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Sample records for nuclear microprobe techniques

  1. Materials analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability to produce focused beams of a few MeV light ions from Van de Graaff accelerators has resulted in the development of nuclear microprobes. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions, and particle-induced x-ray emission are used to provide spatially resolved information from the near surface region of materials. Rutherford backscattering provides nondestructive depth and mass resolution. Nuclear reactions are sensitive to light elements (Z < 15). Particle-induced x-ray analysis is similar to electron microprobe analysis, but 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive. The focused beams are usually produced with specially designed multiplets of magnetic quadrupoles. The LASL microprobe uses a superconducting solenoid as a final lens. The data are acquired by a computer interfaced to the experiment with CAMAC. The characteristics of the information acquired with a nuclear microprobe are discussed; the means of producing the beams of nuclear particles are described; and the limitations and applications of such systems are given.

  2. Data acquisition with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.

    1980-01-01

    Spatially resolved information from the near surfaces of materials can be obtained with a nuclear microprobe. The spatial resolution is determined by the optics of the instrument and radiation damage in the specimen. Two- and three-dimensional maps of elemental concentration may be obtained from the near surfaces of materials. Data are acquired by repeated scans of a constantly moving beam over the region of interest or by counting for a preset integrated charge at each specimen location.

  3. The Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe and its Applications in Biology and Environmental Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Zsofia

    2007-11-26

    Nuclear microscopy is one of the most powerful tools which are able to determine quantitative trace element distributions in complex samples on a microscopic scale. The advantage of nuclear microprobes are that different ion beam analytical techniques, like PIXE, RBS, STIM and NRA can be applied at the same time allowing the determination of the sample structure, major, minor and trace element distribution simultaneously.In this paper a nuclear microprobe setup developed for the microanalysis of thin complex samples of organic matrix at the Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe Facility is presented. The application of nuclear microscopy in life sciences is shown through an example, the study of penetration of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of bodycare cosmetics in skin layers.

  4. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  5. Technical aspects of nuclear microprobe analysis of senile plaques from alzheimer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, N. P.-O.; Tapper, U. A. S.; Sturesson, K.; Odselius, R.; Brun, A.

    1990-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a common form of senile dementia, has been proposed to be caused by aluminium. One of the interesting structures to be studied, senile plaque cores in the brain, have centres of only about 10 μm. We have investigated the possibility of applying nuclear microprobes to sections containing senile plaques. An alternative staining procedure, TMToluidin blue staining using a spray technique, is also presented. An outline is given of a procedure for preparing senile plaque specimens for nuclear microprobe analysis. This includes a technique for accurate ion beam positioning, utilizing electron microscopy-grids. The subject may be of general interest since sample preparation is one of the most important aspects in microprobe analysis of biological matter.

  6. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  7. The Fudan nuclear microprobe set-up and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Zhuang, W.; Shen, H.; Mi, Y.; Wu, Y.; Liu, B.; Yang, M.; Cheng, H.

    2007-07-01

    A new scanning nuclear microprobe has been constructed at the Institute of Modern Physics in Fudan University, to replace the old microbeam system which had been running for more than ten years. The key parts were purchased from Oxford Microbeams Ltd., including triplet quadrupole lens (model OM-150), collimator slits, scanning system, target chamber, and data acquisition system. Ion beams are provided from a NEC 9SDH-2 Tandem accelerator. Three CCD cameras and multiple monitors were installed to assist beam adjust. The design of beam line and beam monitors is described. Beam optics calculations were carried out based on the specific Fudan microprobe system geometry, and the results regarding beam line performance and limitations of the spacial resolution are presented and discussed here. A comparison with experimental results is given as well. About 1.5 μm beam spot size could be achieved with a 3 MeV proton beam at a current of around 10 pA. Recently, the new microprobe is applied to obtain information of fly ash particle, algae cell and otoliths.

  8. Nuclear microprobe and optical investigation of sparkling wine bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padayachee, J.; Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.

    1999-10-01

    Glass bottles, used for sparkling wine, are treated with freon during manufacturing to harden the inside surface. Although this type of treatment normally improves the properties of the glass, in this case the occurrence of "egg" formations (egg-shaped rough areas) on distinct areas of bottles, as well as yeast sticking to the insides of bottles at specific areas pointed to the possibility of different areas showing different properties in the same bottle. The question was whether the correct gas was used for the treatment, and secondly, whether the process was controlled well enough to obtain the correct properties for the inside of the glass. We present results of an optical microscopy and nuclear microprobe (NMP) investigation.

  9. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R. A.; Cohen, D. D.

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile ( Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  10. Electron Microprobe Techniques for Use in Tephrochronological Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.; Severin, K.; Wallace, K.; Beget, J.; Larsen, J.

    2006-12-01

    Tephrochronology generally assumes that a layer of volcanic ash represents a snapshot of eruption/deposition and of a region within the subvolcanic magma chamber. Correlation of tephra deposits over long distances helps establish age control for other deposits (volcanic and nonvolcanic). Reliable correlations depend on establishing similarity among tephra deposits. Although multi-parameter characterization of a tephra enhances long-distance correlations, identification and correlation of unknown tephras is often done using only geochemical analyses. Techniques vary but generally deal with chemically characterizing all (bulk) or portions (glass, crystals) of the tephra layer, with various geochemical techniques at various spatial scales. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) is the most commonly used analytical tool for geochemical analysis and imaging of micron-size volumes of glass and crystals, yet, despite warnings from numerous EPMA analysts dating back to at least 1992, a standard method for collecting, reducing, and reporting tephra data among and within laboratories is not common practice, making comparison of data sets problematic. We review the complexities in volcanic glass analysis, which include: 1) selection of standards (natural and synthetic, minerals and glasses, simple and complex chemistry, primary and secondary); 2) beam diameter, current level and count times; 3) time dependent element migration (volatiles Na, K, Al, Si); and 4) possible hydration of the glass. For example, there are multiple methods available for treating the volatile elements (minimizing the effect vs. not minimizing but correcting for it), and Morgan and London (1996) examined some of these for hydrous silicate glasses; we suggest continued comparisons are warranted, particularly on commonly used standards. Some published data sets are normalized to 100 wt% without an explanation of the extent of the deficiency in raw total. We review the 10 recommendations made by Froggatt

  11. An integrated computer system for Fudan nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Degang; Ren, Chigang; Tang, Jiayong; Yang, Fujia

    1995-09-01

    With the help of modern personal computer (PC) and object oriented programming (OOP) technology, we have recently developed a compact, integrated, user-friendly computer system for Fudan nuclear microprobe, which was originally modeled after the SUNY/Albany system. The system software has been thoroughly rewritten so as to take advantage of today's high-performance PC and facilitate easy upgrading and expansion in the case of future development of both hardware and software. Most functions of this system such as sample searching, scanning control, data acquisition, image processing and displaying, are based on a single 80386 IBM style PC with a 1-MB DRAM TVGA high-resolution monitor. Data from up to 4 ADCs, 4 sensors and a CCD camera can be acquired simultaneously. Two stepper motors are employed to move the target; a CCD camera system is also included to locate the area of interest on the sample; the secondary electron image could act as a reference to fine adjustment. Rectangular raster scanning or irregular scanning is facilitated with beam motion triggered either by a timer or by pulses from a current integrator. A variety of built-in image displaying, processing and printing methods have also been implemented in order to make the maps easier to interpret for the eyes. All of these functions are administrated by an integrated, completely menu-driven software package-MBSYS.

  12. Nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsies: Applications in pathology and clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Ph; Coquet, M.; Gherardi, R. K.; Stoedzel, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe analysis of muscle biopsy sections has been recently applied to investigate different muscle disorders. This technique, employed as a complementary examination in the frame of pathological studies, permitted to confirm the diagnosis for a first pathology and to elucidate the cause of a second. In skeletal muscles of a young patient suffering from a slow progressive myopathy, calcium accumulations have been demonstrated in histologically abnormal fibers. These findings have been compared to histopathological characteristics previously described. On the other hand, we have evaluated muscle sections from two patients who presented symptoms of an inflammatory myopathy, a rare pathology that recently emerged in France. The chemical analyses permitted us to highlight local aluminium infiltration in muscles. The hypothesis of an unusual reaction to intramuscular aluminium accumulation has been advanced. These studies demonstrate the capability for ion beam microanalytical techniques to address acute problems in pathology.

  13. Millimeter length micromachining using a heavy ion nuclear microprobe with standard magnetic scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesprías, F.; Debray, M. E.; Davidson, J.; Kreiner, A. J.; Vega, N.; de la Fournière, E.

    2013-04-01

    In order to increase the scanning length of our microprobe, we have developed an irradiation procedure suitable for use in any nuclear microprobe, extending at least up to 400% the length of our heavy ion direct writing facility using standard magnetic exploration. Although this method is limited to patterns of a few millimeters in only one direction, it is useful for the manufacture of curved waveguides, optical devices such Mach-Zehnder modulators, directional couplers as well as channels for micro-fluidic applications. As an example, this technique was applied to the fabrication of 3 mm 3D-Mach-Zehnder modulators in lithium niobate with short Y input/output branches and long shaped parallel-capacitor control electrodes. To extend and improve the quality of the machined structures we developed new scanning control software in LabView™ platform. The new code supports an external dose normalization, electrostatic beam blanking and is capable of scanning figures at 16 bit resolution using a National Instruments™ PCI-6731 High-Speed I/O card. A deep and vertical micromachining process using swift 35Cl ions 70 MeV bombarding energy and direct write patterning was performed on LiNbO3, a material which exhibits a strong natural anisotropy to conventional etching. The micromachined structures show the feasibility of this method for manufacturing micro-fluidic channels as well.

  14. Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques to photochromic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques to photochromic materials are presented regarding dopant metal ions in the crystal matrices. Types of samples that are amenable to the technique will be discussed, along with sample format and experimental conditions. The chemical information that one can obtain from samples will be presented, and examples of copant contaminant studies in crystals will be given. New types of samples that are possible to study using this technique will be presented.

  15. Determination of nitrogen in coal macerals using electron microprobe technique-experimental procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Gurba, L.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses nitrogen determination with the Cameca SX50 electron microprobe using PCO as an analyzing crystal. A set of conditions using differing accelerating voltages, beam currents, beam sizes, and counting times were tested to determine parameters that would give the most reliable nitrogen determination. The results suggest that, for the instrumentation used, 10 kV, current 20 nA, and a counting time of 20 s provides the most reliable nitrogen determination, with a much lower detection limit than the typical concentration of this element in coal. The study demonstrates that the electron microprobe technique can be used to determine the nitrogen content of coal macerals successfully and accurately. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of Nuclear Microprobes towards Understanding Complex Ore Geo-electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, J. S.; Szymanski, R.; Large, R.; Ryan, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    We report on recent development on the CSIRO Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) towards catering for long exposure mapping required for large area scanning. A new data collection system based on Labview FPGA highly co-ordinated with beam transport sits at the heart of the upgrade. These upgrades are discussed and an example of the systems use for μ-Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis in the area of complex ore geo-electrochemistry is briefly described.

  17. Nuclear microprobe study of TiO 2-penetration in the epidermis of human skin xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Gontier, E.; Moretto, P.; Surlève-Bazeille, J.-E.; Kiss, B.; Juhász, I.; Hunyadi, J.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    Titanium-dioxide is a widely used physical photoprotective component of various cosmetic products. However, very few experiments have been carried out on its penetration through the human epidermal barrier and its possible biological effects in vivo and in vitro. In the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project, the penetration of TiO2-nanoparticles through the epidermis of human foreskin grafts transplanted into SCID mice was investigated in the Debrecen and Bordeaux nuclear microprobe laboratories using combined IBA techniques. Transmission electron microscope studies of the same samples were also carried out in the DMPFCS laboratory. The skin grafts were treated with a hydrophobic emulsion containing micronised TiO2-nanoparticles in occlusion, for different time periods. Quantitative elemental concentrations and distributions have been determined in 14-16 μm thick freeze-dried sections obtained from quick frozen punch biopsies using STIM, PIXE and RBS analytical methods. Using both microscopic methods, we have observed nanoparticles having penetrated into the corneocyte layers of stratum corneum by direct visualisation in TEM and via their chemical fingerprint in PIXE. The human skin xenograft has proved to be a model particularly well adapted to such penetration studies.

  18. Trace Element Zoning and Incipient Metamictization in a Lunar Zircon: Application of Three Microprobe Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wopenka, Brigitte; Jollife, Bradley L.; Zinner, Ernst; Kremser, Daniel T.

    1996-01-01

    We have determined major (Si, Zr, Hf), minor (Al, Y, Fe, P), and trace element (Ca, Sc, Ti, Ba, REE, Th, U) concentrations and Raman spectra of a zoned, 200 microns zircon grain in lunar sample 14161,7069, a quartz monzodiorite breccia collected at the Apollo 14 site. Analyses were obtained on a thin section in situ with an ion microprobe, an electron microprobe, and a laser Raman microprobe. The zircon grain is optically zoned in birefringence, a reflection of variable (incomplete) metamictization resulting from zo- nation in U and Th concentrations. Variations in the concentrations of U and Th correlate strongly with those of other high-field-strength trace elements and with changes in Raman spectral parameters. Concentrations of U and Th range from 21 to 55 ppm and 6 to 31 ppm, respectively, and correlate with lower Raman peak intensities, wider Raman peaks, and shifted Si-O peak positions. Concentrations of heavy rare earth elements range over a factor of three to four and correlate with intensities of fluorescence peaks. Correlated variations in trace element concentrations reflect the original magmatic differentiation of the parental melt approx. 4 b.y. ago. Degradation of the zircon structure, as reflected by the observed Raman spectral parameters, has occurred in this sample over a range of alpha-decay event dose from approx. 5.2 x 10(exp 14) to 1.4 x 10(exp 15) decay events per milligram of zircon, as calculated from the U and Th concentrations. This dose is well below the approx. 10(exp 16) events per milligram cumulative dose that causes complete metamictization and indicates that laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy is an analytical technique that is very sensitive to the radiation-induced damage in zircon.

  19. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  20. A microprobe technique for simultaneously measuring thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Hapenciuc, Claudiu L.; Castillo, Eduardo E.; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Karthik, Chinnathambi; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate a microprobe technique that can simultaneously measure thermal conductivity κ and Seebeck coefficient α of thin films. In this technique, an alternative current joule-heated V-shaped microwire that serves as heater, thermometer and voltage electrode, locally heats the thin film when contacted with the surface. The κ is extracted from the thermal resistance of the microprobe and α from the Seebeck voltage measured between the probe and unheated regions of the film by modeling heat transfer in the probe, sample and their contact area, and by calibrations with standard reference samples. Application of the technique on sulfur-doped porous Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 films reveals α =-105.4 and 1.96 μV/K, respectively, which are within 2% of the values obtained by independent measurements carried out using microfabricated test structures. The respective κ values are 0.36 and 0.52 W/mK, which are significantly lower than the bulk values due to film porosity, and are consistent with effective media theory. The dominance of air conduction at the probe-sample contact area determines the microscale spatial resolution of the technique and allows probing samples with rough surfaces.

  1. Nuclear analytical techniques in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Cesareo, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book acquaints one with the fundamental principles and the instrumentation relevant to analytical technique based on atomic and nuclear physics, as well as present and future biomedical applications. Besides providing a theoretical description of the physical phenomena, a large part of the book is devoted to applications in the medical and biological field, particularly in hematology, forensic medicine and environmental science. This volume reviews methods such as the possibility of carrying out rapid multi-element analysis of trace elements on biomedical samples, in vitro and in vivo, by XRF-analysis; the ability of the PIXE-microprobe to analyze in detail and to map trace elements in fragments of biomedical samples or inside the cells; the potentiality of in vivo nuclear activation analysis for diagnostic purposes. Finally, techniques are described such as radiation scattering (elastic and inelastic scattering) and attenuation measurements which will undoubtedly see great development in the immediate future.

  2. Nuclear microprobe analysis and source apportionment of individual atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Rabello, Marta L. C.; Watt, Frank; Grime, Geoff; Swietlicki, Erik

    1993-04-01

    In atmospheric aerosol research, one key issue is to determine the sources of the airborne particles. Bulk PIXE analysis coupled with receptor modeling provides a useful, but limited view of the aerosol sources influencing one particular site or sample. The scanning nuclear microprobe (SNM) technique is a microanalytical technique that gives unique information on individual aerosol particles. In the SNM analyses a 1.0 μm size 2.4 MeV proton beam from the Oxford SNM was used. The trace elements with Z > 11 were measured by the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method with detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range. Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are measured simultaneously using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at the Brazilian Antarctic Station and at biomass burning sites in the Amazon basin tropical rain forest in Brazil. In the Antarctic samples, the sea-salt aerosol particles were clearly predominating, with NaCl and CaSO 4 as major compounds with several trace elements as Al, Si, P, K, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb. Factor analysis of the elemental data showed the presence of four components: 1) soil dust particles; 2) NaCl particles; 3) CaSO 4 with Sr; and 4) Br and Mg. Strontium, observed at 20-100 ppm levels, was always present in the CaSO 4 particles. The hierarchical cluster procedure gave results similar to the ones obtained through factor analysis. For the tropical rain forest biomass burning aerosol emissions, biogenic particles with a high organic content dominate the particle population, while K, P, Ca, Mg, Zn, and Si are the dominant elements. Zinc at 10-200 ppm is present in biogenic particles rich in P and K. The quantitative aspects and excellent detection limits make SNM analysis of individual aerosol particles a very powerful analytical tool.

  3. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, Zoë; Belton, David; Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson

    2008-01-01

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure.

  4. Effect of magnetic quadrupole lens alignment on a nuclear microprobe resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinko, S. V.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The paper reports the research trends in developing probe-forming systems with high demagnification and analysis factors that limit a nuclear microprobe resolution. Parasitic aberrations caused by tilts and offsets of magnetic quadrupoles are studied in terms of their effect on probe parameters on a target. The most common arrangements of probe-forming systems such as a triplet and "Russian quadruplet" with separated geometry are considered. The accuracy prerequisites for the positioning of the quadrupoles are defined, and practical guidelines for alignment of probe-forming systems with high demagnification factors are suggested.

  5. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into intact and tape-stripped human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Bodnár, E.; Major, I.; Borbíró, I.; Kiss, Á. Z.; Hunyadi, J.

    2010-06-01

    Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the small particle size makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. In the present work the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into intact and tape-stripped human skin was investigated using nuclear microprobe techniques, such as proton induced X-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission ion microscopy. Our results indicate that the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide, in a hydrophobic basis gel with 48 h application time, is limited to the stratum corneum layer of the intact skin. Removing the stratum corneum partially or entirely by tape-stripping did not cause the penetration of the particles into the deeper dermal layers; the zinc particles remained on the surface of the skin.

  6. In situ titanium dioxide nanoparticles quantitative microscopy in cells and in C. elegans using nuclear microprobe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Trequesser, Quentin; Saez, Gladys; Devès, Guillaume; Michelet, Claire; Barberet, Philippe; Delville, Marie-Hélène; Seznec, Hervé

    2014-12-01

    Detecting and tracking nanomaterials in biological systems is challenging and essential to understand the possible interactions with the living. In this context, in situ analyses were conducted on human skin cells and a multicellular organism (Caenorhabditiselegans) exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) using nuclear microprobe. Coupled to conventional methods, nuclear microprobe was found to be suitable for accurate description of chemical structure of biological systems and also for detection of native TiO2 NPs. The method presented herein opens the field to NPs exposure effects analyses and more generally to toxicological analyses assisted by nuclear microprobe. This method will show applications in key research areas where in situ imaging of chemical elements is essential.

  7. New CAMAC based data acquisition and beam control system for Lund nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfman, Mikael; Kristiansson, Per; Malmqvist, Klas; Pallon, Jan; Sjöland, Anders; Utui, Rogerio; Yang, Changyi

    1997-07-01

    A new CAMAC based data acquisition system has been installed at the Lund Nuclear Microprobe facility. This paper reports on the development and present status of the data acquisition system. The system is a true multiparameter CAMAC based system with fast Fera bus readout and in crate memory buffer. The user interface is based on Sparrow Kmax software for a Power Macintosh platform. The system read out and tag the event data with position on-line, which make fast on-line monitoring of spectra or element maps possible.Simultaneously, all data can be saved event by event for off-line analysis. The beam scanning part is software controlled through a timed D/A converter, this allows fast scanning of the beam. With a CCD-camera and video card the area to be analysed could be defined directly from the image, and the sample position can be moved. Any kind of irregular scan patterns could be defined.

  8. A combination of size-resolved particle samplers and XRF microprobe technique for single particle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    It is important to understand the properties of individual airborne particulates that are determined by the processes of various physicochemical reactions occurring in their generation, transformation, and transport. This study describes the application of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe technique to the analysis of size-resolved individual particles as well as the results of an experimental study on the comparison of three different particle collection instruments for single particle analysis: a two-stage filter pack, a low pressure Andersen impactor (LPAI), and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Though LPAI and MOUDI are relatively suitable for multisize-segregated particles sampling compared with the two-stage filter pack sampler, they can easily form particle clusters and finally these particle clusters impede single particle analysis. Even though more particle mass can be collected without overloading on the substrate using MOUDI, by stage rotating, particles are still deposited and form clusters on the concentric circles. When particles are forming a spot (or other shapes of particle cluster), single particle analysis using the XRF micro-beam technique is restricted to individual particles deposited at the edge of the spot. Thus, the sampling duration time depending on the sampler stage should be adjusted for single particle study.

  9. Assessment of dye distribution in sensitized solar cells by microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiros, M. A.; Corregidor, V.; Alves, L. C.; Guimarães, F.; Mascarenhas, J.; Torres, E.; Brites, M. J.

    2015-04-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have received considerable attention once this technology offers economic and environmental advantages over conventional photovoltaic (PV) devices. The PV performance of a DSC relies on the characteristics of its photoanode, which typically consists of a nanocrystalline porous TiO2 film, enabled with a large adsorptive surface area. Dye molecules that capture photons from light during device operation are attached to the film nanoparticles. The effective loading of the dye in the TiO2 electrode is of paramount relevance for controlling and optimizing solar cell parameters. Relatively few methods are known today for quantitative evaluation of the total dye adsorbed on the film. In this context, microprobe techniques come out as suitable tools to evaluate the dye surface distribution and depth profile in sensitized films. Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) and Ion Beam Analytical (IBA) techniques using a micro-ion beam were used to quantify and to study the distribution of the Ru organometallic dye in TiO2 films, making use of the different penetration depth and beam sizes of each technique. Different 1D nanostructured TiO2 films were prepared, morphologically characterized by SEM, sensitized and analyzed by the referred techniques. Dye load evaluation in different TiO2 films by three different techniques (PIXE, RBS and EPMA/WDS) provided similar results of Ru/Ti mass fraction ratio. Moreover, it was possible to assess dye surface distribution and its depth profile, by means of Ru signal, and to visualize the dye distribution in sample cross-section through X-ray mapping by EPMA/EDS. PIXE maps of Ru and Ti indicated an homogeneous surface distribution. The assessment of Ru depth profile by RBS showed that some films have homogeneous Ru depth distribution while others present different Ru concentration in the top layer (2 μm thickness). These results are consistent with the EPMA/EDS maps obtained.

  10. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  11. Development of an external beam nuclear microprobe on the Aglae facility of the Louvre museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.; Ioannidou, E.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Salomon, J.

