isotope pairs. This prescription is applied to the recent ALADIN and EOS Collaboration data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture platform

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; Charest, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying the known commercially-viable manufacturing methods to a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) material resulted in a microfluidic device with enhanced 3D gel capabilities, controlled surface properties, and improved potential to serve high-volume applications. Hot embossing and roller lamination molded and sealed the microfluidic device. A combination of oxygen plasma and thermal treatments enhanced the sealing, ensured proper placement of the 3D gel, and created controlled and stable surface properties within the device. Culture of cells in the new device indicated no adverse effects of the COC material or processing as compared to previous PDMS devices. The results demonstrate a methodology to transition microfludic devices for 3D cell culture from scientific research to high-volume applications with broad clinical impact. PMID:21113663

  2. Hard photons and neutral pions as probes of hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Y.; Martínez, G.; Marqués, F. M.; Marín, A.; Matulewicz, T.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Bożek, P.; Delagrange, H.; Díaz, J.; Franke, M.; Gudima, K. K.; Hlaváč, S.; Holzmann, R.; Lautridou, P.; Lefèvre, F.; Löhner, H.; Mittig, W.; Płoszajczak, M.; van Pol, J. H. G.; Québert, J.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Schubert, A.; Siemssen, R. H.; Simon, R. S.; Sujkowski, Z.; Toneev, V. D.; Wagner, V.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wolf, Gy.

    1997-02-01

    The dynamics of heavy-ion collisions is studied in an energy domain in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. The early history of the collision is analyzed from the theoretical and experimental point of view in which the message conveyed by bremsstrahlung photons and neutral pions is exploited. The Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model and the Dubna Cascade Model, both based on similar principles but each adopting different computation technics, are briefly described and their respective predictions are discussed. In particular the emission pattern of bremsstrahlung photons is discussed. The photon production has been measured in the systems 86Kr+ 58Ni at 60 A MeV, 181Ta+ 197Au at 40 A MeV and 208Pb+ 197Au at 30 A MeV and energy spectra, angular distributions and two-photon correlations have been analyzed. We find that bremsstrahlung photons are emitted from two distinct sources that can be correlated with nuclear-matter density oscillations. The properties of photon emission are discussed in terms of collective properties of nuclear matter. The high energy tail of the photon spectrum is interpreted by π0 and Δ decay but predominantly by radiative capture of pions. The π0 absorption in the nuclear medium is further analyzed by examining their emission pattern.

  3. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.

    1994-12-31

    Theories have suggested that there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and sperm fertility. At present, biochemical analyses have only been performed on bulk populations and existing methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. As part of an investigation into male sperm fertility, nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the ratio of Phosphorus to Sulfur the authors have been able to determine the amount of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in individual cells from bulk fertile samples of bull and mouse sperm. Preliminary results show that, for each species, the relative amounts of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in morphologically normal sperm agree well with expected values.

  4. Experimental evidence of hot carriers solar cell operation in multi-quantum wells heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodière, Jean; Lombez, Laurent; Le Corre, Alain; Durand, Olivier; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2015-05-04

    We investigated a semiconductor heterostructure based on InGaAsP multi quantum wells (QWs) using optical characterizations and demonstrate its potential to work as a hot carrier cell absorber. By analyzing photoluminescence spectra, the quasi Fermi level splitting Δμ and the carrier temperature are quantitatively measured as a function of the excitation power. Moreover, both thermodynamics values are measured at the QWs and the barrier emission energy. High values of Δμ are found for both transition, and high carrier temperature values in the QWs. Remarkably, the quasi Fermi level splitting measured at the barrier energy exceeds the absorption threshold of the QWs. This indicates a working condition beyond the classical Shockley-Queisser limit.

  5. Hot-carrier solar cells using low-dimensional quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    We propose a high-conversion-efficiency solar cell (SC) utilizing the hot carrier (HC) population in an intermediate-band (IB) of a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) structure. The bandgap of the host semiconductor in this device plays an important role as an energy-selective barrier for HCs in the QDSLs. According to theoretical calculation using the detailed balance model with an air mass 1.5 spectrum, the optimum IB energy is determined by a trade-off relation between the number of HCs with energy exceeding the conduction-band edge and the number of photons absorbed by the valence band-IB transition. Utilizing experimental data of HC temperature in InAs/GaAs QDSLs, the maximum conversion efficiency under maximum concentration (45 900 suns) has been demonstrated to increase by 12.6% as compared with that for a single-junction GaAs SC.

  6. Hot-carrier solar cells using low-dimensional quantum structures

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi

    2014-10-27

    We propose a high-conversion-efficiency solar cell (SC) utilizing the hot carrier (HC) population in an intermediate-band (IB) of a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) structure. The bandgap of the host semiconductor in this device plays an important role as an energy-selective barrier for HCs in the QDSLs. According to theoretical calculation using the detailed balance model with an air mass 1.5 spectrum, the optimum IB energy is determined by a trade-off relation between the number of HCs with energy exceeding the conduction-band edge and the number of photons absorbed by the valence band−IB transition. Utilizing experimental data of HC temperature in InAs/GaAs QDSLs, the maximum conversion efficiency under maximum concentration (45 900 suns) has been demonstrated to increase by 12.6% as compared with that for a single-junction GaAs SC.

  7. Assays to measure nuclear mechanics in interphase cells

    PubMed Central

    Isermann, Philipp; Davidson, Patricia M.; Sliz, Josiah D.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus is the characteristic hallmark of all eukaryotic cells. The physical properties of the nucleus reflect important biological characteristics, such as chromatin organization or nuclear envelope composition; they can also directly affect cellular function, for example, when cells pass through narrow constrictions, where the stiff nucleus may present a limiting factor. We present two complementary techniques to probe the mechanical properties of the nucleus. In the first, nuclear stiffness relative to the surrounding cytoskeleton is inferred from induced nuclear deformations during strain application to cells on an elastic substrate. In the second approach, nuclear deformability is deduced from the transit time through a perfusion-based microfabricated device with constrictions smaller than the size of the nucleus. These complementary methods, which can be applied to measure nuclear stiffness in large numbers of living adherent or suspended cells, can help identify important changes in nuclear mechanics associated with disease or development. PMID:22968843

  8. Thermal and stress analysis of hot isostatically pressed, alumina ceramic, nuclear waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yun; Hoenig, C.L.

    1990-03-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is studying design and fabrication options for a safe durable container in which to store nuclear waste underground at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The ceramic container discussed here is an alternative to using a metal container. This ceramic alternative would be selected if site conditions prove too corrosive to use metals for nuclear waste storage. Some of the engineering problems addressed in this study were: the stress generated in the alumina container by compressive loads when 4000 to 40,000 psi of external pressure is applied; the thermal stress in the container during the heating and cooling processes; the temperature histories of the container in various production scenarios and the power required for typical heaters; the fastest possible turnaround time to heat, seal, and cool the container commensurate with preserving the structural integrity of the ceramic and the closure; the testing of some commercial heating elements to determine the maximum available heat output; and the trade-offs between the minimization in thermal stress and cycle time for closure. 2 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Probing the {rho} spectral function in hot and dense nuclear matter by dileptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Rapp, R.; Wambach, J.

    1998-02-01

    We present a dynamical study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN-SPS energies on the basis of the covariant transport approach HSD employing a momentum-dependent {rho}-meson spectral function that includes the pion modifications in the nuclear medium as well as the polarization of the {rho} meson due to resonant {rho}-N scattering. We find that the experimental data from the CERES and HELIOS-3 Collaborations can be described equally well as within the dropping {rho}-mass scenario. Whereas corresponding dilepton q{sub T} spectra are found to be very similar, the inclusive dilepton yield in the invariant mass range 0.85{le}M{le}1.0 GeV should allow us to disentangle the two scenarios experimentally. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Epitaxial Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Below 750 ..deg..C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Alberi, K.; Martin, I. T.; Shub, M.; Teplin, C. W.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; duda, A.; Stradin, P.; Johnston, S. W.; Romero, M. J.; Branz, H. M.; Young, D. L.

