Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear industry support

  1. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  2. DOE/Industrial Matching Grant to Support Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear-Related /Disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, David M.

    2002-08-31

    Final Report - Assurance is given that monies received through the matching grant were, in general, disburse as outlined in the original proposal. Specifically, the grant funded graduate students who participated in the nuclear engineering course opinions. The contract provided for a number of research stipends and student salaries for graduates working with industrial partners affiliated with the CENTER/NEP program (i.e., Envirocare, E-cubed, Aerotest, Little Mountain/Boeing). When necessary, supplies were purchased that supported these student activities. No funds were distributed for faculty or staff salaries.

  3. Nuclear Industry Support Services by the Buffalo Materials Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The Buffalo Materials Research Center (BMRC) is located on the campus of the State University of New York at Buffalo, Principal facilities within BMRC include a 2-MW PULSTAR, low-enrichment reactor, an electron accelerator, and irradiated materials remote testing facilities. The reactor and the materials testing facilities have been utilized extensively in support of the power reactor community since 1961. This paper briefly highlights the nature and scope of this service. The BMRC is operated for the university by Buffalo Materials Research, Inc., a private for-profit company, which is a subsidiary of Materials Engineering Associates, Inc. (MEA), a Maryland-based materials testing company. A primary mission of MEA has been research on the effects of neutron irradiation on reactor structural materials, including those used for pressure vessel and piping systems. The combined resources of MEA and BMRC have played a pivotal role in the assessment of reactor pressure vessel safety both in the United States and abroad and in the development of new radiation-resistant steels.

  4. Industry Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is responsible for the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project, a sub-element task of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) Project of the NASA Aviation System Capacity Program (ASC). The AC/ATM Project is developing new communications technologies and tools that will improve throughput in the U.S. Air Traffic Control System. The goal of the AC/ATM Project is to enable a communications infrastructure providing the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize benefits of the future mature Free-Flight environment. The capabilities and scope of communications technologies needed to accomplish this goal depend on characteristics of the future Free-Flight environment. There are many operational concepts being proposed for a future ATM system to enable user flexibility and efficiency. GRC s focus is on developing new technologies and techniques to support the digital communication of information involving airborne and ground-based users. However, the technologies and techniques must be integrated with the systems and services that industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are developing. Thus, GRC needs to monitor and provide input to the various industry and FAA organizations and committees that are specifying new systems and services. Adoption of technologies by the FAA is partially dependent on acceptance of the technology by the aviation community. The commercial aviation community in particular would like to adopt technologies that can be used throughout the world. As a result, the adoption of common or at least compatible technologies by European countries is a key factor in getting commitments to those technologies by the US aviation community. GRC desires to keep informed of European activities that relate to aviation communication technologies, particularly those that are being supported by Eurocontrol.

  5. Interdisciplinary studies on the development of nuclear-fueled circulatory support systems: Collaboration of industry and academe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to acquaint the Houston community with specific areas of available technology, both public and private, to demonstrate to industry how this technology may be acquired and put to use to provide new and useful services for man. Much of the technology utilized in the development of nuclear-fueled circulatory support systems in our laboratories has evolved from industry, NASA, and AEC; our projects involve radiation biology, thermodynamics, energy transfers, hemodynamics, hematology, pathology, and surgery.

  6. Industry support for dental education.

    PubMed

    Sudzina, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between industry and dental education are multiple and mutually beneficial. Perhaps most prominent are collaboration on research and development of products and technologies and the knowledge and public credibility that accompany them. Industry is also looked to for product and equipment support in schools and increasingly for help with outreach and access programs schools provide for underserved populations. Not as widely recognized, but still quite important, are the programs for support of student research and sharing of management expertise through exchange of board members. A quarter century ago, the relationship between schools and industry was at arm's length. There was a mistrust in schools that feared exposing their students to commercial contact. Today the relationship has evolved into a mutual search for joint benefits with an eye on the future of the profession and its relationship with patients. This is illustrated in the American Dental Education Association Corporate Council. PMID:16350924

  7. Industry-Supported Team Students' Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glozman, Vladimir

    The industry-supported team students' project enhances professional, intellectual, and personal development of students while addressing the needs of local industry. In addition to achieving academic excellence, the students are exposed to industry requirements, and excel in effective oral communication and cooperative teamwork. The teamwork…

  8. Supporting industries energy and environmental profile

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-09-21

    As part of its Industries of the Future strategy, the Industrial Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy works with energy-intensive industries to improve efficiency, reduce waste, and increase productivity. These seven Industries of the Future (IOFs) – aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel – rely on several other so-called “supporting industries” to supply materials and processes necessary to the products that the IOFs create. The supporting industries, in many cases, also provide great opportunities for realizing energy efficiency gains in IOF processes.

  9. Concrete waterproofing in nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Scherbyna, Alexander N; Urusov, Sergei V

    2005-01-01

    One of the main points of aggregate safety during the transportation and storage of radioactive materials is to supply waterproofing for all constructions having direct contact with radiating substances and providing strength, seismic shielding etc. This is the problem with all waterside structures in nuclear industry and concrete installations in the treatment and storage of radioactive materials. In this connection, the problem of developing efficient techniques both for the repair of operating constructions and the waterproofing of new objects of the specified assignment is genuine. Various techniques of concrete waterproofing are widely applied in the world today. However, in conditions of radiation many of these techniques can bring not a profit but irreparable damage of durability and reliability of a concrete construction; for instance, when waterproofing materials contain organic constituents, polymers etc. Application of new technology or materials in basic construction elements requires in-depth analysis and thorough testing. The price of an error might be very large. A comparative analysis shows that one of the most promising types of waterproofing materials for radiation loaded concrete constructions is "integral capillary systems" (ICS). The tests on radiation, thermal and strength stability of ICS and ICS-treated concrete samples were initiated and fulfilled in RFNC-VNIITF. The main result is--ICS applying is increasing of waterproofing and strength properties of concrete in conditions of readiation The paper is devoted to describing the research strategy, the tests and their results and also to planning of new tests. PMID:16604701

  10. Nuclear industry will be short of engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, M.

    1990-09-13

    This article discusses the potential shortage of nuclear engineers due to reduction of educational and training facilities and difficulty in attracting minorities into nuclear engineering. The article reports on recommendations from the National Research Council Nuclear Education Study Committee on attracting minorities to nuclear engineering, increasing DOE fellowships, funding for research and development, involvement of utilities and vendors, and support of the American Nuclear Society's advocacy of nuclear engineering education.

  11. Emergence of the nuclear industry and associated crime. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vaught, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    Nuclear energy, in weapons production and electrical power generation, is a technology that has endured public scrutiny since the late 1940s. Societal acceptance of this industry has been affected by controversy in the following areas: health effects of exposure to radiation, possible consequences resulting from accidents, and nuclear nonproliferation. The literature review begins in Chapter 2 by examining the changing public perceptions of nuclear energy over the last forty years. Support for the ideals and practices of the industry has often wavered, due to media representation of incidents, accidents, and potential catastrophic events. The second part of the chapter highlights the crimes associated with nuclear energy in a chronological order of concern by nuclear industry security specialists. Research has found certain types of crime to be more prevalent during particular eras than others. Crimes instigated by spies, peace activists, terrorists, and the insider (employee) are reviewed, with an emphasis on insider crime.

  12. Options contracts in the nuclear fuel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, D.M.

    1995-04-01

    This article discusses options trading in the nuclear fuels industry. Although there now exists no formal options market in the nuclear industry, flexibilities, or embedded options, are actually quite common in the long-term supply contracts. The value of these flexibilities can be estimated by applying the methods used to evaluate options. The method used is the Black-Scholes Model, and it is applied to a number of examples.

  13. Industry Support of Academic Research Growing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    National Science Board's fourteenth annual report to Congress indicates that university/industry relationships remained vigorous and varied during the 1960s/1970s, that corporate support of academic research is significantly higher than generally believed and that employee recruitment is an impetus for such alliances. These and other findings from…

  14. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  15. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Manpower requirements in the nuclear power industry, 1982-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this study is to project occupational employment needs, created by growth and employee turnover, for the nuclear power industry over the next decade. Employment data for 1981 were collected in a survey conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations of its 60 member utilities. The data were analyzed statistically to identify factors that account for variations in power plant staffing and the number of off-site nuclear support personnel employed by a utility. Total employment in the nuclear power industry is predicted to increase from 54,400 in 1981 to 73,600 in 1991. Nuclear generating capacity will increase from 58 to 124 gigawatts, based on the midline forecast of the Energy Information Administration. The projections assume that current regulations will remain in effect and no new plans for additional generating facilities will be initiated.

  17. Graphite for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Fuller, E.L.; Romanoski, G.R.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite finds applications in both fission and fusion reactors. Fission reactors harness the energy liberated when heavy elements, such as uranium or plutonium, fragment or fission''. Reactors of this type have existed for nearly 50 years. The first nuclear fission reactor, Chicago Pile No. 1, was constructed of graphite under a football stand at Stagg Field, University of Chicago. Fusion energy devices will produce power by utilizing the energy produced when isotopes of the element hydrogen are fused together to form helium, the same reaction that powers our sun. The role of graphite is very different in these two reactor systems. Here we summarize the function of the graphite in fission and fusion reactors, detailing the reasons for their selection and discussing some of the challenges associated with their application in nuclear fission and fusion reactors. 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

    2013-10-01

    Today’s online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRI’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  19. Locking support for nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ledin, Eric

    1980-01-01

    A locking device for supporting and locking a nuclear fuel assembly within a cylindrical bore formed by a support plate, the locking device including a support and locking sleeve having upwardly extending fingers forming wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annular tapered surface on the fuel assembly and the support plate bore as well as downwardly extending fingers having wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annularly tapered surface on the support plate bore and the fuel assembly whereby the sleeve tends to support and lock the fuel assembly in place within the bore by its own weight while facilitating removal and/or replacement of the fuel assembly.

  20. The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Ed; Connor, Donna; Keighley, Debbie

    2013-07-01

    The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

  1. NMA supports the industry's agenda in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-02-15

    New leadership takes over at the National Mining Association, while it readies itself to defend mining interest and educate a new presidential administration and congress. Harold 'Hal' Quinn was appointed CEO on 10 September 2008. In an interview he talks about NMA's top priorities. These include mine safety performance, climate change, training and regulatory issues. The NMA's overall objective is to make sure that USA has a public policy environment that ensures a healthy and vital domestic mining industry so that we can provide the energy and material needed for the public on a cost-effective basis. 1 photo.

  2. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  3. International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Pierre, D.E.; Steinmaus, K.L.; Moon, B.D.

    1994-07-01

    DOE is committed to providing technologies to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to meet escalating monitoring and inspection requirements associated with the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). One example of technology provided to the IAEA is the information management and remote monitoring capabilities being customized for the IAEA by the International Safeguards Division of the Office of Non-Proliferation and National Security. The ongoing Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) program is an interlaboratory effort providing the IAEA with a range of information management capabilities designed to enhance the effectiveness of their nuclear inspection activities. The initial commitment involved the customization of computer capabilities to provide IAEA with the basic capability to geographically organize, store, and retrieve the large quantity of information involved in their nuclear on site inspection activities in Iraq. This initial system, the International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST), was developed by DOE`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). To date, two INSIST workstations have been deployed at the IAEA. The first has been used to support the IAEA Action Team in the inspection of Iraqi nuclear facilities since August 1993. A second, and similar, workstation has been deployed to support environmental monitoring under the IAEA 93+2 Programme. Both INSIST workstations geographically integrate analog (video) and digital data to provide an easy to use and effective tool for storing retrieving and displaying multimedia site and facility information including world-wide maps, satellite and aerial imagery, on site photography, live inspection videos, and treaty and inspection textual information. The interactive, UNIX-based workstations have a variety of peripheral devices for information input and output. INSIST software includes commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) modules and application-specific code developed at PNL.

  4. PREVALENCE OF INDUSTRY SUPPORT AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO RESEARCH INTEGRITY

    PubMed Central

    Tereskerz, Patricia M.; Hamric, Ann B.; Guterbock, Thomas M.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Most U.S. clinical trials are funded by industry. Opportunities exist for sponsors to influence research in ways that jeopardize research objectivity. The purpose of this study was to survey U.S. medical school faculty to assess financial arrangements between investigators and industry to learn about investigators’ first hand knowledge of the effects of industry sponsorship on research. Here we show first-hand knowledge that compromises occurred in: research participants’ well-being (9%), research initiatives (35%), publication of results (28%), interpretation of research data (25%), and scientific advancement (20%) because of industry support. Financial relationships with industry were prevalent and considered important to conducting respondents’ research. PMID:19353387

  5. Manpower Requirements in the Nuclear Power Industry, 1982-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ruth C.

    A study projected employment needs created by growth and employee turnover for the nuclear power industry over the next decade. Only employment by electric utilities in the commercial generation of nuclear power was investigated. Employment data for 1981 were collected in a survey of 60 member utilities of the Institute of Nuclear Power…

  6. Quality user support supporting quality users. [Historical trends and developments in computer support in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, T.C.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes how Oryx Energy Co. addressed problems and opportunities created by the explosive growth in computing power and needs coupled with industry contraction. A successful user-support strategy is described. Characteristics of the program include (1) client-driven support, (2) empowerment of highly skilled professionals to fill the support role, (3) routine and ongoing modification of the support plan, (4) use of the support assignment to create highly trained advocates on the line, and (5) integration of the support role to the reservoir management team. Results of the plan include a highly trained work force, stakeholder teams that include support personnel, and global support from a centralized support organization.

  7. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-12-31

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  8. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  9. Cyber security best practices for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Badr, I.

    2012-07-01

    When deploying software based systems, such as, digital instrumentation and controls for the nuclear industry, it is vital to include cyber security assessment as part of architecture and development process. When integrating and delivering software-intensive systems for the nuclear industry, engineering teams should make use of a secure, requirements driven, software development life cycle, ensuring security compliance and optimum return on investment. Reliability protections, data loss prevention, and privacy enforcement provide a strong case for installing strict cyber security policies. (authors)

  10. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pei Fang Ng; Li Li; Shaobin Wang; Zhonghua Zhu; Gaoqing Lu; Zifeng Yan

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud, a by-product of the aluminium industry) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H{sub 2} adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. 35 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Korean nuclear industry hit by corruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soo Bin

    2013-12-01

    After a four-month investigation, a court in South Korea has indicted 100 officials and suppliers on corruption charges over bogus safety certifications for parts that were supplied to some of the country's 23 nuclear reactors.

  12. Support for Industrialization as a Means to Rural Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Edward L.; Colclough, Glenna

    To determine degree of local support for industrialization as a means of rural economic development, leaders and influentials in three South Carolina counties were interviewed in 1977. Each was asked to define "development" and to list and rank three aspects of his county he especially liked and its most important needs or problems. Responses…

  13. Tackling the nuclear manpower shortage: industry, educators must work together

    SciTech Connect

    Witzig, W.

    1981-10-01

    A 50% decline in graduate enrollment and an increase to 50% of foreign nationals among the nuclear engineering students since 1973 at Pennsylvania State University is typical of national trends, which have led to the closing of 13 undergraduate programs across the country. Penn State's proximity to Three Mile Island had less effect than its interactions with high schools and utilities in keeping the nuclear program as strong as it is. Penn State operates three separate career programs to interest high school students in a nuclear career. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) educational assistance reflects industry interest, but more scholarships are needed to broaden student awareness. (DCK)

  14. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pei Fang; Li, Li; Wang, Shaobin; Zhu, Zhonghua; Lu, Gaoqing; Yan, Zifeng

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H2 adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. PMID:17547209

  15. A Role for Industry in Promoting Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

    2009-11-01

    Industry has a unique opportunity and critical role to play in strengthening governmental efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear, radiological, and dual-use materials and technologies that could be used in a nuclear or radiological weapon. Governmental regulations and policies are in effect at both the national and international levels to inhibit access to such materials and technologies by illegitimate end-users. However, the discovery of an illegal nuclear network, spearheaded by Pakistani scientist A Q Khan, increased international concern about what more could be done to prevent proliferation. Industry is well-poised and has a strong incentive to take a more proactive role to complement existing governmental efforts. Companies can be a tremendous help in ensuring that illicit diversions do not occur by increasing their oversight over the supply chain.

  16. Applied nuclear physics in support of SBSS

    SciTech Connect

    Strottman, D.

    1995-10-01

    Since the advent of the 800-MeV proton linear accelerator over 3 decades ago, the facilities on the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) mesa have pioneered many developments that provide unique capabilities within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in the world. New technologies based on the use of the world`s most intense, medium-energy linac, LAMPF, are being developed. They include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, production of tritium, and experiments for the science-based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involve the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn establish new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. Other areas of technology such as neutron and proton therapy applications are also placing new requirements on nuclear data. The proposed Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) now under discussion combined with the appropriate instrumentation will have unique features and capabilities of which there were previously only aspirations.

  17. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, V.; Fleming, I.; Grant, T.; Hauth, J.; Hendrickson, J.; Kono, B.; Moore, C.; Olson, J.; Saari, L.; Toquam, J.; Wieringa, D.; Yost, P.; Hendrickson, P.; Moon, D.; Scott, W.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas in nuclear power plants are fit for duty. The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in the report is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other sources of impairment on the job are discussed. The report examines the prevalence of fitness-for-duty problems and discusses the use and effects of illicit drugs, prescription drugs, over-the-counter preparations and alcohol. The ways in which fitness-for-duty concerns are being addressed in both public- and private-sector industries are reviewed, and a description is provided of fitness-for-duty practices in six organizations that, like the nuclear industry, are regulated and whose operations can affect public health and safety. Methods of ensuring fitness for duty in the nuclear industry are examined in detail. The report also addresses methods of evaluating the effectiveness of fitness-for-duty programs in the nuclear power industry.

  18. Configural Display to Support Position Teaching to Industrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Yukio; Kurono, Kohei; Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Sawaragi, Tetsuo; Nagatani, Tatsuya; Noda, Akio; Tanaka, Ken'ichi

    For the purpose of developing a practical support tool for human workers engaged in industrial robot teaching, the work domain of position teaching is analyzed in terms of means-end relations. In this work domain analysis, a mechanical explanation model is introduced to capture the force-displacement relationship inherent in and thus informative on the work system. The model is utilized for the investigation of the robot operators' decisions in search of accurate operation positions and clarifies a basic strategy making use of a characteristic frame of reference in the search space. Based on the analytical results, a prototype display is developed that can provide effective information supports. The display presents the activity-related information in a way that affords the robot operators' strategic operations and thus can successfully reduce task time and operational errors in a teaching work.

  19. Environmental and health effects of the nuclear industry and nuclear weapons: a current evaluation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C J

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear weapons industry in the U.S. comprises nine major plants, supported by a network of subcontractors and grantee institutions. Weapons development progresses at the Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos Laboratories under the auspices of the University of California. Fissionable materials and tritium are produced at the Savannah River Plant (du Pont) or at Hanford. Reprocessing of plutonium and weapons grade uranium and manufacture of components are carried out at Rocky Flats (formerly Dow, now Rockwell Int.). Large amounts of radionuclides are generated or involved in operations at most of the nine plants. Internal reports of surveillance efforts by weapons plant personnel to monitor emissions of radioactive gases and particulates have now been released by several of the plants (in one case through litigation). Those reports document major releases of radioactive gases and particulates to the environment in the past, and continuing routine releases of some importance. Few investigations have been made of effects from these potent carcinogens in local populations. There have been several preliminary reports (Rocky Flats, Los Alamos and Savannah River) and one comprehensive report [Ambio 10: 176 (1981)]. Evidence of significantly increased rates of cancer of the more radiosensitive organs has been demonstrated. Adequate cancer registry and vital statistics data are essential for the comprehensive investigations of somatic and genetic effects which should be carried out around all nuclear installations near population centres. PMID:6765303

  20. Quantity and quality in nuclear engineering professional skills needed by the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Slember, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the challenge of work force requirements in the context of the full range of issues facing the nuclear power industry. The supply of skilled managers and workers may be a more serious problem if nuclear power fades away than if it is reborn in a new generation. An even greater concern, however, is the quality of education that the industry needs in all its future professionals. Both government and industry should be helping universities adapt their curricula to the needs of the future. This means building a closer relationship with schools that educate nuclear professionals, that is, providing adequate scholarships and funding for research and development programs, offering in-kind services, and encouraging internships and other opportunities for hands-on experience. The goal should not be just state-of-the-art engineering practices, but the broad range of knowledge, issues, and skills that will be required of the nuclear leadership of the twenty-first century.

  1. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An InternationalComparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-11-15

    This article examines the importance of national and sub-national policies in supporting the development of successful global wind turbine manufacturing companies. We explore the motivations behind establishing a local wind power industry, and the paths that different countries have taken to develop indigenous large wind turbine manufacturing industries within their borders. This is done through a cross-country comparison of the policy support mechanisms that have been employed to directly and indirectly promote wind technology manufacturing in twelve countries. We find that in many instances there is a clear relationship between a manufacturer's success in its home country market and its eventual success in the global wind power market. Whether new wind turbine manufacturing entrants are able to succeed will likely depend in part on the utilization of their turbines in their own domestic market, which in turn will be influenced by the annual size and stability of that market. Consequently, policies that support a sizable, stable market for wind power, in conjunction with policies that specifically provide incentives for wind power technology to be manufactured locally, are most likely to result in the establishment of an internationally competitive wind industry.

  2. NGNP Nuclear-Industrial Facility and Design Certification Boundaries White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Hicks

    2011-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project was initiated at Idaho National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act and based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is helium cooled and graphite moderated and can operate at reactor outlet temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. These varied industrial applications may involve a standard HTGR modular design using different Energy Conversion Systems. Additionally, some of these process heat applications will require process heat delivery systems to lie partially outside the HTGR operator’s facility.

  3. Screening for aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Borofsky, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper attempts to promote a fuller understanding of how psychological assessment procedures can be used to reduce the threat from aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry. It begins with a discussion of the scientifically based methods that are used by psychologists in constructing, scoring, and interpreting these procedures. This discussion includes an emphasis on the concepts of validity and reliability and their central importance when one is choosing specific psychological screening tools. Criteria for selecting and using psychological assessment procedures when screening for aberrant behavior are also provided. Some commonly used assessment procedures that satisfy these criteria are discussed. A number a psychological assessment procedures specifically recommended for use in screening for aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry are described.

  4. Towards A Unified HFE Process For The Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    As nuclear power utilities embark on projects to upgrade and modernize power plants, they are likely to discover that traditional engineering methods do not typically make provision for the integration of human considerations. In addition, human factors professionals will find that traditional human performance methods such as function allocation, task analysis, human reliability analysis and human-machine interface design do not scale well to the complexity of a large-scale nuclear power upgrade project. Up-to-date human factors engineering processes, methods, techniques and tools are required to perform these kinds of analyses. This need is recognized widely in industry and an important part of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program deals with identifying potential impacts of emerging technologies on human performance and the technical bases needed to address them. However, so far no formal initiative has been launched to deal with the lack of integrated processes. Although human factors integration frameworks do exist in industries such as aviation or defense, no formal integrated human factors process exists in the nuclear industry. As a first step towards creating such a process, a “unified human factors engineering process” is proposed as a framework within which engineering organizations, human factors practitioners and regulatory bodies can ensure that human factors requirements are embedded in engineering activities throughout the upgrade project life cycle.

