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1

Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

NONE

2001-04-01

2

Nuclear Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

Badawi, Ramsey D.

2001-01-01

3

Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation). Progress report, January 15, 1992--January 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document is the annual progress report for project entitled ``Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.`` Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging.

Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

1992-07-01

4

Nuclear Medicine Imaging  

MedlinePLUS

Nuclear Medicine Imaging What you need to know about… A nuclear medicine procedure is sometimes described as ... nuclear medicine scan. Estudios de Imagen de Medicina Nuclear Lo que usted necesita saber acerca de... Un ...

5

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The ``IQNP`` agent is an antagonist for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor. Since the IQNP molecule has two asymmetric centers and either cis or trans isomerism of the vinyl iodide, there are eight possible isomeric combinations. In this report, the systematic synthesis, purification and animal testing of several isomers of radioiodinated ``IQNP`` are reported. A dramatic and unexpected relation between the absolute configuration at the two asymmetric centers and the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodide on receptor specificity was observed. The E-(R)(R) isomer shows specific and significant localization (per cent dose/gram at 6 hours) in receptor-rich cerebral structures (i.e. Cortex = 1.38 + 0.31; Striatum = 1.22 + 0.20) and low uptake in tissues rich in the M{sub 2} subtype (Heart = 0.10; Cerebellum = 0.04). In contrast, the E-(R)(S) isomer shows very low receptor-specific uptake (Cortex = 0.04; Striatum = 0.02), demonstrating the importance of absolute configuration at the acetate center. An unexpected and important observation is that the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodine appears to affect receptor subtype specificity, since the Z-(R,S)(R) isomer shows much higher uptake in the heart (0.56 + 0.12) and cerebellum (0.17 + 0.04). Studies are now in progress to confirm these exciting results in vitro. Progress has also continued during this period with several collaborative programs. The first large-scale clinical tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator prototype (500 mCi) was fabricated and supplied to the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology (CMMI), in Newark, New Jersey, for Phase I clinical trials of rhenium-188-labeled anti CEA antibodies for patient treatment. Collaborative studies are also continuing in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department at the University of Massachusetts where a generator is in use to compare the biological properties of {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}indirect{close_quotes} labeled antibodies.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; Hsieh, B.T.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-07-01

6

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In this report the authors describe the use of an effective method for concentration of the rhenium-188 bolus and the results of the first Phase 1 clinical studies for bone pain palliation with rhenium-188 obtained from the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator. Initial studies with therapeutic levels of Re-188-HEDP at the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the University of Bonn, Germany, have demonstrated the expected good metastatic uptake of Re-188-HEDP in four patients who presented with skeletal metastases from disseminated prostatic cancer with good pain palliation and minimal marrow suppression. In addition, skeletal metastatic targeting of tracer doses of Re-188(V)-DMSA has been evaluated in several patients with metastases from prostatic cancer at the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Canterbury and Kent Hospital in Canterbury, England. In this report the authors also describe further studies with the E-(R,R)-IQNP ligand developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program as a potential imaging agent for detection of changes which may occur in the cerebral muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) in Alzheimer`s and other diseases.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Boll, R.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

1997-03-20

7

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Processing of enriched tungsten-186 oxide targets after long irradiations (> 2 cycles) in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has resulted in specific activities significantly lower than the theoretical values, with the concomitant formation of varying amounts of highly radioactive black insoluble material to total tungsten-188 yield, 5% sodium hypochlorite solution has been found to dissolve this black material. Yields for longer irradiation periods (> 2 cycles) have nearly doubled. As an alternative, more simple approach, enriched tungsten-186 metallic targets have also now been irradiated. Following irradiation, these targets were dissolved in hydrogen peroxide/NaOH solution with no evidence of any residual black insoluble material remaining. Yields for a 2-cycle (e.g. 42 days) HFIR irradiation have thus now significantly increased, for example, from 5--6 mCi {sup 188}W/mg of {sup 186}W, to 10 mCi/mg (43 days) and 12.9 mCi/mg (53 days). Large clinical scale (< 1 Ci) generators fabricated from tungsten-188 prepared from such metal targets have exhibited the expected high {sup 188}Re yield and low {sup 188}W breakthrough. Also during this period, a systematic evaluation of the production yields of a number of radioisotopes of current interest in nuclear medicine were evaluated by irradiation of targets in the Hydraulic Tube Facility (HT) of the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Small samples were irradiated for short periods, and the radioactive contents of the sealed sources then analyzed by gamma spectroscopy.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.; Hsieh, B.T.

1994-01-01

8

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we describe the results for study of the production of lutetium-177 ({sup 177}Lu) in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Two pathways for production of {sup 177}Lu were studied which involved both direct neutron capture on enriched {sup 176}Lu, {sup 176}Lu (n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu, reaction and by decay of ytterbium-177 ({sup 177}Yb) produced by the {sup 176}Yb(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Yb ({beta}{sup {minus}} {sup {yields}}) reaction. Although the direct route is more straight forward and does not involve any separation steps, the indirect method via {beta}{sup {minus}}-decay of {sup 177}Yb has the advantage of providing carrier-free {sup 177}Lu, which would be required for antibody radiolabeling and other applications where very high specific activity is required.Substrates required for preparation of tissue-specific agents and several radioisotopes were also provided during this period through several Medical Cooperative Programs. These include the substrate for preparation of the ``BMIPP`` cardiac imaging which was developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program, which was provided to Dr. A. Giodamo, M.D. and colleagues at the Catholic University Hospital in Rome, Italy. Tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL HFIR was also provided to the Catholic University Hospital for fabrication of a tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator to provide carrier-free rhenium-188 which will be used for preparation of rhenium-188 labeled methylenediphosphonate (MDP) for initial clinical evaluation for palliative treatment of bone pain (L. Troncone, M.D.). Samples of substrates for preparation of the new ORNL ``IQNP`` agent for imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors were provided to the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, for preparation of radioiodinated IQNP for initial imaging studies with this new agent in monkeys and for tissue binding studies with human brain samples obtained from autopsy (C. Halldin, Ph.D.).

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

1995-12-31

9

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Rat tissue distribution properties of ``IQNP,`` a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1992-02-01

10

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Rat tissue distribution properties of IQNP,'' a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1992-02-01

11

What Is Nuclear Medicine?  

MedlinePLUS

... Normal Enzyme Level Smoker Reduced Enzyme Level 5 Nuclear medicine can detect the radiation coming from inside a patient’s body. All of ... from outside the body using machines that send radiation through the body. As a result, nuclear medicine determines the cause of a medical problem ...

12

Society of Nuclear Medicine  

Cancer.gov

June 14, 2008 12:00 AM - June 18, 2008 12:00 AM Ernest N Morial Convention Center, Booth 419 New Orleans, LA + Add to Outlook Calendar 2008 Annual Meeting Print This Page Society of Nuclear Medicine News & Events

13

Revolution and progress in medicine.  

PubMed

This paper adapts Kuhn's conceptual framework to developmental episodes in the theory and practice of medicine. Previous attempts to understand the reception of Ignaz Semmelweis's work on puerperal fever in Kuhnian terms are used as a starting point. The author identifies some limitations of these attempts and proposes a new way of understanding the core Kuhnian notions of "paradigm," "progress," and "revolution" in the context of a socially embedded technoscience such as medicine. PMID:25663051

Goodwin, William

2015-02-01

14

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

In this report the excitation functions for production of gallium-66 via {alpha}-induced nuclear reactions on enriched zinc-66 have been measured with E{sub {alpha}}{le}27.3 Mev and E{sub {alpha}}{le}43.7 MeV employing the stack thin-target technique. In addition, the induced activity of gallium-67 in the same sets of targets allowed an evaluation of the excitation functions of the corresponding nuclear reactions. These preliminary studies have demonstrated that sufficient levels of gallium-66 can be produced by {alpha}-induced reactions on enriched zinc targets. A series of radioiodinated analogues of 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}, {alpha}-diphenylacetate (QNB) have been prepared. These new analogues include 1-azabicyclo-(2.2.2)oct-3-yl{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(4-iodophenyl)-{alpha}-methylacetate(2,I-WNA), 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl (3-iodo)-xanthene-9-carboxylate (3,I-QNX), and 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(E-1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (4,I-QNP), which have also been radiolabeled with iodine-125 with high specific activity. The biodistribution, brain uptake, and receptor specificity of these new analogues are currently being studied. Shipments of radioactive agents made to collaborators during this period included. One shipment of iodine-125-labeled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1991-09-01

15

Evaluative studies in nuclear medicine research. Progress report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Effort since the last progress report (September 1979) has been directed toward assessing the potential short and long term benefits of continued development and application and medical research of emission computed tomograhy (ECT). This report contains a review of existing ECT technology, including functional descriptions of current and proposed image systems, for both sngle-photon ECT (SPECT) and positron ECT (PECT) approaches. Medical research and clinical topics to which ECT has been, or may be, applied are presented. One such area of investigation involves the effects of stroke. The application of ECT to laboratory research, and to clinical diagnosis and prognosis, of stroke may result in improved management of the disease. An illustration of the potential savings in the cost of management of stroke due to the effects of applied ECT research is included. The results represent a compilation of data collected from conversations with, and conference presentations by, ECT users, researchers and image system designers, and from a review of the literature.

Potchen, E.J.

1980-07-01

16

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The radioiodination and in vivo evaluation of p-iodocaramiphen a muscarinic antagonist which binds with high affinity to the M{sub 1} receptor subtype in vitro are described. Biodistribution studies in female Fischer rats demonstrated that [{sup 125}I]-piodocaraminphen had significant cerebral localization, but the uptake did not demonstrate specific uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors, and radioactivity washed out rapidly from the brain. In addition there was no significant blockage of activity when the rats were preinjected with quinuclidinyl benzilate. These results suggest that p-iodocaramiphen is not a good candidate for the in vivo study of M{sub 1} muscarinic receptor populations by SPECT. Because of the widespread interest and expected importance of the availability of large amounts of tungsten-188 required for the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator systems, we have investigated the large-scale production of tungsten-188 in the ORNL HFIR. We have also compared our production data with the theoretical production values and with experimental data available in the literature from other reactors. Tungsten-188 is produced in a fission nuclear reactor by double neutron capture of tungsten-186. The experimental yield of tungsten-188 is approximately 4 mCi/mg of tungsten-186 at the end of bombardment (EOB) in the HFIR operating at 85 MWt power for a one cycle irradiation ({approximately}21 days) at a thermal neutron flux of 2 {times} 10{sup 15} n.s{sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}2}.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

1992-12-01

17

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The radioiodination and in vivo evaluation of p-iodocaramiphen a muscarinic antagonist which binds with high affinity to the M[sub 1] receptor subtype in vitro are described. Biodistribution studies in female Fischer rats demonstrated that [[sup 125]I]-piodocaraminphen had significant cerebral localization, but the uptake did not demonstrate specific uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors, and radioactivity washed out rapidly from the brain. In addition there was no significant blockage of activity when the rats were preinjected with quinuclidinyl benzilate. These results suggest that p-iodocaramiphen is not a good candidate for the in vivo study of M[sub 1] muscarinic receptor populations by SPECT. Because of the widespread interest and expected importance of the availability of large amounts of tungsten-188 required for the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator systems, we have investigated the large-scale production of tungsten-188 in the ORNL HFIR. We have also compared our production data with the theoretical production values and with experimental data available in the literature from other reactors. Tungsten-188 is produced in a fission nuclear reactor by double neutron capture of tungsten-186. The experimental yield of tungsten-188 is approximately 4 mCi/mg of tungsten-186 at the end of bombardment (EOB) in the HFIR operating at 85 MWt power for a one cycle irradiation ([approximately]21 days) at a thermal neutron flux of 2 [times] 10[sup 15] n.s[sup [minus]1]cm[sup [minus]2].

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

1992-12-01

18

Whistleblowers and nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

Healthcare facilities that practice nuclear medicine are subject to federal "whistleblower" protection laws when an employee reports a potentially unsafe radiological condition. This article addresses enforcement of the applicable sections of the Atomic Energy Act and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations in order to help such facilities avoid running afoul of those laws, which can result in fines, generate civil lawsuits by the claimant, and significantly disrupt the operation of a healthcare facility. PMID:10538012

Rysavy, C F; Donald, J W

1999-01-01

19

healthcare.utah.edu/radiology What is Nuclear Medicine?  

E-print Network

healthcare.utah.edu/radiology Radiology What is Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear Medicine is a specialized area of radiology often used to help diagnose and treat abnormalities early in the progression depending on the specific procedure and preparations. Nuclear Medicine #12;healthcare.utah.edu/radiology

Feschotte, Cedric

20

Handbooks in radiology: Nuclear medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This series of handbooks covers the basic facts, major concepts and highlights in seven radiological subspecialties. ''Nuclear Medicine'' is a review of the principles, procedures and clinical applications that every radiology resident and practicing general radiologist should know about nuclear medicine. Presented in an outline format it covers all of the organ systems that are imaged by nuclear medicine.

Datz

1988-01-01

21

Boron in nuclear medicine: New synthetic approaches to PET and SPECT. Progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

New methods based on reactive organometallic precursors containing organic functional groups that are generally responsible for physiologic responses are being exploited for preparation of radiopharmaceutials. This program focuses on the design of new chemistry (molecular architecture) and technology as opposed to the application of known reactions to the synthesis of specific radiopharmaceutical. The new technology which is often based on organoborane chemistry is then utilized in nuclear medicine research at the UT Biomedical Imaging Center and in collaboration with colleagues at other DOE. facilities such as Brookhaven National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New radiopharmaceutical are evaluated preclinically by colleagues at UT, Emory University and The University of Pennsylvania, and by Nova Screen.

Kabalka, G.W.

1994-02-01

22

Nuclear medicine techniques in breast imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress has been made in anatomic imaging with mammography, ultrasound, and MRI, but the noninvasive differentiation of malignant from benign breast masses is an unmet goal. Most breast biopsies still are performed in patients with benign disease. Improved nuclear medicine imaging devices, better radiopharmaceutical agents, and new methods of guiding biopsies and surgery are being developed, signaling a growing role

Richard L Wahl

1996-01-01

23

Nuclear medicine hepatobiliary imaging.  

PubMed

Nuclear medicine hepatobilary imaging (HIDA) is a time proven imaging methodology that uses radioactive drugs and specialized cameras to make imaging diagnoses based on physiology. HIDA radiopharmaceuticals are extracted by hepatocytes in the liver and cleared through the biliary system similar to bilirubin. The most common indication for HIDA imaging is acute cholecystitis, diagnosed by nonfilling of the gallbladder due to cystic duct obstruction. HIDA can detect high grade biliary obstruction prior to ductal dilatation; images reveal a persistent hepatogram without biliary clearance due to the high backpressure. HIDA also aids in the diagnosis of partial biliary obstruction due to stones, biliary stricture, and sphincter of Oddi obstruction. It can confirm biliary leakage postcholecystectomy and hepatic transplantation. Calculation of a gallbladder ejection fraction after cholecystokinin infusion is commonly used to diagnose chronic acalculous gallbladder disease. Diseased gallbladders do not contract. There are many other less common but valuable diagnostic indications for HIDA imaging. PMID:19879969

Ziessman, Harvey A

2010-02-01

24

Nuclear medicine and the nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

There were over 9,000,000 diagnostic and therapeutic administrations of radiopharmaceuticals in the United States in 1981. In Pennsylvania alone, there were approximately 650,000 diagnostic and 77,000 therapeutic administrations in 1981. With a state population of 12,000,000, this means that 1 in every 16 persons underwent some type of nuclear medicine treatment in a single year's time. These figures show that the chances of a nuclear power plant worker undergoing nuclear medicine treatment are far from remote. In fact, the chance are increasing each year as the use of nuclear diagnostic and therapeutic techniques continues to rise. Nuclear medicine patients present special problems to power plant health physicists. Some of these are discussed in this paper.

Buring, M.R. (Pennsylvania Power and Light Co., Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Berwick, PA (US)); Brill, D.R. (Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA (US))

1985-04-01

25

Progress in traditional Chinese medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) natural products have been used to produce impressive responses in atopic eczema and related dermatological disorders that have proved resistant to orthodox treatments. The increasing popularity of TCM natural products has also produced fear about their toxicity and uncertainty about their ingredients. In the western world, very little is known of the efficacy and safety

K. Chan

1995-01-01

26

Boron in nuclear medicine: New synthetic approaches to PET and SPECT. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This annual progress report describes new methods of incorporation of radioiodine into physiologically active compounds (amphetamines), and the use of organoboranes to labeled radiopharmaceuticals with Oxygen- 15, Nitrogen-13, carbon-11 and fluorine-18. Preclinical studies are also reported on evaluation of butyothiophenones as agents acting at dopaminergic or serotonic synapses.

Kabalka, G.W.

1992-09-01

27

Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science). Progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of [F18]fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), [F18]fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of [F18]-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

1992-06-01

28

Nuclear medicine imaging system  

DOEpatents

It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

1983-03-11

29

Nuclear chemistry progress report  

SciTech Connect

This is the annual progress report for the Indiana University nuclear chemistry program for the 1992/1993 year. Accomplishments include the construction, testing, and initial experimental runs of the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} charged particle detector. ISiS is designed to study energy dissipation and multifragmentation phenomena in light-ion-induced nuclear reactions at medium-to-high energies. Its second test run was to examine 3.6 GeV {sup 3}He beam reactions at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS) in Saclay. The development and deployment of this system has occupied a great deal of the groups effort this reporting period. Additional work includes: calculations of isotopic IMF yields in the {sup 4}He + {sup 116,124}Sn reaction; cross sections for A = 6 - 30 fragments from the {sup 4}He + {sup 28}Si reaction at 117 and 198 MeV; charging effects of passivated silicon detectors; neck emission of intermediate-mass fragments in the fission of hot heavy nuclei.

Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.

1993-08-01

30

Graduates of 2004 Heidi Ambrose ---Nuclear Medicine  

E-print Network

Michael Congrove --- Marine Biology Justin Crocker --- Biology Karen Culbertson --- Nuclear Medicine Medicine Dustin Earnhardt --- Chemistry and Biochemistry Rebecca Echipare --- Biology Assen Gueorguiev Laroia --- Biology Monica Lea --- Communication Rebecca Long --- Exercise Science Erin Mehalic

31

Licensing criteria for nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

The use of radioactive materials in medicine is one of the most highly regulated areas the physician has to deal with. There are three basic types of licenses for use of radioactive material defined in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), chapter 10, part 35. These are the general license, which is mainly applicable to small volume in vitro work; the specific license, which is used in most medical facilities; and the broad license, which is suited for larger research-oriented practices. Licensing requires proof of competence of the user and of adequate provision for protection of public health. Materials used in medicine are grouped for convenience into three diagnostic categories and two therapeutic categories. A sixth group, for sealed implants, is not generally applicable in nuclear medicine. Training and experience of users may be documented in a number of ways, including board certification in nuclear medicine. Therapeutic applications require additional proof of direct personal experience. The radiation safety officer is a pivotal individual in the licensing procedure, being directly responsible for carrying out the highly detailed requirements for protection of personnel and patients. A radiation safety program based on the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept requires personal monitoring, inventory control, detection and control of contamination, and strict adherence to licensing rules. Training of personnel and proper maintenance of equipment and facilities are also vital parts of the licensing process. The requirements of licensing and for renewal are clearly spelled out by the various regulatory agencies and require meticulous record keeping with documentation that all prescribed procedures have been followed and duly recorded.

Westerman, B.R.

1986-07-01

32

Pulmonary applications of nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear medicine techniques have a long history in pulmonary medicine, one that has been continually changing and growing. Even longstanding methods, such as perfusion scanning for embolic disease or for pretherapy pulmonary function evaluation, have largely withstood the test of recent careful scrutiny. Not only have these techniques remained an important part of the diagnostic armamentarium, but we have learned how to use them more effectively. Furthermore, because of technical advances, we are in a phase of expanding roles for nuclear imaging. Gallium citrate scanning for the mediastinal staging and follow-up of lymphoma has been recognized as a valuable adjunct to the anatomic information provided by CT and MRI. With the growth of PET technology in areas that have been explored in a limited fashion until now, such as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and lung carcinoma, evaluation and management of these patients may substantially improve. Finally, in the field of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, attention is now being turned to both the diagnostic and the therapeutic problems presented by lung carcinoma. As radiolabeling methods are refined and as new and better antibodies are developed, radioimmunodetection and therapy in lung carcinoma may begin to make inroads on this common and hard to control disease.157 references.

Kramer, E.L.; Divgi, C.R. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (USA))

1991-03-01

33

Complementary alternative medicine and nuclear medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complementary alternative medicines (CAMs), including food supplements, are taken widely by patients, especially those with cancer. Others take CAMs hoping to improve fitness or prevent disease. Physicians (and patients) may not be aware of the potential side-effects and interactions of CAMs with conventional treatment. Likewise, their known physiological effects could interfere with radiopharmaceutical kinetics, producing abnormal treatment responses and diagnostic

Ursula Werneke; V. Ralph McCready

2004-01-01

34

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Dear Author,  

E-print Network

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Dear Author, This letter describes how to proof your manuscript slated for an upcoming issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. This PDF is the only set of proofs you.) on the last page; 3) proofread any tables and equations carefully; 4) check that any Greek, especially µ (mu

Piana, Michele

35

New Trends and Possibilities in Nuclear Medicine  

SciTech Connect

New Trends and Possibilities in Nuclear Medicine provides an examination of the latest developments in the field of nuclear medicine. This volume reviews advances made in imaging techniques and presents a detailed overview of many new imaging procedures and their clinical applications, e.g.,the oncological applications of immunoscintigraphy. This book also elucidates the various diagnostic capabilities of nuclear imaging in a wide range of disciplines, including cardiology, neurology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, oncology, and hematology.

Schmidt, H.A.E.; Csernay, L

1988-01-01

36

Enhancing laboratory activities in nuclear medicine education.  

PubMed

Hands-on or active learning is important in nuclear medicine education. As more curricula start to require greater standards and as distance education expands, the effective use of laboratories in nuclear medicine education remains important in physics, instrumentation, and imaging but is often overlooked or underutilized. Laboratory exercises are a unique opportunity for nuclear medicine educators to facilitate students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a manner that often cannot occur in lectures or during online education. Given the lack of current laboratory tools and publications, there exists a requirement for nuclear medicine educators to develop, enhance, and monitor educational tools for laboratory exercises. Expanding technologies, variations in imaging and measurement systems, and the need to ensure that the taught technology is relevant to nuclear medicine students are issues faced by nuclear medicine educators. This article, based on principles of instructional design, focuses on the components and development of effective and enhanced nuclear medicine laboratories in our current educational environment. PMID:19914977

Grantham, Vesper; Martin, Chris; Schmitz, Casey

2009-12-01

37

A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

38

Applications of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging  

SciTech Connect

Major advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals for renal studies have occurred during the last decade. Current nuclear medicine methodology can be applied for accurate evaluation of renal function and for renal imaging in a wide variety of clinical situations. Total renal function can be estimated from the plasma clearance of agents excreted by glomerular filtration or tubular secretion, and individual function can be estimated by imaging combined with renography. A major area of radionuclide application is in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. The introduction of diuretic renography and the use of computer-generated regions of interest offer the clinician added useful data which may aid in diagnosis and management. Imaging is of proven value also in trauma, renovascular hypertension, and acute and chronic renal failure. Methods for the evaluation of residual urine, vesicoureteral reflux, and testicular torsion have achieved increasing clinical use. These many procedures assure a meaningful and useful role for the application of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging.

Blaufox, M.D.; Kalika, V.; Scharf, S.; Milstein, D.

1982-01-01

39

Rheumatoid arthritis: Nuclear Medicine state-of-the-art imaging  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, which is associated with systemic and chronic inflammation of the joints, resulting in synovitis and pannus formation. For several decades, the assessment of RA has been limited to conventional radiography, assisting in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Nevertheless, conventional radiography has poor sensitivity in the detection of the inflammatory process that happens in the initial stages of RA. In the past years, new drugs that significantly decrease the progression of RA have allowed a more efficient treatment. Nuclear Medicine provides functional assessment of physiological processes and therefore has significant potential for timely diagnosis and adequate follow-up of RA. Several single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals have been developed and applied in this field. The use of hybrid imaging, which permits computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine data to be acquired and fused, has increased even more the diagnostic accuracy of Nuclear Medicine by providing anatomical localization in SPECT/CT and PET/CT studies. More recently, fusion of PET with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was introduced in some centers and demonstrated great potential. In this article, we will review studies that have been published using Nuclear Medicine for RA and examine key topics in the area. PMID:25035834

Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; Alexandre, Dângelo; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian; Gutfilen, Bianca

2014-01-01

40

Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.7 Necessity of Patient-Specific Dose Planning in Radionuclide Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

41

Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the annual progress report for project entitled 'Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.' Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging.

Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

1992-07-01

42

Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

1989-01-01

43

Sports medicine: a century of progress.  

PubMed

According to the international Olympic Committee, it is the responsibility of the sports medicine profession to care for the health and welfare of Olympic athletes, treat and prevent injuries, conduct medical examinations, evaluate performance capacity, provide nutritional advice, prescribe and supervise training programs, and to monitor substance use. Implicit in these functions is to assist Olympic athletes in achieving the objectives of the Olympic Motto (Citius, Altius, Fortius), which is to become faster, higher, and stronger. During the past Olympiads, athletic performance has increased, as indicated by times for the men's marathon (-28%) or by the distance covered in the women's javelin throw (+80%). However, the fulfillment of these responsibilities was a slow and protracted process, as demonstrated by the facts that medical examinations were not required until 1920, that 28 years elapsed before an official team physician was appointed, and that women had to wait until 1984 before sanction was given to compete in the marathon race. Doping was not defined until 1964, and monitoring of substance abuse did not materialize until after 1972. Although individuals have prepared for athletic competition since the ancient Olympics, the scientific foundations for various training prescriptions were not firmly established until the 1960s and 1970s. It was speculated that performance records will continue to improve in the next century because more scientific sports medicine information would be available and because such information would be better disseminated to athletes. PMID:9164256

Tipton, C M

1997-05-01

44

Gender Bias in Academic Medicine: Pitfalls, Promise and Progress  

E-print Network

Gender Bias in Academic Medicine: Pitfalls, Promise and Progress University of Pittsburgh April 28 the application of gender bias #12;What we believed... · That the lack of women leaders in any field would fix; Carr et al., JWH, 2003 #12;Constructs: 1. Social Categories 2. Expectancy Bias #12;Gender is a Social

Sheridan, Jennifer

45

A nuclear chocolate box: the periodic table of nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

Radioisotopes of elements from all parts of the periodic table find both clinical and research applications in radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy (nuclear medicine). This article provides an overview of these applications in relation to both the radiological properties of the radionuclides and the chemical properties of the elements, indicating past successes, current applications and future opportunities and challenges for inorganic chemistry. PMID:25406520

Blower, Philip J

2014-11-18

46

Nuclear Medicine Imaging in the Pediatric Patient  

PubMed Central

Pediatric nuclear medicine provides a wealth of information on a variety of disease states; however, precautions on dosing have to be taken into consideration. Also, expertise in conducting procedures and interpreting the results in pediatric patients is necessary. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic studies involving the central nervous system, musculoskeletal system, genitourinary system, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, pulmonary system, and cardiovascular system along with a brief explanation of the mechanism of localization of the radiopharmaceuticals involved. Radiation safety issues are addressed when the expectant mother or nursing mother is administered radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:23115536

Loveless, Vivian

2006-01-01

47

[Research in theoretical nuclear physics]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Research in progress and plans for future investigations are briefly summarized for the following areas: light-ion structure and reactions; nuclear structure; peripheral heavy-ion reactions at medium and high energy; medium-energy heavy-ion collisions and properties of highly excited nuclear matter; and high-energy heavy-ion collisions and QCD plasma.

Not Available

1993-03-02

48

Employment in nuclear medicine during pregnancy  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear medicine technologist can work throughout a pregnancy with high confidence that her occupational radiation exposure will not add any significant risk to her changes of having a normal pregnancy and child. All that is required is for the employer to provide an ALARA work place and for the technologist to observe carefully all radiation safety guidelines and to maintain her occupational exposure ALARA. Current guidance is that the total uterine dose during gestation be less than 0.5 rem (5 mSv). The vast majority of nuclear medicine technologists can achieve this dose level easily, with no modifications of duties or work practices. Technologists working with generators and radiopharmaceutical kits may wish to temporarily transfer to other duties within the clinic, not necessarily to reduce routine exposures but to minimize the changes of an accident having high-dose or high-contamination potential. All of the available human data show that there is small additional risk to the fetus or neonate due to occupational radiation exposure compared to naturally occurring risks so long as the dose is within recommended guidelines.

Benedetto, A.R.

1986-12-01

49

Eigenimage filtering of nuclear medicine image sequences  

SciTech Connect

In many nuclear medicine imaging sequences the localization of radioactivity in organs other than the target organ interferes with imaging of the desired anatomical structure or physiological process. A filtering technique has been developed which suppresses the interfering process while enhancing the desired process. This technique requires the identification of temporal sequential signatures for both the interfering and desired processes. These signatures are placed in the form of signature vectors. Signature matrices, M/sub D/ and M/sub U/, are formed by taking the outer product expansion of the temporal signature vectors for the desired and interfering processes respectively. By using the transformation from the simultaneous diagonalization of these two signature matrices a weighting vector is obtained. The technique is shown to maximize the projection of the desired process while minimizing the interfering process based upon an extension of Rayleigh's Principle. The technique is demonstrated for first pass renal and cardiac flow studies. This filter offers a potential for simplifying and extending the accuracy of diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures.

Windham, J.P.; Froelich, J.W.; Abd-Allah, M.

1985-05-01

50

42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix...Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists The following...Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

2014-10-01

51

Stereoscopic full aperture imaging in nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Images of planar scintigraphy and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) used in nuclear medicine are often low quality. They usually appear to be blurred and noisy. This problem is due to the low spatial resolution and poor sensitivity of the acquisition technique with the gamma camera (GC). Other techniques, such as coded aperture imaging (CAI) reach higher spatial resolutions than GC. However, CAI is not frequently used for imaging in nuclear medicine, due to the decoding complexity of some images and the difficulty in controlling the noise magnitude. Summing up, the images obtained through GC are low quality and it is still difficult to implement CAI technique. A novel technique, full aperture Imaging (FAI), also uses gamma ray-encoding to obtain images, but the coding system and the method of images reconstruction are simpler than those used in CAI. In addition, FAI also reaches higher spatial resolution than GC. In this work, the principles of FAI technique and the method of images reconstruction are explained in detail. The FAI technique is tested by means of Monte Carlo simulations with filiform and spherical sources. Spatial resolution tests of GC versus FAI were performed using two different source-detector distances. First, simulations were made without interposing any material between the sources and the detector. Then, other more realistic simulations were made. In these, the sources were placed in the centre of a rectangular prismatic region, filled with water. A rigorous comparison was made between GC and FAI images of the linear filiform sources, by means of two methods: mean fluence profile graphs and correlation tests. Finally, three-dimensional capacity of FAI was tested with two spherical sources. The results show that FAI technique has greater sensitivity (>100 times) and greater spatial resolution (>2.6 times) than that of GC with LEHR collimator, in both cases, with and without attenuating material and long and short-distance configurations. The FAI decoding algorithm reconstructs simultaneously four different projections which are located in separate image fields on the detector plane, while GC produces only one projection per acquisition. Simulations have allowed comparison of both techniques under ideal identical conditions. Our results show it is possible to apply an extremely simple encoded imaging technique, and get three-dimensional radioactivity information for simplistic geometry sources. The results are promising enough to evaluate the possibility of future research with more complex sources typical of nuclear medicine imaging.

Strocovsky, Sergio G.; Otero, Dino

2011-06-01

52

Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

1994-02-18

53

Source Book of Educational Materials for Nuclear Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contents of this sourcebook of educational materials are divided into the following sections: Anatomy and Physiology; Medical Terminology; Medical Ethics and Department Management; Patient Care and Medical Decision-Making; Basic Nuclear Medicine; Diagnostic in Vivo; Diagnostic in Vitro; Pediatric Nuclear Medicine; Radiation Detection and…

Pijar, Mary Lou, Comp.; Lewis, Jeannine T., Comp.

54

Common uses of nonradioactive drugs in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

A variety of nonradioactive pharmaceuticals commonly used in patients who receive nuclear medicine diagnostic tests are described. Nonradioactive drugs used in thyroid, brain, hepatobiliary, cardiac, renal, Meckel's diverticulum, gallium, adrenal, and hematological studies are described. Pharmaceutical necessities used as disinfectants, diluents, and anticoagulants are also described. Hospital pharmacists should be familiar with the uses of commonly prescribed nonradioactive drugs in nuclear medicine studies.

Ponto, J.A.; Hladik, W.B.

1984-06-01

55

Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.  

PubMed

The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children. PMID:24647992

Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

2014-06-01

56

Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

Atkins, H.L.

1984-01-01

57

42 CFR 482.53 - Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. 482.53 Section 482.53... Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. If the hospital provides nuclear medicine services, those services must meet...

2010-10-01

58

42 CFR 482.53 - Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. 482.53 Section 482.53... Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. If the hospital provides nuclear medicine services, those services must meet...

2011-10-01

59

42 CFR 482.53 - Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. 482.53 Section 482.53... Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. If the hospital provides nuclear medicine services, those services must meet...

2014-10-01

60

[Research progress on mechanisms of modern medicine in cancer metastasis].  

PubMed

Cancer metastasis is the most dangerous stage of tumorigenesis and evolution, the primary cause of death in cancer patients. Clinically, more than 60% of cancer patients have found metastasis at the time of examination. Modern medicine has made significant progress on the mechanisms of cancer metastasis in recent years, from the simple "anatomy and machinery" theory forward to the "seed and soil" theory, then to the "microenvironmental" theory and the "cancer stem cell" theory. The emerging "cancer stem cell" theory successfully explains phenomenon such as tumor genetic heterogeneity, anoikis resistance, tumor dormancy, providing more new targets and ideas for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer metastasis. PMID:25423816

Chen, Hui; Qu, Jing-Lian; Gong, Jie-Ning

2014-08-01

61

[Research progress on mechanisms of modern medicine in cancer metastasis].  

PubMed

Cancer metastasis is the most dangerous stage of tumorigenesis and evolution, the primary cause of death in cancer patients. Clinically, more than 60% of cancer patients have found metastasis at the time of examination. Modern medicine has made significant progress on the mechanisms of cancer metastasis in recent years, from the simple "anatomy and machinery" theory forward to the "seed and soil" theory, then to the "microenvironmental" theory and the "cancer stem cell" theory. The emerging "cancer stem cell" theory successfully explains phenomenon such as tumor genetic heterogeneity, anoikis resistance, tumor dormancy, providing more new targets and ideas for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer metastasis. PMID:25507538

Chen, Hui; Qu, Jing-Lian; Gong, Jie-Ning

2014-08-01

62

Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.  

PubMed

There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article. PMID:23763875

Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

2013-08-01

63

Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R&D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

1993-02-08

64

NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

Not Available

1990-02-02

65

NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

Not Available

1990-02-02

66

Nuclear medicine imaging in the evaluation of endocrine hypertension  

PubMed Central

Endocrine hypertension forms a small (< 5%) but curable subset of patients with hypertension. Common endocrine causes of hypertension include pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, and thyroid disorders. Nuclear medicine imaging plays an important role in evaluation of patients with endocrine hypertension. It has established role in patients of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, Cushing's syndrome, aldosteronism, and thyroid disorders. We present a brief overview of role of nuclear medicine imaging in endocrine hypertension. Development of newer radiotracers might further broaden the role of nuclear medicine in these patients. PMID:23087853

Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh

2012-01-01

67

Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

Not Available

1992-05-01

68

Chinese Herbal Medicine on Dyslipidemia: Progress and Perspective  

PubMed Central

Dyslipidemia is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. The statins are a milestone in the primary and second prevention of cardiovascular diseases and significantly improved its prognosis. Along with the long-term treatment with statins in combination with other hypolipidemic drugs or alone, its safety has attracted a particular attention in clinic, such as the elevation of transaminase and rhabdomyolysis, which have raised an idea of developing the other types of lipid-lowering agents from botanic materials. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 2000 years in China and showed some beneficial effects for human health and many diseases. Recently, many studies demonstrated a favorable effect of TCM for treating dyslipidemia; however, its mechanism remains unclear or totally unknown. The progress and perspective of studies on dyslipidemia with single Chinese herb and its monomers or effective extracts during the past 10 years are discussed in the present review. PMID:24688589

Guo, Ming; Liu, Yue; Gao, Zhu-Ye; Shi, Da-zhuo

2014-01-01

69

Labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals applied in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

This book includes material on radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine with a section on in vitro assays. Contents are divided into four parts: radioisotopes, labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals; radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostic purposes; in vitro methods of analysis with labelled compounds and applications of radioimmunoassay to medicine.

Balaban, A.; Galateanu, I.; Geogescu, G.; Simionescu, L.

1986-01-01

70

A Low-Cost Nuclear Medicine Acquisition Station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A significant obstacle to the use of local area networks in Nuclear Medicine has been the high cost of computer systems capable of digitizing the analog outputs of conventional gamma cameras. A PC-based Nuclear Image Acquisition Station has been designed using readily available components that permits acquisition, display and transfer of nuclear images. Processing functions, including camera uniformity corrections, image rotation and edge enhancement and other operators Elre available locally. With appropriate file format manipulation, images may alternatively be transferred to a conventional Nuclear Medicine computer for processing and archival storage. Hardware and software costs required to implement these functions on an existing micro are less than $4000.

Goble, John C.

1986-06-01

71

What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... imagegently.org What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine uses ... provide patients, parents and caregivers with information about nuclear medicine and radiation exposure. We hope this pamphlet answers your questions. ...

72

Radiation safety audit of a high volume Nuclear Medicine Department  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Professional radiation exposure cannot be avoided in nuclear medicine practices. It can only be minimized up to some extent by implementing good work practices. Aim and Objectives: The aim of our study was to audit the professional radiation exposure and exposure rate of radiation worker working in and around Department of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, Tata Memorial Hospital. Materials and Methods: We calculated the total number of nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) procedures performed in our department and the radiation exposure to the radiation professionals from year 2009 to 2012. Results: We performed an average of 6478 PET/CT scans and 3856 nuclear medicine scans/year from January 2009 to December 2012. The average annual whole body radiation exposure to nuclear medicine physician, technologist and nursing staff are 1.74 mSv, 2.93 mSv and 4.03 mSv respectively. Conclusion: Efficient management and deployment of personnel is of utmost importance to optimize radiation exposure in a high volume nuclear medicine setup in order to work without anxiety of high radiation exposure. PMID:25400361

Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Shetye, Bhakti; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu Chandrakant; Monteiro, Priya; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

2014-01-01

73

Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Uses of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear detectors in medicine are briefly described. They include surgical probes and a system for measuring cerebral blood flow in the intensive care unit. Other uses include nuclear dentistry, x-ray exposure control, cardiology, diabetes, and the testing of new pharmaceuticals. (ACR)

Entine, G.