    2000-03-01

    The external beam line of our facility has been recently equipped with the focusing system previously mounted on a classical nuclear microprobe. When using a 0.1 μm thick Si 3N 4 foil for the exit window and flowing helium on the sample under analysis, a beam spot as small as 10 μm is attainable at a distance of 3 mm from the window. Elemental micromapping is performed by mechanical scanning. An electronic device has been designed which allows XY scanning by moving the sample under the beam by steps down to 0.1 μm. Beam monitoring is carried out by means of the weak X-ray signal emitted by the exit foil and detected by a specially designed Si(Li) detector cooled by Peltier effect. The characteristics of external beams of protons and alpha particles are evaluated by means of resonance scanning and elemental mapping of a grid. An example of application is presented, dealing with elemental micro-mapping of inclusions in gemstones.

  12. The use of the RBI nuclear microprobe in conservation process studies of a church portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuović, Ž.; Fazinić, S.; Jakšić, M.; Krstić, D.; Mudronja, D.

    2005-04-01

    The southern portal of the St. Marko church in Zagreb, Croatia, is currently under the process of conservation. The conservation treatments on calcareous sandstone consist of (i) removal of harmful sulfates (gypsum) from the surface of the material by saturated solution of ammonium carbonate; and (ii) treatment of the material surface with a 10% solution of barium hydroxide in order to convert the remaining dissolvable sulfates into non-dissolvable compounds and to strengthen the material surface. The nuclear microprobe has been used to measure the level of gypsum induced damage, and quality of conservation. More specifically, the surface quantity and depth concentration profiles of sulfur have been determined in several samples taken from the portal before and after the treatment with the solution of ammonium carbonate. To test the quality of treatment by the barium hydroxide solution, the depth concentration of barium in the samples has been determined after the treatment. Both sulfur and barium concentration levels have been determined by scanning the focused proton beam over the samples, detecting PIXE spectra and creating elemental distribution maps. Beside portal samples, the efficiency of the barium hydroxide treatment was tested on sandstone samples from nearby stone pit assumed to be the origin of material used for portal construction.

  13. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  14. Cometary and interstellar dust grains - Analysis by ion microprobe mass spectrometry and other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, E.

    1991-04-01

    A survey of microanalytical measurements on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and interstellar dust grains from primitive meteorites is presented. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry with its capability to determine isotopic compositions of many elements on a micron spatial scale has played a special role. Examples are measurements of H, N, and O isotopes and refractory trace elements in IDPs; C, N, Mg, and Si isotopes in interstellar SiC grains; and C and N isotopes and H, N, Al, and Si concentrations in interstellar graphite grains.

  15. The laser microprobe mass analysis technique in the studies of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Orsulakova, A; Morgenstern, C; Kaufmann, R; D'Haese, M

    1982-01-01

    Laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) has been used to investigate cation and anion concentration in shock frozen, freeze-dried and plastic embedded inner ear tissue. Dissected inner ear specimens were prepared in various media of known ionic compositions and the influence on the K/Na ratio was measured in the lateral cochlea wall (spiral ligament, stria vascularis). For control purposes of the various procedures employed, muscle specimens (external standard) were processed in parallel. It was found that there is a good correlation between the K/Na ratio and the preservation of the tissue fine structure by comparing the results in tissues with different degrees of freezing damage. PMID:6764025

  16. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Ren, Minqin; van Kan, Jeroen A.; Watt, Frank; White, Dan

    2007-07-01

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps.

  17. Application of a nuclear microprobe to the study of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Graeme E.; Vickridge, Ian C.

    1988-03-01

    The mineral fraction of calcified tissue is largely calcium hydroxyapatite (bones and teeth) or calcium carbonate (shells and fish otoliths). Apatite has such a strong affinity for fluoride ions that the F/Ca ratio can vary markedly with position in a bone or tooth, depending on the amount of fluoride present at the time of calcification or partial recrystallization. New biological information can be obtained by introducing extra fluoride into the diet of an animal and using a microprobe later to scan sections of bones or teeth. In suitable burial sites extra fluoride is introduced after death, and the new distribution may have applications in forensic science and archaeology. Fish otoliths are also of interest since a new carbonate layer is formed each day and the distribution of trace elements may record some aspects of the fish's life history. Results from the following studies are presented: fluorine distributions in the teeth of sheep which ingested extra fluoride for known periods; distributions of calcium and fluorine in femurs of rats which drank water high in fluoride for periods from 2 to 15 weeks; calcium and fluorine distributions in artificially-prepared lesions in tooth enamel; diffusion profiles in archaeological human teeth and animal bones; patterns in the strontium/calcium ratio in sectioned otoliths of several species of fish.

  18. Nuclear microprobe analysis of wear tracks on 14N-implanted steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, B. L.; Follstaedt, D. M.; Picraux, S. T.; Yost, F. G.; Pope, L. E.; Knapp, J. A.

    1985-03-01

    Two nuclear microbeam analysis techniques [3,7 MeV(α,p) and 6 MeV(α, α)] have been used to determine the local areal density of 14N which remains in wear tracks resulting from pin-on-disc testing of nitrogen implanted 15-5 PH and 304 stainless steels. The microbeam analysis shows that the extent of N migration into the 15-5 substrate was to depths ≲ 0.5 μm, but perhaps to ≲ 1.0 μm in 304. The as-implanted layer in 15-5 PH contains up to 40-45 at.% N and consists principally of ∼ 2 μm particles of (Fe, Cr) 2N 1-x. When sufficient wear has occurred in 304 to lower the N content below 10 17 N/cm 2, an O buildup to 2 × 10 17 O/cm 2 is observed; however the presence of N does not correlate with low O levels in the wear tracks of 15-5 PH.

  19. Direct Comparison of Monazite Ages Obtained By in situ Techniques: Ion-Probe Isotopic Ages Versus Electron Microprobe Chemical Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, R. J.; Loehn, C. W.; Dahl, P. S.; Aleinikoff, J. N.; Wooden, J. L.; Hamilton, M.; Mazdab, F.; Jones, C.

    2005-12-01

    In situ analytical techniques for geochronology are rapidly becoming the method of choice for characterizing compositionally and chronologically complex minerals, including monazite (mnz) and zircon (zrc). Two such techniques include Ion Microprobe (IMP) (esp. SHRIMP) for both mnz and zrc, and electron microprobe (EMP) for mnz. Debate remains concerning comparability of ages obtained by the two different techniques: U-Pb isotopic dating (IMP) versus Th-total U-total Pb (EMP). The IMP has an advantage in analytical precision whereas the EMP has an advantage in spatial resolution. We report 6 examples of individual monazite grains that have been dated by both techniques, covering a range of ages from 300 to 2850 Ma. Three of our examples are grains that have been used as IMP standards at the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) or at the USGS-Stanford SHRIMP lab; the other grains are from research samples. Most grains display complex zoning in Y, Th and U, both in BSE images and in compositional maps, reflecting complex growth and recrystallization histories. In all cases, the ages obtained by the two techniques agree within their 2-sigma associated error, except where IMP ablation pits cross age boundaries and resolve a mixed age of the two domains, or where EMP spots fall near cracks or pits in the grain surface. One prominent example is a 100-micron mnz from the Tobacco Root Mountains, Montana. It contains a low-Th older core (ca. 2.85 Ga), a higher-Th mantle domain of about 2.45 Ga, and a low-Th rim of 1.78 Ga. This grain has 6 IMP spots that range in age from 1880 Ma (near-rim) to 2785 Ma (core). Only two IMP pits fall totally within a single chemical and age zone delineated by EMP analyses or compositional maps (the medial age zone): 2451 (+/-4) and 2432 (+/-10). The weighted mean EMP age of this domain is 2452 (+/-6). IMP spots aimed at the older core are 2619 (+/-11) and 2785 (+/-9); the weighted mean core age from EMP analyses is 2859 (+/-14). This suggests

  20. Determination of trace element mineral/liquid partition coefficients in melilite and diopside by ion and electron microprobe techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehner, S. M.; Laughlin, J. R.; Grossman, L.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of ion microprobe (IMP) for quantitative analysis of minor elements (Sr, Y, Zr, La, Sm, and Yb) in the major phases present in natural Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) was investigated by comparing IMP results with those of an electron microprobe (EMP). Results on three trace-element-doped glasses indicated that it is not possible to obtain precise quantitative analysis by using IMP if there are large differences in SiO2 content between the standards used to derive the ion yields and the unknowns.

  1. Hydrogen incorporation into high temperature protonic conductors: Nuclear microprobe microanalysis by means of 1H(p, p) 1H scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Gallien, J.-P.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Berger, M.-H.; Sayir, A.

    2006-08-01

    Protonic conductivity of some solid state materials at an intermediate temperature range (400-600 °C), referred as high temperature protonic conductor (HTPC), suggests their application as electrolytes in electrochemical cells, batteries, sensors, etc. Among them, some perovskites can be protonic and electronic conductors. Several obstacles remain to achieve the full potential of these ceramic membranes, among them the lack of measurement techniques and of an unambiguous model for conductivity. A precise understanding of the transport mechanisms requires local profiling of hydrogen concentrations within the microstructure of the ceramic. We have used the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratoire Pierre SÜE to investigate quantitatively the spatial distribution of hydrogen after water heat treatment of textured perovskites, SrCe0.9Y0.1O3-δ and Sr3Ca1+xNb2-xO9-δ, x = 0.18, synthesized according to a melt-process developed at NASA GRC. A not very common method has been developed for hydrogen measurements in thin samples, 1H(p, p)1H elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry (ERCS). Early experiments have evidenced hydrogen concentration enhancement within grain boundaries.

  2. Light detection with spectral analysis at the Legnaro nuclear microprobe: Applications in material and earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Lo Giudice, A.; Manfredotti, C.; Egeni, G.; Rudello, V.; Rossi, P.; Gennaro, G.; Pratesi, G.; Corazza, M.

    2001-07-01

    Among the numerous ion beam analytical (IBA) techniques available for material characterisation, ionoluminescence (IL) has not attracted the interest that it should deserve. Although the importance of IL technique, particularly if combined with other IBA techniques, has been widely proven, very few apparatuses to analyse light emission spectra have been installed at the microbeam facilities. In this paper we present the new IL apparatus installed at the Legnaro (LNL) Ion Microbeam Facility. The system is a modification of the OXFORD MONOCL2 apparatus for cathodoluminescence. Light collection is performed by using a retractable parabolic mirror located at a very short distance from the sample, with a small aperture to allow the ion beam to hit the sample. Accurate positioning of the retractable mirror directly coupled to a chamber mounted high-resolution monochromator allows for high light collection efficiency. This design assures that IL can be used with low beam currents (<1 pA) with the consequent reduction of the radiation damage, which often occurs during ionoluminescence measurements. A summary of some meaningful results obtained with such an apparatus is presented. The combination of IL/PIXE was used to characterise natural silica glass, known as Libyan Desert Glass, and cubic BN grains; polycristalline CVD diamond has been studied by a synergetic combination of IBICC/IL technique.

  3. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  4. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  5. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Mautner, M. N.; Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  6. The Review of Nuclear Microscopy Techniques: An Approach for Nondestructive Trace Elemental Analysis and Mapping of Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2015-01-01

    The properties of many biological materials often depend on the spatial distribution and concentration of the trace elements present in a matrix. Scientists have over the years tried various techniques including classical physical and chemical analyzing techniques each with relative level of accuracy. However, with the development of spatially sensitive submicron beams, the nuclear microprobe techniques using focused proton beams for the elemental analysis of biological materials have yielded significant success. In this paper, the basic principles of the commonly used microprobe techniques of STIM, RBS, and PIXE for trace elemental analysis are discussed. The details for sample preparation, the detection, and data collection and analysis are discussed. Finally, an application of the techniques to analysis of corn roots for elemental distribution and concentration is presented. PMID:26664356

  7. The Review of Nuclear Microscopy Techniques: An Approach for Nondestructive Trace Elemental Analysis and Mapping of Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2015-01-01

    The properties of many biological materials often depend on the spatial distribution and concentration of the trace elements present in a matrix. Scientists have over the years tried various techniques including classical physical and chemical analyzing techniques each with relative level of accuracy. However, with the development of spatially sensitive submicron beams, the nuclear microprobe techniques using focused proton beams for the elemental analysis of biological materials have yielded significant success. In this paper, the basic principles of the commonly used microprobe techniques of STIM, RBS, and PIXE for trace elemental analysis are discussed. The details for sample preparation, the detection, and data collection and analysis are discussed. Finally, an application of the techniques to analysis of corn roots for elemental distribution and concentration is presented. PMID:26664356

  8. Microprobing the Molecular Spatial Distribution and Structural Architecture of Feed-type Sorghum Seed Tissue (Sorghum Bicolor L.) using the Synchrotron Radiation Infrared Microspectroscopy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    P Yu

    2011-12-31

    Sorghum seed (Sorghum bicolor L.) has unique degradation and fermentation behaviours compared with other cereal grains such as wheat, barley and corn. This may be related to its cell and cell-wall architecture. The advanced synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) technique enables the study of cell or living cell biochemistry within cellular dimensions. The objective of this study was to use the SR-IMS imaging technique to microprobe molecular spatial distribution and cell architecture of the sorghum seed tissue comprehensively. High-density mapping was carried out using SR-IMS on beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA). Molecular images were systematically recorded from the outside to the inside of the seed tissue under various chemical functional groups and their ratios [peaks at {approx}1725 (carbonyl C=O ester), 1650 (amide I), 1657 (protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix), 1628 (protein secondary structure {beta}-sheet), 1550 (amide II), 1515 (aromatic compounds of lignin), 1428, 1371, 1245 (cellulosic compounds in plant seed tissue), 1025 (non-structural CHO, starch granules), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160 (CHO), 1150 (CHO), 1080 (CHO), 930 (CHO), 860 (CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2960 (CH{sub 3} anti-symmetric), 2929 (CH{sub 2} anti-symmetric), 2877 (CH{sub 3} symmetric) and 2848 cm{sup -1} (CH{sub 2} asymmetric)]. The relative protein secondary structure {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet ratio image, protein amide I to starch granule ratio image, and anti-symmetric CH{sub 3} to CH{sub 2} ratio image were also investigated within the intact sorghum seed tissue. The results showed unique cell architecture, and the molecular spatial distribution and intensity in the sorghum seed tissue (which were analyzed through microprobe molecular imaging) were generated using SR-IMS. This imaging technique and methodology has high potential and could be used for scientists to develop

  9. Quantification and local distribution of hydrogen within Zircaloy-4 PWR nuclear fuel cladding tubes at the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Süe Laboratory from μ-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bossis, Ph.; Hamon, D.; Béchade, J. L.; Brachet, J. C.

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen content and its distribution in in-core materials of nuclear plants are known to have a strong influence on their behaviour, especially on their mechanical properties but also on their corrosion resistance. This point has to be largely investigated in the case of the nuclear fuel cladding (Zr based alloys) of pressurized water reactors (PWR). Two situations have been considered here, with regards to the hydrogen content and its spatial distribution within the thickness of the tubes: Irradiated fuel cladding tubes after a nominal period under working conditions in a PWR core. Non-irradiated fuel cladding previously exposed to conditions representative of an hypothetical "loss of coolant accident" scenario (LOCA). As far as micrometric distributions of H were required, μ-ERDA has been performed at the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Süe Laboratory. This facility is fitted with two beam lines. In the first one, used for non-active sample analysis, the μ-ERDA configuration has been improved to reduce the limits of detection and the reliability of the results. The second one offers the unique feature of being dedicated to radioactive samples. We will present the nuclear microprobe and emphasize on the μ-ERDA configuration of the two beam lines. We will illustrate the performance of the setup by describing the results obtained for Zircaloy-4 cladding both on non-irradiated and irradiated samples.

  10. A Groundmass Composition for EET 79001A Using a Novel Microprobe Technique for Estimating Bulk Compositions. Lithology A as an Impact Melt?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Hanson, B. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Petrologic investigation of the shergottites has been hampered by the fact that most of these meteorites are partial cumulates. Two lines of inquiry have been used to evaluate the compositions of parental liquids: (i) perform melting experiments at different pressures and temperatures until the compositions of cumulate crystal cores are reproduced [e.g., 1]; and (ii) use point-counting techniques to reconstruct the compositions of intercumulus liquids [e.g., 2]. The second of these methods is hampered by the approximate nature of the technique. In effect, element maps are used to construct mineral modes; and average mineral compositions are then converted into bulk compositions. This method works well when the mineral phases are homogeneous [3]. However, when minerals are zoned, with narrow rims contributing disproportionately to the mineral volume, this method becomes problematic. Decisions need to be made about the average composition of the various zones within crystals. And, further, the proportions of those zones also need to be defined. We have developed a new microprobe technique to see whether the point-count method of determining intercumulus liquid composition is realistic. In our technique, the approximating decisions of earlier methods are unnecessary because each pixel of our x-ray maps is turned into a complete eleven-element quantitative analysis. The success or failure of our technique can then be determined by experimentation. As discussed earlier, experiments on our point-count composition can then be used to see whether experimental liquidus phases successfully reproduce natural mineral compositions. Regardless of our ultimate outcome in retrieving shergottite parent liquids, we believe our pixel-bypixel analysis technique represents a giant step forward in documenting thin-section modes and compositions. For a third time, we have analyzed the groundmass composition of EET 79001, 68 [Eg]. The first estimate of Eg was made by [4] and later

  11. Nuclear based techniques for detection of contraband

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, T.

    1993-12-31

    The detection of contraband such as explosives and drugs concealed in luggage or other container can be quite difficult. Nuclear techniques offer capabilities which are essential to having effective detection devices. This report describes the features of various nuclear techniques and instrumentation.

  12. Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schimpf, A.; Bucci, D.; Broquin, J.E.; Canto, F.; Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L.

    2012-08-15

    We study the miniaturization of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6 x 10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 m, it detects a minimum absorbance of K = 1.2 x 10{sup -4} in a probed volume of 14 pl. (authors)

  13. Nuclear microprobe investigation into the trace elemental contents of carotid artery walls of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minqin, Ren; En, Huang; Beck, Konstanze; Rajendran, Reshmi; Wu, Ben J.; Halliwell, Barry; Watt, Frank; Stocker, Roland

    2007-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease that causes lesions in large and medium-sized arteries. There is increasing evidence that the function of vascular endothelial cells is impaired by oxidation reactions, and that metal ions may participate in these processes. The nuclear microscopy facility in NUS, which has the ability to focus a 2 MeV proton beam down to sub micron spot sizes, was used to investigate the trace elemental changes (e.g. Zn and Fe) in atherosclerotic lesions in the common carotid artery of apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high fat diet. In this preliminary study, which is part of a larger study to investigate the effects of probucol on carotid artery atherosclerosis, two sets of mice were used; a test set fed a high fat diet +1% probucol, and a control set which was fed a high fat diet only. The results show that the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher in the media of arteries of probucol treated animals without overlying lesion (4.3) compared to the media with overlying lesion (1.3) ( p = 0.004) for test mice. For the control mice, the arterial Zn/Fe ratio was 1.8 for media without overlying lesion, compared with 1.0 for media with overlying lesion ( p = 0.1). Thus, for media without overlying lesion, the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher ( p = 0.009) in probucol-treated (4.3) than control mice (1.8), whereas there was little difference in the ratios between the two groups in media with overlying lesion (1.3 compared with 1.0). These preliminary results are consistent with the idea that the levels of iron and zinc concentrations within the artery wall may influence the formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery.

  14. Mars Microprobe Entry Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe mission will provide the first opportunity for subsurface measurements, including water detection, near the south pole of Mars. In this paper, performance of the Microprobe aeroshell design is evaluated through development of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) aerodynamic database and flight dynamics simulation. Numerous mission uncertainties are quantified and a Monte-Carlo analysis is performed to statistically assess mission performance. Results from this 6-DOF Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrate that, in a majority of the cases (approximately 2-sigma), the penetrator impact conditions are within current design tolerances. Several trajectories are identified in which the current set of impact requirements are not satisfied. From these cases, critical design parameters are highlighted and additional system requirements are suggested. In particular, a relatively large angle-of-attack range near peak heating is identified.

  15. Techniques and methods in nuclear materials traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.

    1996-08-01

    The nonproliferation community is currently addressing concerns that the access to special nuclear materials may increase the illicit trafficking in weapons-usable materials from civil and/or weapons material stores and/or fuel cycles systems. Illicit nuclear traffic usually involves reduced quantities of nuclear materials perhaps as samplings of a potential protracted diversionary flow from sources to users. To counter illicit nuclear transactions requires the development of techniques and methods in nuclear material traceability as an important phase of a broad forensic analysis capability. This report discusses how isotopic signatures and correlation methods were applied to determine the origins of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium samples reported as illicit trafficking in nuclear materials.

  16. Trace Analytical Techniques for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, J.E.

    1999-04-28

    Over the history of the Savannah River Site, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has developed high sensitivity analytical capabilities in support of the Site's Environmental Monitoring Program and nuclear material protection process. Many of these techniques are applicable to the developing need for nuclear forensic analysis capabilities. Radiological and critically control procedures are in place at the SRTC, as well as clean room practices, to minimize the potential for a radiological evidentiary sample to contaminate personnel and the facility, as well as to minimize contaminating the sample thus rendering it useless by law enforcement agencies. Some of the trace analytical techniques available at the SRTC include ultra-low-level gamma and alpha spectrometry, high-sensitivity thermal ionization mass spectrometry, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and trace organic analyses. These techniques have been tested during a planned domestic smuggling exercise and in the analysis of an unknown sample.In the event of an interdiction involving the illegal use or movement of radioactive material by U.S. law enforcement agencies (local, state or federal) forensic analyses will be used in developing and building a legal case against the perpetrators. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a former nuclear production site currently conducting nuclear material stabilization missions, located in Aiken South Carolina, has a long history of performing trace analytical analyses for environmental monitoring. Many of these techniques are also applicable to nuclear forensic analyses. A summary of the trace analytical techniques used at the SRTC, which are applicable to Nuclear Forensics, is presented in this paper.Contamination control, of facilities and personnel involved in the analytical analyses, as well as preventing contamination of the sample, is a unique challenge for nuclear forensic analyses

  17. Nuclear techniques in studies of condensed matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have played an important role in the studies of materials over the past several decades. For example, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, neutron activation, and particle- or photon-induced X-ray emission techniques have been used extensively for the elucidation of structural and compositional details of materials. Several new techniques have been developed recently. Four such techniques are briefly reviewed which have great potential in the study and development of new materials. Of these four, Mossbauer spectroscopy, muon spin rotation, and positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques exploit their great sensitivity to the local atomic environments in the test materials. Interest in synchrotron radiation, on the other hand, stems from its special properties, such as high intensity, high degree of polarization, and high monochromaticity. It is hoped that this brief review will stimulate interest in the exploitation of these newer techniques for the development of improved materials.

  18. Nuclear material investigations by advanced analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Martin, M.; Froideval, A.; Cammelli, S.; Orlov, A.; Bertsch, J.; Pouchon, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Advanced analytical techniques have been used to characterize nuclear materials at the Paul Scherrer Institute during the last decade. The analysed materials ranged from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, Zircaloy claddings to fuel samples. The processes studied included copper cluster build up in RPV steels, corrosion, mechanical and irradiation damage behaviour of PWR and BWR cladding materials as well as fuel defect development. The used advanced techniques included muon spin resonance spectroscopy for zirconium alloy defect characterization while fuel element materials were analysed by techniques derived from neutron and X-ray scattering and absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Nuclear Electronics: Superconducting Detectors and Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polushkin, Vladimir

    2004-06-01

    With the commercialisation of superconducting particles and radiation detectors set to occur in the very near future, nuclear analytical instrumentation is taking a big step forward. These new detectors have a high degree of accuracy, stability and speed and are suitable for high-density multiplex integration in nuclear research laboratories and astrophysics. Furthermore, superconducting detectors can also be successfully applied to food safety, airport security systems, medical examinations, doping tests & forensic investigations. This book is the first to address a new generation of analytical tools based on new superconductor detectors demonstrating outstanding performance unsurpassed by any other conventional devices. Presenting the latest research and development in nanometer technologies and biochemistry this book: * Discusses the development of nuclear sensing techniques. * Provides guidance on the design and use of the next generation of detectors. * Describes cryogenic detectors for nuclear measurements and spectrometry. * Covers primary detectors, front-end readout electronics and digital signal processing. * Presents applications in nanotechnology and modern biochemistry including DNA sequencing, proteinomics, microorganisms. * Features examples of two applications in X-ray electron probe nanoanalysis and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This comprehensive treatment is the ideal reference for researchers, industrial engineers and graduate students involved in the development of high precision nuclear measurements, nuclear analytical instrumentation and advanced superconductor primary sensors. This book will also appeal to physicists, electrical and electronic engineers in the nuclear industry.