    2009-06-01

    We report on fabricating film c-Si solar cells on Si wafer templates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. These devices, grown at glass-compatible temperatures < 750..deg..C, demonstrate open-circuit voltages > 500 mV and efficiencies > 5%.

  11. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  12. Indications for a Critical End Point in the Phase Diagram for Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy A.

    2015-04-01

    Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference (Rout2-Rside2) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au +Au (√{sN N }=7.7 - 200 GeV ) and Pb +Pb (√{sN N }=2.76 TeV ) collisions are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed nonmonotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential (T ,μB) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of these data suggests a second order phase transition with the estimates Tcep˜165 MeV and μBcep˜95 MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents (ν ≈0.66 and γ ≈1.2 ) extracted via the same FSS analysis place this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class.

  13. Indications for a critical end point in the phase diagram for hot and dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Roy A

    2015-04-10

    Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference (R_{out}^{2}-R_{side}^{2}) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au+Au (sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7-200  GeV) and Pb+Pb (sqrt[s_{NN}]=2.76  TeV) collisions are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed nonmonotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential (T,μ_{B}) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A finite-size scaling (FSS) analysis of these data suggests a second order phase transition with the estimates T^{cep}∼165  MeV and μ_{B}^{cep}∼95  MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents (ν≈0.66 and γ≈1.2) extracted via the same FSS analysis place this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class. PMID:25910113

  14. Observation of the critical end point in the phase diagram for hot and dense nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy

    2015-10-01

    Excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference (Rout2 -Rside2) obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au+Au (√{sNN} = 7 . 7 - 200 GeV) and Pb+Pb (√{sNN} = 2 . 76 TeV) collisions, are studied for a broad range of collision centralities. The observed non-monotonic excitation functions validate the finite-size scaling patterns expected for the deconfinement phase transition and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature vs. baryon chemical potential (T ,μB) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram. A Dynamic Finite-Size Scaling (DFSS) analysis of these data suggests a second order phase transition with the estimates Tcep 165 MeV and μBcep 95 MeV for the location of the critical end point. The critical exponents (ν 0 . 66 and γ 1 . 2) extracted via the same DFSS analysis, places this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class. This research is supported by the US DOE under Contract DE-FG02-87ER40331.A008.

  15. Route Planning and Estimate of Heat Loss of Hot Water Transportation Piping for Fuel Cell Local Energy Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shinya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    The method of supplying the electric power and heat energy for the energy demand of buildings by Centralized system type and distributed system type of fuel cell network is studied. The hot-water piping route planning program of fuel cell network was developed by using genetic algorithm based on the view of TSP ( Traveling salesman problem) . In this program, the piping route planning which minimizes the quantity of heat loss in hot-water piping can be performed. The residential section model of Sapporo city of 74 buildings was analyzed, and the quantity of heat loss from the hot-water piping of both systems was estimated. Consequently, the ratio of the quantity of heat loss of a distributed system to a centralized system was about 50% in the full year average. This program is introduced into the route planning of hot- Water piping system of the fuel cell network, and plan to reduce the quantity of heat loss in a distributed system will be made.

  16. The feasibility study of hot cell decontamination by the PFC spray method

    SciTech Connect

    Hui-Jun Won; Chong-Hun Jung; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2008-01-15

    module. A performance test on each module was executed and the results have been reported. A combined test of the four modules, however, has not been performed as yet. The main objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of the full PFC spray decontamination process. Decontamination of the inside of the IMEF hot cell by the PFC spray method was also performed. PFC spray decontamination process was demonstrated by using a surrogate wall contaminated with Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The spray pressure was 41 kgf/cm{sup 2}, the orifice diameter was 0.2 mm and the spray velocity was 0.2 L/min. And, the decontaminated area was 100 cm{sup 2}. From previous test results, we found that the decontamination factor of the PFC spray method was in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. When the decontamination efficiency of Co-60 was high, then the decontamination efficiency of Cs-137 was also high. As the surface roughness of the specimen increased, the PFC spray decontamination efficiency decreased. Inferring from the previous results, the surface of the surrogate wall was cleaned by the PFC spray method. The vacuum cup of the collection module operated well and gathered more than 99 % of the PFC solution. Also, filtration and distillation modules operated well. All the filtered PFC solution flowed to the storage chamber where some of the PFC solution was distilled. The coolant of the distillation module was a dry ice. And, the recycled solution was transferred to the spray module by a high pressure pump. To evaluate the PFC spray decontamination efficiency, a smear device was fabricated and operated by a manipulator. Before and after decontamination, a smear test was performed. The tested area was 100 cm{sup 2} and the radioactivity was estimated indirectly by measuring the radioactivity of the filter paper. The average decontamination factor was in the range between 10 and 15. One application time was 2 minutes. The sprayed PFC solution was collected by the vacuum cup and

  17. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  18. Nuclear transfer preserves the nuclear genome of freeze-dried mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Eiji; Li, Chong; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-12-01

    Mouse spermatozoa can be freeze dried without losing genetic integrity and reproductive potential. However, it is not known if freeze-dried mouse cells similarly maintain their genetic integrity and developmental potential following nuclear transfer. Here, we investigated the developmental capacity and embryonic stem (ES) cell derivation of reconstructed oocytes by nuclear transfer using freeze-dried cumulus or ES cells. Cumulus and ES cells were lyophilized overnight and stored at 4 C for up to 1 week. After rehydration, all cells showed membrane damage and were unviable. However, following nuclear transfer, 1-4% of the reconstructed oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage. A total of five nuclear transfer ES (ntES) cell lines were generated from blastocysts and morulae. All ntES cell lines had normal karyotypes and were positive for the ES-cell-specific markers (alkaline phosphatase, Oct3/4 and Nanog). After aggregation of ntES cells with fertilized embryos, chimeric mice with a high level of coat color chimerism were generated. Our findings show that the genomic integrity of cells can be maintained after freeze-drying and that it is possible to produce offspring from the cells using nuclear transfer techniques. PMID:18854641

  19. Nuclear F-actin formation and reorganization upon cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  20. The nuclear pore complex acts as a master switch for nuclear and cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with the functional differentiation of the nucleus, in which alteration of the expression profiles of transcription factors occurs to destine cell fate. Nuclear transport machineries, such as importin-α, have also been reported as critical factors that induce cell differentiation. Using various fluorescence live cell imaging methods, including time-lapse imaging, FRAP analysis and live-cell imaging associated correlative light and electron microscopy (Live CLEM) of Tetrahymena, a unicellular ciliated protozoan, we have recently discovered that type switching of the NPC is the earliest detectable event of nuclear differentiation. Our studies suggest that this type switching of the NPC directs the fate of the nucleus to differentiate into either a macronucleus or a micronucleus. Our findings in this organism may provide new insights into the role of the NPC in controlling nuclear functions in general in eukaryotes, including controlling cell fate leading to cell differentiation in multicellular metazoa. PMID:26479399

  1. The nuclear pore complex acts as a master switch for nuclear and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with the functional differentiation of the nucleus, in which alteration of the expression profiles of transcription factors occurs to destine cell fate. Nuclear transport machineries, such as importin-α, have also been reported as critical factors that induce cell differentiation. Using various fluorescence live cell imaging methods, including time-lapse imaging, FRAP analysis and live-cell imaging associated correlative light and electron microscopy (Live CLEM) of Tetrahymena, a unicellular ciliated protozoan, we have recently discovered that type switching of the NPC is the earliest detectable event of nuclear differentiation. Our studies suggest that this type switching of the NPC directs the fate of the nucleus to differentiate into either a macronucleus or a micronucleus. Our findings in this organism may provide new insights into the role of the NPC in controlling nuclear functions in general in eukaryotes, including controlling cell fate leading to cell differentiation in multicellular metazoa. PMID:26479399

  2. Methods for Assessing Nuclear Rotation and Nuclear Positioning in Developing Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Meredith H; Bray, Matthew G; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle cells are large syncytia, containing hundreds of nuclei positioned regularly along the length of the fiber. During development, nuclei are actively distributed throughout the myotube by the microtubule motor proteins, kinesin-1, and cytoplasmic dynein. Nuclear movement consists of translocation along the long axis of the cell concurrent with three-dimensional rotation of nuclei. In this chapter we describe methods for quantitatively assessing the speed of nuclear rotation in cultured myotubes using live-cell imaging techniques coupled with rigid body kinematic analyses. Additionally, we provide protocols for analyzing nuclear distribution in myotubes. PMID:27147049

  3. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well.