1985-05-07

74

Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

Olivier, Pierre

2004-07-01

75

The use of nuclear medicine techniques in the emergency department  

PubMed Central

Nuclear medicine techniques have received little attention in the practice of emergency medicine, yet radionuclide imaging can provide valuable and unique information in the management of acutely ill patients. In this review, emphasis is placed on the role of these techniques in patients with bone injuries, non-traumatic bone pain and in those with pleuritic chest pain. New developments such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in myocardial infarction are outlined and older techniques such as scrotal scintigraphy are reviewed. Radionuclide techniques are discussed in a clinical context and in relation to alternative imaging modalities or strategies that may be available to the emergency medicine physician. Aspects of a 24 hour nuclear medicine service are considered. PMID:11696487

McGlone, B; Balan, K

2001-01-01

76

[Differential diagnostics of Parkinson's disease with nuclear medicine procedures].  

PubMed

Early differential diagnosis of parkinsonism is of paramount therapeutic and prognostic importance. In the present review, the diagnostic value of routinely used nuclear medicine procedures is presented and critically discussed. The [(123)I]FP-CIT single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the method of choice for differentiation between neurodegenerative and non-neurodegenerative parkinsonism. The [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([(18)F]FDG-PET) method provides a very high diagnostic accuracy for differentiating between Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS), which is clearly superior to the accuracy of [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT, [(123)I]IBZM SPECT and [(123)I]MIBG scintigraphy. Furthermore, [(18)F]FDG-PET is the only of the aforementioned techniques that also allows a reliable differentiation between APS subgroups (e.g., multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration). Current studies are investigating the probable value of [(18)F]FDG-PET for risk stratification of dementia in PD. PMID:24821290

Meyer, P T; Amtage, F; Hellwig, S

2014-06-01

77

Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs.

Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

1988-01-01

78

Position paper on the development of a middle level provider in nuclear medicine: the nuclear medicine practitioner.  

PubMed

The development of an educational program and credentialing structure to support and recognize an advanced level of the practice of nuclear medicine technology is now underway. This work parallels the efforts in many, if not most, health care disciplines as they seek to achieve the twin goals of developing enhanced career paths and providing the best possible patient care in an environment where science and technology can run roughshod over concepts taught in the classroom a mere decade ago. Education is key to both goals. A master's level degree in nuclear medicine technology, coupled with an advanced practice credential recognizing both the educational achievement and a level of clinical expertise, will give nuclear medicine practitioners the knowledge and the right to practice their profession at a high level of autonomy, leading to more efficient and higher quality health care services. To that end the following position paper was prepared by members of the Advance Practice Task Force of the SNMTS and presented to the SNMTS Executive Council and the SNM Board of Directors. In June 2005, the executive council and the board of directors approved a resolution supporting the establishment of a middle level provider in nuclear medicine known as the nuclear medicine practitioner. PMID:17146114

Pickett, Martha W; Keech, Frances K; Owen, Mary Anne Mimi; Stachowiak, Anne; Fulk, Lynnette A; Murphy, Kathleen H; Christian, Paul E; Hunter, Kathy; Hubble, William L; Gordon, Leonie L; Dillehay, Gary L; Henkin, Robert E

2006-12-01

79

Simultaneous acquisition of physiological data and nuclear medicine images.  

PubMed

A technique has been developed that allows the simultaneous acquisition of both image and physiological data into a standard nuclear medicine computer system. The physiological data can be displayed along with the nuclear medicine images allowing temporal correlation between the two. This technique has been used to acquire images of gastroesophageal reflux simultaneously with the intraluminal esophageal pH. The resulting data are displayed either as a standard dynamic sequence with the physiological data appearing in a corner of the image or as condensed dynamic images. PMID:3183752

Rosenthal, M S; Klein, H A; Orenstein, S R

1988-11-01

80

Simultaneous acquisition of physiological data and nuclear medicine images  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed that allows the simultaneous acquisition of both image and physiological data into a standard nuclear medicine computer system. The physiological data can be displayed along with the nuclear medicine images allowing temporal correlation between the two. This technique has been used to acquire images of gastroesophageal reflux simultaneously with the intraluminal esophageal pH. The resulting data are displayed either as a standard dynamic sequence with the physiological data appearing in a corner of the image or as condensed dynamic images.

Rosenthal, M.S.; Klein, H.A.; Orenstein, S.R.

1988-11-01

81

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, April 1984-September 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; and supporting studies. 33 figures, 13 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1984-12-01

82

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

1984-06-01

83

Pioneers of nuclear medicine, Madame Curie.  

PubMed

Among those who have made important discoveries in the field of radioactivity and thus helped in the development of nuclear medicine as an identical entity are: Heinrich Hertz who in 1886 demonstrated the existence of radiowaves. In 1895 Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-rays. In 1896 H. Becquerel described the phenomenon of radioactivity. He showed that a radioactive uranium salt was emitting radioactivity which passing through a metal foil darkened a photographic plate. An analogous experiment performed by S.Thomson in London was announced to the president of the Royal Society of London before the time H.Becquerel announced his discovery but Thomson never claimed priority for his discovery. Muarie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was undoubtedly the most important person to attribute to the discovery of radioactivity. In 1898 she discovered radium as a natural radioactive element. This is how she describes the hard time she had, working with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) for the discovery of radium and polonium: "During the first year we did not go to the theater or to a concert or visited friends. I miss my relatives, my father and my daughter that I see every morning and only for a little while. But I do not complain...". In presenting her discovery of radium, Madame Curie said: " ...in the hands of a criminal, radium is very dangerous. So we must often ask ourselves: will humanity earn or lose from this discovery? I, myself belong to those who believe the former...". The notebooks that Madame Curie had when she was working with radium and other radioactive elements like polonium, thorium and uranium are now kept in Paris. They are contaminated with radioactive materials having very long half-lives and for this reason anyone who wishes to have access to these notes should sign that he takes full responsibility. There are some more interesting points in Madame Curie's life which may not be widely known like: Although her full name is Maria Sklodowska-Curie, she is not known neither by that full name nor as Maria Sklodowska but as Marie Curie. Madame Curie was the second of five children. At the age of 24 she went to Sorbonne-Paris after being invited by her sister Bronja to study for about 2-3 years; instead she stayed in Paris for her whole life. Her doctorate was on the subject: "Research on radioactive substances" which she completed in six years under the supervision of H. Becquerel. Pierre Curie was Director of the Physics Laboratory of the Ecole Municipale of Physics and Industrial Chemistry when he married M. Curie in 1895. Pierre Curie left his other research projects and worked full time with his wife. In this laboratory M. Curie and her husband Pierre discovered radium and polonium. In 1901 Pierre Curie induced a radiation burn on his forearm by applying on his skin radiferous barium chloride for 10 hours. During World War I, M.Curie organized for the Red Cross a fleet of radiological ambulances each with X-ray apparates which were called "Little Curies". The X-ray tubes of these apparates were unshielded and so M.Curie was exposed to high doses of radiation. Once an ambulance fell into a ditch and M.Curie who was inside the ambulance was badly bruised and stayed at home for 3 days. M. Curie with her daughters, Irene and Eve, was invited and visited America in 1921. She led a successful campaign to collect radium for her experiments. Before leaving America, President Harding donated through her to the Radium Institute of Paris 1 g of radium for research purposes. At that time the process to obtain 0.5 g of pure radium bromide required 1 ton of ore and 5 tons of chemicals. No measures of radiation protection were taken back then. In 1929 Madame Curie visited the United States for a second time. She met with President Hoover and with the help of the Polish women's association in America collected funds for another gram of radium. Madame Curie died of leukemia on July 4, 1934. Sixty years after her death her remnants were laid to rest under the dome of the Pantheon. Th

Grammaticos, Philip C

2004-01-01

84

42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...be licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation...

2011-10-01

85

42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...be licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation...

2010-10-01

86

Introduction to holospectral imaging in nuclear medicine for scatter subtraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

An approach to image analysis and processing, called holospectral imaging, is proposed for dealing with Compton scattering contamination in nuclear medicine imaging. The method requires that energy information be available for all detected photons. A set of frames (typically 16) representing the spatial distribution at different energies is then formed. The relationship between these energy frames is analyzed, and the

D. Gagnon; A. Todd-Pokropek; A. Arsenaualt; G. Dupras

1989-01-01

87

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (30-31 semester credits of Radiologic Technology

Sheridan, Scott

88

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (Freshman or AS degree)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (Freshman or AS degree) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMFR] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 RIS 44000 Introduction to Radiologic and Imaging Sciences 2 C Semester Eight: [15 Credit Hours] RIS

Sheridan, Scott

89

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (31-32 semester credits of Radiologic Technology

Sheridan, Scott

90

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (Freshman or AS degree)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (Freshman or AS degree) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMFR] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 to enroll in RIS courses RIS 44000 Introduction to Radiologic and Imaging Sciences 2 C Semester Eight: [14

Sheridan, Scott

91

Replenishment prioritization of highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine  

E-print Network

Serving customers in a nuclear medicine supply chain requires frequent and responsive replenishments. Nuclear medicine is a special category of perishable goods that is subject to rapid, but predictable radioactive decay. ...

Yea, Young-bai Michael

2007-01-01

92

High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

Majewski, Stan

2006-04-01

93

Discharges of nuclear medicine radioisotopes in Spanish hospitals.  

PubMed

Given the increasing use of radiopharmaceuticals in medicine, the aim of this paper is to determine radioactivity levels in the effluents of hospitals with Nuclear Medicine Departments. The radiological study of hospital discharges was carried out by gamma spectrometry, and liquid scintillation spectrometry to determine (14)C and (3)H contents. On March 9th and April 19th, 2010, daily radioactivity levels were monitored from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Each sample was collected at a specific control point of two major public hospitals in Granada (Spain). The analytical results show the presence of radionuclides such as (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, and (111)In.They are frequently used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes. This study shows the differences between direct and after-storage discharges and also justifies the need of storage tanks in hospitals with nuclear medicine departments. Moreover, monitoring of (99m)Tc released at hospital control points can be a useful tool for optimizing the safety conditions of storage tanks and discharge of radionuclides. PMID:23103581

Krawczyk, E; Piñero-García, F; Ferro-García, M A

2013-02-01

94

(New imaging systems in nuclear medicine)  

SciTech Connect

Further progress has been made on improving the uniformity and stability of PCR-I, the single ring analog coded tomograph. This camera has been employed in a wide range of animal studies described below. Data from PCR-I have been used in various image processing procedures. These include motion pictures of dog heart, comparison of PET and MRI image in dog heart and rat brain and quantitation of tumor metabolism in the nude mouse using blood data from heart images. A SUN workstation with TAAC board has been used to produce gated three-dimensional images of the dog heart. The ANALYZE program from the Mayo Clinic has also been mounted on a SUN workstation for comparison of images and image processing. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1990-01-01

95

MEDICAL PROGRESS: ISOTOPES IN CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE  

PubMed Central

This is Part II of an article in two parts. Part I appeared in the July issue of California Medicine, and with it were the list of references for the entire article and the Table 1 referred to in the following text. PMID:18731514

Dougherty, Ellsworth C.; Lawrence, John H.

1948-01-01

96

Source book of educational materials for nuclear medicine. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Source Book has been divided into 22 sections. Each section corresponds to subject areas included in a compilation of curricula for nuclear medicine technology. Each section is subdivided into subsections entitled 'Publications' and in some chapters, 'Audiovisuals', and 'Training Aids'. Entries include title, author, producer, or publisher, data, ordering number if available, price, and when possible, a brief description. Publishers', producers' and manufacturers' addresses are found in Section 22 - Parts, A, B, and C. Section 22 - Part D lists periodicals of special interest to individuals involved in nuclear medicine. This list of resource materials is not exhaustive but in the opinion of the compilers is a representative sample of the material available in the field.

Pijar, M.L.; Lewis, J.T.

1981-08-01

97

[Hodgkin's lymphoma in nuclear medicine: diagnostic and therapeutic aspects].  

PubMed

Today, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) with positron emission tomography and radioimmunotherapy include state-of-the-art nuclear medicine which require the cooperation between oncology and nuclear medicine. The benefit of FDG-PET in HL patients with residual tumor masses consists of its high negative predictive value in the therapy control of the disease. The concept of waitful watching in patients with PET-negative residual masses after BEACOPP-chemotherapy will be evaluated in a large multicenter trial of the GHSG (German Hodgkin Study Group). Radioimmunotherapy has been performed in patients with CD20-positive Non-Hodgkin lymphoma for 10 years with promising results. HL is also an excellent target for immunotherapy due to the expression of antigens such as CD25 and CD30. Thus, a new radioimmunoconstruct consisting of the murine anti-CD30 antibody Ki-4 labeled with iodine-131 was developed for patients with relapsed or refractory HL. PMID:12601450

Staak, J O; Dietlein, M; Engert, A; Weihrauch, M R; Schomäcker, K; Fischer, Th; Eschner, W; Borchmann, P; Diehl, V; Schicha, H; Schnell, R

2003-02-01

98

American College of Nuclear Physics 1991 DOE day symposium: Aids and nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

Since first described in 1981, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has become the medical dilemma of the century. AIDS retrovirus, and the economic consequences of this exposure are staggering. AIDS has been the topic of conferences and symposia worldwide. This symposium, to be held on January 25, 1991, at the 17th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the American College of Nuclear Physicians, will expose the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists to their role in the diagnosis of AIDS, and will educate them on the socio-economic and ethical issues related to this problem. In addition, the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists must be aware of their role in the management of their departments in order to adequately protect the health care professionals working in their laboratories. Strategies are currently being developed to control the spread of bloodborne diseases within the health care setting, and it is incumbent upon the Nuclear Medicine community to be aware of such strategies.

NONE

1991-12-31

99

Forensic Medicine: Age Written in Teeth by Nuclear Bomb Tests  

SciTech Connect

Establishing the age of individuals is an important step in identification and a frequent challenge in forensic medicine. This can be done with high precision up to adolescence by analysis of dentition, but establishing the age of adults has remained difficult. Here we show that measuring {sup 14}C from nuclear bomb tests in tooth enamel provides a sensitive way to establish when a person was born.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2005-05-04

100

Understanding appropriate use criteria in nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

There has been a significant increase in cardiac radionuclide imaging over the past decade, leading to a corresponding increase in scrutiny from Federal and private health plans questioning the necessity of these tests. In response to efforts by third-party payers to limit all types of cardiovascular imaging studies, the American College of Cardiology Foundation, in conjunction with other professional societies, developed appropriate use criteria. The goal of this article is to explain how the criteria were created and define the 3 categories of indications: appropriate, inappropriate, and uncertain. Tips for using appropriate use criteria and tables, including a definition of several key terms technologists should be familiar with, will be provided. In addition, reimbursement, benchmark data, and practical considerations for implementation will be discussed. Finally, several tools to aid in calculating appropriateness are suggested. With a basic understanding, the appropriate use criteria are relatively easy to apply. It is important for facilities to begin to voluntarily incorporate them into their practice and document levels of appropriateness now as payers are developing 2 trends that are not favorable for nuclear cardiology: preauthorization and denial of payment for inappropriate studies. PMID:22553087

Farrell, Mary Beth; Cerqueira, Manuel D

2012-06-01

101

Nuclear medicine in clinical neurology: an update  

SciTech Connect

Isotope scanning using technetium 99m pertechnetate has fallen into disuse since the advent of x-ray computerized tomography. Regional brain blood flow studies have been pursued on a research basis. Increased regional blood flow during focal seizure activity has been demonstrated and is of use in localizing such foci. Cisternography as a predictive tool in normal pressure hydrocephalus is falling into disuse. Positron tomographic scanning is a potent research tool that can demonstrate both regional glycolysis and blood flow. Unfortunately, it is extremely expensive and complex to apply in a clinical setting. With support from the National Institutes of Health, seven extramural centers have been funded to develop positron tomographic capabilities, and they will greatly advance our knowledge of stroke pathophysiology, seizure disorders, brain tumors, and various degenerative diseases. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially valuable tool since it creates tomographic images representing the distribution of brain water. No tissue ionization is produced, and images comparable to second-generation computerized tomographic scans are already being produced in humans.

Oldendorf, W.H.

1981-01-01

102

Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256×256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento

2011-10-01

103

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23

104

PROGRESS IN TEACHING PREVENTIVE MEDICINE IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS  

E-print Network

During recent years the teaching of preventive medicine has been discussed so widely in North America and in Great Britain that it now is possible to state certain general principles which are rather widely accepted in the English-speaking countries. On both sides of the Atlantic committees after considering the matter seriously have made their recommendations. In the fall of 1946 a five-day meeting attended by approximately a hundred persons was held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for teachers of preventive medicine in the United States and Canada. The purpose of this meeting was to provide opportunity for full discussion of the objectives, course content, and methods of teaching the subject in the light of present-day thinking. During the day papers were presented and discussed and in the evenings committees met. Their reports, with slight modifications, were adopted by the Conference for inclusion in the Proceedings.1 There are many points in common among the ideas of all the different groups which have given mature consideration to the question. In October of 1944, Dr. Harry S. Mustard, chairman of a committee of the Association of American Medical Colleges,6 reported after a five-year study, making recommendations concerning the teaching of preventive medicine to medical undergraduates. Several reports have

Hugh R. Leavell

105

Antimalarial Drug Discovery: Approaches and Progress towards New Medicines  

PubMed Central

Malaria elimination has recently been reinstated as a global health priority but current therapies seem to be insufficient for the task. Elimination efforts require new drug classes that alleviate symptoms, prevent transmission and provide a radical cure. To develop these next generation medicines, public-private partnerships are funding innovative approaches to identify compounds that target multiple parasite species at multiple stages of the parasite lifecycle. Here, we review the cell-, chemistry- and target-based approaches used to discover new drug candidates that are currently in clinical trials or undergoing preclinical testing. PMID:24217412

Flannery, Erika L.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

2014-01-01

106

The role of commercial nuclear pharmacy in the future practice of nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

It has been estimated that today 70% to 80% of all radiopharmaceutical doses are dispensed through commercial nuclear pharmacy channels. These services are provided by the approximately 250 facilities in the United States, with some multisite corporations dispensing in excess of 20,000 unit-dose prescriptions per day. As pressures mount within health care institutions to reduce manpower, increase cost-effectiveness, increase participation in managed care contracts, and to seek outside vendors for many services that were previously provided in-house, the future role of the commercial nuclear pharmacy in the practice of nuclear medicine will only continue to increase. The essence of nuclear pharmacy practice is the dispensing of a full range of high quality radiopharmaceuticals in patient-specific unit doses. These doses must be delivered in a timely and cost effective manner, without compromising quality or patient safety. Commercial nuclear pharmacies have expanded to provide such varied functions as radiation safety and waste management, as well as consultative and marketing activities directed towards clinicians within a nuclear medicine practitioners own facility. In-service continuing education programs directed towards physicians and technologists are frequently offered by many commercial nuclear pharmacies. Changes in health care economics, merging and down-sizing in the hospital industry, and the overall impact of managed care on the viability of hospitals in general has resulted in slow growth, or even a small decline in the number of institutionally based nuclear pharmacists. As a result, nuclear medicine practitioners will be looking to the commercial nuclear pharmacies to meet a larger portion of their radiopharmaceutical needs, as well as to value added services, such as education and research and development. Specialized practice settings, such as nuclear cardiology and free-standing nuclear medicine clinics, are especially well suited to the services provided by commercial nuclear pharmacies. Involvement in the distribution of positron-emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals will continue to increase regardless of the results of current regulatory debates on this issue. In the future, nuclear medicine practitioners will look to the commercial nuclear pharmacies for an increasing portion of their radiopharmaceutical needs and the industry should be ready and able to meet these demands in a safe, timely, and cost efficient manner. PMID:8723502

Callahan, R J

1996-04-01

107

Photons across medicine: relating optical and nuclear imaging  

PubMed Central

The Optics in the Life Sciences conference sponsored by the Optical Society of America was held in Waikoloa Beach, HI on April 14 – 18, 2013. Papers were presented in the areas of Bio-Optics: Design & Application, Novel Techniques in Microscopy, Optical Molecular Probes, Imaging & Drug Delivery, and Optical Trapping Applications. A focal point of the meeting was a special symposium entitled “Photons Across Medicine”, organized by Adam Wax, Duke University, highlighting activities of joint interest between the Optical Society of America (OSA) and the Society for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI). This paper is a synopsis of the presentations made at this joint symposium. Central to the special symposium presentations was the fact that the optical and nuclear imaging communities share common interests and challenges. These are highlighted in this article. Also discussed was the fact that the nuclear technologies in imaging have found their way into general clinical utility, a feat that has yet to be achieved by optical methods. Because of the common ground shared by the two technologies, coordination between the two societies should be planned. PMID:24409377

Nordstrom, Robert; Cherry, Simon; Azhdarinia, Ali; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; VanBrocklin, Henry

2013-01-01

108

Center of Excellence in laser medicine. Progress performance report  

SciTech Connect

Achievements during the last 12 months of funding to initiate a Center of Excellence in biomedical laser development include: seven specific research projects within the Center`s three broad interest areas, and program development to establish the MGH Laser Center and its activities. Progress in the three interest areas namely new medical laser systems development, optical diagnostics and photo sensitization is reported. Feasibility studies and prototype development were emphasized, to enhance establishing a substantial Center through future support. Specific projects are outlined below. In addition, the interdepartmental MGH Laser Center`s activities and accomplishments.

Parrish, J.A.

1993-04-29

109

Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation  

PubMed Central

The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation. PMID:24379527

Adedapo, Kayode Solomon; Onimode, Yetunde Ajoke; Ejeh, John Enyi; Adepoju, Adewale Oluwaseun

2013-01-01

110

Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation.  

PubMed

The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation. PMID:24379527

Adedapo, Kayode Solomon; Onimode, Yetunde Ajoke; Ejeh, John Enyi; Adepoju, Adewale Oluwaseun

2013-10-01

111

Recent progress of research on medicinal mushrooms, foods, and other herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine  

PubMed Central

This article will review selected herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine, including medicinal mushrooms (???? b? x? mó g?; Agaricus blazei, ?? yún zh?; Coriolus versicolor, ?? líng zh?; Ganoderma lucidum, ?? xi?ng xùn; shiitake, Lentinus edodes, ??? niú zh?ng zh?; Taiwanofungus camphoratus), Cordyceps (???? d?ng chóng xià c?o), pomegranate (?? shí liú; Granati Fructus), green tea (?? l? chá; Theae Folium Non Fermentatum), garlic (?? dà suàn; Allii Sativi Bulbus), turmeric (?? ji?ng huáng; Curcumae Longae Rhizoma), and Artemisiae Annuae Herba (?? q?ng h?o; sweet wormwood). Many of the discussed herbal products have gained popularity in their uses as dietary supplements for health benefits. The review will focus on the active constituents of the herbs and their bioactivities, with emphasis on the most recent progress in research for the period of 2003 to 2011. PMID:24716120

Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yang, Xiaoming; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Ting; Wu, Shou-Fang; Shi, Qian; Itokawa, Hideji

2012-01-01

112

Anniversary Paper: Nuclear medicine: Fifty years and still counting  

PubMed Central

The history, present status, and possible future of nuclear medicine are presented. Beginning with development of the rectilinear scanner and gamma camera, evolution to the present forms of hybrid technology such as single photon emission computed tomography?computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography?CT is described. Both imaging and therapy are considered and the recent improvements in dose estimation using hybrid technologies are discussed. Future developments listed include novel radiopharmaceuticals created using short chains of nucleic acids and varieties of nanostructures. Patient-specific radiotherapy is an eventual outcome of this work. Possible application to proving the targeting of potential chemotherapeutics is also indicated. PMID:18697524

Williams, Lawrence E.

2008-01-01

113

Center of excellence in laser medicine. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Achievements during the first six months of funding to prepare for a Center of Excellence in biomedical laser development include limited specific research projects within the Center`s three broad interest areas, and program development to establish the Center and its activities. Progress in the three interest areas -- new medical laser systems development, optical diagnostics, and photosensitization, is reported. Feasibility studies and prototype development were emphasized, to enhance establishing a substantial Center through future support. Specific projects are an optimized laser-catheter system for reversal of vasospasm; optical detection of major skin burn depth and cancers using fluorescent drugs, and photosensitization of vascular tissues. In addition, an interdepartmental Laser Center was established at MGH to enhance collaborations and institutional committment to the Center of Excellence. Competitive postdoctoral research fellowships, with provision for matching funds from other departments, have been announced.

Parrish, J.A.

1992-09-01

114

Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers  

SciTech Connect

There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

Mark Smith

2007-01-11

115

Choosing transportation alternatives for highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine  

E-print Network

The transport of highly perishable goods, in particular nuclear medicine, is subject to stringent regulations. Carefully designed transport selection criteria considering available alternatives, product attributes, decay ...

Yang, Xiaowen, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01

116

Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update  

PubMed Central

Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE.

Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

2015-01-01

117

Personalized medicine and pharmacogenetic biomarkers: progress in molecular oncology testing  

PubMed Central

In the field of oncology, clinical molecular diagnostics and biomarker discoveries are constantly advancing as the intricate molecular mechanisms that transform a normal cell into an aberrant state in concert with the dysregulation of alternative complementary pathways are increasingly understood. Progress in biomarker technology, coupled with the companion clinical diagnostic laboratory tests, continue to advance this field, where individualized and customized treatment appropriate for each individual patient define the standard of care. Here, we discuss the current commonly used predictive pharmacogenetic biomarkers in clinical oncology molecular testing: BRAF V600E for vemurafenib in melanoma; EML4–ALK for crizotinib and EGFR for erlotinib and gefitinib in non-small-cell lung cancer; KRAS against the use of cetuximab and panitumumab in colorectal cancer; ERBB2 (HER2/neu) for trastuzumab in breast cancer; BCR–ABL for tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia; and PML/RAR? for all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:22845480

Ong, Frank S; Das, Kingshuk; Wang, Jay; Vakil, Hana; Kuo, Jane Z; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B; Lim, Stephen W; Goodarzi, Mark O; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Rotter, Jerome I; Grody, Wayne W

2012-01-01

118

Nuclear rocket propulsion. NASA plans and progress, FY 1991  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has initiated planning for a technology development project for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for space explorer initiative (SEI) human and robotic missions to the moon and Mars. An interagency project is underway that includes the Department of Energy National Laboratories for nuclear technology development. The activities of the project planning team in FY 1990 and 1991 are summarized. The progress to date is discussed, and the project plan is reviewed. Critical technology issues were identified and include: (1) nuclear fuel temperature, life, and reliability; (2) nuclear system ground test; (3) safety; (4) autonomous system operation and health monitoring; and (5) minimum mass and high specific impulse.

Clark, John S.; Miller, Thomas J.

1991-01-01

119

Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

1994-02-18

120

The A-bomb, 50 years later: The evolution of nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

In the wake of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the U.S. government began to invest heavily in its nuclear program. Nuclear medicine stood to gain from these postwar policies, but it also suffered some setbacks. Fifty years ago this month, two atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, killing thousands of civilians and ushering in a quick and final end to World War II. The beginning of the post-war era signaled the birth of nuclear medicine as it is widely applied today. In fact, the same nuclear reactor that produced elements for the A-bomb project was turned over for the mass production of radionuclides for medicine and industry. The link between the A-bomb and nuclear medicine, however, has always been a sensitive subject among nuclear physicians whose patients may associate radionuclide injections with mushroom clouds. Although this link is not justified, the government`s interest in developing nuclear technology following World War II did have a significant impact on nuclear medicine: on the upside, millions of federal dollars were funneled into the production of radionuclides for research and medicine. On the downside, Congress established the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)-which later became the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-to oversee safety issues, making nuclear medicine the only medical field regulated by a federal agency.

Kotz, D.

1995-08-01

121

Measurement of doses to the extremities of nuclear medicine staff  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Medical uses of ionizing radiation now represent>95% of all man-made radiation exposure, and is the largest single radiation source after natural background radiation. Therefore, it is important to quantify the amount of radiation received by occupational individuals to optimize the working conditions for staff, and further, to compare doses in different departments to ensure compatibility with the recommended standards. For some groups working with unsealed sources in nuclear medicine units, the hands are more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation than the rest of the body. A personal dosimetry service runs extensively in Egypt. But doses to extremities have not been measured to a wide extent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the equivalent radiation doses to the fingers for five different nuclear medicine staff occupational groups for which heavy irradiation of the hands was suspected. Finger doses were measured for (1) nuclear medicine physicians, (2) technologists, (3) nurses and (4) physicists. The fifth group contains three technicians handling 131I, while the others handled 99mTc. Each staff member working with the radioactive material wore two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during the whole testing period, which lasted from 1 to 4 weeks. Staff performed their work on a regular basis throughout the month, and mean annual doses were calculated for these groups. Results showed that the mean equivalent doses to the fingers of technologist, nurse and physicist groups were 30.24±14.5, 30.37±17.5 and 16.3±7.7 ?Sv/GBq, respectively. Equivalent doses for the physicians could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts (mSv) that accumulated in one week. Similarly, the dose to the fingers of individuals in Group 5 was estimated to be 126.13±38.2 ?Sv/GBq. The maximum average finger dose, in this study, was noted in the technologists who handled therapeutic 131I (2.5 mSv). In conclusion, the maximum expected annual dose to extremities is less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y).

Shousha, Hany A.; Farag, Hamed; Hassan, Ramadan A.

122

Extended roles of radiographers working in nuclear medicine: A survey of current practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a number of years it has been recognised that nuclear medicine radiographers have been developing their professional responsibilities in areas in which they have had no formal preparation. To investigate the scope of practice, a survey was undertaken using a convenience sample of 50 nuclear medicine departments in England and Wales.The results confirmed that a number of ‘extended’ roles

Peter Hogg; Patricia Williams; Susan Norton

1997-01-01

123

Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure  

SciTech Connect

The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

1982-07-01

124

A modular scintillation camera for use in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

A ''modular'' scintillation camera is discussed as an alternative to using Anger cameras for gamma-ray imaging in nuclear medicine. Each module is an independent gamma camera and consists of a scintillation crystal, light pipe and mask plane, PMT's, and processing electronics. Groups of modules efficiently image radionuclide distributions by effectively utilizing crystal area. Performance of each module is maximized by using Monte-Carlo computer simulations to determine the optical design of the camera, optimizing the signal processing of the PMT signals using maximum-likelihood (ML) estimators, and incorporating digital lookup tables. Each event is completely processed in 2 ..mu..sec, and FWHM of the PSF over the crystal area is expected to be 3 mm. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional prototypes are tested for spatial and energy resolution

Milster, T.D.; Arendt, J.; Barrett, H.H.; Easton, R.L.; Rossi, G.R.; Selberg, L.A.; Simpson, R.G.

1984-02-01

125

Flexible nuclear medicine camera and method of using  

DOEpatents

A nuclear medicine camera and method of use photographically record radioactive decay particles emitted from a source, for example a small, previously undetectable breast cancer, inside a patient. The camera includes a flexible frame containing a window, a photographic film, and a scintillation screen, with or without a gamma-ray collimator. The frame flexes for following the contour of the examination site on the patient, with the window being disposed in substantially abutting contact with the skin of the patient for reducing the distance between the film and the radiation source inside the patient. The frame is removably affixed to the patient at the examination site for allowing the patient mobility to wear the frame for a predetermined exposure time period. The exposure time may be several days for obtaining early qualitative detection of small malignant neoplasms. 11 figs.

Dilmanian, F.A.; Packer, S.; Slatkin, D.N.

1996-12-10

126

Flexible nuclear medicine camera and method of using  

DOEpatents

A nuclear medicine camera 10 and method of use photographically record radioactive decay particles emitted from a source, for example a small, previously undetectable breast cancer, inside a patient. The camera 10 includes a flexible frame 20 containing a window 22, a photographic film 24, and a scintillation screen 26, with or without a gamma-ray collimator 34. The frame 20 flexes for following the contour of the examination site on the patient, with the window 22 being disposed in substantially abutting contact with the skin of the patient for reducing the distance between the film 24 and the radiation source inside the patient. The frame 20 is removably affixed to the patient at the examination site for allowing the patient mobility to wear the frame 20 for a predetermined exposure time period. The exposure time may be several days for obtaining early qualitative detection of small malignant neoplasms.

Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Packer, Samuel (Great Neck, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY)

1996-12-10

127

Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers.

Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Maia, A. F.

2014-02-01

128

Physics of Nuclear Medicine Polytechnic Institute of NYU, Brooklyn, NY 11201  

E-print Network

Physics of Nuclear Medicine Yao Wang Polytechnic Institute of NYU, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Based on J. L are from the textbook. #12;EL5823 Nuclear Physics Yao Wang, Polytechnic U., Brooklyn 2 Lecture Outline of decay · Radiotracers #12;EL5823 Nuclear Physics Yao Wang, Polytechnic U., Brooklyn 3 What is Nuclear

Suel, Torsten

129

Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

The most significant development this year has been the outcome of a survey of EO transition strength, {rho}{sup 2}(EO), in heavy nuclei. The systematics of {rho}{sup 2}(EO) reveals that the strongest EO`s are between pairs of excited states with the same spin and parity. This is observed in the regions Z,N = 38,60; 48,66; 64,88; and 80,106. Unlike other multipoles it is rare that nuclear ground states are strongly connected to excited states by monopole transitions. Another significant finding is in the results of the experimental study of levels in {sup 187}Au. Two bands of states are observed with identical spin sequences, very similar excitation energies, and EO transitions between the favored band members but not between the unfavored band members. This is interpreted in terms of nearly identical diabatic structures. Experimental data sets for the radioactive decays of {sup 183}Pt and {sup 186}Au to {sup 183}Ir and {sup 186}Pt, respectively, have been under analysis. The studies are aimed at elucidating shape coexistence and triaxiality in the A = 185 region. An extensive program of systematics for nuclei at and near N = Z has been continued in preparation for the planned nuclear structure research program using the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge. A considerable effort has been devoted to HRIBF target development.

Wood, J.L.

1994-10-31

130

Nuclear medicine progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Radioiodinated 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3,3-dimethylpentadecanoic acid (DMIPP) has been prepared as a new terminal iodophenyl-substituted fatty acid containing dimethyl-branching at the beta-position. Iodine-125-labeled DMIPP showed rapid, high myocardial uptake (min, mean % injected dose/g) in fasted rats (5, 4.67; 30, 5.06; 60, 4.79; 120, 4.37), and also exhibited high heart:blood ratios (min, ratio) 5, 3:1; 30, 12:1; 60, 12:1; 120, 13:1. These data demonstrate an unanticipated much longer myocardial residence time with DMIPP (+/sub 1/2/ 7-8 h) than observed with either the 3-monomethyl (BMIPP) analogue (+/sub 1/2/ 30-45 min) or the rapidly metabolized straight-chain (IPP) analogue (+/sub 1/2/ 10-15 min). The (/sup 123/I)DMIPP is thus an excellent candidate for clinical evaluation of regional fatty acid metabolism under conditions where the uptake of energy substrates can be assessed independent of regional blood delivery. Studies with the new activated carbon-based osmium-191/iridium-191m generator system have also continued. A standard lead shipping container has been modified for shipment of the generators to Medical Cooperative investigators. Studies include both left and right ventricular ejection fraction measurements and evaluation of blood flow in the cerebral and leg arteries. Studies with potential new brain imaging agents have also continued and a radioiodinated pargyline analogue has been prepared and evaluated. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Goodman, M.M.; Srivastava, P.C.

1985-07-01

131

Space nuclear safety program: Progress report, April-June 1987  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report describes studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems, carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

George, T.G. (comp.)

1988-07-01

132

Space Nuclear Safety Program: Progress report, January-March 1987  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report describes studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems, which were carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

Lewin, R. (ed.); George, T.G. (comp.)

1988-07-01

133

Space nuclear safety program: Progress report, July--September 1987  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report describes studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems, carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies discussed are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses. 20 figs., 4 tabs.

George, T.G. (comp.)

1989-02-01

134

[Investigation of radiation safety management of nuclear medicine facilities in Japan; contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system. A Working Group of Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine for the Guidelines of Nuclear Medicine Therapy].  

PubMed

Radiation safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities were investigated by the questionnaire method. The first questionnaire was asked in all Japanese 1,401 Nuclear Medicine facilities. Answers from 624 institutes (44.5%) were received and analyzed. The radiation-safety management in nuclear medicine institutes was considered to be very well performed everyday. Opinion for the present legal control of nuclear medicine institutes was that the regulation in Japan was too strict for the clinical use of radionuclides. The current regulation is based on the assumption that 1% of all radioactivity used in nuclear medicine institutes contaminates into the draining-water system. The second questionnaire detailing the contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system was sent to 128 institutes, and 64 answers were received. Of them, 42 institutes were considered to be enough to evaluate the contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system. There was no difference between 624 institutes answered to the first questionnaire and 42 institutes, where the radioactivity in the draining-water system was measured, in the distribution of the institute size, draining-water system equipment and the radioactivity measuring method, and these 42 institutes seemed to be representative of Japanese nuclear medicine institutes. Contamination rate of radioactivity into the draining system was calculated by the value of radioactivity in the collecting tank divided by the amount of radionuclides used daily in each institute. The institutes were divided into two categories on the basis of nuclear medicine practice pattern; type A: in-vivo use only and type B: both in-vivo and in-vitro use. The contamination rate in 27 type A institutes did not exceed 0.01%, whereas in 15 type B institutes the contamination rate distributed widely from undetectable to above 1%. These results indicated that the present regulation for the draining-water system, which assumed that 1% of all radioactivity used in nuclear medicine institutes contaminated into draining-water system, should be reconsidered in nuclear medicine facilities where radionuclides are used only in in-vivo studies. PMID:10659587

Endo, K; Koizumi, M; Kinoshita, F; Nakazawa, K

1999-12-01

135

NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed.

Stone, James R.; Doherty, Michael P.; Peecook, Keith M.

