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Sample records for nuclear progesterone-binding protein

  1. Pregnancy-blocking progesterone antibody targets specifically the uterus through its progesterone-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, M W; Whyte, A; Heap, R B; Taussig, M J

    1990-06-01

    Passive immunization with a mouse monoclonal antibody against progesterone, designated DB3, blocks pregnancy in several species. We have previously reported that DB3 localizes in the mouse uterine epithelium shortly before normal implantation. This phenomenon is pregnancy dependent and specific for the progesterone antibody. In this study we demonstrate that DB3 is present in the lumen of the uterus 36 h after an i.p. injection; this correlates with the time of maximum antibody reaction on the uterine epithelium. Incubation of DB3 with free progesterone, progesterone-hemisuccinate or progesterone-bovine serum albumin before administration prevented its localization on the epithelium, indicating that the localization requires free progesterone-binding sites and thus probably depends upon progesterone binding. In addition, studies in vitro show that DB3 can effectively bind to progesterone carried by high-affinity progesterone-binding protein purified from coypu plasma. We suggest that specific targeting of DB3 may be through progesterone associated with a progesterone-binding molecule on the membrane of the uterine epithelia. This may be an important part of the mechanism of antibody action against implantation. PMID:2198879

  2. Dermatophyte-hormone relationships: characterization of progesterone-binding specificity and growth inhibition in the genera Trichophyton and Microsporum.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Schär, G; Stover, E P; Feldman, D; Stevens, D A

    1988-01-01

    We reported previously that Trichophyton mentagrophytes contains a cytoplasmic macromolecule which specifically binds progesterone. Progesterone is also an effective inhibitor of growth of the fungus. We report here studies which characterize more fully the specific binding properties and the functional responses of T. mentagrophytes and taxonomically related fungi to a series of mammalian steroid hormones. Scatchard analysis of [3H]progesterone binding in both the + and - mating types of Arthroderma benhamiae and in Microsporum canis revealed a single class of binding sites with approximately the same affinity as that in T. mentagrophytes (Kd, 1 X 10(-7) to 2 X 10(-7) M). Trichophyton rubrum had a protein with a higher binding affinity (Kd, 1.6 X 10(-8) M). Characterization of the [3H]progesterone-binding sites in T. mentagrophytes showed the binder to be a protein which was destroyed by trypsin and heating to 56 degrees C. Previous examination of the steroid-binding specificity in T. mentagrophytes had demonstrated that deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were effective competitors for [3H]progesterone binding. Expansion of this study to include other competitors revealed that R5020 (a synthetic progestin), androstenedione, and dehydroepiandosterone possessed relative binding affinities which were 20, 11, and 9% of that of progesterone, respectively. Other ligands tested were less effective. Competition studies for the binder in M. canis resulted in similar findings: DOC and DHT were effective competitors for [3H]progesterone binding. The growth of A. benhamiae + and -, M. canis, and T. rubrum were all inhibited by progesterone in a dose-responsive manner, with 50% inhibition achieved at concentrations of 9.8 x 10(-6), 1.2 x 10(-5), 1.5 x 10(-5), and 2.7 x 10(-6) M. respectively,. PMID:3182998

  3. Progesterone mediates its anti-mitogenic and anti-apoptotic actions in rat granulosa cells through a progesterone-binding protein with gamma aminobutyric acidA receptor-like features.

    PubMed

    Peluso, J J; Pappalardo, A

    1998-05-01

    Progesterone (P4) inhibits small granulosa cell (GC) mitosis and large GC apoptosis. These actions are steroid specific and dose dependent and are inhibited by the progesterone receptor (PR) antagonist, RU-486. However, these cells do not express the nuclear PR but rather an ill-defined P4-binding protein (P4BP). This binding protein could function as a receptor and mediate P4's actions in GCs. Therefore, a series of studies was designed to characterize this P4BP. First, an antibody directed against the ligand-binding site of the nuclear PR was used in a Western blot analysis. This analysis revealed the presence of a 60-kDa P4BP within ovarian and GC lysates as well as within an ovarian membrane preparation. This protein was not observed in lysates of cells derived from the ovarian surface epithelium. In addition, this P4BP was immunoprecipitated by an antibody to the alpha1 chain of the gamma aminobutyric acidA (GABA(A)) receptor, suggesting that the P4BP could be the ovarian GABA(A) receptor. Since activation of the rat ovarian GABA(A) receptor increases intracellular cAMP levels, GCs were cultured with control medium supplemented with either 8-bromo-cAMP (8-br-cAMP), P4, or muscimol (a GABA agonist). Increases in cAMP were detected by monitoring the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Phosphorylated CREB was not observed in control or P4-treated cultures, but it was detected in the majority of both small and large GCs exposed to either 8-br-cAMP or muscimol. Since activation of the GABA(A) receptor with muscimol increases phosphorylated CREB but P4 does not, this study indicates that P4 does not activate the ovarian GABA(A) receptor. However, both bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, and the antibody to PR inhibited P4's ability to prevent both insulin-dependent mitosis and apoptosis. Collectively, these studies suggest that P4 mediates its anti-mitotic and anti-apoptotic effects through this 60-kDa P4BP, which has GABA(A) receptor-like properties and is localized within the surface membrane of GCs. PMID:9603245

  4. Identification and partial characterization of cytosolic progesterone-binding sites in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans.

    PubMed

    Lenasi, H; Hudnik-Plevnik, T

    1996-06-01

    Progesterone and some other steroids have been shown to induce a steroid 11alpha-hydroxylating enzyme system requiring cytochrome P450 in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans. In the present work, we attempted to find out whether the mycelial cytosol contained progesterone-binding sites (PBS) which could function as receptors for P450-inducing steroids and might, therefore, be included in the induction process. Two types of constitutive PBS, PBS-I and PBS-II, were identified in the cytosol pretreated with dextran-coated charcoal which removed the endogenous ligand. The protein nature of these binding activities was indicated by their susceptibility to trypsin and proteinase K digestion, heat denaturation, and their resistance to DNase. Progesterone binding was rapid, the maximal level being reached after 45 min of incubation at 22 degrees C. At this temperature, dissociation of progesterone from PBS-I proceeded with a t1/2 of 17 min and that from PBS-II with a t1/2 of 133 min. The apparent Kd of PBS-I determined by Scatchard analysis was 2.1-7.0 x 10(-9)M, and Bmax 36-218 fmol/mg protein. Bmax for PBS-II was >400 fmol/mg protein, whereas the value of Kd could not be determined accurately due to the sigmoidal nature of the association kinetics. The biological role of PBS-I in transcriptional regulation is suggested by the observation that this receptor-like protein contains a functional DNA-binding domain. A specific function of PBS-I in the induction of 11alpha-hydroxylase seems to be, however, questionable because of poor correlation between the affinity and the inducing capability of corresponding steroids. PMID:8651707

  5. Quantification of progesterone binding in mammary tissue of pregnant ewes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.J.; Capuco, A.V.; Akers, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    Progestin-binding sites in mammary tissue from 14 prepartum, multiparous ewes at 50, 80, 115, and 140 d of gestation were demonstrated by the binding of (/sup 3/H) R5020 (17,21-dimethyl-19-nor-4,9-pregnadiene-3,20-dione) to ovine mammary cytosol in the presence of sodium molybdate and excess cortisol. Homogenization extracted 89% of total mammary receptors (nuclear) into cytosol. Binding was specific for progestins and was of high affinity. The average dissociation constant for (/sup 3/H) R5020 specifically bound to receptors extracted into mammary cytosol was 1.9 (+/- .4) x 10/sup -9/ M (n = 14) and did not change significantly over the test period. However, binding capacities (fmol/mg cytosolic protein) differed according to stage of gestation with averages of 125 +/- 53, 149 +/- 26, 656 +/- 216, 57 +/- 22 at 50, 80, 115, and 140 d of pregnancy, respectively. Increased number of progestin-binding sites at 115 d of gestation (whether data are expressed per unit of tissue weight, DNA, or cytosolic protein) suggests that an increase per mammary epithelial cell may be necessary to produce the full lobuloalveolar proliferation observed at this stage of gestation.

  6. Progesterone Binding to the α1-Subunit of the Na/K-ATPase on the Cell Surface: Insights from Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.; Askari, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Progesterone triggers the resumption of meiosis in the amphibian oocyte through a signaling system at the plasma membrane. Analysis of [3H]ouabain and [3H]progesterone binding to the plasma membrane of the Rana pipiens oocyte indicates that progesterone competes with ouabain for a low affinity ouabain binding site on a 112 kDa α1-subunit of the membrane Na/K-ATPase. Published amino acid sequences from both low and high affinity ouabain binding α1-subunits are compared, together with published site-directed mutagenesis studies of ouabain binding. We propose that the progesterone binding site is located in the external loop (23 amino acids) between the M1-M2 transmembrane helices. Analysis of loop topology and the countercurrent hydrophobicity/polarity gradients within the M1-M2 loop further suggest that the polar β and hydrophobic α surfaces of the planar progesterone molecule interact with opposite sides of the amino acid loop. The 19-angular methyl group of progesterone is essential for activity; it could bind to the C-terminal region of the M1-M2 loop. Maximum biological activity requires formation of hydrogen-bond networks between the 3-keto group of progesterone and Arg118, Asp129 and possibly Glu122-124 in the C-terminal region of the loop. The 20-keto group hydrogen may in turn hydrogen bond to Cys111 near the M1 helix. Peptide flexibility undergoes a maximal transition near the midway point in the M1-M2 loop, suggesting that folding occurs within the loop, which further stabilizes progesterone binding. PMID:17936318

  7. Protein-protein interaction analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Peter M; Beck, Moriah R; Campbell, Sharon L

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has continued to evolve as a powerful method, with an increase in the number of pulse sequences and techniques available to study protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, a straightforward method to map a protein-protein interface and design a structural model is described, using chemical shift perturbation, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and data-driven docking. PMID:25859955

  8. Optogenetic control of nuclear protein export

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Wehler, Pierre; Roensch, Julia; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Active nucleocytoplasmic transport is a key mechanism underlying protein regulation in eukaryotes. While nuclear protein import can be controlled in space and time with a portfolio of optogenetic tools, protein export has not been tackled so far. Here we present a light-inducible nuclear export system (LEXY) based on a single, genetically encoded tag, which enables precise spatiotemporal control over the export of tagged proteins. A constitutively nuclear, chromatin-anchored LEXY variant expands the method towards light inhibition of endogenous protein export by sequestering cellular CRM1 receptors. We showcase the utility of LEXY for cell biology applications by regulating a synthetic repressor as well as human p53 transcriptional activity with light. LEXY is a powerful addition to the optogenetic toolbox, allowing various novel applications in synthetic and cell biology. PMID:26853913

  9. Optogenetic control of nuclear protein export.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Wehler, Pierre; Roensch, Julia; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Active nucleocytoplasmic transport is a key mechanism underlying protein regulation in eukaryotes. While nuclear protein import can be controlled in space and time with a portfolio of optogenetic tools, protein export has not been tackled so far. Here we present a light-inducible nuclear export system (LEXY) based on a single, genetically encoded tag, which enables precise spatiotemporal control over the export of tagged proteins. A constitutively nuclear, chromatin-anchored LEXY variant expands the method towards light inhibition of endogenous protein export by sequestering cellular CRM1 receptors. We showcase the utility of LEXY for cell biology applications by regulating a synthetic repressor as well as human p53 transcriptional activity with light. LEXY is a powerful addition to the optogenetic toolbox, allowing various novel applications in synthetic and cell biology. PMID:26853913

  10. Proteins Connecting the Nuclear Pore Complex with the Nuclear Interior

    PubMed Central

    Strambio-de-Castillia, Caterina; Blobel, Günter; Rout, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    While much has been learned in recent years about the movement of soluble transport factors across the nuclear pore complex (NPC), comparatively little is known about intranuclear trafficking. We isolated the previously identified Saccharomyces protein Mlp1p (myosin-like protein) by an assay designed to find nuclear envelope (NE) associated proteins that are not nucleoporins. We localized both Mlp1p and a closely related protein that we termed Mlp2p to filamentous structures stretching from the nucleoplasmic face of the NE into the nucleoplasm, similar to the homologous vertebrate and Drosophila Tpr proteins. Mlp1p can be imported into the nucleus by virtue of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) within its COOH-terminal domain. Overexpression experiments indicate that Mlp1p can form large structures within the nucleus which exclude chromatin but appear highly permeable to proteins. Remarkably, cells harboring a double deletion of MLP1 and MLP2 were viable, although they showed a slower net rate of active nuclear import and faster passive efflux of a reporter protein. Our data indicate that the Tpr homologues are not merely NPC-associated proteins but that they can be part of NPC-independent, peripheral intranuclear structures. In addition, we suggest that the Tpr filaments could provide chromatin-free conduits or tracks to guide the efficient translocation of macromolecules between the nucleoplasm and the NPC. PMID:10085285

  11. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations. PMID:26932314

  12. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  13. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  14. Quantification of nuclear protein transport using induced heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Hübner, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    Trafficking of proteins between the cytoplasm and nucleus occurs exclusively across the nuclear pore complex of eucaryotic cells. Fundamental aspects of this process affect temporal and spatial parameters, the latter carried out by specific import [nuclear localization sequence (NLS)] and export [nuclear export sequence (NES)] sequences. In this study, we focused on the adaptation of a protein heterodimerization assay to kinetically measure Crm1-mediated nuclear export in living cells using the rapalog AP21967, a heterodimerizing agent and NLS- and NES-containing fusion proteins equipped with distinct AP21967-specific binding motifs. In HeLa cells, we observed rapid nuclear export of the NLS-containing fusion protein in the presence of AP21967, with the extent of this process being a function of the number of AP21967-binding motifs. AP21967-induced nuclear export was specifically inhibited by the Crm1-binding molecule leptomycin B. Half maximal export was achieved after approximately 10 min. We further applied protein heterodimerization in HeLa cells to study induced NLS-mediated nuclear import. Only in the presence of heterodimerizer AP21967 nuclear import of a cytoplasmically localizing fusion protein was observed. Induced protein heterodimerization is thus a valuable tool to quantitatively study nucleocytoplasmic protein trafficking in cultured cells, in a non-invasive, time-saving manner. PMID:19602195

  15. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  16. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of 6-fold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement affect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  17. TTRAP is a novel PML nuclear bodies-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Guanlan; Pan Yukun; Wang Bingyin; Huang Lu; Tian Ling; Xue Jinglun; Chen Jinzhong Jia, William

    2008-10-24

    PML nuclear body (PML NB) is an important macromolecular nuclear structure that is involved in many essential aspects of cellular function. Tens of proteins have been found in PML NBs, and promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) has been proven to be essential for the formation of this structure. Here, we showed that TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) was a novel PML NBs-associated protein. TTRAP colocalized with three important PML NBs-associated proteins, PML, DAXX and Sp100 in the typical fashion of PML NBs. By yeast mating assay, TTRAP was identified to interact with these PML NBs-associated proteins. The transcription and expression of TTRAP could be induced by IFN-{gamma}, representing another common feature of PML NBs-associated proteins. These results would not only be important for understanding PML NBs but also be helpful in studying the TTRAP function in the future.

  18. Protein quality control at the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Blaszczak, Ewa; Pantazopoulou, Marina; Fischer, Bernd; Omnus, Deike J; Le Dez, Gaëlle; Brossard, Audrey; Gunnarsson, Alexander; Barry, Joseph D; Meurer, Matthias; Kirrmaier, Daniel; Boone, Charles; Huber, Wolfgang; Rabut, Gwenaël; Ljungdahl, Per O; Knop, Michael

    2014-12-18

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane that separates the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The inner nuclear membrane (INM) functions in essential nuclear processes including chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression. The outer nuclear membrane is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and is the site of membrane protein synthesis. Protein homeostasis in this compartment is ensured by endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathways that in yeast involve the integral membrane E3 ubiquitin ligases Hrd1 and Doa10 operating with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc6 and Ubc7 (refs 2, 3). However, little is known about protein quality control at the INM. Here we describe a protein degradation pathway at the INM in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mediated by the Asi complex consisting of the RING domain proteins Asi1 and Asi3 (ref. 4). We report that the Asi complex functions together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc6 and Ubc7 to degrade soluble and integral membrane proteins. Genetic evidence suggests that the Asi ubiquitin ligase defines a pathway distinct from, but complementary to, ERAD. Using unbiased screening with a novel genome-wide yeast library based on a tandem fluorescent protein timer, we identify more than 50 substrates of the Asi, Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ubiquitin ligases. We show that the Asi ubiquitin ligase is involved in degradation of mislocalized integral membrane proteins, thus acting to maintain and safeguard the identity of the INM. PMID:25519137

  19. Protein quality control at the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Blaszczak, Ewa; Pantazopoulou, Marina; Fischer, Bernd; Omnus, Deike J.; Le Dez, Gaëlle; Brossard, Audrey; Gunnarsson, Alexander; Barry, Joseph D.; Meurer, Matthias; Kirrmaier, Daniel; Boone, Charles; Huber, Wolfgang; Rabut, Gwenaël; Ljungdahl, Per O.; Knop, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane that separates the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The inner nuclear membrane (INM) functions in essential nuclear processes including chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression1. The outer nuclear membrane is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is the site of membrane protein synthesis. Protein homeostasis in this compartment is ensured by ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathways that in yeast involve the integral membrane E3 ubiquitin ligases Hrd1 and Doa10 operating with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc6 and Ubc72,3. However, little is known regarding protein quality control at the INM. Here we describe a protein degradation pathway at the INM mediated by the Asi complex consisting of the RING domain proteins Asi1 and Asi34. We report that the As complex functions together with the ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc6andUbc7to degrade soluble and integral membrane proteins. Genetic evidence suggest that the Asi ubiquitin ligase defines a pathway distinct from but complementary to ERAD. Using unbiased screening with a novel genome-wide yeast library based on a tandem fluorescent protein timer (tFT)5, we identify more than 50 substrates of the Asi, Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ubiquity ligases. We show that the Asi ubiquitin ligase is involved in degradation of mislocalised integral membrane proteins, thus acting to maintain and safeguard the identity of the INM. PMID:25519137

  20. Regulation of neuronal differentiation by proteins associated with nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Förthmann, Benjamin; van Bergeijk, Jeroen; Lee, Yu-Wei; Lübben, Verena; Schill, Yvonne; Brinkmann, Hella; Ratzka, Andreas; Stachowiak, Michal K; Hebert, Michael; Grothe, Claudia; Claus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are large sub-nuclear structures composed of RNA and protein molecules. The Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein localizes to Cajal bodies (CBs) and nuclear gems. Diminished cellular concentration of SMN is associated with the neurodegenerative disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). How nuclear body architecture and its structural components influence neuronal differentiation remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of SMN and two of its interaction partners in cellular models of neuronal differentiation. The nuclear 23 kDa isoform of Fibroblast Growth Factor - 2 (FGF-2(23)) is one of these interacting proteins - and was previously observed to influence nuclear bodies by destabilizing nuclear gems and mobilizing SMN from Cajal bodies (CBs). Here we demonstrate that FGF-2(23) blocks SMN-promoted neurite outgrowth, and also show that SMN disrupts FGF-2(23)-dependent transcription. Our results indicate that FGF-2(23) and SMN form an inactive complex that interferes with neuronal differentiation by mutually antagonizing nuclear functions. Coilin is another nuclear SMN binding partner and a marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs). In addition, coilin is essential for CB function in maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). The role of coilin outside of Cajal bodies and its putative impacts in tissue differentiation are poorly defined. The present study shows that protein levels of nucleoplasmic coilin outside of CBs decrease during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of coilin has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we find that nucleoplasmic coilin inhibits neurite outgrowth independent of SMN binding revealing a new function for coilin in neuronal differentiation. PMID:24358231

  1. Nucleolar and nuclear envelope proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hurt, E C; McDowall, A; Schimmang, T

    1988-08-01

    We have developed a fast and reliable purification protocol to obtain yeast nuclei in intact and pure form and in a reasonable yield. The purified nuclei appear homogeneous at the light and electron microscopic level, are highly enriched in the nuclear marker histone H2B and devoid of mitochondrial, vacuolar and cytosolic marker proteins. On sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels, the nuclear fraction contains unique proteins which distinguishes them from the major yeast subcellular fractions. Yeast nuclei were separated by detergent/salt extraction into soluble, insoluble and membrane fractions. Antibodies raised against subnuclear fractions lead to the identification of an integral nuclear membrane protein and a high-abundance 38-kDa protein which is located in the yeast nucleolus. PMID:3053175

  2. Lamins: nuclear intermediate filament proteins with fundamental functions in nuclear mechanics and genome regulation.

    PubMed

    Gruenbaum, Yosef; Foisner, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that form a scaffold, termed nuclear lamina, at the nuclear periphery. A small fraction of lamins also localize throughout the nucleoplasm. Lamins bind to a growing number of nuclear protein complexes and are implicated in both nuclear and cytoskeletal organization, mechanical stability, chromatin organization, gene regulation, genome stability, differentiation, and tissue-specific functions. The lamin-based complexes and their specific functions also provide insights into possible disease mechanisms for human laminopathies, ranging from muscular dystrophy to accelerated aging, as observed in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner syndromes. PMID:25747401

  3. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  4. CpG-binding protein is a nuclear matrix- and euchromatin-associated protein localized to nuclear speckles containing human trithorax. Identification of nuclear matrix targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Heon; Skalnik, David G

    2002-11-01

    CpG-binding protein (CGBP) binds unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is essential for mammalian development. CGBP exhibits a punctate nuclear localization correlated with 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole light regions and is excluded from metaphase chromosomes. The distribution of CGBP is distinct from the heterochromatin-associated proteins MBD1, methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, and HP1alpha. Some CGBP-containing nuclear speckles co-localize with splicing factor SC-35 and actively transcribed regions of the genome, whereas most CGBP co-localizes with acetylated histones, indicating that CGBP is localized to active chromatin. CGBP contains two nuclear localization signals that are insufficient to direct punctate subnuclear distribution. Instead, localization of CGBP to nuclear speckles requires signals within the acidic, basic, and coiled-coil domains. CGBP associates with the nuclear matrix, and fragments of CGBP that fail to associate with the nuclear matrix fail to localize to nuclear speckles and exhibit reduced transcriptional activation activity. Mutated versions of CGBP that lack DNA binding activity exhibit a normal nuclear distribution, suggesting that CGBP accumulates at nuclear speckles as a result of protein/protein interactions. Importantly, the subcellular distribution of CGBP is identical to human trithorax, suggesting that these proteins may be components of a multimeric complex analogous to the histone-methylating Set1 complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contains CGBP and trithorax homologues. PMID:12200428

  5. Segmental isotopic labeling of proteins for nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Xu, Rong; Cowburn, David

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as one of the principle techniques of structural biology. It is not only a powerful method for elucidating the three-dimensional structures under near physiological conditions but also a convenient method for studying protein-ligand interactions and protein dynamics. A major drawback of macromolecular NMR is its size limitation, caused by slower tumbling rates and greater complexity of the spectra as size increases. Segmental isotopic labeling allows for specific segment(s) within a protein to be selectively examined by NMR, thus significantly reducing the spectral complexity for large proteins and allowing for the application of a variety of solution-based NMR strategies. Two related approaches are generally used in the segmental isotopic labeling of proteins: expressed protein ligation and protein trans-splicing. Here, we describe the methodology and recent application of expressed protein ligation and protein trans-splicing for NMR structural studies of proteins and protein complexes. We also describe the protocol used in our lab for the segmental isotopic labeling of a 50-kDa protein Csk (C-terminal Src kinase) using expressed protein ligation methods. PMID:19632474

  6. Nuclear export of proteins and drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Dawson, Jana; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular location of a protein is crucial to its normal functioning in a cell. Cancer cells utilize the normal processes of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore complex of a cell to effectively evade anti-neoplastic mechanisms. CRM1-mediated export is increased in various cancers. Proteins that are exported in cancer include tumor-suppressive proteins such as retinoblastoma, APC, p53, BRAC1, FOXO proteins, INI1/hSNF5, galectin-3, Bok, nucleophosmin, RASSF2, Merlin, p21CIP, p27KIP1, N-WASP/FAK, estradiol receptor and Tob, drug targets topoisomerase I and IIα and BCR-ABL, and the molecular chaperone protein Hsp90. Here, we review in detail the current processes and known structures involved in the export of a protein through the nuclear pore complex. We also discuss the export receptor molecule CRM1 and its binding to the leucine-rich nuclear export signal of the cargo protein and the formation of a nuclear export trimer with RanGTP. The therapeutic potential of various CRM1 inhibitors will be addressed, including leptomycin B, ratjadone, KOS-2464, and specific small molecule inhibitors of CRM1, N-azolylacrylate analogs, FOXO export inhibitors, valtrate, acetoxychavicol acetate, CBS9106, and SINE inhibitors. We will also discuss examples of how drug resistance may be reversed by targeting the exported proteins topoisomerase IIα, BCR-ABL, and galectin-3. As effective and less toxic CRM1 export inhibitors become available, they may be used as both single agents and in combination with current chemotherapeutic drugs. We believe that the future development of low-toxicity, small-molecule CRM1 inhibitors may provide a new approach to treating cancer. PMID:22209898

  7. Mediators of nuclear protein import target karyophilic proteins to pore complexes of cytoplasmic annulate lamellae.

    PubMed

    Cordes, V C; Rackwitz, H R; Reidenbach, S

    1997-12-15

    Nuclear pore complexes are constitutive structures of the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells and represent the sites where transport of molecules between nucleus and cytoplasm takes place. However, pore complexes of similar structure, but with largely unknown functional properties, are long known to occur also in certain cytoplasmic cisternae that have been termed annulate lamellae (AL). To analyze the capability of the AL pore complex to interact with the soluble mediators of nuclear protein import and their karyophilic protein substrates, we have performed a microinjection study in stage VI oocytes of Xenopus laevis. In these cells AL are especially abundant and can easily be identified by light and electron microscopy. Following injection into the cytoplasm, fluorochrome-labeled mediators of two different nuclear import pathways, importin beta and transportin, not only associate with the nuclear envelope but also with AL. Likewise, nuclear localization signals (NLS) of the basic and M9 type, but not nuclear export signals, confer targeting and transient binding of fluorochrome-labeled proteins to cytoplasmic AL. Mutation or deletion of the NLS signals prevents these interactions. Furthermore, binding to AL is abolished by dominant negative inhibitors of nuclear protein import. Microinjections of gold-coupled NLS-bearing proteins reveal specific gold decoration at distinct sites within the AL pore complex. These include such at the peripheral pore complex-attached fibrils and at the central "transporter" and closely resemble those of "transport intermediates" found in electron microscopic studies of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). These data demonstrate that AL can represent distinct sites within the cytoplasm of transient accumulation of nuclear proteins and that the AL pore complex shares functional binding properties with the NPC. PMID:9434638

  8. Nuclear Proteins Hijacked by Mammalian Cytoplasmic Plus Strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  9. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Richard E

    2015-05-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  10. HMG Nuclear Proteins: Linking Chromatin Structure to Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    I. Summary Although the three families of mammalian HMG proteins (HMGA, HMGB and HMGN) participate in many of the same nuclear processes, each family plays its own unique role in modulating chromatin structure and regulating genomic function. This review focuses on the similarities and differences in the mechanisms by which the different HMG families impact chromatin structure and influence cellular phenotype. The biological implications of having three architectural transcription factor families with complementary, but partially overlapping, nuclear functions are discussed. PMID:19748605

  11. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  12. Nuclear pore proteins and the control of genome functions

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Arkaitz

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are composed of several copies of ∼30 different proteins called nucleoporins (Nups). NPCs penetrate the nuclear envelope (NE) and regulate the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Beyond this vital role, NPC components influence genome functions in a transport-independent manner. Nups play an evolutionarily conserved role in gene expression regulation that, in metazoans, extends into the nuclear interior. Additionally, in proliferative cells, Nups play a crucial role in genome integrity maintenance and mitotic progression. Here we discuss genome-related functions of Nups and their impact on essential DNA metabolism processes such as transcription, chromosome duplication, and segregation. PMID:25691464

  13. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated. PMID:11983393

  14. Cellular stress induces Bax-regulated nuclear bubble budding and rupture followed by nuclear protein release.

    PubMed

    Lindenboim, Liora; Sasson, Tiki; Worman, Howard J; Borner, Christoph; Stein, Reuven

    2014-01-01

    Cellular stress triggers many pathways including nuclear protein redistribution. We previously discovered that this process is regulated by Bax but the underlying mechanism has not yet been studied. Here we define this mechanism by showing that apoptotic stimuli cause Bax-regulated disturbances in lamin A/C and nuclear envelope (NE)-associated proteins which results in the generation and subsequent rupture of nuclear protein-containing bubbles. The bubbles do not contain DNA and are encapsulated by impaired nuclear pore-depleted NE. Stress-induced generation and rupture of nuclear bubbles ultimately leads to the discharge of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This process precedes morphological changes of apoptosis and occurs independently of caspases. Rescue experiments revealed that this Bax effect is non-canonical, i.e. it requires the BH3 domain and α-helices 5 and 6 but it is not inhibited by Bcl(-)xL. Targeting Bax to the NE by the Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 homology (KASH) domain effectively triggers the generation and rupture of nuclear bubbles. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a novel stress-response, which is regulated by a non-canonical action of Bax on the NE. PMID:25482068

  15. New insights into the nuclear localization of retroviral Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Parent, Leslie J

    2011-01-01

    Retroviruses assemble new virus particles that are released by budding from the plasma membranes of infected cells. Gag proteins, encoded by retroviruses, orchestrate the assembly of virus particles in close collaboration with host cell machinery. The earliest steps in retrovirus assembly-those immediately following synthesis of Gag on cytosolic ribosomes-are poorly understood. Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) offers a unique model system for dissecting these early steps because the RSV Gag protein undergoes transient nuclear trafficking prior to plasma membrane transport. Other Gag proteins, including those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), murine leukemia virus (MLV), foamy virus and retrotransposons in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Drosophila, have also been detected in the nucleus, suggesting that nuclear trafficking of Gag proteins is a common property of retroviruses and retrotransposons. In addition to retroviruses, many structural proteins of unrelated viruses, including influenza M1, NEP and NP proteins,38 Borna disease virus N and P proteins28,56 and coronavirus N protein,23,57 undergo nuclear localization and bind viral RNAs to form viral ribonuclear protein (RNP) complexes that are exported from the nucleus for packaging into virus particles. Similarly, nuclear trafficking of the RSV Gag protein is required for efficient encapsidation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA) into assembling virus particles.19 Recently, we reported that the viral RNA itself appears to be a key factor in controlling the nucleus/cytosol distribution of RSV Gag.22 Our data demonstrate that binding of RSV RNA to the Gag protein promotes Gag-CRM1-RanGTP binding, resulting in export of the retroviral RNP from the nucleus. We propose that association of the viral RNA induces a conformational change in Gag that reveals its nuclear export signal (NES) and prepares that complex for its journey to the plasma membrane for budding. This work challenges existing dogmas regarding the molecular basis of Gag-mediated selection of gRNA for packaging and may lead to novel paradigms for the mechanism of retroviral genome encapsidation. PMID:21738831

  16. Nuclear envelope proteomics: Novel integral membrane proteins of the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Dreger, Mathias; Bengtsson, Luiza; Schöneberg, Torsten; Otto, Henning; Hucho, Ferdinand

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is one of the least characterized structures of eukaryotic cells. The study of its functional roles is hampered by the small number of proteins known to be specifically located to it. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the NE proteome. We applied different fractionation procedures and isolated protein subsets derived from distinct NE compartments. We identified 148 different proteins by 16-benzyl dimethyl hexadecyl ammonium chloride (16-BAC) gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry; among them were 19 previously unknown or noncharacterized. The identification of known proteins in particular NE fractions enabled us to assign novel proteins to NE substructures. Thus, our subcellular proteomics approach retains the screening character of classical proteomic studies, but also allows a number of predictions about subcellular localization and interactions of previously noncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate this result by showing that two novel transmembrane proteins, a 100-kDa protein with similarity to Caenorhabditis elegans Unc-84A and an unrelated 45-kDa protein we named LUMA, reside in the inner nuclear membrane and likely interact with the nuclear lamina. The utility of our approach is not restricted to the investigation of the NE. Our approach should be applicable to the analysis of other complex membrane structures of the cell as well. PMID:11593002

  17. Evolutionary relationship of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins across grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome studies were done across taxa to provide a basic understanding of genome evolution regarding nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins and their conservation in grass species. Two different mitochondria-related gene sets, one from rice and another from Arabidopsis, were us...

  18. Nuclear actin and protein 4.1: Essential interactions during nuclear assembly in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Chen, Cynthia; Penman, Sheldon; Heald, Rebecca

    2003-06-11

    Structural protein 4.1, which has crucial interactions within the spectin-actin lattice of the human red cell membrane skeleton, also is widely distributed at diverse intracellular sites in nucleated cells. We previously showed that 4.1 is essential for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro and that the capacity of 4.1 to bind actin is required. Here we report that 4.1 and actin colocalize in mammalian cell nuclei using fluorescence microscopy and, by higher resolution cell whole mount electron microscopy, are associated on nuclear filaments. We also devised a cell-free assay using Xenopus egg extract containing fluorescent actin to follow actin during nuclear assembly. By directly imaging actin under non-perturbing conditions, the total nuclear actin population is retained and is visualized in situ relative to intact chromatin. We detected actin initially when chromatin and nuclear pores began assembling. As the nuclear lamina assembled, but preceding DNA synthesis, a discrete actin network formed throughout the nucleus. Protein 4.1 epitopes also were detected when actin began to accumulate in nuclei, producing a diffuse coincident pattern. As nuclei matured, actin was detected both coincident with and also independent of 4.1 epitopes. To test whether acquisition of nuclear actin is required for nuclear assembly, the actin inhibitor latrunculin A was added to Xenopus egg extracts during nuclear assembly. Latrunculin A strongly perturbed nuclear assembly and produced distorted nuclear structures containing neither actin nor protein 4.1. Our results suggest that actin as well as 4.1 is necessary for nuclear assembly and that 4.1-actin interactions may be critical.