  5. Probabilistic analysis of accident precursors in the nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, M; De Gelder, P

    2004-07-26

    Feedback of operating experience has always been an important issue in the nuclear industry. A probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) can be used as a tool to analyse how an operational event might have developed adversely in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event. This process is called PSA-based event analysis (PSAEA). A comprehensive set of PSAEA guidelines was developed by an international project. The main characteristics of this methodology are summarised. This approach to analyse incidents can be used to meet different objectives of utilities or nuclear regulators. The paper describes the main objectives and the experiences of the Belgian nuclear regulatory organisation AVN with the application of PSA-based event analysis. Some interesting aspects of the process of PSAEA are further developed and underlined. Several case studies are discussed and an overview of the obtained results is given. Finally, the interest of a broad and interactive forum on PSAEA is highlighted. PMID:15231351

  6. Development program to support industrial coal gasification. Quarterly report 1

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-15

    The Development Program to Support Industrial Coal Gasification is on schedule. The efforts have centered on collecting background information and data, planning, and getting the experimental program underway. The three principal objectives in Task I-A were accomplished. The technical literature was reviewed, the coals and binders to be employed were selected, and tests and testing equipment to be used in evaluating agglomerates were developed. The entire Erie Mining facility design was reviewed and a large portion of the fluidized-bed coal gasification plant design was completed. Much of the work in Task I will be experimental. Wafer-briquette and roll-briquette screening tests will be performed. In Task II, work on the fluidized-bed gasification plant design will be completed and work on a plant design involving entrained-flow gasifiers will be initiated.

  7. A Study of Distance Education for the Needs of the Nuclear Power Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reckline, Sigmund Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This research presents an examination of student satisfaction related to online training for adult learners in the nuclear power industry. Both groups, the nuclear industry and its associated workforce, have demonstrable needs which might be met by such programs. The nuclear industry itself faces an expansion of facilities and services combined…

  8. Support grid for fuel elements in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Finch, Lester M.

    1977-01-01

    A support grid is provided for holding nuclear fuel rods in a rectangular array. Intersecting sheet metal strips are interconnected using opposing slots in the strips to form a rectangular cellular grid structure for engaging the sides of a multiplicity of fuel rods. Spring and dimple supports for engaging fuel and guide rods extending through each cell in the support grid are formed in the metal strips with the springs thus formed being characterized by nonlinear spring rates.

  9. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  10. Health physics activities in support of the thermal shield removal/disposal and core support barrel repair at the St. Lucie Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Maisler, J.J.; Buchanan, H.F.

    1988-02-01

    The health physics activities related to the removal and disposal of a thermal shield at a nuclear power plant and subsequent repairs to the core support barrel required increased planning relative to a normal refueling/maintenance outage. The repair of the core support barrel was a first in the nuclear power industry. Pre-job planning was of great concern because of extremely high radiation levels associated with the irradiated stainless steel thermal shield and core support barrel. ALARA techniques used in the preparation of the thermal shield for removal and shipment to the disposal site are discussed.

  11. ISO 9000 for the U. S. nuclear industry Why not

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.B. )

    1993-01-01

    The growing popularity of the recently developed International Standard for Quality, ISO 9000, is challenging the traditional approach to ensuring quality in the nuclear industry and raising new questions as to whether this standard with its likely worldwide acceptance could become a successor to 10CFR50, Appendix B. The experience of a jointly owned British-American engineering consulting firm may be a harbinger of the future. Halcrow Gilbert Associates, Limited (HGA), was established in the fall of 1988 as a joint venture between two of the world's largest consulting engineering firms, Sir William Halcrow Partners, Ltd., of the United Kingdom and Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., of the United States. Although it initially concentrated on nonpower infrastructure markets, such as environmental, transportation, and alternative energy systems, it has broadened its focus to include the electric power industry over the past 2 yr and expects to play a major role in the U.K. market for this sector.

  12. Quantitative risk assessment in aerospace: Evolution from the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1996-12-31

    In 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the aerospace industry relied on failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) and hazards analysis as the primary tools for safety and reliability of their systems. The FMEAs were reviewed to provide critical items using a set of qualitative criteria. Hazards and critical items judged the worst, by a qualitative method, were to be either eliminated by a design change or controlled by the addition of a safeguard. However, it is frequently the case that limitations of space, weight, technical feasibility, and cost left critical items and hazards unable to be eliminated or controlled. In these situations, program management accepted the risk. How much risk was being accepted was unknown because quantitative risk assessment methods were not used. Perhaps the greatest contribution of the nuclear industry to NASA and the aerospace industry was the introduction of modern (i.e., post-WASH-1400) quantitative risk assessment concepts and techniques. The concepts of risk assessment that have been most useful in the aerospace industry are the following: 1. combination of accident sequence diagrams, event trees, and fault trees to model scenarios and their causative factors; 2. use of Bayesian analysis of system and component failure data; 3. evaluation and presentation of uncertainties in the risk estimates.

  13. iDREAM: an industrial detector for nuclear reactor monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, I. V.; Gromov, M. B.; Lukjanchenko, G. A.; Novikova, G. J.; Obinyakov, B. A.; Oralbaev, A. Y.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Sukhotin, S. V.; Chepurnov, A. S.; Etenko, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype of industrial reactor antineutrino detector iDREAM is dedicated for an experiment to demonstrate the possibility of remote monitoring of PWR reactor operational modes by neutrino method in real-time in order to avoid undeclared exposure modes for nuclear fuel and unauthorized removal of isotopes. The prototype detector was started up in 2014. To test the detector elements and components of electronics distilled water has been used as a target, which enables the use of Cerenkov radiation from cosmic muons as a physical signal. Also parallel measuring of the long-term stability has been doing for samples of liquid organic scintillator doped with gadolinium and synthesized by different methods

  14. [Radioepidemiological studies in the nuclear industry of China].

    PubMed

    Sun, S Q; Li, S Y; Yuan, L Y

    1996-12-01

    The results of retrospective-cohort radioepidemiological studies on workers of mines and plants governed by China National Nuclear Corporation was reported. The total number was 40,122 persons and 575,411 person-years. The accumulated personal dose in workers of reactor, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and research units was 57 mSv on the average. For fuel element fabrication and diffusion plants, it was about 5 mSv. Mortality of cancers, especially the non-cancerous diseases was not higher but lower than the controlled group and national values, showing the so-called health worker effect. 31,786 off springs of workers in the nuclear plants were examined. There were no significant difference in the incidence of hereditary-congenital diseases among exposed and controlled groups. The results mentioned above provide the direct medical evidences of the safety of nuclear industry in China. Owing to the high concentration of radon in the uranium prospective and mining tunnels in early years, the average cumulative exposure to radon progeny was about 80 WLM for miners who had the history of working underground. The relative risk of lung cancer was about 2. The excess relative risk per WLM was similar to the value reported abroad. PMID:9387596

  15. An Assessment of Remote Visual Testing in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T; Cumblidge, Stephen E; Doctor, Steven R

    2005-02-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, requires that volumetric and/or surface examinations be periodically conducted for certain safety-related components in commercial nuclear power plants. Recently, the U.S. nuclear industry has proposed replacing some of these volumetric and surface examinations with a simpler visual testing (VT) method. PNNL researchers conducted a study of the capabilities of remote visual testing (VT) as related to detecting surface-breaking cracks in nuclear components. This paper describes remote visual testing, performance demonstration standards for camera systems, typical dimensions for service induced cracks in reactor components, and an assessment of the reliability of camera systems at finding these cracks. Included is a discussion of the reliability of visual acuity guidelines for calibration of remote visual systems using two crossed 12-μm diameter wires as a performance demonstration standard. Also, the average dimensions of various types of service-induced cracks in nuclear components are reviewed, with the most critical of these being the crack opening dimension (COD). Because many of these cracks have very small (approximately 30 μm) CODs, the reliability of remote VT may not be adequate to insure component integrity, given the capabilities of current VT systems and application practices.

  16. Autonomic Intelligent Cyber Sensor to Support Industrial Control Network Awareness

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vollmer, Todd; Manic, Milos; Linda, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    The proliferation of digital devices in a networked industrial ecosystem, along with an exponential growth in complexity and scope, has resulted in elevated security concerns and management complexity issues. This paper describes a novel architecture utilizing concepts of Autonomic computing and a SOAP based IF-MAP external communication layer to create a network security sensor. This approach simplifies integration of legacy software and supports a secure, scalable, self-managed framework. The contribution of this paper is two-fold: 1) A flexible two level communication layer based on Autonomic computing and Service Oriented Architecture is detailed and 2) Three complementary modules that dynamically reconfiguremore » in response to a changing environment are presented. One module utilizes clustering and fuzzy logic to monitor traffic for abnormal behavior. Another module passively monitors network traffic and deploys deceptive virtual network hosts. These components of the sensor system were implemented in C++ and PERL and utilize a common internal D-Bus communication mechanism. A proof of concept prototype was deployed on a mixed-use test network showing the possible real world applicability. In testing, 45 of the 46 network attached devices were recognized and 10 of the 12 emulated devices were created with specific Operating System and port configurations. Additionally the anomaly detection algorithm achieved a 99.9% recognition rate. All output from the modules were correctly distributed using the common communication structure.« less

  17. Autonomic Intelligent Cyber Sensor to Support Industrial Control Network Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Todd; Manic, Milos; Linda, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    The proliferation of digital devices in a networked industrial ecosystem, along with an exponential growth in complexity and scope, has resulted in elevated security concerns and management complexity issues. This paper describes a novel architecture utilizing concepts of Autonomic computing and a SOAP based IF-MAP external communication layer to create a network security sensor. This approach simplifies integration of legacy software and supports a secure, scalable, self-managed framework. The contribution of this paper is two-fold: 1) A flexible two level communication layer based on Autonomic computing and Service Oriented Architecture is detailed and 2) Three complementary modules that dynamically reconfigure in response to a changing environment are presented. One module utilizes clustering and fuzzy logic to monitor traffic for abnormal behavior. Another module passively monitors network traffic and deploys deceptive virtual network hosts. These components of the sensor system were implemented in C++ and PERL and utilize a common internal D-Bus communication mechanism. A proof of concept prototype was deployed on a mixed-use test network showing the possible real world applicability. In testing, 45 of the 46 network attached devices were recognized and 10 of the 12 emulated devices were created with specific Operating System and port configurations. Additionally the anomaly detection algorithm achieved a 99.9% recognition rate. All output from the modules were correctly distributed using the common communication structure.

  18. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: A review of technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.; Barnes, V.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Fawcett-Long, J.; Toquam, J.; Baker, K.; Wieringa, D.; Olson, J.; Christensen, J.

    1989-05-01

    This report presents information gathered and analyzed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) efforts to develop a rule that will ensure that workers with unescorted access to protected areas of nuclear power plants are fit for duty. This report supplements information previously published in NUREG/CR-5227, Fitness for Duty in the Nuclear Power Industry: A Review of Technical Issues (Barnes et al., 1988). The primary potential fitness-for-duty concern addressed in both of these reports is impairment caused by substance abuse, although other fitness concerns are discussed. This report addresses issues pertaining to workers' use and misuse of alcohol, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs as fitness-for-duty concerns; responds to several questions raised by NRC Commissioners; discusses subversion of the chemical testing process and methods of preventing such subversion; and examines concerns about the urinalysis cutoff levels used when testing for marijuana metabolites, amphetamines, and phencyclidine (PCP).

  19. Multidisciplinary Graduate Curriculum in Support of the Biobased Products Industry

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Dorgan

    2005-07-31

    The project had a dominant education component. The project involved revising curriculum to educate traditional engineering students in the emerging field of industrial biotechnology. New classes were developed and offered. As a result, the curriculum of the Colorado School of Mines was expanded to include new content. Roughly 100 undergraduates and about 10 graduate students each year benefit from this curricular expansion. The research associated with this project consisted of developing new materials and energy sources from renewable resources. Several significant advances were made, most importantly the heat distortion temperature of polylactide (PLA) was increased through the addition of cellulosic nanowhiskers. The resulting ecobionanocomposites have superior properties which enable the use of renewable resource based plastics in a variety of new applications. Significant amounts of petroleum are thereby saved and considerable environmental benefits also result. Effectiveness and economic feasibility of the project proved excellent. The educational activities are continuing in a sustainable fashion, now being supported by tuition revenues and the normal budgeting of the University. The PI will be teaching one of the newly developed classes will next Fall (Fall 2006), after the close of the DOE grant, and again repeatedly into the future. Now established, the curriculum in biobased products and energy will grow and evolve through regular teaching and revision. On the research side, the new plastic materials appear economically feasible and a new collaboration between the PI’s group and Sealed Air, a major food-packaging manufacturer, has been established to bring the new green plastics to market. Public benefits of the project are noteworthy in many respects. These include the development of a better educated workforce and citizenry capable of providing technological innovation as a means of growing the economy and providing jobs. In particular, the

  20. Multidisciplinary Graduate Curriculum in Support of the Biobased Products Industry

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Dorgan

    2005-09-30

    The project had a dominant education component. The project involved revising curriculum to educate traditional engineering students in the emerging field of industrial biotechnology. New classes were developed and offered. As a result, the curriculum of the Colorado School of Mines was expanded to include new content. Roughly 100 undergraduates and about 10 graduate students each year benefit from this curricular expansion. The research associated with this project consisted of developing new materials and energy sources from renewable resources. Several significant advances were made, most importantly the heat distortion temperature of polylactide (PLA) was increased through the addition of cellulosic nanowhiskers. The resulting ecobionanocomposites have superior properties which enable the use of renewable resource based plastics in a variety of new applications. Significant amounts of petroleum are thereby saved and considerable environmental benefits also result. The original project objectives had to be modified as a result of DOE funding cuts, the Biomass Program did not receive adequate funding to fully fund its selected projects. Nonetheless, effectiveness and economic feasibility of the project proved excellent. The educational activities are continuing in a sustainable fashion, now being supported by tuition revenues and the normal budgeting of the University. PI Dorgan taught one of the newly developed classes will in the Fall 2006, after the close of the DOE grant, and again repeatedly into the future. Now established, the curriculum in biobased products and energy will grow and evolve through regular teaching and revisions. On the research side, the new plastic materials appear economically feasible and a new collaboration between the PI’s group and Sealed Air, a major food-packaging manufacturer, has been established to bring the new green plastics to market. Public benefits of the project are noteworthy in many respects. These include the

  1. The Role of Ceramics in a Resurgent Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2006-02-28

    With fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs and worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, there is growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Ceramic materials have long played a very important part in the commercial nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, ceramic materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, ceramic processes are also being applied to fuel reprocessing operations. Ceramic materials continue to provide a vital contribution in ''closing the fuel cycle'' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable grout, ceramics, and glass. In the next five years, programs that are currently in the conceptual phase will begin laboratory- and engineering-scale demonstrations. This will require production-scale demonstrations of several ceramic technologies from fuel form development to advanced stabilization methods. Within the next five to ten years, these demonstrations will move to even larger scales and will also include radioactive demonstrations of these advanced technologies. These radioactive demonstrations are critical to program success and will require advances in ceramic materials associated with nuclear energy applications.

  2. Support arrangement for core modules of nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1987-01-01

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  3. Support arrangements for core modules of nuclear reactors. [PWR

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1983-11-03

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  4. Supporting rural wood industry through timber utilization research. Research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Skog, K.

    1991-10-01

    The report evaluates the potential impact of USDA Forest Service wood utilization and wood energy research on rural employment and income. Recent projections suggest employment will decrease in many forest products industries, such as softwood sawmilling, but will eventually increase in softwood plywood and reconstituated panel mills. Forest products industries expected to provide wages exceeding the average manufacturing production wage include logging, softwood sawmills, millwork, softwood plywood--veneer, structural wood members, particle-board, wood partitions, pulp mills, paper mills, and paperboard mills. Industries expected to pay 90 percent of the average manufacturing production wage include wood kitchen cabinets, mobile homes, prefabricated wood buildings, and wood preservatives.

  5. Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

  6. SUPPORT DEVICE FOR USE IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, F.G.; Long, E.

    1959-03-10

    A shock absorbing support device for fuel elements in a nuclear reactor is described. The device is adapted to support a column of moderator material on a lower support plate of a reactor structure and to axially locate the column of moderator with respect to the coolant fluid entry port in the support plate. Located centrally of the device is a vestically extending shaft member telescopingly engaged at its lower end with a tubular member and connected to the tubular member by a shear pin. Below the shear pin embedded in the end of the shaft member are blade members which are adapted to cut into the side of the tubular member in the went the shear pin is destroyed by the impact or a falling fuel element. The cutting action of the blades in the tube absorbes the shock of the fallen element.

  7. Examination of pump failure data in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1996-12-01

    There are several elements that are critical to any program which is used to optimize the availability and reliability of process equipment. Perhaps the most important elements are routine monitoring and predictive maintenance elements. In order to optimize equipment monitoring and predictive maintenance, it is necessary to fundamentally and thoroughly understand the principal failure modes for the equipment and the effectiveness of alternative monitoring methods. While these observations are general in nature, they are certainly true for the {open_quotes}heart{close_quotes} of fluid systems - pumps. In recent years, particularly within the last decade, the capabilities and ease of use of previously existing pump diagnostic technologies, such as vibration monitoring and oil analysis, have improved dramatically. Newer technologies, such as thermal imaging, have been found effective at detecting certain undesirable or degraded conditions, such as misalignment and overheated bearings or packing. The ASME Code and NRC regulatory requirements have been, like essentially all similar code and regulatory bodies, conservative in their adoption or endorsement of newer technologies. The requirements prescribed by the Code and endorsed by the NRC have, in their essence, changed only minimally over more than a dozen years. As a follow-on to studies of check valve failure experience in the nuclear industry that have proven useful in identifying the effectiveness of alternative monitoring methods, a study of nuclear industry pump failure data has been conducted. The results of this study, conducted for the NRC by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are presented. The historical effectiveness of both regulatory required and voluntarily implemented pump monitoring programs are shown. The distribution of pump failures by application, affected area, and level of significance are indicated. Apparent strengths and weaknesses of alternative monitoring methods are discussed.

  8. Industry Support of Medical Research: Important Opportunity or Treacherous Pitfall?

    PubMed

    Tierney, William M; Meslin, Eric M; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    Pharmaceutical and device manufacturers fund more than half of the medical research in the U.S. Research funding by for-profit companies has increased over the past 20 years, while federal funding has declined. Research funding from for-profit medical companies is seen as tainted by many academicians because of potential biases and prior misbehavior by both investigators and companies. Yet NIH is encouraging partnerships between the public and private sectors to enhance scientific discovery. There are instances, such as methods for improving drug adherence and post-marketing drug surveillance, where the interests of academician researchers and industry could be aligned. We provide examples of ethically performed industry-funded research and a set of principles and benchmarks for ethically credible academic-industry partnerships that could allow academic researchers, for-profit companies, and the public to benefit. PMID:26307387

  9. Generalized Nuclear Data: A New Structure (with Supporting Infrastructure) for Handling Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Patel, N. R.; Summers, N. C.; Hedstrom, G. W.; Brown, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format was designed in the 1960s to accommodate neutron reaction data to support nuclear engineering applications in power, national security and criticality safety. Over the years, the scope of the format has been extended to handle many other kinds of data including charged particle, decay, atomic, photo-nuclear and thermal neutron scattering. Although ENDF has wide acceptance and support for many data types, its limited support for correlated particle emission, limited numeric precision, and general lack of extensibility mean that the nuclear data community cannot take advantage of many emerging opportunities. More generally, the ENDF format provides an unfriendly environment that makes it difficult for new data evaluators and users to create and access nuclear data. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has begun the design of a new Generalized Nuclear Data (or 'GND') structure, meant to replace older formats with a hierarchy that mirrors the underlying physics, and is aligned with modern coding and database practices. In support of this new structure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has updated its nuclear data/reactions management package Fudge to handle GND structured nuclear data. Fudge provides tools for converting both the latest ENDF format (ENDF-6) and the LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) format to and from GND, as well as for visualizing, modifying and processing (i.e., converting evaluated nuclear data into a form more suitable to transport codes) GND structured nuclear data. GND defines the structure needed for storing nuclear data evaluations and the type of data that needs to be stored. But unlike ENDF and ENDL, GND does not define how the data are to be stored in a file. Currently, Fudge writes the structured GND data to a file using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML), as it is ASCII based and can be viewed with any text editor. XML is a meta-language, meaning that it

  10. Generalized Nuclear Data: A New Structure (with Supporting Infrastructure) for Handling Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.R.; Patel, N.R.; Summers, N.C.; Hedstrom, G.W.; Brown, D.A.

    2012-12-15

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format was designed in the 1960s to accommodate neutron reaction data to support nuclear engineering applications in power, national security and criticality safety. Over the years, the scope of the format has been extended to handle many other kinds of data including charged particle, decay, atomic, photo-nuclear and thermal neutron scattering. Although ENDF has wide acceptance and support for many data types, its limited support for correlated particle emission, limited numeric precision, and general lack of extensibility mean that the nuclear data community cannot take advantage of many emerging opportunities. More generally, the ENDF format provides an unfriendly environment that makes it difficult for new data evaluators and users to create and access nuclear data. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has begun the design of a new Generalized Nuclear Data (or 'GND') structure, meant to replace older formats with a hierarchy that mirrors the underlying physics, and is aligned with modern coding and database practices. In support of this new structure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has updated its nuclear data/reactions management package Fudge to handle GND structured nuclear data. Fudge provides tools for converting both the latest ENDF format (ENDF-6) and the LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) format to and from GND, as well as for visualizing, modifying and processing (i.e., converting evaluated nuclear data into a form more suitable to transport codes) GND structured nuclear data. GND defines the structure needed for storing nuclear data evaluations and the type of data that needs to be stored. But unlike ENDF and ENDL, GND does not define how the data are to be stored in a file. Currently, Fudge writes the structured GND data to a file using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML), as it is ASCII based and can be viewed with any text editor. XML is a meta-language, meaning that it

  11. Nuclear Data Activities in Support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, R.M.; McKnight, R.D.

    2005-05-24

    The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) provides the technical infrastructure maintenance for those technologies applied in the evaluation and performance of safe fissionable-material operations in the DOE complex. These technologies include an Analytical Methods element for neutron transport as well as the development of sensitivity/uncertainty methods, the performance of Critical Experiments, evaluation and qualification of experiments as Benchmarks, and a comprehensive Nuclear Data program coordinated by the NCSP Nuclear Data Advisory Group (NDAG).The NDAG gathers and evaluates differential and integral nuclear data, identifies deficiencies, and recommends priorities on meeting DOE criticality safety needs to the NCSP Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG). Then the NDAG identifies the required resources and unique capabilities for meeting these needs, not only for performing measurements but also for data evaluation with nuclear model codes as well as for data processing for criticality safety applications. The NDAG coordinates effort with the leadership of the National Nuclear Data Center, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), and the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The overall objective is to expedite the issuance of new data and methods to the DOE criticality safety user. This paper describes these activities in detail, with examples based upon special studies being performed in support of criticality safety for a variety of DOE operations.