  20. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  1. Nuclear reaction techniques in materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, G.; Lanford, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article discusses nuclear reaction microanalysis (NRA). In NRA, data accumulated in the frame of low-energy nuclear physics is put to advantage for analytical purposes. Unknown targets are bombarded and known reactions are observed. For NRA, the accelerator, detectors, spectrum recording and interpretation must be reliable, simple, and fast. Other MeV ion-beam analytical techniques are described which are complementary to NRA, such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS), proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), and the more recent method of elastic recoil detection (ERD). Applications for NRA range from solid-state physics and electrochemistry, semiconductor technology, metallurgy, materials science, and surface science to biology and archeology.

  2. Intracochlear microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bone, R.C.; Ryan, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) or microprobe analysis provides cochlear physiologists with a means of accurately assessing relative ionic concentrations in selected portions of the auditory mechanism. Rapid freezing followed by lyophilization allows the recovery of fluid samples in crystalline form not only from perilymphatic and endolymphatic spaces, but also from much smaller subregions of the cochlea. Because samples are examined in a solid state, there is no risk of diffusion into surrounding or juxtaposed fluids. Samples of cochlear tissues may also be evaluated without the danger of intercellular ionic diffusion. During direct visualization by scanning electron microscopy, determination of the biochemical makeup of the material being examined can be simultaneously, assuring the source of the data collected. Other potential advantages and disadvantages of EDXA are reviewed. Initial findings as they relate to endolymph, perilymph, stria vascularis, and the undersurface of the tectorial membrane are presented.

  3. Plasma filtering techniques for nuclear waste remediation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gueroult, Renaud; Hobbs, David T.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-04-24

    The economical viability of nuclear waste cleanup e orts could, in some cases, be put at risk due to the difficulties faced in handling unknown and complex feedstocks. Plasma filtering, which operates on dissociated elements, offers advantages over chemical techniques for the processing of such wastes. In this context, the economic feasibility of plasma mass filtering for nuclear waste pretreatment before ultimate disposal is analyzed. Results indicate similar costs for chemical and plasma solid-waste pretreatment per unit mass of waste, but suggest significant savings potential as a result of a superior waste mass minimization. This performance improvement is observed overmore » a large range of waste chemical compositions, representative of legacy waste's heterogeneity. Although smaller, additional savings arise from the absence of a secondary liquid waste stream, as typically produced by chemical techniques.« less

  4. Plasma filtering techniques for nuclear waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Gueroult, Renaud; Hobbs, David T.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-04-24

    The economical viability of nuclear waste cleanup e orts could, in some cases, be put at risk due to the difficulties faced in handling unknown and complex feedstocks. Plasma filtering, which operates on dissociated elements, offers advantages over chemical techniques for the processing of such wastes. In this context, the economic feasibility of plasma mass filtering for nuclear waste pretreatment before ultimate disposal is analyzed. Results indicate similar costs for chemical and plasma solid-waste pretreatment per unit mass of waste, but suggest significant savings potential as a result of a superior waste mass minimization. This performance improvement is observed over a large range of waste chemical compositions, representative of legacy waste's heterogeneity. Although smaller, additional savings arise from the absence of a secondary liquid waste stream, as typically produced by chemical techniques.

  5. Integrated nuclear techniques to detect illicit materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the problem of detecting explosives in the context of an object being transported for illicit purposes. The author emphasizes that technologies developed for this particular application have payoffs in many related problem areas. The author discusses nuclear techniques which can be applied to this detection problem. These include: x-ray imaging; neutronic interrogation; inelastic neutron scattering; fieldable neutron generators. He discusses work which has been done on the applications of these technologies, including results for detection of narcotics. He also discusses efforts to integrate these techniques into complementary systems which offer improved performance.

  6. Plasma techniques for reprocessing nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, E.R.; Lucoff, D.M.; Omberg, R.P.; Walter, A.E.

    1993-06-01

    A newly emerging plasma-based system, currently under development for material dissociation and mass separation applications in the area of high-level radioactive waste treatment, may have possible applications as a central processing unit for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Because this system has no moving parts and obtains separations by electromagnetic techniques, it offers a distinct advantage over chemically based separation techniques, in that the total waste volume does not increase. The basic concepts underlying the operation of this plasma-based system are discussed, along with the demonstrated and expected capabilities of this system. Possible fuel reprocessing configurations using this plasma-based technology are also mentioned.

  7. A noncontact thermal microprobe for local thermal conductivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Castillo, Eduardo E; Mehta, Rutvik J; Ramanath, Ganpati; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact thermal microprobe technique for measuring the thermal conductivity κ with ∼3 μm lateral spatial resolution by exploiting quasiballistic air conduction across a 10-100 nm air gap between a joule-heated microprobe and the sample. The thermal conductivity is extracted from the measured effective thermal resistance of the microprobe and the tip-sample thermal contact conductance and radius in the quasiballistic regime determined by calibration on reference samples using a heat transfer model. Our κ values are within 5%-10% of that measured by standard steady-state methods and theoretical predictions for nanostructured bulk and thin film assemblies of pnictogen chalcogenides. Noncontact thermal microprobing demonstrated here mitigates the strong dependence of tip-sample heat transfer on sample surface chemistry and topography inherent in contact methods, and allows the thermal characterization of a wide range of nanomaterials. PMID:21361625

  8. A noncontact thermal microprobe for local thermal conductivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Castillo, Eduardo E.; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact thermal microprobe technique for measuring the thermal conductivity κ with ˜3 μm lateral spatial resolution by exploiting quasiballistic air conduction across a 10-100 nm air gap between a joule-heated microprobe and the sample. The thermal conductivity is extracted from the measured effective thermal resistance of the microprobe and the tip-sample thermal contact conductance and radius in the quasiballistic regime determined by calibration on reference samples using a heat transfer model. Our κ values are within 5%-10% of that measured by standard steady-state methods and theoretical predictions for nanostructured bulk and thin film assemblies of pnictogen chalcogenides. Noncontact thermal microprobing demonstrated here mitigates the strong dependence of tip-sample heat transfer on sample surface chemistry and topography inherent in contact methods, and allows the thermal characterization of a wide range of nanomaterials.

  9. On the distribution of uranium in hair: Non-destructive analysis using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelsson, A.; Eriksson, M.; Pettersson, H. B. L.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the distribution of uranium in single human hair shafts has been evaluated using two synchrotron radiation (SR) based micro X-ray fluorescence techniques; SR μ-XRF and confocal SR μ-XRF. The hair shafts originated from persons that have been exposed to elevated uranium concentrations. Two different groups have been studied, i) workers at a nuclear fuel fabrication factory, exposed mainly by inhalation and ii) owners of drilled bedrock wells exposed by ingestion of water. The measurements were carried out on the FLUO beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility ANKA, Karlsruhe. The experiment was optimized to detect U with a beam size of 6.8 μm × 3 μm beam focus allowing detection down to ppb levels of U in 10 s (SR μ-XRF setup) and 70 s (SR confocal μ-XRF setup) measurements. It was found that the uranium was present in a 10-15 μm peripheral layer of the hair shafts for both groups studied. Furthermore, potential external hair contamination was studied by scanning of unwashed hair shafts from the workers. Sites of very high uranium signal were identified as particles containing uranium. Such particles, were also seen in complementary analyses using variable pressure electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (ESEM-EDX). However, the particles were not visible in washed hair shafts. These findings can further increase the understanding of uranium excretion in hair and its potential use as a biomonitor.

  10. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  11. Approximate Techniques for Representing Nuclear Data Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark L; Broadhead, Bryan L; Dunn, Michael E; Rearden, Bradley T

    2007-01-01

    Computational tools are available to utilize sensitivity and uncertainty (S/U) methods for a wide variety of applications in reactor analysis and criticality safety. S/U analysis generally requires knowledge of the underlying uncertainties in evaluated nuclear data, as expressed by covariance matrices; however, only a few nuclides currently have covariance information available in ENDF/B-VII. Recently new covariance evaluations have become available for several important nuclides, but a complete set of uncertainties for all materials needed in nuclear applications is unlikely to be available for several years at least. Therefore if the potential power of S/U techniques is to be realized for near-term projects in advanced reactor design and criticality safety analysis, it is necessary to establish procedures for generating approximate covariance data. This paper discusses an approach to create applications-oriented covariance data by applying integral uncertainties to differential data within the corresponding energy range.

  12. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  13. Applying Renormalization Group Techniques to Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Zachary; Bogner, Scott; Nunes, Filomena

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear reactions are commonly used to explore the physics of unstable nuclei. Therefore, it is important that accurate, computationally favorable methods exist to describe them. Reaction models often make use of effective nucleon-nucleus potentials (optical potentials) which fit low-energy scattering data and include an imaginary component to account for the removal of flux from the elastic channel. When describing reactions in momentum space, the coupling between low- and high-momentum states can pose a technical challenge. We would like potentials which allow us to compute low-momentum interactions without including highly virtual momentum states. A solution to this problem is to apply renormalization group (RG) techniques to produce a new effective potential in which high and low momentum degrees of freedom are decoupled, so that we need only consider momenta below some cutoff. This poster will present results relating to an implementation of RG techniques on optical potentials, including complex potentials and spin-orbit effects. We show that our evolved optical potentials reproduce bound states and scattering phase shifts without the inclusion of any momenta above a selected cutoff, and compare new potentials to old ones to examine the effect of transformation.

  14. The electron microprobe as a metallographic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.

    1974-01-01

    The electron microprobe (EMP) is shown to represent one of the most powerful techniques for the examination of the microstructure of materials. It is an electron optical instrument in which compositional and topographic information is obtained from regions smaller than 1 micron in diameter on a specimen. Photographs of compositional and topographic changes in 1-sq-mm to 20-sq-micron areas on various types of specimens can also be obtained. These photographs are strikingly similar to optical photomicrographs. Various signals measured in the EMP (X-rays, secondary electrons, backscattered electrons, etc.) are discussed, along with their resolution and the type of information they may help obtain. In addition to elemental analysis, solid state detecting and scanning techniques are reviewed. Various techniques extending the EMP instrument capabilities, such as deconvolution and soft X-ray analysis, are also described.

  15. On the Applications of IBA Techniques to Biological Samples Analysis: PIXE and RBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-González, J. M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; García-León, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; García, Y. Morilla; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    The analytical techniques based on ion beams or IBA techniques give quantitative information on elemental concentration in samples of a wide variety of nature. In this work, we focus on PIXE technique, analyzing thick target biological specimens (TTPIXE), using 3 MeV protons produced by an electrostatic accelerator. A nuclear microprobe was used performing PIXE and RBS simultaneously, in order to solve the uncertainties produced in the absolute PIXE quantifying. The advantages of using both techniques and a nuclear microprobe are discussed. Quantitative results are shown to illustrate the multielemental resolution of the PIXE technique; for this, a blood standard was used.

  16. Nuclear Reactions on Unstable Nuclei and the Surrogate Reaction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J

    2004-03-01

    Determining reaction cross sections on short-lived nuclear species is a major challenge for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. Many of these nuclei are too difficult to produce with currently available experimental techniques or too short-lived to serve as targets in present-day set-ups. Some nuclear reactions will remain immeasurable even at upcoming and planned radioactive beam facilities. It is therefore important to explore alternative methods for determining reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei.

  17. Plasma filtering techniques for nuclear waste remediation.

    PubMed

    Gueroult, Renaud; Hobbs, David T; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2015-10-30

    Nuclear waste cleanup is challenged by the handling of feed stocks that are both unknown and complex. Plasma filtering, operating on dissociated elements, offers advantages over chemical methods in processing such wastes. The costs incurred by plasma mass filtering for nuclear waste pretreatment, before ultimate disposal, are similar to those for chemical pretreatment. However, significant savings might be achieved in minimizing the waste mass. This advantage may be realized over a large range of chemical waste compositions, thereby addressing the heterogeneity of legacy nuclear waste. PMID:25956646

  18. Plasma filtering techniques for nuclear waste remediation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gueroult, Renaud; Hobbs, David T.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-04-24

    Nuclear waste cleanup is challenged by the handling of feed stocks that are both unknown and complex. Plasma filtering, operating on dissociated elements, offers advantages over chemical methods in processing such wastes. The costs incurred by plasma mass filtering for nuclear waste pretreatment, before ultimate disposal, are similar to those for chemical pretreatment. However, significant savings might be achieved in minimizing the waste mass. As a result, this advantage may be realized over a large range of chemical waste compositions, thereby addressing the heterogeneity of legacy nuclear waste.

  19. Evaluation of the odd-even effect in limits of detection for electron microprobe analysis of natural minerals.

    PubMed

    Verma, Surendra P; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Rodríguez-Ríos, Rodolfo

    2009-04-13

    Limit of detection (LOD), being a fundamental quality parameter for analytical techniques, has been recently investigated and a systematic behavior has been observed for most odd-even element pairs for many techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge very few LOD data are available in published literature for electron microprobe analysis; these consist of three papers, two being on rare-earth elements and the third covering a large number of elements of atomic number between 21 and 92. These data confirm the systematic behavior of LODs for many odd-even pairs. To initiate to full this gap, we determined LODs for several major rock-forming chemical elements from Na to Fe with atomic numbers between 11 and 26, during the microprobe analysis of common minerals (olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, quartz, and opaques) in volcanic rocks. The odd-even effect of nuclear stability seems to be present in LOD data for most odd-even pairs investigated. Nevertheless, the experimental strategy concerning the reference materials, calibration procedure, and blank measurements, should be substantially modified to better evaluate the systematic behavior of LOD values in microprobe analysis. PMID:19327450

  20. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribble, R. E.; Bertulani, C. A.; La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the present status of three indirect techniques that are used to determine reaction rates for stellar burning processes, asymptotic normalization coefficients, the Trojan Horse method and Coulomb dissociation. A comprehensive review of the theory behind each of these techniques is presented. This is followed by an overview of the experiments that have been carried out using these indirect approaches.

  1. Robust control technique for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.V.; Bailey, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes the linear quadratic Guassian (LQG) design technique with loop transfer recovery (LQG/LTR) for design of control systems. The concepts of return ratio, return difference, inverse return difference, and singular values are summarized. The LQG/LTR design technique allows the synthesis of a robust control system. To illustrate the LQG/LTR technique, a linearized model of a simple process has been chosen. The process has three state variables, one input, and one output. Three control system design methods are compared: LQG, LQG/LTR, and a proportional plus integral controller (PI). 7 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Application of nuclear microlocalization techniques to biomedical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, H.W.; Jones, K.W.

    1980-10-01

    Ion beams at the Brookhaven 3.5 MV Research Van de Graaff accelerator have been used for elemental analysis and distribution in biomedical samples. Results from several collaborations are presented. Both collimated and uncollimated charged particle beams are used for elemental analysis by measurement of characteristic x-rays (PIXE). A collimated proton beam, using a pinhole collimator (approx. 20 ..mu..m) has been used as a particle microprobe in the laboratory ambient. Thick, essentially unprepared, samples can be measured with general elemental sensitivities of < 10 ppM. The spatial resolution and elemental sensitivity have proven adequate for many samples of tissue secthons and cell clusters. Specimen damage by charged particle beams is discussed and results of cell irradiations by triton beams are presented. Deuterium localization has been carried out in cell uptake studies using the /sup 2/H(/sup 3/H,n)/sup 4/He reaction initiated by the triton beam at the accelerator. Alpha particles from the reaction register the deuterium distribution in a plastic track detector. This technique suggests that /sup 3/H may be replaced by the stable isotope /sup 2/H in tracer studies. Studies have included the detection of nonexchangeable /sup 2/H in oocytes and the uptake of deuterated thymidine in blood cells.

  3. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics: a review.

    PubMed

    Tribble, R E; Bertulani, C A; Cognata, M La; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Spitaleri, C

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the present status of three indirect techniques that are used to determine reaction rates for stellar burning processes, asymptotic normalization coefficients, the Trojan Horse method and Coulomb dissociation. A comprehensive review of the theory behind each of these techniques is presented. This is followed by an overview of the experiments that have been carried out using these indirect approaches. PMID:25313189

  4. Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques for Environmental and Life Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontasyeva, Marina

    2010-01-01

    The role of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in Environmental and Life Sciences is discussed. Examples of radioanalytical investigations at the IBR-2 pulsed fast reactor in Dubna illustrate the environmental, biomedical, geochemical and industrial applications of instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  5. The detection of bulk explosives using nuclear-based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Gozani, T.; Seher, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    In 1986 we presented a rationale for the detection of bulk explosives based on nuclear techniques that addressed the requirements of civil aviation security in the airport environment. Since then, efforts have intensified to implement a system based on thermal neutron activation (TNA), with new work developing in fast neutron and energetic photon reactions. In this paper we will describe these techniques and present new results from laboratory and airport testing. Based on preliminary results, we contended in our earlier paper that nuclear-based techniques did provide sufficiently penetrating probes and distinguishable detectable reaction products to achieve the FAA operational goals; new data have supported this contention. The status of nuclear-based techniques for the detection of bulk explosives presently under investigation by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is reviewed. These include thermal neutron activation (TNA), fast neutron activation (FNA), the associated particle technique, nuclear resonance absorption, and photoneutron activation. The results of comprehensive airport testing of the TNA system performed during 1987-88 are summarized. From a technical point of view, nuclear-based techniques now represent the most comprehensive and feasible approach for meeting the operational criteria of detection, false alarms, and throughput. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  7. Assessment of Jordanian salt using nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, K.A.; Arafah, D.E.; Jabr, I.J.; Saleh, N.S.

    1987-09-01

    Elemental study and concentration determinations have been conducted on Jordanian crude salt using Rutherford Back-Scattering (RBS) and X-ray Fluorescence (SRF) spectrometry techniques. Analysis have also been carried out on different purified salt samples available in the local market. The concentration of some elements, in particular bromide, content and its significance on human health and nutrition is discussed. Results reveal relatively high traces of elemental concentrations in crude salt. For example, bromide concentration ranges from 178 to 384 ppm in comparison to a tolerance limit of 30 ppm set by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration (USDA) and other International Agencies like FAO/WHO. It is suggested that refining crude salt may result in a reduction of bromide concentration and other traces considerably, thus making it feasible for human consumption.

  8. Image reconstruction techniques applied to nuclear mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Irving O.; Isacker, P. Van; Velazquez, V.; Barea, J.; Mendoza-Temis, J.; Vieyra, J. C. López; Hirsch, J. G.; Frank, A.

    2010-02-01

    A new procedure is presented that combines well-known nuclear models with image reconstruction techniques. A color-coded image is built by taking the differences between measured masses and the predictions given by the different theoretical models. This image is viewed as part of a larger array in the (N,Z) plane, where unknown nuclear masses are hidden, covered by a “mask.” We apply a suitably adapted deconvolution algorithm, used in astronomical observations, to “open the window” and see the rest of the pattern. We show that it is possible to improve significantly mass predictions in regions not too far from measured nuclear masses.

  9. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  10. Microstructural characterization of nuclear-waste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.; Clarke, D.R.

    1982-09-22

    Characterization of nuclear waste ceramics requires techniques possessing high spatial and x-ray resolution. XRD, SEM, electron microprobe, TEM and analytical EM techniques are applied to ceramic formulations designed to immobilize both commercial and defense-related reactor wastes. These materials are used to address the strengths and limitations of the techniques above. An iterative approach combining all these techniques is suggested. 16 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Molecular techniques to interrogate and edit the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome.

    PubMed

    Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-05-01

    The success of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism is to a large extent due to the wide range of molecular techniques that are available for its characterization. Here, we review some of the techniques currently used to modify and interrogate the C. reinhardtii nuclear genome and explore several technologies under development. Nuclear mutants can be generated with ultraviolet (UV) light and chemical mutagens, or by insertional mutagenesis. Nuclear transformation methods include biolistic delivery, agitation with glass beads, and electroporation. Transforming DNA integrates into the genome at random sites, and multiple strategies exist for mapping insertion sites. A limited number of studies have demonstrated targeted modification of the nuclear genome by approaches such as zinc-finger nucleases and homologous recombination. RNA interference is widely used to knock down expression levels of nuclear genes. A wide assortment of transgenes has been successfully expressed in the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, including transformation markers, fluorescent proteins, reporter genes, epitope tagged proteins, and even therapeutic proteins. Optimized expression constructs and strains help transgene expression. Emerging technologies such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system, high-throughput mutant identification, and a whole-genome knockout library are being developed for this organism. We discuss how these advances will propel future investigations. PMID:25704665

  12. Electron microprobe analysis of cryolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, F.; Bravo Silva, P.; Ferreira, J.; Piedade, A. P.; Vieira, M. T. F.

    2014-03-01

    A sample of cryolite was studied with a JEOL JXA 8500-F electron microprobe under several operating conditions. A TAP crystal was used to analyse Na and Al and a LDE1 crystal to analyse F. As F and Na are both highly "volatile" elements, special care must be taken during analysis. The measurement order of Na, F and Al is not irrelevant and optimum conditions may also result in different combinations of accelerating voltage, beam current, beam size or counting times. Relevant X-ray signals were recorded in order to investigate the behaviour of the Na Ka and F Ka counts with elapsed time. The incident beam current was also recorded at the same time. In a clear contrast to what has normally been reported in the EPMA analysis of aluminosilicates and silicate glasses, we found that the Na X-ray counts increase with time. This increment of X-rays intensities for sodium in cryolite depends on the operating conditions and is accompanied by a strong migration of fluorine from the beam excitation volume, leading to a decrease in F X-ray counting rates. It was also observed that higher incident beam currents induce higher radiation damage in the mineral. The current instability is consistent with possible electron induced dissociation in the cryolite structure. An analytical protocol was achieved for 6 kV and 15kV accelerating voltage for the correct EPMA analysis of cryolite.

  13. Production of a positron microprobe using a transmission remoderator.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Masanori; Jinno, Satoshi; Fukuzumi, Masafumi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Oguma, Koichi; Akahane, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A production method for a positron microprobe using a beta+-decay radioisotope (22Na) source has been investigated. When a magnetically guided positron beam was extracted from the magnetic field, the combination of an extraction coil and a magnetic lens enabled us to focus the positron beam by a factor of 10 and to achieve a high transport efficiency (71%). A 150-nm-thick Ni(100) thin film was mounted at the focal point of the magnetic lens and was used as a remoderator for brightness enhancement in a transmission geometry. The remoderated positrons were accelerated by an electrostatic lens and focused on the target by an objective magnetic lens. As a result, a 4-mm-diameter positron beam could be transformed into a microprobe of 60 microm or less with 4.2% total efficiency. The S parameter profile obtained by a single-line scan of a test specimen coincided well with the defect distribution. This technique for a positron microprobe is available to an accelerator-based high-intensity positron source and allows 3-dimensional vacancy-type defect analysis and a positron source for a transmission positron microscope. PMID:18187852

  14. Elemental mapping of biological samples using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Elemental mapping using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) can be a powerful technique for probing trace elements in biology, allowing complex interfaces to be studied in detail, identifying contamination and artefacts present in the specimen, and in certain circumstances obtaining indirect chemical information. Examples used to illustrate the advantages of the technique include the elemental mapping of growing pollen tubes, honey bee brain section, a mouse macrophage cell, human liver section exhibiting primary biliary cirrhosis, and the attack by a mildew fungus on a pea leaf.