  19. A nuclear protein associated with cell divisions in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Krauss, M R; Borkird, C; Sung, Z R

    1988-12-01

    A nuclear protein, present in carrot meristems and rapidly proliferating cultured cells of carrot (Daucus carota L.) has been identified by the use of a monoclonal antibody (MAb 21D7). By combining the techniques of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analysis and blotting separated proteins onto nitrocellulose sheets, it was shown that the antibody detected a single polypeptide of apparent molecular mass (M r) of 45000 and an isoelectric focusing point (pI) of 6.7. This protein was found by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence to be highly concentrated in the nucleoli of somatic and zygotic embryos of a wide range of plants. It was not detectable in logarthmically growing cells ofEscherichia coli, yeast, embryos ofDrosophila melanogaster or cultured C3H mouse cells. These data indicate that this protein is a highly conserved non-histone protein associated with nuclei of rapidly dividing plant cells. PMID:24221561

  20. The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Won Kyung . E-mail: wkkang@riken.jp; Kurihara, Masaaki . E-mail: mkuri@riken.jp; Matsumoto, Shogo . E-mail: smatsu@riken.jp

    2006-06-20

    The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) display a biphasic pattern of intracellular localization during infection. At early times, they reside in the nucleus but then show both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization as the infection proceeds. Therefore, we examined the possibility of nuclear export. Using inhibitors, we reveal that BmNPV BRO proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutations on the leucine-rich region of BRO proteins resulted in nuclear accumulation of transiently expressed proteins, suggesting that this region functions as a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). On the contrary, mutant BRO-D with an altered NES did not show nuclear accumulation in infected cells, although protein production seemed to be reduced. RT-PCR analysis showed that the lower level of protein production was due to a reduction in RNA synthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that BRO proteins are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  1. DPF2 regulates OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Dijuan; Shen, Yuxian; Tao, Xiaofang; Liu, Lihua; Zhong, Yongwang; Fang, Shengyun

    2015-12-01

    The amount of transcription factor OCT4 is strictly regulated. A tight regulation of OCT4 levels is crucial for mammalian embryonic development and oncogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of OCT4 protein expression and nuclear distribution are largely unknown. Here, we report that DPF2, a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein, is upregulated during H9 cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid. Endogenous interaction between DPF2 and OCT4 in P19 cells was revealed by an immunoprecipitation assay. GST-pull down assay proved that OCT4 protein in H9 cells and recombinant OCT4 can precipitate with DPF2 in vitro. In vitro ubiquitination assay demonstrated DPF2 might serve as an E3 ligase. Knock down of dpf2 using siRNA increased OCT4 protein level and stability in P19 cells. DPF2 siRNAs also up-regulates OCT4 but not NANOG in H9 cells. However, RA fails to downregulates OCT4 protein level in cells infected by lenitviruses containing DPF2 siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of both DPF2 and OCT4 in 293 cells proved the DPF2-OCT4 interaction. DPF2 but not PHD2 mutant DPF2 enhanced ubiquitination and degradation of OCT4 in 293 cells co-expressed DPF2 and OCT4. Both wild type DPF2 and PHD2 mutant DPF2 redistributes nuclear OCT4 without affecting DPF2-OCT4 interaction. Further analysis indicated that DPF2 decreases monomeric and mono-ubiquitinated OCT4, assembles poly-ubiquitin chains on OCT4 mainly through Ub-K48 linkage. These findings contribute to an understanding of how OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution is regulated by its associated protein. PMID:26417682

  2. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  3. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  4. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  5. An evolving understanding of nuclear receptor coregulator proteins

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Christopher J.; Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate gene expression through the ligand-controlled recruitment of a diverse group of proteins known as coregulators. Most nuclear receptor coregulators function in large multi-protein complexes that modify chromatin and thereby regulate the transcription of target genes. Structural and functional studies are beginning to reveal how these complexes are assembled bringing together multiple functionalities that mediate: recruitment to specific genomic loci through interaction with transcription factors; recruitment of enzymatic activities that either modify or remodel chromatin; and targeting the complexes to their chromatin substrate. These activities are regulated by post-translational modifications, alternative splicing and small signalling molecules. This review focuses on our current understanding of coregulator complexes and aims to highlight the common principles that are beginning to emerge. PMID:24203923

  6. Nuclear envelope protein MAN1 regulates clock through BMAL1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Ting; Zhang, Luoying; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Linda Chen; Garcia, Valentina Elizabeth; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Ptáček, Louis; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks serve as internal pacemakers that influence many basic homeostatic processes; consequently, the expression and function of their components are tightly regulated by intricate networks of feedback loops that fine-tune circadian processes. Our knowledge of these components and pathways is far from exhaustive. In recent decades, the nuclear envelope has emerged as a global gene regulatory machine, although its role in circadian regulation has not been explored. We report that transcription of the core clock component BMAL1 is positively modulated by the inner nuclear membrane protein MAN1, which directly binds the BMAL1 promoter and enhances its transcription. Our results establish a novel connection between the nuclear periphery and circadian rhythmicity, therefore bridging two global regulatory systems that modulate all aspects of bodily functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02981.001 PMID:25182847

  7. A method for dynamic nuclear polarization enhancement of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam N; Caporini, Marc A; Fanucci, Gail E; Long, Joanna R

    2015-01-26

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has the potential to enhance NMR signals by orders of magnitude and to enable NMR characterization of proteins which are inherently dilute, such as membrane proteins. In this work spin-labeled lipid molecules (SL-lipids), when used as polarizing agents, lead to large and relatively homogeneous DNP enhancements throughout the lipid bilayer and to an embedded lung surfactant mimetic peptide, KL4 . Specifically, DNP MAS ssNMR experiments at 600 MHz/395 GHz on KL4 reconstituted in liposomes containing SL-lipids reveal DNP enhancement values over two times larger for KL4 compared to liposome suspensions containing the biradical TOTAPOL. These findings suggest an alternative sample preparation strategy for DNP MAS ssNMR studies of lipid membranes and integral membrane proteins. PMID:25504310

  8. The Nuclear Envelope Protein, LAP1B, Is a Novel Protein Phosphatase 1 Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana; Rebelo, Sandra; Van Kleeff, Paula J. M.; Kim, Connie E.; Dauer, William T.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding proteins are quintessential regulators, determining substrate specificity and defining subcellular localization and activity of the latter. Here, we describe a novel PP1 binding protein, the nuclear membrane protein lamina associated polypeptide 1B (LAP1B), which interacts with the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA. The PP1 binding domain in LAP1B was here identified as the REVRF motif at amino acids 55-59. The LAP1B:PP1 complex can be immunoprecipitated from cells in culture and rat cortex and the complex was further validated by yeast co-transformations and blot overlay assays. PP1, which is enriched in the nucleus, binds to the N-terminal nuclear domain of LAP1B, as shown by immunocolocalization and domain specific binding studies. PP1 dephosphorylates LAP1B, confirming the physiological relevance of this interaction. These findings place PP1 at a key position to participate in the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia and related nuclear envelope-based diseases. PMID:24116158

  9. Assembly of nuclear pore complexes mediated by major vault protein.

    PubMed

    Vollmar, Friederike; Hacker, Christian; Zahedi, René-Peiman; Sickmann, Albert; Ewald, Andrea; Scheer, Ulrich; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2009-03-15

    During interphase growth of eukaryotic cells, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are continuously incorporated into the intact nuclear envelope (NE) by mechanisms that are largely unknown. De novo formation of NPCs involves local fusion events between the inner and outer nuclear membrane, formation of a transcisternal membranous channel of defined diameter and the coordinated assembly of hundreds of nucleoporins into the characteristic NPC structure. Here we have used a cell-free system based on Xenopus egg extract, which allows the experimental separation of nuclear-membrane assembly and NPC formation. Nuclei surrounded by a closed double nuclear membrane, but devoid of NPCs, were first reconstituted from chromatin and a specific membrane fraction. Insertion of NPCs into the preformed pore-free nuclei required cytosol containing soluble nucleoporins or nucleoporin subcomplexes and, quite unexpectedly, major vault protein (MVP). MVP is the main component of vaults, which are ubiquitous barrel-shaped particles of enigmatic function. Our results implicate MVP, and thus also vaults, in NPC biogenesis and provide a functional explanation for the association of a fraction of vaults with the NE and specifically with NPCs in intact cells. PMID:19240118

  10. Protein Arginine Methylation in Candida albicans: Role in Nuclear Transport▿

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Anne E.; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia; Regis, Anthony; Blum, Emily; Conboy, Ana; Elf, Shannon; Clarke, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation plays a key role in numerous eukaryotic processes, such as protein transport and signal transduction. In Candida albicans, two candidate protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been identified from the genome sequencing project. Based on sequence comparison, C. albicans candidate PRMTs display similarity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hmt1 and Rmt2. Here we demonstrate functional homology of Hmt1 between C. albicans and S. cerevisiae: CaHmt1 supports growth of S. cerevisiae strains that require Hmt1, and CaHmt1 methylates Npl3, a major Hmt1 substrate, in S. cerevisiae. In C. albicans strains lacking CaHmt1, asymmetric dimethylarginine and ω-monomethylarginine levels are significantly decreased, indicating that Hmt1 is the major C. albicans type I PRMT1. Given the known effects of type I PRMTs on nuclear transport of RNA-binding proteins, we tested whether Hmt1 affects nuclear transport of a putative Npl3 ortholog in C. albicans. CaNpl3 allows partial growth of S. cerevisiae npl3Δ strains, but its arginine-glycine-rich C terminus can fully substitute for that of ScNpl3 and also directs methylation-sensitive association with ScNpl3. Expression of green fluorescent protein-tagged CaNpl3 proteins in C. albicans strains with and without CaHmt1 provides evidence for CaHmt1 facilitating export of CaNpl3 in this fungus. We have also identified the C. albicans Rmt2, a type IV fungus- and plant-specific PRMT, by amino acid analysis of an rmt2Δ/rmt2Δ strain, as well as biochemical evidence for additional cryptic PRMTs. PMID:17483287

  11. Characterization of nuclear protein kinases of Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Leiva, L.; Gonzalez, C.; Allende, C.; Allende, J.

    1986-05-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes contain large nuclei (germinal vesicles) that can be isolated in very pure form and which permit the study of enzymatic activities present in these organelles. Incubation of pure oocyte nuclear homogenates with /sup 32/P in a buffered solution containing 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ results in the phosphorylation of a large number of proteins by endogenous protein kinases. This phosphorylation is not affected by the addition of cyclic nucleotides or calcium ion and calmodulin. On the other hand the nuclear kinases are considerably stimulated by spermine and spermidine and strongly inhibited by heparin (10 ..mu..g/ml). Addition of exogenous protein substrates shows that the major oocyte kinases are very active with casein and phosvitin as substrates but do not phosphorylate histones or protamines. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of the nuclear extract fractionates the casein phosphorylating activity in two main peaks. The first peak is not retained on the column equilibrated with 0.1 M NH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and uses exclusively ATP as phosphate donor and is insensitive to polyamines or heparin. The second peak which corresponds to 70% of the casein phosphorylation elutes at 0.27 M NH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and uses both ATP and GTP as phosphate donors and is greatly stimulated by polyamines and completely inhibited by 10 ..mu..g/ml heparin. On this evidence the authors conclude that the major protein kinase peak corresponds to casein kinase type II which has been found in mammalian nuclei.

  12. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Prediction Using SVM and Pfam Domain Information

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Jain, Sohni; Kumari, Bandana; Kumar, Manish

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is the largest and the highly organized organelle of eukaryotic cells. Within nucleus exist a number of pseudo-compartments, which are not separated by any membrane, yet each of them contains only a specific set of proteins. Understanding protein sub-nuclear localization can hence be an important step towards understanding biological functions of the nucleus. Here we have described a method, SubNucPred developed by us for predicting the sub-nuclear localization of proteins. This method predicts protein localization for 10 different sub-nuclear locations sequentially by combining presence or absence of unique Pfam domain and amino acid composition based SVM model. The prediction accuracy during leave-one-out cross-validation for centromeric proteins was 85.05%, for chromosomal proteins 76.85%, for nuclear speckle proteins 81.27%, for nucleolar proteins 81.79%, for nuclear envelope proteins 79.37%, for nuclear matrix proteins 77.78%, for nucleoplasm proteins 76.98%, for nuclear pore complex proteins 88.89%, for PML body proteins 75.40% and for telomeric proteins it was 83.33%. Comparison with other reported methods showed that SubNucPred performs better than existing methods. A web-server for predicting protein sub-nuclear localization named SubNucPred has been established at http://14.139.227.92/mkumar/subnucpred/. Standalone version of SubNucPred can also be downloaded from the web-server. PMID:24897370

  13. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information. PMID:23733702

  14. Karyopherin binding interactions and nuclear import mechanism of nuclear pore complex protein Tpr

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Efraim, Iris; Frosst, Phyllis D; Gerace, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Tpr is a large protein with an extended coiled-coil domain that is localized within the nuclear basket of the nuclear pore complex. Previous studies [1] involving antibody microinjection into mammalian cells suggested a role for Tpr in nuclear export of proteins via the CRM1 export receptor. In addition, Tpr was found to co-immunoprecipitate with importins α and β from Xenopus laevis egg extracts [2], although the function of this is unresolved. Yeast Mlp1p and Mlp2p, which are homologous to vertebrate Tpr, have been implicated in mRNA surveillance to retain unspliced mRNAs in the nucleus[3,4]. To augment an understanding of the role of Tpr in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, we explored the interactions of recombinant Tpr with the karyopherins CRM1, importin β and importin α by solid phase binding assays. We also investigated the conditions required for nuclear import of Tpr using an in vitro assay. Results We found that Tpr binds strongly and specifically to importin α, importin β, and a CRM1 containing trimeric export complex, and that the binding sites for importins α and β are distinct. We also determined that the nuclear import of Tpr is dependent on cytosolic factors and energy and is efficiently mediated by the importin α/β import pathway. Conclusion Based on the binding and nuclear import assays, we propose that Tpr is imported into the nucleus by the importin α/β heterodimer. In addition, we suggest that Tpr can serve as a nucleoporin binding site for importin β during import of importin β cargo complexes and/or importin β recycling. Our finding that Tpr bound preferentially to CRM1 in an export complex strengthens the notion that Tpr is involved in protein export. PMID:19835572

  15. Dynamics of Protein Kinases: Insights from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Liddle, Jennifer C.; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Protein kinases are ubiquitous enzymes with critical roles in cellular processes and pathology. As a result, researchers have studied their activity and regulatory mechanisms extensively. Thousands of X-ray structures give snapshots of the architectures of protein kinases in various states of activation and ligand binding. However, the extent of and manner by which protein motions and conformational dynamics underlie the function and regulation of these important enzymes is not well understood. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide complementary information about protein conformation and dynamics in solution. However, until recently, the large size of these enzymes prevented researchers from using these methods with kinases. Developments in transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY)-based techniques and more efficient isotope labeling strategies are now allowing researchers to carry out NMR studies on full-length protein kinases. In this Account, we describe recent insights into the role of dynamics in protein kinase regulation and catalysis that have been gained from NMR measurements of chemical shift changes and line broadening, residual dipolar couplings, and relaxation. These findings show strong associations between protein motion and events that control kinase activity. Dynamic and conformational changes occurring at ligand binding sites and other regulatory domains of these proteins propagate to conserved kinase core regions that mediate catalytic function. NMR measurements of slow time scale (microsecond to millisecond) motions also reveal that kinases carry out global exchange processes that synchronize multiple residues and allosteric interconversion between conformational states. Activating covalent modifications or ligand binding to form the Michaelis complex can induce these global processes. Inhibitors can also exploit the exchange properties of kinases by using conformational selection to form dynamically quenched states. These investigations have revealed that kinases are highly dynamic enzymes, whose regulation by interdomain interactions, ligand binding, and covalent modifications involve changes in motion and conformational equilibrium in a manner that can be correlated with function. Thus, NMR provides a unique window into the role of protein dynamics in kinase regulation and catalysis with important implications for drug design. PMID:25803188

  16. Nuclear targeting of the maize R protein requires two nuclear localization sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, M.W.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Wessler, S.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Previous genetic and structural evidence indicates that the maize R gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activating factor. In-frame carboxyl- and amino-terminal fusions of the R gene to the reporter gene encoding [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS) were sufficient to direct GUS to the nucleus of the transiently transformed onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Further analysis of chimeric constructs containing regions of the R gene fused to the GUS cDNA revealed three specific nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) that were capable of redirecting the GUS protein to the nucleus. Amino-terminal NLS-A (amino acids 100-109, GDRRAAPARP) contained several arginine residues; a similar localization signal is found in only a few viral proteins. The medial NLS-M (amino acids 419-428, MSERKRREKL) is a simian virus 40 large T antigen-type NLS, and the carboxyl-terminal NLS-C (amino acids 598-610, MISESLRKAIGKR) is a mating type [alpha]2 type. NLSs M and C are independently sufficient to direct the GUS protein to the nucleus when it is fused at the amino terminus of GUS, whereas NLS-A fused to GUS partitioned between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Similar partitioning was observed when localization signals NLS-A and NLS-C were independently fused to the carboxy-terminal portion of GUS. A sequential deletion of the localization signals indicated that the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal fusions of R and GUS were redirected to the nucleus only when both NLS-A and -M, or NLS-C and -M, were present. These results indicate that multiple localization signals are necessary for nuclear targeting of this protein. The conservation of the localization signals within the alleles of R and similar proteins from other organisms is also discussed. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Mitogenic activation, phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation of protein kinase Bbeta.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Alessi, D R; Cron, P; Andjelković, M; Hemmings, B A

    1997-11-28

    Protein kinase B (PKB) is a member of the second messenger-dependent family of serine/threonine kinases that has been implicated in signaling pathways downstream of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Here we report the characterization of the human beta-isoform of PKB (PKBbeta). PKBbeta is ubiquitously expressed in a number of human tissues, with mRNA and protein levels elevated in heart, liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney. After transfection into HEK-293 or COS-1 cells, PKBbeta is activated 2- to 12-fold by mitogens and survival factors. Activation was due to phosphorylation on Thr-309 and Ser-474, which correspond to Thr-308 and Ser-473 implicated in the regulation of PKBalpha. Both phosphorylation and activation were prevented by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Moreover, membrane-targeted PKBbeta was constitutively activated when overexpressed in HEK-293 cells. Although the specific activity of PKBbeta was lower than that of PKBalpha toward Crosstide as a substrate (23 nmol/min/mg compared with 178 nmol/min/mg for PKBalpha), both enzymes showed similar substrate specificities. Using confocal microscopy, we show that activation of PKBbeta results in its nuclear translocation within 20 to 30 min after stimulation. These observations provide evidence that PKBbeta undergoes nuclear translocation upon mitogenic activation and support a role for PKB in signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases to the nucleus through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:9374542

  18. Nuclear Nrf2 induction by protein transduction attenuates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Fumiaki; Kajiya, Mikihito; Fukaya, Sari; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role as intracellular signaling molecules in RANKL stimulation. Previously we demonstrated that induction of cytoprotective enzyme expression by Nrf2-gene transfer successfully ameliorated RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis. In the present study, we hypothesized that Nrf2 activation by inhibiting ubiquitination and degradation of Nrf2 by ETGE-peptide would induce Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective enzyme expression, attenuate ROS signaling, and thereby inhibit RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis. ETGE-peptide containing a cell-permeable sequence (seven consecutive arginine; 7R-ETGE) was applied to a mouse macrophage cell-line RAW 264.7 cell or a primary macrophage culture. ETGE-peptide prevents Keap1 from binding to Nrf2. Nrf2 nuclear translocation and Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective enzyme induction was observed. The effects of 7R-ETGE on RANKL-dependent induction of intracellular ROS levels and osteoclastogenesis were examined. Finally, the protective effect of 7R-ETGE on RANKL-mediated bone destruction was investigated in mice. 7R-ETGE dose-dependently induced nuclear Nrf2, followed by the induction of cytoprotective enzyme expression at both the gene and protein level. 7R-ETGE inhibited upregulation of intracellular ROS levels by RANKL stimulation, and osteoclastogenesis was attenuated. Of particular interest was that local injection of 7R-ETGE ameliorated RANKL-mediated bone destruction. Local induction of nuclear Nrf2 by protein transduction is a potential novel therapeutic target for bone destruction diseases such as periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25224039

  19. Nesprin-3, a novel outer nuclear membrane protein, associates with the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Litjens, Sandy H.M.; Kuikman, Ingrid; Tshimbalanga, Ntambua; Janssen, Hans; van den Bout, Iman; Raymond, Karine; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2005-01-01

    Despite their importance in cell biology, the mechanisms that maintain the nucleus in its proper position in the cell are not well understood. This is primarily the result of an incomplete knowledge of the proteins in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) that are able to associate with the different cytoskeletal systems. Two related ONM proteins, nuclear envelope spectrin repeat (nesprin)–1 and –2, are known to make direct connections with the actin cytoskeleton through their NH2-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD). We have now isolated a third member of the nesprin family that lacks an ABD and instead binds to the plakin family member plectin, which can associate with the intermediate filament (IF) system. Overexpression of nesprin-3 results in a dramatic recruitment of plectin to the nuclear perimeter, which is where these two molecules are colocalized with both keratin-6 and -14. Importantly, plectin binds to the integrin α6β4 at the cell surface and to nesprin-3 at the ONM in keratinocytes, suggesting that there is a continuous connection between the nucleus and the extracellular matrix through the IF cytoskeleton. PMID:16330710

  20. Protein targeting to the nuclear pore. What can we learn from plants. [Nuclear pore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.M.S.; Raikhel, N.V. . DOE Plant Research Lab.)

    1999-04-01

    Characteristic of eukaryotic cells are the numerous types of membrane-bound organelles or compartments found in the cytoplasm, with each type carrying out an essential function for the cell. The spatial separation of proteins and biochemical pathways typical of the various types of organelles requires selective targeting apparatuses. Because each type of organelle contains its own targeting apparatus, proteins destined for a particular organelle must contain the proper targeting signal(s) for entry. These signal-dependent targeting pathways ensure that proteins are targeted to the proper organelle. Understanding how proteins are targeted to the different types of organelles is an important goal in the field of cell biology. In plants recent studies have highlighted a number of unusual features, and as the understanding of import in plants increases, the authors have gained new insights, such as a model for the targeting of proteins from the cytoplasm to the NPC. These advances will contribute to further expansion of the knowledge of nuclear import in eukaryotes.

  1. Several Novel Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identified in Skeletal Muscle Have Cytoskeletal Associations*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K.; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  2. Nanobody-targeted E3-ubiquitin ligase complex degrades nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ju Shin, Yeong; Kyun Park, Seung; Jung Jung, Yoo; Na Kim, Ye; Sung Kim, Ki; Kyu Park, Ok; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Ho Jeon, Sung; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.; Kee, Yun; Joon Hwang, Byung

    2015-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is a powerful tool in determining the function of specific proteins or protein complexes. We fused nanobodies to SPOP, an adaptor protein of the Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, resulting in rapid ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of specific nuclear proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. This approach is easily modifiable, as substrate specificity is conferred by an antibody domain that can be adapted to target virtually any protein. PMID:26373678

  3. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  4. NLS-tagging: an alternative strategy to tag nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Guillaume; Stadhouders, Ralph; Conidi, Andrea; Dekkers, Dick H.W.; Huylebroeck, Danny; Demmers, Jeroen A.A.; Soler, Eric; Grosveld, Frank G.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of transcription factor complexes and their binding sites in the genome by affinity purification has yielded tremendous new insights into how genes are regulated. The affinity purification requires either the use of antibodies raised against the factor of interest itself or by high-affinity binding of a C- or N-terminally added tag sequence to the factor. Unfortunately, fusing extra amino acids to the termini of a factor can interfere with its biological function or the tag may be inaccessible inside the protein. Here, we describe an effective solution to that problem by integrating the ‘tag’ close to the nuclear localization sequence domain of the factor. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach with the transcription factors Fli-1 and Irf2bp2, which cannot be tagged at their extremities without loss of function. This resulted in the identification of novel proteins partners and a new hypothesis on the contribution of Fli-1 to hematopoiesis. PMID:25260593

  5. Specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins can promote the location of chromosomes to and from the nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Different cell types have distinctive patterns of chromosome positioning in the nucleus. Although ectopic affinity-tethering of specific loci can be used to relocate chromosomes to the nuclear periphery, endogenous nuclear envelope proteins that control such a mechanism in mammalian cells have yet to be widely identified. Results To search for such proteins, 23 nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to promote peripheral localization of human chromosomes in HT1080 fibroblasts. Five of these proteins had strong effects on chromosome 5, but individual proteins affected different subsets of chromosomes. The repositioning effects were reversible and the proteins with effects all exhibited highly tissue-restricted patterns of expression. Depletion of two nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins that were preferentially expressed in liver each reduced the normal peripheral positioning of chromosome 5 in liver cells. Conclusions The discovery of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins that can modulate chromosome position and have restricted patterns of expression may enable dissection of the functional relevance of tissue-specific patterns of radial chromosome positioning. PMID:23414781

  6. Inner nuclear membrane protein LEM-2 is required for correct nuclear separation and morphology in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Morales-Martínez, Adela; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter

    2015-03-15

    The inner nuclear membrane proteins emerin and LEMD2 have both overlapping and separate functions in regulation of nuclear organization, gene expression and cell differentiation. We report here that emerin (EMR-1) and LEM domain protein 2 (LEM-2) are expressed in all tissues throughout Caenorhaditis elegans development but their relative distribution differs between cell types. The ratio of EMR-1 to LEM-2 is particularly high in contractile tissues, intermediate in neurons and hypodermis and lowest in intestine and germ line. We find that LEM-2 is recruited earlier than EMR-1 to reforming nuclear envelopes, suggesting the presence of separate mitotic membrane compartments and specific functions of each protein. Concordantly, we observe that nuclei of lem-2 mutant embryos, but not of emr-1 mutants, have reduced nuclear circularity. Finally, we uncover a so-far-unknown role of LEM-2 in nuclear separation and anchoring of microtubule organizing centers. PMID:25653391

  7. Radioprotective Thiolamines WR-1065 and WR-33278 Selectively Denature Nonhistone Nuclear Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Valerie K.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Warters, Raymond L.; Wilmore, Britta H.; Lepock, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the interactions of nuclei isolated from Chinese hamster V79 cells with the radioprotector WR-1065, other thiol compounds, and polyamines. Differential scanning calorimetry monitors denaturation of macromolecules and resolves the major nuclear components (e.g. constrained and relaxed DNA, nucleosome core, and nuclear matrix) of intact nuclei on the basis of thermal stability. WR-1065 treatment (0.5-10 mM) of isolated nuclei led to the irreversible denaturation of nuclear proteins, a fraction of which are nuclear matrix proteins. Denaturation of 50% of the total nonhistone nuclear protein content of isolated nuclei occurred after exposure to 4.7 mM WR-1065 for 20 min at 23 C. In addition, a 22% increase in the insoluble protein content of nuclei isolated from V79 cells that had been treated with 4 mM WR-1065 for 30 min at 37 C was observed, indicating that WR-1065-induced protein denaturation occurs not only in isolated nuclei but also in the nuclei of intact cells. From the extent of the increase in insoluble protein in the nucleus, protein denaturation by WR-1065 is expected to contribute to drug toxicity at concentrations greater than approximately 4 mM. WR-33278, the disulfide form of WR1065, was approximately twice as effective as the free thiol at denaturing nuclear proteins. The proposed mechanism for nucleoprotein denaturation is through direct interactions with protein cysteine groups with the formation of destabilizing protein-WR-1065 disulfides. In comparison to its effect on nuclear proteins in isolated nuclei, WR-1065 had only a very small effect on non-nuclear proteins of whole cells, isolated nuclear matrix, or the thiol-rich Ca (2+) ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum, indicating that WR-1065 can effectively denature protein only inside an intact nucleus, probably due to the increased concentration of the positively charged drug in the vicinity of DNA.

  8. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  9. Probing protein quinary interactions by in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; Xue, Jing; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Historically introduced by McConkey to explain the slow mutation rate of highly abundant proteins, weak protein (quinary) interactions are an emergent property of living cells. The protein complexes that result from quinary interactions are transient and thus difficult to study biochemically in vitro. Cross-correlated relaxation-induced polarization transfer-based in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance allows the characterization of protein quinary interactions with atomic resolution inside live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We show that RNAs are an important component of protein quinary interactions. Protein quinary interactions are unique to the target protein and may affect physicochemical properties, protein activity, and interactions with drugs. PMID:25894651

  10. Molecular Characterization of a Novel, Widespread Nuclear Protein That Colocalizes with Spliceosome Components

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion S.; Knecht, Sylvia; Krämer, Angela

    1998-01-01

    We report the identification and molecular characterization of a novel type of constitutive nuclear protein that is present in diverse vertebrate species, from Xenopus laevis to human. The cDNA-deduced amino acid sequence of the Xenopus protein defines a polypeptide of a calculated mass of 146.2 kDa and a isoelectric point of 6.8, with a conspicuous domain enriched in the dipeptide TP (threonine-proline) near its amino terminus. Immunolocalization studies in cultured cells and tissues sections of different origin revealed an exclusive nuclear localization of the protein. The protein is diffusely distributed in the nucleoplasm but concentrated in nuclear speckles, which represent a subnuclear compartment enriched in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and other splicing factors, as confirmed by colocalization with certain splicing factors and Sm proteins. During mitosis, when transcription and splicing are downregulated, the protein is released from the nuclear speckles and transiently dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Biochemical experiments have shown that the protein is recovered in a ∼12S complex, and gel filtration studies confirm that the protein is part of a large particle. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of chromatographic fractions enriched in human U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles of distinct sizes (12S, 15S, and 17S), reflecting their variable association with splicing factors SF3a and SF3b, strongly suggests that the 146-kDa protein reported here is a constituent of the SF3b complex. PMID:9436997

  11. Histones H3/H4 form a tight complex with the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR and heterochromatin protein 1.

    PubMed

    Polioudaki, H; Kourmouli, N; Drosou, V; Bakou, A; Theodoropoulos, P A; Singh, P B; Giannakouros, T; Georgatos, S D

    2001-10-01

    We have recently shown that heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) interacts with the nuclear envelope in an acetylation-dependent manner. Using purified components and in vitro assays, we now demonstrate that HP1 forms a quaternary complex with the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR and a sub-set of core histones. This complex involves histone H3/H4 oligomers, which mediate binding of LBR to HP1 and cross-link these two proteins that do not interact directly with each other. Consistent with previous observations, HP1 and LBR binding to core histones is strongly inhibited when H3/H4 are modified by recombinant CREB-binding protein, revealing a new mechanism for anchoring domains of under-acetylated chromatin to the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:11571267

  12. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  13. Importin-β facilitates nuclear import of human GW proteins and balances cytoplasmic gene silencing protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Schraivogel, Daniel; Schindler, Susann G.; Danner, Johannes; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pfaff, Janina; Hannus, Stefan; Depping, Reinhard; Meister, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (Ago) proteins to distinct target mRNAs leading to translational repression and mRNA decay. Ago proteins interact with a member of the GW protein family, referred to as TNRC6A-C in mammals, which coordinate downstream gene-silencing processes. The cytoplasmic functions of TNRC6 and Ago proteins are reasonably well established. Both protein families are found in the nucleus as well. Their detailed nuclear functions, however, remain elusive. Furthermore, it is not clear which import routes Ago and TNRC6 proteins take into the nucleus. Using different nuclear transport assays, we find that Ago as well as TNRC6 proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. While import receptors might function redundantly to transport Ago2, we demonstrate that TNRC6 proteins are imported by the Importin-β pathway. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of both Ago2 and TNRC6 proteins can depend on each other suggesting actively balanced cytoplasmic Ago – TNRC6 levels. PMID:26170235

  14. A third viral nuclear protein in lymphoblasts immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, K; Fennewald, S; Kieff, E

    1985-01-01

    Most sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as some sera from normal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected people detect a 140-kDa protein on immunoblots of EBV-infected lymphoblasts. The 140-kDa protein is a nuclear protein characteristic of latent EBV infection. Sera reactive with this protein identify a distinctive globular nuclear antigen. Although the 140-kDa protein is encoded by EBV, it is not encoded by genes that encode the two previously described EBV nuclear antigens (EBNA) or the latent-infection membrane protein. The 140-kDa protein is therefore designated EBNA3. The EBV genes, including the gene encoding EBNA3, that are characteristically expressed in latent infection are likely to play a role in the maintenance of persistent latent viral infection or in the cell proliferation caused by virus infection. Images PMID:2994055

  15. The SUN Protein Mps3 Is Required for Spindle Pole Body Insertion into the Nuclear Membrane and Nuclear Envelope Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smoyer, Christine J.; McCroskey, Scott; Miller, Brandon D.; Weaver, Kyle J.; Delventhal, Kym M.; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian D.; Jaspersen, Sue L.

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB) is anchored in the nuclear envelope so that it can simultaneously nucleate both nuclear and cytoplasmic microtubules. During SPB duplication, the newly formed SPB is inserted into the nuclear membrane. The mechanism of SPB insertion is poorly understood but likely involves the action of integral membrane proteins to mediate changes in the nuclear envelope itself, such as fusion of the inner and outer nuclear membranes. Analysis of the functional domains of the budding yeast SUN protein and SPB component Mps3 revealed that most regions are not essential for growth or SPB duplication under wild-type conditions. However, a novel dominant allele in the P-loop region, MPS3-G186K, displays defects in multiple steps in SPB duplication, including SPB insertion, indicating a previously unknown role for Mps3 in this step of SPB assembly. Characterization of the MPS3-G186K mutant by electron microscopy revealed severe over-proliferation of the inner nuclear membrane, which could be rescued by altering the characteristics of the nuclear envelope using both chemical and genetic methods. Lipid profiling revealed that cells lacking MPS3 contain abnormal amounts of certain types of polar and neutral lipids, and deletion or mutation of MPS3 can suppress growth defects associated with inhibition of sterol biosynthesis, suggesting that Mps3 directly affects lipid homeostasis. Therefore, we propose that Mps3 facilitates insertion of SPBs in the nuclear membrane by modulating nuclear envelope composition. PMID:22125491

  16. Enhancement of cell surface expression and receptor functions of membrane progestin receptor ? (mPR?) by progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1): evidence for a role of PGRMC1 as an adaptor protein for steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A variety of functions have been proposed for progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), including acting as a component of a membrane progestin receptor and as an adaptor protein. Here we show that stable overexpression of human PGRMC1 in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR)-negative breast cancer cell lines causes increased expression of PGRMC1 and membrane progesterone receptor ? (mPR?) on cell membranes that is associated with increased specific [(3)H]progesterone binding. The membrane progestin binding affinity and specificity were characteristic of mPR?, with a Kd of 4.7 nM and high affinity for the mPR-specific agonist, Org OD 02-0, and low affinity for corticosteroids. Progestin treatment caused activation of G proteins, further evidence for increased expression of functional mPRs on PGRMC1-transfected cell membranes. Immunocytochemical and coimmunoprecipitation studies showed a close association of PGRMC1 with mPR? in cell membranes. Transfection of PGRMC1 into spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells was associated with membrane expression of PGRMC1 and mPR? as well as antiapoptotic effects of progestins that were abolished after cotransfection with small interfering RNA for mPR?. These data demonstrate that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein, transporting mPR? to the cell surface, and that the progestin binding and apoptotic functions previously ascribed to PGRMC1 are dependent on cell surface expression of mPR?. Collectively, the results suggest PGRMC1 and mPR? are components of a membrane progesterone receptor protein complex. Increased expression of estrogen receptor ? was also observed in the membranes of PGRMC1-transfected cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein for multiple classes of steroid receptors. PMID:24424068

  17. Enhancement of Cell Surface Expression and Receptor Functions of Membrane Progestin Receptor α (mPRα) by Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1): Evidence for a Role of PGRMC1 as an Adaptor Protein for Steroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    A variety of functions have been proposed for progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), including acting as a component of a membrane progestin receptor and as an adaptor protein. Here we show that stable overexpression of human PGRMC1 in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR)-negative breast cancer cell lines causes increased expression of PGRMC1 and membrane progesterone receptor α (mPRα) on cell membranes that is associated with increased specific [3H]progesterone binding. The membrane progestin binding affinity and specificity were characteristic of mPRα, with a Kd of 4.7 nM and high affinity for the mPR-specific agonist, Org OD 02–0, and low affinity for corticosteroids. Progestin treatment caused activation of G proteins, further evidence for increased expression of functional mPRs on PGRMC1-transfected cell membranes. Immunocytochemical and coimmunoprecipitation studies showed a close association of PGRMC1 with mPRα in cell membranes. Transfection of PGRMC1 into spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells was associated with membrane expression of PGRMC1 and mPRα as well as antiapoptotic effects of progestins that were abolished after cotransfection with small interfering RNA for mPRα. These data demonstrate that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein, transporting mPRα to the cell surface, and that the progestin binding and apoptotic functions previously ascribed to PGRMC1 are dependent on cell surface expression of mPRα. Collectively, the results suggest PGRMC1 and mPRα are components of a membrane progesterone receptor protein complex. Increased expression of estrogen receptor β was also observed in the membranes of PGRMC1-transfected cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein for multiple classes of steroid receptors. PMID:24424068

  18. Karyopherin α 3 and karyopherin α 4 proteins mediate the nuclear import of methyl-CpG binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Baker, Steven Andrew; Lombardi, Laura Marie; Zoghbi, Huda Yahya

    2015-09-11

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a nuclear protein with important roles in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression, and mutations in MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT). Within the MeCP2 protein sequence, the nuclear localization signal (NLS) is reported to reside between amino acids 255-271, and certain RTT-causing mutations overlap with the MeCP2 NLS, suggesting that they may alter nuclear localization. One such mutation, R270X, is predicted to interfere with the localization of MeCP2, but recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that this mutant remains entirely nuclear. To clarify the mechanism of MeCP2 nuclear import, we isolated proteins that interact with the NLS and identified karyopherin α 3 (KPNA3 or Kap-α3) and karyopherin α 4 (KPNA4 or Kap-α4) as key binding partners of MeCP2. MeCP2-R270X did not interact with KPNA4, consistent with a requirement for an intact NLS in this interaction. However, this mutant retains binding to KPNA3, accounting for the normal localization of MeCP2-R270X to the nucleus. These data provide a mechanism for MeCP2 nuclear import and have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at modulating the function of MeCP2 in RTT patients. PMID:26245896

  19. Unique and shared functions of nuclear lamina LEM domain proteins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Barton, Lacy J; Wilmington, Shameika R; Martin, Melinda J; Skopec, Hannah M; Lovander, Kaylee E; Pinto, Belinda S; Geyer, Pamela K

    2014-06-01

    The nuclear lamina is an extensive protein network that contributes to nuclear structure and function. LEM domain (LAP2, emerin, MAN1 domain, LEM-D) proteins are components of the nuclear lamina, identified by a shared ∼45-amino-acid motif that binds Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), a chromatin-interacting protein. Drosophila melanogaster has three nuclear lamina LEM-D proteins, named Otefin (Ote), Bocksbeutel (Bocks), and dMAN1. Although these LEM-D proteins are globally expressed, loss of either Ote or dMAN1 causes tissue-specific defects in adult flies that differ from each other. The reason for such distinct tissue-restricted defects is unknown. Here, we generated null alleles of bocks, finding that loss of Bocks causes no overt adult phenotypes. Next, we defined phenotypes associated with lem-d double mutants. Although the absence of individual LEM-D proteins does not affect viability, loss of any two proteins causes lethality. Mutant phenotypes displayed by lem-d double mutants differ from baf mutants, suggesting that BAF function is retained in animals with a single nuclear lamina LEM-D protein. Interestingly, lem-d double mutants displayed distinct developmental and cellular mutant phenotypes, suggesting that Drosophila LEM-D proteins have developmental functions that are differentially shared with other LEM-D family members. This conclusion is supported by studies showing that ectopically produced LEM-D proteins have distinct capacities to rescue the tissue-specific phenotypes found in single lem-d mutants. Our findings predict that cell-specific mutant phenotypes caused by loss of LEM-D proteins reflect both the constellation of LEM-D proteins within the nuclear lamina and the capacity of functional compensation of the remaining LEM-D proteins. PMID:24700158

  20. Cytosolic and nuclear juvenile hormone-binding proteins from the brain of Diploptera punctata.

    PubMed

    King, L E; Zhang, J; Tobe, S S

    1994-04-01

    Cytosol and crude nuclear extracts of brains from female Diploptera punctata were found to contain a juvenile hormone-binding protein. The binding kinetics of the cytosol and nuclear juvenile hormone-binding proteins toward racemic [3H]JH III were determined using the dextran-coated charcoal assay. Both proteins show reversible and saturable binding toward JH III. The mean dissociation constant (Kd) of the brain cytosol binding protein was 66.5 +/- 7.2 nM, whereas the nuclear-binding protein had a lower affinity, with a mean Kd of 170 +/- 22.1 nM. The specificity of both the cytosol and the nuclear binding proteins was determined by competitive displacement experiments with [3H]JH III. For the cytosol binding protein, the order of relative affinity was JH II > (10R)-JH III > (10RS)-JH III approximately JH I. For the nuclear binding protein the order of relative affinity was JH II > JH I > (10R)-JH III > (10RS)-JH III. The JH analog hydroprene (ZR 512) had > 100-fold lower affinity than JH III for both proteins. PMID:8045360

  1. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:11507226

  2. Insights into the origin of the nuclear localization signals in conserved ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, Sergey; Ben-Shem, Adam; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomal proteins, unlike their bacterial homologues, possess nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to enter the cell nucleus during ribosome assembly. Here we provide a comprehensive comparison of bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes to show that NLSs appear in conserved ribosomal proteins via remodelling of their RNA-binding domains. This finding enabled us to identify previously unknown NLSs in ribosomal proteins from humans, and suggests that, apart from promoting protein transport, NLSs may facilitate folding of ribosomal RNA. PMID:26066547

  3. Identification of an unconventional nuclear localization signal in human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.; Reimers, K.; Wirz, W.; Gressner, A.M.; Mueller, R.; Kiefer, P. . E-Mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-09-16

    Ribosomal proteins must be imported into the nucleus after being synthesized in the cytoplasm. Since the rpS2 amino acid sequence does not contain a typical nuclear localization signal, we used deletion mutant analysis and rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeric proteins to identify the nuclear targeting domains in rpS2. Nuclear rpS2 is strictly localized in the nucleoplasm and is not targeted to the nucleoli. Subcellular localization analysis of deletion mutants of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeras identified a central domain comprising 72 amino acids which is necessary and sufficient to target the chimeric {beta}-galactosidase to the nucleus. The nuclear targeting domain shares no significant similarity to already characterized nuclear localization signals in ribosomal proteins or other nuclear proteins. Although a Nup153 fragment containing the importin{beta} binding site fused to VP22 blocks nuclear import of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase fusion proteins, nuclear uptake of rpS2 could be mediated by several import receptors since it binds to importin{alpha}/{beta} and transportin.