  12. Instructional Support System--Occupational Education. Building Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Theodore; And Others

    The modules which make up the bulk of this report are the result of a two-week workshop at which thirteen building industries occupations teachers worked toward the development of a student outcome oriented curriculum. These modules are divided into the following occupational units: (1) carpentry (containing hand tools; portable power tools;…

  13. Higher Education in Support of Regional Economic and Industrial Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joseph A.; McGinn, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Presentations at the September 1985 conference of the International Association of Consultants in Higher Education Institutions are reviewed. Activities related to university-industry cooperation for regional development in Japan and Massachusetts and at Stanford University and Queens University in Ireland are summarized. (MSE)

  14. Supporting the future nuclear workforce with computer-based procedures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya

    2016-05-01

    Here we see that computer-based tools have dramatically increased ease and efficiency of everyday tasks. Gone are the days of paging through a paper catalog, transcribing product numbers, and calculating totals. Today, a consumer can find a product online with a simple search engine, and then purchase it in a matter of a few clicks. Paper catalogs have their place, but it is hard to imagine life without on-line shopping sites. All tasks conducted in a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures, which helps ensure safe and reliable operation of the plants. One prominent goal of the nuclear industrymore » is to minimize the risk of human errors. To achieve this goal one has to ensure tasks are correctly and consistently executed. This is partly achieved by training and by a structured approach to task execution, which is provided by procedures and work instructions. Procedures are used in the nuclear industry to direct workers' actions in a proper sequence. The governing idea is to minimize the reliance on memory and choices made in the field. However, the procedure document may not contain sufficient information to successfully complete the task. Therefore, the worker might have to carry additional documents such as turnover sheets, operation experience, drawings, and other procedures to the work site. The nuclear industry is operated with paper procedures like paper catalogs of the past. A field worker may carry a large stack of documents needed to complete a task to the field. Even though the paper process has helped keep the industry safe for decades, there are limitations to using paper. Paper procedures are static (i.e., the content does not change after the document is printed), difficult to search, and rely heavily on the field worker’s situational awareness and ability to consistently meet the high expectation of human performance excellence. With computer-based procedures (CBPs) that stack of papers may be reduced to the size of a small tablet or even

  15. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Jr., William S.; Pickering, J. Larry; Black, William E.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal barrier/core support for the fuel core of a nuclear reactor having a metallic cylinder secured to the reactor vessel liner and surrounded by fibrous insulation material. A top cap is secured to the upper end of the metallic cylinder that locates and orients a cover block and post seat. Under normal operating conditions, the metallic cylinder supports the entire load exerted by its associated fuel core post. Disposed within the metallic cylinder is a column of ceramic material, the height of which is less than that of the metallic cylinder, and thus is not normally load bearing. In the event of a temperature excursion beyond the design limits of the metallic cylinder and resulting in deformation of the cylinder, the ceramic column will abut the top cap to support the fuel core post.

  16. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01

    security through more effective utilization of our country’s resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

  17. Support vector machines for nuclear reactor state estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavaljevski, N.; Gross, K. C.

    2000-02-14

    Validation of nuclear power reactor signals is often performed by comparing signal prototypes with the actual reactor signals. The signal prototypes are often computed based on empirical data. The implementation of an estimation algorithm which can make predictions on limited data is an important issue. A new machine learning algorithm called support vector machines (SVMS) recently developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his coworkers enables a high level of generalization with finite high-dimensional data. The improved generalization in comparison with standard methods like neural networks is due mainly to the following characteristics of the method. The input data space is transformed into a high-dimensional feature space using a kernel function, and the learning problem is formulated as a convex quadratic programming problem with a unique solution. In this paper the authors have applied the SVM method for data-based state estimation in nuclear power reactors. In particular, they implemented and tested kernels developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET), a nonlinear, nonparametric estimation technique with a wide range of applications in nuclear reactors. The methodology has been applied to three data sets from experimental and commercial nuclear power reactor applications. The results are promising. The combination of MSET kernels with the SVM method has better noise reduction and generalization properties than the standard MSET algorithm.

  18. Supported liquid inorganic membranes for nuclear waste separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Ramesh R; DeBusk, Melanie M; DelCul, Guillermo D; Delmau, Laetitia H; Narula, Chaitanya K

    2015-04-07

    A system and method for the extraction of americium from radioactive waste solutions. The method includes the transfer of highly oxidized americium from an acidic aqueous feed solution through an immobilized liquid membrane to an organic receiving solvent, for example tributyl phosphate. The immobilized liquid membrane includes porous support and separating layers loaded with tributyl phosphate. The extracted solution is subsequently stripped of americium and recycled at the immobilized liquid membrane as neat tributyl phosphate for the continuous extraction of americium. The sequestered americium can be used as a nuclear fuel, a nuclear fuel component or a radiation source, and the remaining constituent elements in the aqueous feed solution can be stored in glassified waste forms substantially free of americium.

  19. The European nuclear power industry: Restructuring for combined strength and worldwide leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Norman, R.E.; Reich, W.J.; Hill, L.J.

    1993-06-18

    The European nuclear power industry is being restructured from an industry drawn along national lines to a European-wide industry. This, in part, reflects growth of the European Economic Community, but it also reflects changes in the international nuclear power industry. The objectives of the participants, beyond better integration of the nuclear industry in Western Europe, are to (1) obtain European leadership of the worldwide commercial nuclear power industry, (2) improve medium- and long-term safety of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (FSU) power reactors, and (3) reduce domestic concerns about nuclear power. The activities to achieve these goals include (1) formation of Nuclear Power International (a joint venture of the German and French nuclear power plant vendors for design and construction of nuclear power plants), (2) formation of a utility group to forge agreement throughout Europe on what the requirements are for the next generation of nuclear power plants, and (3) agreement by regulators in multiple European countries to harmonize regulations. This is to be achieved before the end of the decade. These changes would allow a single design of nuclear power plant to be built anywhere in Europe. The creation of European-wide rules (utility requirements, engineering standards, and national regulations) would create strong economic and political forces for other European countries (Eastern Europe and FSU) to meet these standards.

  20. Nautical Education for Offshore Extractive Industries. Support Operations & Seamanship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, G. L.

    This training manual is intended for persons who will be employed on supply vessels or towboats which support ocean-based oil extraction operations. The text deals with the basic skills of marine towing procedures, boat handling, deck maintenance, cargo operations, and rope and wire handling. Additional sections treat the proper attitude of a…

  1. (Technical and engineering support for the Office of Industrial Programs)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    As of April 19, 1991, technical, operational and analytic support and assistance to the offices and divisions of the Office of Renewable Energy, under contract DE-AC01-86CE30844 was completed. The overall work effort, initiated February 20, 1986, was characterized by timely, comprehensive, high quality, professional responsiveness to a broad range of renewable energy program operational support requirements. These are no instances of failure to respond, nor unacceptable response, during the five-year period. The technology program areas covered are Solar Buildings Technology, Wind Energy Technology, Photovoltaic Energy Technology, Geothermal Energy Technology, Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology, Solar Thermal Technology, Hydropower Energy Technology, Ocean Energy Technology, and Electric Energy Systems and Energy Storage. The analytical and managerial support provided to the office and staff of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy enabled a comprehensive evaluation of program and policy alternatives, and the selection and execution of appropriate courses of action from amongst those alternatives. Largely through these means the Office has been able to maintain continuity and a meaningful program thrust through the vacillations of policies and budgets that it has experienced over that it has experienced over the past five years. Appended are summaries of support activities within each of the individual technology program areas, as well as a complete listing of all project deliverables and due-dates for each submittal under the contract.

  2. NUCLEAR-FUELED CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEMS IV: RADIOLOGIC PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, F. N.; Norman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    If an implantable artificial heart can be developed, it should prove beneficial to a significant group of patients. A variety of energy sources, such as biologic, electromagnetic, and nuclear, are under evaluation. Currently, biologic fuel cell technology is not sufficiently advanced to permit its extrapolation to the power levels required for implantable circulatory support systems. Electromagnetic systems have the disadvantage of heavy batteries of considerable bulk requiring frequent recharging. Radioisotope-fueled thermal engine systems have the potential of providing degrees of freedom not possible with rechargeable units. However, radiosotope circulatory support systems subject their recipients to prolonged intracorporeal radiation, add to environmental background radiation, and constitute an exceedingly small, but finite, hazard due to possible violation of fuel containment. PMID:15215965

  3. Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The present report lists the technical reviews and comments made during the fiscal year 1988 and summarizes the technical progress of the topical studies. In the area of technical assistance, there were numerous activities detailed in the next section. These included 24 geotechnical support activities, including reviews of 6 Study Plans (SP) and participation in 6 SP Review Workshops, review of one whole document Site Characterization Plan (SCP) and participation in the Assembled Document SCP Review Workshops by 6 LBL reviewers; the hosting of a DOE program review, the rewriting of the project statement of work, 2 trips to technical and planning meetings; preparation of proposed work statements for two new topics for DOE, and 5 instances of technical assistance to DOE. These activities are described in a Table in the following section entitled Geoscience Technical Support for Nuclear Waste Geologic Repositories.''

  4. Supported Molecular Iridium Catalysts: Resolving Effects of Metal Nuclearity and Supports as Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing; Serna, Pedro; Aydin, Cerem; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2012-02-07

    The performance of a supported catalyst is influenced by the size and structure of the metal species, the ligands bonded to the metal, and the support. Resolution of these effects has been lacking because of the lack of investigations of catalysts with uniform and systematically varied catalytic sites. We now demonstrate that the performance for ethene hydrogenation of isostructural iridium species on supports with contrasting properties as ligands (electron-donating MgO and electron-withdrawing HY zeolite) can be elucidated on the basis of molecular concepts. Spectra of the working catalysts show that the catalytic reaction rate is determined by the dissociation of H{sub 2} when the iridium, either as mono- or tetra-nuclear species, is supported on MgO and is not when the support is the zeolite. The neighboring iridium sites in clusters are crucial for activation of both H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} when the support is MgO but not when it is the zeolite, because the electron-withdrawing properties of the zeolite support enable even single site-isolated Ir atoms to bond to both C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2} and facilitate the catalysis.

  5. Industry support for molten carbonate fuel cell commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmons, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Alliance to Commercialize Carbonate Technology (ACCT) is a working alliance of utilities and industry, created to help bring molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) technology into commercial markets by the year 2000. Its principal focus is the IMHEX{reg_sign} MCFC power plant under development by the team of M-C Power Corporation, the Institute of Gas Technology, The Bechtel Corporation, and Stewart & Stevenson Services, Inc. (the {open_quotes}Development Team{close_quotes}), although many ACCT members are also interested in other fuel cell technologies. This paper will describe ACCT`s background, mission, approach and activities, as well as opportunities for those interested to join in ACCT`s ongoing work toward MCFC commercialization.

  6. Status and prospect of NDT technology for nuclear energy industry in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Innovative energy technology is considered to be one of the key solutions for meeting the challenges of climate change and energy security, which is why global leaders are focusing on enhancing energy technology R&D. In accordance with the global movements to accelerate energy R&D, the Korean government has made significant investments in a broad spectrum of energy R&D programs, including energy efficiency, resources, CCS, new and renewable energy, power generation and electricity delivery, nuclear power and nuclear waste management. In order to manage government sponsored energy R&D programs in an efficient and effective way, the government established the Korea Institute of Energy technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) in 2009. Main activities of KETEP include developing energy technology roadmaps, planning, evaluating, and managing R&D programs, fostering experts in the field of energy, promoting international cooperation programs, gathering and analyzing energy statistics, and supporting infrastructure and commercialization. KETEP assists the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy in developing national R&D strategies while also working with researchers, universities, national institutes and the private sector for their successful energy technology and deployment. This presentation consists of three parts. First, I will introduce the characteristics of energy trends and mix in Korea. Then, I'll speak about the related national R&D strategies of energy technology. Finally, I'll finish up with the status and prospect of NDT technology for nuclear energy industry in Korea. The development of the on-line structural integrity monitoring systems and the related techniques in Korean nuclear power plant for the purpose of condition based maintenance is introduced. The needs of NDT techniques for inspection and condition monitoring for GEN IV including SFR, small module reactor etc., are also discussed.

  7. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors. PMID:24727389

  8. Hydrogen: Adding Value and Flexibility to the Nuclear Power Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Bhatt, V.; Friley, P.; Horak, W.; Reisman, A.

    2004-10-04

    The objective of this study was to assess potential synergies between the hydrogen economy and nuclear energy options. Specifically: to provide a market analysis of advanced nuclear energy options for hydrogen production in growing hydrogen demand; to conduct an impact evaluation of nuclear-based hydrogen production on the economics of the energy system, environmental emissions, and energy supply security; and to identify competing technologies & challenges to nuclear options.

  9. Supporting the Global Threat Reduction Initiative through Nuclear Material Recovery: Collaboration between NNSA and AREVA

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniawski, Andrew; Sheely, Ken; Hunter, Ian; Louvet, Thibault

    2007-07-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in response to the growing need to comprehensively and internationally address the potential threat posed by vulnerable high-risk nuclear material. GTRI's mission is to foster international support for national programs to identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition, as quickly and expeditiously as possible, of vulnerable, high-risk nuclear and other radioactive materials around the world that pose a potential threat to the international community. Specifically, GTRI establishes international partnerships to address this global issue. To achieve these objectives, GTRI works with international, regional, and domestic partners to: (1) minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civil nuclear applications worldwide by converting research reactors to LEU fuels; (2) accelerate the removal or final disposition of vulnerable nuclear material throughout the world; (3) accelerate securing and/or removing vulnerable high-risk radiological materials throughout the world; and (4) address the 'gaps' of other programs by identifying throughout the world, recovering and facilitating permanent disposition of vulnerable high-risk nuclear material not previously addressed by other threat reduction programs. DOE desires to work with more partners, both government and industry, to develop options for the disposal of nuclear material in the most expeditious manner. This paper will present the recent success of the first Plutonium Gap Material recycling contract signed by AREVA thanks to the collaboration developed between NNSA and AREVA. Another item which will be presented and illustrates how GTRI supports government-to-industry partnership, is the willingness to consider the treatment option for Gap Materials used-fuel. This new step represents another broadening of the

  10. As Teachers Tell It: Implementing All Aspects of the Industry. Supporting Materials. [Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Erika Nielsen, Ed.

    This document contains supporting materials from five case studies illustrating the All Aspects of the Industry (AAI) approach. AAI provides a framework for redesigning programs around broadly conceived, interdisciplinary, industry-focused programs and integrating academic and vocational education. Materials from the Boston (Massachusetts) Public…

  11. Anomalies in Proposed Regulations for the Release of Redundant Material from Nuclear and Non-nuclear Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.

    2002-02-26

    Now that increasing numbers of nuclear power stations are reaching the end of their commercially useful lives, the management of the large quantities of very low level radioactive material that arises during their decommissioning has become a major subject of discussion, with very significant economic implications. Much of this material can, in an environmentally advantageous manner, be recycled for reuse without radiological restrictions. Much larger quantities--2-3 orders of magnitude larger--of material, radiologically similar to the candidate material for recycling from the nuclear industry, arise in non-nuclear industries like coal, fertilizer, oil and gas, mining, etc. In such industries, naturally occurring radioactivity is artificially concentrated in products, by-products or waste to form TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material). It is only in the last decade that the international community has become aware of the prevalence of T ENORM, specially the activity levels and quantities arising in so many nonnuclear industries. The first reaction of international organizations seems to have been to propose ''double'' standards for the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, with very stringent release criteria for radioactive material from the regulated nuclear industry and up to a hundred times more liberal criteria for the release/exemption of TENORM from the as yet unregulated non-nuclear industries. There are, however, many significant strategic issues that need to be discussed and resolved. An interesting development, for both the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, is the increased scientific scrutiny that the populations of naturally high background dose level areas of the world are being subject to. Preliminary biological studies have indicated that the inhabitants of such areas, exposed to many times the permitted occupational doses for nuclear workers, have not shown any differences in cancer mortality, life expectancy

  12. Pipe support for use in a nuclear system

    DOEpatents

    Pollono, Louis P.; Mello, Raymond M.

    1977-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled vertical piping runs used in a nuclear system. A cylindrical pipe transition member, having the same inside diameter as the thin-walled piping, replaces a portion of the piping where support is desired. The outside diameter of the pipe transition member varies axially along its vertical dimension. For a section of the axial length adjacent the upper and lower terminations of the pipe transition member, the outside diameter is the same as the outside diameter of the thin-walled piping to which it is affixed. Intermediate of the termination sections, the outside diameter increases from the top of the member to the bottom. Adjacent the lower termination section, the diameter abruptly becomes the same as the piping. Thus, the cylindrical transition member is formed to have a generally triangular shaped cross-section along the axial dimension. Load-bearing insulation is installed next to the periphery of the member and is kept in place by an outer ring clamp. The outer ring clamp is connected to pipe hangers, which provide the desired support for the vertical thin-walled piping runs.

  13. A project to transfer technology from NASA centers in support of industrial innovation in the midwest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    A technology transfer program utilizing graduate students in mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas was initiated in early 1981. The objective of the program was to encourage industrial innovation in the Midwest through improved industry/university cooperation and the utilization of NASA technology. A related and important aspect of the program was the improvement of graduate engineering education through the involvement of students in the identification and accomplishment of technological objectives in cooperation with scientists at NASA centers and engineers in industry. The pilot NASA/University Industrial Innovation Program was an outstanding success based on its ability to: attract top graduate students; secure industry support; and stimulate industry/university cooperation leading to enhanced university capability and utilization of advanced technology by industry.

  14. Matching Grant to Support Nuclear Engineering Education at Georgia Tech, September 1, 1999 - September 30, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, John

    2002-05-10

    During the 2001 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE Matching Grant Program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors have been used to support both research (in the area of thermal-hydraulics) and educational missions. Experimental research has been performed in the area of axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors. Numerical research has also been performed in the area of multi-fluid modeling of two-phase flow. Details of activities in these two areas are given below. As for the educational component, funds were used to support the Georgia Tech Nuclear and Radiological Engineering (NRE) Scholarship Program. This Scholarship Program has allowed Georgia Tech to substantially increase the freshman class size and to populate it with outstanding students.

  15. An Overview of the Regulation of Low Dose Radiation in the Nuclear and Non-nuclear Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Shankar; Valencia, Luis; Teunckens, Lucien

    2003-02-27

    Now that increasing numbers of nuclear power stations are reaching the end of their commercially useful lives, the management of the large quantities of very low level radioactive material that arises during their decommissioning has become a major subject of discussion, with very significant economic implications. Much of this material can, in an environmentally advantageous manner, be recycled for reuse without radiological restrictions. Much larger quantities--2-3 orders of magnitude larger--of material, radiologically similar to the candidate material for recycling from the nuclear industry, arise in non-nuclear industries like coal, fertilizer, oil and gas, mining, etc. In such industries, naturally occurring radioactivity is artificially concentrated in products, by-products or waste to form TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material). It is only in the last decade that the international community has become aware of the prevalence of TENORM, specially the activity levels and quantities arising in so many non-nuclear industries. The first reaction of international organizations seems to have been to propose different standards for the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, with very stringent release criteria for radioactive material from the regulated nuclear industry and up to thirty to a hundred times more liberal criteria for the release/exemption of TENORM from the as yet unregulated non-nuclear industries. There are significant strategic issues that need to be discussed and resolved. Some examples of these are: - Disposal aspects of long-lived nuclides, - The use of radioactive residues in building materials, - Commercial aspects of differing and discriminating criteria in competing power industries in a world of deregulated electric power production. Of even greater importance is the need for the discussion of certain basic issues, such as - The quantitative risk levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, - The need for in

  16. Development of Asset Fault Signatures for Prognostic and Health Management in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Randall Bickford; Richard Rusaw

    2014-06-01

    Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using the Electric Power Research Institute’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. The FW-PHM Suite is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The FW-PHM Suite has four main modules: Diagnostic Advisor, Asset Fault Signature (AFS) Database, Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and Remaining Useful Life Database. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures to assess the health status of generator step-up generators and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. At the most basic level, fault signatures are comprised of an asset type, a fault type, and a set of one or more fault features (symptoms) that are indicative of the specified fault. The AFS Database is populated with asset fault signatures via a content development exercise that is based on the results of intensive technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The developed fault signatures capture this knowledge and implement it in a standardized approach, thereby streamlining the diagnostic and prognostic process. This will support the automation of proactive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  17. Preloading of bolted connections in nuclear reactor component supports

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G T

    1984-10-01

    A number of failures of threaded fasteners in nuclear reactor component supports have been reported. Many of those failures were attributed to stress corrosion cracking. This report discusses how stress corrosion cracking can be avoided in bolting by controlling the maximum bolt preloads so that the sustained stresses in the bolts are below the level required to cause stress corrosion cracking. This is a basic departure from ordinary bolted joint design where the only limits on preload are on the minimum preload. Emphasis is placed on the importance of detailed analysis to determine the acceptable range of preload and the selection of a method for measuring the preload that is sufficiently accurate to ensure that the preload is actually within the acceptable range. Procedures for determining acceptable preload range are given, and the accuracy of various methods of measuring preload is discussed.

  18. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Sharbaugh, John E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment

  19. Proceedings of the ASTM 8th international symposium zirconium in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Swam, L.F.P.; Eucken, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the ASTM 8th international symposium on zirconium in the nuclear industry. Topics covered include: Behavior of pressure tubes, Corrosion, Nodular corrosion, Basic metallurgy, and Creep and growth.

  20. The alternative strategies of the development of the nuclear power industry in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goverdovskii, A. A.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Rachkov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    This paper emphasizes the urgency of scientific-and-technical and sociopolitical problems of the modern nuclear power industry without solving of which the transition from local nuclear power systems now in operation to a large-scale nuclear power industry would be impossible. The existing concepts of the longterm strategy of the development of the nuclear power industry have been analyzed. On the basis of the scenarios having been developed it was shown that the most promising alternative is the orientation towards the closed nuclear fuel cycle with fast neutron reactors (hereinafter referred to as fast reactors) that would meet the requirements on the acceptable safety. It was concluded that the main provisions of "The Strategy of the Development of the Nuclear Power Industry of Russia for the First Half of the 21st Century" approved by the Government of the Russian Federation in the year 2000 remain the same at present as well, although they require to be elaborated with due regard for new realities in the market for fossil fuels, the state of both the Russian and the world economy, as well as tightening of requirements related to safe operation of nuclear power stations (NPSs) (for example, after the severe accident at the Fukushima nuclear power station, Japan) and nonproliferation of nuclear weapons.