  15. An x-ray microprobe beam line for trace element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation to an x-ray microprobe for trace element analysis is a complementary and natural extension of existing microprobe techniques using electrons, protons, and heavier ions as excitation sources for x-ray fluorescence. The ability to focus charged particles leads to electron microprobes with spatial resolutions in the sub-micrometer range and down to 100 ppM detection limits and proton microprobes with micrometer resolution and ppM detection limits. The characteristics of synchrotron radiation that prove useful for microprobe analysis include a broad and continuous energy spectrum, a relatively small amount of radiation damage compared to that deposited by charged particles, a highly polarized source which reduces background scattered radiation in an appropriate counting geometry, and a small vertical divergence angle of approx.0.2 mrad which allows for focussing of the light beam into a small spot with high flux. The features of a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) are described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. 77 FR 24228 - Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables Used in Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... COMMISSION Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables Used in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear... Techniques for Electric Cables Used in Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes techniques that the staff of the NRC considers acceptable for condition monitoring of electric cables for nuclear power...

  17. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-18

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  18. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  19. Unconventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using nanostructured diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Victor; Jarmola, Andrey; Budker, Dmitry; Santori, Charles; Huang, Zhihong; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies rely on obtaining high nuclear magnetization, motivating low operating temperatures and high magnetic fields. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques traditionally require another superconducting magnet and THz optics. We seek to use chip-scale devices to polarize nuclei in liquids at room temperature. The technique relies on optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers and subsequent transfer of polarization to nuclei via hyperfine interaction, spin diffusion, and heteronuclear polarization transfer. We expect efficient polarization transfer will be realized by maximizing the diamond surface area. We have fabricated densely-packed (50 % packing fraction), high-aspect-ratio (10+) nanopillars over mm2 regions of the diamond surface. Pillars designed to have a few-hundred-nanometer diameter act as optical antennas, reducing saturation intensity. We also report progress in using nanopillar arrays as sensitive optical detectors of nano-scale NMR by measuring NV center Zeeman shifts produced by nearby external nuclei. The enhanced surface area increases the effective density of NV centers which couple to external nuclei. Combining these techniques may enable, e.g., identification of trace analytes and molecular imaging.

  20. Applications of nuclear and isotopic techniques in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Hilmy, N.; Hendranto, K.

    1994-12-31

    Applications of Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques have been developed by the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) since early 1970 in Indonesia. The scope of these applications covers various fields such as agriculture, hydrology, sedimentology and industry. Some applications of tracer techniques in industry which have been done such as measurement of homogeneity of mixing process in fertiliser and paper factory, residence time distribution in gold processing plant, mercury inventory in caustic soda plant, enhanced oil recovery in oil production wells, leakage investigation in dust chamber of fertiliser plant and blockage of pipeline, are presented in this paper. In the field of NDT by radiographic technique, BATAN regularly conducts training courses and also issues licences for Level I and II. Some applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture such as mutation breeding, animal production and animal health have shown the potential of radiation in creating variability as a basis for varietal improvements in several food crop species, the potential of using isotopes as tracers in the studies on metabolism, particularly in relation to the efficiency of rumen fermentative digestion and biological evaluation of locally available feedstuffs from agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts. So far, four varieties of nice, two varieties of soybean, and one variety of mungbean have been officially approved for release, and one formulation of feed supplement utilizing locally available agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts has been established and used for cattle and goats. In animal health, a radiovaccine against coccidiosis in poultry has been produced and used routinely.

  1. Applications of nuclear techniques relevant for civil security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkovi, Vlado

    2006-05-01

    The list of materials which are subject to inspection with the aim of reducing the acts of terrorism includes explosives, narcotics, chemical weapons, hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials. To this we should add also illicit trafficking with human beings. The risk of nuclear terrorism carried out by sub-national groups is considered not only in construction and/or use of nuclear device, but also in possible radioactive contamination of large urban areas. Modern personnel, parcel, vehicle and cargo inspection systems are non-invasive imaging techniques based on the use of nuclear analytical techniques. The inspection systems use penetrating radiations: hard x-rays (300 keV or more) or gamma-rays from radioactive sources (137Cs and 60Co with energies from 600 to 1300 keV) that produce a high resolution radiograph of the load. Unfortunately, this information is ''non-specific'' in that it gives no information on the nature of objects that do not match the travel documents and are not recognized by a visual analysis of the radiographic picture. Moreover, there are regions of the container where x and gamma-ray systems are ''blind'' due to the high average atomic number of the objects irradiated that appear as black spots in the radiographic image. Contrary to that is the use of neutrons; as results of the bombardment, nuclear reactions occur and a variety of nuclear particles, gamma and x-ray radiation is emitted, specific for each element in the bombarded material. The problem of material (explosive, drugs, chemicals, etc.) identification can be reduced to the problem of measuring elemental concentrations. Neutron scanning technology offers capabilities far beyond those of conventional inspection systems. The unique automatic, material specific detection of terrorist threats can significantly increase the security at ports, border-crossing stations, airports, and even within the domestic transportation infrastructure of potential urban targets as well as

  2. Rapid correction of electron microprobe data for multicomponent metallic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. P.; Sivakumar, R.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical relation for the correction of electron microprobe data for multicomponent metallic systems. It evaluates the empirical correction parameter, a for each element in a binary alloy system using a modification of Colby's MAGIC III computer program and outlines a simple and quick way of correcting the probe data. This technique has been tested on a number of multicomponent metallic systems and the agreement with the results using theoretical expressions is found to be excellent. Limitations and suitability of this relation are discussed and a model calculation is also presented in the Appendix.

  3. Nuclear fuel pellet quality control using artificial intelligence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaolong

    Inspection of nuclear fuel pellets is a complex and time-consuming process. At present, quality control in the fuel fabrication field mainly relies on human manual inspection, which is essentially a judgement call. Considering the high quality requirement of fuel pellets in the nuclear industry, pellet inspection systems must have a high accuracy rate in addition to a high inspection speed. Furthermore, any inspection process should have a low rejection rate of good pellets from the manufacturer point of view. It is very difficult to use traditional techniques, such as simple image comparison, to adequately perform the inspection process of the nuclear fuel pellet. Knowledge-based inspection and a defect-recognition algorithm, which maps the human inspection knowledge, is more robust and effective. A novel method is introduced here for pellet image processing. Three artificial intelligence techniques are studied and applied for fuel pellet inspection in this research. They are an artificial neural network, fuzzy logic, and the decision tree method. A dynamic reference model is located on each input fuel pellet image. Then, those pixels that belong to the abnormal defect are enhanced with high speed and high accuracy. Next, the content-based features for the defect are extracted from those abno1mal pixels and used in the inspection algorithm. Finally, an automated inspection prototype system---Visual Inspection Studio---which combines machine vision and these three AI techniques, is developed and tested. The experimental results indicate a very successful system with a high potential for on-line automatic inspection process.

  4. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  5. Nuclear material safeguards surveillance and accountancy by isotope correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.; Goleb, J.A.; Kroc, T.K.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT) to the Light Water Reactor (LWR) and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel cycles for nuclear material accountancy and safeguards surveillance. The isotopic measurement of the inventory input to the reprocessing phase of the fuel cycle is the primary direct determination that an anomaly may exist in the fuel management of nuclear material. The nuclear materials accountancy gap which exists between the fabrication plant output and the input to the reprocessing plant can be minimized by using ICT at the dissolver stage of the reprocessing plant. The ICT allows a level of verification of the fabricator's fuel content specifications, the irradiation history, the fuel and blanket assemblies management and scheduling within the reactor, and the subsequent spent fuel assembly flows to the reprocessing plant. The investigation indicates that there exist relationships between isotopic concentration which have predictable, functional behavior over a range of burnup. Several cross-correlations serve to establish the initial core assembly-averaged composition. The selection of the more effective functionals will depend not only on the level of reliability of ICT for verification, but also on the capability, accuracy and difficulty of developing measurement methods. The propagation of measurement errors on the correlation functions and respective sensitivities to isotopic compositional changes have been examined and found to be consistent with current measurement methods.

  6. Microprobe PIXE study of Ni-Ge interactions in lateral diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilukusha, D.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Nemutudi, R.; Habanyama, A.; Comrie, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry on the nuclear microprobe (μRBS) is often used in studies of lateral diffusion couples. RBS requires that the positions of the interacting species on the periodic table are not too close in terms of atomic number and therefore do not produce excessive RBS peak overlap. In order to satisfactorily characterize systems that have atomic numbers which are close, it is necessary to find techniques which can complement μRBS. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) could be applied in the lateral diffusion couple study of a system with relatively close atomic numbers. This was with a view that it may eventually be adopted to study systems where the atomic numbers are too close for RBS analysis. The system studied here was the Ni-Ge binary system. Since RBS is an established technique for studying lateral diffusion couples, we used it as a standard for comparison. The PIXE results showed a maximum error of 12% with reference to the RBS standard. In order to achieve the most effective use of PIXE in lateral diffusion couple studies we recommend the use of the technique in such a way as to obtain depth information and the use of relatively thick sample layers.

  7. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1981-06-01

    The areas studied during the period of the contract included determinations of cross sections for nuclear reactions, determination of neutron capture cross sections of radionuclides, application of special activation techniques, and x-ray counting, elucidation of synergic solvent extraction mechanisms and development of new solvent extraction techniques, and the development of a PIXE analytical facility. The thermal neutron capture cross section of /sup 22/Na was determined, and cross sections and energy levels were determined for /sup 20/Ne(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 17/O, /sup 20/Ne(n,P)/sup 20/F, and /sup 40/Ar(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 37/S. Inelastic scattering with 2 to 3 MeV neutrons followed by counting of the metastable states permits analysis of the following elements: In, Sr, Cd, Hg, and Pb. Bromine can be detected in the presence of a 500-fold excess of Na and/or K by thermal neutron activation and x-ray counting, and as little as 0.3 x 10/sup -9/ g of Hg can be detected by this technique. Mediun energy neutrons (10 to 160 MeV) have been used to determine Tl, Pb, and Bi by (n,Xn) and (n,PXn) reactions. The reaction /sup 19/F(P,..cap alpha..)/sup 76/O has been used to determine as little as 50 ..mu..mol of Freon -14. Mechanisms for synergic solvent extractions have been elucidated and a new technique of homogeneous liquid-liquid solvent extraction has been developed in which the neutral complex is rapidly extracted propylene carbonate by raising and lowering the temperature of the system. An external-beam PIXE system has been developed for trace element analyses of a variety of sample types. Various sample preparation techniques have been applied to a diverse range of samples including marine sediment, coral, coal, and blood.

  8. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  9. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  10. Nuclear techniques for finding chemical explosives in airport luggage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzins, Lee

    1991-05-01

    Chemical explosives are composed of concentrated densities of nitrogen and oxygen. High values of the nitrogen alert the presence of a bomb; high values of both nitrogen and oxygen densities certify the bomb's presence uniquely. More than a dozen nuclear-based techniques have been proposed for rapidly scanning airport luggage to find hidden explosives by measuring these elemental distributions. In almost every scheme, the technological challenge is the accelerator, which must be small, well-shielded, cost-effective, and be operable in busy airports by nominally-trained personnel, with minimum unscheduled downtime for repairs or service. This paper will summarize, within the limits imposed by security, four of the imaging schemes.

  11. The second Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars microprobe from a drum. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  12. Thin film characterization using a mechanical properties microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, W. C.; McHargue, C. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    A new ultra-low load microindentation system has been acquired in the ORNL Metals and Ceramics Division. The system's spatial resolution and its data acquisition capabilities allow the determination of several mechanical properties from volumes of material with submicron dimension; hence, the term Mechanical Properties Microprobe (MPM). Research with the MPM at Oak Ridge has led to improved techniques for determining the plastic and elastic properties of materials using microindentation experiments. The techniques have been applied to thin films created by ion implanting metals and ceramics, radiation damaged materials, and thin hard coatings of TiN. Changes in the strength (hardness) and modulus have been measured in films as thin as 200 nm.

  13. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  15. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 20: Radiation Monitoring Techniques (Radiochemical).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  16. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 25: Radioactive Material Handling Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  17. Light stable isotope analysis of meteorites by ion microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The main goal was to develop the necessary secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) techniques to use a Cameca ims-4f ion microprobe to measure light stable isotope ratios (H, C, O and S) in situ and in non-conducting mineral phases. The intended application of these techniques was the analysis of meteorite samples, although the techniques that have been developed are equally applicable to the investigation of terrestrial samples. The first year established techniques for the analysis of O isotope ratios (delta O-18 and delta O-17) in conducting mineral phases and the measurement of S isotope ratios (delta S-34) in a variety of sulphide phases. In addition, a technique was developed to measure delta S-34 values in sulphates, which are insulators. Other research undertaken in the first year resulted in SIMS techniques for the measurement of wide variety of trace elements in carbonate minerals, with the aim of understanding the nature of alteration fluids in carbonaceous chondrites. In the second year we developed techniques for analyzing O isotope ratios in nonconducting mineral phases. These methods are potentially applicable to the measurement of other light stable isotopes such as H, C and S in insulators. Also, we have further explored the analytical techniques used for the analysis of S isotopes in sulphides by analyzing troilite in a number of L and H ordinary chondrites. This was done to see if there was any systematic differences with petrological type.

  18. Nuclear hourglass technique: An approach that detects electrically open nuclear pores in Xenopus laevis oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Danker, T.; Schillers, H.; Storck, J.; Shahin, V.; Krämer, B.; Wilhelmi, M.; Oberleithner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) mediate both active transport and passive diffusion across the nuclear envelope (NE). Determination of NE electrical conductance, however, has been confounded by the lack of an appropriate technical approach. The nuclear patch clamp technique is restricted to preparations with electrically closed NPCs, and microelectrode techniques fail to resolve the extremely low input resistance of large oocyte nuclei. To address the problem, we have developed an approach for measuring the NE electrical conductance of Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei. The method uses a tapered glass tube, which narrows in its middle part to 2/3 of the diameter of the nucleus. The isolated nucleus is sucked into the narrow part of the capillary by gentle fluid movement, while the resulting change in electrical resistance is monitored. NE electrical conductance was unexpectedly large (7.9 ± 0.34 S/cm2). Evaluation of NPC density by atomic force microscopy showed that this conductance corresponded to 3.7 × 106 NPCs. In contrast to earlier conclusions drawn from nuclear patch clamp experiments, NPCs were in an electrically “open” state with a mean single NPC electrical conductance of 1.7 ± 0.07 nS. Enabling or blocking of active NPC transport (accomplished by the addition of cytosolic extracts or gp62-directed antibodies) revealed this large NPC conductance to be independent of the activation state of the transport machinery located in the center of NPCs. We conclude that peripheral channels, which are presumed to reside in the NPC subunits, establish a high ionic permeability that is virtually independent of the active protein transport mechanism. PMID:10557355

  19. Applications of nuclear analytical techniques to environmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, M. C.; Pacheco, A. M. G.; Marques, A. P.; Barros, L. I. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2001-07-01

    A few examples of application of nuclear-analytical techniques to biological monitors—natives and transplants—are given herein. Parmelia sulcata Taylor transplants were set up in a heavily industrialized area of Portugal—the Setúbal peninsula, about 50 km south of Lisbon—where indigenous lichens are rare. The whole area was 10×15 km around an oil-fired power station, and a 2.5×2.5 km grid was used. In north-western Portugal, native thalli of the same epiphytes (Parmelia spp., mostly Parmelia sulcata Taylor) and bark from olive trees (Olea europaea) were sampled across an area of 50×50 km, using a 10×10 km grid. This area is densely populated and features a blend of rural, urban-industrial and coastal environments, together with the country's second-largest metro area (Porto). All biomonitors have been analyzed by INAA and PIXE. Results were put through nonparametric tests and factor analysis for trend significance and emission sources, respectively.

  20. Projection techniques to approach the nuclear many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of angular-momentum-projection goes beyond quantum-number restoration for symmetry-violated states. The angular-momentum-projection method can be viewed as an efficient way of truncating the shell-model space which is otherwise too large to handle. It defines a transformation from the intrinsic system, where dominant excitation modes in the low-energy region are identified with the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking, to the laboratory frame with well-organized configuration states according to excitations. An energy-dictated, physically-guided shell-model truncation can then be carried out within the projected space and the Hamiltonian is thereby diagonalized in a compact basis. The present article reviews the theory of angular-momentum-projection applied in the nuclear many-body problem. Angular momentum projection emerges naturally if a deformed state is treated quantum-mechanically. To demonstrate how different physical problems in heavy, deformed nuclei can be efficiently described with different truncation schemes, we introduce the projected shell model and show examples of calculation in a basis with axial symmetry, a basis with triaxiality, and a basis with both quasiparticle and phonon excitations. Technical details of how to calculate the projected matrix elements and how to build a workable model with the projection techniques are given in the appendix.

  1. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  2. Implementation of ionoluminescence in the AGLAE scanning external microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Gonzalez, V.; Lemasson, Q.; Moignard, B.; Pacheco, C.

    2015-04-01

    The scope of this work is to present the implementation of an IBIL imaging system in the scanning external microprobe of the AGLAE facility so as to correlate luminescence and composition maps provided by PIXE, RBS and PIGE. The challenging integration of the optical spectrometer, due to incompatibility of acquisition timings and data formats with the other IBA channels has motivated the development of a specific acquisition system. This article details the IBIL setup and explains the technical solutions retained for the coupling of IBIL with IBA techniques in order to produce fast and large IBIL-IBA maps. The IBIL maps stored in the same format as the PIXE, RBS and PIGE ones can be visualised and compared using the dedicated AGLAEmap program or the PyMCA processing package. An example of such a coupled mapping on Mesoamerican jade is presented to emphasise the interest of performing simultaneously IBA and IBIL large mappings.

  3. Ion microprobe mass spectrometry using sputtering atomization and resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, D.L.; Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has recently been developed into a useful technique for isotope ratio measurements. Studies performed in our laboratory (1-6) have been reported for a variety of elements using thermal vaporization sources to produce the atom reservoir for laser-induced resonance ionization. A commercial ion microprobe mass analyzer (IMMA) has been interfaced with a tunable pulsed dye laser for carrying out resonance ionization mass spectrometry of sputtered atoms. The IMMA instrument has many advantages for this work, including a micro-focused primary ion beam (2 ..mu..m in diameter) of selected mass, complete sample manipulation and viewing capability, and a double-focusing mass spectrometer for separation and detection of the secondary or laser-generated ions. Data were obtained demonstrating the number and type of ions formed along with optical spectral information showing the wavelengths at which resonance ionization occurs. 7 refs.

  4. MicroProbe Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey; Miles, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The MicroProbe unmanned aerial system (UAS) concept incorporates twin electric motors mounted on the vehicle wing, thus enabling an aerodynamically and environmentally clean nose area for atmospheric sensors. A payload bay is also incorporated in the fuselage to accommodate remote sensing instruments. A key feature of this concept is lightweight construction combined with low flying speeds to minimize kinetic energy and associated hazards, as well as maximizing spatial resolution. This type of aerial platform is needed for Earth science research and environmental monitoring. There were no vehicles of this type known to exist previously.

  5. Some Nuclear Techniques in Experimental Magnetism: Mössbauer Effect, Neutron Scattering and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Michel

    The goal of this chapter is to present three traditional methods for the study of magnetic properties : Mössbauer effect, neutron diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. It begins by recalling the basic properties of atomic nuclei and describing the hyperfine interactions between the nucleus and its surrounding. Then, the recoilless absorption of γ-rays by crystal, the Mössbauer effect is presented, we discuss the main parameters measured and show one example of application. Next we present neutron interactions with matter, the interaction of neutrons with the atomic nucleus and the interaction of the neutron magnetic moment with the magnetic moment of electrons. The use of polarized neutron and the inelastic scattering of neutrons are also discussed. The comparison between neutron experiments and synchrotron radiation techniques is briefly reviewed. One example of the use of neutron scattering in the domain of thin film magnetism is shown. Finally, we present the basic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance and one application of this technique to the study of Co/Cu multilayers.

  6. The first Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. From left, they are Satish Krishnan, Charles Cruzan, Chris Voorhees and Arden Acord. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  7. Ion and laser microprobes applied to the measurement of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    An ion microprobe and a laser microprobe were used to measure concentrations of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale. Hydrogen concentrations of several thousand ppm were measured by both analytical techniques below the fracture surfaces of hot-salt stress-corroded titanium alloy specimens. This segregation of hydrogen below fracture surfaces supports a previously proposed theory that corrosion-produced hydrogen is responsible for hot-salt stress-corrosion embrittlement and cracking of titanium alloys. These advanced analytical techniques suggest great potential for many areas of stress-corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement research, quality control, and field inspection applications.

  8. The Responsibility of Adult Educators in the Nuclear Age. TECHNIQUES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Sandra; Goldberg, Joan Carol

    1984-01-01

    The task of adult educators is to provide students with information as well as opportunities to explore alternatives to the arms race. As a starting point to raising nuclear issues in the classroom and incorporating them into the curriculum, the adult educator can administer a survey or questionnaire to students about nuclear weapons and the…

  9. Design and characterization of a resonant triaxial microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goj, Boris; Dressler, Lothar; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    A new trend for tactile microprobes leads to oscillating microprobes in order to overcome the drawbacks resulting from high Hertzian stress and disturbing surface forces. Thin water films on the measurement surface result in the so-called sticking effect which causes measurement faults such as snap-back and false triggering. This leads to measurement errors and low measurement speeds. We present an innovative oscillating triaxial microprobe which safely avoids sticking in all Cartesian measurement directions. The system design as well as the characterization of the microprobe are presented in this work. The low number of coupling elements, the batch-capable design and the low contact forces are the key features of the microprobe.

  10. First direct-write lithography results on the Guelph high resolution proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. P.; de Kerckhove, D.

    2011-10-01

    The recently completed high-resolution proton microprobe at the University of Guelph is Canada's first one-micron nuclear microprobe, which represents the country's state-of-the-art technology for various nuclear microprobe applications, e.g. direct-write microlithography. Its probe-forming system is comprised of a triplet Oxford Micro beams magnetic quadrupole lenses, along with high-precision objective slits. High energy protons coming off a 3 MV particle accelerator can achieve a nominal resolution of one micro and a beam current of several hundred of picoamperes when arriving at the target. This proton probe is ideal for the use of direct-write lithography with the incorporation of a magnetic scanning system and motorized sample stage. Preliminary lithography results have been obtained using spin-coated PMMA photoresist as specimen. The beam spot size, beam range and straggling inside the substrate and the exposure conditions are investigated by using scanning electron microscopy. This facility is the first in Canada to perform focused direct-write ion beam lithography, which is ideal for modification and machining of polymer and semiconductor materials for biological, microfluidic and ultimate lab-on-chip applications.

  11. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  12. Microprobe and oxygen fugacity study of armalcolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friel, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The stability of synthetic armalcolite was determined as a function of oxygen fugacity with particular regard to the oxidation state of iron and titanium. The equilibrium pseudobrookite (armalcolite) composition was measured at 1200 C under various conditions of oxidation typical of the lunar environment. These data, when compared with published descriptions of mare basalts, provide information about the conditions of crystallization of armalcolite-bearing lunar rocks. Some information about the crystal chemistry of armalcolite was obtained from X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses of synthetic armalcolite and Zr-armalcolite. Further data were gathered from a comparison of the Mossbauer spectra of a phase pure stoichiometric armalcolite and one containing appreciable amounts of trivalent titanium.