  4. ANP32B Is a Nuclear Target of Henipavirus M Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anja; Neumann, Sebastian; Karger, Axel; Henning, Ann-Kristin; Maisner, Andrea; Lamp, Boris; Dietzel, Erik; Kwasnitschka, Linda; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Keil, Günther M.; Finke, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane envelopment and budding of negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) is mainly driven by viral matrix proteins (M). In addition, several M proteins are also known to be involved in host cell manipulation. Knowledge about the cellular targets and detailed molecular mechanisms, however, is poor for many M proteins. For instance, Nipah Virus (NiV) M protein trafficking through the nucleus is essential for virus release, but nuclear targets of NiV M remain unknown. To identify cellular interactors of henipavirus M proteins, tagged Hendra Virus (HeV) M proteins were expressed and M-containing protein complexes were isolated and analysed. Presence of acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member B (ANP32B) in the complex suggested that this protein represents a direct or indirect interactor of the viral matrix protein. Over-expression of ANP32B led to specific nuclear accumulation of HeV M, providing a functional link between ANP32B and M protein. ANP32B-dependent nuclear accumulation was observed after plasmid-driven expression of HeV and NiV matrix proteins and also in NiV infected cells. The latter indicated that an interaction of henipavirus M protein with ANP32B also occurs in the context of virus replication. From these data we conclude that ANP32B is a nuclear target of henipavirus M that may contribute to virus replication. Potential effects of ANP32B on HeV nuclear shuttling and host cell manipulation by HeV M affecting ANP32B functions in host cell survival and gene expression regulation are discussed. PMID:24823948

  5. Identification and characterization of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle D' core protein.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Feeney, R J; Zieve, G W

    1990-01-01

    The addition of urea to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels has allowed the identification and characterization of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) D' protein and has also improved resolution of the E, F, and G snRNP core proteins. In standard SDS-polyacrylamide gels, the D' and D snRNP core proteins comigrate at approximately 16 kilodaltons. The addition of urea to the separating gel caused the D' protein to shift to a slower electrophoretic mobility that is distinct from that of the D protein. The shift to a slower electrophoretic mobility in the presence of urea suggests that the D' protein has extensive secondary structure that is not totally disrupted by SDS alone. Both N-terminal sequencing and partial peptide maps indicate that the D and D' proteins are distinct gene products, and the sequence data have identified the faster moving of the two proteins as the previously cloned D protein (L. A. Rokeach, J. A. Haselby, and S. O. Hoch, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:4832-4836, 1988). In the cytoplasm, the D protein is found primarily in the small-nuclear-RNA-free 6S protein complexes, while the D' protein is found primarily in the 20S protein complexes. Like the D protein, the D' protein is an autoantigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and is recognized by some of the Sm class of autoimmune antisera. Images PMID:2143805

  6. Recruitment of Protein Phosphatase 1 to the Nuclear Envelope by a-Kinase Anchoring Protein Akap149 Is a Prerequisite for Nuclear Lamina Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Rikke L.; Martins, Sandra B.; Taskén, Kjetil; Collas, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Subcellular targeting of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) and of type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1) is believed to enhance the specificity of these enzymes. We report that in addition to anchoring PKA, A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP149 recruits PP1 at the nuclear envelope (NE) upon somatic nuclear reformation in vitro, and that PP1 targeting to the NE is a prerequisite for assembly of B-type lamins. AKAP149 is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum/NE network. The PP1-binding domain of AKAP149 was identified as K153GVLF157. PP1 binds immobilized AKAP149 in vitro and coprecipitates with AKAP149 from purified NE extracts. Affinity isolation of PP1 from solubilized NEs copurifies AKAP149. Upon reassembly of somatic nuclei in interphase extract, PP1 is targeted to the NE. Targeting is inhibited by a peptide containing the PP1-binding domain of AKAP149, abolished in nuclei assembled with membranes immunodepleted of AKAP149, and restored after reincorporation of AKAP149 into nuclear membranes. B-type lamins do not assemble into a lamina when NE targeting of PP1 is abolished, and is rescued upon recruitment of PP1 to the NE. We propose that kinase and phosphatase anchoring at the NE by AKAP149 plays in a role in modulating nuclear reassembly at the end of mitosis. PMID:10995432

  7. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function. PMID:15755682

  8. Heat-shock protein 90 promotes nuclear transport of herpes simplex virus 1 capsid protein by interacting with acetylated tubulin.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Meigong; Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Qiu, Xianxiu; Wang, Qiaoli; Peng, Tao; Kitazato, Kaio; Wang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) can inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 entry and the antiviral mechanisms of Hsp90 inhibitors remain unclear. In this study, we found that Hsp90 inhibitors have potent antiviral activity against standard or drug-resistant HSV-1 strains and viral gene and protein synthesis are inhibited in an early phase. More detailed studies demonstrated that Hsp90 is upregulated by virus entry and it interacts with virus. Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA or treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors significantly inhibited the nuclear transport of viral capsid protein (ICP5) at the early stage of HSV-1 infection. In contrast, overexpression of Hsp90 restored the nuclear transport that was prevented by the Hsp90 inhibitors, suggesting that Hsp90 is required for nuclear transport of viral capsid protein. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection enhanced acetylation of α-tubulin and Hsp90 interacted with the acetylated α-tubulin, which is suppressed by Hsp90 inhibition. These results demonstrate that Hsp90, by interacting with acetylated α-tubulin, plays a crucial role in viral capsid protein nuclear transport and may provide novel insight into the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 infection and offer a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance. PMID:24901434

  9. Structure Determination of Membrane Proteins by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-06-01

    Many biological membranes consist of 50% or more (by weight) membrane proteins, which constitute approximately one-third of all proteins expressed in biological organisms. Helical membrane proteins function as receptors, enzymes, and transporters, among other unique cellular roles. Additionally, most drugs have membrane proteins as their receptors, notably the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane helices. Determining the structures of membrane proteins is a daunting task because of the effects of the membrane environment; specifically, it has been difficult to combine biologically compatible environments with the requirements for the established methods of structure determination. There is strong motivation to determine the structures in their native phospholipid bilayer environment so that perturbations from nonnatural lipids and phases do not have to be taken into account. At present, the only method that can work with proteins in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers is solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Calcium depletion and calmodulin inhibition affect the import of nuclear-encoded proteins into plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sabine; Bussemer, Johanna; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2009-05-01

    Many metabolic processes essential for plant viability take place in mitochondria. Therefore, mitochondrial function has to be carefully balanced in accordance with the developmental stage and metabolic requirements of the cell. One way to adapt organellar function is the alteration of protein composition. Since most mitochondrial proteins are nuclear encoded, fine-tuning of mitochondrial protein content could be achieved by the regulation of protein translocation. Here we present evidence that the import of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins into plant mitochondria is influenced by calcium and calmodulin. In pea mitochondria, the calmodulin inhibitor ophiobolin A as well as the calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin inhibit translocation of nuclear-encoded proteins in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that can be countered by the addition of external calmodulin or calcium, respectively. Inhibition was observed exclusively for proteins translocating into or across the inner membrane but not for proteins residing in the outer membrane or the intermembrane space. Ophiobolin A and the calcium ionophores further inhibit translocation into mitochondria with disrupted outer membranes, but their effect is not mediated via a change in the membrane potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Together, our results suggest that calcium/calmodulin influences the import of a subset of mitochondrial proteins at the inner membrane. Interestingly, we could not observe any influence of ophiobolin A or the calcium ionophores on protein translocation into mitochondria of yeast, indicating that the effect of calcium/calmodulin on mitochondrial protein import might be a plant-specific trait. PMID:19175770

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances nuclear export of a Dictyostelium STAT protein

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Rebecca S.; Dalton, Emma C.; Ryves, W.Jonathan; Fukuzawa, Masashi; Williams, Jeffrey G.; Harwood, Adrian J.

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular cAMP stimulates the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the Dictyostelium STAT protein Dd-STATa. Here we show that it also induces serine phosphorylation by GskA, a homologue of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Tyrosine phosphorylation occurs within 10 s of stimulation, whereas serine phosphorylation takes 5 min, matching the kinetics observed for the cAMP regulation of GskA. Phosphorylation by GskA enhances nuclear export of Dd-STATa. The phosphorylated region, however, is not itself a nuclear export signal and we identify a region elsewhere in the protein that mediates nuclear export. These results suggest a biphasic regulation of Dd-STATa, in which extracellular cAMP initially directs nuclear import and then, via GskA, promotes its subsequent export. It also raises the possibility of an analogous regulation of STAT nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. PMID:11032815

  12. A novel splicing regulator shares a nuclear import pathway with SR proteins.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Kuo, Hao-Wei; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2003-03-17

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is often regulated by serine/arginine-rich proteins (SR proteins) and hnRNPs, and varying their concentration in the nucleus can be a mechanism for controlling splice site selection. To understand the nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanism of splicing regulators is of key importance. SR proteins are delivered to the nucleus by transportin-SRs (TRN-SRs), importin beta-like nuclear transporters. Here we identify and characterize a non-SR protein, RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4), as a novel substrate of TRN-SR2. TRN-SR2 interacts specifically with RBM4 in a Ran-sensitive manner. TRN-SR2 indeed mediates the nuclear import of a recombinant protein containing the RBM4 C-terminal domain. This domain serves as a signal for both nuclear import and export, and for nuclear speckle targeting. Finally, both in vivo and in vitro splicing analyses demonstrate that RBM4 not only modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing but also acts antagonistically to authentic SR proteins in splice site and exon selection. Thus, a novel splicing regulator with opposite activities to SR proteins shares an identical import pathway with SR proteins to the nucleus. PMID:12628928

  13. A novel splicing regulator shares a nuclear import pathway with SR proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Kuo, Hao-Wei; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2003-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is often regulated by serine/arginine-rich proteins (SR proteins) and hnRNPs, and varying their concentration in the nucleus can be a mechanism for controlling splice site selection. To understand the nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanism of splicing regulators is of key importance. SR proteins are delivered to the nucleus by transportin-SRs (TRN-SRs), importin β-like nuclear transporters. Here we identify and characterize a non-SR protein, RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4), as a novel substrate of TRN-SR2. TRN-SR2 interacts specifically with RBM4 in a Ran-sensitive manner. TRN-SR2 indeed mediates the nuclear import of a recombinant protein containing the RBM4 C-terminal domain. This domain serves as a signal for both nuclear import and export, and for nuclear speckle targeting. Finally, both in vivo and in vitro splicing analyses demonstrate that RBM4 not only modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing but also acts antagonistically to authentic SR proteins in splice site and exon selection. Thus, a novel splicing regulator with opposite activities to SR proteins shares an identical import pathway with SR proteins to the nucleus. PMID:12628928

  14. Isolation of nuclear proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seed coats for gene expression regulation studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While seed biology is well characterized and numerous studies have focused on this subject over the past years, the regulation of seed coat development and metabolism is for the most part still non-elucidated. It is well known that the seed coat has an essential role in seed development and its features are associated with important agronomical traits. It also constitutes a rich source of valuable compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Most of the cell genetic material is contained in the nucleus; therefore nuclear proteins constitute a major actor for gene expression regulation. Isolation of nuclear proteins responsible for specific seed coat expression is an important prerequisite for understanding seed coat metabolism and development. The extraction of nuclear proteins may be problematic due to the presence of specific components that can interfere with the extraction process. The seed coat is a rich source of mucilage and phenolics, which are good examples of these hindering compounds. Findings In the present study, we propose an optimized nuclear protein extraction protocol able to provide nuclear proteins from flax seed coat without contaminants and sufficient yield and quality for their use in transcriptional gene expression regulation by gel shift experiments. Conclusions Routinely, around 250 μg of nuclear proteins per gram of fresh weight were extracted from immature flax seed coats. The isolation protocol described hereafter may serve as an effective tool for gene expression regulation and seed coat-focused proteomics studies. PMID:22230709

  15. Evidence for Ubiquitin-Regulated Nuclear and Subnuclear Trafficking among Paramyxovirinae Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pentecost, Mickey; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Beaty, Shannon M.; Park, Arnold; Wang, Yao E.; Yun, Tatyana E; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    The paramyxovirus matrix (M) protein is a molecular scaffold required for viral morphogenesis and budding at the plasma membrane. Transient nuclear residence of some M proteins hints at non-structural roles. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the nuclear sojourn. Previously, we found that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of Nipah virus M (NiV-M) is a prerequisite for budding, and is regulated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLSbp), a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), and monoubiquitination of the K258 residue within the NLSbp itself (NLSbp-lysine). To define whether the sequence determinants of nuclear trafficking identified in NiV-M are common among other Paramyxovirinae M proteins, we generated the homologous NES and NLSbp-lysine mutations in M proteins from the five major Paramyxovirinae genera. Using quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, we determined that the NES and NLSbp-lysine are required for the efficient nuclear export of the M proteins of Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Sendai virus, and Mumps virus. Pharmacological depletion of free ubiquitin or mutation of the conserved NLSbp-lysine to an arginine, which inhibits M ubiquitination, also results in nuclear and nucleolar retention of these M proteins. Recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV-eGFP) bearing the NES or NLSbp-lysine M mutants rescued at similar efficiencies to wild type. However, foci of cells expressing the M mutants displayed marked fusogenicity in contrast to wild type, and infection did not spread. Recombinant Mumps virus (rMuV-eGFP) bearing the homologous mutations showed similar defects in viral morphogenesis. Finally, shotgun proteomics experiments indicated that the interactomes of Paramyxovirinae M proteins are significantly enriched for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear transport receptors, and nucleolar proteins. We then synthesize our functional and proteomics data to propose a working model for the ubiquitin-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of cognate paramyxovirus M proteins that show a consistent nuclear trafficking phenotype. PMID:25782006

  16. Evidence for ubiquitin-regulated nuclear and subnuclear trafficking among Paramyxovirinae matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Pentecost, Mickey; Vashisht, Ajay A; Lester, Talia; Voros, Tim; Beaty, Shannon M; Park, Arnold; Wang, Yao E; Yun, Tatyana E; Freiberg, Alexander N; Wohlschlegel, James A; Lee, Benhur

    2015-03-01

    The paramyxovirus matrix (M) protein is a molecular scaffold required for viral morphogenesis and budding at the plasma membrane. Transient nuclear residence of some M proteins hints at non-structural roles. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the nuclear sojourn. Previously, we found that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of Nipah virus M (NiV-M) is a prerequisite for budding, and is regulated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLSbp), a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), and monoubiquitination of the K258 residue within the NLSbp itself (NLSbp-lysine). To define whether the sequence determinants of nuclear trafficking identified in NiV-M are common among other Paramyxovirinae M proteins, we generated the homologous NES and NLSbp-lysine mutations in M proteins from the five major Paramyxovirinae genera. Using quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, we determined that the NES and NLSbp-lysine are required for the efficient nuclear export of the M proteins of Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Sendai virus, and Mumps virus. Pharmacological depletion of free ubiquitin or mutation of the conserved NLSbp-lysine to an arginine, which inhibits M ubiquitination, also results in nuclear and nucleolar retention of these M proteins. Recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV-eGFP) bearing the NES or NLSbp-lysine M mutants rescued at similar efficiencies to wild type. However, foci of cells expressing the M mutants displayed marked fusogenicity in contrast to wild type, and infection did not spread. Recombinant Mumps virus (rMuV-eGFP) bearing the homologous mutations showed similar defects in viral morphogenesis. Finally, shotgun proteomics experiments indicated that the interactomes of Paramyxovirinae M proteins are significantly enriched for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear transport receptors, and nucleolar proteins. We then synthesize our functional and proteomics data to propose a working model for the ubiquitin-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of cognate paramyxovirus M proteins that show a consistent nuclear trafficking phenotype. PMID:25782006

  17. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2007-11-09

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16 bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16 bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014 s{sup -1}. We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase.

  18. Proteomic analysis of nuclear proteins from proliferative and differentiated human colonic intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Turck, Natacha; Richert, Sophie; Gendry, Patrick; Stutzmann, Jeanne; Kedinger, Michèle; Leize, Emmanuelle; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Launay, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    Self-renewing tissues such as the intestine contain progenitor proliferating cells which subsequently differentiate. Cell proliferation and differentiation involve gene regulation processes which take place in the nucleus. A human intestinal epithelial cell line model (Caco2/TC7) which reproduces these dynamic processes has been used to perform proteomic studies on nuclear proteins. Nuclei from Caco2/TC7 cells at proliferative and differentiated stages were purified by subcellular fractionation. After two-dimensional gel electrophoresis separation and ruthenium staining, 400 protein spots were detected by image analysis. Eighty-five spots corresponding to 60 different proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in nuclei from proliferative cells. Comparison of nuclear proteomes from proliferative or differentiated cells by differential display resulted in the identification of differentially expressed proteins such as nucleolin, hnRNP A2/B1 and hnRNP A1. By using Western blot analysis, we found that the expression and number of specific isoforms of these nuclear proteins decreased in differentiated cells. Immunocytochemistry experiments also showed that in proliferative cells nucleolin was distributed in nucleoli-like bodies. In contrast, hnRNPs A2/B1 and A1 were dispersed throughout the nucleus. This study of the nuclear proteome from intestinal epithelial cells represents the first step towards the establishment of a protein database which will be a valuable resource in future studies on the differential expression of nuclear proteins in response to physiological, pharmacological and pathological modulations. PMID:14730675

  19. Structure Determination of Membrane Proteins by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological membranes consist of 50% or more (by weight) membrane proteins, which constitute approximately one-third of all proteins expressed in biological organisms. Helical membrane proteins function as receptors, enzymes, and transporters, among other unique cellular roles. Additionally, most drugs have membrane proteins as their receptors, notably the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors with seven transmembrane helices. Determining the structures of membrane proteins is a daunting task because of the effects of the membrane environment; specifically, it has been difficult to combine biologically compatible environments with the requirements for the established methods of structure determination. There is strong motivation to determine the structures in their native phospholipid bilayer environment so that perturbations from nonnatural lipids and phases do not have to be taken into account. At present, the only method that can work with proteins in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers is solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23577669

  20. Participation of a fusogenic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in nuclear membrane assembly.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoaki; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Inomata, Akira; Yokota, Sadaki; Miyachi, Kiyomitsu; Kaneda, Mizuho; Umeda, Masato; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Omata, Saburo; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-05-30

    We found an autoimmune serum, K199, that strongly suppresses nuclear membrane assembly in a cell-free system involving a Xenopus egg extract. Four different antibodies that suppress nuclear assembly were affinity-purified from the serum using Xenopus egg cytosol proteins. Three proteins recognized by these antibodies were identified by partial amino acid sequencing to be glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and the regulator of chromatin condensation 1. GAPDH is known to be a fusogenic protein. To verify the participation of GAPDH in nuclear membrane fusion, authentic antibodies against human and rat GAPDH were applied, and strong suppression of nuclear assembly at the nuclear membrane fusion step was observed. The nuclear assembly activity suppressed by antibodies was recovered on the addition of purified chicken GAPDH. A peptide with the sequence of amino acid residues 70-94 of GAPDH, which inhibits GAPDH-induced phospholipid vesicle fusion, inhibited nuclear assembly at the nuclear membrane fusion step. We propose that GAPDH plays a crucial role in the membrane fusion step in nuclear assembly in a Xenopus egg extract cell-free system. PMID:12651855

  1. In vivo functional protein-protein interaction: nuclear targeted hsp90 shifts cytoplasmic steroid receptor mutants into the nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K I; Devin, J; Cadepond, F; Jibard, N; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1994-01-01

    In target tissue extracts, heat shock protein hsp90 has been found associated to all unliganded steroid receptors. Modulation of important functions of these receptors, including prevention of DNA binding and optimization of transcriptional activity, has been attributed to hsp90. However no unequivocal in vivo demonstration of interaction between receptors and hsp90 has been presented. We targeted chicken hsp90, a mainly cytoplasmic protein, with the nucleoplasmin nuclear localization signal (90NLS). After transfection into COS-7 cells, 90NLS was found in the nucleus with specific immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy techniques. A human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant devoid of NLS sequence was also expressed in COS-7 cells and found exclusively cytoplasmic. Coexpression of 90NLS and of the cytoplasmic human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant led to complete nuclear localization of the receptor, indicating its piggyback transport by 90NLS and thus physical and functional interaction between the two proteins in the absence of hormone. The same nuclear localization was obtained after cotransfection of 90NLS and a cytoplasmic rabbit progesterone receptor mutant. Finally, coexpression of wild-type rabbit progesterone receptor (nuclear) and wildtype hsp90 (cytoplasmic) into COS-7 cells provoked partial relocalization of hsp90 into the nucleus. These experiments lay the groundwork on which to study hsp90 as a chaperone, regulating activities of steroid receptors and possibly participating in their nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8278390

  2. Nuclear distribution of eIF3g and its interacting nuclear proteins in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, QIAOLI; LIU, HAO; YE, JINGJIA; ZHANG, HUI; JIA, ZHENYU; CAO, JIANG

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit g (eIF3g) is a core subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, and is important in the initiation of translation. It is also involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and is upregulated in multidrug-resistant cancer cells. In the present study, the nuclear distribution of eIF3g was determined by performing co-immunoprecipitation of proteins that potentially interact with eIF3g in the nucleus. Mass spectrometry characterization showed that three proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U/scaffold attachment factor A, HSZFP36/zinc finger protein 823 and β-actin, were among the candidate eIF3g-interacting proteins in the nucleus. The protein-protein interaction was further confirmed by cross-linking and a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, followed by western blotting. The co-localization of these proteins was determined by confocal microscopy. These findings provide novel insight into the possible functions of eIF3g in the nucleus and serves as an important first step for further investigation of the roles of eIF3g in cancer development. PMID:26935993

  3. Benzo(a)pyrene-binding proteins of hamster embryo cell nuclei: comparison of nuclear isolation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, M.C.; Mansfield, B.K.; Selkirk, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Hamster embryo cells matabolize benzo(a)pyrene to derivatives that covalently modify nuclear macromolecules including proteins. Not all proteins are modified to the same extent nor by the same metabolites. In particular, a protein of apparent molecular weight 32,000 is highly modified by derivatives of trans-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxy B(a)P. This protein is shown here to be preferentially lost from nuclei during purification by centrifugation through high molarity sucrose solutions followed by osmotic shock. It does not appear to be a cytoplasmic contaminant, but shares many properties of an abundant protein from Xenopus laevis oocytes, nucleoplasmin.

  4. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  5. Nuclear envelope-associated endosomes deliver surface proteins to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Chaumet, Alexandre; Wright, Graham D.; Seet, Sze Hwee; Tham, Keit Min; Gounko, Natalia V.; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis directs molecular cargo along three main routes: recycling to the cell surface, transport to the Golgi apparatus or degradation in endolysosomes. Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) is a bacterial protein that typically traffics to the Golgi and then the endoplasmic reticulum before translocating to the cytosol. Here we show that a substantial fraction of internalized PE is also located in nuclear envelope-associated endosomes (NAE), which display limited mobility, exhibit a propensity to undergo fusion and readily discharge their contents into the nuclear envelope. Electron microscopy and protein trapping in the nucleus indicate that NAE mediate PE transfer into the nucleoplasm. RNAi screening further revealed that NAE-mediated transfer depends on the nuclear envelope proteins SUN1 and SUN2, as well as the Sec61 translocon complex. These data reveal a novel endosomal route from the cell surface to the nucleoplasm that facilitates the accumulation of extracellular and cell surface proteins in the nucleus. PMID:26356418

  6. Nuclear cytoplasmic trafficking of proteins is a major response of human fibroblasts to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Baqader, Noor O; Radulovic, Marko; Crawford, Mark; Stoeber, Kai; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-10-01

    We have used a subcellular spatial razor approach based on LC-MS/MS-based proteomics with SILAC isotope labeling to determine changes in protein abundances in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of human IMR90 fibroblasts subjected to mild oxidative stress. We show that response to mild tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide treatment includes redistribution between the nucleus and cytoplasm of numerous proteins not previously associated with oxidative stress. The 121 proteins with the most significant changes encompass proteins with known functions in a wide variety of subcellular locations and of cellular functional processes (transcription, signal transduction, autophagy, iron metabolism, TCA cycle, ATP synthesis) and are consistent with functional networks that are spatially dispersed across the cell. Both nuclear respiratory factor 2 and the proline regulatory axis appear to contribute to the cellular metabolic response. Proteins involved in iron metabolism or with iron/heme as a cofactor as well as mitochondrial proteins are prominent in the response. Evidence suggesting that nuclear import/export and vesicle-mediated protein transport contribute to the cellular response was obtained. We suggest that measurements of global changes in total cellular protein abundances need to be complemented with measurements of the dynamic subcellular spatial redistribution of proteins to obtain comprehensive pictures of cellular function. PMID:25133973

  7. Nuclear Cytoplasmic Trafficking of Proteins is a Major Response of Human Fibroblasts to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Baqader, Noor O.; Radulovic, Marko; Crawford, Mark; Stoeber, Kai; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    We have used a subcellular spatial razor approach based on LC–MS/MS-based proteomics with SILAC isotope labeling to determine changes in protein abundances in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of human IMR90 fibroblasts subjected to mild oxidative stress. We show that response to mild tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide treatment includes redistribution between the nucleus and cytoplasm of numerous proteins not previously associated with oxidative stress. The 121 proteins with the most significant changes encompass proteins with known functions in a wide variety of subcellular locations and of cellular functional processes (transcription, signal transduction, autophagy, iron metabolism, TCA cycle, ATP synthesis) and are consistent with functional networks that are spatially dispersed across the cell. Both nuclear respiratory factor 2 and the proline regulatory axis appear to contribute to the cellular metabolic response. Proteins involved in iron metabolism or with iron/heme as a cofactor as well as mitochondrial proteins are prominent in the response. Evidence suggesting that nuclear import/export and vesicle-mediated protein transport contribute to the cellular response was obtained. We suggest that measurements of global changes in total cellular protein abundances need to be complemented with measurements of the dynamic subcellular spatial redistribution of proteins to obtain comprehensive pictures of cellular function. PMID:25133973

  8. Identification of a Functional, CRM-1-Dependent Nuclear Export Signal in Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified. We show here that the aa(109–133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1–173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication. Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection. PMID:22039426

  9. Intranuclear membranes induced by lipidated proteins are derived from the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Association of nuclear lamins with the inner nuclear membrane (INM) is mediated by lipid modifications: either by C-terminal isoprenylation or N-terminal myristoylation. Overexpression of lamins or other lipidated nuclear proteins induces the formation of intranuclear membrane-like arrays. Lamin-induced intranuclear array formation has been observed in Xenopus oocytes as well as in mammalian tissue culture cells. With the use of a membrane-specific fluorescence dye we show here that these arrays are made up of typical lipid membranes. While continuity between these intranuclear membranes and the INM has not been observed so far the presence of integral as well as luminal marker proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) indicates that these membranes are derived from the nuclear membrane/ER compartment. Earlier studies demonstrated that overexpression of integral membrane proteins of the INM can induce formation of intranuclear membranes, which bud from the INM. Integral membrane proteins reach the INM via the pore membranes while lipidated proteins are imported into the nucleoplasm via the classical NLS pathway where they interact with the INM via their lipid moieties. Together with the previously published data our results show that the formation of intranuclear membranes follows similar routes irrespective of whether the proteins triggering membrane formation are integral membrane or lipidated proteins. PMID:21327083

  10. The CRM1 nuclear export protein in normal development and disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kevin T; Holloway, Michael P; Altura, Rachel A

    2012-01-01

    CRM1 (Chromosomal Maintenance 1, also known as Exportin 1) is the major mammalian export protein that facilitates the transport of large macromolecules including RNA and protein across the nuclear membrane to the cytoplasm. The gene encoding CRM1 was originally identified in yeast as required to maintain higher order chromosome structure. In mammalian cells, CRM1 was found to bind several nuclear pore proteins hence its role in nuclear-cytosolic transport was discovered. In addition to nuclear-cytosolic transport, CRM1 also plays a role in centrosome duplication and spindle assembly, especially in response to DNA damage. The crystal structure of CRM1 suggests a complex protein that binds the Ran protein bound to GTP, allowing for a conformational change that facilitates binding to different cargo proteins through a nuclear export signal (NES). Included in the cadre of cargo are multiple tumor suppressor and oncoproteins as p53, BRCA1, Survivin, NPM, and APC, which function in the nucleus to regulate transcription or aid in chromosomal assembly and movement. An imbalance in the cytosolic level of these proteins has been observed in cancer cells, resulting in either inactivation (tumor suppressor) or an excess of anti-apoptotic activity (oncoprotein). Thus, the concept of inhibiting CRM1 has been explored as a potential therapeutic intervention. Indeed, inhibition of CRM1 by a variety of small molecules that interfere with cargo-NES binding results in cancer cell death. Whether all of these proteins together are responsible for this phenotype or whether specific proteins are required for this effect is unclear at this time. PMID:22773955

  11. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  12. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 ; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 ; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018 ; Jiang, Shi-Jin; Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Disease Control and Prevention, Shandong, Taian 271018

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  13. Tus, an E. coli protein, contains mammalian nuclear targeting and exporting signals.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Stanislaw J; Sitaraman, Kalavathy; Hill, Thomas; Hartley, James L; Chatterjee, Deb K

    2010-01-01

    Shuttling of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm in mammalian cells is facilitated by the presence of nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES), respectively. However, we have found that Tus, an E. coli replication fork arresting protein, contains separate sequences that function efficiently as NLS and NES in mammalian cell lines, as judged by cellular location of GFP-fusion proteins. The NLS was localized to a short stretch of 9 amino acids in the carboxy-terminus of Tus protein. Alterations of any of these basic amino acids almost completely abolished the nuclear targeting. The NES comprises a cluster of leucine/hydrophobic residues located within 21 amino acids at the amino terminus of Tus. Finally, we have shown that purified GFP-Tus fusion protein or GFP-Tus NLS fusion protein, when added to the culture media, was internalized very efficiently into mammalian cells. Thus, Tus is perhaps the first reported bacterial protein to possess both NLS and NES, and has the capability to transduce protein into mammalian cells. PMID:20126275

  14. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome. PMID:26115222

  15. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  16. CGGBP1 is a nuclear and midbody protein regulating abscission

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Umashankar Westermark, Bengt

    2011-01-15

    Abscission marks the completion of cell division and its failure is associated with delayed cytokinesis and even tetraploidization. Aberrant abscission and consequential ploidy changes can underlie various diseases including cancer. Midbody, a transient structure formed in the intercellular bridge during telophase, contains several proteins including Aurora kinase B (AURKB), which participate in abscission. We report here an unexpected expression pattern and function of the transcription repressor protein CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1 (CGGBP1), in normal human fibroblasts. We show that CGGBP1, a chromatin-associated protein, trans-localizes to spindle midzone and midbodies in a manner similar to that of AURKB. CGGBP1 depletion resulted in a cell cycle block at G2, characterized by failure of cells to undergo mitosis and also reduced entry into S phase. Consistent with its presence in the midbodies, live microscopy showed that CGGBP1 deficiency caused mitotic failure at abscission resulting in tetraploidy, which could be rescued by CGGBP1 overexpression. These results show that CGGBP1 is a bona fide midbody protein required for normal abscission and mitosis in general.

  17. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  18. Nuclear condensation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element-binding protein in discrete murine brain structures.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Kubo, Keita; Ogita, Kiyokazu; Pláteník, Jan; Balcar, Vladimir J; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-06-01

    We have directed a polyclonal antibody against an oligo-peptide (123-136) of the transcription factor cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) including the serine residue at 133. Rabbit sera were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by affinity chromatography to homogeneity on one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified antibody not only induced marked supershift of CREB binding, without affecting binding of activator protein-1 on gel retardation electrophoresis, but also differentiated between CREB and CREB phosphorylated at serine133 in brain nuclear fractions on Western blotting. Immunoreactive CREB was detected in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions of discrete murine brain structures but was more highly condensed in cerebellum than in neocortex and hippocampus. Incubation of brain nuclear fractions led to a marked export of immunoreactive CREB in a temperature-dependent manner, whereas the temperature-dependent export activity was significantly lower in cerebellum than in other brain structures. Suppression of general new protein synthesis by cycloheximide (500 mg/kg, i.p.) in vivo resulted in a significant decrease in the nuclear CREB level, with a concomitant increase in the cytosolic level in hippocampus, but not in cerebellum. These results suggest that the nuclear export activity might vary from region to region in murine brains through a hitherto unidentified mechanism other than the nuclear localization signal, to result in different nuclear condensation ratios for subsequent elicitation of differential transcriptional activities by the constitutive transcription factor CREB in the nucleus. PMID:15880467

  19. Laminopathy-inducing lamin A mutants can induce redistribution of lamin binding proteins into nuclear aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, S. . E-mail: stefan.huebner@med.monash.edu.au; Eam, J.E.; Huebner, A.; Jans, D.A.

    2006-01-15

    Lamins, members of the family of intermediate filaments, form a supportive nucleoskeletal structure underlying the nuclear envelope and can also form intranuclear structures. Mutations within the A-type lamin gene cause a variety of degenerative diseases which are collectively referred to as laminopathies. At the molecular level, laminopathies have been shown to be linked to a discontinuous localization pattern of A-type lamins, with some laminopathies containing nuclear lamin A aggregates. Since nuclear aggregate formation could lead to the mislocalization of proteins interacting with A-type lamins, we set out to examine the effects of FLAG-lamin A N195K and R386K protein aggregate formation on the subnuclear distribution of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and the sterol responsive element binding protein 1a (SREBP1a) after coexpression as GFP-fusion proteins in HeLa cells. We observed strong recruitment of both proteins into nuclear aggregates. Nuclear aggregate recruitment of the NPC component nucleoporin NUP153 was also observed and found to be dependent on the N-terminus. That these effects were specific was implied by the fact that a number of other coexpressed karyophilic GFP-fusion proteins, such as the nucleoporin NUP98 and kanadaptin, did not coaggregate with FLAG-lamin A N195K or R386K. Immunofluorescence analysis further indicated that the precursor form of lamin A, pre-lamin A, could be found in intranuclear aggregates. Our results imply that redistribution into lamin A-/pre-lamin A-containing aggregates of proteins such as pRb and SREBP1a could represent a key aspect underlying the molecular pathogenesis of certain laminopathies.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance structural studies of membrane proteins in micelles and bilayers.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao-Min; Franzin, Carla M; Thai, Khang; Yu, Jinghua; Marassi, Francesca M

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy enables determination of membrane protein structures in lipid environments, such as micelles and bilayers. This chapter outlines the steps for membrane-protein structure determination using solution NMR with micelle samples, and solid-state NMR with oriented lipid-bilayer samples. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from gamma and CHIF, two membrane proteins that function as regulatory subunits of the Na+- and K+-ATPase. PMID:17951757

  1. MAF1, a novel plant protein interacting with matrix attachment region binding protein MFP1, is located at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Gindullis, F; Peffer, N J; Meier, I

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of chromatin with the nuclear matrix via matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA is considered to be of fundamental importance for chromatin organization in all eukaryotic cells. MAR binding filament-like protein 1 (MFP1) from tomato is a novel plant protein that specifically binds to MAR DNA. Its filament protein-like structure makes it a likely candidate for a structural component of the nuclear matrix. MFP1 is located at nuclear matrix-associated, specklelike structures at the nuclear envelope. Here, we report the identification of a novel protein that specifically interacts with MFP1 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays. MFP1 associated factor 1 (MAF1) is a small, soluble, serine/threonine-rich protein that is ubiquitously expressed and has no similarity to known proteins. MAF1, like MFP1, is located at the nuclear periphery and is a component of the nuclear matrix. These data suggest that MFP1 and MAF1 are in vivo interaction partners and that both proteins are components of a nuclear substructure, previously undescribed in plants, that connects the nuclear envelope and the internal nuclear matrix. PMID:10488241

  2. Nuclear trafficking of proteins from RNA viruses: potential target for antivirals?

    PubMed

    Caly, Leon; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2012-09-01

    A key aspect of the infectious cycle of many viruses is the transport of specific viral proteins into the host cell nucleus to perturb the antiviral response. Examples include a number of RNA viruses that are significant human pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, influenza A, dengue, respiratory syncytial virus and rabies, as well agents that predominantly infect livestock, such as Rift valley fever virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Inhibiting the nuclear trafficking of viral proteins as a therapeutic strategy offers an attractive possibility, with important recent progress having been made with respect to HIV-1 and dengue. The results validate nuclear protein import as an antiviral target, and suggest the identification and development of nuclear transport inhibitors as a viable therapeutic approach for a range of human and zoonotic pathogenic viruses. PMID:22750233

  3. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2.