    PubMed

    Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-06-01

    In this issue, Chung et al. (2014) generate human embryonic stem cells by fusing an adult somatic cell to a previously enucleated human oocyte, in agreement with recent reports by the Mitalipov and Egli groups. We can now safely say that human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well. PMID:24905159

  4. Development of remote crane system for use inside small argon hot-cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yu, Seung-Nam; Kim, Kiho; Cho, Ilje

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a novel crane system for the use in a small argon hot-cell where only a pair of master-slave manipulators (MSM) is available for the remote maintenance of the crane. To increase the remote maintainability in the space-limited environment, we devised a remote actuation mechanism in which electrical parts consisting of a servo-motor, a position sensor, and two limit switches located inside the workspace of the MSM transmit power to the mechanical parts located in the ceiling. Even though the design concept does not provide thoroughly sufficient solution because the mechanical parts are placed out of the MSM's workspace, the durability of mechanical parts can be easily increased if they have a high safety margin. Therefore, the concept may be one of the best solutions for our special crane system. In addition, we developed a servo-control system based on absolute positioning technology; therefore, it is possible for us to perform the given tasks more safely through an automatic operation. (authors)

  5. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko; Ichiki, Akihisa; Kusano, Yuya; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  6. Hot-gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells-dechlorination and soot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D.; Gelb, A.; Lord, G.; Simons, G.

    1984-01-01

    Two separate aspects of hot-gas conditioning for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) were investigated: potential high temperature chloride sorbent materials were screened and tested and carbon deposition on MCFC components was studied experimentally to determine guidelines for maximizing MCFC efficiency while avoiding carbon fouling. Natural minerals containing sodium carbonate were identified as the most promising candidates for economical removal of chlorides from coal gasifier effluents at temperatures of about 800 K (980 F). The mineral Shortite was tested in a fixed bed and found to perform remarkably well with no calcination. Measurements showed that carbon deposition can occur in the equilibrium carbon free region because of the relative rates of the relevant reactions. On all surfaces tested, the Boudouard carbon formation reaction is much faster than the water-gas shift reaction which is much faster than the methanation reaction. This means that the normal practice of adding steam to prevent carbon formation will only succeed if flows are slow enough for the water shift reaction to go substantially to completion. More direct suppression of carbon formation can be achieved by CO2 addition through anode recycle to force the Boudouard reaction backward.

  7. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Yasuhiko Sugimoto, Noriaki; Ichiki, Akihisa; Kusano, Yuya; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-28

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  8. Hot Cell Liners Category of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Robert Wesley; Hargis, Kenneth Marshall

    2014-09-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is an agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Hot Cell Liners category; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and the justification to reclassify the five containers as LLW rather than TRU waste.

  9. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Buck, Taraz E.; Sullivan, Devin P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  10. Regulation of nuclear transport in proliferating and quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Feldherr, C M; Akin, D

    1993-03-01

    Previously, we compared signal-mediated nuclear transport in proliferating and quiescent BALB/c 3T3 cells and found that both the relative rate of nuclear uptake and the functional size of the transport channels were significantly greater in proliferating cells. In this study, the possible causes of these permeability differences were investigated. To determine if the decrease in transport capacity in quiescent cells was due to a reduction in the availability of soluble cytoplasmic factors (i.e., ATP or receptors for nuclear location sequences), or changes in the properties of the pores themselves, proliferating and quiescent cells were fused, and nuclear import of nucleoplasmin-coated gold (NP-gold) particles was assayed in the heterokaryons 50-60 min later. Significant differences in nuclear uptake were maintained following fusion, even though the two nuclei shared a common cytoplasm, consistent with the view that permeability is regulated at the level of the pores. Cell shape also influenced signal-mediated nuclear import. This was demonstrated by studying transport in rounded and flattened cells attached to different-size palladium domains that were deposited on a nonadhesive substrate. Based on analysis of the nuclear uptake rates of large (110-270 A in diameter) and small (50-80 A in diameter) coated gold particles, it was determined that the functional size of the pores was significantly greater in flattened cells. The effect of growth factors on recovery of nuclear transport capacity following serum depletion was also analyzed. Partial recovery was achieved by treating cells with physiological concentrations of EGF, IGF-1, or PDGF; however, complete recovery required both EGF and IGF-1. PMID:8453991

  11. Nanotopographical Modulation of Cell Function through Nuclear Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Bruce, Allison; Mezan, Ryan; Kadiyala, Anand; Wang, Liying; Dawson, Jeremy; Rojanasakul, Yon; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Although nanotopography has been shown to be a potent modulator of cell behavior, it is unclear how the nanotopographical cue, through focal adhesions, affects the nucleus, eventually influencing cell phenotype and function. Thus, current methods to apply nanotopography to regulate cell behavior are basically empirical. We, herein, engineered nanotopographies of various shapes (gratings and pillars) and dimensions (feature size, spacing and height), and thoroughly investigated cell spreading, focal adhesion organization and nuclear deformation of human primary fibroblasts as the model cell grown on the nanotopographies. We examined the correlation between nuclear deformation and cell functions such as cell proliferation, transfection and extracellular matrix protein type I collagen production. It was found that the nanoscale gratings and pillars could facilitate focal adhesion elongation by providing anchoring sites, and the nanogratings could orient focal adhesions and nuclei along the nanograting direction, depending on not only the feature size but also the spacing of the nanogratings. Compared with continuous nanogratings, discrete nanopillars tended to disrupt the formation and growth of focal adhesions and thus had less profound effects on nuclear deformation. Notably, nuclear volume could be effectively modulated by the height of nanotopography. Further, we demonstrated that cell proliferation, transfection, and type I collagen production were strongly associated with the nuclear volume, indicating that the nucleus serves as a critical mechanosensor for cell regulation. Our study delineated the relationships between focal adhesions, nucleus and cell function and highlighted that the nanotopography could regulate cell phenotype and function by modulating nuclear deformation. This study provides insight into the rational design of nanotopography for new biomaterials and the cell–substrate interfaces of implants and medical devices. PMID:26844365

  12. Fascin Regulates Nuclear Movement and Deformation in Migrating Cells.

    PubMed

    Jayo, Asier; Malboubi, Majid; Antoku, Susumu; Chang, Wakam; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Groen, Christopher; Pfisterer, Karin; Tootle, Tina; Charras, Guillaume; Gundersen, Gregg G; Parsons, Maddy

    2016-08-22

    Fascin is an F-actin-bundling protein shown to stabilize filopodia and regulate adhesion dynamics in migrating cells, and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis and increased metastatic potential in a number of cancers. Here, we identified the nuclear envelope protein nesprin-2 as a binding partner for fascin in a range of cell types in vitro and in vivo. Nesprin-2 interacts with fascin through a direct, F-actin-independent interaction, and this binding is distinct and separable from a role for fascin within filopodia at the cell periphery. Moreover, disrupting the interaction between fascin and nesprin-2 C-terminal domain leads to specific defects in F-actin coupling to the nuclear envelope, nuclear movement, and the ability of cells to deform their nucleus to invade through confined spaces. Together, our results uncover a role for fascin that operates independently of filopodia assembly to promote efficient cell migration and invasion. PMID:27554857

  13. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  14. Hot nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S.