1993-01-01

136

PREFACE: International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine (OptiNM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conference logo The International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine was held at the Atlantica Aeneas Resort in Ayia Napa, Cyprus between 23-26 March 2011. It was organised in the framework of the research project "Optimising Diagnostic Value in SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging" (Y????/?Y????/0308/11), funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation and the European Regional Development Fund, to present the highlights of the project, discuss the progress and results, and define future related goals. The aim of this International Conference was to concentrate on image optimization approaches in Nuclear Medicine. Experts in the field of nuclear medicine presented their latest research results, exchanged experiences and set future goals for image optimisation while balancing patient dose and diagnostic value. The conference was jointly organized by the Frederick Research Centre in Cyprus, the Department of Medical and Public Health Services of the Cyprus Ministry of Health, the Biomedical Research Foundation in Cyprus and the AGH University of Science and Technology in Poland. It was supported by the Cyprus Association of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and the Cyprus Society of Nuclear Medicine. The conference was held under the auspices of the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. The conference scientific programme covered several important topics such as functional imaging; image optimization; quantification for diagnosis; justification; simulations; patient dosimetry, staff exposures and radiation risks; quality assurance and clinical audit; education, training and radiation protection culture; hybrid systems and image registration; and new and competing technologies. The programme consisted of 13 invited and keynote presentations as well as workshops, round table discussions and a number of scientific sessions. A total of 51 speakers presented their research and results to more than 150 participants from 14 countries. During the conference, exhibitors presented medical equipment used in nuclear medicine. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, the European Regional Development Fund and the Cyprus Biomedical Research Foundation. Also, we appreciate the support of the various local sponsors listed in the conference programme. We would like to express our sincere thanks and gratitude to the organising committee, the scientific committee and the supporting professional organizations for the success of the conference. We also thank all of speakers for their excellent contributions, all the participants for their input, and the exhibitors for their valuable presentations. Special thanks go to Demetris Kaolis, Maria Christofidou, Isabelle Chrysanthou, Charalambos Yiannakkaras, Ourania Demetriadou, and Elena Christofidou for their invaluable contribution to the conference. The conference volume consists of 26 selected proceedings papers. We would like to thank all of the authors for their time and genuine efforts and the reviewers for their fruitful comments. The Conference Chairpersons Stelios Christofides and Yiannis Parpottas

Christofides, Stelios; Parpottas, Yiannis

2011-09-01

137

* DESCRIPTION OF THE PROFESSION Nuclear medicine uses radioactivity to diagnose and treat disease. It is a multi-  

E-print Network

to be examined for certification by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board and/or American Registry and will be eligible for examination by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and/or the Nuclear Medicine of Colleges and Schools. The UMDNJ-SHRP Nuclear Medicine Program is currently granted accreditation by Joint

Cheng, Mei-Fang

138

Nuclear PTEN levels and G2 progression in melanoma cells  

PubMed Central

The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) exerts its function, in part, by negatively regulating the well-known phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway. Previous histological work has suggested that alterations in the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN may play a role in the development and progression of melanoma. In this study, we examined the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN in melanoma cell lines and its correlation with the cell cycle. Studies were performed in melanoma cells lines using classic cell biological techniques. In contrast to breast cancer cell lines, we found that increased levels of nuclear PTEN levels correlate with G2 rather than with G1 arrest. In WM164 and SKmel28 cells, overexpression of PTEN protein did not significantly increase the number of cells in the G2 phase. Differential CDC2 phosphorylation levels in cells that overexpressed PTEN compared with those where PTEN was downregulated suggest some involvement of PTEN in G2 checkpoint regulation. The data suggest that although nuclear PTEN levels correlate with the G2 phase, the role of PTEN in modulating G2/M arrest is not limiting. Further, the specific cell cycle phase regulated by nuclear PTEN is cell-type dependent. Taken together, our observations suggest that in melanoma, nuclear PTEN is involved in G2 progression possibly through the modulation of CDC2, opening up a new arena for investigation. PMID:19478684

Jacob, Abraham I.; Romigh, Todd; Waite, Kristin A.; Eng, Charis

2009-01-01

139

Maximum entropy deconvolution of low-count nuclear medicine images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Maximum entropy is applied to the problem of deconvolving nuclear medicine images, with special consideration for very low count data. The physics of the formation of scintigraphic images is described, illustrating the phenomena which degrade planar estimates of the tracer distribution. Various techniques which are used to restore these images are reviewed, outlining the relative merits of each. The development and theoretical justification of maximum entropy as an image processing technique is discussed. Maximum entropy is then applied to the problem of planar deconvolution, highlighting the question of the choice of error parameters for low count data. A novel iterative version of the algorithm is suggested which allows the errors to be estimated from the predicted Poisson mean values. This method is shown to produce the exact results predicted by combining Poisson statistics and a Bayesian interpretation of the maximum entropy approach. A facility for total count preservation has also been incorporated, leading to improved quantification. In order to evaluate this iterative maximum entropy technique, two comparable methods, Wiener filtering and a novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique, were implemented. The comparison of results obtained indicated that this maximum entropy approach may produce equivalent or better measures of image quality than the compared methods, depending upon the accuracy of the system model used. The novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique was shown to be preferable over many existing maximum a posteriori methods due to its simplicity of implementation. A single parameter is required to define the Bayesian prior, which suppresses noise in the solution and may reduce the processing time substantially. Finally, maximum entropy deconvolution was applied as a pre-processing-step in single photon emission computed tomography reconstruction of low count data. Higher contrast results were obtained than those achieved by a Wiener pre-filtering approach and a scatter-subtracted attenuation corrected filtered back projection method. Maximum entropy optimised for low counts holds promise for nuclear medicine applications where counts are necessarily low, and may facilitate reduction of the administered activity for other applications. The algorithm was in fact deemed advantageous for the processing of low count Poisson data in general.

McGrath, Deirdre Maria

140

Benchmarking progress in tackling the challenges of intellectual property, and access to medicines in developing countries.  

PubMed Central

The impact of intellectual property protection in the pharmaceutical sector on developing countries has been a central issue in the fierce debate during the past 10 years in a number of international fora, particularly the World Trade Organization (WTO) and WHO. The debate centres on whether the intellectual property system is: (1) providing sufficient incentives for research and development into medicines for diseases that disproportionately affect developing countries; and (2) restricting access to existing medicines for these countries. The Doha Declaration was adopted at WTO in 2001 and the Commission on Intellectual Property, Innovation and Public Health was established at WHO in 2004, but their respective contributions to tackling intellectual property-related challenges are disputed. Objective parameters are needed to measure whether a particular series of actions, events, decisions or processes contribute to progress in this area. This article proposes six possible benchmarks for intellectual property-related challenges with regard to the development of medicines and ensuring access to medicines in developing countries. PMID:16710545

Musungu, Sisule F.

2006-01-01

141

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01

142

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste\\/rock interactions

A. M. Platt; J. A. Powell

1980-01-01

143

Motion estimation for nuclear medicine: a probabilistic approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate, Respiratory Motion Modelling of the abdominal-thoracic organs serves as a pre-requisite for motion correction of Nuclear Medicine (NM) Images. Many respiratory motion models to date build a static correspondence between a parametrized external surrogate signal and internal motion. Mean drifts in respiratory motion, changes in respiratory style and noise conditions of the external surrogate signal motivates a more adaptive approach to capture non-stationary behavior. To this effect we utilize the application of our novel Kalman model with an incorporated expectation maximization step to allow adaptive learning of model parameters with changing respiratory observations. A comparison is made with a popular total least squares (PCA) based approach. It is demonstrated that in the presence of noisy observations the Kalman framework outperforms the static PCA model, however, both methods correct for respiratory motion in the computational anthropomorphic phantom to < 2mm. Motion correction performed on 3 dynamic MRI patient datasets using the Kalman model results in correction of respiratory motion to ? 3mm.

Smith, Rhodri; Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Jones, John; Tahavori, Fatemeh; Wells, Kevin

2014-03-01

144

Pitfalls in classical nuclear medicine: myocardial perfusion imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scintigraphic imaging is a complex functional procedure subject to a variety of artefacts and pitfalls that may limit its clinical and diagnostic accuracy. It is important to be aware of and to recognize them when present and to eliminate them whenever possible. Pitfalls may occur at any stage of the imaging procedure and can be related with the ?-camera or other equipment, personnel handling, patient preparation, image processing or the procedure itself. Often, potential causes of artefacts and pitfalls may overlap. In this short review, special interest will be given to cardiac scintigraphic imaging. Most common causes of artefact in myocardial perfusion imaging are soft tissue attenuation as well as motion and gating errors. Additionally, clinical problems like cardiac abnormalities may cause interpretation pitfalls and nuclear medicine physicians should be familiar with these in order to ensure the correct evaluation of the study. Artefacts or suboptimal image quality can also result from infiltrated injections, misalignment in patient positioning, power instability or interruption, flood field non-uniformities, cracked crystal and several other technical reasons.

Fragkaki, C.; Giannopoulou, Ch

2011-09-01

145

New filter for iodine applied in nuclear medicine services.  

PubMed

In Nuclear Medicine, radioiodine, in various chemical forms, is a key tracer used in diagnostic practices and/or therapy. Medical professionals may incorporate radioactive iodine during the preparation of the dose to be administered to the patient. In radioactive iodine therapy doses ranging from 3.7 to 7.4 GBq per patient are employed. Thus, aiming at reducing the risk of occupational contamination, we developed a low cost filter to be installed at the exit of the exhaust system (where doses of radioiodine are handled within fume hoods, and new filters will be installed at their exit), using domestic technology. The effectiveness of radioactive iodine retention by silver impregnated silica [10%] crystals and natural activated carbon was verified using radiotracer techniques. The results showed that natural activated carbon and silver impregnated silica are effective for I2 capture with large or small amounts of substrate but the use of activated carbon is restricted due to its low flash point (423 K). Besides, when poisoned by organic solvents, this flash point may become lower, causing explosions if absorbing large amounts of nitrates. To hold the CH3I gas, it was necessary to use natural activated carbon since it was not absorbed by SiO2+Ag crystals. We concluded that, for an exhaust flow range of (145 ± 2)m(3)/h, a double stage filter using SiO2+Ag in the first stage and natural activated carbon in the second stage is sufficient to meet radiological safety requirements. PMID:23974306

Ramos, V S; Crispim, V R; Brandão, L E B

2013-12-01

146

Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects  

PubMed Central

The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 (131I), phosphorous-32 (32P), strontium-90 (90Sr), and yttrium-90 (90Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies. PMID:25294374

Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

2014-01-01

147

Simulation and Optimization Models for Scheduling Multi-step Sequential Procedures in Nuclear Medicine  

E-print Network

with little research attention. In this work we present simulation and optimization models for improving patient and resource scheduling in health care specialty clinics such as nuclear medicine departments. We rst derive a discrete event system speci cation...

Perez Roman, Eduardo

2011-08-08

148

4.8 Dose to Embryo and Foetuses in Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.8 Dose to Embryo and Foetuses in Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

149

Monte Carlo simulation of the dose to nuclear medicine staff wearing protective garments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature contains both endorsements of, and advice against, the use of protective apparel in nuclear medicine procedures.\\u000a The main issues usually centre around: Whether the shielding which can be provided by a protective garment light enough to\\u000a wear (0 to 0.6 mm lead equivalent at the gamma energies commonly encountered in nuclear medicine) is enough to warrant its\\u000a use;

L. S. Fog; P. Collins

2008-01-01

150

Involvement of nuclear NHERF1 in colorectal cancer progression.  

PubMed

NHERF1 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1) is expressed in the luminal membrane of many epithelia, and associated with proteins involved in tumor progression. Alterations of NHERF1 expression in different sites of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) suggest a dynamic role of this protein in colon carcinogenesis. We focused on the observation of the altered expression of NHERF1 from non-neoplastic tissues to metastatic sites by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we studied, by immunofluorescence, the colocalization between NHERF1 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose overexpression is implicated in CRC progression. NHERF1 showed a different localization and expression in the examined sites. The distant non-neoplastic tissues showed NHERF1 mostly expressed at the apical membrane, while in surrounding non-neoplastic tissue decreased the apical membrane and increased cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In adenomas a shift from apical membrane to cytoplasmic localization and nuclear expression were observed. Cytoplasmic staining in the tumor, and metastatic sites was stronger than surrounding non-neoplastic tissue. Furthermore, nuclear NHERF1 expression was noted in 80% of all samples and surprisingly, it appeared already in adenoma lesions, suggesting that NHERF1 represents an early marker of pre-morphological triggering of colorectal carcinogenesis. Then, in few tumors a positive direct correlation between membrane NHERF1 and EGFR expression was evidenced by their colocalization. Nuclear NHERF1 expression, present in the early stages of carcinogenesis and related with poor prognosis, may contribute to the onset of malignant phenotype. Specifically, we hypothesize the direct involvement of nuclear NHERF1 in both carcinogenesis and progression and its role as a potential colorectal cancer marker. PMID:22766563

Mangia, Anita; Saponaro, Concetta; Malfettone, Andrea; Bisceglie, Domenico; Bellizzi, Antonia; Asselti, Mariaconsilia; Popescu, Ondina; Reshkin, Stephan J; Paradiso, Angelo; Simone, Giovanni

2012-09-01

151

Role of nuclear medicine in pulmonary neoplastic processes  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that the single most important factor in determining survival in patients with bronchogenic carcinoma is the extent of spread of metastasis from the primary lesion. This explains the extensive efforts in developing accurate staging tests for pulmonary tumors, both primary and metastatic, with special emphasis on the determination of pulmonary hilar and mediastinal spread of disease. Continued improvements in nuclear medicine instrumentation along with the development of tumor specific radiopharmaceuticals, as well as agents that have the capability of tracking tumor viability, have changed the orientation of scintigraphic techniques in the evaluation of pulmonary neoplastic processes. Gallium scintigraphy is no longer considered as a primary imaging modality in the staging of pulmonary tumors, and in most institutions has been replaced by computed tomography (CT) for this purpose. It has been demonstrated that gallium, relative to other imaging modalities, is a sensitive indicator of hilar spread of tumor. However, because of the normally high background activity within the sternum and spine, mediastinal abnormalities are poorly detected. Since most pulmonary tumors metastasize via regional nodes to the pulmonary hilum and then to the mediastinum, the high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary hilar abnormalities and the high specificity for mediastinal lesion detection suggest that gallium scintigraphy is a valuable adjunctive test when used appropriately. Thallium 201 as a tumor agent is being studied by several institutions. Preliminary results indicate a high degree of sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary hilar and mediastinal lesions and there are early indications that thallium is a promising agent to evaluate tumor viability. 52 references.

Waxman, A.D.

1986-10-01

152

Current progress of nuclear astrophysics experiments at CIAE  

SciTech Connect

This paper described current progress of nuclear astrophysical studies using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE. We measured the angular distributions for some low energy reactions, such as 11C(d,n)12N, 8Li(d,p)9Li and 17F(d,n)18Ne in inverse kinematics, and indirectly derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates of 11C(p,{gamma})12N, 8Li(n,{gamma})9Li, 8B(p,{gamma})9C at astrophysically relevant energies.

Liu Weiping; Li Zhihong; Su Jun; Bai Xixiang; Wang Youbao; Lian Gang; Guo Bing; Zeng Sheng; Yan Shengquan; Wang Baoxiang; Shu Nengchuan; Chen Yongshou [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275(46), Beijing 102413 (China)

2006-07-12

153

Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform  

PubMed Central

Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

2010-01-01

154

Recent Progress on the Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a set of containers for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository of DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This container design, referred to as the standardized DOE SNF canister or standardized canister, was developed by the Department's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Program (NSNFP) working in conjunction with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and the DOE spent fuel sites. This canister had to have a standardized design yet be capable of accepting virtually all of the DOE SNF, be placed in a variety of storage and transportation systems, and still be acceptable to the repository. Since specific design details regarding the storage, transportation, and repository disposal of DOE SNF were not finalized, the NSNFP recognized the necessity to specify a complete DOE SNF canister design. This allowed other evaluations of canister performance and design to proceed as well as providing standardized canister users adequate information to proceed with their work. This paper is an update of a paper presented to the 1999 American Nuclear Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conference. It discusses recent progress achieved in various areas to enhance acceptance of this canister not only by the DOE complex but also fabricators and regulatory agencies.

Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Hill, Thomas Johnathan; Morissette, R. P.

2002-08-01

155

Assessment of radiation safety awareness among nuclear medicine nurses: a pilot study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

All nuclear medicine nurses need to have some knowledge and awareness on radiation safety. At present, there is no study to address this issue in Malaysia. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the level of knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among nuclear medicine nurses at Putrajaya Hospital in Malaysia and (2) to assess the effectiveness of a training program provided by the hospital to increase the knowledge and awareness of the nuclear medicine nurses. A total of 27 respondents attending a training program on radiation safety were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire consists 16 items and were categorized into two main areas, namely general radiation knowledge and radiation safety. Survey data were collected before and after the training and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Respondents were scored out of a total of 16 marks with 8 marks for each area. The findings showed that the range of total scores obtained by the nuclear medicine nurses before and after the training were 6-14 (with a mean score of 11.19) and 13-16 marks (with a mean score of 14.85), respectively. Findings also revealed that the mean score for the area of general radiation knowledge (7.59) was higher than that of the radiation safety (7.26). Currently, the knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among the nuclear medicine nurses are at the moderate level. It is recommended that a national study be conducted to assess and increase the level of knowledge and awareness among all nuclear medicine nurses in Malaysia.

Yunus, N. A.; Abdullah, M. H. R. O.; Said, M. A.; Ch'ng, P. E.

2014-11-01

156

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1981-03-01

157

[Current problems of data processing in clinical nuclear medicine. Symposium of Rhine-Westphalian Society for Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, Dezember 7, 1974].  

PubMed

Practical aspects of the use of computer systems in Nuclear Medicine were discussed in a symposium sponsored by the "Rheinisch-Westfälische Gesellschaft für Nuklearmedizin" which was held at Bonn in December '74. In the opening session the president of the Society, Prof. Winkler (Bonn), gave a brief survey upon the development of data processing procedures for radionuclide diagnostics. He pointed out that at present computer application is not only of essential significance for camera scintigraphy but also for most of the other test methods as well as for the solution of organizing problems when running departments of Nuclear Medicine. For the performance of all these tasks and also for scientific purposes a special process control computer system has been developed in the Institute of Nuclear Medicine at the University of Bonn. A detailed description of this system was given by R. Knopp (Bonn). He emphasized in his paper that the rather bulky Bonn System, which consists of a dual computer (Siemens 305/306) and an extensive operating system, can not be regarded as a standard device for routine use in hospitals. However, on the basis of experiences which have been gathered on hand of the research system in Bonn efforts are in full activity for developing a compact Nuclear Medicine Computer system (CNMCS) suitable for the application within departments of any size. The CNMCS (which will be commercially available in the near future) is based on a 64 K, 16 bit central unit with a highly flexible operating system which permits a simultaneous multi user application of the computer. For CNMCS a comprehensive user software package will be at the clinician's disposal which can be easily handled. PMID:1101220

Biersack, H J

1975-06-30

158

Biological dose assessment after low-dose overexposures in nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on the application of dicentric chromosome assay biodosimetry in cases of low-dose overexposures to professionals working in nuclear medicine and discusses how to present the results and associated uncertainties, to make possible a better understanding of biodosimetric reports. Five examples are presented of low or possibly zero exposure dose that are illustrative of typical problems that arise in occupational settings, in this instance in nuclear medicine departments. This is a scenario of minor concern in terms of health consequences but it is relevant in legal terms. They pose dilemmas for investigators but biological dosimetry can make a valuable contribution to resolving the cases. PMID:24225496

Pinto, Marcela; Amaral, Ademir

2014-12-01

159

Tracking patient radiation exposure: challenges to integrating nuclear medicine with other modalities  

PubMed Central

The cumulative radiation exposure to the patient from multiple radiological procedures can place some individuals at significantly increased risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. Approaches, such as those in the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Smart Card program, have been developed to track cumulative radiation exposures to individuals. These strategies often rely on the availability of structured dose reports, typically found in the DICOM header. Dosimetry information is currently readily available for many individual x-ray based procedures. Nuclear medicine, of which nuclear cardiology constitutes the majority of the radiation burden in the U.S., currently lags behind x-ray based procedures with respect to reporting of radiation dosimetric information. This paper discusses qualitative differences between nuclear medicine and x-ray based procedures, including differences in the radiation source and measurement of its strength, the impact of biokinetics on dosimetry, and the capability of current scanners to record dosimetry information. These differences create challenges in applying monitoring and reporting strategies used in x-ray based procedures to nuclear medicine, and integrating dosimetry information across modalities. A concerted effort by the medical imaging community, dosimetry specialists and manufacturers of imaging equipment is required to develop strategies to improve the reporting of radiation dosimetry data in nuclear medicine. Some ideas on how to address this issue are suggested. PMID:22695788

Mercuri, Mathew; Rehani, Madan M.; Einstein, Andrew J.

2013-01-01

160

Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the ..pi.. beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of ..pi..-..gamma.. angular correlations, low energy ..pi..-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies.

Not Available

1976-11-01

161

Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Progress in Nuclear Energy journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/pnucene Comparison of thorium-based fuels Fhager a , Christophe Demazière b a Thor Energy, Sommerrogaten 13 15, NO-0255 Oslo, Norway b Chalmers

Demazière, Christophe

162

Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics 73 (2013) 134 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics 73 (2013) 1­34 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ppnp Review Geo field between Geology and Physics: the study of the Earth's geo-neutrino flux. We describe competing

Mcdonough, William F.

163

Prognostic Ability of Practitioners of Traditional Arabic Medicine: Comparison with Western Methods Through a Relative Patient Progress Scale  

PubMed Central

The ancient Greek medical theory based on balance or imbalance of humors disappeared in the western world, but does survive elsewhere. Is this survival related to a certain degree of health care efficiency? We explored this hypothesis through a study of classical Greco-Arab medicine in Mauritania. Modern general practitioners evaluated the safety and effectiveness of classical Arabic medicine in a Mauritanian traditional clinic, with a prognosis/follow-up method allowing the following comparisons: (i) actual patient progress (clinical outcome) compared with what the traditional ‘tabib’ had anticipated (= prognostic ability) and (ii) patient progress compared with what could be hoped for if the patient were treated by a modern physician in the same neighborhood. The practice appeared fairly safe and, on average, clinical outcome was similar to what could be expected with modern medicine. In some cases, patient progress was better than expected. The ability to correctly predict an individual's clinical outcome did not seem to be better along modern or Greco-Arab theories. Weekly joint meetings (modern and traditional practitioners) were spontaneously organized with a modern health centre in the neighborhood. Practitioners of a different medical system can predict patient progress. For the patient, avoiding false expectations with health care and ensuring appropriate referral may be the most important. Prognosis and outcome studies such as the one presented here may help to develop institutions where patients find support in making their choices, not only among several treatment options, but also among several medical systems. PMID:18955326

2010-01-01

164

Solid Tumor-Targeting Theranostic Polymer Nanoparticle in Nuclear Medicinal Fields  

PubMed Central

Polymer nanoparticles can be prepared by self-assembling of amphiphilic polymers, and various types of molecular assemblies have been reported. In particular, in medicinal fields, utilization of these polymer nanoparticles as carriers for drug delivery system (DDS) has been actively tried, and some nanoparticulate drugs are currently under preclinical evaluations. A radionuclide is an unstable nucleus and decays with emission of radioactive rays, which can be utilized as a tracer in the diagnostic imaging systems of PET and SPECT and also in therapeutic purposes. Since polymer nanoparticles can encapsulate most of diagnostic and therapeutic agents with a proper design of amphiphilic polymers, they should be effective DDS carriers of radionuclides in the nuclear medicinal field. Indeed, nanoparticles have been recently attracting much attention as common platform carriers for diagnostic and therapeutic drugs and contribute to the development of nanotheranostics. In this paper, recent developments of solid tumor-targeting polymer nanoparticles in nuclear medicinal fields are reviewed. PMID:25379530

Makino, Akira; Kimura, Shunsaku

2014-01-01

165

Medicinally important secondary metabolites in recombinant microorganisms or plants: progress in alkaloid biosynthesis.  

PubMed

Plants produce a high diversity of natural products or secondary metabolites which are important for the communication of plants with other organisms. A prominent function is the protection against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens. Some natural products are also involved in defence against abiotic stress, e.g. UV-B exposure. Many of the secondary metabolites have interesting biological properties and quite a number are of medicinal importance. Because the production of the valuable natural products, such as the anticancer drugs paclitaxel, vinblastine or camptothecin in plants is a costly process, biotechnological alternatives to produce these alkaloids more economically become increasingly important. This review provides an overview of the state of art to produce alkaloids in recombinant microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeast. Some progress has been made in metabolic engineering usually employing a single recombinant alkaloid gene. More importantly, for benzylisoquinoline, monoterpene indole and diterpene alkaloids (taxanes) as well as some terpenoids and phenolics the proof of concept for production of complex alkaloids in recombinant Escherichia coli and yeast has already been achieved. In a long-term perspective, it will probably be possible to generate gene cassettes for complete pathways, which could then be used for production of valuable natural products in bioreactors or for metabolic engineering of crop plants. This will improve their resistance against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens. PMID:19946877

Schäfer, Holger; Wink, Michael

2009-12-01

166

Liposomes: A Novel Option in Nuclear Medicine for Diagnostic Imaging and Internal Therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we review some of the more relevant characteristics that are required for the use of liposomes as carriers of radionuclides in nuclear medicine for diagnostic imaging and internal therapy. We also present a general description of the dosimetric methodology required for the use of liposomes as carriers of charge-particle-emitting radionuclides for radiotherapeutic purposes.

Medina, Luis A.; Goins, Beth

2002-08-01

167

Assessment of metabolic bone disease: review of new nuclear medicine procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the management of patients with metabolic bone disease, nuclear medicine laboratories offer two nontraumatic procedures of potential clinical importance: bone mineral measurements and bone scintigraphy. Bone mineral measurements from the radius, lumbar spine, and hip obtained with use of absorptiometry or computed tomography can be used to predict the risk of fracture at these skeletal sites, can determine the

Wahner

1985-01-01

168

Estimated collective effective dose to the population from nuclear medicine examinations in Slovenia  

PubMed Central

Background A national survey of patient exposure from nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures was performed by Slovenian Radiation Protection Administration in order to estimate their contribution to the collective effective dose to the population of Slovenia. Methods A set of 36 examinations with the highest contributions to the collective effective dose was identified. Data about frequencies and average administered activities of radioisotopes used for those examinations were collected from all nuclear medicine departments in Slovenia. A collective effective dose to the population and an effective dose per capita were estimated from the collected data using dose conversion factors. Results The total collective effective dose to the population from nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures in 2011 was estimated to 102 manSv, giving an effective dose per capita of 0.05 mSv. Conclusions The comparison of results of this study with studies performed in other countries indicates that the nuclear medicine providers in Slovenia are well aware of the importance of patient protection measures and of optimisation of procedures. PMID:24133396

Skrk, Damijan; Zontar, Dejan

2013-01-01

169

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMHO] Regional College Catalog Hours] Note: Students must have graduated from a hospital-based certificate program in radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

170

Recent progress in EDF-based methods applied to nuclear properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent results obtained with energy density functional (EDF) based methods are presented, focused on the nuclear phenomenology. EDF approaches aim for an universal description of the nuclear phenomena over the nuclear chart. Achievements from large to small nuclear systems are depicted: equation of state of nuclear matter, heavy and light nuclei. Dynamical aspects such as nuclear excitations, decay and reactions are also presented. EDF methods are progressing towards an unified and systematic description of the rich variety of the nuclear phenomena such as quantum liquid and cluster states, or nuclear structure and reactions.

Khan, E.

2014-03-01

171

PACS in clinical neuroradiology, nuclear medicine, and teleradiology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PACS research and development efforts at the University of Florida, Department of Radiology have been directed solely toward solving clinical problems with an objective of incorporating successful products or improving the functionality, performance, and reliability of the system. This paper describes the current network and system, experiences with system upgrades and changed, quality control measures used to verify that the system is operational, and current works in progress.

Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Drane, Walter E.; Mancuso, Anthony A.; Quisling, Ronald G.; Peters, Keith R.; Litwiller, Anthony L.; Staab, Edward V.

1992-07-01

172

[Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary  

SciTech Connect

The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p), {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}), comparison of the {sup 12}C(e, e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) reactions, quadrupole strength in the {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}{alpha}{sub 0}) reaction, quadrupole strength in the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}{alpha}) reaction, analysis of the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 1}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) angular distributions, analysis of the {sup 40}Ca(e,e{prime}x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

Not Available

1992-12-31

173

Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.  

PubMed

The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm. PMID:23948309

de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

2013-12-01

174

Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of (F18)fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), (F18)fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of (F18)-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

1992-06-01

175

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics  

E-print Network

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics Contract Number DE-FG02-96ER40980 Title: Nuclear and Particle Physics Research at the University. The experimental work is part of the electromagnetic nuclear physics program in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson

Gilfoyle, Jerry

176

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics  

E-print Network

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics Contract Number DE-FG02-96ER40980 Title: Nuclear and Particle Physics Research at the University Jordan, Matt King, and Mark Moog) worked in Gilfoyle's nuclear physics lab at the University of Richmond

Gilfoyle, Jerry

177

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics  

E-print Network

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics Contract Number DE-FG02-96ER40980 Title: Nuclear and Particle Physics Research at the University's nuclear physics lab at the University of Richmond. One of these students presented his work at the Fall

Gilfoyle, Jerry

178

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics  

E-print Network

Continuation Progress Report Submitted to the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics Contract Number DE-FG02-96ER40980 Title: Nuclear and Particle Physics Research at the University. The experimental work described here is part of the electromagnetic nuclear physics program in Hall B at the Thomas

Gilfoyle, Jerry

179

Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner  

SciTech Connect

In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

Yalow, R.S.

1995-12-01

180

Nuclear medicine in urological cancers: what is new?  

PubMed

The diffusion of PET/computed tomography has opened up a new role for nuclear imaging in urological oncology. Prostate cancer is evaluated with choline ((11)C or (18)F) PET due to a lack of sensitivity of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, many new tracers, such as (18)F-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid and (68)Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen, are under investigation, offering promising results in the particular setting of radically treated patients with biochemical relapse. The performance of (18)F-FDG depends on the histological type; indeed, renal cell cancer may present variable metabolic uptake. In this field, mainly antibodies labeled with positron emitters are under clinical evaluation. Finally, (18)F-FDG PET/computed tomography has been proven to show good accuracy in detecting metastatic testicular and bladder cancers, despite not having valid results in detecting local disease. The urological cancer diagnostic process is currently under continuous development. PMID:25396777

Nanni, Cristina; Zanoni, Lucia; Fanti, Stefano

2014-10-01

181

Physical dosimetry and mathematical dose calculation in nuclear medicine: A comparative study  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This paper addresses a comparison between physical dosimetry and mathematical dose calculation in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: Dose rate was calculated by mathematical external dose calculation formula and by physical dosimetry from the surface of 38 adult patients’ body referred to nuclear medicine department. Results of the methods were compared and correlation and regression tests were also performed. Results: Although the physical dosimetry data in this study are in good consistency with other researches, they are much lower than the results of mathematical dose calculation formula. The correlation coefficient between measured dose rate with calculated values derived by mathematical formula was found to be 0.852 (P value=0.148). Conclusion: It seems that physical dosimetry data are more accurate than the results of mathematical dose calculation. In case of using mathematical dose calculation formula, other correction factors should be considered and applied for getting reliable data. PMID:20844662

Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Amiri, Mehrangiz

2010-01-01

182

Accurate modeling of nuclear-medicine collimators in Monte Carlo simulation of high-energy photons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of nuclear medicine imaging is more difficult for procedures employing 131I than for those using 99mTc because of the higher probability of collimator penetration for the higher-energy 131I gamma. Additionally, an accurate model of the imaging camera must also simulate the scattering and penetration of photons emitted above the 364 keV photo peak (637 keV (6.5%) and 723 keV (1.7%)). Most MC codes used in nuclear medicine either employ severe approximations of the collimator interactions or have not been extended to higher energies. The MC program SKEPTIC, which has previously been used to simulate slit aperture penetration of 511 keV gammas, has been modified to permit modeling of parallel hole collimators. We present here a comparison of measured and simulated energy spectra and point spread functions for 131I.

Wilderman, S. J.; Dewaraja, Y.; Koral, K. F.

1999-02-01

183

Experience In The Integration Of A Nuclear Medicine PACS Into A PACS Radiology System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A local Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) has been operational in the Division of Nuclear Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital for the past five years. Recently, it has been interfaced to a total PACS which is based on different hardware and software. Using this hybrid system, we describe our initial efforts to facilitate the short and long term archiving of NM studies and the use of combined image displays for correlative image analysis.

Tobes, Michael C.; Stahl, Theodore J.; Dasika, Rao

1988-06-01

184

Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by stannous chloride associated to nuclear medicine kits  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present, more than 75% of routine nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures use technetium-99m (99mTc). The binding between 99mTc and the drug to obtain the radiopharmaceutical needs a reducing agent, with stannous chloride (SnCl2) being one of the most used. There are controversies about the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of SnCl2 in the literature. Thus, the approaches below were used

Anderson P. Guedes; Valbert N. Cardoso; Jose C. P. De Mattos; Flavio J. S. Dantas; Vanessa C. Matos; Josiane C. F. Silva; Roberto J. A. C. Bezerra; Adriano Caldeira-de-Araujo

2006-01-01

185

Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3(NOTE: Part II A item 1 indicates ''PAPER'', but a report is attached electronically)

Ulm, Franz-Josef

2000-03-31

186

Measurements of finger doses in x-ray guided surgery, nuclear medicine and research.  

PubMed

The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has performed measurements of finger doses to nuclear medicine staff exposed to 99Tc(m), researchers handling 32P, surgeons performing X-ray guided orthopaedic surgery and surgeons and radiologists performing X-ray guided endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Calibrations were done with X-ray qualities N-40, N-60 and N-300 and with the beta source 90Sr + 90Y. Annual doses were estimated for the nuclear medicine staff and the orthopaedic surgeons. The mean annual finger dose to nuclear medicine staff exposed to 99Tc(m) was estimated to be 18.8 mSv, and the mean annual finger dose to surgeons performing X-ray guided orthopaedic surgery was 13.7 mSv. The surgeons and radiologists performing X-ray guided endovascular treatment of AAA received a mean finger dose of 0.35 mSv per treatment. The majority of researchers handling 32P received no finger dose at all, and the maximum reading was 1.65 mSv. All occupational groups received finger doses well below the annual finger dose limit of 500 mSv. PMID:15817576

Saether, H K; Davidson, T-M; Widmark, A; Wøhni, T

2005-01-01

187

Applied Nuclear Science Research and Development progress report, June 1, 1984-May 31, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes the activities of the Los Alamos Applied Nuclear Science Group for June 1, 1984 through May 31, 1985. The topical content includes the theory and evaluation of nuclear cross sections; neutron cross section processing and testing; neutron activation, fission products and actinides; and core neutronics code development and application. 70 refs., 31 figs., 15 tabs. (WRF)

Arthur, E.D.; Mutschlecner, A.D. (comps.)

1985-09-01

188

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01

189

Nuclear waste programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Programs of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1991-March 1992. In these programs, studies are underway on the performance of waste glass and spent fuel in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories

Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Emery, J.W.; Feng, X.; Finn, P.A.; Gerding, T.J.; Hoh, J.C. [and others

1993-11-01

190

Nuclear Waste Programs semiannual progress report, April--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Programs of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1992. In these programs, studies are underway on the performance of waste glass and spent fuel in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C. [and others

1994-05-01

191

Research progress of nuclear, biological and chemical polluted water treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a major victim of the biochemical warfare in the history, China is confronting the threat of new nuclear, chemical and biological warfare nowadays. Water is the main transmission mode of nuclear, chemical and biological warfare agent. Therefore pure water treatment becomes an important mode of Three Defenses. This paper mainly introduces the characteristics of chemical and biological pollution, the

Wang Xiaojie; Li Xiaojing; Ji Yunzhe

2011-01-01

192

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1982-March 1983  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of a series of technical progress reports designed to report radioactive waste management programs at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Accomplishments in the following programs are reported: waste stabilization; Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; low-level waste management; remedial action; and supporting studies.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1983-06-01

193

Monte Carlo simulation of the dose to nuclear medicine staff wearing protective garments.  

PubMed

The literature contains both endorsements of, and advice against, the use of protective apparel in nuclear medicine procedures. The main issues usually centre around: Whether the shielding which can be provided by a protective garment light enough to wear (0 to 0.6 mm lead equivalent at the gamma energies commonly encountered in nuclear medicine) is enough to warrant its use; and (more recently); Whether the dose enhancement behind the protective garment from electron scatter in lead is sufficient to be of concern. In this work, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to investigate the effectiveness of lead of thicknesses of 0 to 0.6 mm, in shielding staff from photons of energies of 140 and 511 keV. Furthermore, dose escalation behind the lead was investigated. Reasonable dose reductions are obtained at 140 keV with protective garments of 0.5 mm lead equivalence. This perhaps warrants their use, in certain circumstances. At 511 keV, the reduction in dose is less than 10%, and their use is probably not justified (given the weight that has to be carried) from an ALARA point of view. It should be noted here that protective garments designed for X-ray shielding will generally not have the same lead equivalence at the gamma energies used in nuclear medicine. It should also be noted that protective garments which do not contain lead do not always attenuate as much as their stated lead equivalence claims. Dose escalation does occur, but the depth of penetration of the scattered electrons beyond the exit side of the lead shielding is such that it is highly unlikely that a significant dose would be delivered to viable tissue in wearers of protective garments. PMID:19239057

Fog, L S; Collins, P

2008-12-01

194

Three years' experience with an all-digital nuclear medicine department.  

PubMed

We describe our all-digital, filmless, department of nuclear medicine, which has been fully operational for 3 years. The approach to the design and implementation of a nuclear medicine picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is discussed, as well as enhancements found to be necessary or desirable during our 3 years of experience using the system. Studies are initially viewed on remote monitors in the reading room, and transferred from multiple vendor's computers to the PACS by floppy disc network. Scans are analyzed on networked image workstations using a variety of software imaging tools. Reports are dictated into a digital voice storage system, allowing the referring physician immediate telephone access. The dictated report is typed into a computer, electronically edited, reviewed, billed, and printed for appropriate distribution on an integrated medical information system. The final report is stored on the PACS, along with the scan image and other patient information on 1-gigabyte removable optical discs. Two networked optical disc drives allow us to have approximately 3 years of our department's studies available instantly, allowing recall of previous studies for comparison with the current scan. Emergency night and weekend studies are sent via modern over normal phone lines to the on-call physician, who has a similar image workstation at home. Digital image storage allows for easy manipulation of the data, such as gray scale manipulation and cine (movie) display. Cost analysis shows significant savings compared with a film-based department. We conclude that an all-digital nuclear medicine department is practical, cost effective, and beneficial to both patients and staff. PMID:2367870

Cohen, A M; Parker, J A; Donohoe, K; Jansons, D; Kolodny, G M

1990-07-01

195

Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL  

SciTech Connect

Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

Kwan, Joe W.

2002-05-31

196

A strategy for intensive production of molybdenum-99 isotopes for nuclear medicine using CANDU reactors.  

PubMed

Technetium-99m is an important medical isotope utilized worldwide in nuclear medicine and is produced from the decay of its parent isotope, molybdenum-99. The online fueling capability and compact fuel of the CANDU(®)(1) reactor allows for the potential production of large quantities of (99)Mo. This paper proposes (99)Mo production strategies using modified target fuel bundles loaded into CANDU fuel channels. Using a small group of channels a yield of 89-113% of the weekly world demand for (99)Mo can be obtained. PMID:21816619

Morreale, A C; Novog, D R; Luxat, J C

2012-01-01

197

Detection of thoracic infections by nuclear medicine techniques in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome  

SciTech Connect

The challenge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for nuclear medicine has been the early detection of related intrathoracic opportunistic infections, inflammatory conditions, and neoplasms. Gallium-67 citrate scanning has proved a sensitive test not only for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia but for many of the other opportunistic infections and malignancies, including mycobacterial infections and lymphoma. Patterns and intensity of gallium uptake may suggest more specific diagnoses. Indium-111-labeled white blood cells may also be a valuable diagnostic tool in the AIDS patient.41 references.

Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

1989-11-01

198

Genetic alterations and personalized medicine in melanoma: progress and future prospects.  