  1. Understanding the Challenges in the Transition from Film Radiography in the Nuclear Power Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Moran, Traci L.; Nove, Carol A.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2012-09-01

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) applications in the nuclear power industry using film radiography are shrinking due to the advent of modern digital imaging technologies and advances in alternative inspection methods that do not present an ionizing radiation hazard. Technologies that are used routinely in the medical industry for patient diagnosis are being adapted to industrial NDE applications including the detection and characterization of defects in welds. From the user perspective, non-film inspection techniques provide several advantages over film techniques. It is anticipated that the shift away from the application of film radiography in the nuclear power industry represents an irreversible trend. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has noted this trend in the U.S. nuclear power industry and will be working to ensure that the effectiveness and reliability of component inspections is not compromised by this transition. Currently, specific concerns are associated with 1) obtaining a fundamental understanding of how inspection effectiveness and reliability may be impacted by this transition and 2) ensuring training standards and qualifications remain compatible with modern industrial radiographic practice. This paper discusses recent trends in industrial radiography and assesses their advantages and disadvantages from the perspective of nuclear power plant component inspections.

  2. Prioritization of engineering support requests and advanced technology projects using decision support and industrial engineering models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavana, Madjid

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation and prioritization of Engineering Support Requests (ESR's) is a particularly difficult task at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) -- Shuttle Project Engineering Office. This difficulty is due to the complexities inherent in the evaluation process and the lack of structured information. The evaluation process must consider a multitude of relevant pieces of information concerning Safety, Supportability, O&M Cost Savings, Process Enhancement, Reliability, and Implementation. Various analytical and normative models developed over the past have helped decision makers at KSC utilize large volumes of information in the evaluation of ESR's. The purpose of this project is to build on the existing methodologies and develop a multiple criteria decision support system that captures the decision maker's beliefs through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes. The model utilizes the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), subjective probabilities, the entropy concept, and Maximize Agreement Heuristic (MAH) to enhance the decision maker's intuition in evaluating a set of ESR's.

  3. Project WANT - Women's Access to Nuclear Technology, a successful industry/education partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Widen, W.C.; Roth, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, the U.S. Congress issued the Carl D. Perkins Act, which charges vocational educators to increase their focus on two broad themes: (a) the elimination of sexual bias and sexual stereotyping in vocational education and (b) the provision of marketable skills to the economically deprived of the nation's work force. In response to this charter, an industry/education partnership was established among the Illinois State Board of Education, Norther Illinois University, and the Westinbghouse Nuclear Training Center. In essence, these partners established Project WANT - Women's Access to Nuclear Technology - with two premier goals: (a) to increase women's awareness regarding nuclear career opportunities and (b) to train and place women in technical professions within the nuclear industry. Feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics identifies that <2% of all technical positions within the nuclear power industry are held by women. Hence, one may conclude that there is a definite need to promote sexual equity in the nuclear industry and that Illinois represents a unique environment of opportunity to accomplish this.

  4. An evolution of technologies and applications of gamma imagers in the nuclear cycle industry

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, R. A.; Menaa, N.; De Toro, D.; Varet, T.

    2011-07-01

    The tracking of radiation contamination and distribution has become a high priority in the nuclear cycle industry in order to respect the ALARA principle which is a main challenge during decontamination and dismantling activities. To support this need, AREVA/CANBERRA and CEA LIST have been actively carrying out research and development on a gamma-radiation imager. In this paper we will present the new generation of gamma camera, called GAMPIX. This system is based on the Timepix chip, hybridized with a CdTe substrate. A coded mask could be used in order to increase the sensitivity of the camera. Moreover, due to the USB connection with a standard computer, this gamma camera is immediately operational and user-friendly. The final system is a very compact gamma camera (global weight is less than 1 kg without any shielding) which could be used as a hand-held device for radioprotection purposes. In this article, we present the main characteristics of this new generation of gamma camera and we expose experimental results obtained during in situ measurements. Even though we present preliminary results the final product is under industrialization phase to address various applications specifications. (authors)

  5. A comparison of commercial/industry and nuclear weapons safety concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.R.; Summers, D.A.

    1996-07-01

    In this paper the authors identify factors which influence the safety philosophy used in the US commercial/industrial sector and compare them against those factors which influence nuclear weapons safety. Commercial/industrial safety is guided by private and public safety standards. Generally, private safety standards tend to emphasize product reliability issues while public (i.e., government) safety standards tend to emphasize human factors issues. Safety in the nuclear weapons arena is driven by federal requirements and memoranda of understanding (MOUs) between the Departments of Defense and Energy. Safety is achieved through passive design features integrated into the nuclear weapon. Though the common strand between commercial/industrial and nuclear weapons safety is the minimization of risk posed to the general population (i.e., public safety), the authors found that each sector tends to employ a different safety approach to view and resolve high-consequence safety issues.

  6. Parametric instabilities of rotor-support systems with application to industrial ventilators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parszewski, Z.; Krodkiemski, T.; Marynowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rotor support systems interaction with parametric excitation is considered for both unequal principal shaft stiffness (generators) and offset disc rotors (ventilators). Instability regions and types of instability are computed in the first case, and parametric resonances in the second case. Computed and experimental results are compared for laboratory machine models. A field case study of parametric vibrations in industrial ventilators is reported. Computed parametric resonances are confirmed in field measurements, and some industrial failures are explained. Also the dynamic influence and gyroscopic effect of supporting structures are shown and computed.

  7. Reagan's energy war: can deregulation and the Pentagon save the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mr. Feeney feels that Administration energy policies claiming to protect democracy and reduce government interference will transfer money and political control from the people to the energy corporations and the Pentagon. Critics deplore the hard-path approach of downgrading conservation and solar energy in favor of nuclear energy, which some see as setting the stage for a nuclear war in this decade. They see the plan to abolish DOE as providing an opportunity to bail out the nuclear industry, bury environmental and alternative energy research, and block regulations. Critics question why Reagan's devotion to the free market is not applied to the nuclear industry, although they disagree on the linkage with nuclear weapons of new fuel cycle proposals and the use of national security to solve the waste disposal problem by nationalizing and militarizing the fuel cycle. (DCK)

  8. Delivering on Industry Equipment Reliability Goals By Leveraging an Integration Platform and Decision Support Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Coveney, Maureen K.; Bailey, W. Henry; Parkinson, William

    2004-07-01

    Utilities have invested in many costly enterprise systems - computerized maintenance management systems, document management systems, enterprise grade portals, to name but a few - and often very specialized systems, like data historians, high end diagnostic systems, and other focused and point solutions. From recent industry reports, we now know that the average nuclear power utilizes on average 1900 systems to perform daily work, of which 250 might facilitate the equipment reliability decision-making process. The time has come to leverage the investment in these systems by providing a common platform for integration and decision-making that will further the collective industry aim of enhancing the reliability of our nuclear generation assets to maintain high plant availability and to deliver on plant life extension goals without requiring additional large scale investment in IT infrastructure. (authors)

  9. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution. PMID:24213376

  10. A Lesson from the Nuclear Industry: Professionalism and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L.; Widen, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    Focuses on an innovative approach to instill professionalism in workers such as reactor operators and other nuclear power workers. It may be used by technology instructors to send a message to their students: regardless of the advanced state of technology, the human element provides the key to desirable outcomes. (Author/JOW)

  11. A Study of Reasons for Participation in Continuing Professional Education in the U.S. Nuclear Power Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCamey, Randy B.

    2003-01-01

    The need for workers in the U.S. nuclear power industry to continually update their knowledge, skills, and abilities is critical to the safe and reliable operation of the country's nuclear power facilities. To improve their skills, knowledge, and abilities, many professionals in the nuclear power industry participate in continuing professional…

  12. Implementing shared governance in a patient care support industry: information technology leading the way.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Lou Ann

    2014-06-01

    Implementing technology in the clinical setting is not a project but rather a journey in transforming care delivery. As nursing leaders in healthcare and patient care support organizations embrace technology to drive reforms in quality and efficiency, growing opportunities exist to share experiences between these industries. This department submission describes the journey to nursing shared governance from the perspective of an information technology-based company realizing the goal of supporting patient care. PMID:24853793

  13. The thermalhydraulics of tube-support fouling in nuclear steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummens, Helena Elisabeth Cornelia

    Nuclear steam generators (SGs) world-wide have experienced a wide variety of problems, of which a recent one has been fouling and blockage of the supports that restrain the SG primary-coolant tubes. Water chemistry and operating conditions are known to influence fouling, and it is hypothesized that the thermal and hydraulic environments near a support also play a role. The work presented here endeavours to show the effect of support design on this environment and hence on fouling. Experiments were performed to simulate the thermalhydraulic environment near various designs of tube supports. Air/water mixtures were useful in showing the hydraulic flow patterns, while Freon-11 vapour/liquid mixtures showed thermal effects. Measurements of pressure loss, local velocity, and local void fraction were also made to quantitatively characterize the effect of the support. A computer program, called TSFOUL, was coded to predict deposit thicknesses in and near a support. Larger codes used for such predictions in industry have been unable to predict blockage of supports, hence the need for support- specific models. TSFOUL has the same classic particle deposition models as in the larger codes, but considers additional factors such as stagnation zones and surfaces normal to the flow. The fouling mechanisms specific to supports were inferred from SG inspections and from experimental flow patterns, and measured values helped to make the models more quantitative. While limited by a lack of good validation data, TSFOUL was able to predict reasonable deposition patterns, and helped to understand the complex interaction between different mechanisms. The net product is a set of tools for assessing the fouling propensity of a given tube-support design: (1)proposed fouling mechanisms, (2)criteria for support fouling propensity, (3)correlation of fouling with mass flux and quality, (4)experimental tools such as flow visualization and measurement of pressure-loss profiles, and (5)analytical

  14. Perception of Aquaculture Education to Support Further Growth of Aquaculture Industry in Victoria, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awal, Sadiqul; Christie, Andrew; Watson, Matthew; Hannadige, Asanka G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The central aim of this study was to determine the perception of aquaculture educational provisions in the state of Victoria, and whether they are sufficient to ultimately support further growth of the industry. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were formulated and distributed to participants in a variety of ways, including via…

  15. Engineering, Support, and Management Services: Construction Industry Series: Preparation Level: Student Manual and Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The guide is an outline of training experiences designed to lead a student to at least entry-level proficiency in engineering, support, and management service jobs within the construction industry. Teaching units cover construction drafting, architectural drawing, engineering drafting, estimating, expediting and scheduling, surveying, testing and…

  16. A Project-Based Laboratory for Learning Embedded System Design with Industry Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chyi-Shyong; Su, Juing-Huei; Lin, Kuo-En; Chang, Jia-Hao; Lin, Gu-Hong

    2010-01-01

    A project-based laboratory for learning embedded system design with support from industry is presented in this paper. The aim of this laboratory is to motivate students to learn the building blocks of embedded systems and practical control algorithms by constructing a line-following robot using the quadratic interpolation technique to predict the…

  17. A study of distance education for the needs of the nuclear power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckline, Sigmund Joseph

    This research presents an examination of student satisfaction related to online training for adult learners in the nuclear power industry. Both groups, the nuclear industry and its associated workforce, have demonstrable needs which might be met by such programs. The nuclear industry itself faces an expansion of facilities and services combined with an aging workforce and reduction in traditional sources for skilled workers. The workforce, in turn, must deal with tightening economic conditions and the difficulty of matching available time to possible training. This research studies one Bachelor of Applied Sciences degree begun initially as a blended and later as a distance education platform. By means of a survey, built on An Assessment of Training Needs in the Use of Distance Education for Instruction by Sherry and Morse (January, 1995), it examines the reactions to the program and gauges overall success. From the analysis of this typical population, it demonstrates the utility of such online specialty learning programs for the target group.

  18. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  19. The Use of Thorium within the Nuclear Power Industry - 13472

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith

    2013-07-01

    Thorium is 3 to 4 times more abundant than uranium and is widely distributed in nature as an easily exploitable resource in many countries. Unlike natural uranium, which contains ∼0.7% fissile {sup 235}U isotope, natural thorium does not contain any fissile material and is made up of the fertile {sup 232}Th isotope only. Therefore thorium and thorium-based fuel as metal, oxide or carbide, has been utilized in combination with fissile {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu in nuclear research and power reactors for conversion to fissile {sup 233}U, thereby enlarging fissile material resources. During the pioneering years of nuclear energy, from the mid 1950's to mid 1970's, there was considerable interest worldwide to develop thorium fuels and fuel cycles in order to supplement uranium reserves. Thorium fuels and fuel cycles are particularly relevant to countries having large thorium deposits but very limited uranium reserves for their long term nuclear power programme. The feasibility of thorium utilization in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), light water reactors (LWR), pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBR) were demonstrated. The initial enthusiasm for thorium fuels and fuel cycles was not sustained among the developing countries later, due to new discovery of uranium deposits and their improved availability. However, in recent times, the need for proliferation-resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup, and improved waste form characteristics, reduction of plutonium inventories and in situ use of bred-in fissile material has led to renewed interest in thorium-based fuels and fuel cycles. (authors)

  20. Economical Mars Exploration Supported by a Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, S. D.; O'Brien, R. C.

    2012-06-01

    A nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) developed for human Mars missions could act as a "mother ship" and carry multiple unmanned platforms to Mars for independent deployment. Use of the NTR could increase the science per dollar for each Earth launch.

  1. Drug and alcohol abuse: the bases for employee assistance programs in the nuclear-utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, L.R.; Rankin, W.L.; Barnes, V.; McGuire, M.V.; Hope, A.M.

    1983-07-01

    This report describes the nature, prevalence, and trends of drug and alcohol abuse among members of the US adult population and among personnel in non-nuclear industries. Analogous data specific to the nuclear utility industry are not available, so these data were gathered in order to provide a basis for regulatory planning. The nature, prevalence, and trend inforamtion was gathered using a computerized literature, telephone discussions with experts, and interviews with employee assistance program representatives from the Seattle area. This report also evaluates the possible impacts that drugs and alcohol might have on nuclear-related job performance, based on currently available nuclear utility job descriptions and on the scientific literature regarding the impairing effects of drugs and alcohol on human performance. Employee assistance programs, which can be used to minimize or eliminate job performance decrements resulting from drug or alcohol abuse, are also discussed.

  2. Methods and practices used in incident analysis in the Finnish nuclear power industry.

    PubMed

    Suksi, Seija

    2004-07-26

    Finnish nuclear power plant operators Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Fortum) was carried out by the Technical Research Centre (VTT) on request of STUK at the end of 1990s. The study aimed at providing a broad overview and suggestions for improvement of the whole organisational framework to support event investigation practices at the regulatory body and at the utilities. The main objective of the research was to evaluate the adequacy and reliability of event investigation analysis methods and practices in the Finnish nuclear power industry and based on the results to further develop them. The results and suggestions of the research are reviewed in the paper and the corrective actions implemented in event investigation and operating experience procedures both at STUK and at utilities are discussed as well. STUK has developed its own procedure for the risk-informed analysis of nuclear power plant events. The PSA based event analysis method is used to assess the safety significance and importance measures associated with the unavailability of components and systems subject to Technical Specifications. The insights from recently performed PSA based analyses are also briefly discussed in the paper. PMID:15231350

  3. Preparing graduates for today's performance-based environment in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Long, R.L. )

    1993-01-01

    In today's nuclear industry, performance-based criteria have become a way of life in education and training, operations, quality assurance, and even the regulatory process. One way to prepare graduates to understand performance-based criteria is to introduce the use of these criteria in their classroom and laboratory educational experiences. This paper describes various applications of performance-based criteria in the nuclear industry and then suggests ways for engineering educators to introduce such criteria to their students. More and more emphasis in industry (not just nuclear) is on effectiveness and efficiency, i.e., on what needs to be accomplished and on meeting predefined standards of quality. New graduates will find that this emphasis on productivity results in less time for free-wheeling apprenticeship; more time, at least in the nuclear power industry, spent on company, plant, and equipment-specific training programs; and a focus on structured activities being [open quotes]performance based[close quotes] becoming a [open quotes]way of life[close quotes]. Performance-based Quality Assurance (QA) activities focus on a process of assurance that is achieved through observation of people and equipment and assessing their performance as related to both standards and expectations or desired end results. The standards provide information to allow the inspector to determine the accomplishment or nonaccomplishment of the performance objectives, namely, nuclear safety, reliability, and functionality and availability to perform the intended design functions. This performance-based approach takes QA beyond the common paper requirements reviews.

  4. Ernst Young study of the economic effects of the Canadian Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Going, T.; Roberts, M.; Harrison, S. )

    1993-01-01

    A major independent study was completed recently by Ernst Young on behalf of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The [open quotes]Study of the Economic Effects of the Canadian Nuclear Industry[close quotes] is the first attempt to provide a cumulative and comprehensive assessment of the contribution to the Canadian economy made by the industry from business activities in Canada and abroad since commercial development began in the 1950s.

  5. Reactor engineering support of operations at Three Mile Island nuclear station

    SciTech Connect

    Tropasso, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to detail the activities in which plant nuclear engineering personnel provide direct support to plant operations. The specific activities include steady-state, transient, and shutdown/refueling operation support as well as special project involvement. The paper is intended to describe the experiences at Three Mile Island (TMI) in which significant benefit to the success of the activity is achieved through the support of the nuclear engineers.

  6. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, N.; Moore, C.; Grant, T.; Fleming, T.; Hunt, P.; Martin, R.; Murphy, S.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Bittner, A.; Bramwell, A.; Macaulay, J.; Olson, J.; Terrill, E.; Toquam, J. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an overview of the NRC licensees' implementation of the FFD program during the first full year of the program's operation and provides new information on a variety of FFD technical issues. The purpose of this document is to contribute to appropriate changes to the rule, to the inspection process, and to other NRC activities. It describes the characteristics of licensee programs, discusses the results of NRC inspections, updates technical information covered in previous reports, and identifies lessons learned during the first year. Overall, the experience of the first full year of licensees' FFD program operations indicates that licensees have functioning fitness for duty programs devoted to the NRC rule's performance objectives of achieving drug-free workplaces in which nuclear power plant personnel are not impaired as they perform their duties. 96 refs., 14 tabs.

  7. Upgrade of the Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System at the VNIIEF Industrial Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.C.; Maltsev, V.; Singh, S.P.

    1999-09-20

    The Industrial Zone at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center/All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC/VNEEF) consists of ten guarded areas with twenty two material balance areas (A and As). The type of facilities in the Industrial Zone include storage sites, machine shops, research facilities, and training facilities. Modernization of the Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) System at the Industrial Zone started in 1997. This paper provides a description of, the methodology/strategy used in the upgrade of the MFC and A system.

  8. Support of the Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal program

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Roger; Cochran, John; Danneels, Jeff; Chesser, Ronald; Phillips, Carlton; Rogers, Brenda

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Iraq's former nuclear facilities contain large quantities of radioactive materials and radioactive waste. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the Iraq NDs Program) is a new program to decontaminate and permanently dispose of radioactive wastes in Iraq. The NDs Program is led by the Government of Iraq, under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) auspices, with guidance and assistance from a number of countries. The U.S. participants include Texas Tech University and Sandia National Laboratories. A number of activities are ongoing under the broad umbrella of the Iraq NDs Program: drafting a new nuclear law that will provide the legal basis for the cleanup and disposal activities; assembly and analysis of existing data; characterization of soil contamination; bringing Iraqi scientists to the world's largest symposium on radioactive waste management; touring U.S. government and private sector operating radwaste disposal facilities in the U.S., and hosting a planning workshop on the characterization and cleanup of the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Facility. (authors)

  9. Questionable content of an industry-supported medical school lecture series: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Navindra

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical schools are grappling with how best to manage industry involvement in medical education. Objective To describe a case study of industry-supported undergraduate medical education related to opioid analgesics. Method Institutional case study. Results As part of their regular curriculum, Canadian medical students attended pain pharmacotherapy lectures that contained questionable content about the use of opioids for pain management. The lectures were supported by pharmaceutical companies that market opioid analgesics in Canada and the guest lecturer was a member of speakers bureaus of the same companies. These conflicts of interests were not fully disclosed. A reference book that reinforced some of the information in the lectures and that was paid for by a sponsoring company was made available to students. This is the first report of an association between industry sponsorship and the dissemination of potentially dangerous information to medical students. Conclusions This case demonstrates the need for better strategies for preventing, identifying and dealing with problematic interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and undergraduate medical education. These might include the avoidance of unnecessary conflicts of interest, more disclosure of conflicts, an open process for dealing with recognised problems and internationally harmonised conflict of interest policies. PMID:23760579

  10. Geopressure industrial forums, newsletter and lease support. Final report, April 7, 1981-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, C.F.

    1983-12-01

    In the course of this contract C. K. GeoEnergy: (1) planned, organized, conducted, and reported on six DOE/Industry Forum meetings where the progress of DOE's resource development program was outlined and discussed (these six forum meetings included three meetings of the Drilling and Testing Subgroup and three meetings of the Overview Group), (2) prepared and distributed 15 newsletters, and (3) prepared three reports for DOE lease support. This final report includes summaries of each of the forum meetings as well as the three lease support meetings and the newsletter program.

  11. Fuel supply of nuclear power industry with the introduction of fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraviev, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The results of studies conducted for the validation of the updated development strategy for nuclear power industry in Russia in the 21st century are presented. Scenarios with different options for the reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal reactors and large-scale growth of nuclear power industry based on fast reactors of inherent safety with a breeding ratio of ˜1 in a closed nuclear fuel cycle are considered. The possibility of enhanced fuel breeding in fast reactors is also taken into account in the analysis. The potential to establish a large-scale nuclear power industry that covers 100% of the increase in electric power requirements in Russia is demonstrated. This power industry may be built by the end of the century through the introduction of fast reactors (replacing thermal ones) with a gross uranium consumption of up to ˜1 million t and the termination of uranium mining even if the reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal reactors is stopped or suffers a long-term delay.

  12. A survey of fatigue monitoring in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    The original design of nuclear power plants addressed fatigue concerns by including calculations of projected fatigue usage for specific components; the calculations were based on estimates of the number and severity of expected transients over the 40-year design life of the plants. In some cases, the transients occurring in the plants are not as severe as was anticipated in the original design analyses, while in other cases events have occurred that were not anticipated in the design basis documents. Field failures caused by fatigue have identified some of those cases. In response, several organizations in the United States and overseas have developed fatigue monitoring programs to more accurately estimate the fatigue usage. One basic approach consists of reconstructing the fatigue usage to date based on the transients recorded in the operating history instead of those projected in the design documents. Another approach includes monitoring the plant instrumentation to determine actual values for parameters such as temperature and pressure and using the measured values in the fatigue usage calculations instead of the values projected in the design documents. The use of existing plant instrumentation to measure temperature, pressure, flow rate, etc., along with the incorporation of conservative assumptions, had generally proven adequate for estimating fatigue usage; however, in some cases additional instrumentation installed for local monitoring can provide a more accurate estimate, especially where thermal stratification is known to occur. Fatigue monitoring can aid in identifying fatigue concerns not anticipated in the original design and for reducing the excessive conservatism in some of the original design calculations so that the fatigue lives of these components can be justified as they age. Fatigue monitoring can also assist efforts to reduce ongoing fatigue usage through design modifications and operating procedure changes.