  13. Aerodynamics of the Mars Microprobe Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Moss, J. N.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Greene, F. A.; Braun, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    The selection of the unique aeroshell shape for the Mars Microprobes is discussed. A description of its aerodynamics in hypersonic rarefied, hypersonic continuum, supersonic and transonic flow regimes is then presented. This description is based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses in the rarefied-flow regime, thermochemical nonequilibrium Computational Fluid Dynamics in the hypersonic regime, existing wind tunnel data in the supersonic and transonic regime, additional computational work in the transonic regime, and finally, ballistic range data. The aeroshell is shown to possess the correct combination of aerodynamic stability and drag to convert the probe's initial tumbling attitude and high velocity at atmospheric-interface into the desired surface-impact orientation and velocity.

  14. Laser Microprobe (U-Th)/He Thermochronology of Detrital Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.; van Soest, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    A persistent concern in detrital mineral geochronology is the need to obtain a representative sampling of crystallization or cooling ages in the source region. Methods with high throughput --- e.g., laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of muscovite and U-Pb thermochronology of zircon --- have a distinct advantage in this regard. Both techniques have advanced to the point that the dozens of analyses necessary to obtain a representative sampling can be done quickly and with sufficiently precision for high-quality research. Datasets obtained using methods that are far more labor intensive --- e.g., single-grain (U-Th)/He and fission track dating of minerals such as zircon --- typically include many fewer analyses. Consequently, we have less confidence that the cooling age distribution in the dataset represents the cooling age distribution in the source region. Of greater concern are analytical protocols that increase the probability of non-representative sampling. One example is the practice of picking zircon grains that are inclusion-free and euhedral (or nearly so) for conventional (U-Th)/He dating. While this practice is essential for successful conventional (U-Th)/He dating, it unavoidably leads to the systematic exclusion of grains that actually may represent significant portions of the source terrain. We describe a new approach to detrital mineral (U-Th)/He thermochronology that, in principle, provides a higher- fidelity record of the source region cooling history than the conventional technique. It involves the use of an excimer laser microprobe to ablate portions of the grain interiors from detrital zircons in a polished grain mount. (Prior to analyses, the grains can be mapped using backscattered electron and cathodoluminesence imagery.) The amounts of evolved 4He are typically so small that they are best measured using a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer rather than a quadrupole mass spectrometer of the type typically used for conventional (U- Th

  15. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  16. Developing the nuclear idea: concept, technique, and process.

    PubMed

    Billow, Richard M

    2013-10-01

    I introduce an approach to group that has remained undeveloped in the literature, but represents an essence of relationally oriented group psychotherapy. Evolving from the verbalizations and enactments through which the group symbolizes and becomes known-a nuclear idea takes shape. It emerges from the nucleus of the group process: co-created from intersubjective forces and locations that cannot be fully specified, yet may be possible to observe, name, and utilize clinically. Groups organize themselves by developing nuclear ideas, with the therapist's active participation. They are vehicles through which a group comes to think about its thinking: not only what it thinks, but also how it thinks, or chooses not to think, and when and why. Developing the nuclear idea provides a framework for how the therapist-and the group itself-goes about the task of containing. With its emphasis on meaning and the development of meaning as transformational, the concept of the nuclear idea supplements the whole group, interpersonal, and intrapsychic lenses through which the therapist comes to understand group experience and base interventions. Clinical vignettes illustrate how the therapist may develop nuclear ideas thematically, conceptualize further, and negotiate meaning with the co-participation of other group members. PMID:24004013

  17. The use of the laser Raman microprobe for the determination of salinity in fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Mernagh, T.P.; Wilde, A.R. )

    1989-04-01

    The O-H stretching region (2,800-3,800 cm{sup {minus}1}) in Raman spectra of aqueous solutions is sensitive to changes in the salt concentration. This permits determination of the salinity in the aqueous phase of fluid inclusions (at room temperature) by calculating skewing parameters from Raman microprobe spectra. The technique does not require detailed knowledge of the fluid composition and can be applied to most chloride solutions which commonly occur in fluid inclusions. Studies of synthetic fluid inclusions from the NaCl-H{sub 2}O system show that salinities up to halite saturation may be determined to within {plus minus}2 wt%. Well-characterized fluid inclusions from the unconformity-related uranium deposits of Nabarlek and Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia, were studied with the laser Raman microprobe. The salinities determined from the Raman spectra are comparable to those obtained using standard microthermometric techniques. The Raman microprobe technique has the advantage of not requiring analogy to binary salt-water phase diagrams which cannot adequately model the complex brines in these inclusions. Variations in the concentration of salt hydrates, observed in Raman spectra of frozen inclusion, validated the salinities derived from the Raman skewing parameters obtained at room temperature. The Raman analyses confirm previous microthermometric evidence for trapping of discrete high and low salinity fluids.

  18. Fabrication techniques for reverse electrode coaxial germanium nuclear radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1980-11-01

    Germanium detectors with reverse polarity coaxial electrodes have been shown to exhibit improved resistance to radiation damage as compared with conventional electrode devices. However, the production of reverse electrode devices involves the development of new handling and fabrication techniques which has limited their wider application. We have developed novel techniques which lead to a device which is simple to fabricate, environmentally passivated and surface state adjusted.

  19. Application of the Karlsruhe proton microprobe to medical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, D.; Rokita, E.

    1984-04-01

    The Karlsruhe nuclear microprobe was used in the investigation of healthy and malign tissue of animals and men. Target preparation tests showed that cryofixation of the tissue before cutting with a microtome and succeeding lyophilization of the slices gave reliable results. The slices were mounted on backing foils of Formvar the thickness of which varied between 30 and 50 {μg}/{cm 2}. For irradiation we tested various patterns generated by the 3 MeV proton beam by sweeping in one or two dimensions. Most of the data were collected in line-scan mode, where 256 equidistant irradiation dots of 3 × 10 μm 2 formed a line of 750 μm length at beam currents of 250 pA. The target thickness was determined simultaneously by proton elastic scattering in all cases. Radial concentration profiles of degenerated human arteries (atherosclerosis) showed a remarkable increase of Ca, partly correlated with local maxima of the Zn content, when compared with non-degenerated capillaries. Microtome cuts across a Morris Hepatoma 7777 cancer grown in a rat leg were investigated to correlate the concentration shifts of some trace elements in malign tissue with single cells.

  20. Detection of special nuclear materials with the associate particle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, Cédric; Deyglun, Clément; Pérot, Bertrand; Eléon, Cyrille; Normand, Stéphane; Sannié, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenolé; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R&D program against chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRN-E) threats, CEA is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with fast neutrons produced by an associated particle sealed tube neutron generator. The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction produces an alpha particle and a 14 MeV neutron almost back to back, allowing tagging neutron emission both in time and direction with an alpha particle position-sensitive sensor embedded in the generator. Fission prompt neutrons and gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons which are tagged by an alpha particle are detected in coincidence with plastic scintillators. This paper presents numerical simulations performed with the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo computer code and with post processing software developed with the ROOT data analysis package. False coincidences due to neutron and photon scattering between adjacent detectors (cross talk) are filtered out to increase the selectivity between nuclear and benign materials. Accidental coincidences, which are not correlated to an alpha particle, are also taken into account in the numerical model, as well as counting statistics, and the time-energy resolution of the data acquisition system. Such realistic calculations show that relevant quantities of SNM (few kg) can be distinguished from cargo and shielding materials in 10 min acquisitions. First laboratory tests of the system under development in CEA laboratories are also presented.

  1. Detection of special nuclear materials with the associate particle technique

    SciTech Connect

    Carasco, Cedric; Deyglun, Clement; Perot, Bertrand; Eleon, Cyrille; Normand, Stephane; Sannie, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenole; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-04-19

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R and D program against chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRN-E) threats, CEA is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with fast neutrons produced by an associated particle sealed tube neutron generator. The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction produces an alpha particle and a 14 MeV neutron almost back to back, allowing tagging neutron emission both in time and direction with an alpha particle position-sensitive sensor embedded in the generator. Fission prompt neutrons and gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons which are tagged by an alpha particle are detected in coincidence with plastic scintillators. This paper presents numerical simulations performed with the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo computer code and with post processing software developed with the ROOT data analysis package. False coincidences due to neutron and photon scattering between adjacent detectors (cross talk) are filtered out to increase the selectivity between nuclear and benign materials. Accidental coincidences, which are not correlated to an alpha particle, are also taken into account in the numerical model, as well as counting statistics, and the time-energy resolution of the data acquisition system. Such realistic calculations show that relevant quantities of SNM (few kg) can be distinguished from cargo and shielding materials in 10 min acquisitions. First laboratory tests of the system under development in CEA laboratories are also presented.

  2. Experimental study on the mechanical interaction between silicon neural microprobes and rat dura mater during insertion.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Z; Németh, A; Márton, G; Ulbert, I; Pongrácz, A

    2015-02-01

    In vivo insertion experiments are essential to optimize novel neural implants. Our work focuses on the interaction between intact dura mater of rats and as-fabricated single-shaft silicon microprobes realized by deep reactive ion etching. Implantation parameters like penetration force and dimpling through intact dura mater were studied as a function of insertion speed, microprobe cross-section, tip angle and animal age. To reduce tissue resistance, we proposed a unique tip sharpening technique, which was also evaluated in in vivo insertion tests. By doubling the insertion speed (between 1.2 and 10.5 mm/min), an increase of 10-35% in penetration forces was measured. When decreasing the cross-section of the microprobes, penetration forces and dimpling was reduced by as much as 30-50% at constant insertion speeds. Force was noticed to gradually decrease by decreasing tip angles. Measured penetration forces through dura mater were reduced even down to 11±3 mN compared to unsharpened (49±13 mN) probes by utilizing our unique tip sharpening technique, which is very close to exerted penetration force in the case of retracted dura (5±1.5 mN). Our findings imply that age remarkably alters the elasticity of intact dura mater. The decreasing stiffness of dura mater results in a significant rise in penetration force and decrease in dimpling. Our work is the first in vivo comparative study on microelectrode penetration through intact and retracted dura mater. PMID:25631267

  3. New frontiers in science and technology: nuclear techniques in nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Lena; Tanumihardjo, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques in nutrition adds value by the increased specificity and sensitivity of measures compared with conventional techniques in a wide range of applications. This article provides a brief overview of well-established stable-isotope techniques to evaluate micronutrient bioavailability and assess human-milk intake in breastfed infants to monitor the transfer of micronutrients from the mother to the infant. Recent developments are highlighted in the use of nuclear techniques to evaluate biological interactions between food, nutrition, and health to move the agenda forward. PMID:21653797

  4. Aerothermal Heating Predictions for Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; DiFulvio, M.; Horvath, T. J.; Braun, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of computational predictions and experimental measurements of the aerothermal heating expected on the two Mars Microprobes during their entry to Mars are presented. The maximum, non-ablating, heating rate at the vehicle's stagnation point (at alpha = 0 degrees) is predicted for an undershoot trajectory to be 194 Watts per square centimeters with associated stagnation point pressure of 0.064 atm. Maximum stagnation point pressure occurs later during the undershoot trajectory and is 0.094 atm. From computations at seven overshoot-trajectory points, the maximum heat load expected at the stagnation point is near 8800 Joules per square centimeter. Heat rates and heat loads on the vehicle's afterbody are much lower than the forebody. At zero degree angle-of-attack, heating over much of the hemi-spherical afterbody is predicted to be less than 2 percent of the stagnation point value. Good qualitative agreement is demonstrated for forebody and afterbody heating between CFD calculations at Mars entry conditions and experimental thermographic phosphor measurements from the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. A novel approach which incorporates six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations to perform a statistical estimate of the effect of angle-of-attack, and other off-nominal conditions, on heating is included.

  5. Stand-alone microprobe at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A J; Bench, G S; Brown, T A; Frantz, B R; Grant, P G; Morse, D H; Roberts, M L

    1998-10-02

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new stand-alone microprobe facility. Although the facility was built to develop a method to rapidly locate and determine elemental concentrations of micron scale particulates on various media using PIXE, the facility has found numerous applications in biology and materials science. The facility is located at LLNL and uses a General Ionex Corporation Model 358 duoplasmatron negative ion source, a National Electrostatics Corporation 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator, and an Oxford triplet lens. Features of the system include complete computer control of the beam transport using LabVIEWTM for Macintosh, computer controlled beam collimating and divergence limiting slits, automated sample positioning to micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and sample observation. Data collection is accomplished with the simultaneous use of as many as four EG&G Ortec IGLET-XTM X-Ray detectors, digital amplifiers made by X-Ray Instruments and Associates (XIA), and LabVIEWTM for Macintosh acquisition software.

  6. Knowledge elicitation techniques and application to nuclear plant maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, E. Kevin

    The new millennium has brought with it the opportunity of global trade which in turn requires the utmost in efficiency from each individual industry. This includes the nuclear power industry, a point which was emphasized when the electrical generation industry began to be de regulated across North America the late 1990s and re-emphasized when the northeast power grid of North America collapsed in the summer of 2003. This dissertation deals with reducing the cost of the maintenance function of Candu nuclear power plants and initiating a strong link between universities and the Canadian nuclear industry. Various forms of RCM (reliability-centred maintenance) have been the tools of choice in industry for improving the maintenance function during the last 20 years. In this project, pilot studies, conducted at Bruce Power between 1999 and 2005, and reported on in this dissertation, lay out a path to implement statistical improvements as the next step after RCM in reducing the cost of the maintenance. Elicitation protocols, designed for the age group being elicited, address the much-documented issue of a lack of data. Clear, graphical, inferential statistical interfaces are accentuated and developed to aid in building the teams required to implement the various methodologies and to help in achieving funding targets. Graphical analysis and Crow/AMSAA (army materials systems analysis activity) plots are developed and demonstrated from the point of view of justifying the expenditures of cost reduction efforts. This dissertation ultimately speaks to the great opportunity being presented by this approach at this time: of capturing the baby-boom generation's huge pool of knowledge before those people retire. It is expected that the protocols and procedures referenced here will have applicability across the many disciplines where collecting expert information from a similar age group is required.

  7. Overview of nuclear medical imaging instrumentation and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.

    1998-11-01

    Nuclear medical imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of two commonly used methods, namely SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography), as well as the emerging method of intraoperative probes with imaging capability. The discussion concentrates on the instrumentation requirements for these systems and on the potential for incorporating scintillating, wavelength-shifting, and fiber optic light guides into them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Wavelength dispersive analysis with the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Thorn, K. S.; Sutton, S. R.; Jones, K. W.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) was tested on the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Compared to WDS spectra using an electron microprobe, the synchrotron WDS spectra have much better sensitivity and, due to the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation, lower backgrounds. The WDS spectrometer was successfully used to resolve REE L fluorescence spectra from standard glasses and transition metal K fluorescence spectra from kamacite.

  9. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  10. Application of American National Standards of calibration techniques of bulk measurements for nuclear materials control

    SciTech Connect

    Doher, L. W.; Gerald, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Subcommittee ANSI-INMM-8, Calibration Techniques for Nuclear Material Control under the guidance of the American National Standards Institute Committee N15 and sponsored by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, published four standards for calibration of bulk measurement of nuclear materials. The calibration techniques include those for mass, volume, nondestructive assay, and plutonium calorimetry measurements. Since that time, calibration and research personnel of the Rocky Flats Plant and workers at other facilities have applied the direction and guidance of these standards. Results of the applications are reported and th value of each standard discussed. Examples are included together with certain shortcomings and future revision plans.

  11. The Bioscience Nuclear Microscopy Program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.; Freeman, S.; Roberts, M.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    1996-12-31

    Since initiation in mid 1994, a bioscience nuclear microscopy program at Livermore has enabled collaboration with bio-scientists on a variety of projects requiring quantitative elemental microanalysis. For microprobe analysis a combination of PIXE and STIM are typically used; respectively generating element distribution maps with micron scale spatial resolution, and projected densities and histological information with sub-micron spatial resolution. Current studies demonstrate the applicability of nuclear microscopy (particularly when combined with other analysis techniques) in environmental tracing, toxicology, carcinogenesis, and structural biology. The program currently uses {approximately}10 percent of the available time on a 10 MV tandem accelerator that is also applied to a variety of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and other microprobe programs. The completion of a dedicated nuclear microprobe system, using a 5 SDH NEC 1.7 MV tandem accelerator and employing several energy dispersive x-ray detectors to improve x-ray counting rates, promises increased accelerator access, greater sample throughput and continued expansion of the program.

  12. Biological Effects in Coral Biomineralization: The Ion-Microprobe Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, A.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals are among the most prolific biomineralizing organisms on Earth and massive, reef-building corals are used extensively as proxies for past variations in the global climate. It is therefore of wide interest to understand the degree to which biological versus inorganic processes control the chemistry of the coral skeleton. Early workers considered aragonitic coral skeleton formation to be a purely physiochemical process. More recent studies have increasingly emphasized the role of a skeletal organic matrix, or intercalated organic macro-molecules that control the macroscopic shape and size of the growing crystals. It is now well established that organic compounds play a key role in controlling the morphology of crystals in a wide variety of calcium carbonate biomineralization processes by binding to specific sites, thereby causing direction-specific binding energies on the crystal surfaces. Macro-molecules, such as aspartic acid-rich or glutamic proteins and sulfated polysaccharides, are known to be embedded within the aragonitic skeletal components of coral. In addition, endosymbiotic algae and the layer of cells adjacent to the mineralizing surface, the calicoblastic ectoderm, are believed to play important roles in driving and controlling hermatypic coral skeletogenesis. However, until recently, further progress has been somewhat limited because it was not possible to obtain chemical analyses of the coral skeleton with sufficiently high spatial resolution and sensitivity to correlate chemical variations with the micrometer scale organization of its different structural components. The recent emergence of new ion microprobe technology is changing this situation radically. Conventional ion microprobe and laser ablation techniques have already contributed substantially to our knowledge about the micro-distribution of key trace elements such as B, Mg, Sr, Ba and U. However, with the development of the NanoSIMS, a newly designed ion microprobe

  13. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destouches, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND) and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  14. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  15. Identification of cosmogenic argon components in Allende by laser microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1986-01-01

    New techniques are presented for using a laser microprobe to determine the spallation argon systematics of calcium-aluminum inclusions. The Ar-38(s) amounts determined for melilite and anorthite in a coarse-grained inclusion from Allende are 2.9 x 10 to the -8th and 1.3 x 10 to the -8th cc/g, respectively. The ratio of the amounts is consistent with the calcium contents of these two minerals. The Ar-38(s) amount determined for a fine-grained inclusion from Allende is 1.1 x 10 to the -8th cc/g. Calcium and potassium amounts were determined from irradiated samples of the same inclusions so that production of Ar-38 from calcium during the cosmic ray exposure of Allende could be determined for these samples. The production observed was 12.4 + or - 2.1 x 10 to the -8th cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the coarse-grained inclusion and 9.9 + or - 2.4 cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the fine-grained inclusion. No evidence of unusual exposure was observed in the two inclusions studied.

  16. [Investigation of Carbonaceous Airborne Particles by Scanning Proton Microprobe].

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang-man; Liu, Jiang-feng; Lei, Qian-tao; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Gui-lin; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    Carbonaceous particles are an important component of the atmospheric aerosol particles and important for global climate change, air quality and human health. The PM₁₀ single particles from two environmental monitor locations and seven pollution emission sources were analyzed using scanning proton microprobe (SPM) techniques. The concentration of carbon in individual particles was quantitatively determined by proton non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry (EBS). The results of this investigation showed that carbonaceous particles were dominant in the pollution sources of coal and oil combustions, diesel busexhaust and automobile exhaust, while inorganic particles were dominant in the sources of steel industry, cement dust and soil dust. Carbonaceous matter was enriched in particles from the city center, while mineral matter was the main component of airborne particles in the industrial area. Elemental mapping of single aerosol particles yielded important information on the chemical reactions of aerosol particles. The micro-PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) maps of S, Ca and Fe of individual carbonaceous particles showed that sulfuration reaction occurred between SO₂and mineral particles, which increased the sulfur content of particles. PMID:27078933

  17. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-2, Leak Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This second in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes the predominantly used leak test methods in nuclear power plants. More specifically, the module describes these test methods, the testing techniques, and the associated quality assurance requirements. The module follows a typical…

  18. Geiger mode mapping: A new imaging modality for focused ion microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyi; Hougaard, Christiaan R.; Bielejec, Edward; Caroll, Malcolm S.; Jamieson, David N.

    2015-04-01

    Geiger mode detectors fabricated in silicon are used to detect incident photons with high sensitivity. They are operated with large internal electric fields so that a single electron-hole pair can trigger an avalanche breakdown which generates a signal in an external circuit. We have applied a modified version of the ion beam induced charge technique in a nuclear microprobe system to investigate the application of Geiger mode detectors to detect discrete ion impacts. Our detectors are fabricated with an architecture based on the avalanche diode structure and operated with a transient bias voltage that activates the Geiger mode. In this mode avalanche breakdown is triggered by ion impact followed by diffusion of an electron-hole pair into the sensitive volume. The avalanche breakdown is quenched by removal of the transient bias voltage which is synchronized with a beam gate. An alternative operation mode is possible at lower bias voltages where the avalanche process self-quenches and the device exhibits linear charge gain as a consequence. Incorporation of such a device into a silicon substrate potentially allows the exceptional sensitivity of Geiger mode to register an electron-hole pair from sub-10 keV donor atom implants for the deterministic construction of shallow arrays of single atoms in the substrate required for emerging quantum technologies. Our characterization system incorporates a fast electrostatic ion beam switcher gated by the transient device bias, duration 800 ns, with a time delay, duration 500 ns, that allows for both the ion time of flight and the diffusion of the electron-hole pairs in the substrate into the sensitive region of the device following ion impact of a scanned 1 MeV H microbeam. We compare images at the micron scale mapping the response of the device to ion impact operated in both Geiger mode and avalanche (linear) mode for silicon devices engineered with this ultimate-sensitivity detector structure.

  19. Integrated Laser Microprobe (U-Th)/He and U/Pb Dating of Titanite and Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, A.; Van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.; Tripathy-Lang, A.