    1992-11-01

    The goal in this thesis is thus twofold: The first is to investigate the feasibility of using heavy ion collisions to create conditions in the laboratory which are ripe for the formation of a quark-gluon plasma. The second is to develop a technique for studying some of the many non-perturbative features of this novel phase of matter.

  15. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  16. A simple polymeric model describes cell nuclear mechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Stephens, Andrew; Marko, John

    The cell nucleus must continually resist inter- and intracellular mechanical forces, and proper mechanical response is essential to basic cell biological functions as diverse as migration, differentiation, and gene regulation. Experiments probing nuclear mechanics reveal that the nucleus stiffens under strain, leading to two characteristic regimes of force response. This behavior depends sensitively on the intermediate filament protein lamin A, which comprises the outer layer of the nucleus, and the properties of the chromatin interior. To understand these mechanics, we study a simulation model of a polymeric shell encapsulating a semiflexible polymer. This minimalistic model qualitatively captures the typical experimental nuclear force-extension relation and observed nuclear morphologies. Using a Flory-like theory, we explain the simulation results and mathematically estimate the force-extension relation. The model and experiments suggest that chromatin organization is a dominant contributor to nuclear mechanics, while the lamina protects cell nuclei from large deformations.

  17. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  18. Endothelial Cells Derived From Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wing Tak; Huang, Ngan F.; Botham, Crystal M.; Sayed, Nazish; Cooke, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The endothelium plays a pivotal role in vascular homeostasis, regulating the tone of the vascular wall, and its interaction with circulating blood elements. Alterations in endothelial functions facilitate the infiltration of inflammatory cells and permit vascular smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Therefore, endothelial dysfunction is an early event in disease processes including atherosclerosis, and because of its critical role in vascular health the endothelium is worthy of the intense focus it has received. However, there are limitations to studying human endothelial function in vivo, or human vascular segments ex vivo. Thus, methods for endothelial cell culture have been developed and refined. More recently, methods to derive endothelial cells from pluripotent cells have extended the scientific range of human endothelial cell studies. Pluripotent stem cells may be generated, expanded and then differentiated into endothelial cells for in vitro studies. Constructs for molecular imaging can also be employed to facilitate tracking these cells in vivo. Furthermore, one can generate patient-specific endothelial cells to study the effects of genetic or epigenetic alterations on endothelial behavior. Finally, there is the opportunity to apply these cells for vascular therapy. This review focuses on the generation of endothelial cells from stem cells; their characterization by genetic, histological and functional studies; and their translational applications. PMID:23104878

  19. The nuclear membranes in hypertrophied human cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrans, V. J.; Jones, M.; Maron, B. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear membranes of cardiac muscle cells were studied in 134 patients with cardiac hypertrophy of various causes. Abnormalities observed consisted of: a) increased foldings and convolutions; b) nuclear pseudoinclusions formed by cytoplasmic organelles protruding into saccular invaginations of the nuclear membranes, and c) intranuclear tubules. The increased foldings and convolutions of the nuclear membranes and the nuclear pseudoinclusions appear to result from synthesis of nuclear membranes in excess of that needed to accommodate the increase in nuclear volume which occurs in hypertrophy. Intranuclear tubules were found in 6 patients and consisted of tubular invaginations, 400 to 650 A in diameter, of the inner nuclear membranes into the nucleoplasm. Some of these tubules were straight and cylindrical, and were associated with a peripheral layer of marginated chromatin; others were not associated with chromatin, appeared coiled and followed irregular courses. Intranuclear tubules in cardiac muscle cells probably represent an extreme cellular response to the stimulus of hypertrophy. Images Fig 21 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 Fig 14 Fig 1 Fig 15 Fig 2 Figs 3 and 4 Fig 5 Fig 16 Fig 17 Fig 6 Fig 18 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 19 Fig 20 PMID:164122

  20. Hot gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells. A zinc oxide reactor model, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1980-09-16

    Utilization of coal gasifiers to power MCFC requires a cleanup system to remove sulfur and particulates. Of the two near term options available for desulfurization of gasifier effluent, namely low temperature cleanup utilizing absorber/stripper technology, and hot gas cleanup utilizing metal oxides, there is a clear advantage to using hot gas cleanup. Since the MCFC will operate at 1200/sup 0/F, and the gasifier effluent could be between 1200 to 1900/sup 0/F, a hot gas cleanup system will require little or no change in process gas temperature, thereby contributing to a high overall system efficiency. A hot gas cleanup system will consist of FeO for bulk H/sub 2/S removal and ZnO for reduction of H/sub 2/S to sub ppM levels. Hot gas cleanup systems at present are not available commercially, and therefore it is the objective of this project to model the components of the system in order to help bring this technology closer to commercialization, by providing simulated operating characteristics to aid in system design, and system simulations of gasifier/MCFC systems. The modeling of the ZnO reactor is presented.

  1. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  2. Semipermeability of the nuclear membrane in the intact cell.

    PubMed

    HARDING, C V; FELDHERR, C

    1959-07-20

    The osmotic properties of nuclei in intact cells were studied by injecting solutions into the cytoplasm of amphibian oocytes. Subsequent changes in nuclear volume were recorded photographically. The injection of solutions containing polyvinylpyrrolidone or bovine serum albumin caused changes in nuclear volume which were related to the colloid osmotic pressure of the solution injected. The concentration in which no significant nuclear volume change occurred (the isotonic range) was 1.0 to 1.5 per cent polyvinylpyrrolidone (2.0 to 3.75 x 10(-4)M). 2 per cent bovine serum albumin had no significant effect on nuclear volume, whereas 4 per cent caused a significant decrease. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the permeability characteristics of the nuclear membrane. PMID:13664918

  3. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  4. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  5. Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Complexes Containing Polyadenylate from Mouse Ascites Cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Thomas J.; Billings, Peter B.; Martin, Terence E.

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-containing RNA of mouse ascites cells can be extracted in the form of 15-17S ribonucleoprotein complexes under conditions in which the bulk of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA is released as 30S complexes. The poly(A)-containing fraction of nuclear extracts has been resolved into two distinct components, 15 and 17 S; neither contains the two polypeptides of 30S ribonucleoprotein. The 17S particle contains approximately six polypeptide species of molecular masses 17,000-30,000 daltons. The 15S complex has four distinct polypeptides of higher molecular mass, including a prominent 80,000-dalton species. PMID:4368966

  6. ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death.

    PubMed

    Raab, M; Gentili, M; de Belly, H; Thiam, H R; Vargas, P; Jimenez, A J; Lautenschlaeger, F; Voituriez, Raphaël; Lennon-Duménil, A M; Manel, N; Piel, M

    2016-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses. PMID:27013426

  7. Nuclear morphometry and chromatin textural characteristics of basal cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Mendaçolli, Paola Jung; Brianezi, Gabrielli; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Histological subtypes of basal cell carcinoma have biological, evolutionary and distinct prognostic behavior. The analysis of characteristics of the nucleus can provide data on their cellular physiology and behavior. The authors of this study evaluated nuclear morphological parameters and textural patterns of chromatin from different subtypes of basal cell carcinoma: nodular (n=37), superficial (n=28) and sclerodermiform (n=28). The parameters were compared between neoplasms' subtypes and with unaffected adjacent basal epithelium. Nuclear area and diameter of sclerodermiform neoplasms were superior to the other subtypes. Chromatin's color intensity and fractal dimension were less intense in superficial subtypes. Nuclear roundness and chromatin's entropy presented lower values in tumors than in normal epithelium. There was significant correlation between morphological and textural variables of normal skin and tumors. Morphometric elements and textural chromatin's homogeneity of basal cell carcinomas may be related to evolutionary, biological and behavior particularities related to each histotype. PMID:26734870

  8. Hot-cell design considerations for interfacing eddy-current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, E.M.; Webb, J.P.; Larson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North conducts remote eddy-current examination of irradiated fuel elements. Applications include cladding breach detection and irradiation-induced ferrite examination. The seccussful use of remote eddy-current techniques is achieved by applying basic test parameters and interfacing considerations. These include impedance matching, operating frequency, and feedthrough considerations.