  13. A survey of fatigue monitoring in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The original design of nuclear power plants addressed fatigue concerns by including calculations of projected fatigue usage for specific components; the calculations were based on estimates of the number and severity of expected transients over the 40-year design life of the plants. In some cases, the transients occurring in the plants are not as severe as was anticipated in the original design analyses, while in other cases events have occurred that were not anticipated in the design basis documents. Field failures caused by fatigue have identified some of those cases. In response, several organizations in the United States and overseas have developed fatigue monitoring programs to more accurately estimate the fatigue usage. One basic approach consists of reconstructing the fatigue usage to date based on the transients recorded in the operating history instead of those projected in the design documents. Another approach includes monitoring the plant instrumentation to determine actual values for parameters such as temperature and pressure and using the measured values in the fatigue usage calculations instead of the values projected in the design documents. The use of existing plant instrumentation to measure temperature, pressure, flow rate, etc., along with the incorporation of conservative assumptions, had generally proven adequate for estimating fatigue usage; however, in some cases additional instrumentation installed for local monitoring can provide a more accurate estimate, especially where thermal stratification is known to occur. Fatigue monitoring can aid in identifying fatigue concerns not anticipated in the original design and for reducing the excessive conservatism in some of the original design calculations so that the fatigue lives of these components can be justified as they age. Fatigue monitoring can also assist efforts to reduce ongoing fatigue usage through design modifications and operating procedure changes.

  14. Reuse of nuclear byproducts, NaF and HF in metal glass industries

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.; Lee, H.W.; Yoo, S.H.; Moon, H.S.; Cho, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the radiological safety and feasibility associated with reuse of NaF(Sodium Fluoride) and HF(Hydrofluoric Acid) which are generated as byproducts from the nuclear fuel fabrication process. The investigation of oversea`s experience reveals that the byproduct materials are most often used in the metal and glass industries. For the radiological safety evaluation, the uranium radioactivities in the byproduct materials were examined and shown to be less than radioactivities in natural materials. The radiation doses to plant personnel and the general public were assessed to be very small and could be ignored. The Korea nuclear regulatory body permits the reuse of NaF in the metal industry on the basis of associated radioactivity being {open_quote}below regulatory concern{close_quote}. HF is now under review for reuse acceptability in the steel and glass industries.

  15. Proceedings of EPRI/DOE workshop on nuclear industry valve problems

    SciTech Connect

    Sprung, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Representatives from 29 nuclear industry organizations (11 valve manufacturers, 4 nuclear steam supply system vendors, 5 utilities, 3 national laboratories, 2 architect/engineering firms, the Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, and 2 others) attended the workshop. Working sessions on key valves and on valve stem and seat leakage developed the following recommendations: (1) establish a small permanent expert staff to collect, analyze, and disseminate information about nuclear valve problems; (2) perform generic key valve programs for pressurized water reactors and for boiling water reactors, and several plant specific key valve programs, the latter to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of such studies; (3) confirm the identity of, define, and initiate needed longer term research and development programs dealing with seat and stem leakage; and (4) establish an industry working group to review and advise on these efforts. Separate abstracts were prepared for three papers which are included in the appendix. (DLC)

  16. Means for supporting fuel elements in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Harry N.; Keller, Herbert W.

    1980-01-01

    A grid structure for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a plurality of connecting members forming at least one longitudinally extending opening peripheral and inner fuel element openings through each of which openings at least one nuclear fuel element extends, said connecting members forming wall means surrounding said each peripheral and inner fuel element opening, a pair of rigid projections longitudinally spaced from one another extending from a portion of said wall means into said each peripheral and inner opening for rigidly engaging said each fuel element, respectively, yet permit individual longitudinal slippage thereof, and resilient means formed integrally on and from said wall means and positioned in said each peripheral and inner opening in opposed relationship with said projections and located to engage said fuel element to bias the latter into engagement with said rigid projections, respectively

  17. Design of Tokamak ELM Coil Support in High Nuclear Heat Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanwen; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Zhongwei; Ji, Xiang; Daly, E.; Kalish, M.; Lu, Su; Du, Shuangsong; Liu, Xufeng; Feng, Changle; Yang, Hong; Wang, Songke

    2014-03-01

    In Tokomak, the support of the ELM coil, which is close to the plasma and subject to high radiation level, high temperature and high magnetic field, is used to transport and bear the thermal load due to thermal expansion and the alternating electromagnetic force generated by high magnetic field and AC current in the coil. According to the feature of ITER ELM coil, the mechanical performance of rigid and flexible supports under different high nuclear heat levels is studied. Results show that flexible supports have more excellent performance in high nuclear heat condition than rigid supports. Concerning thermal and electromagnetic (EM) loads, optimized results further prove that flexible supports have better mechanical performance than rigid ones. Through these studies, reasonable support design can be provided for the ELM coils or similar coils in Tokamak based on the nuclear heat level.

  18. On perceptions of the effectiveness of the self-assessment process in the nuclear power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riha, Raymond J.

    The organizational self-assessment process came to maturity during the Total Quality Management (TQM) movement. Although varying forms of the process had been utilized for many years, the first mature self-assessments, known as self-appraisals, were performed as a criterion for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA). One objective of this research was to assess whether self-assessments in the nuclear industry are driven more by regulatory requirements or business expectations. If driven by regulatory requirements, this may differentiate the process from other industries. Also, recent literature indicates that the existing models for conducting self-assessment for continuous improvement may be outdated (Williams, Bertsch, Van der Wiele, Van Iwaarden and Dale, 2006). In addition, these authors believe that each industry or organization should develop their own models or adapt the existing TQM model to optimize the benefits of self-assessments. Another objective of the research presented herein was to determine whether there are standard attributes that can be applied to the performance of self-assessments in the nuclear industry. This study, through use of a survey, identified attributes of the nuclear power industry that could be used in future research to construct a standard model to optimize the investments made by the industry in the use of self-assessments. Finally, the study determined the relationships between survey characteristics (e.g., participant level in the organization, those that believe that self-assessment improves performance, and the purpose of self-assessment). Keywords: self-assessment, nuclear, continuous improvement, process attributes

  19. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area

  20. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect

    Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area

  1. Nukes II: the nuclear power industry wants another chance. This time, it promises to do things right

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, H.G.

    1985-03-01

    Anticipating a comback for nuclear power, the nuclear industry points to the need for reliable supplies of electricity to provide over 35% of US energy requirements. The industry faces both technical and institutional problems, in contrast to the mature industry of other countries, and promises to improve its performance in safety design and efficiency. Pointing to design advances, robotics, computerized simulation and other techniques, the industry feels that regulation will be more reasonable and costs will be reduced. Economic solutions include building smaller plants and using modular construction. The biggest uncertainty, however, is whether the public will buy either the need for additional capacity or nuclear power to fill that need.

  2. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-04-26

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

  3. A nuclear plant accident diagnosis method to support prediction of errors of commission

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. H. J.; Coyne, K.; Mosleh, A.

    2006-07-01

    The identification and mitigation of operator errors of commission (EOCs) continue to be a major focus of nuclear plant human reliability research. Current Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods for predicting EOCs generally rely on the availability of operating procedures or extensive use of expert judgment. Consequently, an analysis for EOCs cannot easily be performed for actions that may be taken outside the scope of the operating procedures. Additionally, current HRA techniques rarely capture an operator's 'creative' problem-solving behavior. However, a nuclear plant operator knowledge base developed for the use with the IDAC (Information, Decision, and Action in Crew context) cognitive model shows potential for addressing these limitations. This operator knowledge base currently includes an event-symptom diagnosis matrix for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plant. The diagnosis matrix defines a probabilistic relationship between observed symptoms and plant events that models the operator's heuristic process for classifying a plant state. Observed symptoms are obtained from a dynamic thermal-hydraulic plant model and can be modified to account for the limitations of human perception and cognition. A fuzzy-logic inference technique is used to calculate the operator's confidence, or degree of belief, that a given plant event has occurred based on the observed symptoms. An event diagnosis can be categorized as either: (a) a generalized flow imbalance of basic thermal-hydraulic properties (e.g., a mass or energy flow imbalance in the reactor coolant system), or (b) a specific event type, such as a steam generator tube rupture or a reactor trip. When an operator is presented with incomplete or contradictory information, this diagnosis approach provides a means to identify situations where an operator might be misled to perform unsafe actions based on an incorrect diagnosis. This knowledge base model could also support identification of potential EOCs when

  4. Improving healthcare quality through organisational peer-to-peer assessment: lessons from the nuclear power industry.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Hudson, Daniel W

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare has made great efforts to reduce preventable patient harm, from externally driven regulations to internally driven professionalism. Regulation has driven the majority of efforts to date, and has a necessary place in establishing accountability and minimum standards. Yet they need to be coupled with internally driven efforts. Among professional groups, internally-driven efforts that function as communities of learning and change social norms are highly effective tools to improve performance, yet these approaches are underdeveloped in healthcare. Healthcare can learn much from the nuclear power industry. The nuclear power industry formed the Institute of Nuclear Power Operators following the Three Mile Island accident to improve safety. That organization established a peer-to-peer assessment program to cross-share best practices, safety hazards, problems and actions that improved safety and operational performance. This commentary explores how a similar program could be expanded into healthcare. Healthcare needs a structured, clinician-led, industry-wide process to openly review, identify and mitigate hazards, and share best practices that ultimately improve patient safety. A healthcare version of the nuclear power program could supplement regulatory and other strategies currently used to improve quality and patient safety. PMID:22562877

  5. Supporting U.S. Response to the Japanese Nuclear Crisis | ORAU

    SciTech Connect

    Crapo, John; Jakubowski, Ted

    2012-03-08

    When an earthquake and tsunami hit off the coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, and triggered a nuclear crisis, the U.S. immediately offered support. Among those tapped to assist was ORAU's National Security and Emergency Management team, which provided NNSA with technical and analytical nuclear incident support. Within 48 hours of the earthquake, ORAU emergency management experts accompanied the DOE Office of Emergency Response in deploying to Japan to support the U.S. Air Force Base in Yokota and the U.S. Embassy. A separate team from ORAU supported the NNSA Nuclear Incident Team, which served as the point of coordination for all support activities both in Japan and in the U.S.

  6. Adsorption of Oxyanions from Industrial Wastewater using Perlite-Supported Magnetite.

    PubMed

    Verbinnen, Bram; Block, Chantal; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Most studies on oxyanion adsorption focus on their removal from synthetic solutions. It is often claimed that the considered adsorbents can be used to treat real (industrial) wastewaters, but this is seldom tested. Perlite-supported magnetite was characterized first by determining its specific surface area, magnetite content and by examining the coating. Tests on a synthetic solution showed that at the ideal pH values (pH 3 to 5), the order of adsorption is Mo(VI) > As(V) > Sb(V) > Cr(VI) > Se(VI). Most oxyanions can be removed for more than 75% with an adsorbent dosage of 1 g/l. Furthermore, perlite-supported magnetite has a higher removal efficiency for oxyanions than commercially available adsorbents and comparable adsorbents described in literature. Perlite-supported magnetite is suitable for treating real wastewaters: it can remove several oxyanions simultaneously from the considered industrial wastewater, but the adsorption order changes due to the presence of interfering anions. PMID:26488866

  7. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  8. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, James P.; Kann, William J.; Pan, Yen-Cheng; Saiveau, James G.; Seidensticker, Ralph W.

    1987-01-01

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform. Motion or radiation sensing detectors can be provide at the lower ends of the tension rods for obtaining pertinent readings proximate the core.

  9. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  10. The tethering of chromatin to the nuclear envelope supports nuclear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sarah M.; Koo, Peter K.; Zhao, Yao; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; King, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be the primary mechanical defence of the nucleus. However, the lamina is integrated within a network of lipids, proteins and chromatin; the interdependence of this network poses a challenge to defining the individual mechanical contributions of these components. Here, we isolate the role of chromatin in nuclear mechanics by using a system lacking lamins. Using novel imaging analyses, we observe that untethering chromatin from the inner nuclear membrane results in highly deformable nuclei in vivo, particularly in response to cytoskeletal forces. Using optical tweezers, we find that isolated nuclei lacking inner nuclear membrane tethers are less stiff than wild-type nuclei and exhibit increased chromatin flow, particularly in frequency ranges that recapitulate the kinetics of cytoskeletal dynamics. We suggest that modulating chromatin flow can define both transient and long-lived changes in nuclear shape that are biologically important and may be altered in disease. PMID:26074052

  11. Section 2: Corrosion and failure analysis studies in support of the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Longmire, H.F.

    1997-04-01

    Technical support is being provided to various pulp and paper companies and related industries to help determine the cause of material degradation problems and to identify alternate materials to prevent such degradation. During the past year, examinations have included parts from several sootblowers, two failed economizer tubes, and inspection of a continuous digester. The results of the analyses and inspections were communicated to the plant operators, and, in some cases, recommendations were made. This article discusses examination of sootblower nozzles, which evidenced intergranular cracking. Analysis indicated the presence of chromium carbide precipitates along the grain boundaries, which can cause the sample to be sensitized to grain boundary attack.

  12. Medical support in a nuclear/biological/chemical threat environment.

    PubMed

    Handke, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    This account shows how military personnel deployed abroad are often exposed to particularly stressful events and how they must cope with enormous challenges. Shortly after the ground offensive started in Iraq, 109 soldiers were deployed, at very short notice, from Germany to Kuwait on March 21, 2003, as Extending Operation Forces in the area of operations. They reinforced the German NBC defense battalion that was already stationed on the Persian Gulf. From March 21 to May 6, 2003, I was assigned to Camp Doha, Kuwait, as the senior medical officer of the German contingent participating in Operation Enduring Freedom. The situation changed drastically when Operation Iraqi Freedom started on March 20, 2003, when the camp was attacked by Iraqi missiles. Medical support was then provided under the conditions of an acute conventional and NBC threat situation. Providing medical support in multinational operations is one of the tasks specified in the operational spectrum of the Medical Service. As a result of the growing threat posed worldwide by terrorist acts involving the use not only of conventional weapons but also of NBC agents, it is becoming increasingly important for medical personnel to receive appropriate training in how to behave and in how to treat patients in a NBC threat environment. We must make every effort to fully understand this new type of threat environment and to address it effectively. PMID:18214132

  13. Slimhole Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Logging While Drilling - A New Service for the Oil Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Gerhard; Thern, Holger; Blanz, Martin; Kruspe, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    A 6.75 inch tool size was previously thought to be the smallest size in which a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurement could be made in Logging While Drilling (LWD) applications. Requests from the industry, especially in more complex and deeper environments, presented a need for NMR technology in a 4.75 inch tool size. To meet that need we have made changes in both the electronics and the mechanical design. Recent measurements show that the data quality from the smaller tool is comparable to that from the well established 6.75 in tool. The capability to cover a wide hole size range with NMR is an important step to establish this technology as a standard formation evaluation measurement. The sensitive volume is a 0.7 liter toroid encircling the centralized 4.75 in tool having a nominal diameter of 9.5 inch. The vertical resolution is similar for both tool sizes and depending, amongst other things, on the rate of penetration and running average. The tool concept consequently avoids motion artifacts and enables the tool to measure T2 echo trains. This is especially important in while-drilling applications, where the drill string dynamics often causes tool motion relative to the formation. A low magnetic field gradient of 2.5 Gauss/cm, a short inter-echo time of 0.6 ms, and optimized drillstring stabilization are paramount for this concept. Mud pulse telemetry has been considered to be a bottleneck for LWD NMR data for a long time. An additional feature introduced with the new slimhole NMR LWD is the transmission of whole echo-trains in compressed data format. The possibility of sending compressed NMR data uphole via mud pulse telemetry can provide complete petrophysical information in real-time. This supports quick decisions while drilling, and is important in reducing drilling costs. Reliable answers for a variety of client objectives like tar detection, viscosity estimation, and porosity measurements have already been successfully provided. In case histories

  14. Online Condition Monitoring of Bearings to Support Total Productive Maintenance in the Packaging Materials Industry

    PubMed Central

    Gligorijevic, Jovan; Gajic, Dragoljub; Brkovic, Aleksandar; Savic-Gajic, Ivana; Georgieva, Olga; Di Gennaro, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The packaging materials industry has already recognized the importance of Total Productive Maintenance as a system of proactive techniques for improving equipment reliability. Bearing faults, which often occur gradually, represent one of the foremost causes of failures in the industry. Therefore, detection of their faults in an early stage is quite important to assure reliable and efficient operation. We present a new automated technique for early fault detection and diagnosis in rolling-element bearings based on vibration signal analysis. Following the wavelet decomposition of vibration signals into a few sub-bands of interest, the standard deviation of obtained wavelet coefficients is extracted as a representative feature. Then, the feature space dimension is optimally reduced to two using scatter matrices. In the reduced two-dimensional feature space the fault detection and diagnosis is carried out by quadratic classifiers. Accuracy of the technique has been tested on four classes of the recorded vibrations signals, i.e., normal, with the fault of inner race, outer race, and ball operation. The overall accuracy of 98.9% has been achieved. The new technique can be used to support maintenance decision-making processes and, thus, to increase reliability and efficiency in the industry by preventing unexpected faulty operation of bearings. PMID:26938541

  15. Online Condition Monitoring of Bearings to Support Total Productive Maintenance in the Packaging Materials Industry.

    PubMed

    Gligorijevic, Jovan; Gajic, Dragoljub; Brkovic, Aleksandar; Savic-Gajic, Ivana; Georgieva, Olga; Di Gennaro, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The packaging materials industry has already recognized the importance of Total Productive Maintenance as a system of proactive techniques for improving equipment reliability. Bearing faults, which often occur gradually, represent one of the foremost causes of failures in the industry. Therefore, detection of their faults in an early stage is quite important to assure reliable and efficient operation. We present a new automated technique for early fault detection and diagnosis in rolling-element bearings based on vibration signal analysis. Following the wavelet decomposition of vibration signals into a few sub-bands of interest, the standard deviation of obtained wavelet coefficients is extracted as a representative feature. Then, the feature space dimension is optimally reduced to two using scatter matrices. In the reduced two-dimensional feature space the fault detection and diagnosis is carried out by quadratic classifiers. Accuracy of the technique has been tested on four classes of the recorded vibrations signals, i.e., normal, with the fault of inner race, outer race, and ball operation. The overall accuracy of 98.9% has been achieved. The new technique can be used to support maintenance decision-making processes and, thus, to increase reliability and efficiency in the industry by preventing unexpected faulty operation of bearings. PMID:26938541

  16. RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-11-07

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed

  17. Rapid Radiochemical Analyses in Support of Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 13196

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2013-07-01

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples [1, 2]. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90}Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation [3, 4]. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride

  18. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  19. Assessment of DOD and industry networks for Computer-Aided Logistics Support (CALS) telecommunications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaura, F.L.; Sharp, S.J.; Clark, R.

    1987-06-01

    The Department of Defense is committed to applying the best in modern technology toward improving the transfer of design, engineering, and manufacturing technical information among weapon-system contractors and DoD organizations. The Military Services, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the Defense Communications Agency (DCA), and industry are undertaking or planning telecommunications support for such transfer. In view of these many and diverse efforts, the Computer Aided Logistics Support (CALS) Steering Group through the CALS Communications Working Group has recognized the need for evaluating them. The report presents an evaluation of CALS-related telecommunications requirements in DoD, the major efforts for automating engineering drawing and technical data repositories, and various intelligent-gateway efforts in each of the Services. The overall direction within each Service for telecommunication support and transitioning to the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) standards is presented, as well as the status of commercial efforts for defining and implementing the OSI standards and improving long-haul telecommunications support.

  20. The NUCLARR databank: Human reliability and hardware failure data for the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.J.

    1993-05-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) was developed to provide human reliability and hardware failure data to analysts in the nuclear power industry. This IBM-compatible databank is contained on a set of floppy diskettes which include data files and a menu-driven system for locating, reviewing, sorting, and retrieving the data. NUCLARR contains over 2500 individual data records, drawn from more, than 60 sources. The system is upgraded annually, to include additional human error and hardware component failure data and programming enhancements (i.e., increased user-friendliness). NUCLARR is available from the NRC through project staff at the INEL.

  1. Overview of implementing a project control system in the nuclear utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cooprider, D.H. )

    1994-03-01

    During the late 1980s, a metamorphosis began at Florida Power and Light Company (FPL). A strategic step in nuclear engineering's efforts to become more cost effective began in January 1990. A project control department was formed. The initial mission was to provide support for nuclear engineering design activities associated with FPL's two twin-unit nuclear power generation facilities - Turkey Point and St. Lucie. Later, the goal expanded to include the division's materials management, nuclear licensing, and information management departments. The project control group was organized along the lines of the organizations served. Separate dedicated groups were established for each plant. Since most engineering activity was based at the Juno Beach headquarters, the project control staff also was based there.

  2. The Impacts of Military, Industrial, and Private Support on Modern Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the period following WW I, governmental support for astronomy grew enormously after WWII and during the Cold War. In spite of reservations expressed by leading astronomers like Harlow Shapley at Harvard and Otto Struve at Yerkes, tools provided by the military took astronomy into directions neither Shapley nor Struve could possibly have imagined — radio, X-ray, gamma-ray and infrared astronomy. It was a great ride that lasted half a century. Had it been up to Shapley and Struve, they would have opted for a return to where pre-war optical astronomy had left off — themes over which they could exert personal control.The problem today, however, as I will show, is that the directions the military supported, while still fruitful, may be keeping us from vigorously pursuing new problems astrophysics needs to consider, the nature of dark energy and dark matter, or the pursuit of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe, none of which appear of interest to the military or industry. Topics of this kind could be supported by the very rich, like Yerkes and Hooker in the past, the Keck Foundation and Paul Allen more recently, or by less affluent but highly skilled volunteers. Support by the wealthy has occasionally been questioned, as in a front page article by William Broad in the International New York Times on March 17, 2014, in which he worried that the ultrarich would likely be idiosyncratic and know too little. Whether this fear is justified can be debated. However, failing this kind of philanthropic support, astronomy might opt for aid through the recently developed "economy of the commons,' pioneered by Elinor Ostrom, which tends to succeed by world-wide support on smaller scales coordinated largely through the internet. This movement is sometimes referred to as crowd sourcing. It tends to attract thoughtful, like-minded individuals from across the globe who wish to contribute their skills and have the required talents.I will review both the great

  3. Industrial and agroindustrial wastes: an echotechnological approach to the production of supported photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    da Silva, William Leonardo; Lansarin, Marla Azário; dos Santos, João H Z

    2016-01-01

    Agroindustrial wastes (rice husk, exhausted bark acacia, and tobacco dust) and foundry sands from the iron foundry industry were employed as a support source for photocatalysts. TiCl4 was used as the titanium precursor in the preparation of the supported photocatalysts. The solids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy over the ultraviolet range (DRS-UV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), nitrogen adsorption-desorption at -196 °C and zeta potential (ZP) measurements. The systems were evaluated for the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB). Among the tested systems, the highest percentage of dye degradation was reached by the catalyst prepared with foundry sand supports, with values of 65% under ultraviolet and 39% under visible radiation, whereas under the same conditions, the catalyst prepared with rice husk showed the best photocatalytic performance among the samples prepared with agroindustrial wastes with values of 43% under ultraviolet and 38% under visible radiation. Strong Spearman's correlations among the photocatalytic activity, the zeta potential (ζp>0.900) and the band gap energy (ζp>0.895) were observed. Exploratory tests with tap water samples revealed that the system may be sensitive to other analytes present in these environmental samples. PMID:26744932

  4. Research required to support comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    After years of negotiation, the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was signed at the United Nations in September 1996. The treaty creates a need for global monitoring in the context of national and international efforts to control nuclear arms. To meet this technical challenge, the United States is at a time of pivotal decisions-making with regard to the level and nature of basic research in support of CTBT verification. To address this problem, this study identifies the basic research questions in the fields of seismology, hydroacoustics, infrasonics, and radionuclide monitoring that should be supported to enhance the capabilities to monitor and verify the CTBT.