    2014-12-01

    The application of laser technologies for high spatial resolution dating has proven to be an important advancement in (U-Th)/He thermochronology. Excimer laser microprobes have been used to successfully date high U+Th minerals and are an especially promising way to determine the distribution of (U-Th)/He zircon ages in detrital sedimentary samples. We have also found that another detrital mineral, titanite, may be amenable to this method as well. While titanite contains lower concentrations of parent isotopes than zircon, and consequently less radiogenic 4He, its typically larger grain size allows for these characteristics to be mitigated by the use of larger laser beam diameters during the ablation process. With the integrated use of ICPMS, an established method for U/Pb geochronology, this phase of the laser microprobe (U-Th)/He technique can be modified slightly to enable (U-Th)/He and U/Pb 'double' dating of detrital samples. Here we present a proof of concept study demonstrating the viability of integrated laser microprobe (U-Th)/He and U/Pb through dating Oligocene Fish Canyon tuff titanite and zircon from Colorado. Our use of a well characterized sample with established (U-Th)/He and U/Pb dates allows us to fully evaluate the utility of this technique. By selecting medium- to fine-grained crystals we are able to simulate a realistic, uni-modal detrital sample. Using our modified laser microprobe approach, we are able to reproduce the expected age modes with an analytical imprecision roughly twice that of more established methods, a difference that has little practical effect on geologic interpretations. Additionally, we believe that the technique could prove a viable method for double dating detrital rutile and apatite, so long as characteristically lower U+Th concentrations in these minerals are balanced by appropriately scaled ablation pits in an aliquot unbiased by the need for larger detrital grains. Ultimately, integrated laser microprobe U/Pb and (U

  20. A microprobe for parallel optical and electrical recordings from single neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    LeChasseur, Yoan; Dufour, Suzie; Lavertu, Guillaume; Bories, Cyril; Deschênes, Martin; Vallée, Réal; De Koninck, Yves

    2011-04-01

    Recording electrical activity from identified neurons in intact tissue is key to understanding their role in information processing. Recent fluorescence labeling techniques have opened new possibilities to combine electrophysiological recording with optical detection of individual neurons deep in brain tissue. For this purpose we developed dual-core fiberoptics-based microprobes, with an optical core to locally excite and collect fluorescence, and an electrolyte-filled hollow core for extracellular single unit electrophysiology. This design provides microprobes with tips < 10 μm, enabling analyses with single-cell optical resolution. We demonstrate combined electrical and optical detection of single fluorescent neurons in rats and mice. We combined electrical recordings and optical Ca²(+) measurements from single thalamic relay neurons in rats, and achieved detection and activation of single channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in Thy1::ChR2-YFP transgenic mice. The microprobe expands possibilities for in vivo electrophysiological recording, providing parallel access to single-cell optical monitoring and control. PMID:21317908

  1. Nuclear imaging techniques for the assessment of myocardial viability.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Zaret, B L

    1995-02-01

    Regional and global left ventricular dysfunction caused by coronary artery disease may be reversible in a significant proportion of cases. This fact has important clinical implications. Apart from symptoms of angina and angiographic severity of coronary artery disease, potential for an improvement in left ventricular dysfunction should be taken into account when considering revascularization for the management of patients with coronary artery disease. Because left ventricular function is an important determinant of long-term prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease, identification and appropriate treatment of reversible left ventricular dysfunction may improve prognosis in many patients with significant left ventricular dysfunction. Table 1 describes the impact of myocardial viability in relation to the clinical objectives in various groups of patients with coronary artery disease. The choice of the optimal technique for the detection of myocardial viability is a matter of ongoing debate. There is no consensus in the literature for an optimal investigative approach to predict an improvement in left ventricular function following revascularization. Most of the studies in this field are based on small numbers of patients. Further studies in larger patient populations are needed. This debate is further complicated by the fact that none of the available technologies provides a quantitative estimate of viable myocardium or the extent of improvement that can be expected following revascularization. Currently the choice of technique depends on the clinical question to be answered, the local availability of the technique, and local expertise. Obviously, cost considerations may also play an important role in choice of technique. In patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease in whom reversibility of stress-induced perfusion abnormalities is the question, stress-redistribution-rest Tl-201 imaging may be the preferred modality. In patients with congestive

  2. Nickel geochemistry of a Philippine laterite examined by bulk and microprobe synchrotron analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2011-11-01

    The Ni geochemistry of limonite and saprolite laterite ores from Pujada in the Philippines has been investigated using a mixture of laboratory and synchrotron techniques. Nickel laterite profiles are typically composed of complicated mineral assemblages, with Ni being distributed heterogeneously at the micron scale, and thus a high degree of spatial resolution is required for analysis. This study represents the first such analysis of Philippine laterite ores. Synchrotron bulk and microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), comprising both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, together with synchrotron microprobe X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and diffraction (XRD) have been applied to provide quantitative analysis of the mineral components and Ni speciation. Synchrotron microprobe EXAFS spectroscopy suggests that the limonite Ni is associated with phyllomanganate via adsorption onto the Mn oxide layers and substitution for Mn within these layers. Laboratory scanning electron microscopy, coupled to electron dispersive spectroscopy analyses, indicates that Ni is also associated with concentrated Fe containing particles and this is further confirmed by synchrotron bulk and microprobe investigation. Linear combination fitting of the bulk EXAFS limonite data suggests 60 ± 15% of the Ni is associated with phyllomanganate, with the predominant fraction adsorbed above vacancies in the MnO 6 layers with the remainder being substituted for Mn within these layers. The remaining 40 ± 10% of the Ni in the limonite ore is incorporated into goethite through replacement of the Fe. In the saprolite ore, 90 ± 23% of the Ni is associated with a serpentine mineral, most likely lizardite, as a replacement for Mg. The remaining Ni is found within phyllomanganate adsorbed above vacancies in the MnO 6 layers.

  3. Comparison of preparation techniques for nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D; Cole, James I; Gan, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are addressed.

  4. Application of Nuclear Well Logging Techniques to Lunar Resource Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albats, P.; Groves, J.; Schweitzer, J.; Tombrello, T.

    1992-01-01

    The use of neutron and gamma ray measurements for the analysis of material composition has become well established in the last 40 years. Schlumberger has pioneered the use of this technology for logging wells drilled to produce oil and gas, and for this purpose has developed neutron generators that allow measurements to be made in deep (5000 m) boreholes under adverse conditions. We also make ruggedized neutron and gamma ray detector packages that can be used to make reliable measurements on the drill collar of a rotating drill string while the well is being drilled, where the conditions are severe. Modern nuclear methods used in logging measure rock formation parameters like bulk density and porosity, fluid composition, and element abundances by weight including hydrogen concentration. The measurements are made with high precision and accuracy. These devices (well logging sondes) share many of the design criteria required for remote sensing in space; they must be small, light, rugged, and able to perform reliably under adverse conditions. We see a role for the adaptation of this technology to lunar or planetary resource assessment missions.

  5. Nuclear techniques for the inspection of blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, J. S.; Lanza, R. C.

    1999-06-10

    Carbon hearth wall failures in blast furnaces create safety risks and require a large expense to repair. To avoid failures they are replaced early, incurring costs in wasted hearth wall use. Two non-invasive measurements provide realtime analysis of wall integrity. The two major failure modes are erosion of carbon thickness and iron-filled cracks in the bricks. Measurements of backscattered gamma-ray spectra and thermal neutron decay rate can identify both phenomena. Gamma-ray spectra from a compact Linac beam primarily respond to average carbon thickness. Neutron decay time, using a pulsed neutron source, is sensitive to iron in the carbon volume. Each measurement is sensitive to the other failure made, but the combination permits each phenomenon to be resolved. These techniques can detect a high atomic number and thermal neutron absorption cross section material behind one of low atomic number and thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  6. Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2012-08-01

    The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

  7. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Carazo, V; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Guse, S; Harris, J R; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Paul, A C; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Schmidt, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sitaraman, S; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2009-06-11

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve {approx}10 MV/m gradients for 10s of nanoseconds pulses and to {approx}100 MV/m gradients for {approx}1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We detail the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  8. The application of HPLC and microprobe NMR spectroscopy in the identification of metabolites in complex biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhaoxia; Jin, Mengxia; Liu, Xia; Guo, Wei; Jin, Xiangju; Liu, Hongyue; Wang, Yinghong

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics can be used directly to identify a variety of metabolites in biological fluids and tissues. Metabolite analysis is an important part of life science and metabolomics research. However, the identification of some metabolites using NMR spectroscopy remains a big challenge owing to low abundance or signal overlap. It is important to develop a method to measure these compounds accurately. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, metabolite prediction software packages, and spike-in experiments with authentic standards are often used to solve these problems, but they are costly and time-consuming. In this study, methods were developed to identify metabolites in complex biological mixtures using both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and off-line microprobe NMR spectroscopy. With use of these methods, 83 and 73 metabolites were identified in Sprague Dawley rat urine and feces, respectively. Among them, 40 and 45 metabolites, respectively, could not be identified with traditional NMR methods. Our research revealed that the combination of HPLC and NMR techniques could significantly improve the accuracy of trace and overlapped metabolite identification, while offering an effective and convenient approach to identify potential biomarkers in complex biological systems. PMID:25814271

  9. Applications of nuclear techniques for in vivo body composition studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Wielopolski, L.

    1981-01-01

    A series of technical developments and their clinical applications in various nuclear technologies at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. These include the development of a portable neutron activation facility for measuring cadmium in vivo in kidney and liver, a technique for the measurement of body iron utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays, a non-invasive measure of the skeletal levels of lead by an x-ray fluorescence technique, and the development of a pulsed Van de Graaff generator as a source of pulsed neutrons for the measurement of lung silicon. (ACR)

  10. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

  11. Reliable Wireless Data Acquisition and Control Techniques within Nuclear Hot Cell Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.L.; Tulenko, J.

    2000-09-20

    On this NEER project the University of Florida has investigated and applied advanced communications techniques to address data acquisition and control problems within the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho Falls. The goals of this project have been to investigate and apply wireless communications techniques to solve the problem of communicating with and controlling equipment and systems within a nuclear hot cell facility with its attendant high radiation levels. Different wireless techniques, including radio frequency, infrared and power line communications were reviewed. For each technique, the challenges of radiation-hardened implementation were addressed. In addition, it has been a project goal to achieve the highest level of system reliability to ensure safe nuclear operations. Achievement of these goals would allow the eventual elimination of through-the-wall, hardwired cabling that is currently employed in the hot cell, along wit h all of the attendant problems that limit measurement mobility and flexibility.

  12. 230Th-U dating of surficial deposits using the ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG): A microstratigraphic perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, K.; Wooden, J.L.; Paces, J.B.; Miller, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We used the sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe reverse-geometry (SHRIMP-RG) to date pedogenic opal using the 230Th-U system. Due to the high-spatial resolution of an ion microprobe (typically 30 ??m), regions of pure opal within a sample can be targeted and detrital material can be avoided. In addition, because the technique is non-destructive, the sample can be preserved for other types of analyses including electron microprobe or other stable isotope or trace element ion microprobe measurements. The technique is limited to material with U concentrations greater than ???50 ppm. However, the high spatial resolution, small sample requirements, and the ability to avoid detrital material make this technique a suitable technique for dating many Pleistocene deposits formed in semi-arid environments. To determine the versatility of the method, samples from several different deposits were analyzed, including silica-rich pebble coatings from pedogenic carbonate horizons, a siliceous sinter deposit, and opaline silica deposited as a spring mound. U concentrations for 30-??m-diameter spots ranged from 50 to 1000 ppm in these types of materials. The 230Th/232Th activity ratios also ranged from ???100 to 106, eliminating the need for detrital Th corrections that reduce the precision of traditional U-Th ages for many milligram- and larger-sized samples. In pedogenic material, layers of high-U opal (ca. 500 ppm) are commonly juxtaposed next to layers of calcite with much lower U concentrations (1-2 ppm). If these types of samples are not analyzed using a technique with the appropriate spatial resolution, the ages may be strongly biased towards the age of the opal. Comparison with standard TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) measurements from separate microdrilled samples suggests that although the analytical precision of the ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) measurements is less than TIMS, the high spatial resolution results in better accuracy in the age determination for

  13. Quantitative simultaneous multi-element microprobe analysis using combined wavelength and energy dispersive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, L. S.; Doan, A. S., Jr.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Bredekamp, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A combined WDS-EDS system obviates the severe X-ray peak overlap problems encountered with Na, Mg, Al and Si common to pure EDS systems. By application of easily measured empirical correction factors for pulse pile-up and peak overlaps which are normally observed in the analysis of silicate minerals, the accuracy of analysis is comparable with that expected for WDS electron microprobe analyses. The continuum backgrounds are subtracted for the spectra by a spline fitting technique based on integrated intensities between the peaks. The preprocessed data are then reduced to chemical analyses by existing data reduction programs.

  14. The role of electron microprobe mapping and dating in tectonic geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. L.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Dumond, G.; Mahan, K. H.; Flowers, R. M.

    2007-12-01

    Electron microprobe geochronology occupies a special niche within the spectrum of geochronological techniques and may be particularly relevant to the question, "What are we dating?" The technique was originally envisioned to be a low-cost, reconnaissance dating tool, opening low-resolution geochronology to a large number of researchers. However, more than a decade of research has shown that, when used in a reconnaissance fashion (i.e. using major-element analytical techniques for trace-element analysis) uncertainties are unsuitably large (several 10s of m.y. or more) for solving most tectonic problems. Using trace element analytical techniques (background modeling, interference correction, highly conductive coating, multi-analysis measurement, etc.) precision and accuracy are dramatically increased, but analysis time and cost are also increased, challenging the "quick, cheap, and easy" description. The power of microprobe geochronology comes from the spatial resolution and the natural integration with compositional data. High-resolution compositional mapping is valuable for all in-situ geochronology. Large area maps provide petrologic and textural context for chronometer phases; small scale maps illuminate the history of the chronometers themselves. Compositional maps associated with monazite are particularly informative, but examples from the East Athabasca granulite terrane using zircon, titanite, and rutile will be discussed. Most monazite crystals are 30μ or less and most have several compositional domains. Rim compositions and dates are particularly critical because they can commonly be tied to reactions and to matrix texture and fabric. Commonly, rims and internal sub domains are several microns in width and can only be analyzed by electron probe. Y has been widely used to tie monazite to Grt growth or breakdown, but current studies use a suite of trace and REE (Y, Sm, Nd, Ca, Eu, Gd, etc) to tie monazite into chemical reactions. A rapidly growing

  15. The use of surface analytical techniques to measure the loadings of uranium and plutonium sorbed simultaneously from solution onto rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.A.; Bishop, H.E.; Cowper, M.M.; Fozard, P.R.; McMillan, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    Small polished blocks of granite, diorite and dolerite were immersed in solutions containing uranium and plutonium at equal initial concentration.The samples were analyzed by the advanced surface analytical techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and nuclear microprobe analysis. The results show that both actinides sorb onto the same minerals in the three rocks. However, SIMS data show that significantly more uranium was sorbed than plutonium.

  16. RAMAN MICROPROBE ANALYSIS OF STATIONARY SOURCE PARTICULATE POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of Raman spectroscopy to the molecular characterization of individual particles from stationary sources is described. The NBS-developed Raman microprobe has been used to characterize microparticles of oil- and coal-fired power plant emissions and boiler samples co...

  17. NMR spectroscopy and perfusion of mammalian cells using surface microprobes.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Pataky, Kristopher; Stettler, Matthieu; Wurm, Florian Maria; Brugger, Jürgen; Besse, Pierre-André; Popovic, Radivoje

    2007-03-01

    NMR spectra of mammalian cells are taken using surface microprobes that are based on microfabricated planar coils. The surface microprobe resembles a miniaturized Petri dish commonly used in biological research. The diameter of the planar coils is 1 mm. Chinese Hamster Ovaries are immobilized in a uniform layer on the microprobe surface or patterned by an ink-jet printer in the centre of the microcoil, where the rf-field of the planar microcoil is most uniform. The acquired NMR spectra show the prevalent metabolites found in mammalian cells. The volumes of the detected samples range from 25 nL to 1 nL (or 50,000 to 1800 cells). With an extended set-up that provides fluid inlets and outlets to the microprobe, the cells can be perfused within the NMR-magnet while constantly taking NMR spectra. Perfusion of the cells opens the way to increased cell viability for long acquisitions or to analysis of the cells' response to environmental change. PMID:17330170

  18. Modeling and numerical techniques for high-speed digital simulation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional computing methods are contrasted with newly developed high-speed and low-cost computing techniques for simulating normal and accidental transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are formulated for cost-effective high-fidelity simulation with emphasis on modeling of transient two-phase flow coolant dynamics in nuclear reactors. Available computing architectures are characterized. It is shown that the combination of the newly developed modeling and computing principles with the use of existing special-purpose peripheral processors is capable of achieving low-cost and high-speed simulation with high-fidelity and outstanding user convenience, suitable for detailed reactor plant response analyses.

  19. Non-Destructive Techniques in the Tacis and Phare Nuclear Safety Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Bieth, Michel

    2002-07-01

    Decisions regarding the verification of design plant lifetime and potential license renewal periods involve a determination of the component and circuit condition. In Service Inspection of key reactor components becomes a crucial consideration for continued safe plant operation. The determination of the equipment properties by Non Destructive Techniques during periodic intervals is an important aspect of the assessment of fitness-for-service and safe operation of nuclear power plants The Tacis and Phare were established since 1991 by the European Union as support mechanisms through which projects could be identified and addressed satisfactorily. In Nuclear Safety, the countries mainly concerned are Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, and Kazakhstan for the Tacis programme, and Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovak Republic, Lithuania, Romania and Slovenia for the Phare programme. The Tacis and Phare programs concerning the Nuclear Power Plants consist of: - On Site Assistance and Operational Safety, - Design Safety, - Regulatory Authorities, - Waste management, and are focused on reactor safety issues, contributing to the improvement in the safety of East European reactors and providing technology and safety culture transfer. The main parts of these programmes are related to the On-Site Assistance and to the Design Safety of VVER and RBMK Nuclear power plants where Non Destructive Techniques for In Service Inspection of the primary circuit components are addressed. (authors)

  20. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  1. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhinav K; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2016-04-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  2. Laser-excited fluorescence of rare earth elements in fluorite: Initial observations with a laser Raman microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, R.C.; Ging, T.G.; Eppinger, R.G.; Samson, a.M.

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence emission spectra of three samples of fluorite containing 226-867 ppm total rare earth elements (REE) were excited by visible and ultraviolet wavelength lines of an argon ion laser and recorded with a Raman microprobe spectrometer system. Narrow emission lines ( 0.9 for Eu2+ and 0.99 for Er3+. Detection limits for three micrometer spots are about 0.01 ppm Eu2+ and 0.07 ppm Er3+. These limits are less than chondrite abundance for Eu and Er, demonstrating the potential microprobe analytical applications of laser-excited fluorescence of REE in fluorite. However, application of this technique to common rock-forming minerals may be hampered by competition between fluorescence emission and radiationless energy transfer processes involving lattice phonons. ?? 1992.

  3. Introduction to digital instrumentation and control techniques used in nuclear engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilla, R.G.; Kenney, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    For the past 8 yr, the nuclear engineering department at Pennsylvania State University has been teaching a digital interfacing class at the undergraduate (senior) level. With the ever-increasing use of computers in the nuclear engineering area (such as in the use of automated data acquisition systems) and the complexity of control instrumentation, more than a cursory introduction into electronics and computer controls is needed. Because of the ever-increasing popularity, and hence importance, of IBM-PC compatible microcomputers in the engineering fields, the program has been adapted to the Intel 8086 microprocessor. Courses such as this one are helpful in ensuring the students have an adequate design and practice base as required by accrediting groups. The course, is composed of three parts: (1) machine code/assembly language, (2) interfacing, and (3) final project. Experience demonstrates that a course of this inherent complexity can successfully be taught within a nuclear engineering curriculum without extensive prerequisites. The important ingredient is to treat nuclear engineering students for exactly what they are, engineers. By having them use their creativity and adaptability, they can successfully integrate the digital interfacing techniques now routinely used in the nuclear industry.

  4. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1 3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  5. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1-3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  6. High brightness sources for MeV microprobe applications

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Alton, G.D.; Maskrey, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    State of the art MeV ion microprobe facilities are now approaching current density limitations on targets imposed by the fundamental nature of conventional gaseous ion sources. With a view to addressing this problem efforts are under way which have the ultimate objective of developing high brightness Li liquid metal ion sources suitable for MeV ion microprobe applications. Prototype Li/sup +/ and Ga/sup +/ liquid metal ion sources have been designed, fabricated and are undergoing preliminary testing. This paper describes the first total emittance and brightness measurements of a Ga liquid metal ion source. The effect of the geometry of the ion extraction system is investigated and the brightness data are compared to those of a radio frequency ion source.

  7. Wavelength dispersive μPIXE setup for the ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazinić, S.; Božičević Mihalić, I.; Tadić, T.; Cosic, D.; Jakšić, M.; Mudronja, D.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a small wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer to explore the possibility of performing chemical speciation on microscopic samples utilizing focused ion beams available at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute ion microprobe. Although PIXE spectra are in principle chemically invariant, small influence of chemical effects could be observed even with Si(Li) or SDD detectors. Such chemical effects can be clearly seen with high resolution crystal X-ray spectrometers having energy resolution of several eV. A dedicated vacuum chamber, housing the diffraction crystal, sample holder and CCD X-ray detector, was constructed and positioned behind the main ion microprobe vacuum chamber. Here we will briefly describe the spectrometer, and illustrate its capabilities on measured K X-ray spectra of selected sulfur compounds. We will also demonstrate its abilities to resolve K and M X-ray lines irresolvable by solid state ED detectors usually used in PIXE.

  8. Microprobe analyses of glasses and minerals from Luna-16 soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Harmon, R. S.; Jakes, P.; Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Warner, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Electron microprobe analyses are presented for nine elements in 250 glasses and 434 pyroxenes, eight elements in 113 olivines, and six elements in 354 feldspars, 35 spinels, and 159 ilmenites. All grains are from the 125-425 micron fraction of horizon A and horizon D soil from the Luna 16 sample. A norm is presented for each glass analysis and the structural formula is calculated for each mineral analysis.

  9. Submicron elemental mapping with the oxford scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Watt, F.; Chapman, J. R.

    1987-03-01

    Following recent modifications to the Oxford scanning proton microprobe (SPM) a beam spot diameter of 0.5 μm has been achieved at a beam current of 20-30 pA of 4 MeV protons. This has been confirmed by scanning both a copper test grid and microcrystals of barium sulphate. The potential of using high spatial resolutions in microbiology has been explored by scanning a single mouse cell.

  10. Hyperspectral mapping-combining cathodoluminescence and X-ray collection in an electron microprobe.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Colin M; Wilson, Nicholas C; Johnson, Sally A; Phillips, Peter L; Otsuki, Masayuki

    2005-08-01

    An optical spectrometer has been integrated into a JEOL 8900R electron microprobe, which allows simultaneous collection of light, X-ray, and electron signals. The cathodoluminescence signal is collected from a monocular eyepiece, which is integrated into the electron optics of the electron microprobe. The optical acquisition is synchronized with the stage motion. X-ray lines of major elements are collected using an energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray lines of minor elements are collected using wavelength dispersive spectrometers, and the secondary and backscattered electron signals are collected using standard detectors. In mapping mode of operation the different signals are collected at each pixel with map sizes typically ranging from 1 million to 10 million pixels. This represents a significant amount of data from which the major correlations and associations in the map can be determined. Summing over a small number of channels and examining only a subset of the complete wavelength range are the strategies that have been developed to reduce the size of the data handled. The application of this mapping technique is demonstrated with two examples, zircons and refractory bricks. Zircons with various degrees of metamictization have been characterized, and inclusions differentiated using a combination of cathodoluminescence and X-ray maps. Examination of refractory bricks reveals subtle chemical changes in the spinel grains. PMID:16170823

  11. Electron Microprobe Analyses of Lithic Fragments and Their Minerals from Luna 20 Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. H.; Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Moore, R. B.; Moreland, G.; Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Nehru, C. E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The bulk analyses (determined with the broad beam electron microprobe technique) of lithic fragments are given in weight percentages and are arranged according to the rock classification. Within each rock group the analyses are arranged in order of increasing FeO content. Thin section and lithic fragment numbers are given at the top of each column of analysis and correspond to the numbers recorded on photo mosaics on file in the Institute of Meteoritics. CIPW molecular norms are given for each analysis. Electron microprobe mineral analyses (given in oxide weight percentages), structural formulae and molecular end member values are presented for plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene and K-feldspar. The minerals are selected mostly from lithic fragments that were also analyzed for bulk composition. Within each mineral group the analyses are presented according to the section number and lithic fragment number. Within each lithic fragment the mineral analyses are arranged as follows: Plagioclase in order of increasing CaO; olivine and pyroexene in order of increasing FeO; and K-feldspar in order of increasing K2O. The mineral grains are identified at the top of each column of analysis by grain number and lithic fragment number.