  9. Analyzing Cell Death by Nuclear Staining with Hoechst 33342.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    The nuclei of healthy cells are generally spherical, and the DNA is evenly distributed. During apoptosis the DNA becomes condensed, but this process does not occur during necrosis. Nuclear condensation can therefore be used to distinguish apoptotic cells from healthy cells or necrotic cells. Dyes that bind to DNA, such as Hoechst 33342 or 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), can be used to observe nuclear condensation. These dyes fluoresce at 461 nm when excited by ultraviolet light and can therefore be visualized using conventional fluorescent microscopes equipped with light sources that emit light at ∼350 nm and filter sets that permit the transmission of light at ∼460 nm. This protocol describes staining and visualization of cells stained with Hoechst 33342, but it can be adapted for staining with DAPI or other dyes. PMID:27587774

  10. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  11. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  12. Silicon quantum dots in SiOx dielectrics as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of c-Si QDs embedded in a-SiOx dielectric matrix was achieved at a low temperature ˜400°C, from one step process by reactive rf magnetron co-sputtering of c-Si wafer and pure SiO2 targets, in the (H2+Ar)- plasma. Formation of a double-barrier structure has been primarily identified from the SAX data and exclusively confirmed from the resonant tunneling current appearing in the J-E characteristic curve peaks, determined by the discrete energy levels of c-Si QDs, at which it could be used as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells.

  13. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors. PMID:27114912

  14. Nuclear tristetraprolin acts as a corepressor of multiple steroid nuclear receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Tecalco-Cruz, Ángeles; Valadéz-Graham, Viviana; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a 34-kDa, zinc finger-containing factor that in mammalian cells acts as a tumor suppressor protein through two different mechanisms. In the cytoplasm TTP promotes the decay of hundreds of mRNAs encoding cell factors involved in inflammation, tissue invasion, and metastasis. In the cell nucleus TTP has been identified as a transcriptional corepressor of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), which has been associated to the development and progression of the majority of breast cancer tumors. In this work we report that nuclear TTP modulates the transactivation activity of progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR). In recent years these steroid nuclear receptors have been shown to be of clinical and therapeutical relevance in breast cancer. The functional association between TTP and steroid nuclear receptors is supported by the finding that TTP physically interacts with ERα, PR, GR and AR in vivo. We also show that TTP overexpression attenuates the transactivation of all the steroid nuclear receptors tested. In contrast, siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous TTP expression in MCF-7 cells produced an increase in the transcriptional activities of ERα, PR, GR and AR. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of nuclear TTP in breast cancer cells is to act as a corepressor of ERα, PR, GR and AR. We propose that the reduction of TTP expression observed in different types of breast cancer tumors may contribute to the development of this disease by producing a dysregulation of the transactivation activity of multiple steroid nuclear receptors. PMID:27114912

  15. Irradiation-induced changes in nuclear shape and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, M.; Sasaki, H.; Kishino, Y.; Tsuboi, T.; Sugishita, T.; Hosokawa, T.

    1982-03-01

    Using human uterine cervical carcinoma cells transplanted in nude mice and mice leukemia L5178Y cells, changes in the cell cycle following irradiation were observed by flow cytometry (FCM), and changes in the cell nuclei during the course of irradiation were measured by FCM. Experiments in vivo as well as in vitro caused accumulation of cells in the G2 to M populations, resulting in the so-called G2 block phenomenon as revealed by FCM analysis of DNA distributions. The radiation-induced changes of nuclear shapes were dependent on abnormal mitoses, which occurred more frequently in the G2 to M phases. Therefore it is suggested that the G2 block phenomenon plays an important role in radiation-induced cell death because the process of cell death by irradiation has been shown to proceed via these abnormal mitoses.

  16. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Huseyin; Liu, Jun; Tat, Pollyanna; Heffernan, Corey; Jones, Karen L; Verma, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Even though the technique of mammalian SCNT is just over a decade old it has already resulted in numerous significant advances. Despite the recent advances in the reprogramming field, SCNT remains the bench-mark for the generation of both genetically unmodified autologous pluripotent stem cells for transplantation and for the production of cloned animals. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of SCNT, drawing comparisons with other reprogramming methods. PMID:20232594

  17. Rabbit embryonic stem cell lines derived from fertilized, parthenogenetic or somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen F.; Gai, Hui; Huang, You Z.; Li, Shan G.; Chen, Xue J.; Shi, Jian J.; Wu, Li; Liu, Ailian; Xu, Ping; Sheng, Hui Z. . E-mail: hzsheng2003@yahoo.com

    2006-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells were isolated from rabbit blastocysts derived from fertilization (conventional rbES cells), parthenogenesis (pES cells) and nuclear transfer (ntES cells), and propagated in a serum-free culture system. Rabbit ES (rbES) cells proliferated for a prolonged time in an undifferentiated state and maintained a normal karyotype. These cells grew in a monolayer with a high nuclear/cytoplasm ratio and contained a high level of alkaline phosphate activity. In addition, rbES cells expressed the pluripotent marker Oct-4, as well as EBAF2, FGF4, TDGF1, but not antigens recognized by antibodies against SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-10 and TRA-1-81. All 3 types of ES cells formed embryoid bodies and generated teratoma that contained tissue types of all three germ layers. rbES cells exhibited a high cloning efficiency, were genetically modified readily and were used as nuclear donors to generate a viable rabbit through somatic cell nuclear transfer. In combination with genetic engineering, the ES cell technology should facilitate the creation of new rabbit lines.

  18. A hot-electron thermophotonic solar cell demonstrated by thermal up-conversion of sub-bandgap photons

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Daniel J.; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Wang, Yunpeng; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The direct conversion of solar energy to electricity can be broadly separated into two main categories: photovoltaics and thermal photovoltaics, where the former utilizes gradients in electrical potential and the latter thermal gradients. Conventional thermal photovoltaics has a high theoretical efficiency limit (84%) but in practice cannot be easily miniaturized and is limited by the engineering challenges of sustaining large (>1,000 K) temperature gradients. Here we show a hot-carrier-based thermophotonic solar cell, which combines the compact nature of photovoltaic devices with the potential to reach the high-efficiency regime of thermal photovoltaics. In the device, a thermal gradient of 500 K is established by hot electrons, under Stokes illumination, rather than by raising the temperature of the material itself. Under anti-Stokes (sub-bandgap) illumination we observe a thermal gradient of ∼20 K, which is maintained by steady-state Auger heating of carriers and corresponds to a internal thermal up-conversion efficiency of 30% between the collector and solar cell. PMID:26541415

  19. Decontamination of hot cells K-1, K-3, M-1, M-3, and A-1, M-Wing, Building 200: Project final report Argonne National Laboratory-East

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to remove radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the hot cells, to decontaminate the hot cells, and to dispose of the radioactive waste. The goal was to reduce stack releases of Rn-220 and to place the hot cells in an emptied, decontaminated condition with less than 10 {micro}Sv/h (1 mrem/h) general radiation background. The following actions were needed: organize and mobilize a decontamination team; prepare decontamination plans and procedures; perform safety analyses to ensure protection of the workers, public, and environment; remotely size-reduce, package, and remove radioactive materials and equipment for waste disposal; remotely decontaminate surfaces to reduce hot cell radiation background levels to allow personnel entries using supplied air and full protective suits; disassemble and package the remaining radioactive materials and equipment using hands-on techniques; decontaminate hot cell surfaces to remove loose radioactive contaminants and to attain a less than 10 {micro}Sv/h (1 mrem/h) general background level; document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste; and conduct a final radiological survey.