    PubMed

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  4. Nuclear localisation of NOVH protein: a potential role for NOV in the regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Perbal, B

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To identify the NOV protein detected by immunofluorescence in the nucleus of human cancer cell lines to establish whether targeting to the nucleus reflects dual paracrine and intracrine biological functions of NOV, as has been reported previously for several signalling peptides and proteins. METHODS: Nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared from 143 and HeLa cells in which nuclear NOV protein was detected. Western blotting analysis of NOV proteins in both types of fractions was performed using two NOV specific antibodies. Confocal microscopy was used to visualise the nuclear NOV protein in HeLa and 143 cells. A yeast two hybrid screening system was used to isolate cDNAs encoding proteins able to interact with the human NOV protein. RESULTS: A 31/32 kDa doublet of NOV protein was identified in the nuclear fraction of 143 and HeLa cells. Because the antibodies were directed against the C-terminus of NOV, the 31/32 kDa NOV isoform is probably truncated at the N-terminus and might correspond to the secreted 32 kDa NOV isoform detected in cell culture medium. Confocal microscopy indicated that in addition to the cytoplasmic NOV protein already identified, a nuclear NOV protein was present in both the nucleoplasm and nucleoli of Hela and 143 cells. Screening of cDNA libraries prepared from HeLa cells, Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphocytes, and normal human brain showed that the NOV protein interacts with the rpb7 subunit of RNA polymerase in a yeast two hybrid system. CONCLUSIONS: The NOV protein detected in the nucleus of 143 and HeLa cells is probably an N-terminus truncated isoform of the secreted 48 kDa NOV protein. A growing body of evidence suggests that novH expression is closely associated with differentiation in normal human tissues and that the nov gene encodes a signalling protein that belongs to an emerging family of cell growth regulators. The nuclear localisation of a NOV isoform potentially provides an additional degree of signalling specificity. The interaction of the NOV protein and the rpb7 subunit of RNA polymerase II in the two hybrid system suggests that NOV might be involved in regulating gene expression at the transcriptional level. As has already been suggested for several other nuclearly located cytokines, the NOV protein does not contain a typical nuclear localisation signal. Therefore, it is possible that it combines with either a receptor or a chaperone during its translocation. Disruption of the balance between the secreted and nuclear NOV isoforms might affect the putative autocrine and paracrine functions of NOV and might be of considerable importance in the development of cancers in which the expression of novH has been shown to be impaired. PMID:10474687

  5. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza. PMID:26519791

  6. Identification and characterisation of a nuclear localisation signal in the SMN associated protein, Gemin4

    SciTech Connect

    Lorson, Monique A.; Dickson, Alexa M.; Shaw, Debra J.; Todd, Adrian G.; Young, Elizabeth C.; Morse, Robert; Wolstencroft, Catherine; Lorson, Christian L.; Young, Philip J.

    2008-10-10

    Gemin4 is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional protein that is involved in U snRNP assembly, apoptosis, nuclear/cytoplasmic transportation, transcription, and RNAi pathways. Gemin4 is one of the core components of the Gemin-complex, which also contains survival motor neuron (SMN), the seven Gemin proteins (Gemin2-8), and Unrip. Mutations in the SMN1 gene cause the autosomal recessive disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Although the functions assigned to Gemin4 predominantly occur in the nucleus, the mechanisms that mediate the nuclear import of Gemin4 remain unclear. Here, using a novel panel of Gemin4 constructs we identify a canonical nuclear import sequence (NLS) in the N-terminus of Gemin4. The Gemin4 NLS is necessary and independently sufficient to mediate nuclear import of Gemin4. This is the first functional NLS identified within the SMN-Gemin complex.

  7. Identification of unique SUN-interacting nuclear envelope proteins with diverse functions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Graumann, Katja; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Jones, Jonathan D.G.

    2014-01-01

    Although a plethora of nuclear envelope (NE) transmembrane proteins (NETs) have been identified in opisthokonts, plant NETs are largely unknown. The only known NET homologues in plants are Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, which bind Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 homology (KASH) proteins. Therefore, de novo identification of plant NETs is necessary. Based on similarities between opisthokont KASH proteins and the only known plant KASH proteins, WPP domain–interacting proteins, we used a computational method to identify the KASH subset of plant NETs. Ten potential plant KASH protein families were identified, and five candidates from four of these families were verified for their NE localization, depending on SUN domain interaction. Of those, Arabidopsis thaliana SINE1 is involved in actin-dependent nuclear positioning in guard cells, whereas its paralogue SINE2 contributes to innate immunity against an oomycete pathogen. This study dramatically expands our knowledge of plant KASH proteins and suggests that plants and opisthokonts have recruited different KASH proteins to perform NE regulatory functions. PMID:24891605

  8. The Inner Nuclear Membrane Protein Nemp1 Is a New Type of RanGTP-Binding Protein in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Shibano, Takashi; Mamada, Hiroshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein Nemp1/TMEM194A has previously been suggested to be involved in eye development in Xenopus, and contains two evolutionarily conserved sequences in the transmembrane domains (TMs) and the C-terminal region, named region A and region B, respectively. To elucidate the molecular nature of Nemp1, we analyzed its interacting proteins through those conserved regions. First, we found that Nemp1 interacts with itself and lamin through the TMs and region A, respectively. Colocalization of Nemp1 and lamin at the INM suggests that the interaction with lamin participates in the INM localization of Nemp1. Secondly, through yeast two-hybrid screening using region B as bait, we identified the small GTPase Ran as a probable Nemp1-binding partner. GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays using region B and Ran mutants revealed that region B binds directly to the GTP-bound Ran through its effector domain. Immunostaining experiments using transfected COS-7 cells revealed that full-length Nemp1 recruits Ran near the nuclear envelope, suggesting a role for Nemp1 in the accumulation of RanGTP at the nuclear periphery. At the neurula-to-tailbud stages of Xenopus embryos, nemp1 expression overlapped with ran in several regions including the eye vesicles. Co-knockdown using antisense morpholino oligos for nemp1 and ran caused reduction of cell densities and severe eye defects more strongly than either single knockdown alone, suggesting their functional interaction. Finally we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Nemp1-orthologous proteins interact with A. thaliana Ran, suggesting their evolutionally conserved physical and functional interactions possibly in basic cellular functions including nuclear transportation. Taken together, we conclude that Nemp1 represents a new type of RanGTP-binding protein. PMID:25946333

  9. Impaired nuclear import of mammalian Dlx4 proteins as a consequence of rapid sequence divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Coubrough, Melissa L.; Bendall, Andrew J. . E-mail: abendall@uoguelph.ca

    2006-11-15

    Dlx genes encode a developmentally important family of transcription factors with a variety of functions and sites of action during vertebrate embryogenesis. The murine Dlx4 gene is an enigmatic member of the family; little is known about the normal developmental function(s) of Dlx4. Here, we show that Dlx4 is expressed in the murine placenta and in a trophoblast cell line where the protein localizes to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Despite the presence of several leucine/valine-rich motifs that match known nuclear export sequences, cytoplasmic Dlx4 is not due to CRM-1-mediated nuclear export. Rather, nuclear import of Dlx4 is compromised by specific residues that flank the nuclear localization signal. One of these residues represents a novel conserved feature of the Dlx4 protein in placental mammals, and the second represents novel variation within mouse Dlx4 isoforms. Comparison of orthologous protein sequences reveals a particularly high rate of non-synonymous change in the coding regions of mammalian Dlx4 genes. Since impaired nuclear localization is unlikely to enhance the function of a nuclear transcription factor, these data point to reduced selection pressure as the basis for the rapid divergence of the Dlx4 gene within the mammalian clade.

  10. Specific interaction with the nuclear transporter importin α2 can modulate paraspeckle protein 1 delivery to nuclear paraspeckles

    PubMed Central

    Major, Andrew T.; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Sarraj, Mai A.; Smith, Catherine L.; Koopman, Peter; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Jans, David A.; Loveland, Kate L.

    2015-01-01

    Importin (IMP) superfamily members mediate regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport, which is central to key cellular processes. Although individual IMPα proteins exhibit dynamic synthesis and subcellular localization during cellular differentiation, including during spermatogenesis, little is known of how this affects cell fate. To investigate how IMPαs control cellular development, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen for IMPα2 cargoes in embryonic day 12.5 mouse testis, a site of peak IMPα2 expression coincident with germ-line masculization. We identified paraspeckle protein 1 (PSPC1), the original defining component of nuclear paraspeckles, as an IMPα2-binding partner. PSPC1-IMPα2 binding in testis was confirmed in immunoprecipitations and pull downs, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay–based assay demonstrated direct, high-affinity PSPC1 binding to either IMPα2/IMPβ1 or IMPα6/IMPβ1. Coexpression of full-length PSPC1 and IMPα2 in HeLa cells yielded increased PSPC1 localization in nuclear paraspeckles. High-throughput image analysis of >3500 cells indicated IMPα2 levels can directly determine PSPC1-positive nuclear speckle numbers and size; a transport-deficient IMPα2 isoform or small interfering RNA knockdown of IMPα2 each reduced endogenous PSPC1 accumulation in speckles. This first validation of an IMPα2 nuclear import cargo in fetal testis provides novel evidence that PSPC1 delivery to paraspeckles, and consequently paraspeckle function, may be controlled by modulated synthesis of specific IMPs. PMID:25694451

  11. Association of Nuclear Localization of a Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Protein in Breast Tumors with Poor Prognostic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Chris R.; Normart, Robin; Yang, Qifeng; Stevenson, Elizabeth; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ganesan, Shridar; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Within healthy human somatic cells, retrotransposition by long interspersed nuclear element-1 (also known as LINE-1 or L1) is thought to be held in check by a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation and RNAi. The expression of L1-ORF1 protein, which is rarely found in normal tissue, was assayed using antibodies with a variety of clinical cancer specimens and cancer cell lines. L1-ORF1p expression was detected in nearly all breast tumors that the authors examined, and the protein was also present in a high percentage of ileal carcinoids, bladder, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, as well as in a smaller percentage of prostate and colorectal tumors. Tumors generally demonstrated cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p; however, in several breast cancers, L1-ORF1p was nuclear. Patients with breast tumors displaying nuclear L1-ORF1p had a greater incidence of both local recurrence and distal metastases and also showed poorer overall survival when compared with patients with tumors displaying cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p. These data suggest that expression of L1-ORF1p is widespread in many cancers and that redistribution from cytoplasm to nucleus could be a poor prognostic indicator during breast cancer. High expression and nuclear localization of L1-ORF1p may result in a higher rate of L1 retrotransposition, which could increase genomic instability. PMID:20948976

  12. Control of Protein Activity and Cell Fate Specification via Light-Mediated Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Seth P.; Bear, James E.; Goldstein, Bob; Hahn, Klaus; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Light-activatable proteins allow precise spatial and temporal control of biological processes in living cells and animals. Several approaches have been developed for controlling protein localization with light, including the conditional inhibition of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) with the Light Oxygen Voltage (AsLOV2) domain of phototropin 1 from Avena sativa. In the dark, the switch adopts a closed conformation that sterically blocks the NLS motif. Upon activation with blue light the C-terminus of the protein unfolds, freeing the NLS to direct the protein to the nucleus. A previous study showed that this approach can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins in mammalian tissue culture cells. Here, we extend this result by characterizing the binding properties of a LOV/NLS switch and demonstrating that it can be used to control gene transcription in yeast. Additionally, we show that the switch, referred to as LANS (light-activated nuclear shuttle), functions in the C. elegans embryo and allows for control of nuclear localization in individual cells. By inserting LANS into the C. elegans lin-1 locus using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination, we demonstrated control of cell fate via light-dependent manipulation of a native transcription factor. We conclude that LANS can be a valuable experimental method for spatial and temporal control of nuclear localization in vivo. PMID:26083500

  13. Effect of nitric oxide on gene transcription – S-nitrosylation of nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mengel, Alexander; Chaki, Mounira; Shekariesfahlan, Azam; Lindermayr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in many different physiological processes in plants. It mainly acts by post-translationally modifying proteins. Modification of cysteine residues termed as S-nitrosylation is believed to be the most important mechanism for transduction of bioactivity of NO. The first proteins found to be nitrosylated were mainly of cytoplasmic origin or isolated from mitochondria and peroxisomes. Interestingly, it was shown that redox-sensitive transcription factors are also nitrosylated and that NO influences the redox-dependent nuclear transport of some proteins. This implies that NO plays a role in regulating transcription and/or general nuclear metabolism which is a fascinating new aspect of NO signaling in plants. In this review, we will discuss the impact of S-nitrosylation on nuclear plant proteins with a focus on transcriptional regulation, describe the function of this modification and draw also comparisons to the animal system in which S-nitrosylation of nuclear proteins is a well characterized concept. PMID:23914201

  14. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  15. Quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling of PINK1-deficient cells identifies phosphorylation changes in nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Chaoya; Yates, John R.; Liao, Lujian

    2014-01-01

    The Parkinson's disease (PD) associated gene PINK1 encodes a protein kinase that mediates the phosphorylation of multiple proteins involved in mitochondrial homeostasis. The broader downstream signaling events mediated by PINK1 kinase activity have not been well documented. We combine quantitative phosphoproteomic strategies with siRNA mediated PINK1 knock down in mammalian cells to identify alterations of phosphorylation events downstream of PINK1. Although down-regulation of PINK1 has no major effect on the proteome expression in these cells, phosphorylation of over one hundred proteins was reduced reflecting basal levels of phosphorylation signaling events downstream of PINK1. Motif analysis of the residues flanking the phosphorylation sites indicates proline-directed kinase specificity. Surprisingly, we found that the downstream signaling nodes included many transcription factors, as well as nuclear proteins involved in DNA and RNA metabolism. Thus, PINK1 dependent phosphorylation signaling may regulate nuclear activities. PMID:24626860

  16. NP-40 reduces contamination by endogenous biotinylated carboxylases during purification of biotin tagged nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Dimitris N; Demmers, Jeroen; Strouboulis, John

    2013-05-01

    We describe here a simple procedure for greatly reducing contamination of nuclear extracts by naturally biotinylated cytoplasmic carboxylases, which represent a major source of non-specific background when employing BirA-mediated biotinylation tagging for the purification and characterization of nuclear protein complexes by mass spectrometry. We show that the use of 0.5% of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-40 (NP-40) during cell lysis and nuclei isolation is sufficient to practically eliminate contamination of nuclear extracts by carboxylases and to greatly reduce background signals in downstream mass spectrometric analyses. PMID:23500724

  17. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A. . E-mail: eshelden@wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus.

  18. Distinctive Properties of the Nuclear Localization Signals of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins Heh1 and Heh2.

    PubMed

    Lokareddy, Ravi K; Hapsari, Rizqiya A; van Rheenen, Mathilde; Pumroy, Ruth A; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Steen, Anton; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-07-01

    Targeting of ER-synthesized membrane proteins to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) has long been explained by the diffusion-retention model. However, several INM proteins contain non-classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences, which, in a few instances, have been shown to promote importin α/β- and Ran-dependent translocation to the INM. Here, using structural and biochemical methods, we show that yeast INM proteins Heh2 and Src1/Heh1 contain bipartite import sequences that associate intimately with the minor NLS-binding pocket of yeast importin α and unlike classical NLSs efficiently displace the IBB domain in the absence of importin β. In vivo, the intimate interactions at the minor NLS-binding pocket make the h2NLS highly efficient at recruiting importin α at the ER and drive INM localization of endogenous Heh2. Thus, h1/h2NLSs delineate a novel class of super-potent, IBB-like membrane protein NLSs, distinct from classical NLSs found in soluble cargos and of general interest in biology. PMID:26051712

  19. Nuclear protein kinase CLK1 uses a non-traditional docking mechanism to select physiological substrates.

    PubMed

    Keshwani, Malik M; Hailey, Kendra L; Aubol, Brandon E; Fattet, Laurent; McGlone, Maria L; Jennings, Patricia A; Adams, Joseph A

    2015-12-15

    Phosphorylation-dependent cell communication requires enzymes that specifically recognize key proteins in a sea of similar, competing substrates. The protein kinases achieve this goal by utilizing docking grooves in the kinase domain or heterologous protein adaptors to reduce 'off pathway' targeting. We now provide evidence that the nuclear protein kinase CLK1 (cell division cycle2-like kinase 1) important for splicing regulation departs from these classic paradigms by using a novel self-association mechanism. The disordered N-terminus of CLK1 induces oligomerization, a necessary event for targeting its physiological substrates the SR protein (splicing factor containing a C-terminal RS domain) family of splicing factors. Increasing the CLK1 concentration enhances phosphorylation of the splicing regulator SRSF1 (SR protein splicing factor 1) compared with the general substrate myelin basic protein (MBP). In contrast, removal of the N-terminus or dilution of CLK1 induces monomer formation and reverses this specificity. CLK1 self-association also occurs in the nucleus, is induced by the N-terminus and is important for localization of the kinase in sub-nuclear compartments known as speckles. These findings present a new picture of substrate recognition for a protein kinase in which an intrinsically disordered domain is used to capture physiological targets with similar disordered domains in a large oligomeric complex while discriminating against non-physiological targets. PMID:26443864

  20. Changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities in the regenerating liver of partially irradiated rat

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujiwara, A.; Yasumasu, I. )

    1989-09-01

    X rays (4.8 Gy) inhibit both DNA synthesis and phosphorylation of histone H1 in the regenerating liver of the rat. To determine the cause of the inhibition of histone H1 phosphorylation, changes in the nuclear protein kinase activities during the prereplicative phase of regeneration were measured. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity was low during regeneration, and the changes in the activity were not statistically significant. The cAMP-independent protein kinase activity increased at 15 h, decreased at 18 h, and increased again at 24 h after partial hepatectomy. X irradiation prior to partial hepatectomy did not inhibit the increase at 15 h, but it did inhibit the increase at 24 h. The activity was not inhibited by isoquinolinesulfonamide inhibitors such as H-7, and it was activated by a commercial preparation of an inhibitor protein of the cAMP-dependent kinase. It was also inhibited by quercetin. The possibility that the radiation-sensitive nuclear protein kinase is a nuclear cAMP-independent protein kinase specific for histone H1 is considered.

  1. Characterization of a nuclear compartment shared by nuclear bodies applying ectopic protein expression and correlative light and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Karsten; Reichenzeller, Michaela; Goerisch, Sabine M.; Schmidt, Ute; Scheuermann, Markus O.; Herrmann, Harald; Lichter, Peter . E-mail: m.macleod@dkfz.de

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the accessibility of interphase nuclei for nuclear body-sized particles, we analyzed in cultured cells from human origin by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) the bundle-formation of Xenopus-vimentin targeted to the nucleus via a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Moreover, we investigated the spatial relationship of speckles, Cajal bodies, and crystalline particles formed by Mx1 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), with respect to these bundle arrays. At 37 deg C, the nucleus-targeted, temperature-sensitive Xenopus vimentin was deposited in focal accumulations. Upon shift to 28 deg C, polymerization was induced and filament arrays became visible. Within 2 h after temperature shift, arrays were found to be composed of filaments loosely embedded in the nucleoplasm. The filaments were restricted to limited areas of the nucleus between focal accumulations. Upon incubation at 28 deg C for several hours, NLS vimentin filaments formed bundles looping throughout the nuclei. Speckles and Cajal bodies frequently localized in direct neighborhood to vimentin bundles. Similarly, small crystalline particles formed by YFP-tagged Mx1 also located next to vimentin bundles. Taking into account that nuclear targeted vimentin locates in the interchromosomal domain (ICD), we conclude that nuclear body-sized particles share a common nuclear space which is controlled by higher order chromatin organization.

  2. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection and could potentially enhance the translation of virus protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report that describes Sam68 actively participating in the life cycle of EV71 at a molecular level. These studies will not only improve our understanding of the replication of EV71 but also have the potential for aiding in developing a therapeutic strategy against EV71 infection. PMID:26202240

  3. Loop I of U1 small nuclear RNA is the only essential RNA sequence for binding of specific U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, J; van Santen, V L; Spritz, R A; Mattaj, I W

    1988-01-01

    The binding of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-specific proteins C, A, and 70K to U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) was analyzed. Assembly of U1 snRNAs from bean and soybean and a set of mutant Xenopus U1 snRNAs into U1 snRNPs in Xenopus egg extracts was studied. The ability to bind proteins was analyzed by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antibodies and by a protein-sequestering assay. The only sequence essential for binding of the U1-specific proteins was the conserved loop sequence in the 5' hairpin of U1. Further analysis suggested that protein C binds directly to the loop and that the assembly of proteins A and 70K into the RNP requires mainly protein-protein interactions. Protein C apparently recognizes a specific RNA sequence rather than a secondary structural element in the RNA. Images PMID:2974920

  4. Ubc9 Mediates Nuclear Localization and Growth Suppression of BRCA1 and BRCA1a Proteins

    PubMed Central

    QIN, YUNLONG; XU, JINGYAO; AYSOLA, KARTIK; BEGUM, NURJAHAN; REDDY, VAISHALI; CHAI, YULI; GRIZZLE, WILLIAM E.; PARTRIDGE, EDWARD E.; REDDY, E. SHYAM P.; RAO, VEENA N.

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1 gene mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. In sporadic breast tumors, BRCA1 dysfunction or aberrant subcellular localization is thought to be common. BRCA1 is a nuclear–cytoplasm shuttling protein and the reason for cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 in young breast cancer patients is not yet known. We have previously reported BRCA1 proteins unlike K109R and cancer-predisposing mutant C61G to bind Ubc9 and modulate ER-α turnover. In the present study, we have examined the consequences of altered Ubc9 binding and knockdown on the subcellular localization and growth inhibitory function of BRCA1 proteins. Our results using live imaging of YFP, GFP, RFP-tagged BRCA1, BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins show enhanced cytoplasmic localization of K109 R and C61G mutant BRCA1 proteins in normal and cancer cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of Ubc9 in MCF-7 cells using Ubc9 siRNA resulted in enhanced cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 protein and exclusive cytoplasmic retention of BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins. These mutant BRCA1 proteins were transforming and impaired in their capacity to inhibit growth of MCF-7 and CAL51 breast cancer cells. Interestingly, cytoplasmic BRCA1a mutants showed more clonogenicity in soft agar and higher levels of expression of Ubc9 than parental MCF7 cells. This is the first report demonstrating the physiological link between cytoplasmic mislocalization of mutant BRCA1 proteins, loss of ER-α repression, loss of ubiquitin ligase activity and loss of growth suppression of BRCA1 proteins. Thus, binding of BRCA1 proteins to nuclear chaperone Ubc9 provides a novel mechanism for nuclear import and control of tumor growth. PMID:21344391

  5. A Nonerythroid Isoform of Protein 4.1R Interacts with the Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mattagajasingh, Subhendra N.; Huang, Shu-Ching; Hartenstein, Julia S.; Snyder, Michael; Marchesi, Vincent T.; Benz, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    Red blood cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) is an 80- kD erythrocyte phosphoprotein that stabilizes the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton. In nonerythroid cells, multiple 4.1R isoforms arise from a single gene by alternative splicing and predominantly code for a 135-kD isoform. This isoform contains a 209 amino acid extension at its NH2 terminus (head piece; HP). Immunoreactive epitopes specific for HP have been detected within the cell nucleus, nuclear matrix, centrosomes, and parts of the mitotic apparatus in dividing cells. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, in vitro binding assays, coimmunolocalization, and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we show that a 135-kD 4.1R isoform specifically interacts with the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. NuMA and 4.1R partially colocalize in the interphase nucleus of MDCK cells and redistribute to the spindle poles early in mitosis. Protein 4.1R associates with NuMA in the interphase nucleus and forms a complex with spindle pole organizing proteins, NuMA, dynein, and dynactin during cell division. Overexpression of a 135-kD isoform of 4.1R alters the normal distribution of NuMA in the interphase nucleus. The minimal sequence sufficient for this interaction has been mapped to the amino acids encoded by exons 20 and 21 of 4.1R and residues 1788–1810 of NuMA. Our results not only suggest that 4.1R could, possibly, play an important role in organizing the nuclear architecture, mitotic spindle, and spindle poles, but also could define a novel role for its 22–24-kD domain. PMID:10189366

  6. Regulated nuclear import of Rel proteins in the Drosophila immune response.

    PubMed

    Wu, L P; Anderson, K V

    1998-03-01

    The Drosophila immune response uses many of the same components as the mammalian innate immune response, including signalling pathways that activate transcription factors of the Rel/NK-kappaB family. In response to infection, two Rel proteins, Dif and Dorsal, translocate from the cytoplasm to the nuclei of larval fat-body cells. The Toll signalling pathway, which controls dorsal-ventral patterning during Drosophila embryogenesis, regulates the nuclear import of Dorsal in the immune response, but here we show that the Toll pathway is not required for nuclear import of Dif. Cytoplasmic retention of both Dorsal and Dif depends on Cactus protein; nuclear import of Dorsal and Dif is accompanied by degradation of Cactus. Therefore the two signalling pathways that target Cactus for degradation must discriminate between Cactus-Dorsal and Cactus-Dif complexes. We identified new genes that are required for normal induction of transcription of an antibacterial peptide during the immune response. Mutations in three of these genes prevent nuclear import of Dif in response to infection, and define new components of signalling pathways involving Rel. Mutations in three other genes cause constitutive nuclear localization of Dif; these mutations may block Rel protein activity by a novel mechanism. PMID:9510254

  7. The discovery of a Werner Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP) association with the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simarna; White, Tommy E; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Glavy, Joseph S

    2010-08-01

    The gateway for molecular trafficking between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). Through mass spectral analysis of the isolated Nuclear Pore Nup107-160 subcomplex, we discovered an in vivo interaction with Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein 1, (WRNIP1 or WHIP). WHIP was originally identified as a binding partner of Werner protein (WRN), which functions to maintain genome stability and is responsible for the progeria disease, Werner syndrome. We established the reciprocal isolation of Nup107 by alpha-WHIP. WHIP was found in purified Nuclear Envelope (NE) fractions treated with DNase/RNase/Heparin. We demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy that WHIP is located at the nuclear rim as well as punctate regions in the nuclear matrix. Ultimately, synchronized cells show a dynamic association between WHIP and the Nup107-160 subcomplex through the cell cycle without an interaction with WRN. We thus identify WHIP as a partner/component of the NE/NPC and set forth to investigate a role for the protein positioned at the NPC. PMID:20676042

  8. The tight junction protein Z O-2 has several functional nuclear export signals

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza . E-mail: lorenza@fisio.cinvestav.mx; Ponce, Arturo; Alarcon, Lourdes; Jaramillo, Blanca Estela

    2006-10-15

    The tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-2 changes its subcellular distribution according to the state of confluency of the culture. Thus in confluent monolayers, it localizes at the TJ region whereas in sparse cultures it concentrates at the nucleus. The canine sequence of ZO-2 displays four putative nuclear export signals (NES), two at the second PDZ domain (NES-0 and NES-1) and the rest at the GK region (NES-2 and NES-3). The functionality of NES-0 and NES-3 was unknown, hence here we have explored it with a nuclear export assay, injecting into the nucleus of MDCK cells peptides corresponding to the ZO-2 NES sequences chemically coupled to ovalbumin. We show that both NES-0 and NES-3 are functional and sensitive to leptomycin B. We also demonstrate that NES-1, previously characterized as a non functional NES, is rendered capable of nuclear export upon the acquisition of a negative charge at its Ser369 residue. Experiments performed injecting at the nucleus WT and mutated ZO-2-GST fusion proteins revealed the need of both NES-0 and NES-1, and NES-2 and NES-3 for attaining an efficient nuclear exit of the respective amino and middle segments of ZO-2. Moreover, the transfection of MDCK cells with full-length ZO-2 revealed that the mutation of any of the NES present in the molecule was sufficient to induce nuclear accumulation of the protein.

  9. Steatosis-induced proteins adducts withlipid peroxidation products and nuclear electrophilic stress in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Anavi, Sarit; Ni, Zhixu; Tirosh, Oren; Fedorova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that fatty livers are particularly more susceptible to several pathological conditions, including hepatic inflammation, cirrhosis and liver cancer. However the exact mechanism of such susceptibility is still largely obscure. The current study aimed to elucidate the effect of hepatocytes lipid accumulation on the nuclear electrophilic stress. Accumulation of intracellular lipids was significantly increased in HepG2 cells incubated with fatty acid (FA) complex (1mM, 2:1 oleic and palmitic acids). In FA-treated cells, lipid droplets were localized around the nucleus and seemed to induce mechanical force, leading to the disruption of the nucleus morphology. Level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly increased in FA-loaded cells and was further augmented by treatment with moderate stressor (CoCl2). Increased ROS resulted in formation of reactive carbonyls (aldehydes and ketones, derived from lipid peroxidation) with a strong perinuclear accumulation. Mass-spectroscopy analysis indicated that lipid accumulation per-se can results in modification of nuclear protein by reactive lipid peroxidation products (oxoLPP). 235 Modified proteins involved in transcription regulation, splicing, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA repair and lipid metabolism were identified uniquely in FA-treated cells. These findings suggest that steatosis can affect nuclear redox state, and induce modifications of nuclear proteins by reactive oxoLPP accumulated in the perinuclear space upon FA-treatment. PMID:25560244

  10. Pygopus, a nuclear PHD-finger protein required for Wingless signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Parker, David S; Jemison, Jemileh; Cadigan, Kenneth M

    2002-06-01

    The secreted glycoprotein Wingless (Wg) acts through a conserved signaling pathway to regulate target gene expression. Wg signaling causes nuclear translocation of Armadillo, the fly beta-catenin, which then complexes with the DNA-binding protein TCF, enabling it to activate transcription. Though many nuclear factors have been implicated in modulating TCF/Armadillo activity, their importance remains poorly understood. This work describes a ubiquitously expressed protein, called Pygopus, which is required for Wg signaling throughout Drosophila development. Pygopus contains a PHD finger at its C terminus, a motif often found in chromatin remodeling factors. Overexpression of pygopus also blocks the pathway, consistent with the protein acting in a complex. The pygopus mutant phenotype is highly, though not exclusively, specific for Wg signaling. Epistasis experiments indicate that Pygopus acts downstream of Armadillo nuclear import, consistent with the nuclear location of heterologously expressed protein. Our data argue strongly that Pygopus is a new core component of the Wg signaling pathway that acts downstream or at the level of TCF. PMID:12015286

  11. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of high risk HPV16 E2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, Kristin; Wertz, Mary; Lucchi, John; Leszczynski, Anna; Moroianu, Junona . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2007-03-30

    The E2 protein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) contains an amino-terminal (N) domain, a hinge (H) region and a carboxyl-terminal (C) DNA-binding domain. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusions with full length E2 and E2 domains in transfection assays in HeLa cells, we found that the C domain is responsible for the nuclear localization of E2 in vivo, whereas the N and H domains do not contain additional nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Deletion analysis of EGFP-E2 and EGFP-cE2 determined that the C domain contains an {alpha} helix cNLS that overlaps with the DNA-binding region. Mutational analysis revealed that the arginine and lysine residues in this cNLS are essential for nuclear localization of HPV16 E2. Interestingly, these basic amino acid residues are well conserved among the E2 proteins of BPV-1 and some high risk HPV types but not in the low risk HPV types, suggesting that there are differences between the NLSs and corresponding nuclear import pathways between these E2 proteins.

  12. TMEM120A and B: Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Important for Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose I.; Czapiewski, Rafal; Mouras, Rabah; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the nuclear envelope is a major signaling node for the cell that can influence tissue differentiation processes. Here we present two nuclear envelope trans-membrane proteins TMEM120A and TMEM120B that are paralogs encoded by the Tmem120A and Tmem120B genes. The TMEM120 proteins are expressed preferentially in fat and both are induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Knockdown of one or the other protein altered expression of several genes required for adipocyte differentiation, Gata3, Fasn, Glut4, while knockdown of both together additionally affected Pparg and Adipoq. The double knockdown also increased the strength of effects, reducing for example Glut4 levels by 95% compared to control 3T3-L1 cells upon pharmacologically induced differentiation. Accordingly, TMEM120A and B knockdown individually and together impacted on adipocyte differentiation/metabolism as measured by lipid accumulation through binding of Oil Red O and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS). The nuclear envelope is linked to several lipodystrophies through mutations in lamin A; however, lamin A is widely expressed. Thus it is possible that the TMEM120A and B fat-specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins may play a contributory role in the tissue-specific pathology of this disorder or in the wider problem of obesity. PMID:26024229

  13. Nuclear Envelope Protein Lem2 is Required for Mouse Development and Regulates MAP and AKT Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Olga; Fong, Loren G.; Huber, Michael D.; Young, Stephen G.; Gerace, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina, along with associated nuclear membrane proteins, is a nexus for regulating signaling in the nucleus. Numerous human diseases arise from mutations in lamina proteins, and experimental models for these disorders have revealed aberrant regulation of various signaling pathways. Previously, we reported that the inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2, which is expressed at high levels in muscle, promotes the differentiation of cultured myoblasts by attenuating ERK signaling. Here, we have analyzed mice harboring a disrupted allele for the Lem2 gene (Lemd2). No gross phenotypic defects were seen in heterozygotes, although muscle regeneration induced by cardiotoxin was delayed. By contrast, homozygous Lemd2 knockout mice died by E11.5. Although many normal morphogenetic hallmarks were observed in E10.5 knockout embryos, most tissues were substantially reduced in size. This was accompanied by activation of multiple MAP kinases (ERK1/2, JNK, p38) and AKT. Knockdown of Lem2 expression in C2C12 myoblasts also led to activation of MAP kinases and AKT. These findings indicate that Lemd2 plays an essential role in mouse embryonic development and that it is involved in regulating several signaling pathways. Since increased MAP kinase and AKT/mTORC signaling is found in other animal models for diseases linked to nuclear lamina proteins, LEMD2 should be considered to be another candidate gene for human disease. PMID:25790465

  14. The Leukocyte Nuclear Envelope Proteome Varies with Cell Activation and Contains Novel Transmembrane Proteins That Affect Genome Architecture*

    PubMed Central

    Korfali, Nadia; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Swanson, Selene K.; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; Fairley, Elizabeth A. L.; Malik, Poonam; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Goncharevich, Alexander; de las Heras, Jose; Kelly, David A.; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    A favored hypothesis to explain the pathology underlying nuclear envelopathies is that mutations in nuclear envelope proteins alter genome/chromatin organization and thus gene expression. To identify nuclear envelope proteins that play roles in genome organization, we analyzed nuclear envelopes from resting and phytohemagglutinin-activated leukocytes because leukocytes have a particularly high density of peripheral chromatin that undergoes significant reorganization upon such activation. Thus, nuclear envelopes were isolated from leukocytes in the two states and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology using an approach that used expected contaminating membranes as subtractive fractions. A total of 3351 proteins were identified between both nuclear envelope data sets among which were 87 putative nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that were not identified in a previous proteomics analysis of liver nuclear envelopes. Nuclear envelope localization was confirmed for 11 new NETs using tagged fusion proteins and antibodies on spleen cryosections. 27% of the new proteins identified were unique to one or the other of the two leukocyte states. Differences in expression between activated and resting leukocytes were confirmed for some NETs by RT-PCR, and most of these proteins appear to only be expressed in certain types of blood cells. Several known proteins identified in both data sets have functions in chromatin organization and gene regulation. To test whether the novel NETs identified might include those that also regulate chromatin, nine were run through two screens for different chromatin effects. One screen found two NETs that can recruit a specific gene locus to the nuclear periphery, and the second found a different NET that promotes chromatin condensation. The variation in the protein milieu with pharmacological activation of the same cell population and consequences for gene regulation suggest that the nuclear envelope is a complex regulatory system with significant influences on genome organization. PMID:20693407

  15. Evidence for Distinct Substrate Specificities of Importin α Family Members in Nuclear Protein Import

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Matthias; Speck, Christian; Christiansen, Marret; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Prehn, Siegfried; Haller, Hermann; Görlich, Dirk; Hartmann, Enno

    1999-01-01

    Importin α plays a pivotal role in the classical nuclear protein import pathway. Importin α shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm, binds nuclear localization signal-bearing proteins, and functions as an adapter to access the importin β-dependent import pathway. In contrast to what is found for importin β, several isoforms of importin α, which can be grouped into three subfamilies, exist in higher eucaryotes. We describe here a novel member of the human family, importin α7. To analyze specific functions of the distinct importin α proteins, we recombinantly expressed and purified five human importin α’s along with importin α from Xenopus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding affinity studies showed that all importin α proteins from humans or Xenopus bind their import receptor (importin β) and their export receptor (CAS) with only marginal differences. Using an in vitro import assay based on permeabilized HeLa cells, we compared the import substrate specificities of the various importin α proteins. When the substrates were tested singly, only the import of RCC1 showed a strong preference for one family member, importin α3, whereas most of the other substrates were imported by all importin α proteins with similar efficiencies. However, strikingly different substrate preferences of the various importin α proteins were revealed when two substrates were offered simultaneously. PMID:10523667

  16. Inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 plays a prominent role in mammalian mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) can be roughly classified into two forms: bulk and specific export, involving an nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)-dependent pathway and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent pathway, respectively. SUN proteins constitute the inner nuclear envelope component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Here, we show that mammalian cells require SUN1 for efficient nuclear mRNP export. The results indicate that both SUN1 and SUN2 interact with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) F/H and hnRNP K/J. SUN1 depletion inhibits the mRNP export, with accumulations of both hnRNPs and poly(A)+RNA in the nucleus. Leptomycin B treatment indicates that SUN1 functions in mammalian mRNA export involving the NXF1-dependent pathway. SUN1 mediates mRNA export through its association with mRNP complexes via a direct interaction with NXF1. Additionally, SUN1 associates with the NPC through a direct interaction with Nup153, a nuclear pore component involved in mRNA export. Taken together, our results reveal that the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 has additional functions aside from being a central component of the LINC complex and that it is an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export pathway suggesting a model whereby SUN1 recruits NXF1-containing mRNP onto the nuclear envelope and hands it over to Nup153. PMID:26476453

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sushkov, A. O.; Urbach, E.; de Leon, N. P.; Choi, S.; De Greve, K.; Evans, R.; Gertner, R.; Bersin, E.; Müller, C.; McGuinness, L.; Jelezko, F.; Walsworth, R. L.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    PubMed

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition. PMID:26847544

  19. Identification of different roles for RanGDP and RanGTP in nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, D; Panté, N; Kutay, U; Aebi, U; Bischoff, F R

    1996-01-01

    The importin-alpha/beta heterodimer and the GTPase Ran play key roles in nuclear protein import. Importin binds the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Translocation of the resulting import ligand complex through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires Ran and is terminated at the nucleoplasmic side by its disassembly. The principal GTP exchange factor for Ran is the nuclear protein RCC1, whereas the major RanGAP is cytoplasmic, predicting that nuclear Ran is mainly in the GTP form and cytoplasmic Ran is in the GDP-bound form. Here, we show that nuclear import depends on cytoplasmic RanGDP and free GTP, and that RanGDP binds to the NPC. Therefore, import might involve nucleotide exchange and GTP hydrolysis on NPC-bound Ran. RanGDP binding to the NPC is not mediated by the Ran binding sites of importin-beta, suggesting that translocation is not driven from these sites. Consistently, a mutant importin-beta deficient in Ran binding can deliver its cargo up to the nucleoplasmic side of the NPC. However, the mutant is unable to release the import substrate into the nucleoplasm. Thus, binding of nucleoplasmic RanGTP to importin-beta probably triggers termination, i.e. the dissociation of importin-alpha from importin-beta and the subsequent release of the import substrate into the nucleoplasm. Images PMID:8896452

  20. Protein folding at atomic resolution: analysis of autonomously folding supersecondary structure motifs by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Sadqi, Mourad; de Alba, Eva; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein folding has been conventionally hampered by the assumption that all single-domain proteins fold by an all-or-none process (two-state folding) that makes it impossible to resolve folding mechanisms experimentally. Here we describe an experimental method for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding at atomic resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method is specifically developed for the study of small proteins that fold autonomously into basic supersecondary structure motifs, and that do so in the sub-millisecond timescale (folding archetypes). From the NMR experiments we obtain hundreds of atomic unfolding curves that are subsequently analyzed leading to the determination of the characteristic network of folding interactions. The application of this approach to a comprehensive catalog of elementary folding archetypes holds the promise of becoming the first experimental approach capable of unraveling the basic rules connecting protein structure and folding mechanism. PMID:22987355

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Vasopressin-Responsive Nuclear Proteins in Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Laura K.; Bolger, Steven J.; Luginbuhl, Kelli; Gonzales, Patricia A.; Rinschen, Markus M.; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin controls transport in the renal collecting duct, in part, by regulating transcription. This complex process, which can involve translocation and/or modification of transcriptional regulators, is not completely understood. Here, we applied a method for large-scale profiling of nuclear proteins to quantify vasopressin-induced changes in the nuclear proteome of cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells. Using stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry, we quantified 3987 nuclear proteins and identified significant changes in the abundance of 65, including previously established targets of vasopressin signaling in the collecting duct. Vasopressin-induced changes in the abundance of the transcription factors JunB, Elf3, Gatad2b, and Hmbox1; transcriptional co-regulators Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) and Crebbp; subunits of the Mediator complex; E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4; nuclear transport regulator RanGap1; and several proteins associated with tight junctions and adherens junctions. Bioinformatic analysis showed that many of the quantified transcription factors have putative binding sites in the 5′-flanking regions of genes coding for the channel proteins Aqp2, Aqp3, Scnn1b (ENaCβ), and Scnn1g (ENaCγ), which are known targets of vasopressin. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the increase in β-catenin in nuclear fractions was accompanied by an even larger increase in its phosphorylated form (pSer552). The findings provide a new online database resource for nuclear proteomics (http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mNPD/) and generate new hypotheses regarding vasopressin-mediated transcriptional regulation in the collecting duct. PMID:22440904

  2. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. - Highlights: • KCTD5 nuclear translocation depends upon M phase and protein oligomerization. • Identification of MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193 as KCTD5 interaction partners. • Formation of trimeric complexes of KCTD5/cullin3 with MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193B. • KCTD5 is not involved in polyubiquitylation of MCM7 replication factor. • The KCTD5/cullin3 complex stabilizes ZNF711 transcription factor.