  12. Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey

  13. Correlated petrographic, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe studies of selected primitive and processed phase assemblages in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    During the past three years we have received support to continue our research in elucidating the formation and alteration histories of selected meteoritic materials by a combination of petrographic, trace element, and isotopic analyses employing optical and scanning electron microscopes and electron and ion microprobes. The awarded research funds enabled the P.I. to attend the annual LPSC, the co-I to devote approximately 15 percent of his time to the research proposed in the grant, and partial support for a visiting summer post-doctoral fellow to conduct electron microprobe analyses of meteoritic samples in our laboratory. The research funds, along with support from the NASA Education Initiative awarded to P.I. G. Wasserburg, enabled the co-I to continue a mentoring program with inner-city minority youth. The support enabled us to achieve significant results in the five projects that we proposed (in addition to the Education Initiative), namely: studies of the accretional and post-accretional alteration and thermal histories in CV meteorites, characterization of periclase-bearing Fremdlinge in CV meteorites, characterization of Ni-Pt-Ge-Te-rich Fremdlinge in CV meteorites in an attempt to determine the constraints they place on the petrogenetic and thermal histories of their host CAI's, correlated electron and ion microprobe studies of silicate and phosphate inclusions in the Colomera meteorite in an attempt to determine the petrogenesis of the IE iron meteorites, and development of improved instrumental and correction procedures for improved accuracy of analysis of meteoritic materials with the electron microprobe. This grant supported, in part or whole, 18 publications so far by our research team, with at least three more papers anticipated. The list of these publications is included. The details of the research results are briefly summarized.

  14. Phosphate concentration and association as revealed by sequential extraction and microprobe analysis: The case of sediments from two Argentinean reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgnino, L.; Orona, C.; Avena, M.; Maine, M. A.; RodríGuez, A.; de Pauli, C. P.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the general characteristics of the sediments of two Argentinean reservoirs, which are used for water supply. The chemical composition, granulometry, and specific surface area are presented together with a study of total phosphate concentration and phosphate association by combining sequential extraction and microprobe analysis. In general, the sediments of both reservoirs have similar characteristics. Sequential extraction reveals that the main P fractions in the studied sediments are Ca-bound phosphate in river mouths and Fe-bound phosphate in the rest of the reservoir stations. Microprobe analysis appears to be an important complementary technique to sequential extraction. Combined with chemical fractionation and specific surface area measurements, these analyses indicate that Ca-bound phosphate is mainly distributed within grains or particles highly concentrated in Ca and P, whereas Fe-bound phosphate is rather homogeneously distributed in the sediments at the surface of fine particles. Microprobe analyses also revealed an important coating of phyllosilicate surfaces with Fe (hydr)oxides, which explains the good correlation found between Fe-bound phosphate, clay fraction, and specific surface area. The role of sediments as a potential source of phosphate is discussed in terms of P association in the solid phase and dissolved oxygen concentration profiles in the water column.

  15. Chemical and Isotopic Analysis of Trace Organic Matter on Meteorites and Interstellar Dust Using a Laser Microprobe Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of considerable interest today because they are ubiquitous on Earth and in the interstellar medium (ISM). In fact, about 20% of cosmic carbon in the galaxy is estimated to be in the form of PAHs. Investigation of these species has obvious uses for determining the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Work in this laboratory has focused on four main areas: 1) Mapping the spatial distribution of PAHs in a variety of meteoritic samples and comparing this distribution with mineralogical features of the meteorite to determine whether a correlation exists between the two. 2) Developing a method for detection of fullerenes in extraterrestrial samples using microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy and utilizing this technique to investigate fullerene presence, while exploring the possibility of spatially mapping the fullerene distribution in these samples through in situ detection. 3) Investigating a possible formation pathway for meteoritic and ancient terrestrial kerogen involving the photochemical reactions of PAHs with alkanes under prebiotic and astrophysically relevant conditions. 4) Studying reaction pathways and identifying the photoproducts generated during the photochemical evolution of PAH-containing interstellar ice analogs as part of an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Astrochemistry Lab at NASA Ames. All areas involve elucidation of the solar system formation and chemistry using microprobe Laser Desorption Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry. A brief description of microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy, which allows selective investigation of subattomole levels of organic species on the surface of a sample at 10-40 micrometer spatial resolution, is given.

  16. A hard x-ray scanning microprobe for fluorescence imaging and microdiffraction at the advanced photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Rodrigues, W.

    2000-05-01

    A hard x-ray scanning microprobe based on zone plate optics and undulator radiation, in the energy region from 6 to 20 keV, has reached a focal spot size (FWHM) of 0.15 μm(v)×0.6 μm(h), and a photon flux of 4×109photons/sec/0.01%BW. Using a slit 44 meters upstream to create a virtual source, a circular beam spot of 0.15 μm in diameter can be obtained with a photon flux of one order of magnitude less. During fluorescence mapping of trace elements in a single human ovarian cell, the microprobe exhibited an imaging sensitivity for Pt (Lα line) of 80 attograms/μm2 for a count rate of 10 counts per second. The x-ray microprobe has been used to map crystallographic strain and multiquantum well thickness in micro-optoelectronic devices produced with the selective area growth technique.

  17. A hard x-ray scanning microprobe for fluorescence imaging and microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Rodrigues, W.

    1999-11-02

    A hard x-ray scanning microprobe based on zone plate optics and undulator radiation, in the energy region from 6 to 20 keV, has reached a focal spot size (FWHM) of 0.15 {micro}m (v) x 0.6 {micro}m (h), and a photon flux of 4 x 10{sup 9} photons/sec/0.01%BW. Using a slit 44 meters upstream to create a virtual source, a circular beam spot of 0.15 {micro}m in diameter can be obtained with a photon flux of one order of magnitude less. During fluorescence mapping of trace elements in a single human ovarian cell, the microprobe exhibited an imaging sensitivity for Pt (L{sub a} line) of 80 attograms/{micro}m{sup 2} for a count rate of 10 counts per second. The x-ray microprobe has been used to map crystallographic strain and multiquantum well thickness in micro-optoelectronic devices produced with the selective area growth technique.

  18. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: New technologies: nuclear quadrupole resonance as an explosive and narcotic detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechishkin, Vadim S.; Sinyavskii, Nikolai Ya

    1997-04-01

    Possibilities of detecting nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals in explosives and drugs are considered. Direct and indirect NQR techniques for searching substances are described and the potentialities of various experimental methods are compared.

  19. A Coordinated Research Project on the Implementation of Nuclear Techniques to Improve Food Traceability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, Russell; Cannavan, Andrew; Zandric, Zora; Maestroni, Britt; Abrahim, Aiman

    2013-04-01

    Traceability systems play a key role in assuring a safe and reliable food supply. Analytical techniques harnessing the spatial patterns in distribution of stable isotope and trace element ratios can be used for the determination of the provenance of food. Such techniques offer the potential to enhance global trade by providing an independent means of verifying "paper" traceability systems and can also help to prove authenticity, to combat fraudulent practices, and to control adulteration, which are important issues for economic, religious or cultural reasons. To address some of the challenges that developing countries face in attempting to implement effective food traceability systems, the IAEA, through its Joint FAO/IAEA Division on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, has initiated a 5-year coordinated research project involving institutes in 15 developing and developed countries (Austria, Botswana, Chile, China, France, India, Lebanon, Morocco, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Thailand, Uganda, UK, USA). The objective is to help in member state laboratories to establish robust analytical techniques and databases, validated to international standards, to determine the provenance of food. Nuclear techniques such as stable isotope and multi-element analysis, along with complementary methods, will be applied for the verification of food traceability systems and claims related to food origin, production, and authenticity. This integrated and multidisciplinary approach to strengthening capacity in food traceability will contribute to the effective implementation of holistic systems for food safety and control. The project focuses mainly on the development of techniques to confirm product authenticity, with several research partners also considering food safety issues. Research topics encompass determination of the geographical origin of a variety of commodities, including seed oils, rice, wine, olive oil, wheat, orange juice, fish, groundnuts, tea, pork, honey and

  20. Significant improvement of mouse cloning technique by treatment with trichostatin A after somatic nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi . E-mail: kishigami@cdb.riken.jp; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Wakayama, Sayaka; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2006-02-03

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with epigenetic errors including abnormal DNA hypermethylation. Recently, we elucidated by using round spermatids that, after nuclear transfer, treatment of zygotes with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can remarkably reduce abnormal DNA hypermethylation depending on the origins of transferred nuclei and their genomic regions [S. Kishigami, N. Van Thuan, T. Hikichi, H. Ohta, S. Wakayama. E. Mizutani, T. Wakayama, Epigenetic abnormalities of the mouse paternal zygotic genome associated with microinsemination of round spermatids, Dev. Biol. (2005) in press]. Here, we found that 5-50 nM TSA-treatment for 10 h following oocyte activation resulted in more efficient in vitro development of somatic cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage from 2- to 5-fold depending on the donor cells including tail tip cells, spleen cells, neural stem cells, and cumulus cells. This TSA-treatment also led to more than 5-fold increase in success rate of mouse cloning from cumulus cells without obvious abnormality but failed to improve ES cloning success. Further, we succeeded in establishment of nuclear transfer-embryonic stem (NT-ES) cells from TSA-treated cloned blastocyst at a rate three times higher than those from untreated cloned blastocysts. Thus, our data indicate that TSA-treatment after SCNT in mice can dramatically improve the practical application of current cloning techniques.

  1. Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Datskos, Panos G; Clayton, Dwight A

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in technologies for harvesting waste thermal energy from ambient environments present an opportunity to implement truly wireless sensor nodes in nuclear power plants. These sensors could continue to operate during extended station blackouts and during periods when operation of the plant s internal power distribution system has been disrupted. The energy required to power the wireless sensors must be generated using energy harvesting techniques from locally available energy sources, and the energy consumption within the sensor circuitry must therefore be low to minimize power and hence the size requirements of the energy harvester. Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources can be achieved using pyroelectric or thermoelectric conversion techniques. Recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics in self powered wireless sensor applications and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, is outlined. This paper outlines the modeling of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal-to-electrical energy conversion devices.

  2. Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Datskos, Panos G; Clayton, Dwight A

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in technologies for harvesting waste thermal energy from ambient environments present an opportunity to implement truly wireless sensor nodes in nuclear power plants. These sensors could continue to operate during extended station blackouts and during periods when operation of the plant s internal power distribution system has been disrupted. The energy required to power the wireless sensors must be generated using energy harvesting techniques from locally available energy sources, and the energy consumption within the sensor circuitry must therefore be low to minimize power and hence the size requirements of the energy harvester. Harvesting electrical energy from thermalmore » energy sources can be achieved using pyroelectric or thermoelectric conversion techniques. Recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics in self powered wireless sensor applications and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, is outlined. This paper outlines the modeling of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal-to-electrical energy conversion devices.« less

  3. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  4. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Renslow, R S; Babauta, J T; Majors, P D; Mehta, H S; Ewing, R J; Ewing, T W; Mueller, K T; Beyenal, H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for noninvasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live biofilms respiring on electrodes. Here, we describe a biofilm microreactor system, including a reusable and a disposable reactor, that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radio frequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on electrodes. EC-NMR was used to investigate growth medium flow velocities and depth-resolved acetate concentration inside the biofilm. As a novel contribution we used Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate the standard deviations of the acetate concentration measurements. Overall, we found that the disposable EC-NMR microreactor provided a 9.7 times better signal-to-noise ratio over the reusable reactor. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms. PMID:24622544

  5. Super-achromatic microprobe for ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging at 800 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu; Alemohammad, Milad; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a super-achromatic microprobe made with fiber-optic ball lens to enable ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging. An axial resolution of ~2.4 µm (in air) can be achieved with a 7-fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The microprobe has minimal astigmatism which affords a high transverse resolution of ~5.6 µm. The miniaturized microprobe has an outer diameter of ~520 µm including the encasing metal guard and can be used to image small luminal organs. The performance of the ultrahigh-resolution OCT microprobe was demonstrated by imaging rat esophagus, guinea pig esophagus, and mouse rectum in vivo.

  6. Volatility in the lunar crust: Trace element analyses of lunar minerals by PIXE proton microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ determination of mineral compositions using microbeam techniques can characterize magma compositions through mineral-melt partitioning, and be used to investigate fine-grained or rare phases which cannot be extracted for analysis. Abundances of Fe, Mn, Sr, Ga, Zr, Y, Nb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Se, and Sb were determined for various mineral phases in a small number of lunar highlands rocks using the PIXE proton microprobe. Sr/Ga ratios of plagioclase and Mn/Zn ratios of mafic silicates show that the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-suite cumulates are depleted in volatile lithophile elements to about the same degree compared with chondrites and the Earth. This links the entire lunar crust to common processes or source compositions. In contrast, secondary sulfides in Descartes breccia clasts are enriched in chalcophile elements such as Cu, Zn, Ni, Se, and Sb, and represent a potential resource in the lunar highlands.

  7. Lithium tracer-diffusion in an alkali-basaltic melt — An ion-microprobe determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, R. K.; Reed, S. J. B.; Nolan, J.; Henderson, P.; Long, J. V. P.

    1981-03-01

    An ion-microprobe-based technique has been used to measure lithium tracer-diffusion coefficients ( D Li) in an alkali-basaltic melt at 1300, 1350 and 1400°C. The results can be expressed in the form: D Li=7.5 ×10 -2exp(-27,600/RT)cm 2S -1 The results show significantly faster diffusion rates than those previously recorded for other monovalent, divalent and trivalent cations in a tholeiitic melt. Consequently, diffusive transport of ions acting over a given time in a basaltic melt can produce a wider range of transport distance values than hitherto supposed. Hence, it is concluded that great care should be exercised when applying diffusion data to petrological problems.

  8. LASER MICROPROBE **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar DATING OF MINERAL GRAINS IN SITU.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Hartung, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-microprobe attached to a mass spectrometer for **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age determination of single mineral grains in geological materials has been made operational at the US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. This microanalytical technique involves focusing a pulsed laser beam onto a sample contained in an ultra-high vacuum chamber attached to a rare-gas mass spectrometer. Argon in the neutron-irradiated sample is released by heating with the laser pulse and its isotopic composition is measured to yield an **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age. Laser probe **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar ages of single mineral grains measured in situ can aid greatly in understanding the chronology of many geological situations where datable minerals are present but are not physically separable in quantities needed for conventional age dating.

  9. High resolution imaging and elemental analysis of PAGE electrophoretograms by scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Kocsonya, A.; Kovács, I.; Hopff, D.; Lüthje, S.; Niecke, M.

    2009-06-01

    Metal content of metalloproteins can be detected and even quantified by the PIXE-PAGE method. In this technique the proteins are separated by thin layer electrophoresis (by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in most cases) and the properly dried gel sections are analyzed by PIXE using "band-shaped" proton milli-beam. This PIXE-PAGE method was adapted for our scanning proton microprobe. The microPIXE-PAGE version provides two-dimensional elemental mapping of the protein bands. In addition, the fast continuous scanning reduces the risk of the thermal deterioration of the sample and the X-ray contribution from dust-impurities can be filtered out in the data evaluation process.

  10. Study of ancient Islamic gilded pieces combining PIXE-RBS on external microprobe with sem images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Chamón, J.; Gutiérrez, P. C.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Enguita, O.; Pardo, A. I.; Arroyo, M.; Barrio, J.; Ferretti, M.; Climent-Font, A.

    2008-07-01

    Numerous metallic objects with very aesthetic and technological qualities have been recovered by archaeological excavations. Adequate processes of restoration and conservation treatments require the accurate determination of the elemental composition and distribution within the objects, as well as the identification of the nature and distribution of the corrosion products. Ideally the identification method should cause no alteration in the sample. In this work, different archaeological pieces with a gilded look have been characterized using simultaneously PIXE and RBS at the CMAM external microprobe in order to study the gilding metalworking done in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. The gold layer thickness and its elemental concentrations of Ag, Au and Hg were determined by both techniques and compared with the scanning electron microscopy images obtained for some fragments of pieces.

  11. Development of Advanced Nuclide Separation and Recovery Methods using Ion-Exchanhge Techniques in Nuclear Backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi

    The development of compact separation and recovery methods using selective ion-exchange techniques is very important for the reprocessing and high-level liquid wastes (HLLWs) treatment in the nuclear backend field. The selective nuclide separation techniques are effective for the volume reduction of wastes and the utilization of valuable nuclides, and expected for the construction of advanced nuclear fuel cycle system and the rationalization of waste treatment. In order to accomplish the selective nuclide separation, the design and synthesis of novel adsorbents are essential for the development of compact and precise separation processes. The present paper deals with the preparation of highly functional and selective hybrid microcapsules enclosing nano-adsorbents in the alginate gel polymer matrices by sol-gel methods, their characterization and the clarification of selective adsorption properties by batch and column methods. The selective separation of Cs, Pd and Re in real HLLW was further accomplished by using novel microcapsules, and an advanced nuclide separation system was proposed by the combination of selective processes using microcapsules.

  12. Integration of ab-initio nuclear calculation with derivative free optimization technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sharda, Anurag

    2008-01-01

    Optimization techniques are finding their inroads into the field of nuclear physics calculations where the objective functions are very complex and computationally intensive. A vast space of parameters needs searching to obtain a good match between theoretical (computed) and experimental observables, such as energy levels and spectra. Manual calculation defies the scope of such complex calculation and are prone to error at the same time. This body of work attempts to formulate a design and implement it which would integrate the ab initio nuclear physics code MFDn and the VTDIRECT95 code. VTDIRECT95 is a Fortran95 suite of parallel code implementing the derivative-free optimization algorithm DIRECT. Proposed design is implemented for a serial and parallel version of the optimization technique. Experiment with the initial implementation of the design showing good matches for several single-nucleus cases are conducted. Determination and assignment of appropriate number of processors for parallel integration code is implemented to increase the efficiency and resource utilization in the case of multiple nuclei parameter search.

  13. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  14. Electrostatic microprobe for determining charge domains on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    An electrostatic microprobe was developed to measure charge on wipes and various test surfaces. The device is constructed on an optical microscope platform utilizing a computer controlled XY stage. Test surfaces can be optically imaged to identify microscopic features that can be correlated to the measured charge domain maps. The ultimate goal is to quantify charge on wipe cloths to determine the influence of electrostatic forces on wipe sampling efficiency. We found that certain wipe materials do not extensively charge while others accumulate charge by making contact with other surfaces (through the triboelectric effect). Charge domains are found to be nonuniform. PMID:26628139

  15. Electrostatic microprobe for determining charge domains on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Robert A.

    2015-11-01

    An electrostatic microprobe was developed to measure charge on wipes and various test surfaces. The device is constructed on an optical microscope platform utilizing a computer controlled XY stage. Test surfaces can be optically imaged to identify microscopic features that can be correlated to the measured charge domain maps. The ultimate goal is to quantify charge on wipe cloths to determine the influence of electrostatic forces on wipe sampling efficiency. We found that certain wipe materials do not extensively charge while others accumulate charge by making contact with other surfaces (through the triboelectric effect). Charge domains are found to be nonuniform.

  16. Superconductive microprobes for eddy current evaluation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podney, Walter N.

    1989-07-01

    Superconductive quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) offer new technology for locating materials flaws electromagnetically that promises to increase sensitivity, depth of magnetic flux enables use of microscopic pickup loops in a gradiometer configuration to give high resolution. A cryogenic umbilical connects pickup loops to a remote cryostat housing SQUID sensors to ease scanning. A pair of drive coils a few millimeters in radius that encircle pickup loops forming a coplanar gradiometer 1 mm or less in radius comprise a superconductive microprobe. It provides a depth of field of several millimeters to a 0.1 mm flaw in an aluminum plate, when operating with a drive current a 1 A oscillating at a frequency of 1kHz. Its field of view ranges to several millimeters, for flaws a few millimeters deep, and its horizontal resolution is 1 mm or so, for flaw depths out to its depth of field. An array of microprobes form receptors much like rods in the retina of a magnetic eye. The eye leads to an electromagnetic microscope for imaging internal flaws in aluminum plates. It gives multiple images that enable resolving depth of a 0.1 mm flaw to a few tenths of a millimeter with a horizontal resolution of one millimeter or so.

  17. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine- scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  18. Microprobe analysis of teeth by synchrotron radiation: environmental contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Carvalho, M. L.; Casaca, C.; Barreiros, M. A.; Cunha, A. S.; Chevallier, P.

    1999-10-01

    An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, installed at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Électromagnétique (LURE) synchrotron (France) was used for elemental determination in teeth. To evaluate the influence of living habits in dental elemental composition nine teeth collected post-mortem were analysed, five from a miner and four from a fisherman. All teeth from the fisherman were healthy. From the miner some teeth were carious and one of them was filled with metallic amalgam. Teeth were sliced under the vertical plane and each slice was scanned from the root to the enamel for elemental profile determination. The synchrotron microprobe resolution was of 100 μm and incident photons of 18 keV energy were used. The elemental concentration values found suggest heterogeneity of the teeth material. Moreover, the distinct profiles for Mn, Sr, Br and Pb were found when teeth from the miner and from the fisherman are compared which can be associated with dietary habits and environmental influence. Higher concentrations of Mn and Sr were found for the fisherman teeth. In addition, Br was only observed in this group of teeth. Pb levels are higher for the miner teeth in particular for dentine regions. The influence of amalgam, such as, increase of Zn and Hg contents in the teeth material, is only noticed for the immediate surroundings of the treated cavity.

  19. Development of a Tender-Energy Microprobe for Geosciences at NSLS and NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, Paul A.

    2014-08-30

    We propose to develop a tender-energy (1-8 keV operational range, optimized for 1-5 keV) X-ray microprobe, to bring the functionality and scientific benefits of hard (>5 keV) X-ray microprobes to a largely untapped domain of lighter, geologically-important elements. This proposal seeks to extend and enhance user-facility capabilities particularly optimized for research in Geosciences. This will be accomplished through development and implementation of unique new synchrotron instrumentation for high-performance microspectroscopy and imaging in the distinctive tender energy range. This new user facility at Beamline X15B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) will benefit the specific Earth Science research programs described in this proposal, and will be available for use by the broader community through the merit-based General User program and through the User Cooperative that operates X15B. Its development will provide immediate benefit to regional and national Earth Science research conducted at the NSLS. It will achieve even higher performance at the Tender Energy Spectroscopy (TES) Beamline at NSLS-II, a new state-of-the-art synchrotron under construction and scheduled to begin operation in 2014. Project Objectives: Our goals are threefold: 1. Develop superlative capabilities to extend hard X-ray microprobe functionality and ease of use to the tender energy range. 2. Bring high-performance XAS (including full EXAFS) to the micron scale, over the range of 1-8 keV. 3. Deliver high flux and element sensitivity for geoscience applications. Our user facility will be designed and optimized for tender-energy microbeam applications and techniques for Earth Science research, including XRF imaging and high-quality extended XAS. Its key attributes will be an energy range of 1 to 8 keV, user-tunable spot size ranging from 40x14 to 3x2 μm, high flux up to 2x1011 photons/s, beam positional stability and energy calibration stability optimized for high-quality and

  20. γ-Particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Chamon, L. C.; Cybulska, E. W.; Medina, N. H.; Ribas, R. V.; Seale, W. A.; Silva, C. P.; Gasques, L. R.; Zahn, G. S.; Genezini, F. A.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Lubian, J.; Linares, R.; Toufen, D. L.; Silveira, M. A. G.; Rossi, E. S.; Nobre, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    The Saci-Perere γ ray spectrometer (located at the Pelletron AcceleratorLaboratory - IFUSP) was employed to implement the γ-particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reaction mechanisms. For this, the 18O+110Pd reaction has been studied in the beam energy range of 45-54 MeV. Several corrections to the data due to various effects (energy and angle integrations, beam spot size, γ detector finite size and the vacuum de-alignment) are small and well controlled. The aim of this work was to establish a proper method to analyze the data and identify the reaction mechanisms involved. To achieve this goal the inelastic scattering to the first excited state of 110Pd has been extracted and compared to coupled channel calculations using the São Paulo Potential (PSP), being reasonably well described by it.