  20. Control of hot-carrier relaxation for realizing ideal quantum-dot intermediate-band solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tex, David M.; Kamiya, Itaru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    For intermediate-band solar cells, the broad absorption spectrum of quantum dots (QDs) offers a favorable conversion efficiency, and photocurrent generation via efficient two-step two-photon-absorption (TS-TPA) in QDs is essential for realizing high-performance solar cells. In the last decade, many works were dedicated to improve the TS-TPA efficiency by modifying the QD itself, however, the obtained results are far from the requirements for practical applications. To reveal the mechanisms behind the low TS-TPA efficiency in QDs, we report here on two- and three-beam photocurrent measurements of InAs quantum structures embedded in AlGaAs. Comparison of two- and three-beam photocurrent spectra obtained by subbandgap excitation reveals that the QD TS-TPA efficiency is improved significantly by suppressing the relaxation of hot TS-TPA carriers to unoccupied shallow InAs quantum structure states. PMID:24535195

  1. State of Washington Department of Health radioactive air emission notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-08-15

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from the operation of the Hot Conditioning System Annex (HCSA). This information will be discussed again in the Phase II NOC, providing additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the HCSA. This Phase I NOC is defined as construct in the substructure, including but limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor; construction of the process pits and exterior walls; making necessary interface connections to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) ventilation and utility systems for personnel comfort; and extending the multi-canister over-pack (MCO) handling machine rails into the HCSA. A Phase II NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installation and is defined as the completion of the HCSA, which will consist of installation of Hot Conditioning System Equipment (HCSA), air emissions control equipment, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2,300 MT (2,530 tons) of N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The HCSA will be constructed as an addition to the CSB and will contain the HCSA. The hot conditioning system (HCS) will remove chemically-bound water and will passivate the exposed uranium surfaces associated,with the SNF. The HCSA will house seven hot

  2. Cell-by-Cell Dissection of Gene Expression and Chromosomal Interactions Reveals Consequences of Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The functional consequences of long-range nuclear reorganization were studied in a cell-by-cell analysis of gene expression and long-range chromosomal interactions in the Drosophila eye and eye imaginal disk. Position-effect variegation was used to stochastically perturb gene expression and probe nuclear reorganization. Variegating genes on rearrangements of Chromosomes X, 2, and 3 were probed for long-range interactions with heterochromatin. Studies were conducted only in tissues known to express the variegating genes. Nuclear structure was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes to the variegating gene and heterochromatin. Gene expression was determined alternately by immunofluorescence against specific proteins and by eye pigment autofluorescence. This allowed cell-by-cell comparisons of nuclear architecture between cells in which the variegating gene was either expressed or silenced. Very strong correlations between heterochromatic association and silencing were found. Expressing cells showed a broad distribution of distances between variegating genes and their own centromeric heterochromatin, while silenced cells showed a very tight distribution centered around very short distances, consistent with interaction between the silenced genes and heterochromatin. Spatial and temporal analysis of interactions with heterochromatin indicated that variegating genes primarily associate with heterochromatin in cells that have exited the cell cycle. Differentiation was not a requirement for association, and no differences in association were observed between cell types. Thus, long-range interactions between distal chromosome regions and their own heterochromatin have functional consequences for the organism. PMID:15737020

  3. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Cross Talk in Cell Death: Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein first described to facilitate DNA base excision repair. Recent work has expanded the physiologic functions of PARP-1 and it is clear that the full range of biologic actions of this important protein are not yet fully understood. Regulation of the product of PARP-1, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), is a dynamic process with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) playing a major role in the degradation of the polymer. Under pathophysiologic situations, over activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) results in unregulated PAR synthesis and widespread neuronal cell death. Once thought to be necrotic cell death due to energy failure, we recently found that PARP-1 dependent cell death is dependent on the generation of PAR that triggers nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to result in caspase-independent cell death. This form of cell death is distinct from apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy and is termed Parthanatos. PARP-1 dependent cell death has been implicated in tissues throughout the body and in diseases afflicting hundreds of millions world wide including stroke, Parkinson's disease, heart attack, diabetes, and ischemia reperfusion injury in numerous tissues. The breadth of indications for PARP-1 injury make Parthanatos a clinically important form of cell death to understand and control. PMID:19076445

  4. Preliminary development of thermal nuclear cell homogenization code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Z.; Shafii, M. A.; Yudha, S. P.; Waris, A.; Rijal, K.

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear fuel cell homogenization for thermal reactors usually include three main parts, i.e., fast energy resonance part which usually adopt narrow resonance approximation to treat the resonance, low (intermediate) energy region in which the resonance can not be treated accurately using NR approximation and therefore we should use intermediate resonance treatment, and thermal energy region (very low) in which the effect of thermal must be treated properly. In n this study the application of the intermediate resonance approximation treatment for low energy nuclear resonance is discussed. The method is iterative based. As a sample the method is applied in U-235 low lying resonance and the result is presented and discussed.

  5. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  6. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  7. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  8. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  9. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Commitment is Inhibited by Nuclear Akt Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Wu, Weitao; Quijada, Pearl; Sussman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Stem cell therapies to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue represent a novel approach to treat heart disease. However, the majority of adoptively transferred stem cells delivered to damaged myocardium do not survive long enough to impart protective benefits, resulting in modest functional improvements. Strategies to improve survival and proliferation of stem cells show promise for significantly enhancing cardiac function and regeneration. Objective Determine if injected cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) genetically modified to overexpress nuclear Akt (CPCeA) increase structural and functional benefits to infarcted myocardium relative to control CPCs. Methods and Results CPCeA exhibit significantly increased proliferation and secretion of paracrine factors compared to CPCs. However, CPCeA exhibit impaired capacity for lineage commitment in vitro. Infarcted hearts receiving intramyocardial injection of CPCeA have increased recruitment of endogenous c-kit cells compared to CPCs, but neither population provides long-term functional and structural improvements compared to saline injected controls. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt alleviated blockade of lineage commitment in CPCeA. Conclusions Although overexpression of nuclear Akt promotes rapid proliferation and secretion of protective paracrine factors, the inability of CPCeA to undergo lineage commitment hinders their capacity to provide functional or structural benefits to infarcted hearts. Despite enhanced recruitment of endogenous CPCs, lack of functional improvement in CPCeA treated hearts demonstrates CPC lineage commitment is essential to the regenerative response. Effective stem cell therapies must promote cellular survival and proliferation without inhibiting lineage commitment. Since CPCeA exhibit remarkable proliferative potential, an inducible system mediating nuclear Akt expression could be useful to augment cell therapy approaches. PMID:21350213

  10. AFC-1 Transmutation Fuels Post-Irradiation Hot Cell Examination 4-8 at.% - Final Report (Irradiation Experiments AFC-1B, -1F and -1Æ)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Hilton; Douglas Porter; Steven Hayes

    2006-09-01

    The AFC-1B, AFC-1F and AFC-1Æ irradiation tests are part of a series of test irradiations designed to evaluate the feasibility of the use of actinide bearing fuel forms in advanced fuel cycles for the transmutation of transuranic elements from nuclear waste. The tests were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to an intermediate burnup of 4 to 8 at% (2.7 - 6.8 x 1020 fiss/cm3). The tests contain metallic and nitride fuel forms with non-fertile (i.e., no uranium) and low-fertile (i.e., uranium bearing) compositions. Results of postirradiation hot cell examinations of AFC-1 irradiation tests are reported for eleven metallic alloy transmutation fuel rodlets and five nitride transmutation fuel rodlets. Non-destructive examinations included visual examination, dimensional inspection, gamma scan analysis, and neutron radiography. Detailed examinations, including fission gas puncture and analysis, metallography / ceramography and isotopics and burnup analyses, were performed on five metallic alloy and three nitride transmutation fuels. Fuel performance of both metallic alloy and nitride fuel forms was best correlated with fission density as a burnup metric rather than at.% depletion. The actinide bearing transmutation metallic alloy compositions exhibit irradiation performance very similar to U-xPu-10Zr fuel at equivalent fission densities. The irradiation performance of nitride transmutation fuels was comparable to limited data published on mixed nitride systems.