PubMed

High-throughput sequencing technologies are providing new insights into the genetic alterations involved in melanomagenesis. It appears likely that most genetic events important in the pathogenesis of melanoma will be discovered over the next few years. Genetic analysis is also increasingly being used to direct patient care. In parallel with the discovery of new genes and the elucidation of molecular pathways important in the development of melanoma, therapies targeting these pathways are becoming available. In other words, the age of personalized medicine has arrived, characterized by molecular profiling of melanoma to identify the relevant genetic alterations and the abnormal signaling mechanisms involved, followed by selection of optimal, individualized therapies. In this review, we summarize the key genetic alterations in melanoma and the development of targeted agents against melanomas bearing specific mutations. These developments in melanoma serve as a model for the implementation of personalized medicine for patients with all cancers. PMID:24511108

Griewank, Klaus G; Scolyer, Richard A; Thompson, John F; Flaherty, Keith T; Schadendorf, Dirk; Murali, Rajmohan

2014-02-01

199

Development Progress of the GAIA Nuclear Data Processing Software  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides a general status of the development of GAIA, a new nuclear data processing software. The first part mainly focuses on the concrete developments for resonance reconstruction in the general R-matrix formalism. Then the second part is about a new method for Doppler broadening using Fourier transform.

Ferran, G.; Haeck, W.; Gonin, M.

2014-04-01

200

[Research in theoretical nuclear and subnuclear physics]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Sergei Ananyan has completed one nice piece of nuclear physics on ``Electroweak Processes Involving (0{sup +}0) Excitations in Nuclei`` and has written this work up for publication. He is well into his main thesis problem on weak axial vector exchange currents and already has some very interesting new results. Bryan Barmore is now finishing numerical calculations on the problem of radiating meson fields in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Gary Prezeau has just started on the problem of chiral QHD with vector mesons. Gary should finish his Ph.D. in 1998. A PC has been purchased for the group through CEBAF and they are now tied into the CEBAF computer system., They have organized a Nuclear Theory Study Group in the Department and last year they worked through the books on ``Computational Nuclear Physics.`` Next year they will run a series on effective field theories and chiral perturbation theory. Tod Bachman just completed a senior thesis on relativistic Hartree calculations of the newly-found doubly magic nuclei {sup 100}Sn and {sup 132}Sn. The book on ``Theoretical Nuclear and Subnuclear Physics`` has now been published by Oxford Press. Also included here is the proposal for renewal of the contract.

NONE

1997-12-31

201

Space Nuclear Safety Program. Progress report, April 1984  

SciTech Connect

This technical monthly report covers studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Covered are: general-purpose heat source testing and recovery, and safety technology program (biaxial testing, iridium chemistry).

George, T.G. (comp.)

1985-10-01

202

Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.  

PubMed

A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist in improving the accuracy and tractability of dose and shielding calculations for nuclear medicine facility design. PMID:24849904

Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

2014-07-01

203

Depicting Medullary Thyroid Cancer Recurrence: The Past and the Future of Nuclear Medicine Imaging  

PubMed Central

Context: Inherited and sporadic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an uncommon and medically challenging malignancy. Even if the extent of initial surgery is deemed adequate, the recurrence rate remains high, up to 50% in most series. Measurement of serum calcitonin is important in the follow-up of patients with MTC, and reliably reflects the existence of the disease. Evidence Acquisition: There is no single sensitive diagnostic imaging method to reveal all MTC recurrences or metastases. Conventional morphologic imaging methods (U/S, CT, and MRI) and several methods of nuclear medicine have been used for this purpose with variable accuracy. Results: The main role of nuclear medicine imaging is the detection of residual or recurrent tumor in the postoperative follow-up. In this review we present the radiopharmaceuticals used in the diagnosis of MTC recurrence, and comparison among them. Conclusions: The most used radiopharmaceuticals labelled with ? emitters are: Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), labelled with 131I or 123I, 111In-pentetreotide (Octreoscan), 99mTc-pentavalent dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc(V)-DMSA), and 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide ( Tektrotyd). The radiopharmaceuticals labelled with a positron-emitting radionuclide (?+), suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA), and 68Ga-labelled somatostatin analogues (68Ga-DOTATATE or DOTATOC). PMID:24719630

Skoura, Evangelia

2013-01-01

204

Radiation accidents and their management: emphasis on the role of nuclear medicine professionals.  

PubMed

Large-scale radiation accidents are few in number, but those that have occurred have subsequently led to strict regulation in most countries. Here, different accident scenarios involving exposure to radiation have been reviewed. A triage of injured persons has been summarized and guidance on management has been provided in accordance with the early symptoms. Types of casualty to be expected in atomic blasts have been discussed. Management at the scene of an accident has been described, with explanation of the role of the radiation protection officer, the nature of contaminants, and monitoring for surface contamination. Methods for early diagnosis of radiation injuries have been then described. The need for individualization of treatment according to the nature and grade of the combined injuries has been emphasized, and different approaches to the treatment of internal contamination have been presented. The role of nuclear medicine professionals, including physicians and physicists, has been reviewed. It has been concluded that the management of radiation accidents is a very challenging process and that nuclear medicine physicians have to be well organized in order to deliver suitable management in any type of radiation accident. PMID:25004166

Bomanji, Jamshed B; Novruzov, Fuad; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

2014-10-01

205

Automated motion correction based on target tracking for dynamic nuclear medicine studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear medicine dynamic studies of kidneys, bladder and stomach are important diagnostic tools. Accurate generation of time-activity curves from regions of interest (ROIs) requires that the patient remains motionless for the duration of the study. This is not always possible since some dynamic studies may last from several minutes to one hour. Several motion correction solutions have been explored. Motion correction using external point sources is inconvenient and not accurate especially when motion results from breathing, organ motion or feeding rather than from body motion alone. Centroid-based motion correction assumes that activity distribution is only inside the single organ (without background) and uniform, but this approach is impractical in most clinical studies. In this paper, we present a novel technique of motion correction that first tracks the organ of interest in a dynamic series then aligns the organ. The implementation algorithm for target tracking-based motion correction consists of image preprocessing, target detection, target positioning, motion estimation and prediction, tracking (new search region generation) and target alignment. The targeted organ is tracked from the first frame to the last one in the dynamic series to generate a moving trajectory of the organ. Motion correction is implemented by aligning the organ ROIs in the image series to the location of the organ in the first image. The proposed method of motion correction has been applied to several dynamic nuclear medicine studies including radionuclide cystography, dynamic renal scintigraphy, diuretic renography and gastric emptying scintigraphy.

Cao, Xinhua; Tetrault, Tracy; Fahey, Fred; Treves, Ted

2008-03-01

206

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment

A. M. Platt; J. A. Powell

1980-01-01

207

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste

T. D. Chikalla; J. A. Powell

1981-01-01

208

Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1990--March 1991. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transpose of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

NONE

1992-12-01

209

Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs.

Harmon, J.E. [ed.

1990-12-01

210

Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

Harmon, J.E. [ed.

1992-06-01

211

Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

1992-06-01

212

Nuclear technology programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1989--March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

Harmon, J.E. [ed.

1992-01-01

213

Nuclear technology programs. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April through September 1991. These programs involve R & D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

Not Available

1993-07-01

214

BOOK REVIEW: Therapeutic Applications of Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

H Zaidi and G Sgouros (eds) Bristol: Institute of Physics Publishing (2002) £70.00, ISBN: 0750308168 Monte Carlo techniques are involved in many applications in medical physics, and the field of nuclear medicine has seen a great development in the past ten years due to their wider use. Thus, it is of great interest to look at the state of the art in this domain, when improving computer performances allow one to obtain improved results in a dramatically reduced time. The goal of this book is to make, in 15 chapters, an exhaustive review of the use of Monte Carlo techniques in nuclear medicine, also giving key features which are not necessary directly related to the Monte Carlo method, but mandatory for its practical application. As the book deals with `therapeutic' nuclear medicine, it focuses on internal dosimetry. After a general introduction on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications in nuclear medicine (dosimetry, imaging and radiation protection), the authors give an overview of internal dosimetry methods (formalism, mathematical phantoms, quantities of interest). Then, some of the more widely used Monte Carlo codes are described, as well as some treatment planning softwares. Some original techniques are also mentioned, such as dosimetry for boron neutron capture synovectomy. It is generally well written, clearly presented, and very well documented. Each chapter gives an overview of each subject, and it is up to the reader to investigate it further using the extensive bibliography provided. Each topic is discussed from a practical point of view, which is of great help for non-experienced readers. For instance, the chapter about mathematical aspects of Monte Carlo particle transport is very clear and helps one to apprehend the philosophy of the method, which is often a difficulty with a more theoretical approach. Each chapter is put in the general (clinical) context, and this allows the reader to keep in mind the intrinsic limitation of each technique involved in dosimetry (for instance activity quantitation). Nevertheless, there are some minor remarks to be made, about the goal and general organization of the discussion. First, the book could not be considered to be strictly about the Monte Carlo method, but maybe also internal dosimetry and related Monte Carlo issues. Then, it must be noted that the discussion would sometimes have been clearer if SI units had been used instead of rad, or mCi, especially for European readers. There are some confusing features, which could lead to misconceptions, since sometimes authors refer to treatment planning softwares as Monte Carlo codes. If the precious contribution of a software like MIRDOSE to the field of radiation protection dosimetry must be underlined, it should not be considered, strictly speaking, as a Monte Carlo code. It would have been more interesting and relevant to provide a more exhaustive review of Monte Carlo codes (history of the code, transport algorithm, pros and cons), and to make a separate chapter for treatment planning and radiation protection softwares (3D-ID, MABDOS, MIRDOSE3) which are of clinical routine interest. However, this book is very interesting, of practical interest, and it should have its utility in all modern nuclear medicine departments interested in dosimetry, providing up-to-date data and references. It should be viewed as a good and well-documented handbook, or as a general introduction for beginners and students.

Coulot, J.

2003-08-01

215

Progress in Understanding the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level  

SciTech Connect

At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions.

A.W. Thomas; P.A.M. Guichon

2007-01-03

216

Identifying disease mutations in genomic medicine settings: current challenges and how to accelerate progress  

PubMed Central

The pace of exome and genome sequencing is accelerating, with the identification of many new disease-causing mutations in research settings, and it is likely that whole exome or genome sequencing could have a major impact in the clinical arena in the relatively near future. However, the human genomics community is currently facing several challenges, including phenotyping, sample collection, sequencing strategies, bioinformatics analysis, biological validation of variant function, clinical interpretation and validity of variant data, and delivery of genomic information to various constituents. Here we review these challenges and summarize the bottlenecks for the clinical application of exome and genome sequencing, and we discuss ways for moving the field forward. In particular, we urge the need for clinical-grade sample collection, high-quality sequencing data acquisition, digitalized phenotyping, rigorous generation of variant calls, and comprehensive functional annotation of variants. Additionally, we suggest that a 'networking of science' model that encourages much more collaboration and online sharing of medical history, genomic data and biological knowledge, including among research participants and consumers/patients, will help establish causation and penetrance for disease causal variants and genes. As we enter this new era of genomic medicine, we envision that consumer-driven and consumer-oriented efforts will take center stage, thus allowing insights from the human genome project to translate directly back into individualized medicine. PMID:22830651

2012-01-01

217

Global threat reduction initiative Russian nuclear material removal progress  

SciTech Connect

In December 1999 representatives from the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started discussing a program to return to Russia Soviet- or Russian-supplied highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel stored at the Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia. Trilateral discussions among the United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have identified more than 20 research reactors in 17 countries that have Soviet- or Russian-supplied HEU fuel. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program is an important aspect of the U.S. Government's commitment to cooperate with the other nations to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and weapons-usable proliferation-attractive nuclear materials. To date, 496 kilograms of Russian-origin HEU have been shipped to Russia from Serbia, Latvia, Libya, Uzbekistan, Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Germany, and the Czech Republic. The pilot spent fuel shipment from Uzbekistan to Russia was completed in April 2006. (author)

Cummins, Kelly [DOE/NNSA (United States); Bolshinsky, Igor [INL/NNSA (United States)

2008-07-15

218

Intermediate/high energy nuclear physics. Technical progress report, June 15, 1991--June 14, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses progress on the following research: quark cluster model; solving quantum field theories in non-perturbative regime;relativistic wave equations, quarkonia and electron-positron resonances; nuclear dependence at large transverse momentum; factorization at the order of power corrections; single-spin asymmetries; and hadronic photon production. (LSP)

Vary, J.P.

1992-07-01

219

From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells.  

PubMed

Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs). They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin-pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined. PMID:25506228

Xiao, Li; Nasu, Masanori

2014-01-01

220

Research in nuclear chemistry. Progress report. [Bio Rex-70  

SciTech Connect

The research is concerned primarily with complexes in aqueous solution of actinide elements. Actinides in the trivalent oxidation state have been studied more than species in other valence states. Similar systems have also been investigated for the trivalent lanthanides. Since 15 lanthanides can be studied using a wider variety of techniques than feasible with the actinides (e.g., NMR), comparison of these closely related families of elements using the greater amount and variety of lanthanide data provides better understanding of actinide behavior. The studies have included measurements of the thermodynamic parameters of complexation for both inorganic and organic ligands, of the kinetics of complexation, of the spectroscopic properties of complex species using f reverse arrow f electronic transitions, of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the complexed ligands and of binding to natural polyelectrolytes such as humic acid.

Choppin, Gregory R.

1980-01-01

221

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01

222

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

1981-09-01

223

Nuclear medicine and the failed joint replacement: Past, present, and future  

PubMed Central

Soon after the introduction of the modern prosthetic joint, it was recognized that radionuclide imaging provides useful information about these devices. The bone scan was used extensively to identify causes of prosthetic joint failure. It became apparent, however, that although sensitive, regardless of how the images were analyzed or how it was performed, the test was not specific and could not distinguish among the causes of prosthetic failure. Advances in anatomic imaging, notably cross sectional modalities, have facilitated the diagnosis of many, if not most, causes of prosthetic failure, with the important exception of infection. This has led to a shift in the diagnostic paradigm, in which nuclear medicine investigations increasingly have focused on diagnosing infection. The recognition that bone scintigraphy could not reliably diagnose infection led to the development of combined studies, first bone/gallium and subsequently leukocyte/bone and leukocyte/marrow imaging. Labeled leukocyte imaging, combined with bone marrow imaging is the most accurate (about 90%) imaging test for diagnosing joint arthroplasty infection. Its value not withstanding, there are significant disadvantages to this test. In-vivo techniques for labeling leukocytes, using antigranulocyte antibodies have been explored, but have their own limitations and the results have been inconsistent. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been extensively investigated for more than a decade but its role in diagnosing the infected prosthesis has yet to be established. Antimicrobial peptides bind to bacterial cell membranes and are infection specific. Data suggest that these agents may be useful for diagnosing prosthetic joint infection, but large scale studies have yet to be undertaken. Although for many years nuclear medicine has focused on diagnosing prosthetic joint infection, the advent of hybrid imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography(SPECT)/electronic computer X-ray tomography technique (CT) and the availability of fluorine-18 fluoride PET suggests that the diagnostic paradigm may be shifting again. By providing the anatomic information lacking in conventional radionuclide studies, there is renewed interest in bone scintigraphy, performed as a SPECT/CT procedure, for detecting joint instability, mechanical loosening and component malpositioning. Fluoride-PET may provide new insights into periprosthetic bone metabolism. The objective of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of the evolution of nuclear medicine imaging of joint replacements. PMID:25071885

Palestro, Christopher J

2014-01-01

224

Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1992--June 30 , 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. The section on Hadrons in Nuclei reports research into the ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate decreases in nuclear matter, and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the Structure of Hadrons reports progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon. These results cover widely different approaches -- lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. Progress in Relativistic Nuclear Physics is reported on electromagnetic interactions in a relativistic bound state formalism, with applications to elastic electron scattering by deuterium, and on application of a two-body quasipotential equation to calculate the spectrum of mesons formed as bound states of a quark and antiquark. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium similar to that found from QCD sum rules. Calculations of three-body bound states with simple forms of relativistic dynamics are also discussed. The section on Heavy Ion Dynamics and Related Processes describes progress on the (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) problem and heavy-on dynamics. In particular, the sharp electrons observed in {beta}{sup +} irradiation of heavy atoms have recently been subsumed into the ``Composite Particle Scenario,`` generalizing the ``(e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}-Puzzle`` of the pairs from heavy ion collisions to the ``Sharp Lepton Problem.``

Griffin, J.J.; Cohen, T.D.

1993-07-01

225

An iterative particle filter approach for respiratory motion estimation in nuclear medicine imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continual improvement in spatial resolution of Nuclear Medicine (NM) scanners has made accurate compensation of patient motion increasingly important. A major source of corrupting motion in NM acquisition is due to respiration. Therefore a particle filter (PF) approach has been proposed as a powerful method for motion correction in NM. The probabilistic view of the system in the PF is seen as an advantage that considers the complexity and uncertainties in estimating respiratory motion. Previous tests using XCAT has shown the possibility of estimating unseen organ configuration using training data that only consist of a single respiratory cycle. This paper augments application specific adaptation methods that have been implemented for better PF estimates with an iterative model update step. Results show that errors are further reduced to an extent up to a small number of iterations and such improvements will be advantageous for the PF to cope with more realistic and complex applications.

Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Wells, Kevin; Lewis, Emma; Guy, Matthew; Goswami, Budhaditya

2011-03-01

226

One-year clinical experience with a fully digitized nuclear medicine department: organizational and economical aspects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the department of nuclear medicine of the University Hospital Utrecht a single-modality PACS has been operational since mid-1990. After one year of operation the functionality, the organizational and economical consequences, and the acceptability of the PACS were evaluated. The functional aspects reviewed were: viewing facilities, patient data management, connectivity, reporting facilities, archiving, privacy, and security. It was concluded that the improved quality of diagnostic viewing and the potential integration with diagnosis, reporting, and archiving are highly appreciated. The many problems that have occurred during the transition period, however, greatly influence the appreciation and acceptability of the PACS. Overall, it is felt that in the long term there will be a positive effect on the quality and efficiency of the work.

Anema, P. C.; de Graaf, C. N.; Wilmink, J. B.; Hall, David R.; Hoekstra, A. G.; van Rijk, P. P.; Van Isselt, J. W.; Viergever, Max A.

1991-07-01

227

Assessment of metabolic bone disease: review of new nuclear medicine procedures  

SciTech Connect

In the management of patients with metabolic bone disease, nuclear medicine laboratories offer two nontraumatic procedures of potential clinical importance: bone mineral measurements and bone scintigraphy. Bone mineral measurements from the radius, lumbar spine, and hip obtained with use of absorptiometry or computed tomography can be used to predict the risk of fracture at these skeletal sites, can determine the severity of bone loss for the assessment of a benefit-versus-risk ratio on which appropriate therapy can be based, and can substantiate the effectiveness of therapy over time. Bone scintigraphy with use of labeled diphosphonate allows assessment of focal and, in defined circumstances, of total skeletal bone turnover in patients with normal kidney function. Both of these techniques have been used successfully in studies of population groups for the evaluation of trends. Their application to the management of individual patients is currently being evaluated. 41 references.

Wahner, H.W.

1985-12-01

228

[Effect of changing into slippers on the pollution situation in the nuclear medicine management district].  

PubMed

Changing into slippers when entering the nuclear medicine management district prevented pollution expansion. Accidents involving patients falling occurred in university facilities. It was thought that changing slippers was the cause. The pollution situation was measured in three facilities by using the smear method and the direct technique to examine the effect of changing slippers. The current state was measured. After pollution prevention guidance was continuously done, pollution expansion was measured; three weeks of measurements were compared. Pollution was detected in the first period of weeks at a frequency of 19 times. For the latter period, it was detected 6 times. Half the pollution was in the restroom. Pollution was reduced by doing pollution prevention guidance for the restroom. Patients' falls occur even if they change slippers. Falling accidents can be decreased. PMID:22277821

Miyashita, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Akiyama, Masayuki; Takase, Tadashi; Kato, Kyoichi; Nitta, Masaru; Nakazawa, Yasuo

2012-01-01

229

The patient as a radioactive source: an intercomparison of survey meters for measurements in nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

In this work, the radiation exposure in nuclear medicine is evaluated by measuring dose rates in the proximity of patients and those in close contact to sources like capsules and syringes. A huge number of different survey meters (SMs) are offered commercially. This topic has recently gained interest since dosemeters and active personal dosemeters (APD) for the new dose quantities (ambient and directional dose equivalent) have become available. One main concern is the practical use of SMs and APD in daily clinical routines. Therefore, the radiation field of four common radiopharmaceuticals containing (18)F, (90)Y, (99m)Tc and (131)I in radioactive sources or after application to the patient was determined. Measurements were carried out with different SMs and for several distances. Dose rates decline significantly with the distance to the patient, and with some restrictions, APD can be used as SMs. PMID:25071244

Uhrhan, K; Drzezga, A; Sudbrock, F

2014-11-01

230

Development of a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to develop a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination using a SimSET-based Monte Carlo code. We added a dose deposition routine to store the deposited energy of the photons during their flights in SimSET and developed a user-friendly interface for reading PET and CT images. Dose calculated on ORNL phantom was used to validate the accuracy of this system. The S values for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 131}I obtained by the system were compared to those from the MCNP4C code and OLINDA. The ratios of S values computed by this system to those obtained with OLINDA for various organs were ranged from 0.93 to 1.18, which are comparable to that obtained from MCNP4C code (0.94 to 1.20). The average ratios of S value were 0.99{+-}0.04, 1.03{+-}0.05, and 1.00{+-}0.07 for isotopes {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, and {sup 99m}Tc, respectively. The simulation time of SimSET was two times faster than MCNP4C's for various isotopes. A 3D dose calculation was also performed on a patient data set with PET/CT examination using this system. Results from the patient data showed that the estimated S values using this system differed slightly from those of OLINDA for ORNL phantom. In conclusion, this system can generate patient-specific dose distribution and display the isodose curves on top of the anatomic structure through a friendly graphic user interface. It may also provide a useful tool to establish an appropriate dose-reduction strategy to patients in nuclear medicine environments. (authors)

Lin, H. H.; Dong, S. L.; Yang, H. J. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Chen, S. [Dept. of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical Univ., Taiwan (China); Shih, C. T. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Chuang, K. S. [Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Lin, C. H. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Yao, W. J. [PET Center, National Cheng Kung Univ. Hospital, Taiwan (China); Jan, M. L. [Physics Div., Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taiwan (China)

2011-07-01

231

Development of departmental standard for traceability of measured activity for I-131 therapy capsules used in nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

International Basic Safety Standards (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA) provide guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine indicating the maximum usual activity for various diagnostic tests in terms of activities of injected radioactive formulations. An accuracy of ± 10% in the activities of administered radio-pharmaceuticals is being recommended, for expected outcome in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures. It is recommended that the long-term stability of isotope calibrators used in nuclear medicine is to be checked periodically for their performance using a long-lived check source, such as Cs-137, of suitable activity. In view of the un-availability of such a radioactive source, we tried to develop methods to maintain traceability of these instruments, for certifying measured activities for human use. Two re-entrant chambers [(HDR 1000 and Selectron Source Dosimetry System (SSDS)] with I-125 and Ir-192 calibration factors in the Department of Radiotherapy were used to measure Iodine-131 (I-131) therapy capsules to establish traceability to Mark V isotope calibrator of the Department of Nuclear Medicine. Special nylon jigs were fabricated to keep I-131 capsule holder in position. Measured activities in all the chambers showed good agreement. The accuracy of SSDS chamber in measuring Ir-192 activities in the last 5 years was within 0.5%, validating its role as departmental standard for measuring activity. The above method is adopted because mean energies of I-131 and Ir-192 are comparable. PMID:21430859

Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, Jp

2011-01-01

232

Self-irradiation of the blood from selected nuclides in nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear medicine dosimetry and research in biodosimetry often require the knowledge of the absorbed dose to the blood. This study provides coefficients for the absorbed dose rates to the blood related to the activity concentration in the blood as a function of the vessel radius for radionuclides commonly used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET-diagnostics: C-11, F-18, Ga-68, Y-90, Tc-99 m, I-124, I-131, and Lu-177. The energy deposition patterns after nuclear disintegrations in blood vessel lumina (cylinders homogeneously filled with blood) with radii from 0.01 to 25.0 mm were simulated with the Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX. An additional contribution from photon radiation from activity in blood in the remainder of the body was taken into account based on a reasonable blood distribution model. The fraction of energy absorbed from non-penetrating radiation in the blood is low in thin blood vessels but approaches the total energy emitted by particles with increasing lumen radius. For photon radiation, irradiation to blood in small vessels is almost completely due to radioactive decays in distant blood distributed throughout the body, whereas the contribution from activity in the vessel becomes dominant for lumen radii exceeding 13 mm. The dependences of the absorbed dose rates on the lumen radius can be described with good accuracy by empirical functions which can be used to determine the absorbed doses to the blood and to the surrounding tissue.

Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Eberlein, U.; Lassmann, M.

2014-03-01

233

Some Recent Progress on Quark Pairings in Dense Quark and Nuclear Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this review article we give a brief overview on some recent progress in quark pairings in dense quark/nuclear matter mostly developed in the past five years. We focus on following aspects in particular: the BCS-BEC crossover in the CSC phase, the baryon formation and dissociation in dense quark/nuclear matter, the Ginzburg—Landau theory for three-flavor dense matter with UA(1) anomaly, and the collective and Nambu—Goldstone modes for the spin-one CSC.

Pang, Jin-Yi; Wang, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Qun

2012-02-01

234

The American College of nuclear physicians 18th annual meeting and scientific sessions DOE day: Substance abuse and nuclear medicine abstracts  

SciTech Connect

Despite the enormous personal and social cost Of substance abuse, there is very little knowledge with respect to the mechanisms by which these drugs produce addiction as well as to the mechanisms of toxicity. Similarly, there is a lack of effective therapeutic intervention to treat the drug abusers. In this respect, nuclear medicine could contribute significantly by helping to gather information using brain imaging techniques about mechanisms of drug addiction which, in turn, could help design better therapeutic interventions, and by helping in the evaluation and diagnosis of organ toxicity from the use of drugs of abuse. This volume contains six short descriptions of presentations made at the 18th Meeting of the American College of Nuclear Physicians -- DOE Day: Substance Abuse and Nuclear Medicine.

Not Available

1992-02-01

235

Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología Department of Nuclear Medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with 137Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrología, to known 137Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are 131I, 18F, 67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 201Tl and 137Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with 131I and 137Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of 137Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the 137Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51±0.02)×10-3 mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05±0.03)×10-3 mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

Ávila, O.; Torres-Ulloa, C. L.; Medina, L. A.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; de Buen, I. Gamboa; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

2010-12-01

236

Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Department of Nuclear Medicine  

SciTech Connect

Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrologia, to known {sup 137}Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 137}Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51{+-}0.02)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05{+-}0.03)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

Avila, O. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Torres-Ulloa, C. L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Medina, L. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000, DF (Mexico); Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando 22 C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando 22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Gamboa de Buen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543, 04510 DF (Mexico); Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000, DF (Mexico)

2010-12-07

237

Nuclear-waste-management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development, alternate waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of

T. D. Chikalla; J. A. Powell

1981-01-01

238

Rationale for the combination of nuclear medicine with magnetic resonance for pre-clinical imaging.  

PubMed

Multi-modality combinations of SPECT/CT and PET/CT have proven to be highly successful in the clinic and small animal SPECT/CT and PET/CT are becoming the norm in the research and drug development setting. However, the use of ionizing radiation from a high-resolution CT scanner is undesirable in any setting and particularly in small animal imaging (SAI), in laboratory experiments where it can result in radiation doses of sufficient magnitude that the experimental results can be influenced by the organism's response to radiation. The alternative use of magnetic resonance (MR) would offer a high-resolution, non-ionizing method for anatomical imaging of laboratory animals. MR brings considerably more than its 3D anatomical capability, especially regarding the imaging of laboratory animals. Dynamic MR imaging techniques can facilitate studies of perfusion, oxygenation, and diffusion amongst others. Further, MR spectroscopy can provide images that can be related to the concentration of endogenous molecules in vivo. MR imaging of injected contrast agents extends MR into the domain of molecular imaging. In combination with nuclear medicine (NM) SPECT and PET modalities in small animal imaging, MR would facilitate studies of dynamic processes such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. However, the detectors for nearly all PET and SPECT systems are still based on vacuum tube technology, namely: photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) in which the signal is generated by transporting electrons over a substantial distance within an evacuated glass tube, making them inoperable in even small magnetic fields. Thus the combination of SPECT or PET with MR has not been practical until the recent availability of semiconductor detectors such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD's) for PET and CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for SPECT coupled with the availability of high-density low noise ASIC electronics to read out the semiconductor detectors. The strong advantage of these technologies over PMT's is their insensitivity to magnetic fields which makes their use in co-axial multi-modality nuclear medicine/magnetic resonance instrumentation possible. PMID:16866565

Wagenaar, Douglas J; Kapusta, Maciej; Li, Junqiang; Patt, Bradley E

2006-08-01

239

Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine personnel handling positron emitters from Ge-68/Ga-68 generator  

PubMed Central

Objective: To measure the radiation exposure to nuclear medicine personnel during synthesis and injection to the patients of Ga-68 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N?,N?,N??-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-1-Nal3-octreotide (NOC)- (DOTA-NOC) using ring thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Materials and Methods: Synthesis of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC was done on a semi-automated system. Finger doses were measured during synthesis and injection of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC. The occupational workers wore TLDs at the base of ring finger of both hands. The finger doses of two radio chemists were measured during synthesis of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC while that of a physician during its injection to the patients. Results: Duration of the study was eight months and a total of 20 samples were prepared. During synthesis, the mean dose to base of left ring finger was 3.02 ± 1.01 mSv and to base of right ring finger was 1.96 ± 0.86 mSv. Mean dose to base of left ring finger was 1.26 ± 0.35 mSv while that to base of right ring finger was 1.03 ± 0.13 mSv during injection. The mean dose was observed to be higher during synthesis than injection. However, the difference was not significant (P = 0.27 and P = 0.18, respectively). Overall mean finger dose of left hand was 2.43 ± 1.21 mSv, whereas for the right hand the same was 1.65± 0.82 mSv. Conclusion: Finger doses to radio chemists during semi-automated synthesis of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC and that to the physician involved in injection of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC were found to be within permissible limits. Ring dosimeters must be worn for the safety of the nuclear medicine personnel involved in synthesis and injection of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC. PMID:22174513

Dwivedi, Durgesh Kumar; Snehlata; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar; Lochab, Satya Pal; Kumar, Rakesh; Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Malhotra, Arun; Bandopadhayaya, Guru Pad; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Pant, Gauri Shankar

2011-01-01

240

Design, development, and analysis of semiconductor-based instrumentation for nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear medicine imaging using a gamma camera is a sensitive tool for mapping various physiological and biological processes in vivo. In some respects, the instrumentation for gamma-ray imaging is highly developed. Nevertheless, current technology in nuclear medicine has some significant limitations in the area of spatial resolution. Scintillator-based imaging systems most likely have reached their limits of spatial resolution. Achieving higher spatial resolution will require the use of semiconductor detectors. The first part and major focus of this dissertation is the development of a prototype imaging system based on modular CdZnTe semiconductor arrays. Each modular array is approximately 1.5 mm thick, and is patterned on one surface into a 64 x 64 array of pixels with 380-micron pitch. We present details of the design, the electronics, and system performance. The second part of this dissertation presents results on a coincidence-type surgical probe. The sensitivity of a surgical probe for tumor detection is often limited by spatial variations in radiotracer uptake in normal tissue. We are developing a probe for use with 111In that uses coincidences between the 171 keV and 245 keV gamma rays for background suppression. The performance of a coincidence probe was compared to that of single-gamma probe for the task of detecting radiolabeled tumor models in a water phantom containing an inhomogeneous background. A single-element NaI(Tl) probe was placed in random locations throughout the tank; the tumor was attached to the probe in half of the trials. Count data were recorded in three channels: 171 keV, 245 keV, and 416 keV. A linear discriminant was calculated from the data. The detectability index, d', was derived from the data and used to compare the optimal linear discriminant against the single-gamma energy peaks for counting times up to 30s. For a realistic 15s exposure time, d' for the linear discriminant attains a near-perfect value of 3. In contrast, the single-photon channel d' is always near zero, so this channel is worthless for background discrimination. Coincidence detection using linear discriminants shows promise for in vivo tumor localization with 111In-labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

Matherson, Kevin James

2003-10-01

241

Soraya Boudia, Radioisotopes "economy of promises : On the limits of biomedicine in public legitimization of nuclear activities" in X. Roqu et N. Herran(eds), Isotopes: Science, Medicine  

E-print Network

at "redeeming" the act of having used the nuclear bomb.2 This desire for redemption made it possible in public legitimization of nuclear activities" in X. Roqué et N. Herran(eds), Isotopes: Science, Medicine": On the limits of biomedicine in public legitimization of nuclear activities Soraya Boudia 7 rue de l

Boyer, Edmond

242

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of "Instituto Nacional de Cancerología" (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are 131I, 18F, 68Ga, 99mTc, 111In and 11C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of "Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares" (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the "Reglamento General de Seguridad Radiológica", México (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the "International Commission on Radiation Protection" (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Ávila, O.; Sánchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodríguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

2012-10-01

243

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

SciTech Connect

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23

244

An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department.  

PubMed

Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented. PMID:21731225

Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L S

2011-04-01

245

Development of a particle filter framework for respiratory motion correction in nuclear medicine imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research aims to develop a methodological framework based on a data driven approach known as particle filters, often found in computer vision methods, to correct the effect of respiratory motion on Nuclear Medicine imaging data. Particles filters are a popular class of numerical methods for solving optimal estimation problems and we wish to use their flexibility to make an adaptive framework. In this work we use the particle filter for estimating the deformation of the internal organs of the human torso, represented by X, over a discrete time index k. The particle filter approximates the distribution of the deformation of internal organs by generating many propositions, called particles. The posterior estimate is inferred from an observation Zk of the external torso surface. We demonstrate two preliminary approaches in tracking organ deformation. In the first approach, Xk represent a small set of organ surface points. In the second approach, Xk represent a set of affine organ registration parameters to a reference time index r. Both approaches are contrasted to a comparable technique using direct mapping to infer Xk from the observation Zk. Simulations of both approaches using the XCAT phantom suggest that the particle filter-based approaches, on average performs, better.

Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Lewis, Emma; Wells, Kevin; Guy, Matthew; Goswami, Budhaditya

2010-03-01

246

Clinical use of differential nuclear medicine modalities in patients with ATTR amyloidosis.  

PubMed

Histological proof remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of amyloidosis. Nuclear medicine imaging techniques are able to determine the amyloid load in the body. Currently, the best imaging modality is (123)I-SAP scintigraphy. This modality has high sensitivity for detecting amyloid deposits in all amyloid subtypes. Involvement of liver and spleen can be visualized before clinical signs are present. The addition of single photon emission computed tomography improves the differentiation of overlying organs. However, (123)I-SAP is not FDA approved. Its availability is limited to two centres in Europe. Furthermore, it is not suitable for imaging cardiac involvement of amyloidosis, due to movement, blood-pool content and lack of fenestrated endothelial in the myocardium. Phosphate derivates labelled with (99m)Tc, are able to detect calcium compounds in cardiac amyloidosis. Finally, (123)I-MIBG, an analogue of norepinephrine, can detect cardiac sympathetic innervation abnormalities as a consequence of amyloid deposits. Both these last techniques seem to be able to detect cardiac involvement before echocardiographic parameters are present. We illustrate the clinical use of these modalities with two patients with ATTR type amyloidosis. PMID:22913327

Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Dierckx, Rudi A; Hazenberg, Bouke P C

2012-12-01

247

Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff involved in PET/CT practice in Serbia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the radiation exposure to nuclear medicine (NM) staff in the two positron emission tomography-computed tomography centres in Serbia and to investigate the possibilities for dose reduction. Dose levels in terms of Hp(10) for whole body and Hp(0.07) for hands of NM staff were assessed using thermoluminescence and electronic personal dosemeters. The assessed doses per procedure in terms of Hp(10) were 4.2-7 and 5-6 ?Sv, in two centres, respectively, whereas the extremity doses in terms of Hp(0.07) in one of the centres was 34-126 ?Sv procedure(-1). The whole-body doses per unit activity were 17-19 and 21-26 ?Sv GBq(-1) in two centres, respectively, and the normalised finger dose in one centre was 170-680 ?Sv GBq(-1). The maximal estimated annual whole-body doses in two centres were 3.4 and 2.0 mSv, while the corresponding extremity dose in the later one was 45 mSv. Improvements as introduction of automatic dispensing system and injection and optimisation of working practice resulted in dose reduction ranging from 12 up to 67 %. PMID:24464817

Antic, V; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Stankovic, J; Arandjic, D; Todorovic, N; Lucic, S

2014-12-01

248

The development of new radionuclide generator systems for nuclear medicine applications  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotope generator systems have traditionally played a central role in nuclear medicine in providing radioisotopes for both research and clinical applications. In this paper, the development of several tungsten-188/rhenium-188 prototype generators which provide rhenium-188 for radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) is discussed. The authors have recently demonstrated that carrier-free iridium-194 can be obtained from the activated carbon system from decay of reactor-produced osmium-194 for potential RAIT applications. Instrumentation advances such as the new generation of high-count-rate (fast) gamma camera systems for first-pass technology require the availability of generator-produced ultra short-lived radioisotopes for radionuclide angiography (RNA). The activated carbon generator is an efficient system to obtain ultra short-lived iridium-191 m from osmium-191 for RNA. In addition, the growing number of PET centers has stimulated research in generators which provide positron-emitting radioisotopes. Copper-62, obtained from the zinc-62 generator, is currently used for PET evaluation of organ perfusion. The availability of the parent radioisotopes, the fabrication and use of these generators, and the practical factors for use of these systems in the radiopharmacy are discussed. 74 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Callahan, A.P.; Mirzadeh, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Brihaye, C.; Guillaume, M. (Liege Univ. (Belgium). Cyclotron Research Center)

1991-01-01

249

Lanthanides in Nuclear Medicine. The Production of Terbium-149 by Heavy Ion Beams  

E-print Network

Among radioactive isotopes of lanthanide series elements, finding the increasing using in nuclear medicine, alpha-emitter {149}Tb (T_{1/2} = 4.118 h; EC 76.2 %; beta^+ 7.1 %; alpha 16.7 %) is considered as a perspective radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy. The aim of the present work is to study experimental conditions of the {149}Tb production in reactions Nd({12}C, xn){149}Dy (4.23 min; beta^+, EC)\\to {149}Tb when the Nd targets have been irradiated by heavy ions of carbon. On the basis of results of formation and decay of {149}Dy\\to{149}Tb evaluation of the {149}Tb activity, is made which can be received under optimum conditions (enriched {142}Nd target, {12}C ions with the energy 120 MeV and up to current 100 mu A, time of irradiating 8-10 hours). Under these conditions {149}Tb can be obtained up to 30 GBq (up to 0.8 Ci).