  1. Improved cost-benefit techniques in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, F.J.; Nesse, R.J.; Vaeth, M.; Wusterbarth, A.R.; Currie, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    The major objective of this report is to help the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory mission, particularly with respect to improving the use of cost-benefit analysis and the economic evaluation of resources within the NRC. The objectives of this effort are: (1) to identify current and future NRC requirements (e.g., licensing) for valuing nonmarket goods; (2) to identify, highlight, and present the relevant efforts of selected federal agencies, some with over two decades of experience in valuing nonmarket goods, in this area; and (3) to review methods for valuing nonmarket impacts and to provide estimats of their magnitudes. Recently proposed legislation may result in a requirement for not only more sophisticated valuation analyses, but more extensive applications of these techniques to issues of concern to the NRC. This paper is intended to provide the NRC with information to more efficiently meet such requirements.

  2. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; T.W. Kornack; D. Majeski; G. Schilling; C.H. Skinner; R. Wilson

    2002-08-05

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel.

  3. Results of a nuclear power plant application of A New Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, D.W.; Forester, J.A.; Bley, D.C.

    1998-03-01

    A new method to analyze human errors has been demonstrated at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. This was the first application of the new method referred to as A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA). The main goals of the demonstration were to test the ATHEANA process as described in the frame-of-reference manual and the implementation guideline, test a training package developed for the method, test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the error-forcing-contexts (EFCs) that can make unsafe actions (UAs) more likely, and to identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. A set of criteria to evaluate the success of the ATHEANA method as used in the demonstration was identified. A human reliability analysis (HRA) team was formed that consisted of an expert in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with some background in HRA (not ATHEANA) and four personnel from the nuclear power plant. Personnel from the plant included two individuals from their PRA staff and two individuals from their training staff. Both individuals from training are currently licensed operators and one of them was a senior reactor operator on shift until a few months before the demonstration. The demonstration was conducted over a 5-month period and was observed by members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ATHEANA development team, who also served as consultants to the HRA team when necessary. Example results of the demonstration to date, including identified human failure events (HFEs), UAs, and EFCs are discussed. Also addressed is how simulator exercises are used in the ATHEANA demonstration project.

  4. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  5. RABBIT: an electron microprobe data-reduction program using empirical corrections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, Fraser E.

    1977-01-01

    RABBIT is a FORTRAN IV computer Program that uses Bence-Albee empirical corrections for the reduction of electron microprobe data of silicates, oxides, sulphates, carbonates, and phosphates. RABBIT efficiently reduces large volumes of data collected on 3-11 channel microprobes.

  6. Development and applications of an epifluorescence module for synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lisa M.; Smith, Randy J.; Ruppel, Meghan E.; Ott, Cassandra H.; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2005-06-15

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe is a valuable analysis tool for imaging trace element composition in situ at a resolution of a few microns. Frequently, epifluorescence microscopy is beneficial for identifying the region of interest. To date, combining epifluorescence microscopy with x-ray microprobe has involved analyses with two different microscopes. We report the development of an epifluorescence module that is integrated into a synchrotron XRF microprobe beamline, such that visible fluorescence from a sample can be viewed while collecting x-ray microprobe images simultaneously. This unique combination has been used to identify metal accumulation in Alzheimer's disease plaques and the mineral distribution in geological samples. The flexibility of this accessory permits its use on almost any synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe beamline and applications in many fields of science can benefit from this technology.

  7. Systematic and Statistical Errors Associated with Nuclear Decay Constant Measurements Using the Counting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Typical nuclear decay constants are measured at the accuracy level of 10-2. There are numerous reasons: tests of unconventional theories, dating of materials, and long term inventory evolution which require decay constants accuracy at a level of 10-4 to 10-5. The statistical and systematic errors associated with precision measurements of decays using the counting technique are presented. Precision requires high count rates, which introduces time dependent dead time and pile-up corrections. An approach to overcome these issues is presented by continuous recording of the detector current. Other systematic corrections include, the time dependent dead time due to background radiation, control of target motion and radiation flight path variation due to environmental conditions, and the time dependent effects caused by scattered events are presented. The incorporation of blind experimental techniques can help make measurement independent of past results. A spectrometer design and data analysis is reviewed that can accomplish these goals. The author would like to thank TechSource, Inc. and Advanced Physics Technologies, LLC. for their support in this work.

  8. Sedimentary rock porosity studied by electromagnetic techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance and dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramia, M. E.; Martín, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The present work involves a comprehensive experimental study of porosity and pore size distribution of sedimentary rocks, from oil fields formations, by means of two electromagnetic techniques, namely proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dielectric complex constant (DCC) as function of the frequency, both providing complementary results. The NMR yields an accurate determination of the relative pore size distribution and both movable and irreducible fluids. The DCC measurement provides the direct current electrical resistivity of the samples with different degrees of hydration. Thus, combining the results of both techniques allows the determination of the tortuosity index, by means of Archie's relation, and from it the average pore channel length. These measurements are performed on fully hydrated (saturated), centrifuged, dried, and cleaned rocks and also on samples with the irreducible fluids. Finally, the results are complemented with capillary pressure measurements to obtain the total volume associated with the pore channels related to the rock permeability. Additionally, the work presents a particular method to use a network analyzer to measure the DCC.

  9. Taking the perfect nuclear image: quality control, acquisition, and processing techniques for cardiac SPECT, PET, and hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Case, James A; Bateman, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear Cardiology for the past 40 years has distinguished itself in its ability to non-invasively assess regional myocardial blood flow and identify obstructive coronary disease. This has led to advances in managing the diagnosis, risk stratification, and prognostic assessment of cardiac patients. These advances have all been predicated on the collection of high quality nuclear image data. National and international professional societies have established guidelines for nuclear laboratories to maintain high quality nuclear cardiology services. In addition, laboratory accreditation has further advanced the goal of the establishing high quality standards for the provision of nuclear cardiology services. This article summarizes the principles of nuclear cardiology single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and techniques for maintaining quality: from the calibration of imaging equipment to post processing techniques. It also will explore the quality considerations of newer technologies such as cadmium zinc telleride (CZT)-based SPECT systems and absolute blood flow measurement techniques using PET. PMID:23868070

  10. The Oxford scanning proton microprobe: A medical diagnostic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.; Takacs, J.; Vaux, D. J. T.

    1984-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease characterised by progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, cholestasis, and high levels of copper within the liver. The Oxford 1 μm scanning proton microprobe (SPM) has been used to construct elemental maps of a 7 μm section of diseased liver at several different magnifications. The results of these investigations have shown that the copper is distributed in small deposits ( < 5 μm) at specific locations in the liver. Further there appears to be a 1:1 atomic correlation between copper and sulphur, indicating the presence of an inorganic salt or a protein with approximately equal numbers of copper and sulphur atoms.

  11. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  12. Micro Electron MicroProbe and Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bearman, Gregory; Douglas, Susanne; Bronikowski, Michael; Urgiles, Eduardo; Kowalczyk, Robert; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A proposed, low-power, backpack-sized instrument, denoted the micro electron microprobe and sample analyzer (MEMSA), would serve as a means of rapidly performing high-resolution microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) of soil, dust, and rock particles in the field. The MEMSA would be similar to an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) but would be much smaller and designed specifically for field use in studying effects of geological alteration at the micrometer scale. Like an ESEM, the MEMSA could be used to examine uncoated, electrically nonconductive specimens. In addition to the difference in size, other significant differences between the MEMSA and an ESEM lie in the mode of scanning and the nature of the electron source.

  13. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Project and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Gavit, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe Project, or Deep Space 2 (DS2), is the second of the New Millennium Program planetary missions and is designed to enable future space science network missions through flight validation of new technologies. A secondary goal is the collection of meaningful science data. Two micropenetrators will be deployed to carry out surface and subsurface science. The penetrators are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring and will be launched in January 1999. The microprobe has no active control, attitude determination, or propulsive systems. It is a single stage from separation until landing and will passively orient itself due to its aerodynamic design. The aeroshell will be made of a nonerosive heat shield material, Silicon impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablator(SIRCA), developed at Ames Research Center. The aeroshell shatters on impact, at which time the probe separates into an aftbody that remains at the surface and a forebody that penetrates into the subsurface. Each probe has a total mass of up to 3 kg, including the aeroshell. The impact velocity will be about 180 meters per second. The forebody will experience up to 30,000 g's and penetrate between 0.3 and 2 meters, depending on the ice content of the soil. The aftbody deceleration will be up to 80,000 g. The penetrators arrive in December 1999. The landing ellipse latitude range is 73 deg-77 deg S. The longitude will be selected by the Mars Surveyor Project to place the lander on the polar layered deposits in the range of 180 deg -230 deg W. The two micropenetrators are likely to land within 100 km of the Mars Surveyor Lander, on the polar deposits. The likely arrival date is L(sub s) = 256, late southern spring. The nominal mission lasts 2 days. A science team was selected in April 1998.

  14. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Project and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Gavit, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe Project, or Deep Space 2 (DS2), is the second of the New Millennium Program planetary missions and is designed to enable future space science network missions through flight validation of new technologies. A secondary goal is the collection of meaningful science data. Two micropenetrators will be deployed to carry out surface and subsurface science. The penetrators are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring and will be launched in January 1999. The microprobe has no active control, attitude determination, or propulsive systems. It is a single stage from separation until landing and will passively orient itself due to its aerodynamic design. The aeroshell will be made of a nonerosive heat shield material, Silicon impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablator(SIRCA), developed at Ames Research Center. The aeroshell shatters on impact, at which time the probe separates into an aftbody that remains at the surface and a forebody that penetrates into the subsurface. Each probe has a total mass of up to 3 kg, including the aeroshell. The impact velocity will be about 180 meters per second. The forebody will experience up to 30,000 g's and penetrate between 0.3 and 2 meters, depending on the ice content of the soil. The aftbody deceleration will be up to 80,000 g. The penetrators arrive in December 1999. The landing ellipse latitude range is 73 deg-77 deg S. The longitude will be selected by the Mars Surveyor Project to place the lander on the polar layered deposits in the range of 180 deg -230 deg W. The two micropenetrators are likely to land within 100 km of the Mars Surveyor Lander, on the polar deposits. The likely arrival date is Ls = 256, late southern spring. The nominal mission lasts 2 days. A science team was selected in April 1998.

  15. Measurement of soil water erosion in Africa: the potential support provided by nuclear techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabit, Lionel

    2010-05-01

    medium-term rates of soil redistribution integrating land use and climatic variability. FRN can be used to obtain average soil redistribution figures for time scales ranging from single events to many years of erosion processes, while direct erosion measurements are related to single rainfall events or rather short periods of time (e.g. erosion plots). FRN methodologies integrate all processes involving soil particle movements and allow quantification of soil loss and deposition associated with sheet erosion, which is difficult to assess using other conventional approaches. Sampling of individual points allows spatially distributed information on rates and patterns of soil redistribution. Also, one of the main advantages of the FRN is that time-consuming, costly maintenance, long-term monitoring programme and installations required by non isotopic and conventional methods can be avoided. Soil sampling can be completed in a short time and the site disturbance during sampling is minimal and does not interfere with seeding and cultivation operations. Since radionuclide-based measurements also provide information on the spatial distribution of erosion/sedimentation rates, they can be used to validate the results of distributed soil erosion models. The main purpose of this contribution is to present a synthetic overview of the usefulness in using nuclear techniques in Africa to investigate medium and short term soil erosion and sedimentation processes. Also, the advantages and limitations in using the FRN (137-Cs, 210-Pb and 7-Be) as soil redistribution tracer will be compared to other conventional water erosion methods. Keywords: Water erosion, conventional erosion assessment and measurement, nuclear techniques.

  16. Development of a bio-PIXE setup at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Uzonyi, I.; Simon, A.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    On the growing need of an accurate, quantitative method for the analysis of thin biological tissues down to the cell level, a measurement setup and data evaluating system has been developed at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe facility, using its unique capability of the PIXE-PIXE technique. Quantitative elemental concentrations and true elemental maps from C to U can be produced in the case of thin (10-50 μm), inhomogeneous samples of organic matrix with a 2 μm lateral resolution. The method is based on the combined application of on-axis STIM and PIXE-PIXE ion beam analytical techniques. STIM spectra and maps are used to determine the morphology and the area density of the samples. PIXE spectra and maps of an ultra thin windowed and a conventional Be-windowed Si(Li) X-ray detectors are used to quantify concentrations and distributions of elements in the C to Fe (light and medium) and S to U (medium and heavy) atomic number regions, separately. For cross-checking the validation of the obtained data in a few cases RBS technique was used simultaneously. The application of the new bio-PIXE method is shown through an example, the study of the penetration and clearance of ultra-fine particles containing heavy metals (TiO2) of physical bodycare cosmetics in different layers of skin within the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project.

  17. Study of lignification by noninvasive techniques in growing maize internodes. An investigation by Fourier transform infrared cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunocytochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Joseleau, J P; Ruel, K

    1997-07-01

    Noninvasive techniques were used for the study in situ of lignification in the maturing cell walls of the maize (Zea mays L.) stem. Within the longitudinal axis of a developing internode all of the stages of lignification can be found. The synthesis of the three types of lignins, p-hydroxyphenylpropane (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S), was investigated in situ by cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and immunocytochemical electron microscopy. The first lignin appearing in the parenchyma is of the G-type preceeding the incorporation of S nuclei in the later stages. However, in vascular bundles, typical absorption bands of S nuclei are visible in the Fourier transform infrared spectra at the earliest stage of lignification. Immunocytochemical determination of the three types of lignin in transmission electron microscopy was possible thanks to the use of antisera prepared against synthetic H, G, and the mixed GS dehydrogenative polymers (K. Ruel, O. Faix, J.P. Joseleau [1994] J Trace Microprobe Tech 12: 247-265). The specificity of the immunological probes demonstrated that there are differences in the relative temporal synthesis of the H, G, and GS lignins in the different tissues undergoing lignification. Considering the intermonomeric linkages predominating in the antigens used for the preparation of the immunological probes, the relative intensities of the labeling obtained provided, for the first time to our knowledge, information about the macromolecular nature of lignins (condensed versus noncondensed) in relation to their ultrastructural localization and development stage. PMID:9232887

  18. Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, John L.

    2011-05-01

    As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

  19. Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

  20. Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

  1. COMPARISON OF CELLULAR AND NUCLEAR FLOW CYTOMETRIC TECHNIQUES FOR DISCRIMINATING APOPTOTIC SUBPOPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared cellular flow cytometric methods employing carboxyfluorescein (CF), Hoechst 33342, and Hoechst 33258 with a nuclear method in their ability to discriminate apoptotic subpopulations in rat thymocyte cultures exposed to dexamethasone r tributyltin. n the nuclear techniq...

  2. Nuclear microbeam analysis of ICF target material made by GDP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, C.; He, X.; Meng, J.; Gao, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, X.; Lyu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Wang, X.; Shen, H.

    2015-04-01

    Germanium doped carbon-hydrogen polymer (CH) by Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) technique has become the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target material. The nondestructive measurement of elements content in the ICF target has become a significant work in recent years. This paper presents the compositional and distributional results of the Germanium doped CH analysis. The Ge doped CH materials as thin film and as hollow sphere were investigated by the Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) combined with the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and the Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA). The samples are thin film with 36 μm thickness and ICF target with 500-2000 μm diameter. The calibration and geometrical arrangement in the analysis of spherical target should be carefully considered in order to acquire accurate results. In the work, the uniformity of the sphere is shown and the ratio of carbon, hydrogen and germanium has been measured. The ratio values are in good agreement with the results obtained by the combustion method. In addition, the difference of the composition from thin film to hollow sphere is also discussed. This work demonstrates that nuclear microbeam analysis is an ideal method to evaluate the ICF target quality.

  3. Clinical nuclear imaging techniques for the diagnosis and evaluation of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Garvin, A A; Taillon, L A

    1992-02-01

    The use of nuclear imaging techniques allows the accurate detection of myocardial infarction, determination of the impact of infarction on ventricular performance, assessment of the myocardial salvage with thrombolysis, identification of preserved regional metabolism in jeopardized myocardial segments, and the elucidation of inducible reversible ischemia requiring aggressive therapeutic intervention. Assessment of myocardial salvage after thrombolysis or revascularization can be accomplished with serial perfusion imaging. Infarct-avid imaging with Tc-99m-PYP can be used to rapidly determine the size and location of the acute transmural myocardial infarction. In the future, however, the improved image quality and diagnostic accuracy of immunoscintigraphy with antimyosin antibodies may supplant PYP imaging. Studies of global ventricular function can be performed at rest, or with multiple interventions using portable scintigraphic devices. The measurement of the dynamic response of left ventricular ejection fraction over time shows promise for risk stratification. As yet, there has been no comprehensive comparison of the relative predictive value of metabolic imaging parameters, perfusion/antibody uptake mismatch, Tl-201 redistribution, or ejection fraction response data. Such a comparison could optimize the diagnostic algorithm for post-infarction damage assessment and risk stratification. PMID:1532141

  4. Borehole techniques identifying subsurface chimney heights in loose ground-some experiences above underground nuclear explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.; Lacomb, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The location of the subsurface top of the chimney formed by the collapse of the cavity resulting from an underground nuclear explosion is examined at five sites at the Nevada Test Site. The chimneys were investigated by drilling, coring, geophysical logging (density, gamma-ray, caliper), and seismic velocity surveys. The identification of the top of the chimney can be complicated by chimney termination in friable volcanic rock of relatively high porosity. The presence of an apical void in three of the five cases is confirmed as the chimney horizon by coincidence with anomalies observed in coring, caliper and gamma-ray logging (two cases), seismic velocity, and drilling. In the two cases where an apical void is not present, several of these techniques yield anomalies at identical horizons, however, the exact depth of chimney penetration is subject to some degree of uncertainty. This is due chiefly to the extent to which core recovery and seismic velocity may be affected by perturbations in the tuff above the chimney due to the explosion and collapse. The data suggest, however, that the depth uncertainty may be only of the order of 10 m if several indicators are available. Of all indicators, core recovery and seismic velocity indicate anomalous horizons in every case. Because radiation products associated with the explosion are contained within the immediate vicinity of the cavity, gamma-ray logs are generally not diagnostic of chimney penetration. In no case is the denisty log indicative of the presence of the chimney. ?? 1993.

  5. Nondestructive and Localized Measurements of Stress-Strain Curves and Fracture Toughness of Ferritic Steels at Various Temperatures Using Innovative Stress-Strain Microprobe Technology. Final Report for Period 8/13/1996--06/16/1999

    SciTech Connect

    Fahmy M. Haggag

    1999-10-29

    The results presented in this report demonstrate the capabilities of Advanced Technology Corporation's patented Portable/In Situ Stress-Strain Microprobe (TM) (SSM) System and its Automated Ball Indentation (ABI) test techniques to nondestructively measure the yield strength, the stress-strain curve, and the fracture toughness of ferritic steel samples and components in a reliable and accurate manner.

  6. Using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobes in the study of metal homeostasis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis. PMID:19182222

  7. Laser {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar microprobe analyses of fine-grained illite

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T.C.; Mueller, C.; Vrolijk, P.J.; Pevear, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    Fine-grained (<0.02 {mu}m) to coarse-grained (2.0-0.2 {mu}m) illite separates and finely powdered muscovite standards were analyzed with a microencapsulation technique and an {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser microprobe. The integrated ages of the illite agreed within error with conventional K/Ar analyses, even though the sample sizes, 1-100 micrograms, were at least a 10,000-fold less. Incremental laser heating of an artificial mixture of illite and muscovite of two different ages yielded a stair step profile, where the youngest and oldest incremental ages approximately coincided with their K/Ar ages. The thermally activated argon release rate from illite was distinct from that of the muscovite and may result from differences in grain thickness, lower K concentration, and the presence of cis vs. trans-sited vacancies. Incremental heating, therefore, may prove capable of delineating detrital from authigenic components in illite extracted from shale and sandstone. Microencapsulation and laser {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses, when combined with sophisticated techniques for separating clays, will permit dating of samples where clay is a minor constituent, such as sandstones and meteorites, and will enhance identification of endmember ages in naturally occurring clay. 45 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Micro-probe Raman spectroscopy for detection of inhomogeneities in YVO4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, S.; Jin, B.; Ainger, F. W.; Bhalla, A. S.; Keszei, B.; Vandlik, J.; Süveges, A.

    1996-03-01

    Several near quasicongruent undoped YVO4 single crystals grown by the Czochralski (CZ) technique as well as near stoichiometric YVO4 single crystals grown by the top-seeded solution growth technique, were investigated by micro-probe Raman spectroscopy using unpolarized argon-ion laser light. The line broadening effects of the Raman active mode at 379 cm-1 indicate that all CZ grown crystals possess wider peak widths than near stoichiometric YVO4. In the latter case a value of 9.23 cm-1 was measured for full width at half-maximum. Although the annealing process in O2 can improve the oxygen stoichiometry in the originally slightly oxygen deficient CZ grown YVO4 crystals, certain remaining peak broadening effects demonstrate a Y-V related stoichiometry problem by both lower (external) and higher frequency (internal) modes. Radial inhomogeneous distributions were observed in CZ specimens by the shift of external Raman modes at 157 and 162 cm-1 frequencies. In addition, nonassigned low intensity extra Raman peaks appeared over 1000 cm-1 frequencies in all CZ grown samples. The above detected changes in Y-V-O stoichiometry demonstrate a complex phase system around the homogeneity region of quasicongruent YVO4 specimens and enable a more realistic and unified interpretation of the segregated defects and stoichiometry changes in CZ grown YVO4 single crystals than previously available.

  9. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  10. Nuclear medicine techniques in Merkel cell carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    KRITIKOS, NIKOLAOS; PRIFTAKIS, DIMITRIOS; STAVRINIDES, STAVROS; KLEANTHOUS, STEFANOS; SARAFIANOU, ELENI

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive type of neuroendocrine cancer of the skin. It predominantly affects the elderly, with a predilection for the sun-exposed skin of the head and neck. Risk factors include immune-suppressing diseases, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma, organ transplantation, and the presence of the newly-identified Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Diagnosis is based on pathological findings, primarily the immunohistochemical determination of cytokeratin 20 positivity. By contrast, staging relies on conventional imaging methods, such as ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine techniques, such as sentinel lymph node scintigraphy, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) or alternative radiopharmaceuticals. The treatment of MCC is primarily surgical, with possible adjuvant radiation, while the use of chemotherapy appears to be an alternative therapeutic option that is used only in specific cases. The present study describes the case of a 43-year-old HIV-positive Caucasian man with MCC located on the posterior surface of the left thigh, which was identified by cytological and histological examination of tissue sampled by fine needle aspiration and biopsy performed under CT. SRS demonstrated a high uptake of 111In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-octreotide at the affected site. Therefore, the lesion was surgically excised, and the patient received chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Three months subsequent to treatment, the patient underwent a PET/CT scan with 18F-FDG that demonstrated uptake in the cervical lymph nodes and the area of the excised lesion. These findings indicated that the disease was in remission. The aim of the present study was to highlight the value and contribution of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis, staging and