  11. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor Regulates Gametogenesis in Developing Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Sabour, Davood; Xu, Xueping; Chung, Arthur C. K.; Le Menuet, Damien; Ko, Kinarm; Tapia, Natalia; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Gentile, Luca; Greber, Boris; Hübner, Karin; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Guangming; Schöler, Hans R.; Cooney, Austin J.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF; Nr6a1), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor gene family of transcription factors, during gastrulation and neurulation is critical for normal embryogenesis in mice. Gcnf represses the expression of the POU-domain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) during mouse post-implantation development. Although Gcnf expression is not critical for the embryonic segregation of the germ cell lineage, we found that sexually dimorphic expression of Gcnf in germ cells correlates with the expression of pluripotency-associated genes, such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, as well as the early meiotic marker gene Stra8. To elucidate the role of Gcnf during mouse germ cell differentiation, we generated an ex vivo Gcnf-knockdown model in combination with a regulated CreLox mutation of Gcnf. Lack of Gcnf impairs normal spermatogenesis and oogenesis in vivo, as well as the derivation of germ cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. Inactivation of the Gcnf gene in vivo leads to loss of repression of Oct4 expression in both male and female gonads. PMID:25140725

  12. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  13. The Spatial Predilection for Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Neoplasia: A "Hot Zone" for Endoscopic Screening and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-04-01

    Early esophageal squamous cell neoplasias (ESCNs) are easily missed with conventional white-light endoscopy. This study aimed to assess whether early ESCNs have a spatial predilection and the patterns of recurrence after endoscopic treatment.We analyzed the circumferential and longitudinal location of early ESCNs, as well as their correlations with exposure to carcinogens in a cohort of 162 subjects with 248 early ESCNs; 219 of which were identified by screening and 29 by surveillance endoscopy. The circumferential location was identified using a clock-face orientation, and the longitudinal location was identified according to the distance from the incisor.The most common circumferential and longitudinal distributions of the early ESCNs were found in the 6 to 9 o'clock quadrant (38.5%) and at 26 to 30 cm from the incisor (41.3%), respectively. A total of 163 lesions (75%) were located in the lower hemisphere arc, and 149 (68.4%) were located at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor. One hundred eleven (51%) early ESCNs were centered within the "hot zone" (i.e., lower hemisphere arc of the esophagus at 26 to 35 cm from the incisor), which comprised 20% of the esophageal area. Exposure to alcohol, betel nut, or cigarette was risk factors for the development of early ESCNs in the lower hemisphere. After complete endoscopic treatment, the mean annual incidence of metachronous tumors was 10%. In addition, 43% of the metachronous recurrent neoplasias developed within the "hot zone." Cox regression analysis revealed that the index tumor within the hot zone (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-8.68; P = 0.02) and the presence of numerous Lugol-voiding lesions in the esophageal background mucosa were independent predictors for metachronous recurrence (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.36-15.56; P = 0.01).We identified a hot zone that may be used to enhance the detection of early ESCNs during endoscopic screening and surveillance, especially in areas that lack

  14. [Inhibitory effects of a hot water extract from Japanese tea on the cell growth of mutans streptococci].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Loyola, J P; Sobue, S

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of a hot water extract from Japanese tea on the cellular growth of mutans streptococci in vitro. The extract contained polyphenol compounds, mainly catechin derivatives. Few fluoride components were contained in the extract. Streptococcus mutans MT8148R (serotype c) and S. sobrinus MT6715 (serotype g) strains were used in the present study. The organisms (10-10(7) CFU/ml) were cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) and tryptose phosphate (TP) broths containing the tea extract (0-8 mg/ml). After incubation for 24-48 hours the cell numbers in the cultures were determined. Furthermore, cell growth of these strains on BHI agar plates containing the extract (0-2 mg/ml) were examined. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The tea extract (2-8 mg/ml) in BHI broth inhibited remarkably the growth of S. mutans and S. sobrinus (inoculum size; 10(6) CFU/ml). No difference in susceptibility to the tea extract between S. mutans and S. sobrinus was noted. 2. The cell growth of both strains in TP broth was inhibited by the tea extract. However S. sobrinus was found to be more sensitive to the extract than S. mutans. 3. Growth of S. sobrinus cells on the BHI agar plate was suppressed by the tea extract more effectively than that of S. mutans. These results suggest that the tea extract would be useful as an anti-cariogenic agent. PMID:2133962

  15. Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi

    2008-01-15

    Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

  16. Nuclear cysteine cathepsin variants in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tedelind, Sofia; Poliakova, Kseniia; Valeta, Amanda; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Yemanaberhan, Eyoel Lemma; Heldin, Nils-Erik; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Weber, Ekkehard; Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša; Turk, Boris; Bogyo, Matthew; Brix, Klaudia

    2010-08-01

    The cysteine peptidase cathepsin B is important in thyroid physiology by being involved in thyroid prohormone processing initiated in the follicular lumen and completed in endo-lysosomal compartments. However, cathepsin B has also been localized to the extrafollicular space and is therefore suggested to promote invasiveness and metastasis in thyroid carcinomas through, e.g., ECM degradation. In this study, immunofluorescence and biochemical data from subcellular fractionation revealed that cathepsin B, in its single- and two-chain forms, is localized to endo-lysosomes in the papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line KTC-1 and in the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines HTh7 and HTh74. This distribution is not affected by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) incubation of HTh74, the only cell line that expresses a functional TSH-receptor. Immunofluorescence data disclosed an additional nuclear localization of cathepsin B immunoreactivity. This was supported by biochemical data showing a proteolytically active variant slightly smaller than the cathepsin B proform in nuclear fractions. We also demonstrate that immunoreactions specific for cathepsin V, but not cathepsin L, are localized to the nucleus in HTh74 in peri-nucleolar patterns. As deduced from co-localization studies and in vitro degradation assays, we suggest that nuclear variants of cathepsins are involved in the development of thyroid malignancies through modification of DNA-associated proteins. PMID:20536394

  17. Nuclear PI3K signaling in cell growth and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William J.; Lehmann, Peter Z.; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a major driving force in a variety of cellular functions. Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in many human diseases including cancer. While the activity of the cytoplasmic PI3K/Akt pathway has been extensively studied, the functions of these molecules and their effector proteins within the nucleus are poorly understood. Harboring key cellular processes such as DNA replication and repair as well as nascent messenger RNA transcription, the nucleus provides a unique compartmental environment for protein–protein and protein–DNA/RNA interactions required for cell survival, growth, and proliferation. Here we summarize recent advances made toward elucidating the nuclear PI3K/Akt signaling cascade and its key components within the nucleus as they pertain to cell growth and tumorigenesis. This review covers the spatial and temporal localization of the major nuclear kinases having PI3K activities and the counteracting phosphatases as well as the role of nuclear PI3K/Akt signaling in mRNA processing and exportation, DNA replication and repair, ribosome biogenesis, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. PMID:25918701

  18. Silicon quantum dots in SiO{sub x} dielectrics as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-06-24

    Thin films of c-Si QDs embedded in a-SiO{sub x} dielectric matrix was achieved at a low temperature ∼400°C, from one step process by reactive rf magnetron co-sputtering of c-Si wafer and pure SiO{sub 2} targets, in the (H{sub 2}+Ar)- plasma. Formation of a double-barrier structure has been primarily identified from the SAX data and exclusively confirmed from the resonant tunneling current appearing in the J-E characteristic curve peaks, determined by the discrete energy levels of c-Si QDs, at which it could be used as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells.