Dmitriev, S N; Zaitseva, N G; Maslov, O D; Molokanova, L G; Starodub, G Ya; Shishkin, S V; Shishkina, T V

2001-01-01

250

Exposures from nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures: the dose impact on the Aosta Valley population.  

PubMed

The present work evaluates the per-procedure, annual collective and per-capita effective doses to the Aosta Valley region population from nuclear medicine (NM) examinations performed from 2005 to 2011 at the regional NM department. Based on its demographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this area can be considered as representative of the level I countries, as defined by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. The NM per-procedures effective doses were within the range of 0.018-35 mSv. A steady frequency per 10 000 inhabitants has been observed, together with a decrease for thyroid and whole-body bone scintigraphy. Myocardial and bone scintigraphy studies were the major contributors to the total collective effective dose. The mean annual collective and per-capita effective doses to the population were 15 man Sv y(-1) and 120 µSv y(-1), respectively. The NM contribution to the total per-capita effective dose accounts for 5.9 % of that due to the medical ionising radiation examinations overall. PMID:23816980

Aimonetto, S; Arrichiello, C; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Catuzzo, P; Zeverino, M; Poti, C; Meloni, T; Pasquino, M; Tofani, S

2013-12-01

251

Intercomparison of 131I and 99mTc activity measurements in Brazilian nuclear medicine services.  

PubMed

This work outlines the quality assurance program for the activity measurements of the most used radionuclides at Brazilian Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS). The program aims to guarantee that the patient is given the correct prescribed amount of activity in diagnostic or therapeutic applications. This accurate administration depends upon proper use and calibration of the activity meters by the NMS. Underestimation of administered activity in diagnostic practices could delay correct diagnosis disturbing the value of the investigation. On the other hand, the overestimation would be worse, mainly in therapeutic applications, because an unnecessarily high absorbed dose would be delivered to the patient. The preliminary results of intercomparison for 131I and 99mTc showed that many activity meters used at NMS's present problems giving results up to 41% greater than the reference values determined at the National Metrology Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI) which is recognized as the Brazilian authorized metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation. These results have demonstrated that the NMS should improve the accuracy of the activity measurements of the radionuclides administered to the patients and establish the traceability to the national standards of measurements. These standards are based on a pressurized well-type ionization chamber installed at LNMRI and calibrated with reference sources standardized by absolute methods. The protocol of the intercomparison and recommendations made in order to minimize errors in measuring procedures are described and results are discussed. PMID:11214886

Iwahara, A; De Oliveira, A E; Tauhata, L; da Silva, C J; Lopes, R T

2001-03-01

252

Implementation of a national metrology network of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

The Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) in Brazil routinely use dose calibrators to measure the activity of solutions containing radiopharmaceuticals. These solutions are administered to patients with the intention to diagnose or treat illnesses. However, for optimal results, the activity of these radiopharmaceuticals must be determined as accurately as possible. The National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI) led, since 1998, a comparison program for activity measurements of radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients in the NMS with the purpose promoting quality control. This program has been carried out successfully in Rio de Janeiro, but there is a need to implement it around the country. This can be resolved through the implementation of a network of regional laboratories at various locations throughout the national territory. Currently, such a network is active at a second site, located in Brasília, covering the needs of the Center-West Region, and at a third site, located in Porto Alegre, in the South Region. This work presents the results of comparisons for the radiopharmaceuticals nuclides 131I and 99Tcm and proves that the implementation of a radionuclide metrology network is feasible and viable. PMID:16549360

dos Santos, Joyra A; Iwahara, Akira; Nícoli, Iêda G; Corrêa, Rosângela S; Alabarse, Frederico G; dos Santos, Carlos E L; Xavier, Ana M; Garcia, Eloy J; Tauhata, Luiz; Lopes, Ricardo T

2006-01-01

253

Scene setting: criteria for acceptability and suspension levels in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy.  

PubMed

The EC (European Commission) Directive on radiation protection of patients requires that Criteria for Acceptability of Equipment in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy be established throughout the member states. This paper reviews the background to this requirement and to its implementation in practice. It notes parallel requirements in the EC medical devices directive and International Electrotechnical Commission standards. It is also important to be aware and that both sets of requirements should ideally be harmonised due to the global nature of the equipment industry. The paper further reviews the type of criteria that can be well applied for the above purposes, and defines qualitative criteria and suspension levels suitable for application. Both are defined and relationships with other acceptance processes are considered (including acceptance testing at the time of purchase, commissioning and the issue of second-hand equipment). Suspension levels are divided into four types, A, B, C and D, depending on the quality of evidence and consensus on which they are based. Exceptional situations involving, for example, new or rapidly evolving technology are also considered. The publication and paper focuses on the role of the holder of the equipment and related staff, particularly the medical physics expert and the practitioner. Advice on how the criteria should be created and implemented and how this might be coordinated with the supplier is provided for these groups. Additional advice on the role of the regulator is provided. PMID:23173218

Malone, Jim; Faulkner, Keith; Christofides, Stelios; Lillicrap, Stephen; Horton, Patrick

2013-02-01

254

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1988.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-08-01

255

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

We have exploring the possibility of measuring urinary radioactivity as an index of pancreatic lipase activity after oral administration of a new triglyceride containing a radioactive iodine-1 25-labeled fatty acid moiety. The new agent, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3[15-(p-iodophenyl)pentandecan-l-oyl]-racglycerol (1,2-Pal-3-IPPA), was prepared by the thallation-iodide displacement method. Following oral gavage of the radioiodinated triglyceride to rats, about 30% of the administered activity was excreted in 24 hours in the urine. In normal human controls an higher urinary excretion (of about 75% was observed. In this report, we describe an evaluation of the metabolites excreted in the urine and the chemical species stored in adipose from rats. The urine activity co-chromatographed with hippuric acid by TLC indicating conjugation of the IPPA metabolites. Release of the acidic components from the conjugated excretory products by acid hydrolysis of the urine provided the radioactive acidic IPPA metabolites. Analysis of the Folch extracts of fat samples from rats demonstrated that the radioactive components co-chromatographed In the triglyceride region. Recent studies in patients with compromised pancreatic exocrine function have demonstrated significantly decreased 24 hr. urinary excretion of about 25%, following oral administration of [1 -1 31]-1,2-Pal-3-IPPA. Thus, urine analysis after oral administration of [I -1 31]-1,2-Pal-3-IPPA may be a simple, non-invasive tool for the clinical evaluation of various diseases involving dietary fat digestion.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-04-01

256

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on (1) a new improved synthesis of carrier-free rhenium-188-labeled Re(V) dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) complex as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of thyroid medullary carcinoma; and (2) the synthesis and evaluation of a series of iodine-125-labeled analogues of altanserine for imaging of serotonin receptors.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1992-04-01

257

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Biodistribution studies with the radioiodinated 3(R)- and 3(S)-BMIPP isomers in rats have shown that 3(R)-BMIPP has 20-25% higher heart uptake (15-180 min) than 3(S)-BMIPP, while uptake in other tissues examined is similar. To evaluate the possible differences in metabolic fate of the two isomers, a mixture of [I-125]-3(R)/[I-131]- 3(S)-BMIPP was administered to fasted female Fisher rats. Groups (n=3 rats per group) were sacrificed after 15, 60 and 180 min, and urine and feces collected from another group. Samples of blood, heart, liver, lungs, kidney, and urine were Folch-extracted. The distribution of I-125 and I-131 in the organic, aqueous, and pellet samples were determined. Organic samples were then analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The relative distribution of I-125/I-131 in the lipid, aqueous, and pellet samples was similar for both isomers. Distribution of I-125/I-131 in the various components of the lipid extracts observed by TLC was similar, with principal incorporation into the free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride (TG) pools. HPLC analyses (Cl8) of the FFA fraction showed similar I-125/I-131 profiles, corresponding to BMIPP, and the {alpha}-methyl-C,4 (PIPA) and C12, Cl0 and C6 carbon chain-length catabolites. By TLC, urine I-125/I-131 chromatographed with hippuric acid. HPLC analyses (Cl 8) of acid-hydrolyzed urine gave a single I-125/I-131 component with the same RRT as 2-({beta}-iodophenyl)acetic acid, the final {alpha}/{beta}-oxidative BMIPP catabolite. Unexpectedly, HPLC of lipids from base hydrolyzed TG from the heart tissue, showed I-125/I-125 co-chromatographing with short-chain fatty acids, with only levels in BMIPP. These unexpected results demonstrate that the 3(R)-BMIPP and 3(S)-BMIPP isomers are metabolized similarly in rat tissues, and that the higher myocardial extraction observed for the 3(R)-BMIPP may reflect differences in the relative membrane transport of the two isomers.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Guhlke, S.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Mokler, F.

1996-10-01

258

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The four stereoisomers of 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-(1fluoropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (FQNPe, 4) have been resolved and were evaluated as potential candidates for PET imaging agents. Labeling with fluorine-18 involved a two-step synthesis via fluoride displacement of a mesylate intermediate at the ethyl ester stage followed by transesterification with (R)-quinuclidinol. In vitro data utilizing cloned human receptor subtypes demonstrated that while the (+,+)-isomer did not have significant receptor binding, the other stereoisomers of FNPe bound with high affinity to the various mA ChR subtypes tested (K{sub i}, nm: m1, ({minus},{minus}), 0.33; ({minus},+), 1.4; (+,{minus}), 3.8; m2, ({minus},{minus}), 0.1; ({minus},+), 4.2; +,{minus}), < 75% binding; m3, ({minus},{minus}), 0.34; ({minus},+), 3.1; (+;{minus}), 7.6. [{sup 18}F]-({minus},{minus})- and [{sup 18}F]-({minus},+)-FQNPe (4) were prepared in decay corrected radiochemical yields of 14% ([{sup 18}F]-({minus},{minus})-4) and 8% ([{sup 18}F]-({minus},+)-4). In vivo biodistribution studies were conducted in female rats with [18F]-({minus},{minus})- and (+,{minus})-FQNPe (4). [{sup 18}F]({minus},{minus})-4 demonstrated high uptake in mA ChR regions of the brain up to 3 hours post injection and low accumulation of radioactivity in the bone indicated good in vivo stability.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Guhlke, S.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

1996-12-31

259

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We describe the synthesis of the cis- and trans-iodovinyl isomers of the new ORNL cholinergic-muscarinicreceptorligand, 1 -azabicyclo[2.2-2]oct-3-yl{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-l-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (``IQNP``). This agent is prepared in high radiochemical yield, and the racemic mixture shows high specificity and selectivity for the cerebral and myocardial receptors. Since two chiral centers are present in this molecule, it is important to evaluate the importance of the absolute configuration of the two centers on receptor specificity. The tributyltin substrates were carefully separated by column chromatography, converted to the iodine-125 analogues by iododestannylation, and evaluated in rats in vivo. While the ``E`` (trans) isomer cleared rapidly from the receptor-rich areas of rat brain, the ``Z`` (cis) isomer showed high uptake in these areas but also high concentration in the cerebellum. In contrast, the E,Z-isomeric mixture showed good uptake and retention in the receptor rich areas. Also described in this report is a description of neutron flux measurements in the hydraulic tube position at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Also during this period, samples of [l-125]- and [l-131]-labeled racemic ``IQNP`` were supplied through a collaborative program with the Brookhaven National Laboratory for high resolution autoradiographic studies in rat tissues.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-03-01

260

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We describe the synthesis of the cis- and trans-iodovinyl isomers of the new ORNL cholinergic-muscarinicreceptorligand, 1 -azabicyclo[2.2-2]oct-3-yl[alpha]-hydroxy-[alpha]-(1-iodo-l-propen-3-yl)-[alpha]-phenylacetate ( IQNP''). This agent is prepared in high radiochemical yield, and the racemic mixture shows high specificity and selectivity for the cerebral and myocardial receptors. Since two chiral centers are present in this molecule, it is important to evaluate the importance of the absolute configuration of the two centers on receptor specificity. The tributyltin substrates were carefully separated by column chromatography, converted to the iodine-125 analogues by iododestannylation, and evaluated in rats in vivo. While the E'' (trans) isomer cleared rapidly from the receptor-rich areas of rat brain, the Z'' (cis) isomer showed high uptake in these areas but also high concentration in the cerebellum. In contrast, the E,Z-isomeric mixture showed good uptake and retention in the receptor rich areas. Also described in this report is a description of neutron flux measurements in the hydraulic tube position at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Also during this period, samples of [l-125]- and [l-131]-labeled racemic IQNP'' were supplied through a collaborative program with the Brookhaven National Laboratory for high resolution autoradiographic studies in rat tissues.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-03-01

261

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

In this report the conditions for ``direct`` labeling of the anti-granulocyte (MAb) BW 250/183 monoclonal antibody with rhenium-188 (Re-188) from a generator are described. Re-188-BW 250/183 is of interest for potential use for bone marrow ablation. The labeling time, temperature, pH, and the amount of tin and citric acid were optimized utilizing IgG. Radiolabeling yields of greater than 97% were achieved using 1 mL of a phthalate/tartrate buffer (pH 5.{und M}=?), 250 {micro} g BW 250/183, 1.0 mg citric acid, 400 {micro} g tin (II) chloride, and 1 mL of the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator eluent (200--800 {micro} Ci of Re-188). Analysis of the Re-188-labeled IgG and BW 250/183 was performed by Instant Thin Layer Chromatography (ITLC), Sephadex purification and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). When the labeling was performed at room temperature or 37 C, in vitro stability studies performed in HSA solution, cysteine solution, 6 {und M} urea solution and a 1% casein solution showed that the Re-188 label demonstrated a similar stability profile in all solutions. Initial studies indicate that Re-188-BW 250/183 retained {approximately} 90% of immunoreactivity when compared to the technetium-99m labeled antibody prepared from the same kit. During this period, several radioisotopes prepared in the ORNL HFIR were also supplied on a cost-recovery basis or provided to collaborators for ongoing collaborative projects. These include tin-117m, processed tungsten-188 and the ORNL alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generators.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

1995-06-01

262

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe the first resolution of the 3R-(+)-and 3S- ({minus})-methyl BMIPP methyl-branched fatty acid stereoisomers and biodistribution of the radioiodinated isomers in rats to investigate the effects of the configuration of the 3({beta})-methyl group on the organ distribution and myocardial uptake and release kinetics. Synthesesis of 3R-(+)BMIPP was accompanied by initial acylation of the thiophene template with the acid chloride of ethyl 3R- methylglutarate. The amide of the synthetic 3R-BMIPP isomer prepared S-(-)-{alpha}-methylbenzylamine exhibited identical spectral and chromatographic properties with the chromatographically more polar isomer (TLC and HPLC) which was separated from the mixture of amides prepared from reaction of the acid chloride of racemic BMIPP with the S-(-)-{alpha}-methylbenzylamine. The second less chromatographically polar amide isomer was assigned the 3S-(-)-methyl configuration. The free acids were obtained by acid hydrolysis of the amides and converted to the radioiodinated analogues. While biodistribution studies in separate groups of rats demonstrated greater myocardial uptake of 3R-BMIPP compared with the 3S-isomer values for most other tissues evaluated (blood, lungs, kidneys and thyroid) were similar, whereas the 3S-BMIPP isomer consistently showed higher liver uptake. These results were confirmed in a [l-131]-3S-BMIPP/[l-125]-3R-BMIPP dual label study and both isomers had similar myocardial wash-out curves (5-180 min). These studies suggest that [l-123]-3R-BMIPP is a candidate for clinical evaluation and may show greater myocardial uptake than the 3S-isomer and thus may require a reduced injected dose compared to racemic BMIPP.

Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Mokler, F

1995-12-31

263

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe tile first successful synthesis and in vivo evaluation of a fluorinated analogue of the IQNP muscarinic-cholinergic receptor ligand. Unanticipated synthetic hurdles lead to several unsuccessful approaches before the synthesis of a model compound was achieved. The successful route involved introduction of the fluoroethyl moiety at an early stage of the synthesis by alkylation of ethyl 1,3-dithiane-2-carboxylate with 1-fluoro-2-bromoethane. Subsequent unmasking of the carbonyl, followed by introduction of the phenyl group with phenylmagnesium bromide and subsequent transesterification with racemic quinuclidinol afforded the target compound, 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-(1-fluoroethan-2-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (QNF). Pretreatment of Fisher rats with QNF one hour prior to the intravenous administration of the [I-131]-Z-(R,R) IQNP isomer demonstrated that the new fluoro analogue blocked uptake of iodine-131 in those regions of the brain rich in muscarinic-cholinergic receptors measured three hours after injection. As an example, the control values for group of nontreated animals were (5 animals; mean {+-} SD): cortex, 1.20{+-}0.27; striatum, 0.73{+-}0.19; pons, 0.70{+-}0.20; cerebellum, 0.43{+-}0.114. Brains from animals pretreated with the fluoro analogue had the following values (mean{+-}SD; % decrease): cortex, 0.67{+-}0.15 (65%); striatum, 0.35{+-}0.114 (52%); pons, 0.40{+-}0.08 (43%); cerebellum, 0.16{+-}0.09(63%). Also during this period several tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generators and tin-117m samples were provided for collaborative studies.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Lambert, C.R.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Luo, H.

1994-08-01

264

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The reactor production yields of tungsten-188 produced by neutron capture by enriched tungsten-186 in the HFIR and other reactors are nearly an order of magnitude lower than expected by calculation using established cross section values. Since neutron capture of tungsten-188 may be the major factor which significantly reduces the observed yields of tungsten-188, the authors have evaluated the possible burn-up cross section of the tungsten-188 product. Tungsten-189 was produced by irradiating a radioactive target containing a known amount of {sup 188}W. In order to reduce the radiation level to an acceptable level (<20% detector dead time), the authors chemically removed >90% of {sup 188}Re, which is the decay product of {sup 188}W, prior to irradiation. They were able to confirm the two predominant {gamma}-rays in the decay of {sup 189}W, 260.1 {+-} 1.4 and 421.5 {+-} 1.6 keV. By following the decay of these {gamma}-rays in two sets of experiments, a half-life of 10.8 {+-} 0.3 m was obtained for {sup 189}W. Based on a knowledge of the {sup 188}W content of target (52.6 mBq), neutron flux of 5 {times} 10{sup 13} n {center_dot} s{sup {minus}1} {center_dot} cm{sup {minus}2}, irradiation time of 10 min and with the assumption of 100% intensity for 260.1 and 421.5 keV {gamma}-rays, a cross-section of 12.0 {+-} 2.5 b was calculated for burn-up cross-section of {sup 188}W, which helps explain the greatly reduced production yields of {sup 188}W.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Boll, R.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

1997-01-01

265

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The results of preliminary in vivo metabolic studies of the iodine-125-labeled E-(R,R)-IQNP in rats are described. The E-(R,R) isomer demonstrates highly selective and specific localization in cerebral regions rich in the m{sub 1} and m{sub 4} muscarinic-cholinergic receptor subtypes and is a good candidate for potential human studies. Since the external evaluation of receptor-ligand complexes requires that only uptake of the unmetabolized agent is measured, these studies were performed to evaluate the metabolism of the radioiodinated ligand in the whole brain, heart, liver and serum from rats at several time points after intravenous administration. Radioactivity was very rapidly excreted in the first 24-hour period (urine = 46; feces = 26). Folch extracts of the different tissue samples showed that the lipid-soluble extract from brain tissue contained 87 of the activity at 24 hours. In the heart, 62 of the activity was extracted in the lipid soluble extract after 30 minutes and decreased to 51 after 4 hours. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the lipid soluble extracts indicated that only the unmetabolized E-(R,R)-IQNP was detected in brain extracts. Also in this report, the predicted medical radioisotope production capabilities of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) are discussed.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

1994-02-01

266

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The authors` new radioiodinated ``IQNP`` agent, an analogue of ``4-IQNB``, has a high affinity for the muscarinic-cholinergic receptor (m-AChR). Iodine is stabilized in ``IQNP`` by attachment as a vinyl iodide. To evaluate the potential usefulness of a [Br-76]-labeled analogue as a candidate for positron emission tomography (PET), they have synthesized the trans-3-bromopropenyl analogue (BrQNP) and evaluated its ability in vivo to block uptake of [I-125]-Z-(R,R)-IQNP. Reaction of bromine with the trans-tributylstannyl substrate prepared from ethyl -{alpha}-hydroxy -{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}-(1-propyn-3-yl)acetate, followed by column purification and transesterification with (R,S)-3-quinuclidinol gave BrQNP. Female rats were pre-treated with the oxalate salt of BrQNP one hour prior to I.V. injection of [I-125]-IQNP. While the brain and heart uptake in BrQNP pre-treated animals was significantly decreased, the control animals showed the expected high uptake of IQNP in these tissues. The ease of preparation and ability to block m-AChR suggest that [Br-76]-labeled BrQNP is a potential candidate for PET studies. In this report, the authors also summarize their current on-going collaborative studies assessing the usefulness of various rhenium-188-labeled therapeutic agents. In addition, collaborative programs have been established to evaluate rhenium-188-labeled particles for treatment of arthritis (synovectomy), treatment of bone pain resulting from cancer metastheses with rhenium-188-phosphonates (palliation), and other applications.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Lambert, C.R.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Luo, H.

1994-05-01

267

Nuclear medicine program. Progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe the first synthesis of the (-)(-) and (-)(+) isomers of 1-azabicyclo oct-3-yl {alpha}-(1-fluoropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate ({open_quotes}FQNPe{close_quotes}). Earlier studies with the racemic FQNPe mixture had demonstrated high in vitro binding affinity for the muscarinic-cholinergic receptor and showed that pre-treatment of rats with this new agent significantly blocked receptor localization of subsequently injected -Z-(-,-)-IQNP. Because of the potential important use of fluorine-18-labeled analogues for clinical evaluation of changes in muscarinic-cholinergic receptors by positron emission tomography (PET), we have now synthesized the diastereomeric isomers of FQNPe. Multi-gram quantities of ethyl-{alpha}- (1-chloropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate were prepared and then saponified into the racemic {alpha}-(1-chloropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetic acid mixture. The racemic acid was resolved into (-)- and (+)-{alpha}-(1-chloropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetic acid enantiomers by isolation of the (-) salt of (S-)-(-)-{alpha}-methylbenzylamine and the (+) salt of (R)-(+)-{alpha}-methylbenzylamine. The resolved (-)- ([{alpha}]{sub D} = -12.1{degrees}, c = 5.8, chloroform) and (+)-acetic acids ([{alpha}]{sub D} = + 11.6{degrees}, c = 6.0, chloroform) were fully characterized and then converted to the enantiomeric ethyl-{alpha}-(1-fluoropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetates by a four-step reaction sequence. The (-)- and (+)-ethyl-{alpha}-(1-fluoropent-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetates were then each transesterified with (-)-quinuclidinol to form the (-)(-) FQNPe and (-)(+) FQNPe diastereomers. These diastereomeric esters will now be evaluated in in vitro studies. The availability of the substrates for preparation of the fluorine-18-labeled enantiomers will now allow evaluation of the radiolabeled compounds in animals.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L. [and others

1995-09-01

268

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect

In this report the development of a solvent extraction technique for the efficient separation of iridium radioisotopes from osmium radioisotopes is described. The Os-191 (Os-VIII) was efficiently separated from iridium-192 by extraction of a 1 M HCl solution with <10{sup {minus}2}M tetrahexylamine (THA) in methyl isobutyl ketone. Over 99% of the osmium is extracted in one step, leaving the radioactive iridium in the aqueous acidic solution. This simple extraction technique may be useful for the development of a new Os-194/Ir-194 generator prototype which is currently being explored. Also in this report, biodistribution studies of the two iodine-125 (I-125)-labeled spiroperidol analogues, E-3-N-(iodo-1-propen-3-yl)- and E-3-N-(iodo-1-penten-5-yl)spiroperidol in male Balb C mice are described. Several samples were supplied for collaborative research projects during this period and included I-125 and I-131 methyl-branched fatty acids, samples of tin-117m (Sn-117m), gold-199 (Au-199) and scandium-47 (Sc-47). 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Allred, J.F.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1991-06-01

269

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 (W-188/Re-188) generator system has continued. Our goal is to develop a prototype system which will provide sufficient levels of Re-188 for radiolabeling of tumor-specific antibodies for radioimmunotherapy. During this review period several samples were supplied for collaborative studies. Samples of rhenium-188 from the ORNL W-188/Re-188 generators were supplied to the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) as a calibration standard. Iodine-125-labeled IMP protein labeling agent was supplied to the University of Michigan for antibody radiolabeling studies (D. Buchsbaum, Ph.D.). The iodine-123-labeled BMIPP fatty acid analogue developed at ORNL was also supplied to collaborators at BNL for SPECT imaging studies of the effects of cocaine intoxication on myocardial fatty acid uptake in a canine model. Iodine-125-BMIPP was also supplied to the University of Bonn, Germany for continuing metabolic studies in an isolated heart model. In this report the resumption of radioisotope production in the HFIR following the restart of this important facility in July 1990 and the preparation and review and evaluation of issues for the DOE Tiger Team visit to ORNL on November 1--December 7 are also discussed. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Allred, J.F.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1991-02-01

270

Progress on the Development of High Spatial Resolution Imaging Techniques in Nuclear Medicine  

E-print Network

into the patient. The second phase is data acquisition, during which a detector system is placed and/or moved of a gamma camera is the projection of the three-dimensional (3D) radioactivity distribution on the detector period mt, or in a combination in a time period less than mt (where mt is much shorter than the half-life

271

[Radiopharmacokinetics: Utilization of nuclear medicine]. Comprehensive progress report, [1986--1989  

SciTech Connect

The work performed in the 1986/1989 period can be characterized as one of testing and documenting that the Radiopharmacokinetic technique is both feasible and applicable to human studies, as well as developing spectroscopic methods for undertaking noninvasive human studies. Main accomplishments include studies which: show that drug targeting can be monitored noninvasively using radiolabeled drugs. The study that documented this finding involved an analysis of the comparative kinetics of biodistribution of {sup 195m}Pt-cisplatin to brain tumors, when administered intravenously and intra-arterially; show that such differential targeting of Platinum represents a differential quantity of drug and a differential amount of the active component reaching the target site; show that in vivo NMRS studies of drugs are possible, as documented by our studies of 5-fluorouracil; show that 5-fluorouracil can be trapped in tumors, and that such trapping may be directly correlatable to patient response; show that the radiopharmacokinetic technique can also be used effectively for the study of radiopharmaceuticals used for imaging, as documented in our studies with {sup 99m}T{sub c}-DMSA.

Wolf, W.

1989-12-31

272

Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 4  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 4. The analysis of the effect of cracks on the acceleration of the calcium leaching process of cement-based materials has been pursued. During the last period (Technical Progress Report No 3), we have introduced a modeling accounting for the high diffusivity of fractures in comparison with the weak solid material diffusivity. It has been shown through dimensional and asymptotic analysis that small fractures do not significantly accelerate the material aging process. This important result for the overall structural aging kinetics of containment structure has been developed in a paper submitted to the international journal ''Transport in Porous Media''.

Ulm, Franz-Josef

2000-06-30

273

Progress in Developing Nuclear Reaction Calculation Code CCONE for High Energy Nuclear Data Evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To adapt the CCONE code to the high energy nuclear data evaluation, the preequilibrium exciton model part of the code has been extended to multiple particle emission. This is realized by sequential calculation of the decay of exciton states for all residual nuclei left by particle emissions. In addition, Iwamoto-Harada cluster coalescence model has been incorporated in the multiple-emission exciton model to improve the accuracy of calculated cluster emission spectra for deuteron, triton, 3He and ? particles. The calculated light particle emission spectra are compared with experimental and evaluated data.

Iwamoto, O.

2014-04-01

274

Forensic Medicine in South Africa: Associations between Medical Practice and Legal Case Progression and Outcomes in Female Murders  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundForensic medicine has been largely by-passed by the tide of health systems research and evidence based medicine. Murder victims form a central part of forensic medical examiners' case load, and women murdered by intimate partners are an important subgroup, representing the most severe form and consequence of intimate partner violence. Our aim was to describe the epidemiology of female murder

Naeemah Abrahams; Rachel Jewkes; Lorna J. Martin; Shanaaz Mathews

2011-01-01

275

Theoretical nuclear reaction and structure studies using hyperons and photons. Progress report, January 1991--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report details research progress and results obtained during the 12 month period from January 1991 through 31 December 1991. The research project, entitled ``Theoretical Nuclear Reaction and Structure Studies Using Hyperons and Photons,`` is supported by grant DE-FG05-88ER40461 between North Carolina State University and the United States Department of Energy. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator, Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, has conducted a research program addressing theoretical investigations of reactions involving hyperons and photons. The new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following sections.

Cotanch, S.R.

1991-12-31

276

[Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary, [January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The past year has seen continued progress in our efforts. On the experimental side, we completed data acquisition on our major remaining involvement at NIKHEF, the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) experiment. We advanced the analysis of most of projects in low lying nuclear structure and giant resonances, of which several were completed and published. We received approval for several new experiments, and have made major contributions to design and development of detectors to be used at Bates and CEBAF. Our data interpretation efforts have been extended and enhanced with the availability of our new computer cluster. In this paper we briefly report on most of these efforts.

Not Available

1991-12-31

277

Dosimetry of transmission measurements in nuclear medicine: a study using anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters.  

PubMed

Quantification in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomographic (SPET) relies on attenuation correction which is generally obtained with an additional transmission measurement. Therefore, the evaluation of the radiation doses received by patients needs to include the contribution of transmission procedures in SPET (SPET-TM) and PET (PET-TM). In this work we have measured these doses for both PET-TM and SPET-TM. PET-TM was performed on an ECAT EXACT HR+ (CTI/Siemens) equipped with three rod sources of germanium-68 (380 MBq total) and extended septa. SPET-TM was performed on a DST (SMV) equipped with two collimated line sources of gadolinium-153 (4 GBq total). Two anthropomorphic phantoms representing a human head and a human torso, were used to estimate the doses absorbed in typical cardiac and brain transmission studies. Measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, consisting of lithium fluoride) having characteristics suitable for dosimetry investigations in nuclear medicine. Sets of TLDs were placed inside small plastic bags and then attached to different organs of the phantoms (at least two TLDs were assigned to a given organ). Before and after irradiation the TLDs were placed in a 2.5-cm-thick lead container to prevent exposure from occasional sources. Ambient radiation was monitored and taken into account in calculations. Transmission scans were performed for more than 12 h in each case to decrease statistical noise fluctuations. The doses absorbed by each organ were calculated by averaging the values obtained for each corresponding TLD. These values were used to evaluate the effective dose (ED) following guidelines described in ICRP report number 60. The estimated ED values for cardiac acquisitions were 7.7 x 10(-4) +/- 0.4 x 10(-4) mSv/MBq.h and 1.9 x 10(-6) +/- 0.4 x 10(-6) mSv/MBq.h for PET-TM and SPET-TM, respectively. For brain scans, the values of ED were calculated as 2.7 x 10(-4) +/- 0.2 x 10(-4) mSv/MBq.h for PET-TM and 5.2 x 10(-7) +/- 2.3 x 10(-7) mSv/MBq.h for SPET-TM. In our institution, PET-TM is usually performed for 15 min prior to emission. SPET-TM is performed simultaneously with emission and usually lasts 30 and 15 min for brain and cardiac acquisitions respectively. Under these conditions ED values, estimated for typical source activities at delivery time (22,000 MBq in SPET and 555 MBq for PET), were 1.1 x 10(-1) +/- 0.1 x 10(-1) mSv and 1.1 x 10(-2) +/- 0.2 x 10(-2) mSv for cardiac PET-TM and SPET-TM respectively. For brain acquisitions, the ED values obtained under the same conditions were 3.7 x 10(-2) +/- 0.3 x 10(-2) mSv and 5.8 x 10(-3) +/- 2.6 x 10(-3) mSv for PET-TM and SPET-TM respectively. These measurements show that the dose received by a patient during a transmission scan adds little to the typical dose received in a routine nuclear medicine procedure. Radiation dose, therefore, does not represent a limit to the generalised use of transmission measurements in clinical SPET or PET. PMID:9818285

Almeida, P; Bendriem, B; de Dreuille, O; Peltier, A; Perrot, C; Brulon, V

1998-10-01

278

Nuclear physics and astrophysics. Progress report for period June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on recent progress of research at the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics. During the past year, the authors continued to work on Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis, the solar neutrino problem, the equation of state for dense matter, the quark-hadron phase transition, and the origin of gamma-ray bursts; and began studying the consequences of nuclear reaction rates in the presence of strong magnetic fields. They have shown that the primordial production of B and Be cannot explain recent detections of these elements in halo stars and have looked at spallation as the likely source of these elements. By looking at nucleosynthesis with inhomogeneous initial conditions, they concluded that the Universe must have been very smooth before nucleosynthesis. They have also constrained neutrino oscillations and primordial magnetic fields by Big Bang nucleosynthesis. On the solar neutrino problem, they have analyzed the implications of the SAGE and GALLEX experiments. They also showed that the presence of dibaryons in neutron stars depends weakly on uncertainties of nuclear equations of state. They have started to investigate the consequences of strong magnetic fields on nuclear reactions and implications for neutron star cooling and supernova nucleosynthesis.

Schramm, D.N.; Olinto, A.V.

1993-06-01

279

General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of LASL are presented. The three programs involved are: general-purpose heat source development; space nuclear safety; and fuels program. Three impact tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high temperature reentry pulse and the use of CBCF on impact performance. Additionally, two /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ pellets were encapsulated in Ir-0.3% W for impact testing. Results of the clad development test and vent testing are noted. Results of the environmental tests are summarized. Progress on the Stirling isotope power systems test and the status of the improved MHW tests are indicated. The examination of the impact failure of the iridium shell of MHFT-65 at a fuel pass-through continued. A test plan was written for vibration testing of the assembled light-weight radioisotopic heater unit. Progress on fuel processing is reported.

Maraman, W.J.

1980-02-01

280

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, October 1December 31, 1985. Volume 5, No. 4  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced and Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Reports have been combined and are included in this report entitled, ''Safety Research Programs Sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research - Quarterly Progress Report.'' This progress report will describe current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Accident Evaluation,

1986-01-01

281

Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Nineteenth annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

Our effort is centered on radioactive decay studies of far-from-stable nuclides produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Progress is reported on the following studies: lifetime of the g/sub 7/2/ level in /sup 109/Ag; halflife of the h/sub 9/2/ level in /sup 187/Au; decay of 8.4 min /sup 187/Au ..-->.. /sup 187/Pt; orbital EC probabilities and decay energy of /sup 207/Bi; decay of 9 min /sup 201m/Po and 16 min /sup 201g/Po; decay of 2.5 min /sup 125/Ba; decay of 7.4 min /sup 203/At; exploration of neutron-deficient Sm, Pm, and Nd nuclides; preparation of thoron active deposit conversion electron sources; inception of nuclear laser spectroscopy at UNISOR; and nuclear structure calculations with nuclear models. Publications are listed. (WHK)

Fink, R.W.

1983-08-31

282

Implementation of test for quality assurance in nuclear medicine gamma camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In nuclear medicine (NM) over 90% of procedures are performed for diagnostic purposes. To ensure adequate diagnostic quality of images and the optimization of the doses received by patients originated from the radioactive material is essential for regular monitoring and equipment performance through a quality assurance program (QAP). The QAP consists of 15 proposed performance tomographic and not tomographic gamma camera (GC) tests, and is based on recommendations of international organizations. We describe some results of the performance parameters of QAP applied to a GC model e.cam Siemens, of the Department of NM of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The results were: (1) The average intrinsic spatial resolution (Rin) was 4.67 ± 0.25 mm at the limit of acceptance criterion of 4.4 mm. (2) The sensitivity extrinsic (Sext), with maximum variations of 1.8% (less than 2% which is the criterion of acceptance). (3) Rotational Uniformity (Urot), with values of integral uniformity (IU) in the useful field of view detector (UFOV), with maximum percentage change of 0.97% and monthly variations equal angles, ranging from 0.13 to 0.99% less than 1%. (4) The displacement of the center of rotation (DCOR), indicated a maximum deviation of 0.155 ± 0.039 mm less than 4.795 mm, an absolute deviation of less than 0.5 where pixel 0.085 pixel is suggested, the criteria are assigned to low-energy collimator high resolution. (5) In tomographic uniformity (Utomo), UI values (%) and percentage noise level (rms%) were 7.54 ± 1.53 and 4.18 ± 1.69 which are consistent with the limits of acceptance of 7.0-12.0% and 3.0-6.0% respectively. The smallest cold sphere has a diameter of 11.4 mm. The implementation of a QAP allows for high quality diagnostic images, optimization of the doses given to patients, a reduction of exposure to occupationally exposed workers (POE, by its Spanish acronym), and generally improves the productivity of the service. This proposal can be used to develop a similar QAP in other facilities and may serve as a precedent for the proposed regulations for quality assurance (QA) teams in MN.

Moreno, A. Montoya; Laguna, A. Rodríguez; Zamudio, Flavio E. Trujillo

2012-10-01

283

Development and validation of a fast voxel-based dose evaluation system in nuclear medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PET imaging has been widely used in the detection and staging of malignancies and the evaluation of patient-specific dosimetry for PET scans is important in nuclear medicine. However, patient-specific dosimetry can be estimated only by Monte Carlo methods which are usually time-consuming. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast dose evaluation system namely SimDOSE. SimDOSE is a Monte Carlo code embedded in SimSET with a dose scoring routine to record the deposited energy of the photons and electrons. Fluorine-18 is one of the most commonly used radionuclides that decay predominantly by positron emission. Only a 635 keV (Emax) positron and two annihilation photons should be concerned in F-18 radiation dosimetry, hence simulation is relatively simple. To evaluate the effects of resolution, an F-18 point source placed in a 20 cm diameter sphere filled with water was simulated by SimDOSE and GATE v6.1. Grid sizes of 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm were tested and each was simulated with a total of 107 decays. The resultant dose distribution functions were compared. Dose evaluation on ORNL phantom was also performed to validate the accuracy of SimDOSE. The grid size of phantom was set as 3 mm and the number of decays was 107. The S-values of liver computed by SimDOSE were compared with GATE and OLINDA (Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment) for 11C, 15O, and 18F.Finally, the CPU time of simulations was compared between SimDOSE and GATE. The dose profiles show the absorption doses located 3 mm outside the center are similar between SimDOSE and GATE. However, 71% (19%) difference of the center dose between SimDOSE and GATE are observed for 1 mm (3 mm) grid. The differences of the profile lie in the assumption in SimDOSE that all kinetic energies of electrons are locally absorbed. The ratios of S values of (SimDOSE/OLINDA) range from 0.95 to 1.11 with a mean value of 1.02±0.043. To compare simulation time from SimDOSE to GATE for calculation of 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm gird point source and S values of ORNL phantom are 1.3%, 1.2%, 1.2% and 1.2%, respectively. In conclusion, SimDOSE is an efficient and accurate toolkit to generate patient-specific dose distribution in clinical PET application.