  3. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the mouse TET3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Peng; Zhou, Xiao-long; Zhang, Hong-xiao; Xiong, Kai; Teng, Yun; Huang, Xian-ju; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Hong-lin

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •Amino acid sequence KKRK is responsible for nuclear localization of TET3. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are capable of targeting the cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are conserved in TET3 orthologs. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation is associated with gene activation and is mediated by a family of ten-eleven translocation (TET) dioxygenase. The TET3 protein is a 1668-amino-acid DNA demethylase that is predicted to possess five nuclear localization signals (NLSs). In this paper, we used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged and mutation constructs to identify a conserved NLS (KKRK) embedded between amino acid 1615 and 1618 of mouse TET3. The KKRK sequence facilitates the cytoplasmic protein’s translocation into the nucleus. Additionally TET3 may be imported into the nucleus by importin-α and importin-β.

  4. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 ; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 ; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  5. Nuclear actions of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Robert C

    2015-09-10

    In addition to its actions outside the cell, cellular uptake and nuclear import of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has been recognized for almost two decades, but knowledge of its nuclear actions has been slow to emerge. IGFBP-3 has a functional nuclear localization signal and interacts with the nuclear transport protein importin-β. Within the nucleus IGFBP-3 appears to have a role in transcriptional regulation. It can bind to the nuclear receptor, retinoid X receptor-α and several of its dimerization partners, including retinoic acid receptor, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). These interactions modulate the functions of these receptors, for example inhibiting VDR-dependent transcription in osteoblasts and PPARγ-dependent transcription in adipocytes. Nuclear IGFBP-3 can be detected by immunohistochemistry in cancer and other tissues, and its presence in the nucleus has been shown in many cell culture studies to be necessary for its pro-apoptotic effect, which may also involve interaction with the nuclear receptor Nur77, and export from the nucleus. IGFBP-3 is p53-inducible and in response to DNA damage, forms a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), translocating to the nucleus to interact with DNA-dependent protein kinase. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity or downregulation of IGFBP-3 can inhibit DNA double strand-break repair by nonhomologous end joining. IGFBP-3 thus has the ability to influence many cell functions through its interactions with intranuclear pathways, but the importance of these interactions in vivo, and their potential to be targeted for therapeutic benefit, require further investigation. PMID:26074086

  6. Protein-protein interactions that precede the nuclear entry of goat uterine estrogen receptor under cell-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Sai Padma, A; Renil, M; Varman Thampan, R

    2000-06-12

    Mechanisms associated with a regulated nuclear entry of the goat uterine estrogen receptor (gER), under the influence of estradiol, have been examined using a cell-free system. The gER transport into the nucleus is mediated by a 55-kDa cytosolic protein, p55. Experimental evidence has been provided to demonstrate that p55 binds to the nuclear localization signals (NLS) on the gER. Under hormone-free conditions, a 28-kDa protein, p28, binds to the NLS and prevents the p55 interaction with the NLS. This inhibition is reversed by a 73-kDa protein, p73. It appears that p73 associates with the hormone binding domain (HBD) of the gER under hormone-free conditions. Estradiol binding to the HBD facilitates p73 interaction with p28. This leads to the dissociation of p28 from the NLS, which, in turn, facilitates the binding of p55 to the NLS on the gER. Both p28 and p55 cross-react with monoclonal antibodies against hsp-25 and hsp-70, indicating a possibility that p28 and p55 belong to a superfamily of molecular chaperones. J. Cell. Biochem. 78:650-665, 2000. PMID:10861862

  7. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M.; Heery, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  8. A Crowdsourced nucleus: Understanding nuclear organization in terms of dynamically networked protein function

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ashley M.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of the nucleus results in a compartmentalized structure that affects all aspects of nuclear function. This compartmentalization involves genome organization as well as the formation of nuclear bodies and plays a role in many functions, including gene regulation, genome stability, replication, and RNA processing. Here we review the recent findings associated with the spatial organization of the nucleus and reveal that a common theme for nuclear proteins is their ability to participate in a variety of functions and pathways. We consider this multiplicity of function in terms of Crowdsourcing, a recent phenomenon in the world of information technology, and suggest that this model provides a novel way to synthesize the many intersections between nuclear organization and function. PMID:24412853

  9. "Nuclear FGF receptor-1 and CREB binding protein: an integrative signaling module".

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Michal K; Birkaya, B; Aletta, J M; Narla, S T; Benson, C A; Decker, B; Stachowiak, E K

    2015-05-01

    In this review we summarize the current understanding of a novel integrative function of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1) and its partner CREB Binding Protein (CBP) acting as a nuclear regulatory complex. Nuclear FGFR1 and CBP interact with and regulate numerous genes on various chromosomes. FGFR1 dynamic oscillatory interactions with chromatin and with specific genes, underwrites gene regulation mediated by diverse developmental signals. Integrative Nuclear FGFR1 Signaling (INFS) effects the differentiation of stem cells and neural progenitor cells via the gene-controlling Feed-Forward-And-Gate mechanism. Nuclear accumulation of FGFR1 occurs in numerous cell types and disruption of INFS may play an important role in developmental disorders such as schizophrenia, and in metastatic diseases such as cancer. Enhancement of INFS may be used to coordinate the gene regulation needed to activate cell differentiation for regenerative purposes or to provide interruption of cancer stem cell proliferation. PMID:25503065

  10. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine , Shanghai 200025 ; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  11. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    SciTech Connect

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H. . E-mail: doday@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ({sup 171}EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF{sup 195}) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues {sup 48}KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK{sup 64} that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to {sup 48}EF{sup 49} abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the {sup 48}EF{sup 49} construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

  12. Nuclear localization of orphan receptor protein kinase (Ror1) is mediated through the juxtamembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as EGFR, FGFR, TRK, and VEGFR are capable of localizing in the cell nucleus in addition to their usual plasma membrane localization. Recent reports also demonstrate that nuclear-localized RTKs have important cellular functions such as transcriptional activation. On the basis of preliminary bioinformatic analysis, additional RTKs, including receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (Ror1) were predicted to have the potential for nuclear subcellular localization. Ror1 is a receptor protein tyrosine kinase that modulates neurite growth in the central nervous system. Because the nuclear localization capability of the Ror1 cytoplasmic domain has not been reported, we examined the cellular expression distribution of this region. Results The Ror1 cytoplasmic region was amplified and cloned into reporter constructs with fluorescent tags. Following transfection, the nuclear distribution patterns of transiently expressed fusion proteins were observed. Serial deletion constructs were then used to map the juxtamembrane domain of Ror1 (aa_471-513) for this nuclear translocation activity. Further site-directed mutagenesis suggested that a KxxK-16 aa-KxxK sequence at residues 486-509 is responsible for the nuclear translocation interaction. Subsequent immunofluorescence analysis by cotransfection of Ran and Ror1 implied that the nuclear translocation event of Ror1 might be mediated through the Ran pathway. Conclusions We have predicted several RTKs that contain the nuclear localization signals. This is the first report to suggest that the juxtamembrane domain of the Ror1 cytoplasmic region mediates the translocation event. Ran GTPase is also implicated in this event. Our study might be beneficial in future research to understand the Ror1 biological signaling pathway. PMID:20587074

  13. Molecular cloning of a novel importin alpha homologue from rice, by which constitutive photomorphogenic 1 (COP1) nuclear localization signal (NLS)-protein is preferentially nuclear imported.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C J; Shoji, K; Matsuki, R; Baba, A; Inagaki, N; Ban, H; Iwasaki, T; Imamoto, N; Yoneda, Y; Deng, X W; Yamamoto, N

    2001-03-23

    Nuclear import of proteins that contain classical nuclear localization signals (NLS) is initiated by importin alpha, a protein that recognizes and binds to the NLS in the cytoplasm. In this paper, we have cloned a cDNA for a novel importin alpha homologue from rice which is in addition to our previously isolated rice importin alpha1a and alpha2, and we have named it rice importin alpha1b. In vitro binding and nuclear import assays using recombinant importin alpha1b protein demonstrate that rice importin alpha1b functions as a component of the NLS-receptor in plant cells. Analysis of the transcript levels for all three rice importin alpha genes revealed that the genes were not only differentially expressed but that they also responded to dark-adaptation in green leaves. Furthermore, we also show that the COP1 protein bears a bipartite-type NLS and its nuclear import is mediated preferentially by the rice importin alpha1b. These data suggest that each of the different rice importin alpha proteins carry distinct groups of nuclear proteins, such that multiple isoforms of importin alpha contribute to the regulation of plant nuclear protein transport. PMID:11124253

  14. C-reactive protein reacts with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du Clos, T.W. )

    1989-10-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) was found to produce a small, discrete, speckled fluorescence pattern in the nucleus of HEp-2 cells. Double staining with anti-RNP serum and CRP produced very similar staining patterns. By counterimmunoelectrophoresis CRP was bound to extractable nuclear antigens found in rabbit thymus extract. The reactive components of the extract were only partially sensitive to treatment with RNase. CRP immunoprecipitated the U1 RNA species from ({sup 32}P)labeled HeLa cells and the protein bands of the Sm/RNP complex from ({sup 35}S)-methionine-labeled HeLa cells. By blotting, CRP bound to several discrete bands in a calcium-dependent, PC-inhibitable manner. Two of the bands comigrated with the 70K protein band associated with the U1 snRNP, and its major breakdown product. Binding to these bands was inhibited by both EDTA and PC indicating that CRP binds these proteins through the PC-binding site. Binding to the 70K protein of the U1 snRNP was confirmed by reactivity with the recombinant 70K protein in a dot blot. These findings indicate the CRP binds to the U1-RNP snRNP particle. Considering the ability of CRP to inhibit antibody responses to its ligands and its ability to activate C and promote phagocytosis it is suggested that CRP may play a role in the regulation of autoantibody responses to nuclear Ag.

  15. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, N; McMahon, C; Blobel, G

    1991-01-01

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear and "suppressor-of-white-apricot" proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an approximately 70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, our structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing. Images PMID:1896467

  16. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.; McMahon, C.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-09-15

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and the Drosophila transformer and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an {approximately}70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, the structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing.

  17. Presence of a functional but dispensable Nuclear Export Signal in the HTLV-2 Tax protein

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Sbastien A; Meertens, Laurent; Calattini, Sara; Gessain, Antoine; Kiemer, Lars; Mahieux, Renaud

    2005-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 and type 2 are related human retroviruses. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of the Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma and of the Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy, whereas, HTLV-2 infection has not been formally associated with any T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 and 2 genomes encode, respectively, the Tax1 and Tax2 proteins whose role is to transactivate the viral promoter. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax sequences display 28% divergence at the amino acid level. Tax1 is a shuttling protein that possesses both a non canonical nuclear import (NLS) and a nuclear export (NES) signal. We have recently demonstrated that Tax1 and Tax2 display different subcellular localization and that residues 90100 are critical for this process. We investigate in the present report, whether Tax2 also possesses a functional NES. Results We first used a NES prediction method to determine whether the Tax2 protein might contain a NES and the results do suggest the presence of a NES sequence in Tax2. Using Green Fluorescent Protein-NES (GFP-NES) fusion proteins, we demonstrate that the Tax2 sequence encompasses a functional NES (NES2). As shown by microscope imaging, NES2 is able to mediate translocation of GFP from the nucleus, without the context of a full length Tax protein. Furthermore, point mutations or leptomycin B treatment abrogate NES2 function. However, within the context of full length Tax2, similar point mutations in the NES2 leucine rich stretch do not modify Tax2 localization. Finally, we also show that Tax1 NES function is dependent upon the positioning of the nuclear export signal "vis--vis" GFP. Conclusion HTLV-2 Tax NES is functional but dispensable for the protein localization in vitro. PMID:16285885

  18. CDK2 regulates nuclear envelope protein dynamics and telomere attachment in mouse meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Viera, Alberto; Alsheimer, Manfred; Gómez, Rocío; Berenguer, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Symonds, Catherine E; Santamaría, David; Benavente, Ricardo; Suja, José A

    2015-01-01

    In most organisms, telomeres attach to the nuclear envelope at the onset of meiosis to promote the crucial processes of pairing, recombination and synapsis during prophase I. This attachment of meiotic telomeres is mediated by the specific distribution of several nuclear envelope components that interact with the attachment plates of the synaptonemal complex. We have determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy that the ablation of the kinase CDK2 alters the nuclear envelope in mouse spermatocytes, and that the proteins SUN1, KASH5 (also known as CCDC155) and lamin C2 show an abnormal cap-like distribution facing the centrosome. Strikingly, some telomeres are not attached to the nuclear envelope but remain at the nuclear interior where they are associated with SUN1 and with nuclear-envelope-detached vesicles. We also demonstrate that mouse testis CDK2 phosphorylates SUN1 in vitro. We propose that during mammalian prophase I the kinase CDK2 is a key factor governing the structure of the nuclear envelope and the telomere-led chromosome movements essential for homolog pairing. PMID:25380821

  19. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis. PMID:27031510

  20. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  1. A Single Herpesvirus Protein Can Mediate Vesicle Formation in the Nuclear Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Michael; Vollmer, Benjamin; Unsay, Joseph D.; Klupp, Barbara G.; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Antonin, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses assemble capsids in the nucleus and egress by unconventional vesicle-mediated trafficking through the nuclear envelope. Capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the nuclear envelope lumen. The resulting intralumenal vesicles fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, delivering the capsids to the cytoplasm. Two viral proteins are required for vesicle formation, the tail-anchored pUL34 and its soluble interactor, pUL31. Whether cellular proteins are involved is unclear. Using giant unilamellar vesicles, we show that pUL31 and pUL34 are sufficient for membrane budding and scission. pUL34 function can be bypassed by membrane tethering of pUL31, demonstrating that pUL34 is required for pUL31 membrane recruitment but not for membrane remodeling. pUL31 can inwardly deform membranes by oligomerizing on their inner surface to form buds that constrict to vesicles. Therefore, a single viral protein can mediate all events necessary for membrane budding and abscission. PMID:25605719

  2. Mutational analyses of fs(1)Ya, an essential, developmentally regulated, nuclear envelope protein in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Song, Kiwon; Wolfner, M.F.

    1995-12-01

    The fs(1)Ya protein (YA) is an essential, maternally encoded, nuclear lamina protein that is under both developmental and cell cycle control. A strong Ya mutation results in early arrest of embryos. To define the function of YA in the nuclear envelope during early embryonic development, we characterized the phenotypes of four Ya mutant alleles and determined their molecular lesions. Ya mutant embryos arrest with abnormal nuclear envelopes prior to the first mitotic division; a proportion of embryos from two leaky Ya mutants proceed beyond this but arrest after several abnormal divisions. Ya unfertilized eggs contain nuclei of different sizes and condensation states, apparently due to abnormal fusion of the meiotic products immediately after meiosis. Lamin is localized at the periphery of the uncondensed nuclei in these eggs. These results suggest that Ya function is required during and after egg maturation to facilitate proper chromatin condensation, rather than to allow a lamin-containing nuclear envelope to form. Two leaky Ya alleles that partially complement have lesions at opposite ends of the YA protein, suggesting that the N- and C-termini are important for YA function might interact with itself either directly or indirectly. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  3. The retinoblastoma gene product is a cell cycle-dependent, nuclear matrix-associated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, M A; Shan, B; Nickerson, J A; Penman, S; Lee, W H

    1994-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb) has been established as a tumor suppressor and cell cycle regulator, although its mechanism of action remains obscure. The observations that several Rb-binding viral oncoproteins all associate with the nuclear matrix suggest that these interactions may occur on this structure. To determine whether Rb itself is a component of the matrix, we extracted synchronized cultured cells to isolate matrix proteins while preserving nuclear architecture. Immunoblot and immunolabeling data show that a significant portion of hypophosphorylated Rb associates with the matrix only during early G1. Mutant Rb in tumor cells did not associate with the matrix, whereas Rb-reconstituted cells contained abundant matrix-bound Rb. Rb is distributed widely throughout the matrix, particularly concentrated at the nuclear periphery and in nucleolar remnants. Core filaments of the matrix contained no detectable Rb. Our screening of expression libraries for potential Rb-associated proteins has identified several that are part of the matrix. Specifically, the peripheral matrix proteins lamin A and C bound Rb in vitro. We therefore suggest that Rb interactions with the nuclear matrix may be important for its ability to regulate cell cycle progression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8278403

  4. MLV based viral-like-particles for delivery of toxic proteins and nuclear transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dai-Tze; Roth, Monica J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed nanoparticles based on Murine Leukemia Virus virus-like-particles (VLPs) that efficiently deliver therapeutic bioactive proteins in their native state into target cells. Nuclear transcription factors and toxic proteins were incorporated into the VLPs from stable producer cells without transducing viral-encoded genetic material. Delivery of nuclear transcription factors required incorporation of nuclear export signals (NESs) into the vector backbone for the efficient formation of VLPs. In the presence of an appropriate targeting Env glycoprotein, transcription factors delivered and activated nuclear transcription in the target cells. Additionally, we show delivery of the bacterial toxin, MazF, which is an ACA-specific mRNA interferase resulted in the induction of cell death. The stable producer cells are protected from the toxin through co-expression of the anti-toxin MazE and continuously released MazF incorporating VLPs. This highly adaptable platform can be harnessed to alter and regulate cellular processes by bioactive protein delivery. PMID:24997480

  5. Epstein - Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 suppresses reporter activity through modulation of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to increase the expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) and the immunofluorescent intensity of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs). PML NBs have been implicated in the modulation of transcription and the association of reporter plasmids with PML NBs has been implicated in repression of reporter activity. Additionally, repression of various reporters in the presence of LMP1 has been noted. This study demonstrates that LMP1 suppresses expression of reporter activity in a dose responsive manner and corresponds with the LMP1 induced increase in PML NB intensity. Disruption of PML NBs with arsenic trioxide or a PML siRNA restores reporter activity. These data offer an explanation for previously conflicting data on LMP1 signaling and calls attention to the possibility of false-positives and false-negatives when using reporter assays as a research tool in cells expressing LMP1. PMID:21975125

  6. Tau protein binds to pericentromeric DNA: a putative role for nuclear tau in nucleolar organization.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Marcela K; Shestakova, Elena; Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Maccioni, Ricardo B; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2006-05-15

    The microtubule-associated tau protein participates in the organization and integrity of the neuronal cytoskeleton. A nuclear form of tau has been described in neuronal and non-neuronal cells, which displays a nucleolar localization during interphase but is associated with nucleolar-organizing regions in mitotic cells. In the present study, based on immunofluorescence, immuno-FISH and confocal microscopy, we show that nuclear tau is mainly present at the internal periphery of nucleoli, partially colocalizing with the nucleolar protein nucleolin and human AT-rich alpha-satellite DNA sequences organized as constitutive heterochromatin. By using gel retardation, we demonstrate that tau not only colocalizes with, but also specifically binds to, AT-rich satellite DNA sequences apparently through the recognition of AT-rich DNA stretches. Here we propose a functional role for nuclear tau in relation to the nucleolar organization and/or heterochromatinization of a portion of RNA genes. Since nuclear tau has also been found in neurons from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), aberrant nuclear tau could affect the nucleolar organization during the course of AD. We discuss nucleolar tau associated with AT-rich alpha-satellite DNA sequences as a potential molecular link between trisomy 21 and AD. PMID:16638814

  7. Herpes simplex virus 2 UL13 protein kinase disrupts nuclear lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Cano-Monreal, Gina L.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A.

    2009-09-15

    Herpesviruses must cross the inner nuclear membrane and underlying lamina to exit the nucleus. HSV-1 US3 and PKC can phosphorylate lamins and induce their dispersion but do not elicit all of the phosphorylated lamin species produced during infection. UL13 is a serine threonine protein kinase conserved among many herpesviruses. HSV-1 UL13 phosphorylates US3 and thereby controls UL31 and UL34 nuclear rim localization, indicating a role in nuclear egress. Here, we report that HSV-2 UL13 alone induced conformational changes in lamins A and C and redistributed lamin B1 from the nuclear rim to intranuclear granular structures. HSV-2 UL13 directly phosphorylated lamins A, C, and B1 in vitro, and the lamin A1 tail domain. HSV-2 infection recapitulated the lamin alterations seen upon expression of UL13 alone, and other alterations were also observed, indicating that additional viral and/or cellular proteins cooperate with UL13 to alter lamins during HSV-2 infection to allow nuclear egress.

  8. Interactome of the negative regulator of nuclear import BRCA1-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Shadma; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Loveland, Kate L; Jans, David A

    2015-01-01

    Although the negative regulator of nuclear import (NRNI) BRCA1 binding protein 2 (BRAP2) is highly expressed in testis, its role is largely unknown. Here we address this question by documenting the BRAP2 interactome from human testis, using the yeast 2-hybrid system to identify BRAP2-interacting proteins with roles in diverse cellular processes, including regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, ubiquitinylation, cell cycle/apoptosis and transcription. Interaction with BRAP2 in adult mouse testis with three of these, PH domain and leucine rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), A-Kinase anchor protein (AKAP3) and DNA methyl transferase 1 (DNMT1), was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation assays. BRAP2's ability to inhibit PHLPP1 and DNMT1 nuclear localisation was also confirmed by quantitative confocal microscopy. Importantly, the physiological relevance thereof was implied by the cytoplasmic localisation of PHLPP1, AKAP3 and DNMT1 in pachytene spermatocytes/round spermatids where BRAP2 is present at high levels, and nuclear localisation of PHLPP1 and DNMT1 in spermatogonia concomitant with lower levels of BRAP2. Interestingly, BRAP2 was also present in murine spermatozoa, in part colocalised with AKAP3. Together the results indicate for the first time that BRAP2 may play an important NRNI role in germ cells of the testis, with an additional, scaffold/structural role in mature spermatozoa. PMID:25820252

  9. Control of heterochromatin localization and silencing by the nuclear membrane protein Lem2.

    PubMed

    Barrales, Ramón Ramos; Forn, Marta; Georgescu, Paula Raluca; Sarkadi, Zsuzsa; Braun, Sigurd

    2016-01-15

    Transcriptionally silent chromatin localizes to the nuclear periphery, which provides a special microenvironment for gene repression. A variety of nuclear membrane proteins interact with repressed chromatin, yet the functional role of these interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear membrane protein Lem2 associates with chromatin and mediates silencing and heterochromatin localization. Unexpectedly, we found that these functions can be separated and assigned to different structural domains within Lem2, excluding a simple tethering mechanism. Chromatin association and tethering of centromeres to the periphery are mediated by the N-terminal LEM (LAP2-Emerin-MAN1) domain of Lem2, whereas telomere anchoring and heterochromatin silencing require exclusively its conserved C-terminal MSC (MAN1-Src1 C-terminal) domain. Particularly, silencing by Lem2 is epistatic with the Snf2/HDAC (histone deacetylase) repressor complex SHREC at telomeres, while its necessity can be bypassed by deleting Epe1, a JmjC protein with anti-silencing activity. Furthermore, we found that loss of Lem2 reduces heterochromatin association of SHREC, which is accompanied by increased binding of Epe1. This reveals a critical function of Lem2 in coordinating these antagonistic factors at heterochromatin. The distinct silencing and localization functions mediated by Lem2 suggest that these conserved LEM-containing proteins go beyond simple tethering to play active roles in perinuclear silencing. PMID:26744419

  10. Nuclear ARVCF Protein Binds Splicing Factors and Contributes to the Regulation of Alternative Splicing*

    PubMed Central

    Rappe, Ulrike; Schlechter, Tanja; Aschoff, Moritz; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Hofmann, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The armadillo repeat protein ARVCF is a component of adherens junctions. Similar to related proteins, such as p120-catenin and β-catenin, with known signaling functions, localization studies indicate a cytoplasmic and a nuclear pool of ARVCF. We find that ARVCF interacts with different proteins involved in mRNA-processing: the splicing factor SRSF1 (SF2/ASF), the RNA helicase p68 (DDX5), and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP H2. All three proteins bind to ARVCF in an RNA-independent manner. Furthermore, ARVCF occurs in large RNA-containing complexes that contain both spliced and unspliced mRNAs of housekeeping genes. By domain analysis, we show that interactions occur via the ARVCF C terminus. Overexpression of ARVCF, p68, SRSF1, and hnRNP H2 induces a significant increase in splicing activity of a reporter mRNA. Upon depletion of ARVCF followed by RNA sequence analysis, several alternatively spliced transcripts are significantly changed. Therefore, we conclude that nuclear ARVCF influences splicing of pre-mRNAs. We hypothesize that ARVCF is involved in alternative splicing, generating proteomic diversity, and its deregulation may contribute to diseased states, such as cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:24644279

  11. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a dynamic nuclear and sarcomeric protein

    PubMed Central

    Hanel, Meredith L.; Sun, Chia-Yun Jessica; Jones, Takako I.; Long, Steven W.; Zanotti, Simona; Milner, Derek; Jones, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a candidate gene for mediating FSHD pathophysiology, however, very little is known about the endogenous FRG1 protein. This study uses immunocytochemistry (ICC) and histology to provide insight into FRG1's role in vertebrate muscle development and address its potential involvement in FSHD pathophysiology. In cell culture, primary myoblast/myotube cultures, and mouse and human muscle sections, FRG1 showed distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations and nuclear shuttling assays indicated the subcellular pools of FRG1 are linked. During myoblast differentiation, FRG1's subcellular distribution changed dramatically with FRG1 eventually associating with the matured Z-discs. This Z-disc localization was confirmed using isolated mouse myofibers and found to be maintained in adult human skeletal muscle biopsies. Thus, FRG1 is not likely involved in the initial assembly and alignment of the Z-disc but may be involved in sarcomere maintenance or signaling. Further analysis of human tissue showed FRG1 is strongly expressed in arteries, veins, and capillaries, the other prominently affected tissue in FSHD. Overall, we show that in mammalian cells, FRG1 is a dynamic nuclear and cytoplasmic protein, however in muscle, FRG1 is also a developmentally regulated sarcomeric protein suggesting FRG1 may perform a muscle-specific function. Thus, FRG1 is the only FSHD candidate protein linked to the muscle contractile machinery and may address why the musculature and vasculature are specifically susceptible in FSHD. PMID:20970242

  12. Histone H3 Interacts and Colocalizes with the Nuclear Shuttle Protein and the Movement Protein of a Geminivirus ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Rojas, Maria R.; Park, Mi-Ri; Seo, Young-Su; Lucas, William J.; Gilbertson, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses are plant-infecting viruses with small circular single-stranded DNA genomes. These viruses utilize nuclear shuttle proteins (NSPs) and movement proteins (MPs) for trafficking of infectious DNA through the nuclear pore complex and plasmodesmata, respectively. Here, a biochemical approach was used to identify host factors interacting with the NSP and MP of the geminivirus Bean dwarf mosaic virus (BDMV). Based on these studies, we identified and characterized a host nucleoprotein, histone H3, which interacts with both the NSP and MP. The specific nature of the interaction of histone H3 with these viral proteins was established by gel overlay and in vitro and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays. The NSP and MP interaction domains were mapped to the N-terminal region of histone H3. These experiments also revealed a direct interaction between the BDMV NSP and MP, as well as interactions between histone H3 and the capsid proteins of various geminiviruses. Transient-expression assays revealed the colocalization of histone H3 and NSP in the nucleus and nucleolus and of histone H3 and MP in the cell periphery and plasmodesmata. Finally, using in vivo co-IP assays with a Myc-tagged histone H3, a complex composed of histone H3, NSP, MP, and viral DNA was recovered. Taken together, these findings implicate the host factor histone H3 in the process by which an infectious geminiviral DNA complex forms within the nucleus for export to the cell periphery and cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata. PMID:21900168

  13. Comprehensive evaluation of solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy sample preparation for helical integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Page, Richard C; Moore, Jacob D; Nguyen, Hau B; Sharma, Mukesh; Chase, Rose; Gao, Fei Philip; Mobley, Charles K; Sanders, Charles R; Ma, Liping; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Lee, Sangwon; Howell, Stanley C; Opella, Stanley J; Cross, Timothy A

    2006-03-01

    The preparation of high quality samples is a critical challenge for the structural characterization of helical integral membrane proteins. Solving the structures of this diverse class of proteins by solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) requires that well-resolved 2D 1H/15N chemical shift correlation spectra be obtained. Acquiring these spectra demands the production of samples with high levels of purity and excellent homogeneity throughout the sample. In addition, high yields of isotopically enriched protein and efficient purification protocols are required. We describe two robust sample preparation methods for preparing high quality, homogeneous samples of helical integral membrane proteins. These sample preparation protocols have been combined with screens for detergents and sample conditions leading to the efficient production of samples suitable for solution NMR spectroscopy. We have examined 18 helical integral membrane proteins, ranging in size from approximately 9 kDa to 29 kDa with 1-4 transmembrane helices, originating from a number of bacterial and viral genomes. 2D 1H/15N chemical shift correlation spectra acquired for each protein demonstrate well-resolved resonances, and >90% detection of the predicted resonances. These results indicate that with proper sample preparation, high quality solution NMR spectra of helical integral membrane proteins can be obtained greatly enhancing the probability for structural characterization of these important proteins. PMID:16850177

  14. Nuclear Export and Retention Signals in the RS Domain of SR Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cazalla, Demian; Zhu, Jun; Manche, Lisa; Huber, Elisabeth; Krainer, Adrian R.; Cceres, Javier F.

    2002-01-01

    Splicing factors of the SR protein family share a modular structure consisting of one or two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a C-terminal RS domain rich in arginine and serine residues. The RS domain, which is extensively phosphorylated, promotes protein-protein interactions and directs subcellular localization andin certain situationsnucleocytoplasmic shuttling of individual SR proteins. We analyzed mutant versions of human SF2/ASF in which the natural RS repeats were replaced by RD or RE repeats and compared the splicing and subcellular localization properties of these proteins to those of SF2/ASF lacking the entire RS domain or possessing a minimal RS domain consisting of 10 consecutive RS dipeptides (RS10). In vitro splicing of a pre-mRNA that requires an RS domain could take place when the mutant RD, RE, or RS10 domain replaced the natural domain. The RS10 version of SF2/ASF shuttled between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in the same manner as the wild-type protein, suggesting that a tract of consecutive RS dipeptides, in conjunction with the RRMs of SF2/ASF, is necessary and sufficient to direct nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. However, the SR protein SC35 has two long stretches of RS repeats, yet it is not a shuttling protein. We demonstrate the presence of a dominant nuclear retention signal in the RS domain of SC35. PMID:12215544

  15. Cloning and characterisation of a nuclear, site specific ssDNA binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smidt, M P; Russchen, B; Snippe, L; Wijnholds, J; Ab, G

    1995-01-01

    Estradiol inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene is mediated through the estrogen receptor and a variety of other DNA-binding proteins. In the present study we report the cloning and characterisation of a single-strand DNA binding protein that interacts with the lower strand of a complex regulatory site, which includes the major estrogen responsive element and a site that resembles the rat albumin site D (apoVLDL II site D). Based on its binding specificity determined with electro-mobility shift assays, the protein is named single-strand D-box binding factor (ssDBF). Analysis of the deduced 302 amino acid sequence revealed that the protein belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B family (hnRNP A/B) and resembles other known eukaryotic single-strand DNA binding proteins. Transient transfection experiments in a chicken liver cell-line showed that the protein represses estrogen-induced transcription. A protein with similar binding characteristics is present in liver nuclear extract. The relevance of the occurrence of this protein to the expression of the apoVLDL II gene is discussed. Images PMID:7630716

  16. Development of an ELISA detecting Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 in serum of prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Houda; Seillier, Marion; Sandi, Maria José; Peuget, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Dusetti, Nelson J; Iovanna, Juan L; Rocchi, Palma; Amri, Mohamed; Carrier, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) plays an important role during cell stress response in synergy with the potent "genome-keeper" p53. In human, the gene encoding TP53INP1 is expressed at very high level in some pathological situations, such as inflammation and prostate cancer (PC). TP53INP1 overexpression in PC seems to be a worse prognostic factor, particularly predictive of biological cancer relapse, making TP53INP1 a relevant specific target for molecular therapy of Castration Resistant (CR) PC. In that context, detection of TP53INP1 in patient biological fluids is a promising diagnostic avenue. We report here successful development of a new Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) detecting TP53INP1, taking advantage of molecular tools (monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and recombinant proteins) generated in the laboratory during the course of basic functional investigations devoted to TP53INP1. The ELISA principle is based on a sandwich immunoenzymatic system, TP53INP1 protein being trapped by a first specific mAb coated on microplate then recognized by a second specific mAb. This new assay allows specific detection of TP53INP1 in serum of several PC patients. This breakthrough paves the way towards investigation of a large cohort of patients and assessment of clinical applications of TP53INP1 dosage. PMID:24600558

  17. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Identification of a functional nuclear export signal in the green fluorescent protein asFP499

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Huseyin . E-mail: huseyinm@hotmail.com; Strasser, Bernd; Rauth, Sabine; Irving, Robert A.; Wark, Kim L.

    2006-04-21

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) asFP499 from Anemonia sulcata is a distant homologue of the GFP from Aequorea victoria. We cloned the asFP499 gene into a mammalian expression vector and showed that this protein was expressed in the human lymphoblast cell line Ramos RA1 and in the embryonic kidney 293T cell line (HEK 293T). In HEK 293T cells, asFP499 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, suggesting that the protein was excluded from the nucleus. We identified {sub 194}LRMEKLNI{sub 201} as a candidate nuclear export signal in asFP499 and mutated the isoleucine at position 201 to an alanine. Unlike the wildtype form, the mutant protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. This is First report of a GFP that contains a functional NES.

  19. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W. W.; , Francis E. Jenney, Jr.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2013-12-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  20. Nuclear localization of DMP1 proteins suggests a role in intracellular signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, Arwa; Department of Endodontology, Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University, 3223 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140-5007 ; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Mues, Gabriele; Stevens, Roy; D'Souza, Rena N.; Lu, Yongbo

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of DMP1 in various cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-synchronized cells show either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of DMP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear DMP1 is restricted to the nucleoplasm but absent in the nucleolus. -- Abstract: Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts/osteocytes and plays an essential role in tooth and bone mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. It is debatable whether DMP1, in addition to its function in the extracellular matrix, can enter the nucleus and function as a transcription factor. To better understand its function, we examined the nuclear localization of endogenous and exogenous DMP1 in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and 17IIA11 odontoblast-like cells. RT-PCR analyses showed the expression of endogenous Dmp1 in all three cell lines, while Western-blot analysis detected a major DMP1 protein band corresponding to the 57 kDa C-terminal fragment generated by proteolytic processing of the secreted full-length DMP1. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that non-synchronized cells presented two subpopulations with either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of endogenous DMP1. In addition, cells transfected with a construct expressing HA-tagged full-length DMP1 also showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of the exogenous DMP1 when examined with an antibody against the HA tag. Furthermore, nuclear DMP1 was restricted to the nucleoplasm but was absent in the nucleolus. In conclusion, these findings suggest that, apart from its role as a constituent of dentin and bone matrix, DMP1 might play a regulatory role in the nucleus.