  19. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to analyze the thermal field of a non-nuclear tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, radiative and conjugate heat transfers.

  20. Effect of microstructure of carbon steel on magnetite formation in simulated Hot Conditioning environment of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Prafful Kumar; Kiran Kumar, M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2015-09-01

    The objective of present investigation is to establish the role of starting microstructure of carbon steel on the magnetite formation behaviour in Hot Conditioning simulated environment. Two grades of carbon steel (low and high carbon) were subjected to selective heat-treatments to generate different microstructures: martensite, tempered martensite and modified ferrite-pearlite. Oxidation was carried out in lithiated water of pH 10-10.2 in a static autoclave at 270 °C. The results of the investigation clearly establish that: (a) high carbon steel (0.63% C) showed a relatively higher rate of oxidation over the low carbon (0.08% C) grade at all the test durations and (b) the oxidation rates for both the grades were sensitive to microstructural differences at initial stages of oxidation while the differences narrowed down after 72 h of exposure. The oxide formed was established to be magnetite on all the specimens.

  1. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  2. Viscum Album Var Hot Water Extract Mediates Anti-cancer Effects through G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in SK-Hep1 Human Hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Joseph Flores; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lumbera, Wenchie Marie Lara; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2015-01-01

    Viscum album var (VAV) also known as mistletoe, has long been categorized as a traditional herbal medicine in Asia. In addition to its immunomodulating activities, mistletoe has also been used in the treatment of chronic hepatic disorders in China and Korea. There are numerous reports showing that VAV possesses anti-cancer effects, however influence on human hepatocarcinoma has never been elucidated. In the present study, hot water extracts of VAV was evaluated for its potential anti-cancer effect in vitro. SK-Hep1 cells were treated with VAV (50-400 ug/ml) for both 24 and 48 hours then cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the proportion of SK-Hep1 in the different stages of cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted to measure expression of cell cycle arrest related genes and proteins respectively. VAV dose dependently inhibited the proliferation of SK-Hep1 cells without any cytotoxicity with normal Chang liver cell (CCL-13). Flow cytometry analysis showed that VAV extract inhibited the cell cycle of SK-Hep1 cells via G1 phase arrest. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis both revealed that cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclin D1 gene expression were significantly down regulated while p21 was upregulated dose dependently by VAV treatment. Combined down regulation of Cdk2, Cyclin D1 and up regulation of p21 can result in cell death. These results indicate that VAV showed evidence of anti-cancer activity through G1 phase cell cycle arrest in SK-Hep1 cells. PMID:26434853

  3. Somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cell lines in humans: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Langerova, Alena; Fulka, Helena; Fulka, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The recent paper, published by Mitalipov's group in Cell (Tachibana et al., 2013 ), reporting the production of human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), opens again the debate if, in the era of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the production of these cells is indeed necessary and, if so, whether they are different from ESCs produced from spare embryos and iPSCs. It is our opinion that these questions are very difficult to answer because it is still unclear whether and how normal ESCs differ from iPSCs. PMID:24180743

  4. Nuclear anomalies in the buccal cells of calcite factory workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The micronucleus (MN) assay on exfoliated buccal cells is a useful and minimally invasive method for monitoring genetic damage in humans. To determine the genotoxic effects of calcite dust that forms during processing, MN assay was carried out in exfoliated buccal cells of 50 (25 smokers and 25 non-smokers) calcite factory workers and 50 (25 smokers and 25 non-smokers) age- and sex-matched control subjects. Frequencies of nuclear abnormalities (NA) other than micronuclei, such as binucleates, karyorrhexis, karyolysis and ‘broken eggs', were also evaluated. Micronuclei and the other aforementioned anomalies were analysed by two way analysis of covariance. The linear correlations between the types of micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities were determined by Spearman's Rho. There was a positive correlation between micronuclei and other types of nuclear abnormalities in accordance with the Spearman's Rho test. Results showed statistically significant difference between calcite fabric workers and control groups. MN and NA frequencies in calcite fabric workers were significantly higher than those in control groups (p < 0.05). The results of this study indicate that calcite fabric workers are under risk of significant cytogenetic damage. PMID:21637497

  5. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  6. Structural and functional analysis of cell adhesion and nuclear envelope nano-topography in cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The cell death mechanisms of necrosis and apoptosis generate biochemical and morphological changes in different manners. However, the changes that occur in cell adhesion and nuclear envelope (NE) topography, during necrosis and apoptosis, are not yet fully understood. Here, we show the different alterations in cell adhesion function, as well as the topographical changes occurring to the NE, during the necrotic and apoptotic cell death process, using the xCELLigence system and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Studies using xCELLigence technology and AFM have shown that necrotic cell death induced the expansion of the cell adhesion area, but did not affect the speed of cell adhesion. Necrotic nuclei showed a round shape and presence of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Moreover, we found that the process of necrosis in combination with apoptosis (termed nepoptosis here) resulted in the reduction of the cell adhesion area and cell adhesion speed through the activation of caspases. Our findings showed, for the first time, a successful characterization of NE topography and cell adhesion during necrosis and apoptosis, which may be of importance for the understanding of cell death and might aid the design of future drug delivery methods for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26490051

  7. Structural and functional analysis of cell adhesion and nuclear envelope nano-topography in cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The cell death mechanisms of necrosis and apoptosis generate biochemical and morphological changes in different manners. However, the changes that occur in cell adhesion and nuclear envelope (NE) topography, during necrosis and apoptosis, are not yet fully understood. Here, we show the different alterations in cell adhesion function, as well as the topographical changes occurring to the NE, during the necrotic and apoptotic cell death process, using the xCELLigence system and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Studies using xCELLigence technology and AFM have shown that necrotic cell death induced the expansion of the cell adhesion area, but did not affect the speed of cell adhesion. Necrotic nuclei showed a round shape and presence of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Moreover, we found that the process of necrosis in combination with apoptosis (termed nepoptosis here) resulted in the reduction of the cell adhesion area and cell adhesion speed through the activation of caspases. Our findings showed, for the first time, a successful characterization of NE topography and cell adhesion during necrosis and apoptosis, which may be of importance for the understanding of cell death and might aid the design of future drug delivery methods for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26490051

  8. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  9. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  10. Micronuclei Frequencies and Nuclear Abnormalities in Oral Exfoliated Cells of Nuclear Power Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Babannavar, Roopa; Lohra, Abhishek; Kodgi, Ashwin; Bapure, Sunil; Rao, Yogesh; J., Arun; Malghan, Manjunath

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequencies of Micronuclei (MN) and other Nuclear abnormalities (NA) from exfoliated oral mucosal cells in Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers. Materials and Methods: Micronucleus frequencies in oral exfoliated cells were done from individuals not known to be exposed to either environmental or occupational carcinogens (Group I). Similarly samples were obtained from full-time Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers with absence of Leukemia and any malignancy (Group II) and workers diagnosed as leukemic patients and undergoing treatment (Group III). Results: There was statistically significant difference between Group I, Group II & Group III. MN and NA frequencies in Leukemic Patients were significantly higher than those in exposed workers &control groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion: MN and other NA reflect genetic changes, events associated with malignancies. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work in NPS about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures. PMID:25654022