Lu, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Dong, Shang-Lung; Wu, Jay; Ni, Yu-Ching; Jan, Meei-Ling

2014-11-01

284

Nuclear medicine dynamic investigations in the diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the hepatic hemodynamics in the Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) using per-rectal portal scintigraphy (PRPS) and liver angioscintigraphy (LAS). METHODS: Fourteen consecutive patients with BCS were evaluated by PRPS between 2003 and 2012. Ten of them underwent LAS and liver scan (LS) with Tc-99m colloid. Eleven patients had clinical manifestations and three were asymptomatic, incidentally diagnosed at PRPS. The control group included 15 healthy subjects. We used new parameters at PRPS, the liver transit time of portal inflow and the blood circulation time between the right heart and liver. PRPS offered information on the hepatic areas missing venous outflow or portal inflow, length and extent of the lesions, open portosystemic shunts (PSS), involvement of the caudate lobe (CL) as an intrahepatic shunt and flow reversal in the splenic vein. LAS was useful in the differential diagnosis between the BCS and portal obstructions, highlighting the hepatic artery buffer response and reversed portal flow. LS offered complementary data, especially on the CL. RESULTS: We described three hemodynamic categories of the BCS with several subtypes and stages, based on the finding that perfusion changes depend on the initial number and succession in time of the hepatic veins (HVs) obstructions. Obstruction of one hepatic vein (HV) did not cause opening of PSS. The BCS debuted by common obstruction of two HVs had different hemodynamic aspects in acute and chronic stages after subsequent obstruction of the third HV. In chronic stages, obstruction of two HVs resulted in opening of PSS. The BCS, determined by thrombosis of the terminal part of the inferior vena cava, presented in the acute stage with open PSS with low speed flow. At least several weeks are required in the obstructions of two or three HVs for the spontaneous opening of dynamically efficient PSS. The CL seems to have only a transient important role of intrahepatic shunt in several types of the BCS. CONCLUSION: Dynamic nuclear medicine investigations assess the extent and length of hepatic venous obstructions, open collaterals, areas without portal inflow, hemodynamic function of the CL and reverse venous flow. PMID:24799994

Dragoteanu, Mircea; Balea, Ioan-Adrian; Piglesan, Cecilia-Diana

2014-01-01

285

Knowledge about the availability of the pharmacist in the Nuclear Medicine Department: A questionnaire-based study among health-care professionals  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the knowledge about the availability of the pharmacist in the nuclear medicine department among health-care professionals through a prospective cohort study. Methods: A total of 741 health-care professionals participated in the study by answering 10 simple questions about the role of the pharmacist in the nuclear medicine department and the availability of pharmacist in the nuclear medicine department. An online questionnaire system was used to conduct the study, and participants were invited to participate through personal communications and by promoting the study through social websites including Facebook, LinkedIn and Google (including Gmail and Google+). The study was conducted between April 2013 and March 2014 using the http://www.freeonlinesurveys.com/Webserver. Finally, the data provided by 621 participants was analyzed. Group frequency analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 (SPSS Inc. USA). Results: The participants were from Malaysia, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, UAE and Nepal. In total, 312 (50.2%) female health-care professionals and 309 (49.8%) male health-care professionals participated in the study. Of the 621 participants, 390 were working in hospitals, and 231 were not working in hospitals. Of the participants who were working in hospitals, 57.6% were pharmacists. The proportion of study participants who were aware of nuclear pharmacists was 55.39%. Awareness about the role of the pharmacist in nuclear medicine was poor. Conclusion: The role of the pharmacist in a nuclear medicine unit needs to be highlighted and promoted among health-care professionals and hence that the nuclear medicine team can provide better pharmaceutical care.

Parasuraman, Subramani; Mueen Ahmed, K.K.; Bin Hashim, Tin Soe @ Saifullah; Muralidharan, Selvadurai; Kumar, Kalaimani Jayaraja; Ping, Wu Yet; Syamittra, Balakrishnan; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam Arumugam

2014-01-01

286

Occupational exposure at the Department of Nuclear Medicine as a work environment: A 19-year follow-up  

PubMed Central

Summary Background: This study assessed the radiation safety at Nuclear Medicine Department being a work environment. Ionizing radiation exposure of the employees in the last 19 years and the effects of legislative changes in radiological protection were analyzed. Material/Methods: All employees of the investigated department were regularly and individually monitored using chest badges equipped with Kodak film type 2. Overall, 629 annual doses of the employees of nuclear medicine department, registered in the period 1991–2009, were analyzed statistically. Results: Technicians were found to be the largest exposed professional group, whereas nurses received the highest annual doses. Physicians received an average annual dose at the border detection methods. Ancillary and administration staff occasionally received doses above the method detection limit (MDL). The average annual dose for all dosimetry records was 0.7 mSv, and that for dosimetry records equal and higher than MDL was 2.2 mSv. Conclusions: There was no case of an exceeded dose limit for a worker. Furthermore, improvement of radiological protection had a significant impact on the reduction of doses for the most exposed employees. PMID:22802825

Piwowarska-Bilska, Hanna; Birkenfeld, Bo?ena; Gwardy?, Aleksandra; Supi?ska, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Maria H.; Elbl, Bogumi?a; Cicho?-Ba?kowska, Katarzyna

2011-01-01

287

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01

288

On-line nuclear orientation. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during the extended final year (April 1, 1992 to December 31, 1993) and summarizes the accomplishments of the entire three-year period (April 1, 1990 through December 31, 1993) of the current US Department of Energy grant DE-FG06-87ER40345. This work is carried out primarily at the UNISOR (University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge) facility of the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary mission of this work is the study of the structure and properties of nuclei far from stability through on-line nuclear orientation using the UNISOR Nuclear Orientation Facility, a helium dilution refrigerator coupled on-line to the UNISOR mass separator. The author`s group was one of the original proposers of this facility and played a central role in its design, construction, and development. The structure of nuclei far from stability is in general poorly known. Knowledge from heavy-ion reactions is generally limited to states on or near the yrast line, and thus a great deal of the low-energy structure, especially that at low spin, is often missed in such studies. The large beta-decay energies, on the other hand, result in the population of a multitude of states which often give a reasonably complete picture of the complex structure of these nuclei. The goal of this work is to use the nuclear orientation facility in conjunction with other UNISOR capabilities to examine and to understand the structure of these nuclei.

Krane, K.S.

1993-12-31

289

Pilot Quasi-Randomized Controlled Study of Herbal Medicine Hochuekkito as an Adjunct to Conventional Treatment for Progressed Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Disease  

PubMed Central

Introduction Hochuekkito, a traditional herbal medicine, is occasionally prescribed in Japan to treat patients with a poor general condition. We aimed to examine whether this medicine was beneficial and tolerable for patients with progressed pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Methods This pilot open-label quasi-randomized controlled trial enrolled 18 patients with progressed pulmonary MAC disease who had initiated antimycobacterial treatment over one year ago but were persistently culture-positive or intolerant. All patients continued their baseline treatment regimens with (n?=?9) or without (n?=?9) oral Hochuekkito for 24 weeks. Results Baseline characteristics were generally similar between the groups. Most patients were elderly (median age 70 years), female, had a low body mass index (<20 kg/m2), and a long-term disease duration (median approximately 8 years). After the 24-week treatment period, no patient achieved sputum conversion. Although the number of colonies in sputum tended to increase in the control group, it generally remained stable in the Hochuekkito group. Radiological disease control was frequently observed in the Hochuekkito group than the control group (8/9 vs. 3/9; p?=?0.05). Patients in the Hochuekkito group tended to experience increase in body weight and serum albumin level compared with those in the control group (median body weight change: +0.4 kg vs. ?0.8 kg; median albumin change: +0.2 g/dl vs. ±0.0 g/dl). No severe adverse events occurred. Conclusions Hochuekkito could be an effective, feasible adjunct to conventional therapy for patients with progressed pulmonary MAC disease. Future study is needed to explore this possibility. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000009920 PMID:25093868

Enomoto, Yasunori; Hagiwara, Eri; Komatsu, Shigeru; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Baba, Tomohisa; Kitamura, Hideya; Sekine, Akimasa; Nakazawa, Atsuhito; Ogura, Takashi

2014-01-01

290

Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the contribution of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations for the fourth quarter of FY-81. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: waste package development; nuclide migration experiments in G tunnel-laboratory studies; geochemistry of tuff; mineralogy-petrology of tuff; volcanism studies; rock physics studies; exploratory shaft; and quality assurance.

Daniels, W R; Wolfsberg, K; Vaniman, D T; Erdal, B R [comps.] [comps.

1982-01-01

291

Recent Progress of Research on Herbal Products Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine: the Herbs belonging to The Divine Husbandman's Herbal Foundation Canon (????? Shén Nóng B?n C?o J?ng)  

PubMed Central

This article will review selected herbal products from Chinese Materia Medica that are used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The herbs come from the upper, middle, and lower class medicines as listed in The Divine Husbandman's Herbal Foundation Canon (????? Shén Nóng B?n C?o J?ng). The review will focus on the active constituents of the herbs and their bioactivities, with emphasis on the most recent progress in research for the period of 2003 to 2011. PMID:24716110

Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan; Qian, Keduo; Dong, Yizhou; Yang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ting; Belding, Eileen; Wu, Shou-Fang; Wada, Koji; Akiyama, Toshiyuki

2012-01-01

292

Nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s through the mid-1970s and occupational radiation doses to technologists from diagnostic radioisotope procedures.  

PubMed

Data on occupational radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures for the time period of the 1950s through the 1970s is important for retrospective health risk studies of medical personnel who conducted those activities. However, limited information is available on occupational exposure received by physicians and technologists who performed nuclear medicine procedures during those years. To better understand and characterize historical radiation exposures to technologists, the authors collected information on nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. To collect historical data needed to reconstruct doses to technologists, a focus group interview was held with experts who began using radioisotopes in medicine in the 1950s and the 1960s. Typical protocols and descriptions of clinical practices of diagnostic radioisotope procedures were defined by the focus group and were used to estimate occupational doses received by personnel, per nuclear medicine procedure, conducted in the 1950s to 1960s using radiopharmaceuticals available at that time. The radionuclide activities in the organs of the reference patient were calculated using the biokinetic models described in ICRP Publication 53. Air kerma rates as a function of distance from a reference patient were calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using a hybrid computational phantom. Estimates of occupational doses to nuclear medicine technologists per procedure were found to vary from less than 0.01 ?Sv (thyroid scan with 1.85 MBq of administered I-iodide) to 0.4 ?Sv (brain scan with 26 MBq of Hg-chlormerodin). Occupational doses for the same diagnostic procedures starting in the mid-1960s but using Tc were also estimated. The doses estimated in this study show that the introduction of Tc resulted in an increase in occupational doses per procedure. PMID:25162420

Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Mettler, Fred A; Beckner, William M; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Kirchner, Peter T; Langan, James K; Reba, Richard C; Smith, Gary T; Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S; Melo, Dunstana R; Lee, Choonsik; Simon, Steven L

2014-10-01

293

Inhibition of Nuclear Factor ?B Activation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Aqueous Extracts of Hispanic Medicinal Herbs  

PubMed Central

Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a primary choice of therapy for diseases with a chronic inflammatory component. Unfortunately, long-term NSAID therapy is often accompanied by severe side effects, including cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Because of this, there is critical need for identification of new and safer treatments for chronic inflammation to circumvent these side effects. Inflammatory diseases have been successfully remedied with natural herbs by many cultures. To better understand the potential of natural herbs in treating chronic inflammation and to identify their mechanism of action, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of 20 medicinal herbs commonly used in the Hispanic culture. We have established a standardized method for preparing aqueous extracts (teas) from the selected medicinal herbs and screened for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-?-induced activation of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), which is the central signaling pathway of the inflammatory response. A number of herbal teas were identified that exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity. In particular, tea from the herb commonly called laurel was found to be an especially potent inhibitor of NF-?B-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression and prostaglandin E2 production in cultured murine macrophages. These findings indicate that laurel tea extract contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds that function by inhibiting the major signal transduction pathway responsible for inducing an inflammatory event. Based on these results, laurel may represent a new, safe therapeutic agent for managing chronic inflammation. PMID:20482259

Gonzales, Amanda M.; Hunsaker, Lucy A.; Franco, Carolina R.; Royer, Robert E.; Vander Jagt, David L.; Vander Jagt, Dorothy J.

2010-01-01

294

Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with fluka Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, fluka Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, fluka has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. Methods: fluka DPKs have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10{sup -3} MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy ({sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re). Point isotropic sources have been simulated at the center of a water (bone) sphere, and deposed energy has been tallied in concentric shells. fluka outcomes have been compared to penelope v.2008 results, calculated in this study as well. Moreover, in case of monoenergetic electrons in water, comparison with the data from the literature (etran, geant4, mcnpx) has been done. Maximum percentage differences within 0.8{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} and 0.9{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} for monoenergetic electrons (R{sub CSDA} being the continuous slowing down approximation range) and within 0.8{center_dot}X{sub 90} and 0.9{center_dot}X{sub 90} for isotopes (X{sub 90} being the radius of the sphere in which 90% of the emitted energy is absorbed) have been computed, together with the average percentage difference within 0.9{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} and 0.9{center_dot}X{sub 90} for electrons and isotopes, respectively. Results: Concerning monoenergetic electrons, within 0.8{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} (where 90%-97% of the particle energy is deposed), fluka and penelope agree mostly within 7%, except for 10 and 20 keV electrons (12% in water, 8.3% in bone). The discrepancies between fluka and the other codes are of the same order of magnitude than those observed when comparing the other codes among them, which can be referred to the different simulation algorithms. When considering the beta spectra, discrepancies notably reduce: within 0.9{center_dot}X{sub 90}, fluka and penelope differ for less than 1% in water and less than 2% in bone with any of the isotopes here considered. Complete data of fluka DPKs are given as Supplementary Material as a tool to perform dosimetry by analytical point kernel convolution. Conclusions: fluka provides reliable results when transporting electrons in the low energy range, proving to be an adequate tool for nuclear medicine dosimetry.

Botta, F.; Mairani, A.; Battistoni, G.; Cremonesi, M.; Di Dia, A.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, M.; Paganelli, G.; Pedroli, G.; Valente, M. [Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (I.N.F.N.), Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Nuclear Medicine Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 2014 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba and CONICET, Cordoba, Argentina C.P. 5000 (Argentina)

2011-07-15

295

Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with fluka Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy  

SciTech Connect

The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, fluka Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, fluka has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one.Methods: fluka DPKs have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10–3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy (89Sr, 90Y, 131I, 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, and 188Re). Point isotropic sources have been simulated at the center of a water (bone) sphere, and deposed energy has been tallied in concentric shells. fluka outcomes have been compared to penelope v.2008 results, calculated in this study as well. Moreover, in case of monoenergetic electrons in water, comparison with the data from the literature (etran, geant4, mcnpx) has been done. Maximum percentage differences within 0.8·RCSDA and 0.9·RCSDA for monoenergetic electrons (RCSDA being the continuous slowing down approximation range) and within 0.8·X90 and 0.9·X90 for isotopes (X90 being the radius of the sphere in which 90% of the emitted energy is absorbed) have been computed, together with the average percentage difference within 0.9·RCSDA and 0.9·X90 for electrons and isotopes, respectively.Results: Concerning monoenergetic electrons, within 0.8·RCSDA (where 90%–97% of the particle energy is deposed), fluka and penelope agree mostly within 7%, except for 10 and 20 keV electrons (12% in water, 8.3% in bone). The discrepancies between fluka and the other codes are of the same order of magnitude than those observed when comparing the other codes among them, which can be referred to the different simulation algorithms. When considering the beta spectra, discrepancies notably reduce: within 0.9·X90, fluka and penelope differ for less than 1% in water and less than 2% in bone with any of the isotopes here considered. Complete data of fluka DPKs are given as Supplementary Material as a tool to perform dosimetry by analytical point kernel convolution.Conclusions: fluka provides reliable results when transporting electrons in the low energy range, proving to be an adequate tool for nuclear medicine dosimetry.

Botta, F; Di Dia, A; Pedroli, G; Mairani, A; Battistoni, G; Fasso, A; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, M; Paganelli, G

2011-06-01

296

Design and manufacturing of anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom for use in nuclear medicine centres in Chile.  

PubMed

Anthropomorphic phantoms are used in nuclear medicine for imaging quality control, calibration of gamma spectrometry system for the study of internal contamination with radionuclides and for internal dosimetric studies. These are constructed of materials that have radiation attenuation coefficients similar to those of the different organs and tissues of the human body. The material usually used for the manufacture of phantoms is polymethyl methacrylate. Other materials used for this purpose are polyethylene, polystyrene and epoxy resin. This project presents the design and manufacture of an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom that includes the cervical spine, trachea and oesophagus, using a polyester resin (? = 1.1 g cm(-3)). Its linear and mass attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined and simulated by means of XCOM software, finding that this material reproduces the soft tissue ICRU-44 in a range of energies between 80 keV and 11 MeV, with less than a 5 % difference. PMID:24567500

Hermosilla, A; Díaz Londoño, G; García, M; Ruíz, F; Andrade, P; Pérez, A

2014-12-01

297

Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator is associated with tumor growth and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.  

PubMed

bHLH/PAS proteins play important roles in tumor progression. Lost or reduced expression of single-minded homolog 2 (SIM) as well as aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) has been observed in cancerous human tissues. Here, we investigated the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), another bHLH/PAS protein, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry, we found that intratumoral ARNT was inversely correlated with time to recurrence and overall survival of HCC patients after resection. Knockdown of ARNT in HepG2, HCCLM3 and HCCLM6 cells significantly shortened cell doubling time, increased S-phase cell populations and accelerated in vivo HCCLM6 growth and metastasis. After ARNT expression was rescued, prolonged cell doubling time and decreased S-phase cell populations were observed in HepG2, HCCLM3 and HCCLM6 cells. And, HCCLM6 growth and metastasis in vivo were remarkably inhibited. Screening by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and PCR arrays revealed that cyclin E1, CDK2, Fos and Jun were negatively regulated by ARNT, whereas CDKN1C, CNKN2A, CDKN2B, MAPK11 and MAPK14 were positively regulated in HCC. According to the results of immunoprecipitation assay, both ARNT/ARNT and ARNT/AHRR complexes were clearly formed in HCCLM6 xenograft with increased ARNT expression. In summary, ARNT is an important regulator of HCC growth and metastasis and could be a promising prognostic candidate in HCC patients. PMID:21544813

Liang, Ying; Li, Wei-Wei; Yang, Bi-Wei; Tao, Zhong-Hua; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Lu; Xia, Jing-Lin; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You; Fan, Jia; Wu, Wei-Zhong

2012-04-15

298

Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored. This report summarizes the progress achieved after only seven months of work on a three-year project.'

Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.

1998-06-01

299

Progress on an integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability for plasma chamber nuclear components  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the behavior of a plasma chamber component in the fusion environment requires a simulation technique that is capable of integrating multi-disciplinary computational codes while appropriately treating geometric heterogeneity and complexity. Such a tool should be able to interpret phenomena from mutually dependent scientific disciplines and predict performance with sufficient accuracy and consistency. Integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability (ISPC) relies upon advanced numerical simulation techniques and is being applied to ITER first wall/shield and Test Blanket Module (TBM) designs. In this paper, progress in ISPC development is described through the presentation of a number of integrated simulations. The simulations cover key physical phenomena encountered in a fusion plasma chamber system, including tritium permeation, fluid dynamics, and structure mechanics. Interface engines were developed in order to pass field data, such as surface deformation or nuclear heating rate, from the structural analysis to the thermo-fluid MHD analysis code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) velocity profile assessments, or from the neutronics analysis to the thermo-fluid analysis for temperature calculations, respectively. Near-term effort toward further ISPC development is discussed.

A. Ying; M. Abdou; H. Zhang; R. Munipalli; M. Ulrickson; M. Sawan; B. Merrill

2010-12-01

300

Nuclear-waste-management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development, alternate waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1981-12-01

301

Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications. (GHT)

Not Available

1980-06-01

302

Boron in nuclear medicine: New synthetic approaches to PET and SPECT  

SciTech Connect

This annual progress report describes new methods of incorporation of radioiodine into physiologically active compounds (amphetamines), and the use of organoboranes to labeled radiopharmaceuticals with Oxygen- 15, Nitrogen-13, carbon-11 and fluorine-18. Preclinical studies are also reported on evaluation of butyothiophenones as agents acting at dopaminergic or serotonic synapses.

Kabalka, G.W.

1992-09-01

303

Nuclear war in the Middle East: where is the voice of medicine and public health.  

PubMed

Once again, the politically volatile Middle East and accompanying rhetoric has escalated the risk of a major nuclear exchange. Diplomatic efforts have failed to make the medical consequences of such an exchange a leading element in negotiations. The medical and academic communities share this denial. Without exaggeration, the harsh reality of the enormous consequences of an imminently conceivable nuclear war between Iran and Israel will encompass an unprecedented millions of dead and an unavoidable decline in public health and environmental devastation that would impact major populations in the Middle East for decades to come. Nuclear deterrence and the uncomfortable but real medical and public health consequences must become an integral part of a broader global health diplomacy that emphasizes health security along with poverty reduction and good governance. PMID:22509536

Dallas, Cham E; Burkle, Frederick M

2011-10-01

304

Adjusting to progress: interactions between the National Library of Medicine and health sciences librarians, 1961–2001*  

PubMed Central

Most health sciences librarians would agree that the National Library of Medicine's (NLM's) leadership and its services have been highly beneficial to the field, but this does not prevent specific NLM actions—or lack of action—from being perceived as annoying or infuriating. Over the past forty years, NLM's interactions with health sciences librarians have been affected by significant additions to NLM's mission and services, the expansion of NLM's direct user groups, and the growing range of possible relationships between health sciences librarians and NLM. The greatest friction between NLM and health services librarians occurs when there is a fundamental change in the way NLM carries out its mission—a change that adds to the web of relationships that link librarians and NLM and prompts corresponding changes in the way other libraries do business. Between 1961 and 2001, there were two such fundamental changes: the implementation of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and the development and promotion of services targeted toward individual health professionals. On a lesser scale, each new service that connects NLM and health sciences librarians is another potential source of irritation, ready to flare up when the service is interrupted, changed, or eliminated. Other factors—including strong personalities, mistakes, and poor communication—add to, but do not cause, the intermittent problems between NLM and its most longstanding and engaged user group. These problems are in essence the price we pay for the leadership and vision of NLM's directors and for NLM's success in developing excellent services and in enhancing them based on advice from librarians and other users. PMID:11838459

Humphreys, Betsy L.

2002-01-01

305

Population radiation dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the Tehran population in 1999-2003: striking changes in only one decade.  

PubMed

Use of unsealed radiopharmaceuticals in Iran's nuclear medicine centers has expanded rapidly in the last decade. As part of a nationwide survey, this study was undertaken to estimate the radiation risk due to the diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures performed in Tehran in 1999-2003. During the five years of the study, the data of 101,540 yearly examinations of diagnostic nuclear medicine were obtained for 34 (out of 40) active nuclear medicine centers in Tehran. The patients studied were aged 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, and adults (>15 y). Compared to an earlier investigation in 1989 (which was published in 1995), striking changes were found to be occurring in the trends of nuclear medicine in Tehran in a matter of a decade. The frequency of cardiac examinations increased from less than 1% in 1989 to 43.2% (mean of 5 y) in 2003; thyroid examinations, with the relative frequency of higher than 80% in 1989, decreased to 26.7% in the current investigation (averaged for 2001); and the number of overall examinations per 1,000 population of Tehran increased from 1.9 in 1989 to 8.8 in this study (about fourfold). The decrease in relative frequency of thyroid examinations could be attributed to the lower referral policy (mainly by specialists), decreased incidence of goiter due to implementation of programs for iodine enrichment diets, introduction of fine needle aspiration (FNA), and sonography techniques for diagnosis of thyroid disease. The large increase in relative frequency of cardiac examinations could be due to the increase in the number of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) systems in recent years as compared to 1989 in Tehran. The collective effective dose increased from 400 (person-Sv) in 1999 to 529 (person-Sv) in 2003, and the effective dose per capita increased from 34.80 ?Sv in 1999 to 44.06 ?Sv in 2003 (average, 35.60 ?Sv). PMID:23274814

Tabeie, Faraj; Mohammadi, Hooshang; Asli, Isa Neshandar

2013-02-01

306

PROGRESS REPORT. CORROSION OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL: THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The successful disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is one of the most serious challenges to the success of the nuclear fuel cycle and the future of nuclear power generation. Spent nuclear fuel is essentially UO2 with approximately 4-5 atomic percent actinides and fission product...

307

Radiopharmaceuticals 1994. Nil desperandum. European Association of Nuclear Medicine Committees on Radiopharmaceuticals and Positron Emission Tomography.  

PubMed

On the basis of the discussions at a symposium held in Düsseldorf and attended by representatives of various interested bodies, European legislation as it affects radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed. Due consideration is given to the new, centralised and decentralised, registration procedures, effective since 1 January 1995. The dossier required to support an application for marketing authorisation is discussed, separate consideration being given to single-photon emitters, therapeutic radio-nuclides and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The role of the European Pharmacopoiea is also considered. It is concluded that the new, modified procedures for the registration of medicinal products in the European Union may actually inhibit free availability of radio-pharmaceuticals within the Community, and that there is a strong case for modification of the European Directives so that radiopharmaceuticals are placed in a separate category to therapeutic drugs, with less stringent registration requirements. PMID:7556305

Cox, P H; Meyer, G J

1995-06-01

308

Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report, June 1, 1980-May 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Research in nuclear spectroscopy at University of Tennessee from June 1980 through May 1981 is summarized. Topics covered include: radioactive decay studies; high spin states; inelastic scattering and reactions of heavy ions from deformed nuclei; and nuclear structure theory. (GHT)

Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Guidry, M.W.

1981-03-01

309

A traditional herbal medicine enhances bilirubin clearance by activating the nuclear receptor CAR  

PubMed Central

Yin Zhi Huang, a decoction of Yin Chin (Artemisia capillaris) and three other herbs, is widely used in Asia to prevent and treat neonatal jaundice. We recently identified the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a key regulator of bilirubin clearance in the liver. Here we show that treatment of WT and humanized CAR transgenic mice with Yin Zhi Huang for 3 days accelerates the clearance of intravenously infused bilirubin. This effect is absent in CAR knockout animals. Expression of bilirubin glucuronyl transferase and other components of the bilirubin metabolism pathway is induced by Yin Zhi Huang treatment of WT mice or mice expressing only human CAR, but not CAR knockout animals. 6,7-Dimethylesculetin, a compound present in Yin Chin, activates CAR in primary hepatocytes from both WT and humanized CAR mice and accelerates bilirubin clearance in vivo. We conclude that CAR mediates the effects of Yin Zhi Huang on bilirubin clearance and that 6,7-dimethylesculetin is an active component of this herbal medicine. CAR is a potential target for the development of new drugs to treat neonatal, genetic, or acquired forms of jaundice. PMID:14702117

Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Jun; Moore, David D.

2004-01-01

310

Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)  

SciTech Connect

This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index.

Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

1982-06-01

311

Diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate administration protocol for radiological emergency medicine in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants.  

PubMed

Inhalation therapy of diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate (DTPA) should be initiated immediately to workers who have significant incorporation of plutonium, americium or curium in the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. A newly designed electric mesh nebulizer is a small battery-operated passive vibrating mesh device, in which vibrations in an ultrasonic horn are used to force drug solution through a mesh of micron-sized holes. This nebulizer enables DTPA administration at an early stage in the event of a radiation emergency from contamination from the above radioactive metals. PMID:18274997

Jin, Yutaka

2008-01-01

312

Recent progress in applications of high energy ion beams to nuclear structure and atomic physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss some recent experiments at the Bevalac which demonstrate the usefulness of relativistic heavy ion beams for study of the nuclear structure of radioactive isotopes. This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract

T. J. M. Symons

1986-01-01

313

Variable-pitch rectangular cross-section radiofrequency coils for the nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance investigation of sealed medicines packets.  

PubMed

The performance of rectangular radio frequency (RF) coils capable of being used to detect nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals from blister packs of medicines has been compared. The performance of a fixed-pitch RF coil was compared with that from two variable-pitch coils, one based on a design in the literature and the other optimized to obtain the most homogeneous RF field over the whole volume of the coil. It has been shown from (14)N NQR measurements with two medicines, the antibiotic ampicillin (as trihydrate) and the analgesic medicine Paracetamol, that the latter design gives NQR signal intensities almost independent of the distribution of the capsules or pills within the RF coil and is therefore more suitable for quantitative analysis. PMID:23057555

Barras, Jamie; Katsura, Shota; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Itozaki, Hideo; Kyriakidou, Georgia; Rowe, Michael D; Althoefer, Kaspar A; Smith, John A S

2012-11-01

314

Usefulness of specific calibration coefficients for gamma-emitting sources measured by radionuclide calibrators in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In nuclear medicine, the activity of a radionuclide is measured with a radionuclide calibrator that often has a calibration coefficient independent of the container type and filling. Methods: To determine the effect of the container on the accuracy of measuring the activity injected into a patient, The authors simulated a commercial radionuclide calibrator and 18 container types most typically used in clinical practice. The instrument sensitivity was computed for various container thicknesses and filling levels. Monoenergetic photons and electrons as well as seven common radionuclides were considered. Results: The quality of the simulation with gamma-emitting sources was validated by an agreement with measurements better than 4% in five selected radionuclides. The results show that the measured activity can vary by more than a factor of 2 depending on the type of container. The filling level and the thickness of the container wall only have a marginal effect for radionuclides of high energy but could induce differences up to 4%. Conclusions: The authors conclude that radionuclide calibrators should be tailored to the uncertainty required by clinical applications. For most clinical cases, and at least for the low-energy gamma and x-ray emitters, measurements should be performed with calibration coefficients specific to the container type.

Bochud, Francois O.; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Baechler, Sebastien; Kosinski, Marek; Bailat, Claude J. [Institute of Radiation Physics, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Rue du Grand-Pre 1, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2011-07-15

315

Specificity and sensitivity of SPECT myocardial perfusion studies at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) performed at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Limassol General Hospital in Cyprus. Through a retrospective analysis, patient results obtained by MPI were compared to results obtained by Invasive Angiography. We analyzed data from 96 patients that underwent both MPI and Angiography during the years 2009-2010, with a maximum time interval of ± 9 months between the two types of medical exams. For 51 patients, the indication was the detection of CAD. For 45 patients, the indication was to assess viability and/or ischemia after MI, PCI or CABG. Out of 84 patients with CAD confirmed by angiography, 80 patients resulted in abnormal MPI (sensitivity of 95% and positive predictive value of 98%). Out of 12 patients with normal coronaries, 10 patients resulted in normal MPI (specificity of 83% and negative predictive value of 71%).In conclusion, for the patients with abnormal MPI and confirmed CAD, MPI was a useful aid for further therapy management.

Koumna, S.; Yiannakkaras, Ch; Avraamides, P.; Demetriadou, O.

2011-09-01

316

Multivendor nuclear medicine PACS provide fully digital clinical operation at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an effort to improve patient care while considering cost-effectiveness, we developed a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), which combines imaging cameras, computers and other peripheral equipment from multiple nuclear medicine vectors. The PACS provides fully-digital clinical operation which includes acquisition and automatic organization of patient data, distribution of the data to all networked units inside the department and other remote locations, digital analysis and quantitation of images, digital diagnostic reading of image studies and permanent data archival with the ability for fast retrieval. The PACS enabled us to significantly reduce the amount of film used, and we are currently proceeding with implementing a film-less laboratory. Hard copies are produced on paper or transparent sheets for non-digitally connected parts of the hospital. The PACS provides full-digital operation which is faster, more reliable, better organized and managed, and overall more efficient than a conventional film-based operation. In this paper, the integration of the various PACS components from multiple vendors is reviewed, and the impact of PACS, with its advantages and limitations on our clinical operation is analyzed.

Georgiou, Mike F.; Sfakianakis, George N.; Johnson, Gary; Douligeris, Christos; Scandar, Silvia; Eisler, E.; Binkley, B.

1994-05-01

317

Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

Not Available

1994-04-01

318

Molecular authentication of the medicinal herb Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae) and an adulterant using nuclear and chloroplast DNA markers.  

PubMed

Dried parts of different plant species often look alike, especially in powdered form, making them very difficult to identify. Ruta graveolens, sold as a dried medicinal herb, can be adulterated with Euphorbia dracunculoides. The genomic DNA was isolated from the leaf powder (100 mg each) using the modified CTAB method. Internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA-ITS), and chloroplast spacer sequences (rpoB and rpoC1) are regarded as potential genes for plant DNA barcoding. We amplified and sequenced these spacer sequences and confirmed the sequences with a BLAST search. Sequence alignment was performed using ClustalX to look for differences in the sequences. A DNA marker was developed based on rpoB and rpoC1 of the nrDNA-ITS for the identification of the adulterant E. dracunculoides in samples of R. graveolens that are sold in local herbal markets. Sequence-characterized amplified region markers of 289 and 264 bp for R. graveolens and 424 bp for E. dracunculoides were developed from dissimilar sequences of this nrDNA-ITS to speed up the authentication process. This marker successfully distinguished these species in extracted samples with as little as 5 ng DNA/?L extract. PMID:22095605

Al-Qurainy, F; Khan, S; Tarroum, M; Al-Hemaid, F M; Ali, M A

2011-01-01

319

Radiation Exposure Levels in Diagnostic Patients Injected with 99mTc, 67Ga and 131I at the Mexican National Institute of Cancerology Nuclear Medicine Department  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

According to the Mexican Radiation Safety regulations for patients treated in a nuclear medicine service, the exposure rate limit at 1 m from the patients is 5 mR/h before leaving the hospital. Three groups of patients have been monitored after: a) whole body bone studies with 740 MBq of 99mTc-MDP (207 patients); b) infection studies after i.v. administration of 185 MBq of 67Ga (207 patients); and c) thyroid studies with 185 MBq of 131I (142 patients). The results indicated that the average exposure rate levels in each group were: a) 0.57 ± 0.17 mR/h, b) 0.47 ± 0.20 mR/h, and c) 0.86 ± 0.14 mR/h. This study has shown that the Nuclear Medicine Department at INCAN complies with the NOM-013-NUCL-1995 Mexican regulation.

Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; Gómez-Argumosa, E.; Estrada-Lobato, E.; Medina, L. A.

2006-09-01

320

Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

Davis, H. S.

1984-01-01

321

Radiation dose to technicians per nuclear medicine procedure: comparison between technetium-99m, gallium-67, and iodine-131 radiotracers and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The aim of this study was to determine the non-extremity gamma dose received by a technician while performing an ordinary\\u000a nuclear medicine procedure or a static (i.e. without blood sampling) fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission\\u000a tomography (PET) study. The dose per patient was measured by means of a commercial electronic pocket Geiger Mueller dosimeter,\\u000a worn in the upper left

C. Chiesa; V. De Sanctis; F. Crippa; M. Schiavini; C. E. Fraigola; A. Bogni; C. Pascali; D. Decise; R. Marchesini; E. Bombardieri

1997-01-01

322

Preventive Medicine Redefined.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Departments of preventive medicine can survive through unity, which can be achieved through majority agreement on a new and specific definition of preventive medicine. A definition is proposed that is based on a review and analysis of recent progress in the prevention of the major causes of mortality. (MLW)

Moore, George

1981-01-01

323

Nuclear Safety. Technical Progress Journal, October--December 1991: Volume 32, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

Not Available

1991-01-01

324

Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.  

PubMed

The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients. PMID:10334720

Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

1999-01-01

325

The Intl Conf Fully 3D Image Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Saint Malo, France, pp. PM1-4, 2003 1 Abstract--Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of deaths  

E-print Network

The Intl Conf Fully 3D Image Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Saint Malo, France of Radiology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA (phone: 631- 444-7837; fax: 631, WI 53201, USA. Wang is with the Department of Radiology, University of Iowa School of Medicine, Iowa

326

Development of Career Opportunities for Technicians in the Nuclear Medicine Field, Phase I. Interim Report Number 1: Survey of Job Characteristics, Manpower Needs and Training Resources, July 1969.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Phase I of a multiphase research program in progress at the Technical Education Research Center, Inc., was conducted to analyze needs and resources in terms of job performance tasks, career opportunities, and training requirements for nuclear medical technicians. Data were gathered through personal interviews with 203 persons, mostly physicians,…

Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

327

Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A {approx_equal} 182 region, structure of {sup 182}Hg and {sup 182}Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm and the anomalous h{sub 11/2} proton crossing in the A{approximately}135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier {alpha} particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4{pi} channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

Sarantites, D.G.

1992-12-01

328

Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

Not Available

1980-03-07

329

Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

Not Available

1980-06-25

330

Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, April 1, 1979-June 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

Not Available

1980-01-25

331

Study of the cost-savings potential of the Military - Civilian Health Services Partnership Program in the nuclear medicine and radioimmunoassay services at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky. Master's thesis, July 1987-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

Using workload data for Calendar Year 1987, a cost savings analysis was performed on the following three options (involving the Nuclear Medicine Department at Ireland Army Community Hospital); (1) Elimination of Radioimmunoassay Internal Service, (2) Civilian Military Health Service Partnership Program and (3) Fixed price contract for Nuclear Medicine Services. This study revealed the Civilian-Military Health Services Partnership Program would potentially generate the greatest cost savings and recommended that it be implemented in other areas throughout the Army Medical Department.

Amon, T.M.

1989-01-01

332

Study of a New Design of P-N Semiconductor Detector Array for Nuclear Medicine Imaging by Monte Carlo Simulation Codes  

PubMed Central

Gamma camera is an important apparatus in nuclear medicine imaging. Its detection part is consists of a scintillation detector with a heavy collimator. Substitution of semiconductor detectors instead of scintillator in these cameras has been effectively studied. In this study, it is aimed to introduce a new design of P-N semiconductor detector array for nuclear medicine imaging. A P-N semiconductor detector composed of N-SnO2 :F, and P-NiO:Li, has been introduced through simulating with MCNPX monte carlo codes. Its sensitivity with different factors such as thickness, dimension, and direction of emission photons were investigated. It is then used to configure a new design of an array in one-dimension and study its spatial resolution for nuclear medicine imaging. One-dimension array with 39 detectors was simulated to measure a predefined linear distribution of Tc99_m activity and its spatial resolution. The activity distribution was calculated from detector responses through mathematical linear optimization using LINPROG code on MATLAB software. Three different configurations of one-dimension detector array, horizontal, vertical one sided, and vertical double-sided were simulated. In all of these configurations, the energy windows of the photopeak were ± 1%. The results show that the detector response increases with an increase of dimension and thickness of the detector with the highest sensitivity for emission photons 15-30° above the surface. Horizontal configuration array of detectors is not suitable for imaging of line activity sources. The measured activity distribution with vertical configuration array, double-side detectors, has no similarity with emission sources and hence is not suitable for imaging purposes. Measured activity distribution using vertical configuration array, single side detectors has a good similarity with sources. Therefore, it could be introduced as a suitable configuration for nuclear medicine imaging. It has been shown that using semiconductor P-N detectors such as P-NiO:Li, N-SnO2 :F for gamma detection could be possibly applicable for design of a one dimension array configuration with suitable spatial resolution of 2.7 mm for nuclear medicine imaging. PMID:25298932

Hajizadeh-Safar, M.; Ghorbani, M.; Khoshkharam, S.; Ashrafi, Z.