  1. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:25144938

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana atrab28: a nuclear targeted protein related to germination and toxic cation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Antonio; Cutanda, M Cruz; Lumbreras, Victoria; Pujal, Judit; Goday, Adela; Culiáñez-Macià, Francisco A; Pagès, Montserrat

    2002-09-01

    The Arabidopsis gene Atrab28 has been shown to be expressed during late embryogenesis. The pattern of expression of Atrab28 mRNA and protein during embryo development is largely restricted to provascular tissues of mature embryos, and in contrast to the maize Rab28 homologue it cannot be induced by ABA and dehydration in vegetative tissues. Here, we have studied the subcellular location of Atrab28 protein and the effect of its over-expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The Atrab28 protein was mainly detected in the nucleus and nucleolus of cells from mature embryos. In frame fusion of Atrab28 to the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP) directed the GFP to the nucleus in transgenic Arabidopsis and in transiently transformed onion cells. Analysis of chimeric constructs identified an N-terminal region of 60 amino acids containing a five amino acid motif QPKRP that was necessary for targeting GFP to the nucleus. These results indicate that Atrab28 protein is targeted to the nuclear compartments by a new nuclear localization signal (NLS). Transgenic Arabidopsis plants, with gain of Atrab28 function, showed faster germination rates under either standard or salt and osmotic stress conditions. Moreover, improved cation toxicity tolerance was also observed not only during germination but also in seedlings. These results suggest a role of Atrab28 in the ion cell balance during late embryogenesis and germination. PMID:12175017

  3. LaRbp38: A Leishmania amazonensis protein that binds nuclear and kinetoplast DNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, C.B.B.; Siqueira Neto, J.L.; Giardini, M.A.; Winck, F.V.; Ramos, C.H.I.; Cano, M.I.N. . E-mail: micano@ibb.unesp.br

    2007-07-06

    Leishmania amazonensis causes a wide spectrum of leishmaniasis. There are no vaccines or adequate treatment for leishmaniasis, therefore there is considerable interest in the identification of new targets for anti-leishmania drugs. The central role of telomere-binding proteins in cell maintenance makes these proteins potential targets for new drugs. In this work, we used a combination of purification chromatographies to screen L. amazonensis proteins for molecules capable of binding double-stranded telomeric DNA. This approach resulted in the purification of a 38 kDa polypeptide that was identified by mass spectrometry as Rbp38, a trypanosomatid protein previously shown to stabilize mitochondrial RNA and to associate with nuclear and kinetoplast DNAs. Western blotting and supershift assays confirmed the identity of the protein as LaRbp38. Competition and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that LaRbp38 interacted with kinetoplast and nuclear DNAs in vivo and suggested that LaRbp38 may have dual cellular localization and more than one function.

  4. Molecular basis for the redox control of nuclear transport of the structural chromatin protein Hmgb1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, George . E-mail: hoppeg@ccf.org; Talcott, Katherine E.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Crabb, John W.; Sears, Jonathan E.

    2006-11-01

    Oxidative stress can induce a covalent disulfide bond between protein and peptide thiols that is reversible through enzymatic catalysis. This process provides a post-translational mechanism for control of protein function and may also protect thiol groups from irreversible oxidation. High mobility group protein B1 (Hmgb1), a DNA-binding structural chromosomal protein and transcriptional co-activator was identified as a substrate of glutaredoxin. Hmgb1 contains 3 cysteines, Cys23, 45, and 106. In mild oxidative conditions, Cys23 and Cys45 readily form an intramolecular disulfide bridge, whereas Cys106 remains in the reduced form. The disulfide bond between Cys23 and Cys45 is a target of glutathione-dependent reduction by glutaredoxin. Endogenous Hmgb1 as well as GFP-tagged wild-type Hmgb1 co-localize in the nucleus of CHO cells. While replacement of Hmgb1 Cys23 and/or 45 with serines did not affect the nuclear distribution of the mutant proteins, Cys106-to-Ser and triple cysteine mutations impaired nuclear localization of Hmgb1. Our cysteine targeted mutational analysis suggests that Cys23 and 45 induce conformational changes in response to oxidative stress, whereas Cys106 appears to be critical for the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Hmgb1.

  5. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  6. Apoptotic activity of a nuclear form of mitogaligin, a cell death protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Patrick; Robinet, Pauline; Charpentier, Stephane; Mollet, Lucile; Normand, Thierry; Dubois, Martine; Legrand, Alain

    2009-01-23

    Galig, an internal gene to the galectin-3 gene, encodes two proteins and induces cell death in human cells. Mitogaligin, one of these proteins, contains a mitochondrial targeting sequence and promotes the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Here, we show that mitogaligin can also localize to nucleus. The nuclear form of mitogaligin induced cell death through a pathway exhibiting typical properties of apoptosis. These observations indicate for the first time that mitogaligin expresses cytotoxic properties not only when addressed to mitochondria but also when targeted to the nucleus.

  7. A cancer-associated RING finger protein, RNF43, is a ubiquitin ligase that interacts with a nuclear protein, HAP95

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, Takeyuki Yamaguchi, Aya; Miyamoto, Kentaro

    2008-04-15

    RNF43 is a recently discovered RING finger protein that is implicated in colon cancer pathogenesis. This protein possesses growth-promoting activity but its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, to gain insight into the biological action of RNF43 we characterized it biochemically and intracellularly. A combination of indirect immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation experiments suggests that RNF43 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nuclear envelope. Sucrose density gradient fractionation demonstrates that RNF43 co-exists with emerin, a representative inner nuclear membrane protein in the nuclear subcompartment. The cell-free system with pure components reveals that recombinant RNF43 fused with maltose-binding protein has autoubiquitylation activity. By the yeast two-hybrid screening we identified HAP95, a chromatin-associated protein interfacing the nuclear envelope, as an RNF43-interacting protein and substantiated this interaction in intact cells by the co-immunoprecipitation experiments. HAP95 is ubiquitylated and subjected to a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway, however, the experiments in which 293 cells expressing both RNF43 and HAP95 were treated with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, show that HAP95 is unlikely to serve as a substrate of RNF43 ubiquitin ligase. These results infer that RNF43 is a resident protein of the ER and, at least partially, the nuclear membrane, with ubiquitin ligase activity and may be involved in cell growth control potentially through the interaction with HAP95.

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Proteins Ectopically Expressed in the Heterologous Environment of Plant Cells are Strictly Targeted to the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Christian E.; Link, Katrin; Wagner, Sabrina; Milbradt, Jens; Marschall, Manfred; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleus forms a prominent cellular compartment containing the cell’s nuclear genome. Although structurally similar, animal and plant nuclei differ substantially in details of their architecture. One example is the nuclear lamina, a layer of tightly interconnected filament proteins (lamins) underlying the nuclear envelope of metazoans. So far no orthologous lamin genes could be detected in plant genomes and putative lamin-like proteins are only poorly described in plants. To probe for potentially conserved features of metazoan and plant nuclear envelopes, we ectopically expressed the core nuclear egress proteins of human cytomegalovirus pUL50 and pUL53 in plant cells. pUL50 localizes to the inner envelope of metazoan nuclei and recruits the nuclear localized pUL53 to it, forming heterodimers. Upon expression in plant cells, a very similar localization pattern of both proteins could be determined. Notably, pUL50 is specifically targeted to the plant nuclear envelope in a rim-like fashion, a location to which coexpressed pUL53 becomes strictly corecruited from its initial nucleoplasmic distribution. Using pUL50 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening, the cytoplasmic re-initiation supporting protein RISP could be identified. Interaction of pUL50 and RISP could be confirmed by coexpression and coimmunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and by confocal laser scanning microscopy in plant cells, demonstrating partial pUL50-RISP colocalization in areas of the nuclear rim and other intracellular compartments. Thus, our study provides strong evidence for conserved structural features of plant and metazoan nuclear envelops and identifies RISP as a potential pUL50-interacting plant protein. PMID:26978388

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Proteins Ectopically Expressed in the Heterologous Environment of Plant Cells are Strictly Targeted to the Nuclear Envelope.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Christian E; Link, Katrin; Wagner, Sabrina; Milbradt, Jens; Marschall, Manfred; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleus forms a prominent cellular compartment containing the cell's nuclear genome. Although structurally similar, animal and plant nuclei differ substantially in details of their architecture. One example is the nuclear lamina, a layer of tightly interconnected filament proteins (lamins) underlying the nuclear envelope of metazoans. So far no orthologous lamin genes could be detected in plant genomes and putative lamin-like proteins are only poorly described in plants. To probe for potentially conserved features of metazoan and plant nuclear envelopes, we ectopically expressed the core nuclear egress proteins of human cytomegalovirus pUL50 and pUL53 in plant cells. pUL50 localizes to the inner envelope of metazoan nuclei and recruits the nuclear localized pUL53 to it, forming heterodimers. Upon expression in plant cells, a very similar localization pattern of both proteins could be determined. Notably, pUL50 is specifically targeted to the plant nuclear envelope in a rim-like fashion, a location to which coexpressed pUL53 becomes strictly corecruited from its initial nucleoplasmic distribution. Using pUL50 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening, the cytoplasmic re-initiation supporting protein RISP could be identified. Interaction of pUL50 and RISP could be confirmed by coexpression and coimmunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and by confocal laser scanning microscopy in plant cells, demonstrating partial pUL50-RISP colocalization in areas of the nuclear rim and other intracellular compartments. Thus, our study provides strong evidence for conserved structural features of plant and metazoan nuclear envelops and identifies RISP as a potential pUL50-interacting plant protein. PMID:26978388

  10. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Imagesbased on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-09-05

    Background: The distribution of the chromatin-associatedproteins plays a key role in directing nuclear function. Previously, wedeveloped an image-based method to quantify the nuclear distributions ofproteins and showed that these distributions depended on the phenotype ofhuman mammary epithelial cells. Here we describe a method that creates ahierarchical tree of the given cell phenotypes and calculates thestatistical significance between them, based on the clustering analysisof nuclear protein distributions. Results: Nuclear distributions ofnuclear mitotic apparatus protein were previously obtained fornon-neoplastic S1 and malignant T4-2 human mammary epithelial cellscultured for up to 12 days. Cell phenotype was defined as S1 or T4-2 andthe number of days in cultured. A probabilistic ensemble approach wasused to define a set of consensus clusters from the results of multipletraditional cluster analysis techniques applied to the nucleardistribution data. Cluster histograms were constructed to show how cellsin any one phenotype were distributed across the consensus clusters.Grouping various phenotypes allowed us to build phenotype trees andcalculate the statistical difference between each group. The resultsshowed that non-neoplastic S1 cells could be distinguished from malignantT4-2 cells with 94.19 percent accuracy; that proliferating S1 cells couldbe distinguished from differentiated S1 cells with 92.86 percentaccuracy; and showed no significant difference between the variousphenotypes of T4-2 cells corresponding to increasing tumor sizes.Conclusion: This work presents a cluster analysis method that canidentify significant cell phenotypes, based on the nuclear distributionof specific proteins, with high accuracy.

  11. Utilization of nuclear structural proteins for targeted therapy and detection of proliferative and differentiation disorders

    DOEpatents

    Lelievre, Sophie; Bissell, Mina

    2001-01-01

    The localization of nuclear apparatus proteins (NUMA) is used to identify tumor cells and different stages in the tumor progression and differentiation processes. There is a characteristic organization of NuMA in tumor cells and in phenotypically normal cells. NuMA distribution patterns are significantly less diffuse in proliferating non-malignant cells compared to malignant cells. The technique encompasses cell immunostaining using a NuMA specific antibody, and microscopic analysis of NuMA distribution within each nucleus.

  12. Protein profiles of bovine placenta derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Rye; Kang, Jae Ku; Yoon, Jong Taek; Seong, Hwan Hoo; Jung, Jin Kwan; Lee, Hong Mie; Sik Park, Chang; Jin, Dong Il

    2005-11-01

    Practical application of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been hampered by an extremely low success rate. To address whether placental dysfunction in SCNT causes fetal loss during pregnancy, we have used a global proteomics approach using 2-DE and MS to analyze the differential protein patterns of three placentae from the afterbirth of cases of postnatal death, derived from SCNT of Korean Native cattle, and three normal placentae obtained from the afterbirth of fetuses derived from artificial insemination. Proteins within a pI range of 4.0-7.0 and 6.0-9.0 were analyzed separately by 2-DE in triplicate. A total of approximately 2000 spots were detected in placental 2-DE gels stained with CBB. In the comparison of normal and SCNT samples, 60 spots were identified as differentially expressed proteins, of which 33 spots were up-regulated proteins in SCNT placentae, while 27 spots were down-regulated proteins. Most of the proteins identified in this analysis appeared to be related with protein repair or protection, cytoskeleton, signal transduction, immune system, metabolism, extracellular matrix and remodeling, transcription regulation, cell structure or differentiation and ion transport. One of up-regulated proteins in SCNT was TIMP-2 protein known to be related to extracellular matrix and remodeling during pregnancy. Western blot analysis showed an increased level of TIMP-2 in SCNT placenta compared to normal. Our results revealed composite profiles of key proteins involved in abnormal placenta derived from SCNT, and suggested expression abnormality of these genes in SCNT placenta, resulting in fetal losses following SCNT. PMID:16196098

  13. Nuclear export of proteins in plants: AtXPO1 is the export receptor for leucine-rich nuclear export signals in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Haasen D; Köhler C; Neuhaus G; Merkle T

    1999-12-01

    Transport across the nuclear envelope is mediated by transport receptors from the Importin beta family. We identified Exportin 1 from Arabidopsis (AtXPO1/AtCRM1) as the nuclear export receptor for proteins carrying leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs). AtXPO1 shares 42-50% identity with its functional homologues from humans and yeasts. We functionally characterised AtXPO1 by its interaction with NESs of animal and plant proteins, which is inhibited by the cytotoxin leptomycin B (LMB), and also by its interaction with the small GTPase Ran1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. Furthermore, we demonstrated the existence of a nuclear export pathway for proteins in plants. For the characterisation of nuclear export activities, we established an in vivo assay based on the localisation equilibrium of a GFP reporter protein fused to both a nuclear localisation signal (NLS) and an NES motif. Using this in vivo assay we demonstrated that the NES of the heterologous protein Rev is also functional in plants and that its export is inhibited by LMB. In addition, we identified a leucine-rich NES in the Arabidopsis protein AtRanBP1a. The NES, which is located at the carboxy terminus of the protein, is disrupted by mutating three long chain hydrophobic amino acid residues to alanine (L176A, L179A, V181A). In BY-2 protoplasts the NES of AtRanBP1a is functionally indistinguishable from the Rev NES. Our results demonstrate that the machinery for the nuclear export of proteins is functionally conserved in plants.

  14. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HBx) were assessed in 328 HBV-associated HCCs and in 155 matched nontumorous tissues by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: The positive rates of HBsAg and cytoplasmic HBx staining in tumor tissue were lower than those in nontumorous tissue (7.3% vs. 57.4%, p < .001; 43.4% vs. 81.3%, p < .001). Conversely, nuclear HBx was detected more frequently in tumors than in nontumorous tissue (52.1% vs. 30.3%, p < .001). HCCs expressing HBsAg, HBcAg, or cytoplasmic HBx had smaller size; lower Edmondson-Steiner (ES) nuclear grade, pT stage, and serum alpha-fetoprotein, and less angioinvasion than HCCs not expressing HBV-associated proteins. Exceptionally, nuclear HBx-positive HCCs showed higher ES nuclear grade and more frequent large-vessel invasion than did nuclear HBx-negative HCCs. In survival analysis, only nuclear HBx-positive HCCs had shorter disease-free survival than nuclear HBx-negative HCCs in pT1 and ES nuclear grade 1–2 HCC subgroup (median, 126 months vs. 35 months; p = .015). Conclusions: Our data confirmed that expression of normal HBV-associated proteins generally decreases in tumor cells in comparison to nontumorous hepatocytes, with the exception of nuclear HBx, which suggests that nuclear HBx plays a role in recurrence of well-differentiated and early-stage HCCs. PMID:27086597

  15. Chromatin De-Compaction By The Nucleosomal Binding Protein HMGN5 Impairs Nuclear Sturdiness

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Taher, Leila; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Anderson, Stasia; Bustin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In most metazoan nuclei, heterochromatin is located at the nuclear periphery in contact with the nuclear lamina, which provides mechanical stability to the nucleus. We show that in cultured cells, chromatin de-compaction by the nucleosome binding protein HMGN5 decreases the sturdiness, elasticity, and rigidity of the nucleus. Mice overexpressing HMGN5, either globally or only in the heart, are normal at birth but develop hypertrophic heart with large cardiomyoctyes, deformed nuclei and disrupted lamina, and die of cardiac malfunction. Chromatin de-compaction is seen in cardiomyocytes of newborn mice but misshaped nuclei with disrupted lamina are seen only in adult cardiomyocytes, suggesting that loss of heterochromatin diminishes the ability of the nucleus to withstand the mechanical forces of the contracting heart. Thus, heterochromatin enhances the ability of the nuclear lamina to maintain the sturdiness and shape of the eukaryotic nucleus; a structural role for chromatin that is distinct from its genetic functions. PMID:25609380

  16. Chromatin decompaction by the nucleosomal binding protein HMGN5 impairs nuclear sturdiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Taher, Leila; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Anderson, Stasia; Bustin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In most metazoan nuclei, heterochromatin is located at the nuclear periphery in contact with the nuclear lamina, which provides mechanical stability to the nucleus. We show that in cultured cells, chromatin decompaction by the nucleosome binding protein HMGN5 decreases the sturdiness, elasticity and rigidity of the nucleus. Mice overexpressing HMGN5, either globally or only in the heart, are normal at birth but develop hypertrophic heart with large cardiomyoctyes, deformed nuclei and disrupted lamina and die of cardiac malfunction. Chromatin decompaction is seen in cardiomyocytes of newborn mice but misshaped nuclei with disrupted lamina are seen only in adult cardiomyocytes, suggesting that loss of heterochromatin diminishes the ability of the nucleus to withstand the mechanical forces of the contracting heart. Thus, heterochromatin enhances the ability of the nuclear lamina to maintain the sturdiness and shape of the eukaryotic nucleus; a structural role for chromatin that is distinct from its genetic functions.

  17. Retinoblastoma-binding Protein 4-regulated Classical Nuclear Transport Is Involved in Cellular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a fundamental cellular process in eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrated that retinoblastoma-binding protein 4 (RBBP4) functions as a novel regulatory factor to increase the efficiency of importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. RBBP4 accelerates the release of importin β1 from importin α via competitive binding to the importin β-binding domain of importin α in the presence of RanGTP. Therefore, it facilitates importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. We showed that the importin α/β pathway is down-regulated in replicative senescent cells, concomitant with a decrease in RBBP4 level. Knockdown of RBBP4 caused both suppression of nuclear transport and induction of cellular senescence. This is the first report to identify a factor that competes with importin β1 to bind to importin α, and it demonstrates that the loss of this factor can trigger cellular senescence. PMID:26491019

  18. Chromatin decompaction by the nucleosomal binding protein HMGN5 impairs nuclear sturdiness.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Taher, Leila; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Nagashima, Kunio; Anderson, Stasia; Bustin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In most metazoan nuclei, heterochromatin is located at the nuclear periphery in contact with the nuclear lamina, which provides mechanical stability to the nucleus. We show that in cultured cells, chromatin decompaction by the nucleosome binding protein HMGN5 decreases the sturdiness, elasticity and rigidity of the nucleus. Mice overexpressing HMGN5, either globally or only in the heart, are normal at birth but develop hypertrophic heart with large cardiomyoctyes, deformed nuclei and disrupted lamina and die of cardiac malfunction. Chromatin decompaction is seen in cardiomyocytes of newborn mice but misshaped nuclei with disrupted lamina are seen only in adult cardiomyocytes, suggesting that loss of heterochromatin diminishes the ability of the nucleus to withstand the mechanical forces of the contracting heart. Thus, heterochromatin enhances the ability of the nuclear lamina to maintain the sturdiness and shape of the eukaryotic nucleus; a structural role for chromatin that is distinct from its genetic functions. PMID:25609380

  19. BGLF4 Kinase Modulates the Structure and Transport Preference of the Nuclear Pore Complex To Facilitate Nuclear Import of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chou-Wei; Lee, Chung-Pei; Su, Mei-Tzu; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BGLF4 kinase, the only Ser/Thr protein kinase encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome, phosphorylates multiple viral and cellular substrates to optimize the cellular environment for viral DNA replication and the nuclear egress of nucleocapsids. Previously, we found that nuclear targeting of BGLF4 is through direct interaction with the FG repeat-containing nucleoporins (FG-Nups) Nup62 and Nup153 independently of cytosolic transport factors. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of BGLF4 on the structure and biological functions of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). In EBV-positive NA cells, the distribution of FG-Nups was modified during EBV reactivation. In transfected cells, BGLF4 changed the staining pattern of Nup62 and Nup153 in a kinase activity-dependent manner. Detection with anti-phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro MPM-2 antibody demonstrated that BGLF4 induced the phosphorylation of Nup62 and Nup153. The nuclear targeting of importin β was attenuated in the presence of BGLF4, leading to inhibition of canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS)-mediated nuclear import. An in vitro nuclear import assay revealed that BGLF4 induced the nuclear import of larger molecules. Notably, we found that BGLF4 promoted the nuclear import of several non-NLS-containing EBV proteins, including the viral DNA-replicating enzymes BSLF1, BBLF2/3, and BBLF4 and the major capsid protein (VCA), in cotransfected cells. The data presented here suggest that BGLF4 interferes with the normal functions of Nup62 and Nup153 and preferentially helps the nuclear import of viral proteins for viral DNA replication and assembly. In addition, the nuclear import-promoting activity was found in cells expressing the BGLF4 homologs of another two gammaherpesviruses but not those from alpha- and betaherpesviruses. IMPORTANCE During lytic replication, many EBV genome-encoded proteins need to be transported into the nucleus, not only for viral DNA replication but also for the assembly of nucleocapsids. Because nuclear pore complexes are effective gateways that control nucleocytoplasmic traffic, most EBV proteins without canonical NLSs are retained in the cytoplasm until they form complexes with their NLS-containing partners for nuclear targeting. In this study, we found that EBV BGLF4 protein kinase interacts with the Nup62 and Nup153 and induces the redistribution of FG-Nups. BGLF4 modulates the function of the NPC to inhibit the nuclear import of host NLS-containing proteins. Simultaneously, the nuclear import of non-NLS-containing EBV lytic proteins was enhanced, possibly through phosphorylation of Nup62 and Nup153, nuclear pore dilation, or microtubule reorganization. Overall, our data suggest that BGLF4-induced modification of nuclear pore transport may block nuclear targeting of cellular proteins and increase the import of viral proteins to promote viral lytic replication. PMID:25410863

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Protein Complex Involved in Nuclear Hormone Receptor-mediated Gene Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Garapaty, Shivani; Xu, Chong-Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Mahajan, Muktar A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Samuels, Herbert H.

    2009-01-01

    NRC/NCoA6 plays an important role in mediating the effects of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors as well as other transcription factors. NRC interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) was cloned as a novel factor that interacts in vivo with NRC. Although NIF-1 does not directly interact with nuclear hormone receptors, it enhances activation by nuclear hormone receptors presumably through its interaction with NRC. To further understand the cellular and biological function of NIF-1, we identified NIF-1-associated proteins by in-solution proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry. The identified components revealed factors involved in histone methylation and cell cycle control and include Ash2L, RbBP5, WDR5, HCF-1, DBC-1, and EMSY. Although the NIF-1 complex contains Ash2L, RbBP5, and WDR5, suggesting that the complex might methylate histone H3-Lys-4, we found that the complex contains a H3 methyltransferase activity that modifies a residue other than H3-Lys-4. The identified components form at least two distinctly sized NIF-1 complexes. DBC-1 and EMSY were identified as integral components of an NIF-1 complex of ∼1.5 MDa and were found to play an important role in the regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Stimulation of the Sox9 and HoxA1 genes by retinoic acid receptor-α was found to require both DBC-1 and EMSY in addition to NIF-1 for maximal transcriptional activation. Interestingly, NRC was not identified as a component of the NIF-1 complex, suggesting that NIF-1 and NRC do not exist as stable in vitro purified complexes, although the separate NIF-1 and NRC complexes appear to functionally interact in the cell. PMID:19131338

  1. Nuclear localization of Beet black scorch virus capsid protein and its interaction with importin ?.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjing; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Shaofang; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2011-01-01

    Beet black scorch virus (BBSV) is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to Necrovirus genus. In order to better understand the life cycle of BBSV, we have investigated the subcellular localization of BBSV capsid protein (CP) by its fusion with green fluorescent protein (GFP) agroinfiltrated into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and by particle bombardment into onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that BBSV CP fused to GFP displayed enhanced fluorescence in nuclei and nuclear import of the CP was confirmed in BBSV-infected N. benthamiana leaves. Mutational analysis revealed that the N-terminal basic amino acid cluster (4)KRNKGGKKSR(13) of the CP is essential for nuclear localization. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays indicated that the CP could interact with the nuclear import factor importin ?, suggesting that the CP is possibly imported into the nucleus via an importin ?-dependent pathway. This is the first report of the nuclear localization of the CP encoded by a necrovirus. PMID:21056066

  2. Targeting the Nuclear Export Protein XPO1/CRM1 Reverses Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Asfar S.; Muqbil, Irfana; Wu, Jack; Aboukameel, Amro; Senapedis, William; Baloglu, Erkan; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Dyson, Gregory; Kauffman, Michael; Landesman, Yosef; Shacham, Sharon; Philip, Philip A.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that targeted inhibition of nuclear exporter protein exportin 1 (XPO1) also known as chromosome maintenance region 1 (CRM1) by Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds results in reversal of EMT in snail-transduced primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SINE compounds selinexor (KPT-330) and KPT-185, leptomycin B (LMB as +ve control) but not KPT-301 (–ve control) reverse EMT, suppress mesenchymal markers and consequently induce growth inhibition, apoptosis and prevent spheroid formation. SINE treatment resulted in nuclear retention of snail regulator FBXL5 that was concurrent with suppression of snail and down-regulation of mesenchymal markers. FBXL5 siRNA or transfection with cys528 mut-Xpo1 (lacking SINE binding site) markedly abrogated SINE activity highlighting an XPO1 and FBXL5 mediated mechanism of action. Silencing XPO1 or snail caused re-expression of FBXL5 as well as EMT reversal. Pathway analysis on SINE treated HMECs further verified the involvement of additional F-Box family proteins and confirmed the suppression of snail network. Oral administration of selinexor (15 mg/kg p.o. QoDx3/week for 3weeks) resulted in complete cures (no tumor rebound at 120 days) of HMLER-Snail xenografts. These findings raise the unique possibility of blocking EMT at the nuclear pore. PMID:26536918

  3. Targeting the Nuclear Export Protein XPO1/CRM1 Reverses Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Muqbil, Irfana; Wu, Jack; Aboukameel, Amro; Senapedis, William; Baloglu, Erkan; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Dyson, Gregory; Kauffman, Michael; Landesman, Yosef; Shacham, Sharon; Philip, Philip A; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that targeted inhibition of nuclear exporter protein exportin 1 (XPO1) also known as chromosome maintenance region 1 (CRM1) by Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds results in reversal of EMT in snail-transduced primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SINE compounds selinexor (KPT-330) and KPT-185, leptomycin B (LMB as +ve control) but not KPT-301 (-ve control) reverse EMT, suppress mesenchymal markers and consequently induce growth inhibition, apoptosis and prevent spheroid formation. SINE treatment resulted in nuclear retention of snail regulator FBXL5 that was concurrent with suppression of snail and down-regulation of mesenchymal markers. FBXL5 siRNA or transfection with cys528 mut-Xpo1 (lacking SINE binding site) markedly abrogated SINE activity highlighting an XPO1 and FBXL5 mediated mechanism of action. Silencing XPO1 or snail caused re-expression of FBXL5 as well as EMT reversal. Pathway analysis on SINE treated HMECs further verified the involvement of additional F-Box family proteins and confirmed the suppression of snail network. Oral administration of selinexor (15 mg/kg p.o. QoDx3/week for 3weeks) resulted in complete cures (no tumor rebound at 120 days) of HMLER-Snail xenografts. These findings raise the unique possibility of blocking EMT at the nuclear pore. PMID:26536918

  4. Mapping Functional Group Free Energy Patterns at Protein Occluded Sites: Nuclear Receptors and G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-? (PPAR?) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and ?2-adreneric (?2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the ?2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting ?2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents. PMID:25692383

  5. SINC, a type III secreted protein of Chlamydia psittaci, targets the inner nuclear membrane of infected cells and uninfected neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Sergio A.; Hovis, Kelley M.; Frieman, Matthew B.; Tran, Bao; Hsia, Ru-ching; Ravel, Jacques; Jenkins-Houk, Clifton; Wilson, Katherine L.; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2015-01-01

    SINC, a new type III secreted protein of the avian and human pathogen Chlamydia psittaci, uniquely targets the nuclear envelope of C. psittaci–infected cells and uninfected neighboring cells. Digitonin-permeabilization studies of SINC-GFP–transfected HeLa cells indicate that SINC targets the inner nuclear membrane. SINC localization at the nuclear envelope was blocked by importazole, confirming SINC import into the nucleus. Candidate partners were identified by proximity to biotin ligase-fused SINC in HEK293 cells and mass spectrometry (BioID). This strategy identified 22 candidates with high confidence, including the nucleoporin ELYS, lamin B1, and four proteins (emerin, MAN1, LAP1, and LBR) of the inner nuclear membrane, suggesting that SINC interacts with host proteins that control nuclear structure, signaling, chromatin organization, and gene silencing. GFP-SINC association with the native LEM-domain protein emerin, a conserved component of nuclear “lamina” structure, or with a complex containing emerin was confirmed by GFP pull down. Our findings identify SINC as a novel bacterial protein that targets the nuclear envelope with the capability of globally altering nuclear envelope functions in the infected host cell and neighboring uninfected cells. These properties may contribute to the aggressive virulence of C. psittaci. PMID:25788290

  6. SINC, a type III secreted protein of Chlamydia psittaci, targets the inner nuclear membrane of infected cells and uninfected neighbors.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Sergio A; Hovis, Kelley M; Frieman, Matthew B; Tran, Bao; Hsia, Ru-ching; Ravel, Jacques; Jenkins-Houk, Clifton; Wilson, Katherine L; Bavoil, Patrik M

    2015-05-15

    SINC, a new type III secreted protein of the avian and human pathogen Chlamydia psittaci, uniquely targets the nuclear envelope of C. psittaci-infected cells and uninfected neighboring cells. Digitonin-permeabilization studies of SINC-GFP-transfected HeLa cells indicate that SINC targets the inner nuclear membrane. SINC localization at the nuclear envelope was blocked by importazole, confirming SINC import into the nucleus. Candidate partners were identified by proximity to biotin ligase-fused SINC in HEK293 cells and mass spectrometry (BioID). This strategy identified 22 candidates with high confidence, including the nucleoporin ELYS, lamin B1, and four proteins (emerin, MAN1, LAP1, and LBR) of the inner nuclear membrane, suggesting that SINC interacts with host proteins that control nuclear structure, signaling, chromatin organization, and gene silencing. GFP-SINC association with the native LEM-domain protein emerin, a conserved component of nuclear "lamina" structure, or with a complex containing emerin was confirmed by GFP pull down. Our findings identify SINC as a novel bacterial protein that targets the nuclear envelope with the capability of globally altering nuclear envelope functions in the infected host cell and neighboring uninfected cells. These properties may contribute to the aggressive virulence of C. psittaci. PMID:25788290

  7. The Drosophila nuclear lamina protein Otefin is required for germline stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Lacy J.; Pinto, Belinda S.; Wallrath, Lori L.; Geyer, Pamela K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary LEM domain (LEM-D) proteins are components of an extensive protein network that assembles beneath the inner nuclear envelope. Defects in LEM-D proteins cause tissue-restricted human diseases associated with altered stem cell homeostasis. Otefin (Ote) is a Drosophila LEM-D protein that is intrinsically required for female germline stem cells (GSCs) maintenance. Previous studies linked Ote loss with transcriptional activation of the key differentiation gene, bag-of-marbles (bam), leading to the model that Ote tethers the bam gene to the nuclear periphery for gene silencing. Using genetic and phenotypic analyses of multiple ote−/− backgrounds, we obtained evidence that is inconsistent with this model. We show that bam repression is maintained in ote−/− GSCs and that germ cell loss persists in ote−/−, bam−/− mutants, together demonstrating that GSC loss is independent of bam transcription. We show the primary defect in ote−/− GSCs is a block of differentiation, which ultimately leads to germ cell death. PMID:23806619

  8. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  10. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Nuclear Protein FAM76B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Human FAM76B (hFAM76B) is a 39 kDa protein that contains homopolymeric histidine tracts, a targeting signal for nuclear speckles. FAM76B is highly conserved among different species, suggesting that it may play an important physiological role in normal cellular functions. However, a lack of appropriate tools has hampered study of this potentially important protein. To facilitate research into the biological function(s) of FAM76B, murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against hFAM76B were generated by using purified, prokaryotically expressed hFAM76B protein. Six strains of MAbs specific for hFAM76B were obtained and characterized. The specificity of MAbs was validated by using FAM76B-/- HEK 293 cell line. Double immunofluorescence followed by laser confocal microscopy confirmed the nuclear speckle localization of hFAM76B, and the specific domains recognized by different MAbs were further elucidated by Western blot. Due to the high conservation of protein sequences between mouse and human FAM76B, MAbs against hFAM76B were shown to react with mouse FAM76B (mFAM76B) specifically. Lastly, FAM76B was found to be expressed in the normal tissues of most human organs, though to different extents. The MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating the biological function(s) of FAM76B. PMID:27018871

  11. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-01-01

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one. PMID:26703574

  12. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  13. Delivering Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to the Nucleus Using Engineered Nuclear Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Patrick D; Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Holt, Brian D; Buehler, Markus J; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-02-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential for cell-based therapies due to their unique intrinsic optical and physical characteristics. Consequently, broad classes of dispersants have been identified that individually suspend SWCNTs in water and cell media in addition to reducing nanotube toxicity to cells. Unambiguous control and verification of the localization and distribution of SWCNTs within cells, particularly to the nucleus, is needed to advance subcellular technologies utilizing nanotubes. Here we report delivery of SWCNTs to the nucleus by noncovalently attaching the tail domain of the nuclear protein lamin B1 (LB1), which we engineer from the full-length LMNB1 cDNA. More than half of this low molecular weight globular protein is intrinsically disordered but has an immunoglobulin-fold composed of a central hydrophobic core, which is highly suitable for associating with SWCNTs, stably suspending SWCNTs in water and cell media. In addition, LB1 has an exposed nuclear localization sequence to promote active nuclear import of SWCNTs. These SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions in water and cell media display near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra with sharp van Hove peaks and an NIR fluorescence spectra, suggesting that LB1 individually disperses nanotubes. The dispersing capability of SWCNTs by LB1 is similar to that by albumin proteins. The SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions with concentrations ≥150 μg/mL (≥30 μg/mL) in water (cell media) remain stable for ≥75 days (≥3 days) at 4 °C (37 °C). Further, molecular dynamics modeling of association of LB1 with SWCNTs reveal that the exposure of the nuclear localization sequence is independent of LB1 binding conformation. Measurements from confocal Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, NIR fluorescence imaging of SWCNTs, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy show that millions of these SWCNTs-LB1 complexes enter HeLa cells, localize to the nucleus of cells, and interact with DNA. We postulate that the modification of native cellular proteins as noncovalent dispersing agents to provide specific transport will open new possibilities to utilize both SWCNT and protein properties for multifunctional subcellular targeting applications. Specifically, nuclear targeting could allow delivery of anticancer therapies, genetic treatments, or DNA to the nucleus. PMID:26783632

  14. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasenko, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles being more successfully sequenced. PMID:26716693

  15. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick Yh; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. PMID:27198189

  16. Reverse micelles as a platform for dynamic nuclear polarization in solution NMR of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Kathleen G; Mathies, Guinevere; Bédard, Sabrina; Nucci, Nathaniel V; Dodevski, Igor; Stetz, Matthew A; Can, Thach V; Griffin, Robert G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-02-19

    Despite tremendous advances in recent years, solution NMR remains fundamentally restricted due to its inherent insensitivity. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) potentially offers significant improvements in this respect. The basic DNP strategy is to irradiate the EPR transitions of a stable radical and transfer this nonequilibrium polarization to the hydrogen spins of water, which will in turn transfer polarization to the hydrogens of the macromolecule. Unfortunately, these EPR transitions lie in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum where bulk water absorbs strongly, often resulting in catastrophic heating. Furthermore, the residence times of water on the surface of the protein in bulk solution are generally too short for efficient transfer of polarization. Here we take advantage of the properties of solutions of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents to implement DNP in liquids. Such samples are largely transparent to the microwave frequencies required and thereby avoid significant heating. Nitroxide radicals are introduced into the reverse micelle system in three ways: attached to the protein, embedded in the reverse micelle shell, and free in the aqueous core. Significant enhancements of the water resonance ranging up to ∼-93 at 0.35 T were observed. We also find that the hydration properties of encapsulated proteins allow for efficient polarization transfer from water to the protein. These and other observations suggest that merging reverse micelle encapsulation technology with DNP offers a route to a significant increase in the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy of proteins and other biomolecules. PMID:24456213

  17. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, 440-746 ; Um, Sung Hee; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, 440-746 ; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, 440-746

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  18. Systematic Deletion and Mitotic Localization of the Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins of Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Osmani, Aysha H.; Davies, Jonathan; Liu, Hui-Lin; Nile, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    To define the extent of the modification of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) during Aspergillus nidulans closed mitosis, a systematic analysis of nuclear transport genes has been completed. Thirty genes have been deleted defining 12 nonessential and 18 essential genes. Several of the nonessential deletions caused conditional phenotypes and self-sterility, whereas deletion of some essential genes caused defects in nuclear structure. Live cell imaging of endogenously tagged NPC proteins (Nups) revealed that during mitosis 14 predicted peripheral Nups, including all FG repeat Nups, disperse throughout the cell. A core mitotic NPC structure consisting of membrane Nups, all components of the An-Nup84 subcomplex, An-Nup170, and surprisingly, An-Gle1 remained throughout mitosis. We propose this minimal mitotic NPC core provides a conduit across the nuclear envelope and acts as a scaffold to which dispersed Nups return during mitotic exit. Further, unlike other dispersed Nups, An-Nup2 locates exclusively to mitotic chromatin, suggesting it may have a novel mitotic role in addition to its nuclear transport functions. Importantly, its deletion causes lethality and defects in DNA segregation. This work defines the dramatic changes in NPC composition during A. nidulans mitosis and provides insight into how NPC disassembly may be integrated with mitosis. PMID:16987955

  19. UVA irradiation induces relocalisation of the DNA repair protein hOGG1 to nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Campalans, Anna; Amouroux, Rachel; Bravard, Anne; Epe, Bernd; Radicella, J Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The DNA glycosylase hOGG1 initiates base excision repair (BER) of oxidised purines in cellular DNA. Using confocal microscopy and biochemical cell fractionation experiments we show that, upon UVA irradiation of human cells, hOGG1 is recruited from a soluble nucleoplasmic localisation to the nuclear matrix. More specifically, after irradiation, hOGG1 forms foci colocalising with the nuclear speckles, organelles that are interspersed between chromatin domains and that have been associated with transcription and RNA-splicing processes. The use of mutant forms of hOGG1 unable to bind the substrate showed that relocalisation of hOGG1 does not depend on the recognition of the DNA lesion by the enzyme. The recruitment of hOGG1 to the nuclear speckles is prevented by the presence of antioxidant compounds during UVA irradiation, implicating reactive oxygen species as signals for the relocalisation of hOGG1. Furthermore, APE1, the second enzyme in the BER pathway, is also present in nuclear speckles in UVA-irradiated cells. The recruitment of DNA repair proteins to nuclear speckles after oxidative stress implicates these organelles in the cellular stress response. PMID:17148573

  20. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMP?2/IMP?1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMP?2/IMP?1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMP?2 lacking the IMP?-binding autoinhibitory domain (?IBB-IMP?2), and IMP?1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein subcellular localization, consistent with important roles in infection. PMID:26939125

  1. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Caitlin L.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein subcellular localization, consistent with important roles in infection. PMID:26939125

  2. Identification of a nuclear localization sequence in the polyomavirus capsid protein VP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the C-terminal (Glu307-Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Gln-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus minor capsid protein VP2. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of newly synthesized VP2 was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP2 (expressing full-length VP2) and pSG5 delta 3VP2 (expressing truncated VP2, lacking amino acids Glu307-Leu318). These constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells, and the intracellular localization of the VP2 protein was determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP2 was localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP2 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. A biochemical "additive" approach was also used to determine whether this sequence could target nonnuclear proteins to the nucleus. A synthetic peptide identical to VP2 amino acids Glu307-Leu318 was cross-linked to the nonnuclear proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG). The conjugates were then labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and microinjected into the cytoplasm of NIH 3T6 cells. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus of the microinjected cells, whereas unconjugated BSA and IgG remained in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these genetic subtractive and biochemical additive approaches have identified the C-terminal sequence of polyoma-virus VP2 (containing amino acids Glu307-Leu318) as the NLS of this protein.