  5. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  6. Design of a professional development and support program for future photonics industry team leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall-Wallace, Michelle; Regens, Nancy L.; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2002-05-01

    The University of Arizona's Collaboration to Advance Teaching Technology and Science (CATTS) program sponsored by the National Science Foundation has found a successful way to unite public and charter school students and teachers, university science outreach programs, graduate and undergraduate students, and university faculty for the betterment of science education. A key aspect of this success has been the ability of the project to assist stakeholders in understanding the different cultural perspectives of all of the participants. The success of this program has led us to create a template for a professional development and support program emphasizing the degree of cross-cultural understanding appropriate for today's multinational photonics industry. This template is designed to give future photonics technical, managerial, and manufacturing leaders training in a variety of areas that can enhance their productivity and ability to lead teams. The design would be appropriate for photonics research and development teams, sales and marketing teams, teams with diverse members new college hires, and newly emplaced managers. This education template would also be appropriate for students in photonics industry technician and graduate- level programs. This type of program is not a substitute for other forms of professional managerial training, but rather augments such programs with material that can aid in a more global perspective.

  7. Tritium activities in Canada supporting CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.

    2008-07-15

    An overview of the various Canadian tritium research and operational activities supporting the development, refurbishment and operation of CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors is presented. These activities encompass tritium health and safety, tritium in the environment, tritium interaction with materials, and tritium processing, and relate to both supporting R and D advances as well as operational best practices. The collective results of these activities contribute to our goals of improving worker and public safety, and operational efficiency. (authors)

  8. Nuclear Power for Catalonia: The Role of the Official Chamber of Industry of Barcelona, 1953-1962

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salom, Francesc X. Barca

    2005-01-01

    Between 1939 and 1959, the regime led by General Franco pursued a policy of economic self-sufficiency. This policy inflicted great injury on Spanish science and industry, not least in Catalonia, and in its capital, Barcelona. In response, Catalan industry looked to a future made more promising by the advent of nuclear power. This paper describes…

  9. Definitional Hegemony as a Public Relations Strategy: The Rhetoric of the Nuclear Power Industry after Three Mile Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionisopoulos, George N.; Crable, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    Examines (1) definitional hegemony as one of several rhetorical options available to issue managers; (2) the post-accident rhetorical context of the Three Mile Island nuclear crisis; and (3) the specific strategies utilized to deal with this crisis. Assesses the nuclear industry's public relations efforts. (MS)

  10. Current practices for risk zoning around nuclear power plants in comparison to other industry sectors.

    PubMed

    Kirchsteiger, Christian

    2006-08-25

    This paper analyses the background and current status of the information basis leading to the definition of risk and emergency zones around nuclear power plants (NPPs) in different countries in Europe and beyond. Although dependable plant-specific probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of level 2 and/or level 3 could in principle provide sufficiently detailed input to define the geographical dimension of a NPP's risk and emergency zones, the analysis of the status in some European and other countries shows that other, "deterministic" approaches using a reference accident are actually used in practice. Regarding use of level 2 PSA for emergency planning, the approach so far has been to use the level 2 PSA information retrospectively to provide the justification for the choice of reference accident(s) used to define the emergency plans and emergency planning zones (EPZs). There are significant differences in the EPZs that are defined in different countries, ranging from a few up to 80km. There is a striking contrast in the extent of using probabilistic information to define emergency zones between the nuclear and other high risk industry sectors, such as the chemical process industry, and the reasons for these differences are not entirely clear, since the risk of chemical industry is similar as that of the nuclear sector. The differences seem to be more related to risk perception than to the actual risk potential. Therefore, there is a strong need to be able to communicate risk information to the Public both before and following an accident. In addition, there is a need to educate the Public so that they can understand risk information in a comparative sense. Finally, based on the consensus discussions at a recent JRC/OECD International Seminar on Risk and Emergency Zoning around NPPs, a set of recommendations is given in the areas of: -a more comprehensive use of the available risk information for risk zoning purposes, -risk communication; -comparative (energy) risk

  11. NASA safety program activities in support of the Space Exploration Initiatives Nuclear Propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the joint NASA/DOE/DOD Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Panels have been used as the basis for the current development of safety policies and requirements for the Space Exploration Initiatives (SEI) Nuclear Propulsion Technology development program. The Safety Division of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Quality has initiated efforts to develop policies for the safe use of nuclear propulsion in space through involvement in the joint agency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG), encouraged expansion of the initial policy development into proposed programmatic requirements, and suggested further expansion into the overall risk assessment and risk management process for the NASA Exploration Program. Similar efforts are underway within the Department of Energy to ensure the safe development and testing of nuclear propulsion systems on Earth. This paper describes the NASA safety policy related to requirements for the design of systems that may operate where Earth re-entry is a possibility. The expected plan of action is to support and oversee activities related to the technology development of nuclear propulsion in space, and support the overall safety and risk management program being developed for the NASA Exploration Program.

  12. INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

  13. Radiation exposure control from the application of nuclear gauges in the mining industry in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Faanu, A; Darko, E O; Awudu, A R; Schandorf, C; Emi-Reynolds, G; Yeboah, J; Glover, E T; Kattah, V K

    2010-05-01

    The use of nuclear gauges for process control and elemental analysis in the mining industry in Ghana, West Africa, is wide spread and on the increase in recent times. The Ghana Radiation Protection Board regulates nuclear gauges through a system of notification and authorization by registration or licensing, inspection, and enforcement. Safety assessments for authorization and enforcement have been established to ensure the safety and security of radiation sources as well as protection of workers and the general public. Appropriate training of mine staff is part of the efforts to develop the necessary awareness about the safety and security of radiation sources. The knowledge and skills acquired will ensure the required protection and safety at the workplaces. Doses received by workers monitored over a period between 1998 and 2007 are well below the annual dose limit of 20 mSv recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. PMID:20386190

  14. Proceedings: The Second EPRI Workshop on Support-Structure Corrosion in Nuclear Plant Steam Generators

    SciTech Connect

    1985-03-01

    In presentations and group sessions, participants in this international workshop examined support-structure corrosion in nuclear steam generators. Interesting developments were a corrosion-resistance ranking of carbon steel and several alloy steels and the use of hideout return analysis for monitoring corrosive solutions in crevices.

  15. Counterintelligence and operations security-support program for the Defense Nuclear Agency. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, L.

    1983-01-25

    The Directive establishes the counterintelligence (CI) and operations security (OPSEC) support program for the Defense Nuclear Agency which includes activities designed to protect classified and operationally sensitive unclassified information and material. Included are CI investigations, counterespionage and countersabotage operations, OPSEC analyses, technical surveillance countermeasures services, CI security education, and CI security assistance.

  16. Human-centered HMI design to support cognitive process of operators in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; Seong, P. H.

    2006-07-01

    In this study, an operation advisory system to aid cognitive process of operators is proposed for advanced main control rooms (MCRs) in future nuclear power plants (NPPs). As MCRs are fully digitalized and designed based on computer technologies, MCRs have much evolved by improving human-machine interface (HMI) design and by adapting automation or support systems for helping operator's convenient operation and maintenance. Various kinds of support systems for operators are developed or developing for advanced MCRs. The proposed system is suggesting a design basis about 'What kinds of support systems are most efficient and necessary for MCR operators ' and 'how to use them together.' In this paper, the operator's operation processes are analyzed based on a human cognitive process model and appropriate support systems that support each activity of the human cognitive process are suggested. Also, the proposed support system is evaluated using Bayesian belief network model and human error probabilities in order to estimate its effect. (authors)

  17. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  18. CESAR5.3: An Industrial Tool for Nuclear Fuel and Waste Characterization with Associated Qualification - 12067

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, Jean-Marc; Eschbach, Romain; Launay, Agnes; Binet, Christophe; THRO, Jean-Francois

    2012-07-01

    CEA and AREVA-NC have developed and used a depletion code named CESAR for 30 years. This user-friendly industrial tool provides fast characterizations for all types of nuclear fuel (PWR / UOX or MOX or reprocess Uranium, BWR / UOX or MOX, MTR and SFR) and the wastes associated. CESAR can evaluate 100 heavy nuclides, 200 fission products and 150 activation products (with Helium and Tritium formation). It can also characterize the structural material of the fuel (Zircalloy, stainless steel, M5 alloy). CESAR provides depletion calculations for any reactor irradiation history and from 3 months to 1 million years of cooling time. CESAR5.3 is based on the latest calculation schemes recommended by the CEA and on an international nuclear data base (JEFF-3.1.1). It is constantly checked against the CEA referenced and qualified depletion code DARWIN. CESAR incorporates the CEA qualification based on the dissolution analyses of fuel rod samples and the 'La Hague' reprocessing plant feedback experience. AREVA-NC uses CESAR intensively at 'La Hague' plant, not only for prospective studies but also for characterizations at different industrial facilities all along the reprocessing process and waste conditioning (near 150 000 calculations per year). CESAR is the reference code for AREVA-NC. CESAR is used directly or indirectly with other software, data bank or special equipment in many parts of the La Hague plants. The great flexibility of CESAR has rapidly interested other projects. CESAR became a 'tool' directly integrated in some other softwares. Finally, coupled with a Graphical User Interface, it can be easily used independently, responding to many needs for prospective studies as a support for nuclear facilities or transport. An English version is available. For the principal isotopes of U and Pu, CESAR5 benefits from the CEA experimental validation for the PWR UOX fuels, up to a burnup of 60 GWd/t and for PWR MOX fuels, up to 45 GWd/t. CESAR version 5.3 uses the CEA

  19. Radiation litigation and the nuclear industry--the experience in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Leigh, W J; Wakeford, R

    2001-12-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 places a "strict" statutory duty on the operators of nuclear facilities to ensure that any exposure to radiation resulting from operations does not cause injury or damage. A claimant does not have to prove fault to receive compensation under the Act, only causation. The 1965 Act has been fundamental in shaping litigation involving the nuclear industry in the UK. Civil law cases brought under the Act will be heard before a single judge (with no jury or technical assessor) who must present his or her decision in a reasoned judgment. This process leads to a considerable volume of expert evidence being presented to the court and extensive cross-examination of witnesses. The expense and uncertain outcome of cases involving claims by nuclear workers that occupational exposure to radiation had caused the development of cancer has led to employers and trade unions setting up the voluntary Compensation Scheme for Radiation-linked Diseases as an alternative to litigation. This Scheme has worked well and is held up as a model of alternative dispute resolution. However, a few cases concerning personal injury or damage to property have come before the courts when the defendant nuclear operator considered that the claims were technically unjustified and where settlement was not a policy option. As anticipated, these cases were lengthy, complex, and expensive. The radiation doses assessed to have been received by the individuals who were the subject of claims, whether workers or members of the public, have been crucial to the outcome. The technical expertise of health physicists and allied specialists has been vital in establishing defensible estimates of dose, and this contribution can be expected to remain of high importance in radiation litigation in the UK. PMID:11725882

  20. Overview of United States Department of Energy activities to support life extension of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-11-01

    Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one-third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: establishment of regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; development, verification, and validation of technical criteria and bases for monitoring, refurbishing, and/or replacing plant equipment; and demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues in the principal areas of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity, fatigue, and environmental qualification (EQ).

  1. The Thermal Hydraulics of Tube Support Fouling in Nuclear Steam Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rummens, Helena E.C.; Rogers, J.T.; Turner, C.W.

    2004-12-15

    It is hypothesized that the thermal-hydraulic environment plays a role in the fouling of tube supports in nuclear steam generators. Experiments were performed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic environment near various designs of supports. Pressure loss, local velocity, turbulence intensity, and local void fraction were measured to characterize the effect of the support. Fouling mechanisms specific to supports were inferred from these experimental data and from actual steam generator inspection results. An analytical model was developed to predict the rate of particulate deposition on the supports, to better understand the complex processes involved.This paper presents the following set of tools for assessing the fouling propensity of a given support design: (1) proposed fouling mechanisms, (2) criteria for support fouling propensity, (3) correlation of fouling with parameters such as mass flux and quality, (4) descriptions of experimental tools such as flow visualization and measurement of pressure-loss profiles, and (5) analytical tools.An important conclusion from this and our previous work is that the fouling propensity is greater with broached support plates, both trefoil and quatrefoil, than with lattice bar supports and formed bar supports, in which significant cross flows occur.

  2. In vitro dissolution of respirable aerosols of industrial uranium and plutonium mixed-oxide nuclear fuels.

    PubMed

    Eidson, A F; Mewhinney, J A

    1983-12-01

    Dissolution characteristics of mixed-oxide nuclear fuels are important considerations for prediction of biological behavior of inhaled particles. Four representative industrial mixed-oxide powders were obtained from fuel fabrication enclosures. Studies of the dissolution of Pu, Am and U from aerosol particles of these materials in a serum simulant solution and in 0.1M HCl showed: (1) dissolution occurred at a rapid rate initially and slowed at longer times, (2) greater percentages of U dissolved than Pu or Am: with the dissolution rates of U and Pu generally reflecting the physical nature of the UO2-PuO2 matrix, (3) the temperature history of industrial mixed-oxides could not be reliably related to Pu dissolution except for a 3-5% increase when incorporated into a solid solution by sintering at 1750 degrees C, and (4) dissolution in the serum simulant agreed with the in vivo UO2 dissolution rate and suggested the dominant role of mechanical processes in PuO2 clearance from the lung. The rapid initial dissolution rate was shown to be related, in part, to an altered surface layer. The advantages and uses of in vitro solubility data for estimation of biological behavior of inhaled industrial mixed oxides, such as assessing the use of chelation therapy and interpretation of urinary excretion data, are discussed. It was concluded that in vitro solubility tests were useful, simple and easily applied to individual materials potentially inhaled by humans. PMID:6643070

  3. Supported noble metal catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of industrial wastewaters and sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Besson, M; Descorme, C; Bernardi, M; Gallezot, P; di Gregorio, F; Grosjean, N; Minh, D Pham; Pintar, A

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews some catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) investigations of industrial wastewaters over platinum and ruthenium catalysts supported on TiO2 and ZrO2 formulated to be active and resistant to leaching, with particular focus on the stability of the catalyst. Catalyst recycling experiments were performed in batch reactors and long-term stability tests were conducted in trickle-bed reactors. The catalyst did not leach upon treatment of Kraft bleaching plant and olive oil mill effluents, and could be either recycled or used for long periods of time in continuous reactors. Conversely, these catalysts were rapidly leached when used to treat effluents from the production of polymeric membranes containing N,N-dimethylformamide. The intermediate formation of amines, such as dimethylamine and methylamine with a high complexing capacity for the metal, was shown to be responsible for the metal leaching. These heterogeneous catalysts also deactivated upon CWAO of sewage sludges due to the adsorption of the solid organic matter. Pre-sonication of the sludge to disintegrate the flocs and improve solubility was inefficient. PMID:21214003

  4. Fitness for duty in the nuclear industry: Update of the technical issues 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, N.; Grant, T.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an update of information on the technical issues surrounding the creation, implementation, and maintenance of fitness-for-duty (FFD) policies and programs. It has been prepared as a resource for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and nuclear power plant personnel who deal with FFD programs. It contains a general overview and update on the technical issues that the NRC considered prior to the publication of its original FFD rule and the revisions to that rule (presented in earlier NUREG/CRs). It also includes chapters that address issues about which there is growing concern and/or about which there have been substantial changes since NUREG/CR-5784 was published. Although this report is intended to support the NRC`s rule making on fitness for duty, the conclusions of the authors of this report are their own and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the NRC.

  5. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy - 13575

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Mueller, Don E.; Gehin, Jess C.; Worrall, Andrew; Taiwo, Temitope; Nutt, Mark; Williamson, Mark A.; Todosow, Mike; Wigeland, Roald; Halsey, William G.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Swift, Peter N.; Carter, Joe

    2013-07-01

    A technical assessment of the current inventory [∼70,150 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) as of 2011] of U.S.-discharged used nuclear fuel (UNF) has been performed to support decisions regarding fuel cycle strategies and research, development and demonstration (RD and D) needs. The assessment considered discharged UNF from commercial nuclear electricity generation and defense and research programs and determined that the current UNF inventory can be divided into the following three categories: 1. Disposal - excess material that is not needed for other purposes; 2. Research - material needed for RD and D purposes to support waste management (e.g., UNF storage, transportation, and disposal) and development of alternative fuel cycles (e.g., separations and advanced fuels/reactors); and 3. Recycle/Recovery - material with inherent and/or strategic value. A set of key assumptions and attributes relative to the various disposition options were used to categorize the current UNF inventory. Based on consideration of RD and D needs, time frames and material needs for deployment of alternative fuel cycles, characteristics of the current UNF inventory, and possible uses to support national security interests, it was determined that the vast majority of the current UNF inventory should be placed in the Disposal category, without the need to make fuel retrievable from disposal for reuse or research purposes. Access to the material in the Research and Recycle/Recovery categories should be retained to support RD and D needs and national security interests. This assessment does not assume any decision about future fuel cycle options or preclude any potential options, including those with potential recycling of commercial UNF. (authors)

  6. DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Lee

    2003-09-30

    For the academic year 2001-2002, the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences received $50,000 of industrial contributions, matched by a DOE grant of $35,000. We used the combined DOE/Industry Matching Grant of $85,000 toward (a) undergraduate merit scholarships and research support, (b) graduate student support, and (c) partial support of a research scientist.

  7. DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Group in Support of Criticality, DBE, TSPA-LA

    SciTech Connect

    Henry Loo

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the basis for grouping the over 250 Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types in support of analyses for final repository disposal. For each of the required analyses, the parameters needed in conducting the analyses were identified and reviewed. The grouping proposed for the three types of analyses (criticality, design basis events, and total system performance assessment) are based on the similarities of DOE SNF as a function of these parameters. As necessary, further justifications are provided to further reduce the DOE SNF grouping in support of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System’s preclosure and postclosure safety cases.

  8. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  9. Fire accident analysis modeling in support of non-reactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, L.F.

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) requires that fire hazard analyses (FHAs) be conducted for all nuclear and new facilities, with results for the latter incorporated into Title I design. For those facilities requiring safety analysis documentation, the FHA shall be documented in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). This paper provides an overview of the methodologies and codes being used to support FHAs at Sandia facilities, with emphasis on SARs.

  10. New Applications of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Henry; Dagmar Koller; Phil Marriott

    1998-12-31

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) complements the traditional methods of quantitation of radioactive isotopes. Because of the favorable ionization potential of most actinides and their daughter products, the argon plasma provides a rich, stable source of ions, which are introduced through a plasma-mass spectrometer interface into the mass spectrometer for isotopic separation. Samples are normally introduced in solution, although direct solids analysis has also been achieved using laser ablation of the sample into the argon plasma. Since 1983, improvements in ICP-MS sensitivity have resulted in correspondingly lower mass detection capability. This development has in turn expanded the number of isotopes accessible to measurement at the levels required in the nuclear industry.

  11. Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management at Chernobyle Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ahner, S.; Fomin, V. V.

    2002-02-26

    In the framework of the preparation for the decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) an Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) will be built under the EC TACIS Program in the vicinity of ChNPP. The paper will present the proposed concepts and their integration into existing buildings and installations. Further, the paper will consider the safety cases, as well as the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper will provide information on the status of the interim design and the effects of value engineering on the output of basic design phase. The paper therefor summarizes the design results of the involved design engineers of the Design and Process Providers BNFL (LOT 1), RWE NUKEM GmbH (LOT 2 and General) and INITEC (LOT 3).

  12. Industrial Information Service Managers: Expectations of, and Support of, the Educational Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchobanoff, James B.; Price, Jack A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses qualities needed by library school graduates to fill positions in industrial special libraries and the skills industrial library managers expect to be included in the curricula of library schools. Topics addressed include professional knowledge and skills, interpersonal skills and personal characteristics, personal and professional…

  13. Radiochemistry Student, Postdoc and Invited Speaker Support for New Directions in Isotope Production, Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry Supported by the DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jurisson, Silvia, S.

    2011-04-11

    The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (NUCL) of the American Chemistry Society (ACS) is sponsoring a symposium entitled "New Directions in Isotope Production, Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry Supported by the DOE" at the 240th ACS National Meeting in Boston, MA 22-26 August 2010. Radiochemistry and nuclear science is a critical area of research and funding for which the DOE has provided support over the years. Radiochemistry is undergoing a renaissance in interdisciplinary areas including medicine, materials, nanotechnology, nuclear forensics and energy. For example, interest in nuclear energy is growing in response to global warming. The field of nuclear forensics has grown significantly since 9/11 in response to potential terror threats and homeland security. Radioactive molecular imaging agents and targeted radiotherapy are revolutionizing molecular medicine. The need for radiochemists is growing, critical, and global. The NUCL Division of the ACS has been involved in various areas of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry for many years, and is the host of the DOE supported Nuclear Chemistry Summer Schools. This Symposium is dedicated to three of the critical areas of nuclear science, namely isotope production, nuclear forensics and radiochemistry. An important facet of this meeting is to provide support for young radiochemistry students/postdoctoral fellows to attend this Symposium as participants and contributors. The funding requested from DOE in this application will be used to provide bursaries for U.S. students/postdoctoral fellows to enable them to participate in this symposium at the 240th ACS National Meeting, and for invited scientists to speak on the important issues in these areas.