2014-01-01

333

Study of a new design of p-N semiconductor detector array for nuclear medicine imaging by monte carlo simulation codes.  

PubMed

Gamma camera is an important apparatus in nuclear medicine imaging. Its detection part is consists of a scintillation detector with a heavy collimator. Substitution of semiconductor detectors instead of scintillator in these cameras has been effectively studied. In this study, it is aimed to introduce a new design of P-N semiconductor detector array for nuclear medicine imaging. A P-N semiconductor detector composed of N-SnO2 :F, and P-NiO:Li, has been introduced through simulating with MCNPX monte carlo codes. Its sensitivity with different factors such as thickness, dimension, and direction of emission photons were investigated. It is then used to configure a new design of an array in one-dimension and study its spatial resolution for nuclear medicine imaging. One-dimension array with 39 detectors was simulated to measure a predefined linear distribution of Tc(99_m) activity and its spatial resolution. The activity distribution was calculated from detector responses through mathematical linear optimization using LINPROG code on MATLAB software. Three different configurations of one-dimension detector array, horizontal, vertical one sided, and vertical double-sided were simulated. In all of these configurations, the energy windows of the photopeak were ± 1%. The results show that the detector response increases with an increase of dimension and thickness of the detector with the highest sensitivity for emission photons 15-30° above the surface. Horizontal configuration array of detectors is not suitable for imaging of line activity sources. The measured activity distribution with vertical configuration array, double-side detectors, has no similarity with emission sources and hence is not suitable for imaging purposes. Measured activity distribution using vertical configuration array, single side detectors has a good similarity with sources. Therefore, it could be introduced as a suitable configuration for nuclear medicine imaging. It has been shown that using semiconductor P-N detectors such as P-NiO:Li, N-SnO2 :F for gamma detection could be possibly applicable for design of a one dimension array configuration with suitable spatial resolution of 2.7 mm for nuclear medicine imaging. PMID:25298932

Hajizadeh-Safar, M; Ghorbani, M; Khoshkharam, S; Ashrafi, Z

2014-07-01

334

Evaluation of bi-level image converting methods for nuclear medicine image database stored in the IS&C magneto-optical disk.  

PubMed

1. INTRODUCTION. We have developed a report and imaging management system for nuclear medicine. The report and image data are stored in the IS&C magneto-optical disk (IS&C MOD). Nuclear medicine image data are relatively small, but they are large enough to create problems when being transported over a low-speed Hospital Information System (HIS) network. Moreover, gray scale image output devices (i.e., high-resolution displays, sonoprinters) are expensive. If high quality bi-level (black and white) images were available, images could be transferred through low-speed network with inexpensive bi-level terminals or conventional page-printers. We examined images using several bi-level image conversion techniques [1, 2] in order to determine how useful the bi-level images are and to assess their suitability for use in nuclear medicine. The images were compared with original film images by ROC analysis. The modified minimized average error method was found to be superior to other methods in bone and gallium images. Its A-values are 0.83 in gallium scan and 0.85 in bone scan. 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Our system consists of three digital gamma cameras, a nuclear medicine data processing unit, two UNIX stations, and two personal computers. The computers and the data processing unit are connected via Ethernet and each computer has an IS&C MOD unit. Image and report data are stored in the IS&C MOD. The computers are also connected off-line through the IS&C MOD. To evaluate image quality, bone scan images and gallium scan images (1024x512, 2048x1024 pixels and 16 bits depth) were converted to bi-level images (same pixels and one bit depth) using four methods: dither method, minimized average error method (MAE)[1], modified regional adaptation method, and constrained average method. For the dither methods, three sets of dither matrix (Fatting's, Bayer's and our original matrix) were employed. The computer images were compared with original film images by ROC analysis. 3. RESULTS. The converted bi-level images were 1/16 the size of the originals. They were transferred via Ethernet, displayed on the monochrome display, and printed using a conventional page-printer (240 dpi or 300 dpi). The A-values of the original gallium and bone images on the films were 0.89 and 0.94. Modified MAE method gave better results than other methods tested, with the gallium image using this technique reading 0.83 on the A-scale; and the bone images were 0.85. 4. DISCUSSION. Generally, nuclear medicine images require lower spatial and gray level resolution than other computer imaging techniques. We compared four bi-level image conversion methods in order to know which methods are suitable to nuclear medicine images. The ROC analysis was employed to evaluate these image qualities. The MAE methods made particular texture pattern as artifacts in the intermediate gray level area. But it can express homogeneity the neutral level. The dither method images are coarse texture. It affects detectabilities of subtle abnormal findings. 5. CONCLUSIONS. The A-z values of the modified MAE images were comparable to those of original film images. Although bone images give slightly lower values, many abnormal findings can be ascertained on bi-level images. High quality bi-level image techniques are considered to be useful for nuclear medicine image database systems. PMID:8591224

Tsukamoto, N; Ando, Y; Kunieda, E; Kawaguchi, O; Shigematsu, N; Kubo, A; Arai, Y

1995-01-01

335

The effects of radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine on diagnostic radioimmunoassay testing. Is there any significant interference  

SciTech Connect

The administration of radioisotopes for diagnostic nuclear medicine scans and therapeutic procedures is quite prevalent today. A period of interference with the counting of a radioimmunoassay (RIA) test may occur with the serum of a patient receiving an in vivo radionuclide that decays by gamma emission. Because the logistics of precounting all specimens may be cumbersome and prohibitive, it is important to determine the degree of this interference. In this study, the authors evaluate the potential interference of the most commonly used radioisotopes with RIA studies. For two months (March and August 1988) 10,650 patient serum specimens were counted for significant background gamma radiation before RIA testing. Forty-three patients, on whom 105 RIA tests were performed, were identified as having preassay gamma radiation in their serum. With the use of selective energy windows for each different interfering radionuclide, proportional determinations were made as to the amount of interfering gamma radiation spilling into the iodine 125 test marker window. It was shown that initial whole serum pretest gamma counts as high as 111,000 counts/minute did not significantly affect the results of the RIA. Because of the meticulous washing and decanting procedures required in modern RIA and the monoclonal nature of most antibodies used currently, it appears the degree of nonspecific binding of this potentially interfering radiation is minuscule. The energy level of cobalt 57, however, and many of the other commonly used radioisotopes, overlaps so closely that it is difficult to window for this interference. It is possible, therefore, that this distinction cannot be made and folate and vitamin B12 test systems using cobalt 57 markers may have to be routinely prescreened.

Riccio, J.A.; Maturani, D.; Wright, J.; Fleetwood, M.K. (Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA (USA))

1990-11-01

336

Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

1994-06-01

337

A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression  

EPA Science Inventory

Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

338

A Boolean Network Model of Nuclear Receptor Mediated Cell Cycle Progression (S)  

EPA Science Inventory

Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate a broad range of cellular processes. Hormones, lipids and xenobiotics have been shown to activate NRs with a range of consequences on development, metabolism, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prolif...

339

Glimpses of Islamic medicine.  

PubMed

The fall of the Roman Empire during the fifth century A.D. Ushered in the beginning of the Dark Ages. After this, in Europe further progress of Greco-Roman medicine originated from Hippocrates was halted. The ideas about medicine and hygiene were kept alive in monasteries only. The Arabs made advances in medicine at a time when the rest of Europe was in the Dark Ages. Islamic system or the rulers of the day actively encouraged scholarship and growth of knowledge. The Islamic gift of the day to the world of medicine was simply unique. PMID:12572570

Majumdar, S K

1997-07-01

340

ACTIVATION ANALYSIS, NUCLEAR CHEMICAL RESEARCH, RADIOCHEMICAL SEPARATIONS. Progress Report No. 11, November 1961October 1962  

Microsoft Academic Search

Routine operation of the Ford reactor at about 1 Mw during the year is ; reported. Details are given concerning measurement of reactor foils, monitoring ; of pile neutron fluxes, installation of an automatic rabbit catcher system, ; measurement of the laboratory counting rooms, and experiments using a Kaman ; neutron generator. Progress in instrumentation is reported on check-out of

R. S. Maddock; W. W. eds. Meinke

1962-01-01

341

Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms: a research proposal (renewal) and report of progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research progress is reported on the following subjects: (1) diamagnetism, gauge transformations and sum rules, (2) quantal motion in an electric field, (3) a theorem concerning quadrupole absorption and scattering of photons, (4) excitation of natural parity states by Raman scattering in nuclei, (5) retarded E1 transitions and isoscaler giant dipole resonances, (6) low energy photon scattering from nuclei, (7)

S. Fallieros; F. S. Levin

1981-01-01

342

AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MARCH 10, 1952  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the circulating fuel aircraft reactor was extended to ; systems incorporating intermediate heat exchangers, various secondary coolants, ; liquid moderators, core is discussed. Progress is reported in the design of the ; reactor, fluid circuits, the reactor building, and associated equipment. ; Development of plumbing for high-temperature fluoride mixtures is reported. ; Techniques of preparation, purification, and handling

W. B. ed

1952-01-01

343

A program in medium-energy nuclear physics. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This renewal proposal requests continued funding for our program in experimental medium-energy nuclear physics. The focus of our program remains the understanding of the short-range part of the strong interaction in the nuclear medium. In the past three years we have focused our attention ever more sharply on experiments with real tagged photons at CEBAF. We are part of the Hall-B Collaboration at CEBAF. We are co-spokespersons on two approved CEBAF experiments, Photoreactions on {sup 3}He and Photoabsorption and Photofission of Nuclei, and we are preparing another, Nondiffractive Photoproduction of the {rho} Meson with Linearly Polarized Photons, for presentation to the next CEBAF PAC. We are part of the team that is instrumenting the Photon Tagger and a high-energy tagged polarized-photon beam for Hall B; some of the instrumentation for these projects is being built at our Nuclear Detector Laboratory, under the auspices of The George Washington University Center for Nuclear Studies. Our recent measurements of pion scattering from {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He at LAMPF and of cluster knockout from few-body nuclei at NIKHEF have yielded very provocative results, showing the importance of the very light nuclei as a laboratory for quantifying important aspects of the nuclear many-body force. We look forward to expanding our studies of short-range forces in nuclei, particularly the very fight nuclei using electromagnetic probes and employing the extraordinary power of CEBAF and the CLAS.

Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

1994-08-01

344

Studies of nuclear processes; Progress report, 1 September 1992--31 August 1993  

SciTech Connect

Results for the period 1 Sep 92 through 31 Aug 93 are presented in nearly a hundred brief papers, some of which present new but preliminary data. Activities reported may be grouped as follows: Fundamental symmetries in the nucleus (parity-mixing measurements, time reversal invariance measurements, signatures of quantum chaos in nuclei), Internucleon reactions (neutron -- proton interactions, the neutron -- neutron scattering length, reactions between deuterons and very light nuclei), Dynamics of very light nuclei (measurements of D states of very light nuclei by transfer reactions, nuclear reactions between very light nuclei, radiative capture reactions with polarized sources), The many-nucleon problem (nuclear astrophysics, high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation, the nuclear mean field: Dispersive relations and nucleon scattering, configuration mixing in {sup 56}Co and {sup 46}Sc using (d,{alpha}) reactions, radiative capture studies, high energy resolution resonance studies at 100--400 keV, nuclear data evaluation for A=3--20), Nuclear instruments and methods (FN tandem accelerator operation, KN accelerator operation and maintenance, atomic beam polarized ion source, development of techniques for determining the concentration of SF{sub 6} in the accelerator insulating gas mixture, production of beams and targets, detector systems, updating of TeX, Psprint, and associated programs on the VAX cluster), and Educational Activities.

Ludwig, E.J.

1993-09-01

345

AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING DECEMBER 10, 1952  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABS>The most significant ARE modification was the completion of the off-; gas system design. Progress is repeated on valves, pumps, instrumentation, and ; other compcnents of the fluoride-fuel and reflector-coolant circuits. A ; rotameter-type flowmeter and the modified Moore Nullmatic pressure transmitter ; were tested. The heattransfer coefficient of a sodium-to-air radiator was ; increased by 20%. General design studies

W. B. ed

1960-01-01

346

Modeling, analysis and experiments for fusion nuclear technology: FNT progress report: Modeling and FINESSE  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a progress report on two technical studies carried out during 1986, both of which relate to the implementation phase of FNT. The first, which is a follow-up to FINESSE, focuses on specific key questions for: (1) very near-term (0 to 3 years) non-fusion experiments and facilities, and (2) FNT testing in a fusion facility. The second is

M. A. Abdou; M. S. Tillack; A. R. Raffray; A. H. Hadid; J. R. Bartlit; C. E. C. Bell; P. J. Gierszewski; J. D. Gordon; T. Iizuka; C. N. Kim

1987-01-01

347

ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT. IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES: AN ALTERNATIVE FOR VITRIFYING CERTAIN NUCLEAR WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

A high priority has been given to investigating the vitrification of three specific nuclear wastes in iron phosphate glasses (IPG). These wastes, which were recommended by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) group of Hanford, are poorly suited for vitrification in the currently DOE-approve...

348

Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... also very helpful. Often, a television with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... not all—imaging procedures are covered by insurance. Web page review process: Reviewed regularly by physicians with ...

349

Activation of the nuclear factor kappaB pathway by astrocyte elevated gene-1: implications for tumor progression and metastasis.  

PubMed

Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) was initially identified as an HIV-1- and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-inducible transcript in primary human fetal astrocytes by a rapid subtraction hybridization approach. Interestingly, AEG-1 expression is elevated in subsets of breast cancer, glioblastoma multiforme and melanoma cells and AEG-1 cooperates with Ha-ras to promote transformation of immortalized melanocytes. Activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), a TNF-alpha downstream signaling component, is associated with several human illnesses, including cancer, and NF-kappaB controls the expression of multiple genes involved in tumor progression and metastasis. We now document that AEG-1 is a significant positive regulator of NF-kappaB. Enhanced expression of AEG-1 via a replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad.AEG-1) in HeLa cells markedly increased binding of the transcriptional activator p50/p65 complex of NF-kappaB. The NF-kappaB activation induced by AEG-1 corresponded with degradation of IkappaBalpha and nuclear translocation of p65 that resulted in the induction of NF-kappaB downstream genes. Infection with an adenovirus expressing the mt32IkappaBalpha superrepressor (Ad.IkappaBalpha-mt32), which prevents p65 nuclear translocation, inhibited AEG-1-induced enhanced agar cloning efficiency and increased matrigel invasion of HeLa cells. We also document that TNF-alpha treatment resulted in nuclear translocation of both AEG-1 and p65 wherein these two proteins physically interacted, suggesting a potential mechanism by which AEG-1 could activate NF-kappaB. Our findings suggest that activation of NF-kappaB by AEG-1 could represent a key molecular mechanism by which AEG-1 promotes anchorage-independent growth and invasion, two central features of the neoplastic phenotype. PMID:16452207

Emdad, Luni; Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-zhong; Randolph, Aaron; Boukerche, Habib; Valerie, Kristoffer; Fisher, Paul B

2006-02-01

350

RadNuc: A graphical user interface to deliver dose rate patterns encountered in nuclear medicine with a 137Cs irradiator  

PubMed Central

The temporal variations in absorbed dose rates to organs and tissues in the body are very large in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. The response of biological endpoints of relevance to radiation safety and therapeutic efficacy are generally modulated by dose rate. Therefore, it is important to understand how the complex dose rate patterns encountered in nuclear medicine impact relevant biological responses. Accordingly, a graphical user interface (GUI) was created to control a cesium-137 irradiator to deliver such dose rate patterns. Methods Visual Basic 6.0 was used to create a user-friendly GUI to control the dose rate by varying the thickness of a mercury attenuator. The GUI facilitates the delivery of a number of dose rate patterns including constant, exponential increase or decrease, and multi-component exponential. Extensive visual feedback is provided by the GUI during both the planning and delivery stages. Results The GUI controlled irradiator can achieve a maximum dose rate of 40 cGy/hr and a minimum dose rate of 0.01 cGy/hr. Addition of machined lead blocks can be used to further reduce the minimum dose rate to 0.0001 cGy/hr. Measured dose rate patterns differed from programmed dose rate patterns in total dose by 3.2% to 8.4%. Conclusion The GUI controlled irradiator is able to accurately create dose rate patterns encountered in nuclear medicine and other related fields. This makes it an invaluable tool for studying the effects of chronic constant and variable low dose rates on biological tissues in the contexts of both radiation protection and clinical administration of internal radionuclides. PMID:23265668

Pasternack, Jordan B.; Howell, Roger W.

2012-01-01

351

Progress toward bridging from atomistic to continuum modeling to predict nuclear waste glass dissolution.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research performed for the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Subcontinuum and Upscaling Task. The work conducted focused on developing a roadmap to include molecular scale, mechanistic information in continuum-scale models of nuclear waste glass dissolution. This information is derived from molecular-scale modeling efforts that are validated through comparison with experimental data. In addition to developing a master plan to incorporate a subcontinuum mechanistic understanding of glass dissolution into continuum models, methods were developed to generate constitutive dissolution rate expressions from quantum calculations, force field models were selected to generate multicomponent glass structures and gel layers, classical molecular modeling was used to study diffusion through nanopores analogous to those in the interfacial gel layer, and a micro-continuum model (K{mu}C) was developed to study coupled diffusion and reaction at the glass-gel-solution interface.

Zapol, Peter (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Bourg, Ian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Steefel, Carl I. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-10-01

352

SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing.

Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

2014-10-02

353

Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

2008-10-01

354

Nuclear-structure studies with medium-energy probes. Annual progress report, August 1981-August 1982  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the following studies: pion induced reactions, proton induced reactions, and electron induced reactions. Pion induced reaction studies include double charge exchange and elastic and inelastic scattering. Proton reaction studies include pion production reactions, p Vector + p ..-->.. d + ..pi../sup +/, p Vector + p Vector ..-->.. d + ..pi../sup +/, p Vector + d ..-->.. t + ..pi../sup +/, d (p Vector, ..pi../sup +/) d*, and proton elastic and inelastic scattering. Electron scattering from /sup 40/Ca and /sup 26/Mg are under study. Lists of publications and papers are included. (WHK)

Seth, K. K.

1982-01-01

355

Nucleosynthesis in novae: experimental progress in the determination of nuclear reaction rates  

E-print Network

The sources of nuclear uncertainties in nova nucleosynthesis have been identified using hydrodynamical nova models. Experimental efforts have followed and significantly reduced those uncertainties. This is important for the evaluation of nova contribution to galactic chemical evolution, gamma--ray astronomy and possibly presolar grain studies. In particular, estimations of expected gamma-ray fluxes are essential for the planning of observations with existing or future satellites.

Alain Coc

2008-01-18

356

Fetal imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance: a study in goats: work in progress  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging was used to obtain images of goat fetuses in utero. The long T1 relaxation time of amniotic fluid makes it appear black on proton density images when examined using the Aberdeen imager, and so allows very good discrimination of the position and structure of the fetus. Some fetal internal tissues can be seen on T1 images. These findings suggest that NMR imaging has great potential in pregnancy studies.

Foster, M.A. (Univ. of Aberdeen, Scotland); Knight, C.H.; Rimmington, J.E.; Mallard, J.R.

1983-10-01

357

Implementation of a personal computer (PC) as a graphic station into the system MicroDELTA-MaxDELTA for processing of nuclear medicine images.  

PubMed

One of the possibilities to integrate PC into the system "MicroDELTA-MaxDELTA" for acquisition and nuclear medicine image processing is introduced. A 386 IBM compatible personal computer is connected into the local area network with MicroVAX II, which is the part of a "MicroDELTA-MaxDELTA" system. "NuMed" application, which enables simple and efficient manipulation of patient studies and also their archiving, processing and generating reports, is developed in WINDOWS environment. Considering the fact that existing system fully satisfies the acquisition requirements, the whole conception has the aim to upgrade the digital image processing, and initiate further development of the whole system. PMID:8569590

Markovi?, D; Muratovi?, I; Veljovi?, M; Bosnjakovi?, V

1993-01-01

358

Advanced-gas-cooled-nuclear-reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1982-December 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1982 through December 31, 1982 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with modifications and operation of the simulated reactor helium supply system and testing equipment. Work underway to determine the extent of depletion, especially of oxidants (H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/) in the simulated HTGR helium, as a function of controllable variables or equipment modifications, is described. Progress on the multispecimen creep testing extensions to 15,000 hours is discussed. The status of creep rupture testing in simulated HTGR helium and in air is covered. The status of fatigue testing in simulated HTGR helium is described; the test results obtained are listed and discussed. The status of materials procurement for the contract extension work is presented.

Kimball, O.F.

1983-04-15

359

Development of inorganic ion exchangers for nuclear waste remediation. 1997 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'In this research program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Texas A and M University in the development of highly selective inorganic ion exchangers for the removal of cesium and strontium from nuclear tank-waste and from groundwater. Inorganic ion exchangers are developed and characterized at Texas A and M University; ORNL is involved in preparing the powders in engineered forms and testing the performance of the sorbents in actual nuclear waste solutions. The Texas A and M studies are divided into two main categories: (1) exchangers for tank wastes and (2) exchangers for groundwater remediation. These are subdivided into exchangers for use in acid and alkaline solutions for tank wastes and those that can be recycled for use in groundwater remediation. The exchangers will also be considered for in situ immobilization of radionuclides. The approach will involve a combination of exchanger synthesis, structural characterization, and ion exchange behavior. ORNL has developed a technique for preparing inorganic ion exchangers in the form of spherules by a gel-sphere internal gelation process. This technology, which was developed and used for making nuclear fuels, has the potential of greatly enhancing the usability of many other special inorganic materials because of the improved flow dynamics of the spherules. Also, pure inorganic spherules can be made without the use of binders. ORNL also has access to actual nuclear waste in the form of waste tank supernatant solutions for testing the capabilities of the sorbents for removing the cesium and strontium radionuclides from actual waste solutions. The ORNL collaboration will involve the preparation of the powdered ion exchangers, developed and synthesized at Texas A and M, in the form of spherules, and evaluating the performance of the exchangers in real nuclear waste solutions. Selected sorbents will be provided by Texas A and M for potential incorporation into microspheres, and the performance of the sorbents and microspheres will be examined using actual waste supernatant solutions. This collaborative program could potentially take an exchanger from concept, synthesis, structure determination, and elucidation of exchange mechanism, to engineered product and testing on real waste streams.'

Egan, B.Z.; Clearfield, A.; Collins, J.L.

1997-09-01

360

Progression of nuclear sclerosis based on changes in refractive values after lens-sparing vitrectomy in proliferative diabetic retinopathy  

PubMed Central

Background Nuclear sclerosis (NS) based on the Emery–Little classification and refractive values after lens-sparing vitrectomy was compared between proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR) patients and nondiabetic patients. Methods Progression of NS based on the Emery–Little classification and changes in refractive values were compared between 13 proliferative DR patients (14 eyes, DR group) and 14 nondiabetic patients (14 eyes, non-DR group) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. All patients revealed grade I NS based on the Emery–Little classification. Mean patient age and refractive value just after surgery were 56.07 years and ?0.33 diopters (D) in the DR group, and 57.06 years and ?0.96 D in the non-DR group. Results The Emery–Little classification in the DR group at 6 and 24 months postoperative were grade I (13 eyes)/grade II (one eye) and grade I (eleven eyes)/grade II (three eyes), respectively. Mean refractive values in the DR group at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative were +0.28 D, +0.27 D, and +0.37 D, respectively. The Emery–Little classification in the non-DR group at 6 and 24 months (or preoperative for patients undergoing cataract surgery) were grade I (five eyes)/grade II (eight eyes) and grade I (zero eyes)/grade II (eight eyes)/grade III (five eyes), respectively. The mean refractive value in the non-DR group at 6 months postoperative was ?3.20 D. All eyes exhibited myopic changes and progression of NS. Conclusion The findings of this study show that the progression of NS postvitrectomy is mild, even for DR patients 50 years of age or older, thus suggesting the need to reconsider the indications for simultaneous cataract surgery with vitrectomy. PMID:24876762

Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Minami, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Kida, Teruyo; Fukumoto, Masanori; Sato, Takaki; Ishizaki, Eisuke

2014-01-01

361

Nuclear waste criticality analysis. Quarterly progress report, 1 October--31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The work to date includes the preparation of a report related to criticality in spent fuel, a report on the Oklo reactors and their relevance to Yucca Mountain, and the creation of a computer program to model the Oklo reactors. The objective of the program includes a computational model of the only known natural analogue to an underground nuclear waste repository and the possible application of the model to predict the long-term behavior of Yucca Mountain. A final summary of all work completed will be presented after the end of the project on February 29, 1996.

Culbreth, W.G.

1996-01-19

362

Development of improved thermoelectric materials for space nuclear power systems. Sixth technical progress report, March 1985  

SciTech Connect

The program consists of two main tasks encompassing (1) the development of an improved SiGe alloy and (2) the development of an as yet unspecified advanced material intended to have superior performance characteristics when compared to SiGe alloys. Significant progress was made toward the goal of producing a SiGe based material with an improved figure-of-merit during this reporting period. In these studies, a quantitative evaluation of the characteristics which produce the low thermal conductivities observed in SiGe alloys is being developed. Specific areas of emphasis include the effects of grain size, charge carrier and GaP concentrations. An alternate method for alloying with GaP was evaluated in which the GaP was added to SiGe during the melting operation.

Not Available

1985-01-01

363

PROGRESS WITH K BASINS SLUDGE RETRIEVAL STABILIZATION & PACKAGING AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the U.S. and the U.K. to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford Site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, so as to remove the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building, is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout packaging processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. Optimization and simplification of the original sludge corrosion process design is described and the use of transportable and reusable equipment is indicated. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup.

KNOLLMEYER, P.M.; PHILLIPS, C; TOWNSON, P.S.

2006-01-30

364

Progress on Cleaning Up the Only Commercial Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility to Operate in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress on cleanup of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), an environmental management project located south of Buffalo, NY. The WVDP was the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing facility to have operated in the United States (1966 to 1972). Former fuel reprocessing operations generated approximately 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste stored in underground tanks. The U.S. Congress passed the WVDP Act in 1980 (WVDP Act) to authorize cleanup of the 220-acre facility. The facility is unique in that it sits on the 3,345-acre Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC), which is owned by New York State through the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has overall responsibility for the cleanup that is authorized by the WVDP Act, paying 90 percent of the WVDP costs; NYSERDA pays 10 percent. West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) is the management contractor at the WVDP. This paper will provide a description of the many accomplishments at the WVDP, including the pretreatment and near completion of vitrification of all the site's liquid high-level radioactive waste, a demonstration of technologies to characterize the remaining material in the high-level waste tanks, the commencement of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities to place the site in a safe configuration for long-term site management options, and achievement of several technological firsts. It will also include a discussion of the complexities involved in completing the WVDP due to the various agency interests that require integration for future cleanup decisions.

Jackson, T. J.; MacVean, S. A.; Szlis, K. A.

2002-02-26

365

Theoretical nuclear physics. Progress report, October 1, 1991--August 1, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: Exact 1-loop vacuum polarization effects in 1 + 1 dimensional QHD; exact 1-fermion loop contributions in 1 + 1 dimensional solitons; exact scalar 1-loop contributions in 1 + 3 dimensions; exact vacuum calculations in a hyper-spherical basis; relativistic nuclear matter with self- consistent correlation energy; consistent RHA-RPA for finite nuclei; transverse response functions in the {triangle}-resonance region; hadronic matter in a nontopological soliton model; scalar and vector contributions to {bar p}p {yields} {bar {Lambda} {Lambda}} reaction; 0+ and 2+ strengths in pion double-charge exchange to double giant-dipole resonances; and nucleons in a hybrid sigma model including a quantized pion field.

Rost, E.; Shephard, J.R.

1992-08-01

366

Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress toward acceptance of high-alumina formulations  

SciTech Connect

We have critically compiled and analyzed historical data for investigating the quantity of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) precipitation as a function of composition in simulated nuclear waste glasses. To understand composition we used two primary methods: 1) investigating the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O ternary with filtering for different B2O3 levels and 2) creating a quadrant system consisting of compositions reduced to two metric numbers. These metrics are 1) the nepheline discriminator (ND) which depends only on the SiO2 content by weight normalized to the total weight of the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O sub-mixture and 2) the optical basicity (OB) which contains contributions from all constituents in the glass. Nepheline precipitation is expected to be suppressed at high SiO2 levels (ND >0.62) or at low basicities (OB <0.55 to 0.57). Changes in sodium aluminosilicate glass OB due to additions of CaO and B2O3 correlate with observed effects on nepheline formation. We propose that additional composition space is available for formulating high-waste-loading, high-Al¬2O3 nuclear waste glasses when Na2O levels are less than ~0.125 (normalized by weight on the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O sub-mixture). However, this compositional space is considerably extended to higher Na2O levels when adding >5 wt% B2O3. The OB concept can help further refine regions of nepheline-free glass formation.

McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Vienna, John D.

2011-09-01

367

Paralympic medicine.  

PubMed

Paralympic medicine describes the health-care issues of those 4500 or so athletes who gather every 4 years to compete in 20 sports at the Summer Paralympic Games and in five sports at the Winter Paralympic Games. Paralympic athletes compete within six impairment groups: amputation or limb deficiencies, cerebral palsy, spinal cord-related disability, visual impairment, intellectual impairment, or a range of physically impairing disorders that do not fall into the other classification categories, known as les autres. The variety of impairments, many of which are severe, fluctuating, or progressive disorders (and are sometimes rare), makes maintenance of health in thousands of Paralympians while they undertake elite competition an unusual demand on health-care resources. The increased physical fitness of athletes with disabilities has important implications for cardiovascular risk reduction in a population for whom the prevalence of risk factors can be high. PMID:22770458

Webborn, Nick; Van de Vliet, Peter

2012-07-01

368

Individualized pain medicine  

PubMed Central

Since the first draft of the human genome was published 10 years ago, scientists have tried to develop new treatment strategies for various types of diseases based on individual genomes. It is called personalized (or individualized) medicine and is expected to increase efficacy and reduce adverse reactions of drugs. Much progress has been made with newly developed technologies, though individualized pain medicine is still far from realization. Efforts on the integrative genomic analyses along with understandings of interactions between other related factors such as environment will eventually translate complex genomic information into individualized pain medicine. PMID:21399745

Kim, Hyungsuk; Dionne, Raymond A.

2010-01-01

369

Further progress for a fast scanning of nuclear emulsions with Large Angle Scanning System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The LASSO (Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA) is a scanning system designed in the framework of the OPERA experiment as a result of several R&Ds aimed to improve the performance of the European Scanning System (ESS) by increasing the scanning speed, the angular acceptance and the efficiency in microtrack reconstruction. The novel Continuous Motion (CM) scanning approach allows to double the ESS nominal speed without any changes in the hardware set-up. The LASSO modular design makes the system easily adaptable to new hardware. The novel microtrack reconstruction algorithm has been developed to be efficient in both standard Stop&Go (SG) and CM modes, performing a number of corrections during the processing like corrections for vibrations, optical distortions, field of view curvature. As an intermediate step it reconstructs silver grains positions inside emulsion layer to make a transition from 2D images to real 3D traces of a charged particle. This allows the algorithm to have no internal limits on the slope of microtracks being equally efficient on all angles. The LASSO has been used for about one year for mass production scanning of emulsion films of OPERA, Muon Radiography and also of films employed to study nuclear fragmentation of ion beams used in medical physics. More than 50000 cm2 of the emulsion surface have been analyzed during this period.

Alexandrov, A.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

2014-02-01

370

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1985. Volume 5, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced and Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Reports have been combined and are included in this report entitled, ''Safety Research Programs Sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research - Quarterly Progress Report.'' This progress report will describe current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Accident Evaluation, Division of Engineering Technology, and Division of Risk Analysis and Operations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The projects reported are the following: High Temperature Reactor Research, SSC Modeling for Low Flow Conditions, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, Thermal Hydraulics of Core/Concrete Interactions, Plant Analyzer, Code Assessment and Application, Code Maintenance (RAMONA-3B), MELCOR Verification and Benchmarking, Pool Version of the SSC Code, Source Term Code Package Verification and Benchmarking, Uncertainty Analysis of the Source Term; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Soil-Structure Interaction Evaluations, Seismic Research Coordination and Technology Transfer - Transfer and Use of the SMACS Code at BNL, Combinational Procedures for Piping Response Spectra Analyses, Validation of Seismic Calculational Methods, Identification of Age Related Failure Modes; Application of HRA/PRA Results to Support Resolution of Generic Safety Issues Involving Human Performance, Protective Action Decisionmaking, Rebaseling of Risk for Zion, and Operational Safety Reliability Research. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1985. 16 figs.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1986-04-01

371

Medium energy nuclear physics research. Progress report, July 1, 1987--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The UMass group has concentrated on using electromagnetic probes, particularly the electron in high-energy scattering experiments at the Stanford Liner Accelerator Center (SLAC). Plans are also being made for high energy work at the Continuous Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The properties of this accelerator should permit a whole new class of coincidence experiments to be carried out. At SLAC UMass has made major contributions toward the plans for a cluster-jet gas target and detector system at the 16 GeV PEP storage ring. For the future CEBAF accelerator, tests were made of the feasibility of operating wire drift chambers in the vicinity of a continuous electron beam at the University Illinois microtron. At the same time a program of studies of the nuclear structure of more complex nuclei has been continued at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center and in Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K laboratory. At the MIT-Bates Accelerator, because of an unforeseen change in beam scheduling as a result of problems with the T{sub 20} experiment, the UMass group was able to complete data acquisition on experiments involving 180{degrees} elastic magnetic scattering on {sup 117}Sn and {sup 41}Ca. A considerable effort has been given to preparations for a future experiment at Bates involving the high-resolution threshold electrodisintegration of the deuteron. The use of these chambers should permit a high degree of discrimination against background events in the measurement of the almost neutrino-like small cross sections that are expected. In Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K facility, single arm (e,e{prime}) measurements were made in November of 1987 on {sup 10}B in order to better determine the p{sub 3/2} wave function from the transition from the J{sup pi} = 3{sup +} ground state to the O{sup +} excited state at 1.74 MeV. In 1988, (e,e{prime}p) coincidence measurements on {sup 10}B were completed. The objective was to obtain information on the p{sub 3/2} wave function by another means.

Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

1988-09-01

372

Advanced-Gas-Cooled Nuclear-Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of work performed from January 1, 1982 through March 31, 1982 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply systems and testing equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described; this includes screening creep results and metallographic analyses for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750/sup 0/, 850/sup 0/, 950/sup 0/ and 1050/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/, 1562/sup 0/, 1742/sup 0/ and 1922/sup 0/F) in controlled-purity helium. The status of creep-rupture in controlled-purity helium and air and fatigue testing in controlled-purity helium and air in the intensive screening test program is discussed. The results of metallographic studies of multispecimen creep specimens tested at 950/sup 0/C for 6000 hours (solid solution strengthened alloys and an iron-base oxide dispersion strengthened alloy) are presented and discussed.

Not Available

1982-07-30

373

Proficiency tests in the determination of activity of radionuclides in radiopharmaceutical products measured by nuclear medicine services in 8 years of comparison programmes in Brazil.  

PubMed

Proficiency tests were applied to assess the performance of 74 nuclear medicine services in activity measurements of (131)I, (123)I, (99)Tc(m), (67)Ga and (201)Tl. These tests produced 913 data sets from comparison programmes promoted by the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI) from 1999 to 2006. The data were evaluated against acceptance criteria for accuracy and precision and assigned as Acceptable or Not acceptable accordingly. In addition, three other statistical parameters were used as complementary information for performance evaluation which related to normative requirements and to radionuclide calibrators. The results have shown a necessity to improve quality control procedures and unsatisfactory performances of radionuclide calibrators, which incorporate Geiger-Müller detectors. PMID:18346902

Tauhata, Luiz; Iwahara, Akira; de Oliveira, Antonio E; Rezende, Eduarda Alexandre; Delgado, José Ubiratan; da Silva, Carlos José; Dos Santos, Joyra A; Nícoli, Ieda G; Alabarse, Frederico G; Xavier, Ana Maria

2008-01-01

374

Production of therapeutic radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for applications in nuclear medicine, oncologyand interventional cardiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Angiogenesis is integral to the development and progression of atherosclerotic disease and solid tumor growth. New microvessels form in atherosclerotic plaque and the presence of new vessels has been associated with carotid plaque instability. Likewise, solid tumor growth depends upon angiogenesis to provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrients. Recently, Lanza et al. have demonstrated molecular imaging of angiogenesis both

S. Mirzadeh; A. L. Beets; M. Du

2005-01-01

375

International Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau, Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)  

E-print Network

International Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau is with the Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA (e-mail: jingwang@mil.sunysb.edu). H. Lu was with the Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA

376

NERI Project 99-119. A New Paradigm for Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architectures for Nuclear Power Plants. Phase-2 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the tasks performed and the progress made during Phase 2 of the DOE-NERI project number 99-119 entitled Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architecture for Future Nuclear Power Plants. This project is a collaboration effort between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) and the North Carolina State University (NCSU). ORNL is the lead organization and is responsible for the coordination and integration of all work.

March-Leuba, JA

2002-01-15

377

STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECT OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND HADRON THERAPY IN NORTH-WEST REGION OF RUSSIA  

E-print Network

, a proton beam extracted from C-80 will be used for eyes therapy (high precision 80 MeV beam with low Since 1975, a Center of Stereotaxic Proton Therapy (CSPT) is operating at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) exploiting a 1000 MeV proton beam from the PNPI synchro- cyclotron. The center

Titov, Anatoly

378

Evolving trade policy and the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement: Does it threaten Vietnam's access to medicine and its progress towards scaling up HIV prevention, treatment and care?  

PubMed

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) has undergone 18 rounds of secretive negotiation between the USA and 11 Asia-Pacific countries. Aiming at a free trade area, this multilateral trade proposal covers all aspects of commercial relations among the countries involved. Despite some anticipated positive impacts in trade, specific articles in this proposal's intellectual property and transparency chapters might negatively impact access to medicine, in general, and to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, in particular, in Vietnam. Drawing on a desk review and qualitative in-depth interviews with 20 key informants from government, academia, hospitals and civil society, we analyse various provisions of the proposal being negotiated leaked after the 14th round of negotiations in September 2012. Findings suggest that the TPP could lead to increased monopoly protection and could limit technological advancements within the local pharmaceutical manufacturing industry, resulting in higher medicine prices in Vietnam. This outcome would have a significant impact on Vietnam's ability to achieve goals for HIV prevention, treatment and care, and create barriers to universal health-care coverage. This research provides unique evidence for Vietnam to advocate for more equitable pharmaceutical provisions in and to raise awareness of the implications of the TPP among the pharmaceutical stakeholder community in Vietnam. PMID:25469870

Linh, Nguyen Nhat; Huong, Nguyen Thanh; Thuy, Hua Thanh

2015-01-01

379

COPD Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... 5654 ) You are here: Health Information > Medications > COPD COPD Medicine Your doctor may prescribe medicine to control ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count COPD Program This program offers comprehensive, individualized care for ...

380

Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

381

[Can medicine move mountains?].  