  3. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  4. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liu; Zheng, Aihua; Yi, Ling; Xu, Chongren; Ding, Mingxiao; Deng, Hongkui

    2004-12-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation. PMID:15522233

  5. The Nuclear Factor-kB Pathway Regulates Cytochrome P450 3A4 Protein Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Verma, Seema; Karin, Norm J.; Lu, Yi

    2008-06-01

    We have previously observed that CYP3A4 protein levels are suppressed by inhibition of the proteasome in primary cultured hepatocytes. Because this result is opposite of what would be expected if CYP3A4 is degraded by the proteasome, it seems likely that there is another protein that is susceptible to proteasomal degradation that regulates CYP3A4 expression. In this study, we evaluate whether the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway is involved in that process. Our model system uses an adenovirus system to express CYP3A4 protein in HepG2 cells, which are derived from human cancer cells. Similar to results in primary hepatocytes, we found that inhibition of the proteasome with MG132 suppresses CYP3A4. Consistent with reports that proteasome inhibition suppresses the NF-kB pathway, we also observe a suppression of inhibitory kB kinase protein levels after treatment with MG132. Treatment of the HepG2 cells with NK-kB Activation Inhibitor also suppresses CYP3A4 proteins levels. In contrast, inhibition of either the proteasome or NF-kB pathways increases CYP3A4 mRNA levels. When the HepG2 cells are treated with cycloheximide, a general inhibitor of translation, the loss of CYP3A4 protein is accelerated by co-treatment with an NF-kB Activation Inhibitor. These results indicate that NF-kB activity regulates CYP3A4 protein stability and suggest that the NF-kB pathway is responsible for the decrease in CYP3A4 protein levels that results from the inhibition of proteasomal activity.

  6. Mapping of nuclear import signal and importin {alpha}3 binding regions of 52K protein of bovine adenovirus-3

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, Carolyn P.; Ayalew, Lisanework E.; Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3 S7N 5B4 Canada ; Tikoo, Suresh K.

    2012-10-10

    The L1 region of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3 encodes a non-structural protein designated 52K. Anti-52K serum detected a protein of 40 kDa, which localized to the nucleus but not to the nucleolus in BAdV-3-infected or transfected cells. Analysis of mutant 52K proteins suggested that three basic residues ({sup 105}RKR{sup 107}) of the identified domain (amino acids {sup 102}GMPRKRVLT{sup 110}) are essential for nuclear localization of 52K. The nuclear import of a GST-52K fusion protein utilizes the classical importin {alpha}/{beta}-dependent nuclear transport pathway. The 52K protein is preferentially bound to the cellular nuclear import receptor importin {alpha}3. Although deletion of amino acid 102-110 is sufficient to abrogate the nuclear localization of 52K, amino acid 90-133 are required for interaction with importin-{alpha}3 and localizing a cytoplasmic protein to the nucleus. These results suggest that 52K contains a bipartite NLS, which preferentially utilize an importin {alpha}3 nuclear import receptor-mediated pathway to transport 52K to the nucleus.

  7. cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates and activates nuclear Ca2+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Rogue, Patrick J.; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Meyer, Alphonse; Freyermuth, Solange; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Malviya, Anant N.

    1998-01-01

    A Ca2+-pump ATPase, similar to that in the endoplasmic reticulum, has been located on the outer membrane of rat liver nuclei. The effect of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on nuclear Ca2+-ATPase (NCA) was studied by using purified rat liver nuclei. Treatment of isolated nuclei with the catalytic unit of PKA resulted in the phosphorylation of a 105-kDa band that was recognized by antibodies specific for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase type 2b. Partial purification and immunoblotting confirmed that the 105-kDa protein band phosphorylated by PKA is NCA. The stoichiometry of phosphorylation was 0.76 mol of phosphate incorporated/mol of partially purified enzyme. Measurement of ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into purified nuclei showed that PKA phosphorylation enhanced the Ca2+-pumping activity of NCA. We show that PKA phosphorylation of Ca2+-ATPase enhances the transport of 10-kDa fluorescent-labeled dextrans across the nuclear envelope. The findings reported in this paper are consistent with the notion that the crosstalk between the cAMP/PKA- and Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways identified at the cytoplasmic level extends to the nucleus. Furthermore, these data support a function for crosstalk in the regulation of calcium-dependent transport across the nuclear envelope. PMID:9689054

  8. MicroRNA-205 promotes the tumorigenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma through targeting tumor protein p53-inducible nuclear protein 1

    PubMed Central

    NIE, GUOHUI; DUAN, HONGFANG; LI, XIAOQING; YU, ZHENDONG; LUO, LIANG; LU, RUIJING; JI, ZILIANG; ZHANG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common type of cancer in southern China, miRNAs have been shown to be involved in the tumorigenesis of multiple cancer types. The present study aimed to explore the potential role of miR-205 in NPC. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression levels of miR-205 in 20 fresh NPC specimens and 20 normal nasopharyngeal tissues. The function of miR-205 in the proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of NPC-derived cells was detected by MTT assay, colony formation assay, wound healing assay, Transwell assay and flow cytometry. Furthermore, a target gene of miR-205 was identified using the luciferase reporter assay. The expression of miR-205 was increased in NPC tissues compared with that in normal tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 was found to promote the proliferation, migration and invasion of NPC-derived cells, while apoptosis was suppressed. Tumor protein p53-inducible nuclear protein 1 was identified as a target gene of miR-205. Overall, the present study demonstrated that miR-205 may function as an oncogene in NPC tumorigenesis. PMID:26252115

  9. Nuclear protein-binding sites in a transcriptional control region of the rabbit alpha-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yost, S E; Shewchuk, B; Hardison, R

    1993-01-01

    The 5'-flanking and internal regions of the rabbit alpha-globin gene, which constitute a CpG island, are required for enhancer-independent expression in transfected cells. In this study, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that a battery of nuclear proteins from both erythroid and nonerythroid cells bind specifically to these regulatory regions. Assays based on exonuclease III digestion, methylation interference, and DNase I footprinting identified sequences bound by proteins in crude nuclear extracts and by purified transcription factor Sp1. In the 5' flank, recognition sites for the transcription factors alpha-IRP (positions -53 to -44 relative to the cap site), CP1 (-73 to -69), and Sp1 (-95 to -90) are bound by proteins in K562 cell nuclear extracts, as are three extended upstream regions. Two recognition sites for Sp1 in intron 1 are also bound both by proteins in crude nuclear extracts and by purified Sp1. The sequences CCAC in intron 2 and C5 in the 3'-untranslated region also bind proteins. A major binding site found in exon 1, TATGGCGC, matches in sequence and methylation interference pattern the binding site for nuclear protein YY1, and binding is inhibited through competition by YY1-specific oligonucleotides. The protein-binding sites flanking and internal to the rabbit alpha-globin gene may form an extended promoter. Images PMID:8355692

  10. Physical and functional interactions of human papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear receptor coactivators

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.-H.; Huang, C.-J.; Liu, S.-T.; Liu, P.-Y.; Ho, C.-L. . E-mail: shihming@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

    2007-05-11

    In addition to the human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced immortalization of epithelial cells, which usually requires integration of the viral DNA into the host cell genome, steroid hormone-activated nuclear receptors (NRs) are thought to bind to specific DNA sequences within transcriptional regulatory regions on the long control region to either increase or suppress transcription of dependent genes. In this study, our data suggest that the NR coactivator function of HPV E2 proteins might be mediated through physical and functional interactions with not only NRs but also the NR coactivators GRIP1 (glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1) and Zac1 (zinc-finger protein which regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest 1), reciprocally regulating their transactivation activities. GRIP1 and Zac1 both were able to act synergistically with HPV E2 proteins on the E2-, androgen receptor-, and estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation systems. GRIP1 and Zac1 might selectively function with HPV E2 proteins on thyroid receptor- and p53-dependent transcriptional activation, respectively. Hence, the transcriptional function of E2 might be mediated through NRs and NR coactivators to regulate E2-, NR-, and p53-dependent transcriptional activations.

  11. Physical modeling of the conformation of the unfolded proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton; Opferman, Michael; Coalson, Rob; Jasnow, David

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) is a biological ``nano-machine'' that controls the macromolecular transport between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm. NPC functions without direct input of metabolic energy and without transitions of the gate from a ``closed'' to an ``open'' state during transport. The key and unique aspect of transport is the interaction of the transported molecules with the unfolded, natively unstructured proteins that cover the lumen of the NPC. Recently, the NPC inspired creation of artificial bio-mimetic for nano-technology applications. Although several models have been proposed, it is still not clear how the passage of the transport factors is coupled to the conformational dynamics of the unfolded proteins within the NPC. Morphology changes in assemblies of the unfolded proteins induced by the transport factors have been investigated experimentally in vitro. I will present a coarse-grained theoretical and simulation framework that mimics the interactions of unfolded proteins with nano-sized transport factors. The simple physical model predicts morphology changes that explain the recent puzzling experimental results and suggests possible new modes of transport through the NPC. It also provides insights into the physics of the behavior of unfolded proteins.

  12. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate promotes nuclear translocation of hepatic steroid response element binding protein-2.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Tan, Yan Qin; Lin, Shu-Mei; Leung, Lai K

    2016-06-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-2 is a pivotal transcriptional factor in cholesterol metabolism. Factors interfering with the proper functioning of SREBP-2 potentially alter plasma lipid profiles. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), which is a common protein kinase C (PKC) activator, was shown to promote the post-translational processing and nuclear translocation of SREBP-2 in hepatic cells in the current study. Following SREBP-2 translocation, the transcripts of its target genes HMGCR and LDLR were upregulated as demonstrated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) also demonstrated an induced DNA-binding activity on the sterol response element (SRE) domain under PMA treatment. The increase of activated Srebp-2 without the concurrent induced mRNA expression was also observed in an animal model. As the expression of SREBP-2 was not increased by PMA, the activation of PKC was the focus of investigation. Specific PKC isozyme inhibition and overexpression supported that PKCβ was responsible for the promoting effect. Further studies showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), but not 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), were the possible downstream signaling proteins of PKCβ. In conclusion, this study illustrated that PKCβ increased SREBP-2 nuclear translocation in a pathway mediated by MEK/ERK and JNK, rather than the one dictated by AMPK. These results revealed a novel signaling target of PKCβ in the liver cells. PMID:27032751

  13. Synthesis of sperm-specific basic nuclear proteins (SPs) in cultured spermatids from Xenopus laevis

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Hiyoshi, H. )

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation and synthesis of sperm-specific basic nuclear proteins (SPs) in Xenopus spermatids in vitro were studied by acid-urea-Triton polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In synchronous cultures of round spermatids, the amount of SP2 and SP3-5 accumulated almost linearly with time, while that of SP1 remained almost constant. Fluorography showed that round spermatids incorporated {sup 14}C arginine mostly into SP1 and SP3-5, very little into SP2, and none into histones. When {sup 14}C arginine was incorporated into cells for 24 h on Days 0, 3, and 6, followed by immediate extraction of basic nuclear proteins, the SP1 band was detected faintly on Day 0 and the intensity increased to the maximum level by Day 3 and remained constant on Day 6; the SP3-5 bands were first detected on Day 3 and their intensity increased by Day 6. Thus, SP1 and SP3-5 were synthesized differentially during the culture period. When {sup 14}C arginine or {sup 14}C lysine was incorporated into round spermatids on Days 0, 3, and 6 for 15 h and chased for 3-12 days, the intensity of the SP2 band increased significantly, while the intensity of the SP1 band decreased concomitantly. This result indicates that SP2 was processed from a precursor protein which is probably SP1.

  14. Nuclear trafficking of the human cytomegalovirus pp71 (ppUL82) tegument protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Weiping; Westgard, Elizabeth; Huang Liqun; Ward, Michael D.; Osborn, Jodi L.; Chau, Nha H.; Collins, Lindsay; Marcum, Benjamin; Koach, Margaret A.; Bibbs, Jennifer; Semmes, O. John; Kerry, Julie A.

    2008-06-20

    The human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp71 localizes to the nucleus immediately upon infection, and functions to initiate viral gene expression. Analysis of a series of random insertion mutations revealed that sequences within the mid region (MR) of pp71 are important for localization to the nucleus. Fusion of MR sequences with eGFP revealed that amino acids 94 to 300 were sufficient to target proteins to the nucleus. Random substitution mutagenesis within this domain resulted in two double substitution mutants, pp71P203T/T223M and pp71T228M/L275Q, with a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. Disruption of nuclear targeting resulted in relocalization of the fusion proteins to a distinct perinuclear region. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we determined that threonine 223 can be phosphorylated. Mutation of this residue to a phosphomimetic amino acid resulted in abrogation of nuclear targeting. These results strongly suggest that the intracellular trafficking of pp71 is regulated by phosphorylation.

  15. Nuclear pore complex protein sequences determine overall copolymer brush structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ando, David; Zandi, Roya; Kim, Yong Woon; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2014-05-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature. We perform coarse-grained simulations of both individual nucleoporins and grafted rings of nups mimicking the in vivo geometry of the NPC and supplement this with polymer brush modeling. Our results indicate that different regions or blocks of an individual NPC protein can have distinctly different forms of disorder and that this property appears to be a conserved functional feature. Furthermore, this block structure at the individual protein level is critical to the formation of a unique higher-order polymer brush architecture that can exist in distinct morphologies depending on the effective interaction energy between the phenylalanine glycine (FG) domains of different nups. Because the interactions between FG domains may be modulated by certain forms of transport factors, our results indicate that transitions between brush morphologies could play an important role in regulating transport across the NPC, suggesting novel forms of gated transport across membrane pores with wide biomimetic applicability. PMID:24806932

  16. Nuclear body formation and PML body remodeling by the human cytomegalovirus protein UL35

    SciTech Connect

    Salsman, Jayme; Wang Xueqi; Frappier, Lori

    2011-06-05

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL35 gene encodes two proteins, UL35 and UL35a. Expression of UL35 in transfected cells results in the formation of UL35 nuclear bodies that associate with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein. PML forms the basis for PML nuclear bodies that are important for suppressing viral lytic gene expression. Given the important relationship between PML and viral infection, we have further investigated the association of UL35 with PML bodies. We demonstrate that UL35 bodies form independently of PML and subsequently recruit PML, Sp100 and Daxx. In contrast, UL35a did not form bodies; however, it could bind UL35 and inhibit the formation of UL35 bodies. The HCMV tegument protein pp71 promoted the formation of UL35 bodies and the cytoplasmic localization of UL35a. Similarly, UL35a shifted pp71 to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the interplay between UL35, UL35a and pp71 affects their subcellular localization and likely their functions throughout infection.

  17. Solution structures of Mengovirus Leader protein, its phosphorylated derivatives, and in complex with nuclear transport regulatory protein, RanGTPase

    PubMed Central

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R.; Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Cornilescu, Claudia C.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader (L) proteins induce potent antihost inhibition of active cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by triggering aberrant hyperphosphorylation of nuclear pore proteins (Nup). To achieve this, L binds protein RanGTPase (Ran), a key trafficking regulator, and diverts it into tertiary or quaternary complexes with required kinases. The activity of L is regulated by two phosphorylation events not required for Ran binding. Matched NMR studies on the unphosphorylated, singly, and doubly phosphorylated variants of Mengovirus L (LM) show both modifications act together to partially stabilize a short internal α-helix comprising LM residues 43–46. This motif implies that ionic and Van der Waals forces contributed by phosphorylation help organize downstream residues 48–67 into a new interface. The full structure of LM as bound to Ran (unlabeled) and Ran (216 aa) as bound by LM (unlabeled) places LM into the BP1 binding site of Ran, wrapped by the conformational flexible COOH tail. The arrangement explains the tight KD for this complex and places the LM zinc finger and phosphorylation interface as surface exposed and available for subsequent reactions. The core structure of Ran, outside the COOH tail, is not altered by LM binding and remains accessible for canonical RanGTP partner interactions. Pull-down assays identify at least one putative Ran:LM partner as an exportin, Crm1, or CAS. A model of Ran:LM:Crm1, based on the new structures suggests LM phosphorylation status may mediate Ran’s selection of exportin(s) and cargo(s), perverting these native trafficking elements into the lethal antihost Nup phosphorylation pathways. PMID:25331866

  18. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  19. Reconstitution of nucleoprotein complexes with mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) core proteins

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Newly transcribed heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) in the eucaryote cell nucleus is bound by proteins, giving rise to large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) fibrils with an inherent substructure consisting largely of relatively homogeneous approximately 20-nm 30S particles, which contain core polypeptides of 34,000-38,000 mol wt. To determine whether this group of proteins was sufficient for the assembly of the native beaded nucleoprotein structure, we dissociated 30S hnRNP purified from mouse ascites cells into their component proteins and RNA by treatment with the ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate and then reconstituted this complex by addition of Triton X-100 to sequester the deoxycholate. Dissociation and reassembly were assayed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, monitoring UV absorbance, protein composition, and radiolabeled nucleic acid, and by electron microscopy. Endogenous RNA was digested and reassembly of RNP complexes carried out with equivalent amounts of exogenous RNA or single-stranded DNA. These complexes are composed exclusively of groups of n 30S subunits, as determined by sucrose gradient and electron microscope analysis, where n is the length of the added nucleic acid divided by the length of nucleic acid bound by one native 30S complex (about 1,000 nucleotides). When the nucleic acid: protein stoichiometry in the reconstitution mixture was varied, only complexes composed of 30S subunits were formed; excess protein or nucleic acid remained unbound. These results strongly suggest that core proteins determine the basic structural properties of 30S subunits and hence of hnRNP. In vitro construction of RNP complexes using model nucleic acid molecules should prove useful to the further study of the processing of mRNA. PMID:6134739

  20. EAST Organizes Drosophila Insulator Proteins in the Interchromosomal Nuclear Compartment and Modulates CP190 Binding to Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Golovnin, Anton; Melnikova, Larisa; Shapovalov, Igor; Kostyuchenko, Margarita; Georgiev, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Recent data suggest that insulators organize chromatin architecture in the nucleus. The best studied Drosophila insulator proteins, dCTCF (a homolog of the vertebrate insulator protein CTCF) and Su(Hw), are DNA-binding zinc finger proteins. Different isoforms of the BTB-containing protein Mod(mdg4) interact with Su(Hw) and dCTCF. The CP190 protein is a cofactor for the dCTCF and Su(Hw) insulators. CP190 is required for the functional activity of insulator proteins and is involved in the aggregation of the insulator proteins into specific structures named nuclear speckles. Here, we have shown that the nuclear distribution of CP190 is dependent on the level of EAST protein, an essential component of the interchromatin compartment. EAST interacts with CP190 and Mod(mdg4)-67.2 proteins in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of EAST in S2 cells leads to an extrusion of the CP190 from the insulator bodies containing Su(Hw), Mod(mdg4)-67.2, and dCTCF. In consistent with the role of the insulator bodies in assembly of protein complexes, EAST over-expression led to a striking decrease of the CP190 binding with the dCTCF and Su(Hw) dependent insulators and promoters. These results suggest that EAST is involved in the regulation of CP190 nuclear localization. PMID:26489095

  1. A calreticulin-dependent nuclear export signal is involved in the regulation of liver receptor homologue-1 protein folding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Ming; Feng, Shan-Jung; Lai, Tsai-Chun; Hu, Meng-Chun

    2015-10-15

    As an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family, liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1) controls a tremendous range of transcriptional programmes that are essential for metabolism and hormone synthesis. Our previous studies have shown that nuclear localization of the LRH-1 protein is mediated by two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that are karyopherin/importin-dependent. It is unclear whether LRH-1 can be actively exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In the present study, we describe a nuclear export domain containing two leucine-rich motifs [named nuclear export signal (NES)1 and NES2] within the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Mutation of leucine residues in NES1 or NES2 abolished nuclear export, indicating that both NES1 and NES2 motifs are essential for full nuclear export activity. This NES-mediated nuclear export was insensitive to the chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1) inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) or to CRM1 knockdown. However, knockdown of calreticulin (CRT) prevented NES-mediated nuclear export. Furthermore, our data show that CRT interacts with LRH-1 and is involved in the nuclear export of LRH-1. With full-length LRH-1, mutation of NES1 led to perinuclear accumulation of the mutant protein. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that these perinuclear aggregates were co-localized with the centrosome marker, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), ubiquitin and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), indicating that the mutant was misfolded and sequestered into aggresome-like structures via the autophagic clearance pathway. Our study demonstrates for the first time that LRH-1 has a CRT-dependent NES which is not only required for cytoplasmic trafficking, but also essential for correct protein folding to avoid misfolding-induced aggregation. PMID:26268559

  2. Interaction of DNA/nuclear protein/polycation and the terplexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuan; Peng, Hui; Pan, Shirong; Feng, Min; Wen, Yuting; Deng, Jingjing; Luo, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear transport of exogenous DNA is a major barrier to nonviral gene delivery that needs to be addressed in the design of new vectors. In this study, we prepared pDNA/HMGB1/PEG-PEI terplexes to promote nuclear import. HMGB1 in the terplexes was used to assist the transportation of pDNA into the nucleus of cells, since it contained nuclear localization signal (NLS) PEG chains were introduced to stabilize pDNA/vector terplexes and reduce the cytotoxicity. HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors have been investigated specifically for their structure interaction by atomic force microscopy and circular dichroic spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the HMGB1 molecule could bind with the pDNA chains, but not condense pDNA well. The PEG-PEI further compacted pDNA/HMGB1 complexes into nanosized spherical terplexes. The pDNA delivered by HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors was significantly accumulated in the nucleus of cells, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The percentage of GFP-transfected cells and VEGF protein expression level induced by HMGB1/PEG-PEI were 2.6-4.9-fold and 1.4-2.8-fold higher, respectively, than that of a common cationic polymer PEI 25 kDa. Therefore, the HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vector could be used as a versatile vector for promoting exogenous DNA nuclear localization, thereby enhancing its expression.

  3. Multifunctional protein nanocarriers for targeted nuclear gene delivery in nondividing cells.

    PubMed

    Glover, Dominic J; Ng, Su May; Mechler, Adam; Martin, Lisandra L; Jans, David A

    2009-09-01

    Compartmentalization within eukaryotic cells hinders the efficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the cell nucleus. Here we describe novel multifunctional DNA carriers (MDCs) that self-assemble with DNA to form structured nanoparticles that possess virus-like functions for cellular trafficking. MDCs contain, in fusion, the DNA-compacting sperm chromatin component protamine, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone for cell-targeted internalization, the endosome-translocation domain of diphtheria toxin, and an optimized nuclear localization sequence to confer recognition by the nuclear import machinery. The structure of the MDC-DNA particles was examined using atomic force microscopy, and the functionality of each domain assessed using in vitro techniques, including a reconstituted nuclear transport assay in semi-intact cells relying on the use of quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy. The nanoparticles were internalized in cell-specific fashion and subsequently exited the endosome into the cytoplasm. Notably, the nanoparticles interact with cellular nuclear transport proteins as shown in direct binding assays and are actively trafficked into the cell nucleus of nondividing cells, resulting in 3- to 4-fold higher reporter gene expression in growth-arrested human embryonic kidney cells, as well as lower cytotoxicity, than lipid and polyethyleneimine vectors. The importance of each functional domain was examined by comparing MDCs with different domain compositions as controls, as well as using antibodies to block particular pathways. MDCs that utilize cellular signaling pathways have enormous potential to safely and efficiently deliver therapeutic transgenes into the nucleus of nondividing cells. PMID:19395475

  4. Nuclear Envelope Protein SUN2 Promotes Cyclophilin-A-Dependent Steps of HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Xavier; Satoh, Takeshi; Gentili, Matteo; Cerboni, Silvia; Silvin, Aymeric; Conrad, Cécile; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Rodriguez, Elisa C.; Guichou, Jean-François; Bosquet, Nathalie; Piel, Matthieu; Le Grand, Roger; King, Megan C.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Manel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the early phase of replication, HIV reverse transcribes its RNA and crosses the nuclear envelope while escaping host antiviral defenses. The host factor Cyclophilin A (CypA) is essential for these steps and binds the HIV capsid; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here, we identify related capsid mutants in HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVmac that are restricted by CypA. This antiviral restriction of mutated viruses is conserved across species and prevents nuclear import of the viral cDNA. Importantly, the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN2 is required for the antiviral activity of CypA. We show that wild-type HIV exploits SUN2 in primary CD4+ T cells as an essential host factor that is required for the positive effects of CypA on reverse transcription and infection. Altogether, these results establish essential CypA-dependent functions of SUN2 in HIV infection at the nuclear envelope. PMID:27149839

  5. Nuclear pore complex proteins mark the implantation window in human endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Guffanti, Elisa; Kittur, Nupur; Brodt, Z. Nilly; Polotsky, Alex J.; Kuokkanen, Satu M.; Heller, Debra S.; Young, Steven L.; Santoro, Nanette; Meier, U. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Summary Nucleolar channel systems (NCSs) are membranous organelles appearing transiently in the epithelial cell nuclei of postovulatory human endometrium. Their characterization and use as markers for a healthy receptive endometrium have been limited because they are only identifiable by electron microscopy. Here we describe the light microscopic detection of NCSs using immunofluorescence. Specifically, the monoclonal nuclear pore complex antibody 414 shows that NCSs are present in about half of all human endometrial epithelial cells but not in any other cell type, tissue or species. Most nuclei contain only a single NCS of uniform 1 μm diameter indicating a tightly controlled organelle. The composition of NCSs is as unique as their structure; they contain only a subset each of the proteins of nuclear pore complexes, inner nuclear membrane, nuclear lamina and endoplasmic reticulum. Validation of our robust NCS detection method on 95 endometrial biopsies defines a 6-day window, days 19-24 (±1) of an idealized 28 day cycle, wherein NCSs occur. Therefore, NCSs precede and overlap with the implantation window and serve as potential markers of uterine receptivity. The immunodetection assay, combined with the hitherto underappreciated prevalence of NCSs, now enables simple screening and further molecular and functional dissection. PMID:18505792

  6. DETECTION OF EXTRA-NUCLEAR HIGH MOBILITY GROUP BOX-1 PROTEIN IN A CANINE MODEL OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB-1) is a well-characterized nuclear protein recently shown to be involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and injury. Studies have linked HMGB-1 release to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, a role for HMGB-1 in other disorders involvi...

  7. HIV-1 uncoating: connection to nuclear entry and regulation by host proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Aiken, Christopher

    2014-04-15

    The RNA genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is enclosed by a capsid shell that dissociates within the cell in a multistep process known as uncoating, which influences completion of reverse transcription of the viral genome. Double-stranded viral DNA is imported into the nucleus for integration into the host genome, a hallmark of retroviral infection. Reverse transcription, nuclear entry, and integration are coordinated by a capsid uncoating process that is regulated by cellular proteins. Although uncoating is not well understood, recent studies have revealed insights into the process, particularly with respect to nuclear import pathways and protection of the viral genome from DNA sensors. Understanding uncoating will be valuable toward developing novel antiretroviral therapies for HIV-infected individuals.

  8. The phylogeny and classification of caenophidian snakes inferred from seven nuclear protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Nicolas; Delmas, Anne-Sophie; David, Patrick; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Hedges, S Blair

    2007-02-01

    More than 80% of the approximately 3000 living species of snakes are placed in the taxon Caenophidia (advanced snakes), a group that includes the families Acrochordidae, Viperidae, Elapidae, Atractaspididae, and the paraphyletic 'Colubridae'. Previous studies using DNA sequences have involved few nuclear genes (one or two). Several nodes have therefore proven difficult to resolve with statistical significance. Here, we investigated the higher-level relationships of caenophidian snakes with seven nuclear protein-coding genes and obtained a well-supported topology. Accordingly, some adjustments to the current classification of Caenophidia are made to better reflect the relationships of the groups. The phylogeny also indicates that, ancestrally, caenophidian snakes are Asian and nocturnal in origin, although living species occur on nearly all continents and are ecologically diverse. PMID:17303545

  9. Collapsin response mediator protein 3 deacetylates histone H4 to mediate nuclear condensation and neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng T.; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Cooke, Matthew; Zhou, Lei

    2013-01-01

    CRMP proteins play critical regulatory roles during semaphorin-mediated neurite outgrowth, neuronal differentiation and death. Albeit having a high degree of structure and sequence resemblance to that of liver dihydropyrimidinase, purified rodent brain CRMPs do not hydrolyze dihydropyrimidinase substrates. Here we found that mouse CRMP3 has robust histone H4 deacetylase activity. During excitotoxicity-induced mouse neuronal death, calpain-cleaved, N-terminally truncated CRMP3 undergoes nuclear translocation to cause nuclear condensation through deacetylation of histone H4. CRMP3-mediated deacetylation of H4 leads to de-repression of the E2F1 gene transcription and E2F1-dependent neuronal death. These studies revealed a novel mechanism of CRMP3 in neuronal death. Together with previous well established bodies of literature that inhibition of histone deacetylase activity provides neuroprotection, we envisage that inhibition of CRMP3 may represent a novel therapeutic approach towards excitotoxicity-induced neuronal death. PMID:23443259

  10. Nuclear translocation of the cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, upon induction of skeletal muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cambier, Linda; Pomiès, Pascal

    2011-06-17

    The skALP isoform has been shown to play a critical role in actin organization and anchorage within the Z-discs of skeletal muscles, but no data is available on the function of the smALP isoform in skeletal muscle cells. Here, we show that upon induction of differentiation a nuclear translocation of smALP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts, concomitant to an up-regulation of the protein expression, occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear translocation of the protein. PMID:21620799

  11. Novel Nuclear Export Signal-Interacting Protein, NESI, Critical for the Assembly of Hepatitis Delta Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Hsin; Chang, Shin C.; Huang, Cheng; Li, Ya-Ping; Lee, Chia-Huei; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2005-01-01

    The process of host factor-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport is critical for diverse cellular events in eukaryotes and the life cycle of viruses. We have previously identified a chromosome region maintenance 1-independent nuclear export signal (NES) at the C terminus of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), designated NES(HDAg-L) that is required for the assembly of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) (C.-H. Lee et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276:8142-8148, 2001). To look for interacting proteins of the NES(HDAg-L), yeast two-hybrid screening was applied using the GAL4-binding domain fused to the NES(HDAg-L) as bait. Among the positive clones, one encodes a protein, designated NESI [NES(HDAg-L) interacting protein] that specifically interacted with the wild-type NES(HDAg-L) but not with the export/package-defective HDAg-L mutant, NES*(HDAg-L), in which Pro-205 has been replaced by Ala. Northern blot analysis revealed NESI as the gene product of a 1.9-kb endogenous mRNA transcript that is present predominantly in human liver tissue. NESI consists of 467 amino acid residues and bears a putative actin-binding site and a bipartite nuclear localization signal. Specific interaction between HDAg-L and NESI was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining. Overexpression of antisense NESI RNAs inhibited the expression of NESI and abolished HDAg-L-mediated nuclear export and assembly of HDV genomic RNA. These data indicate a critical role of NESI in the assembly of HDV through interaction with HDAg-L. PMID:15956556

  12. Nucleolar protein allocation and ultrastructure in bovine embryos produced by nuclear transfer from embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Hyttel, P; Laurincik, J; Zakhartchenko, V; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Ochs, R L; Brem, G

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, autoradiography following (3)H-uridine incubation, and transmission electron microscopy were used to evaluate the nucleolar protein localization, transcriptional activity, and nucleolar ultrastructure during genomic reprogramming in bovine embryos reconstructed by nuclear transfer from in vitro-produced bovine morulae to activated cytoplasts. During the first cell cycle (one-cell embryos), no autoradiographic labelling was detected. Ultrastructurally, whorls consisting of densely packed fibrillar material were observed instead of nucleoli. During the second, third, and fourth cell cycle (two-, four-, and tentative eight-cell embryos), autoradiographically unlabelled nuclei contained vacuolated bodies consisting of densely packed fibrillar material. Also, during the fourth cell cycle, the first nucleoplasmic autoradiographic labelling was observed, but still without formation of fibrillo-granular nucleoli. During the fifth cell cycle (tentative 16-cell embryos), the nuclei displayed autoradiographic labelling over both nucleoplasm and presumptive nucleoli, and the formation of fibrillo-granular nucleoli was observed. In a certain proportion of blastomeres, however, abnormal patterns of nucleolar formation and apoptosis were noted. During the first two cell cycles, labelling of RNA polymerase I, fibrillarin, upstream binding factor (UBF), nucleolin (C23), and nucleophosmin (B23) was localized to nuclear entities. During the third cell cycle, labelling of topoisomerase I was observed in addition. During the fourth and fifth cell cycles, a substantial portion of the embryos presented blastomeres that lacked labelling of several of these nucleolar proteins. In conclusion, the nuclear transfer procedure was associated with remodelling of the nucleoli to an inactive form, followed by reformation of fibrillo-granular nucleoli during the fifth cell cycle. Moreover, a certain proportion of blastomeres failed to form functional nucleoli with respect to both ultrastructural organization and protein allocation. PMID:11900641

  13. Nuclear transport of Ras-associated tumor suppressor proteins: different transport receptor binding specificities for arginine-rich nuclear targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Gita; Singhal, Prabhat K; Rao, M R K Subba; Mahalingam, S

    2007-04-13

    Ras proteins regulate a wide range of biological processes by interacting with a variety of effector proteins. In addition to the known role in tumorigensis, the activated form of Ras exhibits growth-inhibitory effects by unknown mechanisms. Several Ras effector proteins identified as mediators of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest also exhibit properties normally associated with tumor suppressor proteins. Here, we show that Ras effector RASSF5/NORE-1 binds strongly to K-Ras but weakly to both N-Ras and H-Ras. RASSF5 was found to localize both in the nucleus and the nucleolus in contrast to other Ras effector proteins, RASSF1C and RASSF2, which are localized in the nucleus and excluded from nucleolus. A 50 amino acid residue transferable arginine-rich nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) identified in RASSF5 is capable of interacting with importin-beta and transporting the cargo into the nucleolus. Surprisingly, similar arginine-rich signals identified in RASSF1C and RASSF2 interact with importin-alpha and transport the heterologous cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. Interestingly, mutation of arginine residues within these nuclear targeting signals prevented interaction of Ras effector proteins with respective transport receptors and abolished their nuclear translocation. These results provide evidence for the first time that arginine-rich signals are able to recognize different nuclear import receptors and transport the RASSF proteins into distinct sub-cellular compartments. In addition, our data suggest that the nuclear localization of RASSF5 is critical for its cell growth control activity. Together, these data suggest that the transport of Ras effector superfamily proteins into the nucleus/nucleolus may play a vital role in modulating Ras-mediated cell proliferation during tumorigenesis. PMID:17320110