  14. Attitude towards personal protective equipment in the French nuclear fuel industry.

    PubMed

    Guseva Canu, Irina; Faust, Ségolène; Canioni, Pierre; Collomb, Philippe; Samson, Eric; Laurier, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study examines the compliance of workers from the European Gaseous Diffusion Uranium Enrichment Consortium (EURODIF) with personal protection equipment (PPE) in view of the various hazards in the nuclear fuel industry. The PPE inventory was drawn up by an industrial hygienist in charge of the PPE at EURODIF. Two hundred and twenty seven (10%) randomly selected, active and retired, EURODIF workers filled in a questionnaire on their attitudes towards PPE. Exposure data from the EURODIF job exposure matrix were used to examine whether PPE usage varies according to exposure level. The study suggests a PPE usage profile that varies depending on the hazards present and PPE available. Anti-uranium PPE and gloves were among the best rated, while anti-spray goggles were the least used. We found that, for most hazards known to cause cancer or irreversible health damage, PPE usage varied according to exposure (homogeneity test, p<0.05; trend test, p<0.05). The continuous use of PPE among workers should be encouraged through improvements to the PPE management system. A precise model of individual exposure can only be designed if the use and efficiency of PPE are taken into consideration. PMID:23819938

  15. Development of irradiation capabilities to address the challenges of the nuclear industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leay, L.; Bower, W.; Horne, G.; Wady, P.; Baidak, A.; Pottinger, M.; Nancekievill, M.; Smith, A. D.; Watson, S.; Green, P. R.; Lennox, B.; LaVerne, J. A.; Pimblott, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    With the announcement of the U.K. new nuclear build and the requirement to decommission old facilities, researchers require bespoke facilities to undertake experiments to inform decision making. This paper describes development of The University of Manchester's Dalton Cumbrian Facility, a custom built research environment which incorporates a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator as well as a self-shielded 60Co irradiator. The ion accelerator allows the investigation into the radiolytic consequences of various charged particles, including protons, alpha particles and a variety of heavier (metal and nonmetal) ions, while the 60Co irradiator allows the effects of gamma radiation to be studied. Some examples of work carried out at the facility are presented to demonstrate how this equipment can improve our mechanistic understanding of various aspects of the deleterious effects of radiation in the nuclear industry. These examples include applications in waste storage and reprocessing as well as geological storage and novel surveying techniques. The outlook for future research is also discussed.

  16. Nuclear energy in Malaysia - closing the gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    >Malaysian Nuclear Society (Mns,

    2013-06-01

    This article is prepared by the Malaysian Nuclear Society (MNS) to present the views of the Malaysian scientific community on the need for Malaysia to urgently upgrade its technical know-how and expertise to support the nuclear energy industry for future sustainable economic development of the country. It also present scientific views that nuclear energy will bring economic growth as well as technically sound industry, capable of supporting nuclear energy industry needs in the country, and recommend action items for timely technical upgrading of Malaysian expertise related to nuclear energy industry.

  17. The hydrological impact assessment in the decision support of nuclear emergency response.

    PubMed

    Vamanu, Dan V; Slavnicu, Dan S; Gheorghiu, Dorina; Acasandrei, Valentin T; Slavnicu, Elena

    2010-07-01

    The paper presents several aspects believed to be relevant for the integration in the decision support systems for the management of radiological emergencies, of assessment tools addressing surface water contamination. Three exemplary cases are discussed in the context-the CONVEX 2005 international alert exercise, AXIOPOLIS 09, a national drill targeting a CANDU reactor at Cernavoda nuclear power plant in Romania, and Oltenia 07-a nation-wide drill around a scenario, involving trans-border effects of a virtual accident at a VVER reactor at Kozloduy, Bulgaria. The capability of different analytic tools were tested, including public deliverables like real-time, online decision support system's HDM module and model-based computerised system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide-contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas, as well as research-grade, home-made facilities, in order to identify and sort out merits and issues of interest in steering their effective utilisation. PMID:20172931

  18. Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author`s responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A.

  19. Investigation of the entry characteristics of dust samplers of a type used in the British nuclear industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D.; Vincent, J. H.; Stevens, D. C.; Marshall, M.

    Experiments have been carried out in a large wind tunnel to investigate the entry characteristics of dust samplers—both static and personal—of the type used to monitor 'total' airborne radioactive paniculate in the British nuclear industry. These samplers were exposed to test dusts of closely-graded fused alumina under experimental conditions relevant to the environmental conditions found in nuclear industry workplaces. For the static samplers (60-mm open face filter holders), performance was determined by reference to a 10-mm isokinetic probe. The resultant aspiration efficiency ( A) was found to be close to unity for the range of environmental conditions found in the nuclear industry workplace and for particles with aerodynamic diameter up to about 30 μm. Also it is unaffected by mounting the sampler itself on the large bluff body of the sampling pump. The performances of the personal samplers (of the 25-mm filter holder type) were assessed in terms of the ratio ( R) between the mass of dust entering each personal sampler when worn on the body of a mannequin and that entering the mouth of the mannequin under simulated breathing. The results show that, for nuclear industry workplace conditions, the personal samplers reflect satisfactorily the health-related 'total' dust exposure of the wearer.

  20. The effects of electric power industry restructuring on the safety of nuclear power plants in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas S.

    Throughout the United States the electric utility industry is restructuring in response to federal legislation mandating deregulation. The electric utility industry has embarked upon an extraordinary experiment by restructuring in response to deregulation that has been advocated on the premise of improving economic efficiency by encouraging competition in as many sectors of the industry as possible. However, unlike the telephone, trucking, and airline industries, the potential effects of electric deregulation reach far beyond simple energy economics. This dissertation presents the potential safety risks involved with the deregulation of the electric power industry in the United States and abroad. The pressures of a competitive environment on utilities with nuclear power plants in their portfolio to lower operation and maintenance costs could squeeze them to resort to some risky cost-cutting measures. These include deferring maintenance, reducing training, downsizing staff, excessive reductions in refueling down time, and increasing the use of on-line maintenance. The results of this study indicate statistically significant differences at the .01 level between the safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants and boiling water reactor nuclear power plants. Boiling water reactors exhibited significantly more problems than did pressurized water reactors.

  1. Incorporating GIS data into an agent-based model to support planning policy making for the development of creative industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Helin; Silva, Elisabete A.; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an extension to the agent-based model "Creative Industries Development-Urban Spatial Structure Transformation" by incorporating GIS data. Three agent classes, creative firms, creative workers and urban government, are considered in the model, and the spatial environment represents a set of GIS data layers (i.e. road network, key housing areas, land use). With the goal to facilitate urban policy makers to draw up policies locally and optimise the land use assignment in order to support the development of creative industries, the improved model exhibited its capacity to assist the policy makers conducting experiments and simulating different policy scenarios to see the corresponding dynamics of the spatial distributions of creative firms and creative workers across time within a city/district. The spatiotemporal graphs and maps record the simulation results and can be used as a reference by the policy makers to adjust land use plans adaptively at different stages of the creative industries' development process.

  2. Incorporating GIS data into an agent-based model to support planning policy making for the development of creative industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Helin; Silva, Elisabete A.; Wang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an extension to the agent-based model "Creative Industries Development-Urban Spatial Structure Transformation" by incorporating GIS data. Three agent classes, creative firms, creative workers and urban government, are considered in the model, and the spatial environment represents a set of GIS data layers (i.e. road network, key housing areas, land use). With the goal to facilitate urban policy makers to draw up policies locally and optimise the land use assignment in order to support the development of creative industries, the improved model exhibited its capacity to assist the policy makers conducting experiments and simulating different policy scenarios to see the corresponding dynamics of the spatial distributions of creative firms and creative workers across time within a city/district. The spatiotemporal graphs and maps record the simulation results and can be used as a reference by the policy makers to adjust land use plans adaptively at different stages of the creative industries' development process.

  3. Cancer mortality in relation to monitoring for radionuclide exposure in three UK nuclear industry workforces.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, L. M.; Higgins, C. D.; Douglas, A. J.; Maconochie, N. E.; Omar, R. Z.; Fraser, P.; Beral, V.; Smith, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Cancer mortality in 40,761 employees of three UK nuclear industry facilities who had been monitored for external radiation exposure was examined according to whether they had also been monitored for possible internal exposure to tritium, plutonium or other radionuclides (uranium, polonium, actinium or other unspecified). Death rates from cancer were compared both with national rates and with rates in radiation workers not monitored for exposure to any radionuclides. Among workers monitored for tritium exposure, overall cancer mortality was significantly below national rates [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 83, 165 deaths; 2P = 0.02] and none of the cancer-specific death rates was significantly above either the national average or rates in non-monitored workers. Although the overall death rate from cancer in workers monitored for plutonium exposure was also significantly low relative to national rates (SMR = 89, 581 deaths; 2P = 0.005), mortality from pleural cancer was significantly raised (SMR = 357, nine deaths; 2P = 0.002); none of the rates differed significantly from those of non-monitored workers. Workers monitored for radionuclides other than tritium or plutonium also had a death rate from all cancers combined that was below the national average (SMR = 86, 418 deaths; 2P = 0.002) but prostatic cancer mortality was raised both in relation to death rates in the general population (SMR = 153, 37 deaths; 2P = 0.02) and to death rates in radiation workers who had not been monitored for exposure to any radionuclide [rate ratio (RR) = 1.65; 2P = 0.03]. Mortality from cancer of the lung was also significantly increased in workers monitored for other radionuclides compared with those of radiation workers not monitored for exposure to radionuclides (RR = 1.31, 164 deaths; 2P = 0.01). For cancers of the lung, prostate and all cancers combined, death rates in monitored workers were examined according to the timing and duration of monitoring for radionuclide

  4. Abandoned coal mining sites: using ecotoxicological tests to support an industrial organic sludge amendment.

    PubMed

    Chiochetta, Claudete G; Radetski, Marilice R; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Tischer, Vinícius; Tiepo, Erasmo N; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-11-01

    The different stages involved in coal mining-related activities result in a degraded landscape and sites associated with large amounts of dumped waste material. Remediation of these contaminated soils can be carried out by application of industrial organic sludge if the concerns regarding the potential negative environmental impacts of this experimental practice are properly addressed. In this context, the objective of this study was to use ecotoxicological tests to determine the quantity of organic industrial sludge that is required as a soil amendment to restore soil production while avoiding environmental impact. Chemical analysis of the solids (industrial sludge and soil) and their leachates was carried out as well as a battery of ecotoxicity tests on enzymes (hydrolytic activity), bacteria, algae, daphnids, earthworms, and higher plants, according to standardized methodologies. Solid and leachate samples of coal-contaminated soil were more toxic than those of industrial sludge towards enzyme activity, bacteria, algae, daphnids, and earthworms. In the case of the higher plants (lettuce, corn, wild cabbage, and Surinam cherry) the industrial sludge was more toxic than the coal-contaminated soil, and a soil/sludge mixture (66:34% dry weight basis) had a stimulatory effect on the Surinam cherry biomass. The ecotoxicological assessment of the coal-contaminated soil remediation using sludge as an amendment is very important to determine application rates that could promote a stimulatory effect on agronomic species without negatively affecting the environment. PMID:23114837

  5. More regulation of industry-supported biomedical research: are we asking the right questions?

    PubMed

    Fry-Revere, Sigrid; Malmstrom, David Bjorn

    2009-01-01

    Industry-sponsored biomedical research is under the microscope. In an attempt to achieve just results in extraordinary cases, critics are suggesting regulations that would pervert the U.S. clinical trial process. However, the arguments made to justify such regulation are weak at best. All the proposals to regulate industry sponsorship of clinical trials that we surveyed (over a hundred articles and ten books, most written in the past decade) suffer from some form of fallacious reasoning. In the interest of advocating sound policy, this article points out some of the most common reasoning errors found in the literature on financial conflicts of interest in clinical trials. PMID:19723253

  6. Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, James E; Meek, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the

  7. Structural dynamic and thermal stress analysis of nuclear reactor vessel support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi-Diango, J.

    1972-01-01

    A nuclear reactor vessel is supported by a Z-ring and a box ring girder. The two proposed structural configurations to transmit the loads from the Z-ring and the box ring girder to the foundation are shown. The cantilever concrete ledge transmitting the load from the Z-ring and the box girder via the cavity wall to the foundation is shown, along with the loads being transmitted through one of the six steel columns. Both of these two supporting systems were analyzed by using rigid format 9 of NASTRAN for dynamic loads, and the thermal stresses were analyzed by AXISOL. The six column configuration was modeled by a combination of plate and bar elements, and the concrete cantilever ledge configuration was modeled by plate elements. Both configurations were found structurally satisfactory; however, nonstructural considerations favored the concrete cantilever ledge.

  8. A case in support of implementing innovative bio-processes in the metal mining industry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Stams, Alfons J M; Weijma, Jan; Gonzalez Contreras, Paula; Dijkman, Henk; Rozendal, Rene A; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-06-01

    The metal mining industry faces many large challenges in future years, among which is the increasing need to process low-grade ores as accessible higher grade ores become depleted. This is against a backdrop of increasing global demands for base and precious metals, and rare earth elements. Typically about 99% of solid material hauled to, and ground at, the land surface currently ends up as waste (rock dumps and mineral tailings). Exposure of these to air and water frequently leads to the formation of acidic, metal-contaminated run-off waters, referred to as acid mine drainage, which constitutes a severe threat to the environment. Formation of acid drainage is a natural phenomenon involving various species of lithotrophic (literally 'rock-eating') bacteria and archaea, which oxidize reduced forms of iron and/or sulfur. However, other microorganisms that reduce inorganic sulfur compounds can essentially reverse this process. These microorganisms can be applied on industrial scale to precipitate metals from industrial mineral leachates and acid mine drainage streams, resulting in a net improvement in metal recovery, while minimizing the amounts of leachable metals to the tailings storage dams. Here, we advocate that more extensive exploitation of microorganisms in metal mining operations could be an important way to green up the industry, reducing environmental risks and improving the efficiency and the economy of metal recovery. PMID:27190293

  9. The Child Care Industry: Supporting Jobs and Economic Development in Minneapolis. Report and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miels, Gayle, Ed.

    Once generally perceived as a service for working parents, child care is now recognized as an early education setting where children learn skills and behaviors for life. The child care and early education industry is also a powerful economic force that experienced significant growth in the past three decades in response to family, economic, and…

  10. Occupation and Industry Sex Segregation, Gender, and Workplace Support: The Use of Flexible Scheduling Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnotte, Krista Lynn; Cook, Alison; Minnotte, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how industry and occupation sex segregation are related to the use of flexible scheduling policies and perceptions of the career repercussions of using such policies. The analysis is performed on data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 2,810). Findings suggest that the percentage of women per industry…

  11. Intellectual Disability and Sexuality: Attitudes of Disability Support Staff and Leisure Industry Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Linda; Chambers, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    Background: The attitudes of support staff and others in the community towards the sexuality of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) have the potential to influence opportunities for normalised life experiences in the area of sexuality. Method: A sample of 169 disability support staff and 50 employees from leisure and service…

  12. Applications of high resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.G.; Giglio, J.J.; Goodall, P.S.; Cummings, D.G.

    1998-07-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of {sup 139}La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, {sup 236}U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of {sup 235}U:{sup 238}U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of HR-ICP-AES.

  13. A Review of Human Reliability Needs in the U.S. Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-08-01

    In this survey, 34 subject matter experts from the U.S. nuclear industry were interviewed to determine specific needs for human reliability analysis (HRA). Conclusions from the interviews are detailed in this article. A summary of the findings includes: (1) The need for improved guidance on the use of HRA methods generally and for specific applications. (2) The need for additional training in HRA to provide more hands-on experience in the application of HRA methods. (3) Thedevelopment of HRA approaches suitable for advanced reactors, severe accident situations, and low-power and shutdown applications. (4) The refinement of HRA methods to account forfactors such as crew variability, latent errors, more sophisticated dependency modeling, and errors of commission. (5) The continued need for simplified HRA methods appropriate for field applications. (6) The need for tighter coupling of HRA and human factors. (7) The need for improvements in the quantitative basis of HRA methods. These findings suggest the field of HRA is mature but still benefits from refinements.

  14. Modeling of Some Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys for Nuclear Applications in Support of UFD Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff

    2013-08-01

    Zirconium-based alloys Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 are widely used in the nuclear industry as cladding materials for light water reactor (LWR) fuels. These materials display a very good combination of properties such as low neutron absorption, creep behavior, stress-corrosion cracking resistance, reduced hydrogen uptake, corrosion and/or oxidation, especially in the case of Zircaloy-4. However, over the last couple of years, in the post-Fukushima Daiichi world, energetic efforts have been undertaken to improve fuel clad oxidation resistance during off-normal temperature excursions. Efforts have also been made to improve upon the already achieved levels of mechanical behavior and reduce hydrogen uptake. In order to facilitate the development of such novel materials, it is very important to achieve not only engineering control, but also a scientific understanding of the underlying material degradation mechanisms, both in working conditions and in storage of used nuclear fuel. This report strives to contribute to these efforts by constructing the thermodynamic models of both alloys; constructing of the respective phase diagrams, and oxidation mechanisms. A special emphasis was placed upon the role of zirconium suboxides in hydrogen uptake reduction and the atomic mechanisms of oxidation. To that end, computational thermodynamics calculations were conducted concurrently with first-principles atomistic modeling.

  15. The role of research in nuclear regulation: A US industry perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The author reviews the focus of research efforts within the NRC following the development of nuclear energy. Initial work focused on research in support of rulemaking and generic-issue resolution largely to support the licensing of U.S. plants that was going on at the time, including study of design basis accidents. Going into the 1980`s there was a need for information on accidents beyond the design basis, following the TMI accident. Aging research became relevant with the plants accumulating years of operation. More recently effort has gone into work on more advanced reactor designs. Looking ahead the author argues there may be few unresolved safety issues, and analytic tools are presently very well developed. So the question of what to do in the future is relevant, especially when coupled with changing responsibilities, changing legislation, changing budgets, changing market forces, and changing expectations from consumers. So the author poses questions which should be addressed as one looks at planning for the role of research in the NRC in the future.

  16. Modular assembly for supporting, straining, and directing flow to a core in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1977-01-01

    A reactor core support arrangement for supporting, straining, and providing fluid flow to the core and periphery of a nuclear reactor during normal operation. A plurality of removable inlet modular units are contained within permanent liners in the lower supporting plate of the reactor vessel lower internals. During normal operation (1) each inlet modular unit directs main coolant flow to a plurality of core assemblies, the latter being removably supported in receptacles in the upper portion of the modular unit and (2) each inlet modular unit may direct bypass flow to a low pressure annular region of the reactor vessel. Each inlet modular unit may include special fluid seals interposed between mating surfaces of the inlet modular units and the core assemblies and between the inlet modular units and the liners, to minimize leakage and achieve an hydraulic balance. Utilizing the hydraulic balance, the modular units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the modular unit receptacles by their own respective weight. Included as part of the permanent liners below the horizontal support plate are generally hexagonal axial debris barriers. The axial debris barriers collectively form a bottom boundary of a secondary high pressure plenum, the upper boundary of which is the bottom surface of the horizontal support plate. Peripheral liners include radial debris barriers which collectively form a barrier against debris entry radially. During normal operation primary coolant inlet openings in the liner, below the axial debris barriers, pass a large amount of coolant into the inlet modular units, and secondary coolant inlet openings in the portion of the liners within the secondary plenum pass a small amount of coolant into the inlet modular units. The secondary coolant inlet openings also provide alternative coolant inlet flow paths in the unlikely event of blockage of the primary inlet openings. The primary inlet openings have characteristics which limit the

  17. DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

    2011-07-01

    Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

  18. Who supports whom? Gender and intergenerational transfers in post-industrial Barbados.

    PubMed

    Quashie, Nekehia T

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the likelihood that older adults and their children in Bridgetown, Barbados engage in exchanges of financial, functional, and material support and the extent to which gender influences transfers. Data come from the 2000 Survey of Health, Well-Being and Aging in Latin America and the Caribbean (SABE) of Bridgetown, Barbados N = 3876 children, representing 1135 families. Multivariate logistic regression models examine the demographic and economic situations of both older and younger cohorts that encourage or constrain intergenerational exchanges. Results confirm, as in many developing countries, a higher proportion of older Barbadians receive rather than provide support. Gender differentiation in support transfers depends on the type of support examined and the living arrangements of parents and children. Support exchanges are highly conditioned by the socioeconomic circumstances of both generations but gender stratification in the labor market does not appear to mediate support exchanges. These findings suggest some flexibility in gender systems with respect to intergenerational support within Barbado. PMID:25894849

  19. Supporting data for identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Abdullah, Shakila; Salim, Mohd Razman

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluet. The identification of the potential bacterial strain using a polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA gene analysis was closely related to Serratia marcescens with its recorded strain of SA30 "Fundamentals of mass transfer and kinetics for biosorption of oil and grease from agro-food industrial effluent by Serratia marcescens SA30" (Fulazzaky et al., 2015) [1]; however, many biochemical tests have not been published yet. The biochemical tests of biosurfactant production, haemolytic assay and cell surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the beneficial strain of biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Here we do share data collected from the biochemical tests to get a better understanding of the use of Serratia marcescens SA30 to degrade oil, which contributes the technical features of strengthening the biological treatment of oil-contaminated wastewater in tropical environments. PMID:27077083

  20. Challenges and models in supporting logistics system design for dedicated-biomass-based bioenergy industry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xueping; Yao, Qingzhu; Chen, Yuerong

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzed the uniqueness and challenges in designing the logistics system for dedicated biomass-to-bioenergy industry, which differs from the other industries, due to the unique features of dedicated biomass (e.g., switchgrass) including its low bulk density, restrictions on harvesting season and frequency, content variation with time and circumambient conditions, weather effects, scattered distribution over a wide geographical area, and so on. To design it, this paper proposed a mixed integer linear programming model. It covered from planting and harvesting switchgrass to delivering to a biorefinery and included the residue handling, concentrating on integrating strategic decisions on the supply chain design and tactical decisions on the annual operation schedules. The present numerical examples verified the model and demonstrated its use in practice. This paper showed that the operations of the logistics system were significantly different for harvesting and non-harvesting seasons, and that under the well-designed biomass logistics system, the mass production with a steady and sufficient supply of biomass can increase the unit profit of bioenergy. The analytical model and practical methodology proposed in this paper will help realize the commercial production in biomass-to-bioenergy industry. PMID:20863690

  1. Creating an educational consortium to support the recruitment and retention of expertise for the nuclear weapons complex

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Wells, Douglas P.; Hunt, Alan; Beller, Denis

    2006-12-13

    From FY 02-05 IAC has been a part of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and its predecessor organization Advanced Accelerator Applications. In the IAC program effort has been divided into three parts; Student Research, Accelerator Driven Nuclear Research and Materials Science. Within the three parts specific research and development activities have been undertaken in Student Research, which supported undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, engineering staff, program administration, project infrastructure, visiting and summer faculty appointments, visiting scientists, and support of students and faculty at the University of Michigan, Texas A&M University, University of Texas and UNLV; Accelerator Driven Nuclear Research included the use of electron accelerators to study driven sub-critical nuclear systems (ADS) and to provide practical methods of monitoring and assaying nuclear materials for accountancy in non proliferation applications (Materials Accountability and Control, MA&C); and Materials Science research at IAC supported all AFC national technical areas.