PubMed

For the author involvement with Paracelsus demands consideration of both, socio-cultural as well as historico-cultural aspects. Each generation has obtained a different picture of this famous physician from Einsiedeln. Around 1941 the progress initiated by Paracelsus has been emphasized, such as the assumed foundation of chemistry, chemotherapy, and the renewal of surgery, occupational medicine, balneology and many more. For the year 1941 (= 400th anniversary of Paracelsus death) a nationalistic perception of Paracelsus was typical. For National-Socialistic Germany, Paracelsus was the founder of a "German medicine" as a contrast to medicine oriented towards France and Jewish-Arabia. Paracelsus also was seen as a pioneer of the experiment and as opponent of medical dilettantism in a popular direction. The perception of Paracelsus of 1993 is completely different. Today Theophrastus from Hohenheim is seen in a post-modern perspective, not as the man of progress, but as one, who opposed to the medicine of his age a partial ancient natural medicine, including the arts of gypsies, witches and midwives. The magic and psychosomatic informations of Paracelsus are seen as precious compensation for losses that we had to accept in the progress of modern medicine. As a psychiatrist Paracelsus was involved with diseases that originated from a "misuse of credo". He reports about collective psychoses, for example those appearing in the group of anabaptists in St. Gallen. Misuse of credo derives from intended provocation of martyrium. To move mountains with one's faith is another pathologic imagination. A therapy should aim at the restitution of such a "mountain" moved by the ill patient. Paracelsus demands the greatest mercy in dealing with mentally ill patients. This disease is also a challenge for theology: "What gives harm to the body destroys the house of the eternal".(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8191181

Meier, P

1993-12-21

382

Medicine Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

383

Osteopathic Medicine: About Osteopathic Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Contact Us A A A Advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine Inside the AOA ... of four years of academic study. Reflecting osteopathic philosophy, the curriculum emphasizes preventive medicine and comprehensive patient ...

384

BioChroma – A New and Patented Technology for Processing Radioactive Wastewater from Nuclear Medicine Therapy Facilities in Hospitals and Clinics  

PubMed Central

After undergoing radionuclide therapy, patients generate wastewater with a considerable amount of radioactivity, which can reach levels of as much as 90% of the administered dose. Due to the risk of accumulation after discharge into the sewer, it is advisable to collect this effluent for its treatment prior to final discharge. Delay and decay (natural decomposition of the isotope) is the most commonly used technical method of abating radioactive iodine, but it is frequently criticized as being complex and very expensive. BioChroma is a technology that has been developed as an alternative to these complicated and expensive systems. This paper describes this new technology and presents, as an example, a system that was installed and successfully commissioned in the middle of 2008 in a nuclear medicine ward with 12 beds in Stuttgart (Germany). Based on existing legislation, the responsible authorities and the company that operated the hospital agreed on a maximum activity level of 5 Bq/l. If a typical delay and decay system would have been installed, the 180 m3 treatment plant that was already available in the hospital cellar would have to be extended by additional 150 m3. By implementing the patented BioChroma process, the space requirements were reduced by 75%. For instance, since the new system was integrated into the existing installation, tanks accounting for 120 m³ could be used as buffering volume in the new wastewater treatment plant. The operation of the referred plant is currently producing very good results with values below the specified limit of 5 Bq/l for the isotope 131I. In addition, 90Y has been reported to be eliminated at the same time. Over the past 2 years of operation, the wastewater treatment plant has been able to achieve a maximum processing capacity of more than 2,000 l/day, which equates to a nuclear medicine ward with approx. 20 beds. The highest level recorded during the test period (of 180 days after start-up) was a peak of nearly 2,800 l/day. PMID:22942776

Rodríguez, José Canga

2012-01-01

385

SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

Not Available

1993-05-01

386

Accumulation of mutant lamin A causes progressive changes in nuclear architecture in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome  

PubMed Central

Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder, commonly caused by a point mutation in the lamin A gene that results in a protein lacking 50 aa near the C terminus, denoted LA?50. Here we show by light and electron microscopy that HGPS is associated with significant changes in nuclear shape, including lobulation of the nuclear envelope, thickening of the nuclear lamina, loss of peripheral heterochromatin, and clustering of nuclear pores. These structural defects worsen as HGPS cells age in culture, and their severity correlates with an apparent increase in LA?50. Introduction of LA?50 into normal cells by transfection or protein injection induces the same changes. We hypothesize that these alterations in nuclear structure are due to a concentration-dependent dominant-negative effect of LA?50, leading to the disruption of lamin-related functions ranging from the maintenance of nuclear shape to regulation of gene expression and DNA replication. PMID:15184648

Goldman, Robert D.; Shumaker, Dale K.; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Maria; Goldman, Anne E.; Gordon, Leslie B.; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Khuon, Satya; Mendez, Melissa; Varga, Renée; Collins, Francis S.

2004-01-01

387

NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Nov. 15, 2001 - Feb. 15,2002) ''Design and Layout Concepts for Compact, Factory-Produced, Transportable, Generation IV Reactor Systems''  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. Three nuclear power plant concepts are being studied representing water, helium and lead-bismuth coolants. This is the sixth quarterly progress report.

Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Mohammed Khan; Joe McConn; Lawrence Townsend; Wesley Williams; Martin Williamson

2002-03-15

388

Cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on enriched 111Cd and 112Cd for the production of 111In for use in nuclear medicine.  

PubMed

Proton induced nuclear reactions on enriched 111Cd and 112Cd have been studied up to 30 MeV in the context of routine production of the medically used isotope 111In with low and medium energy cyclotrons. The excitation functions of 111Cd(p,n)111m,gIn and 112Cd(p,2n)111m,gIn as production reactions and 111Cd(p,2n)110mIn, 111Cd(p,2n)110In, 111Cd(p,3n)109ml,m2,In, 112Cd(p,3n)110mIn, 112Cd(p,3n)110gIn as competing processes have been measured using the activation method involving the stacked-foil technique. The deduced thick target yields are compared with those obtained experimentally. PMID:8312883

Tárkányi, F; Szelecsényi, F; Kopecký, P; Molnár, T; Andó, L; Mikecz, P; Tóth, G Y; Rydl, A

1994-02-01

389

Final Progress Report to the Department of Energy's Office of Science on the Committee on Nuclear Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Committee on Nuclear Physics (CNP), under the National Research Council's Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), conducted an assessment of the field as part of the BPA's survey of physics in the last decade, titled ''Physics in a New Era.'' The CNP report was published by the National Academy Press in early 1999 under the title ''Nuclear Physics: The

2001-01-01

390

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990, Number 3; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, the US Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1 through September 30, 1990. This report is the third of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. The report covers a number of new initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the site characterization program and covers continued efforts related to preparatory activities, study plans, and performance assessment. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1991-03-01

391

Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twentieth annual progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Research under this continuing DOE contract centers on radioactive decay studies of nuclei far from stability produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). These investigations encompass three aspects of nuclear structure research: nuclear spectroscopic measurements involving detailed ..gamma gamma..t, ..gamma..e/sup -/t, and X..gamma..t three-parameter coincidence spectrometry; on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift spectroscopy for determining quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and mean nuclear charge radii; and computer calculations of nuclear model predictions for comparison with the experimental level schemes. The focus of this research program is on odd-mass nuclei in which the odd nucleon probes the core, making possible observation of such phenomena as the onset of abrupt shape changes, the occurrence of shape coexistence, and shell-model intruder states. These phenomena are critical tests of concepts fundamental to an understanding of low-energy nuclear structure, such as nuclear deformations, shell models, collective models, and particle-core couplings.

Fink, R.W.

1984-08-31

392

Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twenty-first annual progress report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear chemistry group in the School of Chemistry continues investigating the radioactive decay of nuclei far from stability under this DOE contract. These nuclei are produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Radioactive decay represents a unique method for the population of low-energy, low-spin structures in nuclei, and new phenomena which do not occur near stability can be explored. Our research encompasses three aspects of nuclear structure: (1) nuclear spectroscopy with detailed elelt, e elt, Xelt, etc., multiparameter coincidence spectrometry; (2) on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift measurements for the determination of nuclear quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and changes in mean nuclear charge radii as a means of revealing systematic shape changes in nuclei; and (3) theoretical calculations of predictions of nuclear models for comparison with experimental level structures in nuclei studied at UNISOR. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Fink, R.W.

1985-08-31

393

Development of tailored ceramics for geologic storage of nuclear wastes. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Tailored ceramics are crystalline assemblages made by high-temperature and pressure consolidation of a nuclear waste with selected additives. The multitask program includes waste form development and characterizations, and process and equipment development. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-02-15

394

Nuclear  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What part does nuclear energy play in satisfying energy demands? This informational piece, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to the uranium atom as an energy source. Here students read about the history of nuclear energy, how energy is derived from uranium, and benefits of nuclear energy. Information is also provided about limitations, particularly disposal problems and radioactivity, and geographical considerations of nuclear power in the United States. Thought-provoking questions afford students chances to reflect on what they've read about the uses of nuclear power. Articles and information on new nuclear plant design and nuclear accidents are available from a sidebar. Five energy-related PBS NewsHour links are provided. A web link to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is included. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

2004-01-01

395

Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twenty-second annual progress report, February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear chemistry group in the School of Chemistry continues investigations of radioactive decay of nuclei far from stability under this DOE contract. These nuclei are produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Radioactive decay represents a unique method for the population of low-energy, low-spin structures in nuclei, and new phenomena which do not occur near stability can be explored. Our research interest encompasses three aspects of nuclear structure: (1) nuclear spectroscopy with detailed ..gamma gamma..t, e/sup -/..gamma..t, X..gamma..t, ..cap alpha gamma..t multiparameter coincidence spectrometry; (2) measurements of single ..gamma..-ray angular distributions and magnetic moments of mass separated low-temperature oriented nuclei, using the helium dilution refrigerator ''ORIENT'' being installed on-line to the isotope separator; and (3) on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift measurements for determination of nuclear quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and changes in mean nuclear charge radii as a means of revealing systematic shape changes in nuclei. 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Fink, R.W.

1986-08-31

396

Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?  

PubMed

Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J; Atala, Anthony

2013-08-01

397

Vulnerable Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

Bochner, Arthur P.

2009-01-01

398

Behavioral Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

1982-01-01

399

Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Quarterly progress report, June-September 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress for the following major research projects: stabilization, engineering, and monitoring alternatives assessment for improving regulation of uranium recovery operations and waste management; attenuation of radon emission from uranium tailings; assessment of leachate movement from uranium mill tailings; and methods of minimizing ground-water contaminants from in-situ leach uranium mining.

Foley, M.G.; Deutsch, W.J.; Gee, G.W.; Hartley, J.N.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Mayer, D.W.; Nelson, R.W.; Opitz, B.E.; Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.

1983-11-01

400

Meeting the challenges of global nuclear medicine technologist training in the 21st century: the IAEA Distance Assisted Training (DAT) program.  

PubMed

Many countries have made significant investments in nuclear medicine (NM) technology with the acquisition of modern equipment and establishment of facilities, however, often appropriate training is not considered as part of these investments. Training for NM professionals is continually evolving, with a need to meet changing requirements in the workforce. Even places where established higher education courses are available, these do not necessarily cater to the practical component of training and the ever-changing technology that is central to medical imaging. The continuing advances in NM technology and growth of applications in quantitative clinical assessment place increases the pressure on technologists to learn and practice new techniques. Not only is training to understand new concepts limited but often there is inadequate training in the basics of NM and this can be a major constraint to the effective use of the evolving technology. Developing appropriate training programs for the broader international NM community is one of the goals of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). A particularly successful and relevant development has been the program on 'distance assisted training (DAT) for NM professionals'. The development of DAT was initiated in the 1990s through Australian Government funding, administered under auspices of the IAEA through its Regional Cooperative Agreement, involving most countries in Asia that are Member States of the IAEA. The project has resulted in the development of a set of training modules which are designed for use under direct supervision in the workplace, delivered through means of distance-learning. The program has undergone several revisions and peer reviews with the current version providing a comprehensive training package that is now available online. DAT has been utilized widely in Asia or the Pacific region, Latin America, and parts of Africa and Europe. Currently there are approximately 1000 registered participants, including persons providing student support, in the program. PMID:23561457

Patterson, Heather E; Nunez, Margarita; Philotheou, Geraldine M; Hutton, Brian F

2013-05-01

401

Wilderness medicine  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Human activity in wilderness areas has increased globally in recent decades, leading to increased risk of injury and illness. Wilderness medicine has developed in response to both need and interest. METHODS: The field of wilderness medicine encompasses many areas of interest. Some focus on special circumstances (such as avalanches) while others have a broader scope (such as trauma care). Several core areas of key interest within wilderness medicine are discussed in this study. RESULTS: Wilderness medicine is characterized by remote and improvised care of patients with routine or exotic illnesses or trauma, limited resources and manpower, and delayed evacuation to definitive care. Wilderness medicine is developing rapidly and draws from the breadth of medical and surgical subspecialties as well as the technical fields of mountaineering, climbing, and diving. Research, epidemiology, and evidence-based guidelines are evolving. A hallmark of this field is injury prevention and risk mitigation. The range of topics encompasses high-altitude cerebral edema, decompression sickness, snake envenomation, lightning injury, extremity trauma, and gastroenteritis. Several professional societies, academic fellowships, and training organizations offer education and resources for laypeople and health care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The future of wilderness medicine is unfolding on multiple fronts: education, research, training, technology, communications, and environment. Although wilderness medicine research is technically difficult to perform, it is essential to deepening our understanding of the contribution of specific techniques in achieving improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:25215140

Sward, Douglas G.; Bennett, Brad L.

2014-01-01

402

General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress reportt, January 1980  

SciTech Connect

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are the general-purpose heat source development and space nuclear safety and fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Maraman, W.J. (comp.)

1980-04-01

403

Complementary medicine.  

PubMed Central

The widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine techniques, often explored by patients without discussion with their primary care physician, is seen as a request from patients for care as well as cure. In this article, we discuss the reasons for the growth of and interest in complementary and alternative medicine in an era of rapidly advancing medical technology. There is, for instance, evidence of the efficacy of supportive techniques such as group psychotherapy in improving adjustment and increasing survival time of cancer patients. We describe current and developing complementary medicine programs as well as opportunities for integration of some complementary techniques into standard medical care. PMID:9584661

Spiegel, D; Stroud, P; Fyfe, A

1998-01-01

404

Engineering and Physics Optimization of Breed and Burn Fast Reactor Systems; NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This project is organized under four major tasks (each of which has two or more subtasks) with contributions among the three collaborating organizations (MIT, INEEL and ANL-West): Task A: Core Physics and Fuel Cycle; Task B: Core Thermal Hydraulics; Task C: Plant Design; Task D: Fuel Design The lead PI, Michael J. Driscoll, has consolidated and summarized the technical progress submissions provided by the contributing investigators from all sites, under the above principal task headings.

ERROR, [value too long for type character varying(50); Hejzlar, Pavel; Yarsky, Peter; Driscoll, Mike; Wachs, Dan; Weaver, Kevan; Czerwinski, Ken; Pope, Mike; Parry, James; Marshall, Theron D.; Davis, Cliff B.; Crawford, Dustin; Hartmann, Thomas; Saha, Pradip

2005-01-31

405

Quantum chromodynamics and nuclear physics at extreme energy density. Progress report, May 15, 1994--May 14, 1995  

SciTech Connect

A brief summary of the progress made for the year is given for each of the following areas: (1) quark-gluon plasma and relativistic heavy ion collisions (nine contributions); (2) effective theories for hadrons and nuclei (four contributions); (4) renormalization group approach to field theory at finite temperature; (5) symmetry-preserving regularization; and (6) an effective field theory approach to the cosmological constant problem.

Mueller, B.; Springer, R.P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-05-15

406

Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the following studies dealing with mill tailings: long-term stabilization; interim stabilization of mill tailings piles; tailings dewatering techniques; tailings neutralization and other alternatives in immobilizing toxic materials in tailings; evaluation of seepage and leachate transport from tailings disposal facilities; effluent and environmental monitoring methods and equipment and instrument testing; attenuation of radon emissions; assessment of leachate movement from uranium mill tailings; and methods of minimizing ground water contamination in in-situ leach uranium mining. 1 figure.

Foley, M.G.; Deutsch, W.J.; Gee, G.W.; Hartley, J.N.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Fayer, M.J.; Nelson, R.W.; Opitz, B.E.; Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.; thomas, V.W.; Walters, W.H.; Wogman, N.A.

1984-08-01

407

Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the following studies dealing with mill tailings: long-term stabilizaton; interim stabilization of mill tailings piles; tailings dewatering techniques; tailings neutralization and other alternatives in immobilizing toxic materials in tailings; evaluation of seepage and leachate transport from tailings disposal facilities; effluent and environmental monitoring methods and equipment and instrument testing; attenuation of radon emissions; assessment of leachate movement from uranium mill tailings; and methods of minimizing ground water contamination in in-situ leach uranium mining.

Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.; Hartley, J.N.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Walters, W.H.; Fayer, M.J.; Wogman, N.A.; Nelson, R.W.

1984-05-01

408

Research and development related to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes some of the technical contributions by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project from October 1 through December 31, 1984. The report is not a detailed technical document but does indicate the status of the investigations being performed at Los Alamos.

Thomas, K.W. (comp.)

1988-11-01

409

Nuclear EGFR signalling network in cancers: linking EGFR pathway to cell cycle progression, nitric oxide pathway and patient survival  

E-print Network

Minireview Nuclear EGFR signalling network in cancers: linking EGFR pathway to cell cycle and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 EGFR in prognostic prediction is further suggested in patients with breast carcinomas and oropharyngeal

Cai, Long

410

Managing the Nuclear Legacy in the United Kingdom: Strategies and Progress in the Formation of a Liabilities Management Authority  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presentation describes the status of recent initiatives undertaken by the United Kingdom Government to address the long-standing problems confronting it with regards to discharge of public sector civil nuclear liabilities. It describes the enabling steps taken thus far in the creation of a Liabilities Management Unit (LMU) to prepare the ground for this important work, with specific reference to

A. Edwards; B. Meyers

2003-01-01

411

High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1978February 14, 1979  

Microsoft Academic Search

High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, were studied in gaseous, high pressure and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes and other organic systems in order to better understand the mechanisms and dynamics of high energy monovalent species. The experimental and theoretical program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) the reactions of iodine with

Rack

1979-01-01

412

NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) TLD (Thermoluminescent Dosimetry) direct radiation monitoring network: Progress report, July-September 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network is operated by the NRC in cooperation with participating states to provide continuous measurement of the ambient radiation levels around licensed NRC facilities, primarily power reactors. Ambient radiation levels result from naturally occurring radionuclides present in the soil, cosmic radiation constantly bombarding the earth from outer space, and the contribution,

R. Struckmeyer; N. McNamara; L. Cohen

1987-01-01

413

Progressive Accumulation of Activated ERK2 within Highly Stable ORF45-Containing Nuclear Complexes Promotes Lytic Gammaherpesvirus Infection  

PubMed Central

De novo infection with the gammaherpesvirus Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a close homolog of the human oncogenic pathogen, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), led to persistent activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and increasing nuclear accumulation of pERK2 complexed with the RRV protein, ORF45 (R45) and cellular RSK. We have previously shown that both lytic gene expression and virion production are dependent on the activation of ERK [1]. Using confocal microscopy, sequential pull-down assays and FRET analyses, we have demonstrated that pERK2-R45-RSK2 complexes were restricted to the nucleus but that the activated ERK retained its ability to phosphorylate nuclear substrates throughout infection. Furthermore, even with pharmacologic inhibition of MEK beginning at 48 h p.i., pERK2 but not pERK1, remained elevated for at least 10 h, showing first order decay and a half-life of nearly 3 hours. Transfection of rhesus fibroblasts with R45 alone also led to the accumulation of nuclear pERK2 and addition of exogenous RSK augmented this effect. However, knock down of RSK during bona fide RRV infection had little to no effect on pERK2 accumulation or virion production. The cytoplasmic pools of pERK showed no co-localization with either RSK or R45 but activation of pERK downstream targets in this compartment was evident throughout infection. Together, these observations suggest a model in which R45 interacts with pERK2 to promote its nuclear accumulation, thereby promoting lytic viral gene expression while also preserving persistent and robust activation of both nuclear and cytoplasmic ERK targets. PMID:24722398

Woodson, Evonne N.; Anderson, Melissa S.; Loftus, Matthew S.; Kedes, Dean H.

2014-01-01

414

Progressive accumulation of activated ERK2 within highly stable ORF45-containing nuclear complexes promotes lytic gammaherpesvirus infection.  

PubMed

De novo infection with the gammaherpesvirus Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a close homolog of the human oncogenic pathogen, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), led to persistent activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and increasing nuclear accumulation of pERK2 complexed with the RRV protein, ORF45 (R45) and cellular RSK. We have previously shown that both lytic gene expression and virion production are dependent on the activation of ERK [1]. Using confocal microscopy, sequential pull-down assays and FRET analyses, we have demonstrated that pERK2-R45-RSK2 complexes were restricted to the nucleus but that the activated ERK retained its ability to phosphorylate nuclear substrates throughout infection. Furthermore, even with pharmacologic inhibition of MEK beginning at 48 h p.i., pERK2 but not pERK1, remained elevated for at least 10 h, showing first order decay and a half-life of nearly 3 hours. Transfection of rhesus fibroblasts with R45 alone also led to the accumulation of nuclear pERK2 and addition of exogenous RSK augmented this effect. However, knock down of RSK during bona fide RRV infection had little to no effect on pERK2 accumulation or virion production. The cytoplasmic pools of pERK showed no co-localization with either RSK or R45 but activation of pERK downstream targets in this compartment was evident throughout infection. Together, these observations suggest a model in which R45 interacts with pERK2 to promote its nuclear accumulation, thereby promoting lytic viral gene expression while also preserving persistent and robust activation of both nuclear and cytoplasmic ERK targets. PMID:24722398

Woodson, Evonne N; Anderson, Melissa S; Loftus, Matthew S; Kedes, Dean H

2014-04-01

415

ADHD Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... Body Works Main Page The Pink Locker Society ADHD Medicines KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Learning & Emotional Problems > ... and the Mind How Therapy Can Help About ADHD Have you ever been so bored that you ...

416

Plasma medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different aspects of plasma medicine, the new branch interdisciplinary between plasma chemistry and medicine, are considered.\\u000a It was shown that complex biological processes in living tissues and bodies can be controlled, stimulated, catalyzed, and\\u000a diagnosed with the use of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure air plasma. It was found that discharge plasma can produce\\u000a the desired therapeutic effect in wound sterilization and healing,

V. N. Vasilets; A. Gutsol; A. B. Shekhter; A. Fridman

2009-01-01

417

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE  

E-print Network

GRANT REGENERATIVE MEDICINE Postdoctoral Scholar Application Deadline: September 10, 2012 Instructions factor. b) Up to two postdoctoral scholars; recruited and selected by an individual faculty members based, applications for a second year of funding require a new letter from the preceptor and must include a progress

Quake, Stephen R.

418

Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described. This includes: screening creep results, weight gain and post-exposure mechanical properties for materials thermally exposed at 750/sup 0/ and 850/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/ and 1562/sup 0/F). In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

Not Available

1980-04-18

419

(Radiopharmacokinetics: Utilization of nuclear medicine)  

SciTech Connect

The work performed in the 1986/1989 period can be characterized as one of testing and documenting that the Radiopharmacokinetic technique is both feasible and applicable to human studies, as well as developing spectroscopic methods for undertaking noninvasive human studies. Main accomplishments include studies which: show that drug targeting can be monitored noninvasively using radiolabeled drugs. The study that documented this finding involved an analysis of the comparative kinetics of biodistribution of {sup 195m}Pt-cisplatin to brain tumors, when administered intravenously and intra-arterially; show that such differential targeting of Platinum represents a differential quantity of drug and a differential amount of the active component reaching the target site; show that in vivo NMRS studies of drugs are possible, as documented by our studies of 5-fluorouracil; show that 5-fluorouracil can be trapped in tumors, and that such trapping may be directly correlatable to patient response; show that the radiopharmacokinetic technique can also be used effectively for the study of radiopharmaceuticals used for imaging, as documented in our studies with {sup 99m}T{sub c}-DMSA.

Wolf, W.

1989-01-01

420

[Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].  

PubMed

The term individualised medicine, also called personalised medicine, is commonly used as an equivalent to stratified medicine. However, this is erroneous since quite often it is forgotten that especially biological medicinal products have other aspects of individualization that go beyond mere stratification. The principles of stratified medicine have been applied for biological medicinal products for many years. A historical example is diphtheria antitoxin made from horse serum, while current examples are transfusion of red blood cells and the administration of factor VIII in haemophilia A. The stratifying aspects of these medicinal products are given by the following considerations: diphtheria antitoxin is only administered after a diagnosis of diphtheria and not in other forms of tonsillitis, red blood cells should only be transfused once blood group compatibility as been established and factor VIII replacement is only administered in haemophilia A as opposed to other acquired or hereditary disease of the coagulation system. The peculiarities of biological medicinal products, in particular the inherent variability of the drug, are especially important for autologous cellular medicinal products. In addition to the expected variability of the biological source material there is interindividual variability of patients as cell donors, which make definition of specifications and determination of criteria for pharmaceutical quality and potency tests difficult. Therapy with modified autologous cells, a common and important application of advanced therapy medicinal products, is exemplary for the special considerations that must be made when evaluating pharmaceutical quality, mode of action and toxicological properties of the biological medicine. The clinical investigation of advanced therapy medicinal products with the intent of demonstrating safety and efficacy is particularly challenging because of the complexity of therapy, which often involves invasive interventions. The development of biomarkers accelerates the process towards stratified or individualised therapies. Increased requirements for companion diagnostics are a possible consequence. Progress in analytical processes and in biotechnology make a higher degree of individualization likely, possibly to the degree that medicinal products will be individually manufactured for each patient. Current principles of medicinal product testing and market authorization may be applicable only with limitations, because the individual medicinal products are not uniform and are not repeatedly manufactured. The assessment of the process, performed on several different medicinal products manufactured by the same process could potentially serve as a basis for the assessment. For the evaluation of risk for the patient in clinical trials new concepts must be considered, which can be facilitated by interaction of regulatory authorities and developers. PMID:24170083

Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

2013-11-01

421

Nuclear weapons test detection: Ensuring a verifiable treaty. Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty research and development program 1995 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has an active program to provide technologies for monitoring and verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). DOE technologies will significantly increase the nation`s capability to identify potential nuclear explosions with high confidence and with minimal false alarms. This report presents the highlights of the first year of this program. The primary objectives of the CTBT monitoring system are to deter nuclear explosions in all environments (underground, underwater, or in the atmosphere) and, if such an explosion does occur, to detect, locate, and identify its source. The system is designed to provide credible evidence to national authorities to aid in resolving ambiguities and to serve as the basis for appropriate action. To collect this evidence, one must develop technologies that can detect and identify the signals from a nuclear test against a background of hundreds of thousands of benign events. The monitoring system must have high sensitivity to detect the events of interest and, to minimize false alarms, it must identify those events with a high level of confidence.

NONE

1995-12-31

422

Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Water reactor research performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. during January through March 1980 is reported. The Semiscale Program conducted four small break loss-of-coolant tests to aid in evaluation of Semiscale system heat losses and provide data to the NRC for evaluation of small break analytical model capability to properly predict the effects of primary coolant pump operation during a small break loss-of-coolant accident. The Loss-of-Fluid Test Experimental Program conducted the second nuclear experiment in its Small Break Test Series L3. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program completed a power-cooling-mismatch/reactivity initiated accident test in the Power Burst Facility reactor, a fission gas release test in the Halden Reactor in Norway, and the second in a series of internal fuel rod fill gas composition tests. The Code Development and Analysis Program progressed in the development of advanced computer codes (FRAPCON-2 and FRAP-T6) for predicting the steady state and transient behavior of light water reactor fuel rods. The Code Assessment and Applications Program characterized a data sample for fuel code assessment and initiated PWR and BWR analysis to identify and analyze accident sequences. Engineering Support Projects progressed in development of flow measurement instrumentation in the 3-D Experiment Project and in advanced instrumentation development, with the application of a heated differential thermocouple liquid level system.

Ybarnondo, L.J.

1980-05-01

423

Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1982. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has in progress several discrete investigations for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concerned with process wastes during the active life of uranium mills and during an extended period following their shutdown. The overall objective of this research is to provide NRC and their licensees with technical guidance on several issues related to management of wastes from uranium mills and in situ recovery operations. Principal issues addressed in these studies are designs and performance of radon-suppression covers, the incentives, and constraints in using rock covers (riprap) as well as their design for armoring tailings pile covers, shorter term stabilization options for controlling windblown particles, leachate movement in soil, tailings dewatering, disposal deliberately below the water table, neutralization incentives, contamination control and restoration in in situ uranium recovery and effluent and environmental measurements, instrumentation and protocols. It is expected that many results of these studies will be used in developing regulatory guides and better evaluation of environmental impacts during and following the active life of a uranium recovery facility. Progress on each of several separately identified areas is reported. The information reported is preliminary and conclusions should be regarded as tentative. About 20 topical reports are scheduled during the year to provide detailed description of phases of the work and conclusions therefrom.

Schwendiman, L.C.; Gee, G.W.; Hartley, J.N.; Mishima, J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Silker, W.B.; Serne, R.J.; Nelson, R.W.; Wogman, N.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

1982-04-01

424

Nuclear structure at intermediate energies. Progress report, April 1, 1980-March 31, 1981. [Bonner Nuclear Labs. , Rice Univ. , 4/1/80-3/31/81  

SciTech Connect

During the contract year several results of prior LAMPF experiments were completed and prepared for publication. Progress was made in the data analysis of other experiments. Three LAMPF variable energy experiments were carried out with the polarized target PPT-VI: sigma/sub total, transverse/ (p(polarized)p(polarized)) and A/sub YY/ for p(polarized)p(polarized) elastic scattering at 14 energies between 300 and 800 MeV, and A/sub YY/ for p(polarized)p(polarized) ..-->.. d..pi../sup +/ at a few energies. Proposals were made for future experiments: two for continued nucleon-nucleon studies and one for a search for neutrino oscillations.

Phillips, G.C.; Mutchler, G.S.

1981-01-01

425

Mouse tissues that undergo neoplastic progression after K-Ras activation are distinguished by nuclear translocation of phospho-Erk1/2 and robust tumor suppressor responses.  

PubMed

Mutation of K-Ras is a frequent oncogenic event in human cancers, particularly cancers of lungs, pancreas, and colon. It remains unclear why some tissues are more susceptible to Ras-induced transformation than others. Here, we globally activated a mutant oncogenic K-Ras allele (K-Ras(G12D)) in mice and examined the tissue-specific effects of this activation on cancer pathobiology, Ras signaling, tumor suppressor, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses. Within 5 to 6 weeks of oncogenic Ras activation, mice develop oral and gastric papillomas, lung adenomas, and hematopoietic hyperproliferation and turn moribund. The oral, gastric, and lung premalignant lesions display activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)1/2 and NF-?B signaling as well as activated tumor suppressor and DNA damage responses. Other organs such as pancreas, liver, and small intestine do not exhibit neoplastic progression within 6 weeks following K-Ras(G12D) activation and do not show a potent tumor suppressor response. Even though robust Erk1/2 signaling is activated in all the tissues examined, the pErk1/2 distribution remains largely cytoplasmic in K-Ras(G12D)-refractory tissues (pancreas, liver, and intestines) as opposed to a predominantly nuclear localization in K-Ras(G12D)-induced neoplasms of lung, oral, and gastric mucosa. The downstream targets of Ras signaling, pElk-1 and c-Myc, are elevated in K-Ras(G12D)-induced neoplastic lesions but not in K-Ras(G12D)-refractory tissues. We propose that oncogenic K-Ras-refractory tissues delay oncogenic progression by spatially limiting the efficacy of Ras/Raf/Erk1/2 signaling, whereas K-Ras-responsive tissues exhibit activated Ras/Raf/Erk1/2 signaling, rapidly form premalignant tumors, and activate potent antitumor responses that effectively prevent further malignant progression. PMID:22532587

Parikh, Neha; Shuck, Ryan L; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai; Herron, Alan; Donehower, Lawrence A

2012-06-01

426

[Intensive medicine in Spain].  

PubMed

Intensive care medicine is a medical specialty that was officially established in our country in 1978, with a 5-year training program including two years of common core training followed by three years of specific training in an intensive care unit accredited for training. During this 32-year period, intensive care medicine has carried out an intense and varied activity, which has allowed its positioning as an attractive and with future specialty in the hospital setting. This document summarizes the history of the specialty, its current situation, the key role played in the programs of organ donation and transplantation of the National Transplant Organization (after more than 20 years of mutual collaboration), its training activities with the development of the National Plan of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, with a trajectory of more than 25 years, its interest in providing care based on quality and safety programs for the severely ill patient. It also describes the development of reference registries due to the need for reliable data on the care process for the most prevalent diseases, such as ischemic heart disease or ICU-acquired infections, based on long-term experience (more than 15 years), which results in the availability of epidemiological information and characteristics of care that may affect the practical patient's care. Moreover, features of its scientific society (SEMICYUC) are reported, an organization that agglutinates the interests of more than 280 ICUs and more than 2700 intensivists, with reference to the journal Medicina Intensiva, the official journal of the society and the Panamerican and Iberian Federation of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care Societies. Medicina Intensiva is indexed in the Thompson Reuters products of Science Citation Index Expanded (Scisearch(®)) and Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition. The important contribution of the Spanish intensive care medicine to the scientific community is also analyzed, and in relation to the future of intensive care medicine in Spain and in Europe, recommendations are made towards specialization in intensive care medicine incorporating in the training program those competences (knowledge, skills and attitudes) that should be present an intensivist in Europe and that are extensively fulfilled by the current Spanish training program. The trajectory followed by intensive care medicine in Europe and recently in China, shows the increasing need of intensive care and the progressive recognition of the specialty in economically growing countries, and emphasizes the need of homogenization in the training of future specialists in intensive care medicine globally. PMID:21371787

2011-03-01

427

Travel medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

2014-01-01

428

Medium energy nuclear physics research. Progress report for the period June 1, 1992 through May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Nuclear Physics Program continues to concentrate upon the use of the electromagnetic interaction in a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the study of nucleon and nuclear properties. During the past year the activities of the group involved data analysis, design and construction of equipment, planning for new experiments, completion of papers and review articles for publication, writing of proposals for experiments, but very little actual data acquisition. Section II.A. described experiments at Bates Linear Accelerator Center. They include the following: electrodisintegration of deuteron; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of {sup 3}He; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e{prime}p) cross section; transverse form factors of {sup 117}Sn; ground state magnetization density of {sup 89}Y; and measurement of the 5th structure function in deuterium and {sup 12}C. Section II.B. includes the following experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; separation of charge and magnetic form factors of the neutron and proton; measurement of the X-, Q{sup 2}, and A-dependence of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}; and analysis of 14.5 GeV electrons and positions scattered from gases in the PEP Storage Ring. Section III.C. includes the following experiments at NIKHEF and Lund: complementary studies of single-nucleon knockout and single-nucleon wave functions using electromagnetic interactions and single-particle densities of sd-shell nuclei. Section II.D. discusses preparations for future work at CEBAF: electronics for the CLAS region 1 drift chamber Section III. includes theoretical work on parity-violating electron scattering and nuclear structure.

Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

1993-06-01

429

Extracellular Matrix, Nuclear and Chromatin Structure and GeneExpression in Normal Tissues and Malignant Tumors: A Work inProgress  

SciTech Connect

Almost three decades ago, we presented a model where theextracellular matrix (ECM) was postulated to influence gene expressionand tissue-specificity through the action of ECM receptors and thecytoskeleton. This hypothesis implied that ECM molecules could signal tothe nucleus and that the unit of function in higher organisms was not thecell alone, but the cell plus its microenvironment. We now know that ECMinvokes changes in tissue and organ architecture and that tissue, cell,nuclear, and chromatin structure are changed profoundly as a result ofand during malignant progression. Whereas some evidence has beengenerated for a link between ECM-induced alterations in tissuearchitecture and changes in both nuclear and chromatin organization, themanner by which these changes actively induce or repress gene expressionin normal and malignant cells is a topic in need of further attention.Here, we will discuss some key findings that may provide insights intomechanisms through which ECM could influence gene transcription and howtumor cells acquire the ability to overcome these levels ofcontrol.

Spencer, Virginia A.; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J.

2006-08-01

430

Functional Analysis of Centrosomal Kinase Substrates in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals a New Function of the Nuclear Envelope Component Otefin in Cell Cycle Progression  

PubMed Central

Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate centrosome biogenesis, spindle assembly, and cell cycle progression. However, little is known about centrosome-specific phosphorylation sites and their functional relevance. Here, we identified phosphoproteins of intact Drosophila melanogaster centrosomes and found previously unknown phosphorylation sites in known and unexpected centrosomal components. We functionally characterized phosphoproteins and integrated them into regulatory signaling networks with the 3 important mitotic kinases, cdc2, polo, and aur, as well as the kinase CkII?. Using a combinatorial RNA interference (RNAi) strategy, we demonstrated novel functions for P granule, nuclear envelope (NE), and nuclear proteins in centrosome duplication, maturation, and separation. Peptide microarrays confirmed phosphorylation of identified residues by centrosome-associated kinases. For a subset of phosphoproteins, we identified previously unknown centrosome and/or spindle localization via expression of tagged fusion proteins in Drosophila SL2 cells. Among those was otefin (Ote), an NE protein that we found to localize to centrosomes. Furthermore, we provide evidence that it is phosphorylated in vitro at threonine 63 (T63) through Aurora-A kinase. We propose that phosphorylation of this site plays a dual role in controlling mitotic exit when phosphorylated while dephosphorylation promotes G2/M transition in Drosophila SL2 cells. PMID:22751930

Habermann, Karin; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Gobom, Johan; Lehmann, Verena; Müller, Hannah; Blümlein, Katharina; Deery, Michael J.; Czogiel, Irina; Erdmann, Christoph; Ralser, Markus; von Kries, Jens Peter

2012-01-01

431

Biological activities and medicinal properties of neem (Azadirachta indica)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the neem com- pounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal appli - cations of neem.

Kausik Biswas; Ishita Chattopadhyay; Ranajit K. Banerjee; Uday Bandyopadhyay

432

Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

With recent theoretical and empirical research in basic and applied psychology, human factors, and engineering, it is now sufficient to define an integrated approach to the deign of advanced displays for present and future nuclear power plants. Traditionally, the conventional displays have shown operators the individual variables on gauges, meters, strip charts, etc. This design approach requires the operators to mentally integrate the separately displayed variables and determine the implications for the plant state. This traditional approach has been known as the single-sensor-single-indicator display design and it places an intolerable amount of mental workload on operators during transients and abnormal conditions. This report discusses a new alternative approach which is the use of direct perception interfaces. Direct perception a interfaces display the underlying physical and system constraints of the situation in a directly perceptual way, such that the viewer need not reason about what is seen to identify system states, but can identify the state of the system perceptually. It is expected that displays which show the dynamics of fundamental physical laws should better support operator decisions and diagnoses of plant states. The purpose of this research project is to develop a suite of direct perception displays for PWR nuclear power plant operations.

Jones, B.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.; Sanderson, P.; Reising, D.V.

1993-05-21