  2. Innovative 3D and 4D geological interpretation, modelling and visualisation techniques for subsurface characterisation of complex industrial sites - examples in the UK nuclear industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicholas; Shevelan, John; Hodgetts, David; Head, William

    2013-04-01

    Industrial sites are typically complex, with numerous plants within their (often) relatively small footprint. The 'cramped' nature of these sites means that the geological characterisation that is essential to the development of environmental safety cases may be hampered by a lack of access to exposures, if they exist at all. Due to access limitations and potential for ground vibration affecting key plants, geophysical data are typically limited to those gathered from lower resolution surveys (e.g. electrical resistivity tomography) rather than those gathered from more informative vibroseis seismic reflection surveys. Thus, whilst many industrial sites may possess numerous intrusive boreholes (Sellafield, perhaps the UK's most complex industrial site, has over 3000), there is a lack of ties to either high resolution geophysical data, or important regional lithostratigraphic data provided by exposure of key sequences. This poses a conundrum: the hydrogeological 3D and 4D numerical models required to show the predicted migration paths of potential contamination within the subsurface require the best geological understanding possible, yet without high resolution geophysical data or geological exposure within the sites themselves geological interpretation is often restricted to attempting to correlate between boreholes that may be tens to hundreds of metres apart and only a few metres deep, which one could assume may not provide a good geological understanding. In this paper, using examples from the nuclear industry, we describe how the use of outcrop analogues and innovative GIS-based, 3D/4D geological interpretation, characterisation, modelling and visualisation techniques goes some way to addressing these issues. Regional outcrops of Triassic sandstone and unconsolidated Quaternary sequences are ideal analogues for unexposed sequences underlying key nuclear sites in West Cumbria (UK), providing important sedimentological (and depositional), lithostratigraphic and

  3. Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

    2009-03-01

    Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the

  4. Technology status in support of refined technical baseline for the Spent Nuclear Fuel project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Puigh, R.J.; Toffer, H.; Heard, F.J.; Irvin, J.J.; Cooper, T.D.

    1995-10-20

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) has undertaken technology acquisition activities focused on supporting the technical basis for the removal of the N Reactor fuel from the K Basins to an interim storage facility. The purpose of these technology acquisition activities has been to identify technology issues impacting design or safety approval, to establish the strategy for obtaining the necessary information through either existing project activities, or the assignment of new work. A set of specific path options has been identified for each major action proposed for placing the N Reactor fuel into a ``stabilized`` form for interim storage as part of this refined technical basis. This report summarizes the status of technology information acquisition as it relates to key decisions impacting the selection of specific path options. The following specific categories were chosen to characterize and partition the technology information status: hydride issues and ignition, corrosion, hydrogen generation, drying and conditioning, thermal performance, criticality and materials accountability, canister/fuel particulate behavior, and MCO integrity. This report represents a preliminary assessment of the technology information supporting the SNFP. As our understanding of the N Reactor fuel performance develops the technology information supporting the SNFP will be updated and documented in later revisions to this report. Revision 1 represents the incorporation of peer review comments into the original document. The substantive evolution in our understanding of the technical status for the SNFP (except section 3) since July 1995 have not been incorporated into this revision.

  5. Gap Analysis to Support Modeling the Long-Term Degradation of Used Nuclear Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Philip J.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Ross, Steven B.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Hanson, Brady D.; Devanathan, Ram

    2015-04-01

    Welded stainless steel canisters are being used worldwide for dry storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies, and the number of canisters in use is steadily increasing. In support of work currently being pursued at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand the atmospheric corrosion behavior of spent fuel dry storage systems, a gap analysis is underway to assess the state of knowledge for modeling of the long-term degradation of a UNF canister. The fundamental aim of this work is to inform research and development (R&D) efforts to establish a sound technical basis to support the extended dry storage of UNF for 100+ years. The analysis is considering all major components of the atmosphere corrosion degradation processes, ranging from contaminant sources and climatic interactions to regional conditions of particle transport and deposition, to microscale effects leading to stress corrosion cracking. The results of this gap analysis will be used to define the R&D pathway to develop an integrated multi-scale atmospheric corrosion modeling capability for UNF in dry storage canisters that can support the safe and reliable performance of these structures for more than 100 years.

  6. Virtual Reality Based Support System for Layout Planning and Programming of an Industrial Robotic Work Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell. PMID:25360663

  7. Virtual reality based support system for layout planning and programming of an industrial robotic work cell.

    PubMed

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell. PMID:25360663

  8. Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, C.; Lee, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Ma, D.C.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-10-01

    In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal.

  9. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP. PMID:27516940

  10. ADRIANA project: Identification of research infrastructures for the SFR, within the frame of European industrial initiative for sustainable nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Latge, C.; Gastaldi, O.; Vala, L.; Gerbeth, G.; Homann, C.; Benoit, P.; Papin, J.; Girault, N.; Roelofs, F.; Bucenieks, I.; Paffumi, E.; Ciampichetti, A.

    2012-07-01

    Fast neutron reactors have a large potential as sustainable energy source. In particular, Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) with a closed fuel cycle and potential for minor actinide burning may allow minimization of volume and heat load of high level waste and provide improved use of natural resources (as compared to only 1% energy recovery in the current once-through fuel cycle, with Thermal Reactors, such as EPR). The coordinating action ADRIANA (Advanced Reactor Initiative And Network Arrangement) has been initiated to set up a network dedicated to the construction and operation of research infrastructures in support of developments for the European Industrial Initiative for sustainable nuclear fission. The Project sets these objectives for the following reactor systems and related technologies: Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR), Lead Fast Reactor (LFR), Gas Fast Reactor (GFR, including very high temperature technologies), Instrumentation, diagnostics and experimental devices, Irradiation facilities and hot laboratories, Zero power reactors. Among the fast reactor systems, the sodium cooled reactor has the most comprehensive technological basis as result of the experience gained from worldwide operation of several experimental, prototype and commercial size reactors, since the forties (see Appendix I). This concept is currently considered as the reference, within the European strategy. Innovations are needed to further enhance safety, reduce capital cost and improve efficiency reliability and operability, making the Generation IV SFR an attractive option for electricity production. Currently, in France, a moderate (500 to 600 MWe) power demonstrator named ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) has been proposed and endorsed by EU. Presently, the reference configuration is a pool concept. General R and D needs have been identified and experimental facilities required to satisfy these needs have been listed for the following domains: material and

  11. Supporting data for identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluent

    PubMed Central

    Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Abdullah, Shakila; Salim, Mohd Razman

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluet. The identification of the potential bacterial strain using a polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA gene analysis was closely related to Serratia marcescens with its recorded strain of SA30 “Fundamentals of mass transfer and kinetics for biosorption of oil and grease from agro-food industrial effluent by Serratia marcescens SA30” (Fulazzaky et al., 2015) [1]; however, many biochemical tests have not been published yet. The biochemical tests of biosurfactant production, haemolytic assay and cell surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the beneficial strain of biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Here we do share data collected from the biochemical tests to get a better understanding of the use of Serratia marcescens SA30 to degrade oil, which contributes the technical features of strengthening the biological treatment of oil-contaminated wastewater in tropical environments. PMID:27077083

  12. Stakeholder supportiveness and strategic vulnerability: implications for competitive strategy in the HMO industry.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, C J; Blair, J D; Smith, R R; Nix, T W; Savage, G T

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual and empirical analysis of the strategic vulnerability of HMOs shows that they are strategically vulnerable on the social dimension of stakeholder supportiveness. One of the major implications of this finding is that HMOs' cost leadership strategy cannot be sustained, given the competition from such substitutes as PPAs. PMID:2670835

  13. Increasing the Reliability of Decision-Support Systems for Nuclear Emergency Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Tudor B.

    2013-04-01

    Decision support systems for nuclear emergency management (DSNE) are currently used worldwide to assist decision makers in taking emergency response countermeasures in case of accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The present work has been motivated by the fact that, up until now, DSNE systems have not been regarded as safety critical software systems. The core of any DSNE system is represented by the different simulation codes linked together to form the dispersion simulation workflow. These codes require input emission and meteorological data to produce forecasts of the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants and other substances. However, the reliability of the system not only depends on the trustworthiness of the measured (or generated) input data but also on the reliability of the simulation codes used. The main goal of this work is to improve the reliability of DSNE systems by adapting current state of the art methods from the domain of software reliability engineering to the case of atmospheric dispersion simulation codes. The current approach is based on the "design by diversity principle" for improving the reliability of simulation codes and the trustworthiness of simulation results. The effectiveness of the approach has been tested using the results of two test versions of the RODOS DSNE system used in several European countries.

  14. Calculating Relative Ionization Probabilities of Plutonium for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Support Nuclear Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensegrav, Craig; Smith, Craig; Isselhardt, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on the ionization potential of isotopes of uranium, and the present effort has expanded and extended the previous work by identifying and integrating new data for plutonium isotopes. In addition to extending the effort to this important new element, we have implemented more accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of the laser beams to improve the accuracy of model predictions compared with experiment results as well as an ability to readily incorporate new experimental data as they become available. The model is used to estimate ionization cross sections and to compare relative excitation on two isotopes as a function of wavelength. This allows the study of sensitivity of these measurements to fluctuations in laser wavelength, irradiance, and bandwidth. We also report on initial efforts to include predictions of americium ionization probabilities into our modeling package. I would like to thank my co-authors, Gamani Karunasiri and Fabio Alves. My success is a product of their support and guidance.

  15. Export support of renewable energy industries. Task number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on task coordination and effectiveness.

  16. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  17. Aquatic toxicity of forty industrial chemicals: Testing in support of hazardous substance spill prevention regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, M. W.; Ward, C. H.

    1981-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is presently developing hazardous substance spill regulations to help prevent water pollution. Aquatic animal toxicity data are used as criteria for the designation and categorization of substances as hazardous, even though this type of data is not available for many industrial chemicals. Static 96-hr. toxicity tests were conducted with 40 such chemicals to provide basic toxicity data for regulatory decision making. Thirty-two of the 40 chemicals tested were hazardous to aquatic life as determined by 96-hr. LC 50's less than or equal to 500 mg/l. All 40 chemicals were tested with the fresh-water fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and ten chemicals were also tested with the salt-water grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

  18. Creation of a Hyponatremia Registry Supported by an Industry-Derived Quality Control Methodology

    PubMed Central

    D., Giunta; N., Fuentes; V., Pazo; M. L., Posadas-Martínez; H., Michellangelo; G., Waisman; F., González Bernaldo De Quirós

    2010-01-01

    Background A clinical registry encompasses a selective set of rigorously collected and stored clinical data focused on a specific condition. Hyponatremia has multiple, complex underlying causes and is one of the most frequent laboratory abnormalities. No systematic registries of hyponatremic patients have been reported in the medical literature. The purpose of this project was to create a registry for hyponatremia in order to obtain epidemiological data that will help to better understand this condition. Objective This paper describes the creation of a registry for hyponatremia within a single institution that employs industry-based approaches for quality management to optimize data accuracy and completeness. Methods A prospective registry of incident hyponatremia cases was created for this study. A formalized statistically based quality control methodology was developed and implemented to analyze and monitor all the process indicators that were developed to ensure data quality. Results Between December 2006 and April 2009, 2443 episodes of hyponatremia were included. Six process indicators that reflect the integrity of the system were evaluated monthly, looking for variation that would suggest systematic problems. The graphical representation of the process measures through control charts allowed us to identify and subsequently address problems with maintaining the registry. Conclusion In this project we have created a novel hyponatremia registry. To ensure the quality of the data in this registry we have implemented a quality control methodology based on industrial principles that allows us to monitor the performance of the registry over time through process indicators in order to detect systematic problems. We postulate that this approach could be reproduced for other registries. PMID:23616856

  19. An application of principal component analysis and logistic regression to facilitate production scheduling decision support system: an automotive industry case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrjoo, Saeed; Bashiri, Mahdi

    2013-05-01

    Production planning and control (PPC) systems have to deal with rising complexity and dynamics. The complexity of planning tasks is due to some existing multiple variables and dynamic factors derived from uncertainties surrounding the PPC. Although literatures on exact scheduling algorithms, simulation approaches, and heuristic methods are extensive in production planning, they seem to be inefficient because of daily fluctuations in real factories. Decision support systems can provide productive tools for production planners to offer a feasible and prompt decision in effective and robust production planning. In this paper, we propose a robust decision support tool for detailed production planning based on statistical multivariate method including principal component analysis and logistic regression. The proposed approach has been used in a real case in Iranian automotive industry. In the presence of existing multisource uncertainties, the results of applying the proposed method in the selected case show that the accuracy of daily production planning increases in comparison with the existing method.

  20. Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: President Bush signs Radiation Victim Compensation Act; Japan Nuclear Fuel Completes construction of Rokkasho Enrichment Plant; Japanese vapor laser achieves 5% enrichment; US to cooperate with Hungary and Czechoslovakia on nuclear power; Soviet Union may reopen nuclear station in Armenia; despite earthquake concerns; and Japan`s Kashiwazak; Kaviwa - 2 begins commercial operation.

  1. Structural Analyses of the Support Trusses for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines and Drop Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2006-01-01

    Finite element structural analyses were performed on the support trusses of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engines and drop tanks to verify that the proper amount of mass was allocated for these components in the vehicle sizing model. The verification included a static stress analysis, a modal analysis, and a buckling analysis using the MSC/NASTRAN™ structural analysis software package. In addition, a crippling stress analysis was performed on the truss beams using a handbook equation. Two truss configurations were examined as possible candidates for the drop tanks truss while a baseline was examined for the engine support thrust structure. For the drop tanks trusses, results showed that both truss configurations produced similar results although one performed slightly better in buckling. In addition, it was shown that the mass allocated in the vehicle sizing model was adequate although the engine thrust structure may need to be modified slightly to increase its lateral natural frequency above the minimum requirement of 8 Hz that is specified in the Delta IV Payload Planners Guide.

  2. Iberian red deer: paraphyletic nature at mtDNA but nuclear markers support its genetic identity.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Juan; Salinas, María; de Andrés, Damián; Pérez-González, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Red deer populations in the Iberian glacial refugium were the main source for postglacial recolonization and subspecific radiation in north-western Europe. However, the phylogenetic history of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) and its relationships with northern European populations remain uncertain. Here, we study DNA sequences at the mitochondrial control region along with STR markers for over 680 specimens from all the main red deer populations in Spain and other west European areas. Our results from mitochondrial and genomic DNA show contrasting patterns, likely related to the nature of these types of DNA markers and their specific processes of change over time. The results, taken together, bring support to two distinct, cryptic maternal lineages for Iberian red deer that predated the last glacial maximum and that have maintained geographically well differentiated until present. Haplotype relationships show that only one of them contributed to the northern postglacial recolonization. However, allele frequencies of nuclear markers evidenced one main differentiation between Iberian and northern European subspecies although also supported the structure of both matrilines within Iberia. Thus, our findings reveal a paraphyletic nature for Iberian red deer but also its genetic identity and differentiation with respect to northern subspecies. Finally, we suggest that maintaining the singularity of Iberian red deer requires preventing not only restocking practices with red deer specimens belonging to other European populations but also translocations between both Iberian lineages. PMID:26843924

  3. Solid-State NMR/Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Polypeptides in Planar Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Sarrouj, Hiba; Reiter, Christian; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Purea, Armin; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Fedotenko, Illya; Engelke, Frank; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2015-11-19

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has been developed to overcome the limitations of the inherently low signal intensity of NMR spectroscopy. This technique promises to be particularly useful for solid-state NMR spectroscopy where the signals are broadened over a larger frequency range and most investigations rely on recording low gamma nuclei. To extend the range of possible investigations, a triple-resonance flat-coil solid-state NMR probe is presented with microwave irradiation capacities allowing the investigation of static samples at temperatures of 100 K, including supported lipid bilayers. The probe performance allows for two-dimensional separated local field experiments with high-power Lee-Goldberg decoupling and cross-polarization under simultaneous irradiation from a gyrotron microwave generator. Efficient cooling of the sample turned out to be essential for best enhancements and line shape and necessitated the development of a dedicated cooling chamber. Furthermore, a new membrane-anchored biradical is presented, and the geometry of supported membranes was optimized not only for good membrane alignment, handling, stability, and filling factor of the coil but also for heat and microwave dissipation. Enhancement factors of 17-fold were obtained, and a two-dimensional PISEMA spectrum of a transmembrane helical peptide was obtained in less than 2 h. PMID:26487390

  4. Fire simulation in nuclear facilities: the FIRAC code and supporting experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, M.W.; Martin, R.A.; Fenton, D.L.; Gunaji, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    The fire accident analysis computer code FIRAC was designed to estimate radioactive and nonradioactive source terms and predict fire-induced flows and thermal and material transport within the ventilation systems of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRAC maintains its basic structure and features and has been expanded and modified to include the capabilities of the zone-type compartment fire model computer code FIRIN developed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The two codes have been coupled to provide an improved simulation of a fire-induced transient within a facility. The basic material transport capability of FIRAC has been retained and includes estimates of entrainment, convection, deposition, and filtration of material. The interrelated effects of filter plugging, heat transfer, gas dynamics, material transport, and fire and radioactive source terms also can be simulated. Also, a sample calculation has been performed to illustrate some of the capabilities of the code and how a typical facility is modeled with FIRAC. In addition to the analytical work being performed at Los Alamos, experiments are being conducted at the New Mexico State University to support the FIRAC computer code development and verification. This paper summarizes two areas of the experimental work that support the material transport capabiities of the code: the plugging of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by combustion aerosols and the transport and deposition of smoke in ventilation system ductwork.

  5. NIST Accelerator Facilities And Programs In Support Of Industrial Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, F.B.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Hudson, L.T.; Coursey, B.M.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Seltzer, S.M.

    2003-08-26

    NIST's Ionizing Radiation Division maintains and operates three electron accelerators used in a number of applications including waste treatment and sterilization, radiation hardness testing, detector calibrations and materials modification studies. These facilities serve a large number of governmental, academic and industrial users as well as an active intramural research program. They include a 500 kV cascaded-rectifier accelerator, a 2.5 MV electron Van de Graaff accelerator and a 7 to 32 MeV electron linac, supplying beams ranging in energy from a few keV up to 32 MeV. In response to the recent anthrax incident, NIST along with the US Postal Service and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) are working to develop protocols and testing procedures for the USPS mail sanitization program. NIST facilities and personnel are being employed in a series of quality-assurance measurements for both electron- and photon-beam sanitization. These include computational modeling, dose verification and VOC (volatile organic compounds) testing using megavoltage electron and photon sources.

  6. The Bavarian Model? Modernization, Environment, and Landscape Planning in the Bavarian Nuclear Power Industry, 1950--1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Russell Lowell

    Perhaps no state in the Federal Republic of Germany witnessed a more pronounced state sponsored modernization effort than Bavaria, 1950-1980. This vast transformation, particularly in the field of nuclear energy, required a continuous negotiation of landscape planning between state officials, scientists, and ordinary citizens. While ordinary Bavarians had little input in the technical or scientific aspects of the nuclear industry, they could shape the landscape policy, by offering environmental and cultural criticism on specific locations for reactors. Using material from the Bavarian State Archives (some, from the 1970s, only recently declassified), this dissertation compares the Bavarian landscape disputes over nuclear facilities in the nineteen-fifties with those featured in the widespread anti-nuclear demonstrations of the nineteen-seventies. As one of the few English language studies on the topic, this dissertation suggests considerably more continuity in landscape disputes than previous scholarship and offers a fresh look into the migration of skepticism towards the landscape use of nuclear power from political right to left over the course of thirty years.

  7. DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Information In Support of TSPA-VA

    SciTech Connect

    A. Brewer; D. Cresap; D. Fillmore; H. Loo; M. Ebner; R. McCormack

    1998-09-01

    RW has started the viability assessment (VA) effort to determine the feasibility of Yucca Mountain as the first geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste. One component of the viability assessment will be a total system performance assessment (TSPA), based on the design concept and the scientific data and analysis available, describing the repository's probable behavior relative to the overall system performance standards. Thus, all the data collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility to-date have been incorporated into the latest TSPA model. In addition, the Repository Integration Program, an integrated probabilistic simulator, used in the TSPA has also been updated by Golder Associates Incorporated at December 1997. To ensure that the Department of Energy-owned (DOE-owned) SNF continues to be acceptable for disposal in the repository, it will be included in the TSPA-VA evaluation. A number of parameters are needed in the TSPA-VA models to predict the performance of the DOE-owned SNF materials placed into the potential repository. This report documents all of the basis and/or derivation for each of these parameters. A number of properties were not readily available at the time the TSPA-VA data was requested. Thus, expert judgement and opinion was utilized to determine a best property value. The performance of the DOE-owned SNF will be published as part of the TSPA-VA report. Each DOE site will be collecting better data as the DOE SNF program moves closer to repository license application. As required by the RW-0333P, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program will be assisting each site in qualifying the information used to support the performance assessment evaluations.

  8. The role of non-destructive assay in support of the exemption of solid waste from nuclear licensed sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan; Adsley, Ian; Green, Tommy

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Nuclear Site License Holders within the United Kingdom are increasingly re-examining the options available for disposal of solid waste produced during routine operations and decommissioning activities. The incentives to do so include: 'Compliance with the requirement to minimise radioactive waste, as stipulated in Disposal Authorisations issued by the Environment Agency' Reducing the burden on the UK Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR)' Achieving cost savings on waste management, by avoiding expensive conditioning, transport and disposal costs for certain wastes. Wastes may be exempted from regulation under the Radioactive Substances Act, 1993 (RSA 93) provided they comply with the conditions laid out in the relevant Exemption Orders. In effect, they may be legally disposed as if they were non-radioactive waste. A national Code of Practice on Clearance and Exemption Principles, Processes and Practices was introduced in 2005 to clarify the requirements of these Exemption Orders and provide guidance on their practical application. In order to demonstrate compliance with these Exemption Orders, it is essential to have good knowledge of the items' history and their potential for contamination. Monitoring is frequently used as definitive evidence that the radioactivity content of waste items does not exceed limits proscribed in the relevant Exemption Orders. The practicalities of monitoring require careful consideration in order to achieve meaningful results and be capable of achieving the low specific activity limits quoted in the Exemption Orders. The Cross Industry Assay Working Group is a national collection of non-destructive assay specialists from a range of companies, which meets regularly to discuss challenges relating to the assay of all categories of waste. In this paper, the Group presents examples of how NDA techniques are being used to support the exemption of waste items. (authors)

  9. Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sitakanta; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-04-01

    In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

  10. Ergonomics support for local initiative in improving safety and health at work: International Labour Organization experiences in industrially developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Kogi, K

    2005-04-15

    Ergonomics has played essential roles in the technical cooperation activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in occupational safety and health in industrially developing countries. Ergonomics support focusing on practical day-to-day needs at the grass-root workplace has strengthened the local initiative in improving safety and health. Practical action-tools such as ergonomics checklists, local good example photos and group discussions have assisted workers and employers in identifying feasible solutions using locally available resources. Direct participation of workers and employers has been promoted in ergonomics training aimed at immediate solutions. ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems have played increasingly important roles in the systematic planning of local improvement actions. Policy-level programmes to develop network support mechanisms to the grass-root workplace were essential for following up and sustaining local achievements. Practical ergonomics support tools, such as action checklists and low-cost improvement guides, should be developed and widely applied so as to reach grass-root levels and help local people create safer and healthier workplaces. PMID:16040528