  14. The trypanosome Pumilio-domain protein PUF7 associates with a nuclear cyclophilin and is involved in ribosomal RNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Droll, Dorothea; Archer, Stuart; Fenn, Katelyn; Delhi, Praveen; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2010-03-19

    Proteins with Pumilio RNA binding domains (Puf proteins) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Some Puf proteins bind to the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, acting to repress translation and promote degradation; others are involved in ribosomal RNA maturation. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei encodes eleven Puf proteins whose function cannot be predicted by sequence analysis. We show here that epitope-tagged TbPUF7 is located in the nucleolus, and associated with a nuclear cyclophilin-like protein, TbNCP1. RNAi targeting PUF7 reduced trypanosome growth and inhibited two steps in ribosomal RNA processing. PMID:20153321

  15. The trypanosome Pumilio-domain protein PUF7 associates with a nuclear cyclophilin and is involved in ribosomal RNA maturation

    PubMed Central

    Droll, Dorothea; Archer, Stuart; Fenn, Katelyn; Delhi, Praveen; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with Pumilio RNA binding domains (Puf proteins) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Some Puf proteins bind to the 3′-untranslated regions of mRNAs, acting to repress translation and promote degradation; others are involved in ribosomal RNA maturation. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei encodes eleven Puf proteins whose function cannot be predicted by sequence analysis. We show here that epitope-tagged TbPUF7 is located in the nucleolus, and associated with a nuclear cyclophilin-like protein, TbNCP1. RNAi targeting PUF7 reduced trypanosome growth and inhibited two steps in ribosomal RNA processing. PMID:20153321

  16. Transmembrane protein TMEM170A is a newly discovered regulator of ER and nuclear envelope morphogenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Andri; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphogenesis is incompletely understood. ER tubules are shaped by the reticulons (RTNs) and DP1/Yop1p family members, but the mechanism of ER sheet formation is much less clear. Here, we characterize TMEM170A, a human transmembrane protein, which localizes in ER and nuclear envelope membranes. Silencing or overexpressing TMEM170A in HeLa K cells alters ER shape and morphology. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that downregulation of TMEM170A specifically induces tubular ER formation, whereas overexpression of TMEM170A induces ER sheet formation, indicating that TMEM170A is a newly discovered ER-sheet-promoting protein. Additionally, downregulation of TMEM170A alters nuclear shape and size, decreases the density of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the nuclear envelope and causes either a reduction in inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins or their relocalization to the ER. TMEM170A interacts with RTN4, a member of the reticulon family; simultaneous co-silencing of TMEM170A and RTN4 rescues ER, NPC and nuclear-envelope-related phenotypes, implying that the two proteins have antagonistic effects on ER membrane organization, and nuclear envelope and NPC formation. PMID:26906412

  17. Transmembrane protein TMEM170A is a newly discovered regulator of ER and nuclear envelope morphogenesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Andri; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Santama, Niovi; Mattaj, Iain W

    2016-04-15

    The mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphogenesis is incompletely understood. ER tubules are shaped by the reticulons (RTNs) and DP1/Yop1p family members, but the mechanism of ER sheet formation is much less clear. Here, we characterize TMEM170A, a human transmembrane protein, which localizes in ER and nuclear envelope membranes. Silencing or overexpressing TMEM170A in HeLa K cells alters ER shape and morphology. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that downregulation of TMEM170A specifically induces tubular ER formation, whereas overexpression of TMEM170A induces ER sheet formation, indicating that TMEM170A is a newly discovered ER-sheet-promoting protein. Additionally, downregulation of TMEM170A alters nuclear shape and size, decreases the density of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the nuclear envelope and causes either a reduction in inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins or their relocalization to the ER. TMEM170A interacts with RTN4, a member of the reticulon family; simultaneous co-silencing of TMEM170A and RTN4 rescues ER, NPC and nuclear-envelope-related phenotypes, implying that the two proteins have antagonistic effects on ER membrane organization, and nuclear envelope and NPC formation. PMID:26906412

  18. Data in support of DPF2 regulates OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Dijuan; Shen, Yuxian; Tao, Xiaofang; Liu, Lihua; Zhong, Yongwang; Fang, Shengyun

    2015-01-01

    DPF2, also named ubi-d4/requiem (REQU), interacts with a protein complex containing OCT4. This paper provides data in support of the research article entitled “DPF2 regulates OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution”. The highlights include: (1) Denature-immunoprecipitation assay revealed ubiquitination of OCT4 in pluripotent H9 cells, which was enhancedby MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. (2) Well colocalization of ectopic OCT4 and FLAG-Ub was found in HeLa cells, which was also increased by MG132. (3) MG132 treatment decreased DPF2 cytoplasmic expression in vivo. These data give insights into how proteasome inhibition contributes to studying ubiquitnation of OCT4. PMID:26958616

  19. Nuclear assembly of polyomavirus capsids in insect cells expressing the major capsid protein VP1.

    PubMed Central

    Montross, L; Watkins, S; Moreland, R B; Mamon, H; Caspar, D L; Garcea, R L

    1991-01-01

    Polyomavirus normally assembles in the nucleus of infected mouse cells. Sf9 insect cells expressing the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1 were examined by electron microscopy. Capsidlike particles of apparently uniform size were found in the nucleus. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated abundant VP1 in the cytoplasm which was not assembled into any recognizable higher-order structure. Cytoplasmic VP1 assembled after the cells were treated with the calcium ionophore ionomycin. Purified VP1 aggregates were shown by negative staining and cryoelectron microscopy to consist predominantly of particles similar to the empty T = 7 viral capsid. Thus, polyomavirus VP1 can assemble in vivo into capsids independent of other viral proteins or DNA. Nuclear assembly may result from increased available calcium in this subcellular compartment. Images PMID:1651418

  20. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  1. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  2. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    It was shown by immunofluorescence method that serum M68 and serum K43 from patients with autoimmune disease stain interphase nuclei and periphery of mitotic chromosomes of pig kidney cells. Western blotting reveals the polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa in serum M68, and the polypeptide with mol. mass of 38 kDa in serum K43. In the nuclear protein matrix, the antibodies to protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa stained only nucleolar periphery, while the antibodies to the protein with mol. mass of 50 kDa stained both the nucleolar periphery and all the interphase nucleus. It shows that among all components of nuclear protein matrix (lamina, internuclear network, residual nucleoli) only nucleolar periphery contains the 38 kDa protein, while the 50 kDa protein is a part of residual nucleolar periphery and takes part in nuclear protein network formation. In the interphase cells, both proteins were in situ localized in the nuclei, but one of them with mol. mass of 50 kDa was in the form of small clearly outlined granules, while the other (38 kDa) was in the form of small bright granules against the background of diffusely stained nuclei. Both proteins were also revealed as continuous ring around nucleolar periphery. During all mitotic stages, the 50 kDa protein was seen on the chromosomal periphery as a cover, and the 38 kDa protein formed separate fragments and granules around them. After nuclear and chromosome decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment, both antibodies stain interphase nuclei in diffuse manner, but in mitotic cells they stained the surface of the swollen chromosomes. The polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa maintained strong connection with chromosome periphery both in norm and under condition of decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment and at subsequent recondensation in isotonic medium. In contrast, the protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa partially lost the contact with a chromosome during recondensation appearing also in the form of granules in cytoplasm. The data allow to consider, that nuclear matrix proteins can be transported as a part of peripheral chromosomal material, and that they can have connection of different stability with chromosomal periphery as well as the main nucleolar proteins (fibrillarin, B-23, nucleolin et al.) and some non-nucleolar components of nuclear protein matrix. PMID:21105365

  3. Mitochondria of the Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis Contain Nuclear rDNA-Encoded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Galopier, Aurélie; Hermann-Le Denmat, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is the source of the structural 18S, 5.8S and 25S rRNAs. In hemiascomycetous yeasts, the 25S rDNA sequence was described to lodge an antisense open reading frame (ORF) named TAR1 for Transcript Antisense to Ribosomal RNA. Here, we present the first immuno-detection and sub-cellular localization of the authentic product of this atypical yeast gene. Using specific antibodies against the predicted amino-acid sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TAR1 product, we detected the endogenous Tar1p polypeptides in S. cerevisiae (Sc) and Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl) species and found that both proteins localize to mitochondria. Protease and carbonate treatments of purified mitochondria further revealed that endogenous Sc Tar1p protein sub-localizes in the inner membrane in a Nin-Cout topology. Plasmid-versions of 5′ end or 3′ end truncated TAR1 ORF were used to demonstrate that neither the N-terminus nor the C-terminus of Sc Tar1p were required for its localization. Also, Tar1p is a presequence-less protein. Endogenous Sc Tar1p was found to be a low abundant protein, which is expressed in fermentable and non-fermentable growth conditions. Endogenous Sc TAR1 transcripts were also found low abundant and consistently 5′ flanking regions of TAR1 ORF exhibit modest promoter activity when assayed in a luciferase-reporter system. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR, we also determined that endogenous Sc TAR1 transcripts possess heterogeneous 5′ and 3′ ends probably reflecting the complex expression of a gene embedded in actively transcribed rDNA sequence. Altogether, our results definitively ascertain that the antisense yeast gene TAR1 constitutes a functional transcription unit within the nuclear rDNA repeats. PMID:21283537

  4. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Koji; Uehata, Yasuko; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Toshihisa; Darmanin, Stephanie; Asaka, Masahiro; Department of Cancer Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 ; Takeda, Hiroshi; Department of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 ; Kobayashi, Masanobu; School of Nursing and Social Services, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPK{alpha}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis co-localizes with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic {alpha} subunit and regulatory {beta} and {gamma} subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the {alpha}-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPK{alpha}2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPK{alpha}2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK{alpha}2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex.

  5. Fast track, dynein-dependent nuclear targeting of human immunodeficiency virus Vpr protein; impaired trafficking in a clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Caly, Leon; Kassouf, Vicki T; Moseley, Gregory W; Diefenbach, Russell J; Cunningham, Anthony L; Jans, David A

    2016-02-12

    Nuclear import of the accessory protein Vpr is central to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We previously identified the Vpr F72L mutation in a HIV-infected, long-term non-progressor, showing that it resulted in reduced Vpr nuclear accumulation and altered cytoplasmic localisation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the effects of nuclear accumulation of the F72L mutation are due to impairment of microtubule-dependent-enhancement of Vpr nuclear import. We use high resolution imaging approaches including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and other approaches to document interaction between Vpr and the dynein light chain protein, DYNLT1, and impaired interaction of the F72L mutant with DYNLT1. The results implicate MTs/DYNLT1 as drivers of Vpr nuclear import and HIV infection, with important therapeutic implications. PMID:26792716

  6. Binding of HeLa cell nuclear proteins to a human chromosome 9 specific repetitive DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.; Robinson, D.; Moyzis, R.

    1987-05-01

    In order to investigate DNA-protein interactions in defined chromosome regions, the authors have initiated studies to detect the specific binding of proteins from a crude HeLe cell nuclear extract to a cloned human chromosome 9 specific satellite III DNA sequence. Approximately 150,000 copies of this sequence, representing 0.23% of human DNA, are localized in chromosome region 9qh. Using a band retardation assay, in which the migration of a radiolabeled DNA probe is altered by protein binding, two discrete DNA-protein complexes were observed. Kinetic analysis of the formation and dissociation of these two complexes suggests that the slower migrating complex may be a dimer of the faster migrating complex. Competition experiments, in which these specific DNA-protein complexes are formed in the presence of increasing amounts of E. coli, pBr 322, or poly d(I-c) DNA indicate that the HeLa nuclear protein(s) has an approximately 20,000 fold greater affinity for the chromosome 9 specific DNA sequence. Preliminary experiments indicate that the formation of these specific DNA-protein complexes are not blocked by either cloned Alu repetitive DNA sequences, or a related chromosome 16 satellite II repetitive DNA sequence. This suggests that some nuclear proteins may have distinct chromosomal locations.

  7. Identification of nuclear target proteins for S-nitrosylation in pathogen-treated Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Shekariesfahlan, Azam; Ageeva, Alexandra; Mengel, Alexander; von Toerne, Christine; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a significant signalling molecule involved in the regulation of many different physiological processes in plants. One of the most imperative regulatory modes of action of NO is protein S-nitrosylation--the covalent attachment of an NO group to the sulfur atom of cysteine residues. In this study, we focus on S-nitrosylation of Arabidopsis nuclear proteins after pathogen infection. After treatment of Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures with pathogens, nuclear proteins were extracted and treated with the S-nitrosylating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). A biotin switch assay was performed and biotin-labelled proteins were purified by neutravidin affinity chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. A total of 135 proteins were identified, whereas nuclear localization has been described for 122 proteins of them. 117 of these proteins contain at least one cysteine residue. Most of the S-nitrosylated candidates were involved in protein and RNA metabolism, stress response, and cell organization and division. Interestingly, two plant-specific histone deacetylases were identified suggesting that nitric oxide regulated epigenetic processes in plants. In sum, this work provides a new collection of targets for protein S-nitrosylation in Arabidopsis and gives insight into the regulatory function of NO in the nucleus during plant defense response. Moreover, our data extend the knowledge on the regulatory function of NO in events located in the nucleus. PMID:26259180

  8. Nuclear Pore Complex Protein Sequences Determine Overall Copolymer Brush Structure and Function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, David; Kim, Yongwoon; Zandi, Roya; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Disordered proteins are an interesting class of unfolded protein biopolymers which are functionally versatile. Their sequences are unconstrained by a sequence-structure relationship, and allow for a wide range of chemical and physical polymer properties. The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) contains over one hundred of such proteins (FG nups), which collectively function to regulate the exchange of all materials between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We perform coarse grained simulations of both individual FG nups and grafted rings of nups mimicking the in vivo geometry of the NPC, supplemented with polymer brush modeling. Our results indicate that different regions or ``blocks'' of an individual FG nup can have distinctly different forms of disorder, and that this property appears to be a conserved feature across eukarya. Furthermore, this block structure at the individual protein level is critical to the formation of a unique higher-order polymer brush architecture. Because the interactions between FG nups may be modulated by certain forms of transport factors, our results indicate that transitions between brush morphologies could play an important role in regulating transport across the NPC, suggesting novel forms of gated transport across membrane pores with wide biomimetic applicability.

  9. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  10. Interaction of nuclear proteins with intrinsically curved DNA in a matrix attachment region of a tobacco gene.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Y

    2000-09-01

    Two scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs), designated S/M I and S/M II, are located in the 5'-flanking region of the tobacco basic class I chitinase gene, CHN50. Structural analysis of these S/MARs showed that S/M II contained an intrinsically curved DNA sequence that is located between -1786 and -1722 relative to the initiation site of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and southwestern blotting analysis were performed to identify the tobacco nuclear proteins that bind specifically to this curved DNA. These experiments revealed that nuclear proteins bound specifically to the curved DNA. Moreover, the nuclear proteins appeared to recognize the overall structure of the intrinsically curved DNA, as distinct from binding to the DNA with sequence specificity. Southwestern blotting analysis showed that proteins of 22, 24, 28 and 34 kDa bound specifically to the curved DNA. The possible functions of the binding proteins and their relationship to previously identified nuclear proteins, such as high-mobility-group proteins, are discussed. PMID:11094983

  11. Nucleolin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C proteins specifically interact with the 3'-untranslated region of amyloid protein precursor mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, S H; Malter, J S

    1995-07-21

    The central nervous system deposition by neurons and glia of beta A4 amyloid protein is an important contributing factor to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloidogenic cells overexpress amyloid precursor protein (APP) mRNAs suggesting a transcriptional or post-transcriptional defect may contribute to this process. We have previously shown that APP mRNAs display regulated stability which is dependent on a 29-base element within the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). This domain specifically interacted with several cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins. We have purified these APP RNA-binding proteins from a human T-cell leukemia and demonstrate that five cytoplasmic proteins of 70, 48, 47, 39, and 38 kDa form the previously observed APP RNA protein complexes. Amino acid sequence analyses showed that the 70-, 48-, and 47-kDa proteins were fragments of nucleolin and that the 39- and 38-kDa proteins were heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C protein. Northwestern and Western blot analyses of purified material further confirmed these data. Nucleolin protein is known to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm but hnRNP C has not been reported within the cytoplasm. This report of sequence specific, mRNA binding by nucleolin and hnRNP C suggests that these proteins participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNA through 3'-UTR, site-specific interactions. PMID:7615529

  12. Identification of a nuclear export signal sequence for bovine papillomavirus E1 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rosas-Acosta, German; Wilson, Van G.

    2008-03-30

    Recent studies have demonstrated nuclear export by papillomavirus E1 proteins, but the requisite export sequence(s) for bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E1 were not defined. In this report we identify three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) present in BPV E1, with NES2 being the strongest in reporter assays. Nuclear localization of BPV1 E1 was modulated by over- or under-expression of CRM1, the major cellular exportin, and export was strongly reduced by the CRM1 inhibitor, Leptomycin B, indicating that E1 export occurs primarily through a CRM1-dependent process. Consistent with the in vivo functional results, E1 bound CRM1 in an in vitro pull-down assay. In addition, sumoylated E1 bound CRM1 more effectively than unmodified E1, suggesting that E1 export may be regulated by SUMO modification. Lastly, an E1 NES2 mutant accumulated in the nucleus to a greater extent than wild-type E1, yet was defective for viral origin replication in vivo. However, NES2 exhibited no intrinsic replication defect in an in vitro replication assay, implying that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling may be required to maintain E1 in a replication competent state.

  13. Loss of the integral nuclear envelope protein SUN1 induces alteration of nucleoli.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Matsumori, Haruka; Katahira, Jun; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Hieda, Miki

    2016-03-01

    A supervised machine learning algorithm, which is qualified for image classification and analyzing similarities, is based on multiple discriminative morphological features that are automatically assembled during the learning processes. The algorithm is suitable for population-based analysis of images of biological materials that are generally complex and heterogeneous. Here we used the algorithm wndchrm to quantify the effects on nucleolar morphology of the loss of the components of nuclear envelope in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, an assembly of nuclear envelope proteins comprising mainly members of the SUN and nesprin families, connects the nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments. The components of the LINC complex are markedly deficient in breast cancer tissues. We found that a reduction in the levels of SUN1, SUN2, and lamin A/C led to significant changes in morphologies that were computationally classified using wndchrm with approximately 100% accuracy. In particular, depletion of SUN1 caused nucleolar hypertrophy and reduced rRNA synthesis. Further, wndchrm revealed a consistent negative correlation between SUN1 expression and the size of nucleoli in human breast cancer tissues. Our unbiased morphological quantitation strategies using wndchrm revealed an unexpected link between the components of the LINC complex and the morphologies of nucleoli that serves as an indicator of the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells. PMID:26962703

  14. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ryan M; Jeganathan, Karthik B; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  15. Efficient large-scale protein production of larvae and pupae of silkworm by Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus bacmid system.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y

    2005-01-21

    Silkworm is one of the most attractive hosts for large-scale production of eukaryotic proteins as well as recombinant baculoviruses for gene transfer to mammalian cells. The bacmid system of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) has already been established and widely used. However, the AcNPV does not have a potential to infect silkworm. We developed the first practical Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus bacmid system directly applicable for the protein expression of silkworm. By using this system, the green fluorescence protein was successfully expressed in silkworm larvae and pupae not only by infection of its recombinant virus but also by direct injection of its bacmid DNA. This method provides the rapid protein production in silkworm as long as 10 days, is free from biohazard, thus will be a powerful tool for the future production factory of recombinant eukaryotic proteins and baculoviruses. PMID:15596136

  16. Nuclear translocation of the cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, upon induction of skeletal muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cambier, Linda; Pomies, Pascal

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, is expressed in differentiated skeletal muscle. {yields} smALP is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts upon induction of myogenesis. {yields} The differentiation-dependent nuclear translocation of smALP occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. {yields} The LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear accumulation of the protein. {yields} smALP might act in the nucleus to control some critical aspect of the muscle differentiation process. -- Abstract: The skALP isoform has been shown to play a critical role in actin organization and anchorage within the Z-discs of skeletal muscles, but no data is available on the function of the smALP isoform in skeletal muscle cells. Here, we show that upon induction of differentiation a nuclear translocation of smALP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts, concomitant to an up-regulation of the protein expression, occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear translocation of the protein.

  17. Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) Promotes the Nuclear Import of p73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Wu, Shengnan

    2011-01-01

    p73 has been identified as a structural and functional homolog of the tumor suppressor p53. However, mechanisms that regulate the localization of p73 have not been fully clarified. The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional coactivator. As a transcriptional coactivator, YAP needs to bind transcription factors to stimulate gene expression. p73 is a reported YAP target transcription factors and YAP has been shown to positively regulate p73 in promoting apoptosis. Previous studies show that p73 interacts with YAP through its PPPY motif, and increases p73 transactivation of apoptotic genes. In this study, we focused on YAP's regulation of the localization of p73. After transient transfection into Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and Human embryonic kidney 293T cells with GFP-YAP and/or YFP-p73, and incubated for 24 hours expression. p73 was fused to YFP to allow the examination of its subcellular localization. When expressed alone, YFP-p73 was distributed throughout the cell. When coexpressed with YAP, nuclear accumulation of YFP-p73 became evident. We quantitated the effect of YAP on the redistribution of YFP-p73 by counting cells with nuclear-only YFP signal. We found that YAP can influence the subcellular distribution of p73. Altogether, coexpression with YAP affected the subcellular distribution of the p73 protein. Our studies attribute a central role to YAP in regulating p73 accumulation and YAP, at least in part, might promote the nuclear import of p73.

  18. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is localized to Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Dury, Alain Y; El Fatimy, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W

    2013-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome. PMID:24204304

  19. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is localized to Cajal Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M.; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W.

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome. PMID:24204304

  20. Src1 is a Protein of the Inner Nuclear Membrane Interacting with the Dictyostelium Lamin NE81.

    PubMed

    Batsios, Petros; Ren, Xiang; Baumann, Otto; Larochelle, Denis A; Gräf, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) consists of the outer and inner nuclear membrane (INM), whereby the latter is bound to the nuclear lamina. Src1 is a Dictyostelium homologue of the helix-extension-helix family of proteins, which also includes the human lamin-binding protein MAN1. Both endogenous Src1 and GFP-Src1 are localized to the NE during the entire cell cycle. Immuno-electron microscopy and light microscopy after differential detergent treatment indicated that Src1 resides in the INM. FRAP experiments with GFP-Src1 cells suggested that at least a fraction of the protein could be stably engaged in forming the nuclear lamina together with the Dictyostelium lamin NE81. Both a BioID proximity assay and mis-localization of soluble, truncated mRFP-Src1 at cytosolic clusters consisting of an intentionally mis-localized mutant of GFP-NE81 confirmed an interaction of Src1 and NE81. Expression GFP-Src1(1-646), a fragment C-terminally truncated after the first transmembrane domain, disrupted interaction of nuclear membranes with the nuclear lamina, as cells formed protrusions of the NE that were dependent on cytoskeletal pulling forces. Protrusions were dependent on intact microtubules but not actin filaments. Our results indicate that Src1 is required for integrity of the NE and highlight Dictyostelium as a promising model for the evolution of nuclear architecture. PMID:26999214

  1. Src1 is a Protein of the Inner Nuclear Membrane Interacting with the Dictyostelium Lamin NE81

    PubMed Central

    Batsios, Petros; Ren, Xiang; Baumann, Otto; Larochelle, Denis A.; Gräf, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) consists of the outer and inner nuclear membrane (INM), whereby the latter is bound to the nuclear lamina. Src1 is a Dictyostelium homologue of the helix-extension-helix family of proteins, which also includes the human lamin-binding protein MAN1. Both endogenous Src1 and GFP-Src1 are localized to the NE during the entire cell cycle. Immuno-electron microscopy and light microscopy after differential detergent treatment indicated that Src1 resides in the INM. FRAP experiments with GFP-Src1 cells suggested that at least a fraction of the protein could be stably engaged in forming the nuclear lamina together with the Dictyostelium lamin NE81. Both a BioID proximity assay and mis-localization of soluble, truncated mRFP-Src1 at cytosolic clusters consisting of an intentionally mis-localized mutant of GFP-NE81 confirmed an interaction of Src1 and NE81. Expression GFP-Src11–646, a fragment C-terminally truncated after the first transmembrane domain, disrupted interaction of nuclear membranes with the nuclear lamina, as cells formed protrusions of the NE that were dependent on cytoskeletal pulling forces. Protrusions were dependent on intact microtubules but not actin filaments. Our results indicate that Src1 is required for integrity of the NE and highlight Dictyostelium as a promising model for the evolution of nuclear architecture. PMID:26999214

  2. Conservation of inner nuclear membrane targeting sequences in mammalian Pom121 and yeast Heh2 membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kralt, Annemarie; Jagalur, Noorjahan B.; van den Boom, Vincent; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Steen, Anton; Cingolani, Gino; Fornerod, Maarten; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum–synthesized membrane proteins traffic through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) en route to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Although many membrane proteins pass the NPC by simple diffusion, two yeast proteins, ScSrc1/ScHeh1 and ScHeh2, are actively imported. In these proteins, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an intrinsically disordered linker encode the sorting signal for recruiting the transport factors for FG-Nup and RanGTP-dependent transport through the NPC. Here we address whether a similar import mechanism applies in metazoans. We show that the (putative) NLSs of metazoan HsSun2, MmLem2, HsLBR, and HsLap2β are not sufficient to drive nuclear accumulation of a membrane protein in yeast, but the NLS from RnPom121 is. This NLS of Pom121 adapts a similar fold as the NLS of Heh2 when transport factor bound and rescues the subcellular localization and synthetic sickness of Heh2ΔNLS mutants. Consistent with the conservation of these NLSs, the NLS and linker of Heh2 support INM localization in HEK293T cells. The conserved features of the NLSs of ScHeh1, ScHeh2, and RnPom121 and the effective sorting of Heh2-derived reporters in human cells suggest that active import is conserved but confined to a small subset of INM proteins. PMID:26179916

  3. Atypical IκB proteinsnuclear modulators of NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) controls a multitude of physiological processes such as cell differentiation, cytokine expression, survival and proliferation. Since NF-κB governs embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis and the functions of innate and adaptive immune cells it represents one of the most important and versatile signaling networks known. Its activity is regulated via the inhibitors of NF-κB signaling, the IκB proteins. Classical IκBs, like the prototypical protein IκBα, sequester NF-κB transcription factors in the cytoplasm by masking of their nuclear localization signals (NLS). Thus, binding of NF-κB to the DNA is inhibited. The accessibility of the NLS is controlled via the degradation of IκBα. Phosphorylation of the conserved serine residues 32 and 36 leads to polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. This process marks the central event of canonical NF-κB activation. Once their NLS is accessible, NF-κB transcription factors translocate into the nucleus, bind to the DNA and regulate the transcription of their respective target genes. Several studies described a distinct group of atypical IκB proteins, referred to as the BCL-3 subfamily. Those atypical IκBs show entirely different sub-cellular localizations, activation kinetics and an unexpected functional diversity. First of all, their interaction with NF-κB transcription factors takes place in the nucleus in contrast to classical IκBs, whose binding to NF-κB predominantly occurs in the cytoplasm. Secondly, atypical IκBs are strongly induced after NF-κB activation, for example by LPS and IL-1β stimulation or triggering of B cell and T cell antigen receptors, but are not degraded in the first place like their conventional relatives. Finally, the interaction of atypical IκBs with DNA-associated NF-κB transcription factors can further enhance or diminish their transcriptional activity. Thus, they do not exclusively act as inhibitors of NF-κB activity. The capacity to modulate NF-κB transcription either positively or negatively, represents their most important and unique mechanistic difference to classical IκBs. Several reports revealed the importance of atypical IκB proteins for immune homeostasis and the severe consequences following their loss of function. This review summarizes insights into the physiological processes regulated by this protein class and the relevance of atypical IκB functioning. PMID:23578005

  4. Dynamic relocation of nuclear proteins during the execution phase of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Bottone, Maria Grazia; Biggiogera, Marco; Pellicciari, Carlo

    2008-12-01

    In the apoptotic program of controlled cell dismantling, the most characteristic nuclear changes involve chromatin, which condenses and often collapses against the nuclear envelope in the form of crescents. A severe reorganization also occurs in ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-containing structures which are involved in the synthesis and processing of transcripts: already during early apoptosis, the nucleoplasmic RNPs (namely, perichromatin fibrils, perichromatin granules, and interchromatin granules) coalesce in the interchromatin space where they associate with segregated nucleolar components, to ectopically form fibro-granular heterogeneous clusters. This was found to occur in cell systems in vivo and in cultured cell lines, after different apoptogenic stimuli. These RNP aggregates we have called heterogeneous ectopic RNP-derived structures (HERDS) move from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and may be found in apoptotic bodies, in late apoptosis. Immunolabeling experiments demonstrated that several other proteins which are normally located inside the nucleus also move into the cytoplasm, during apoptosis, independently from HERDS. Apoptotic cells have been suggested to be a powerful source of nuclear auto-antigens, which are produced by the partial proteolytic or nucleolytic cleavage of a wide variety of nuclear substrates. In the presence of defective phagocytosis (or when massive apoptosis overwhelms the clearance capability of the tissue scavenger cells), the disposal of apoptotic cells becomes insufficient and unphagocytosed late apoptotic cells may accumulate in the tissue where they may be engulfed by antigen-presenting cells (such as dendritic cells); an autoimmune response may thus be elicited, by which apoptosis-derived auto-antigens are recognized and presented to the immune system. PMID:18606154

  5. Protein Kinase A Is Part of a Mechanism That Regulates Nuclear Reimport of the Nuclear tRNA Export Receptors Los1p and Msn5p

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jacqueline B.; van der Merwe, George

    2014-01-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors. PMID:24297441

  6. Function of Piwi, a nuclear Piwi/Argonaute protein, is independent of its slicer activity

    PubMed Central

    Darricarrère, Nicole; Liu, Na; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Lin, Haifan

    2013-01-01

    The Piwi protein subfamily is essential for Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) biogenesis, transposon silencing, and germ-line development, all of which have been proposed to require Piwi endonuclease activity, as validated for two cytoplasmic Piwi proteins in mice. However, recent evidence has led to questioning of the generality of this mechanism for the Piwi members that reside in the nucleus. Drosophila offers a distinct opportunity to study the function of nuclear Piwi proteins because, among three Drosophila Piwi proteins—called Piwi, Aubergine, and Argonaute 3—Piwi is the only member of this subfamily that is localized in the nucleus and expressed in both germ-line and somatic cells in the gonad, where it is responsible for piRNA biogenesis and regulatory functions essential for fertility. In this study, we demonstrate beyond doubt that the slicer activity of Piwi is not required for any known functions in vivo. We show that, in transgenic flies with the DDX catalytic triad of PIWI mutated, neither primary nor secondary piRNA biogenesis is detectably affected, transposons remain repressed, and fertility is normal. Our observations demonstrate that the mechanism of Piwi is independent of its in vitro endonuclease activity. Instead, it is consistent with the alternative mode of Piwi function as a molecule involved in the piRNA-directed guidance of epigenetic factors to chromatin. PMID:23297219

  7. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  8. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  9. The nuclear protein Sam68 is recruited to the cytoplasmic stress granules during enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ning; Li, Pengfei; Pan, Ziye; Ding, Yun; Zou, Dehua; Li, Liyang; Xiao, Lijie; Shen, Binglei; Liu, Shuxia; Cao, Hongwei; Cui, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study found that the nuclear protein, 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis protein (Sam68), is translocated to the cytoplasm and forms punctate pattern during enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection [Virus Research, 180 (2014), 1-11]. However, the exact function of this punctate pattern in cytoplasm during EV71 infection remains unknown. In this study, we firstly have examined this punctate pattern of Sam68 re-localization in the cytoplasm, and observed the obvious recruitments of Sam68 to the EV71-induced stress granules (SGs). Sam68, belongs to the KH domain family of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), was then confirmed that its KH domain was essential for this recruitment. Nevertheless, Knockdown of Sam68 expression using ShRNA had no effects on SGs assembly, indicating that Sam68 is not a constitutive component of the SGs during EV71 infection. Lastly, we investigated the importance of microtubulin transport to SGs aggregation, and revealed that microtubule depolymerization inhibited SGs formation, suggesting that EV71-induced SGs move throughout the cytoplasm in a microtubule-dependent manner. Taken together, these results illuminated that EV71 infections can induce SGs formation, and Sam68, as a SGs component, migrates alone with SGs dependent on intact microtubule upon the viral infections. These findings may provide novel underlying mechanism for delineating the role of SGs during EV71 infection. PMID:27057671

  10. S100A6 mediates nuclear translocation of Sgt1: a heat shock-regulated protein.

    PubMed

    Prus, Wiktor; Filipek, Anna

    2011-10-01

    Sgt1 was originally identified in yeast as a suppressor of the Skp1 protein. Later, it was found that Sgt1 is present in plant and mammalian organisms and that it binds other ligands such as S100A6, a calcium-binding protein. In this work we show that in HEp-2 cells Sgt1 translocates to the nucleus due to heat shock. We also found that in HEp-2 cells with diminished level of S100A6, due to stable transfection with siRNA against S100A6, such translocation occurred at a much smaller scale in comparison with cells expressing a normal level of S100A6. Moreover, translocation of Sgt1 was observed in HEp-2 cells treated with thapsigargin instead of heat shock. In contrast thapsigargin was ineffective in cells with diminished level of S100A6. Thus, our results suggest that increase in intracellular concentration of Ca(2+), transduced by S100A6, is necessary for nuclear translocation of the Sgt1 protein. PMID:20213445

  11. Simple biophysics underpins collective conformations of the intrinsically disordered proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vovk, Andrei; Gu, Chad; Opferman, Michael G; Kapinos, Larisa E; Lim, Roderick YH; Coalson, Rob D; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Pore Complexes (NPCs) are key cellular transporter that control nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotic cells, but its transport mechanism is still not understood. The centerpiece of NPC transport is the assembly of intrinsically disordered polypeptides, known as FG nucleoporins, lining its passageway. Their conformations and collective dynamics during transport are difficult to assess in vivo. In vitro investigations provide partially conflicting results, lending support to different models of transport, which invoke various conformational transitions of the FG nucleoporins induced by the cargo-carrying transport proteins. We show that the spatial organization of FG nucleoporin assemblies with the transport proteins can be understood within a first principles biophysical model with a minimal number of key physical variables, such as the average protein interaction strengths and spatial densities. These results address some of the outstanding controversies and suggest how molecularly divergent NPCs in different species can perform essentially the same function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10785.001 PMID:27198189

  12. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  13. The T-DNA-linked VirD2 protein contains two distinct functional nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed Central

    Tinland, B; Koukolíková-Nicola, Z; Hall, M N; Hohn, B

    1992-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes neoplastic growth in plants by transferring a piece of DNA, called T-DNA, into the nucleus of the plant cell. The virulence protein VirD2 of A. tumefaciens is tightly linked to the T-DNA and is thought to direct it to the plant genome. Here we show that the VirD2 protein contains two nuclear localization signals that are functional both in yeast and in plant cells. One signal is located in the N-terminal part of the protein and resembles a single-cluster-type nuclear localization signal. The second signal is near the C terminus and is a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. The involvement of these sequences in the entry of the T-DNA into the nucleus is discussed. Images PMID:1502156

  14. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  15. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  16. Role of a nuclear localization signal on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV nuclear entry.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shauna M; Zhao, Linbo; Bosard, Catherine; Imperiale, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. PMID:25463609

  17. Role of a Nuclear Localization Signal on the Minor Capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. PMID:25463609

  18. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  19. C++ OPPS, a new software for the interpretation of protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Meirovitch, Eva

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool for elucidating protein dynamics because of the possibility to interpret nuclear spin relaxation properties in terms of microdynamic parameters. Magnetic relaxation times T1, T2, and NOE depend on dipolar and quadrupolar interactions, on chemical shift anisotropy and cross-correlation effects. Within the framework of given motional model, it is possible to express the NMR relaxation times as functions of spectral densities (Abragam, The Principles of Nuclear Magnetism; Oxford University Press: Clarendon, London, 1961), obtaining the connection between macroscopic observables and microscopic properties. In this context, recently Meirovitch et al. (Shapiro et al., Biochemistry 2002, 41, 6271, Meirovitch et al., J Phys Chem B 2006, 110, 20615, Meirovitch et al., J Phys Chem B 2007, 111, 12865) applied the dynamical model introduced by Polimeno and Freed (Polimeno and Freed, Adv Chem Phys 1993, 83, 89, Polimeno and Freed, J Phys Chem 1995, 99, 10995), known as the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) model, to the study of NMR data. The program C++OPPS (http://www.chimica.unipd.it/licc/), developed in our laboratory, implements the SRLS model in an user-friendly way with a graphical user interface (GUI), introduced to simplify the work to users who do not feel at ease with the complex mathematics of the model and the difficulties of command line based programs. The program is an evolution of the old FORTRAN 77 implementation COPPS (COupled Protein Probe Smoluchowski) and presents a number of new features: the presence of an easy to use GUI written in JAVA; high calculation performance thanks to features of C++ language, employment of BLAS (basic linear algebra subprograms) library (Blackford et al., Trans Math Soft 2002, 28, 135) in handling matrix-vector operations and parallelization of the code under the MPI (message passing interface) paradigm (Gropp et al., Parallel Comput 1996, 22, 789, Gropp and Lusk, User's Guide for mpich, a Portable Implementation of MPI Mathematics and Computer Science Division; Argonne National Laboratory, 1996); possibility to predict the diffusion tensor of the protein via a hydrodynamic approach (Barone et al., J Comp Chem, in press). A cluster version of C++OPPS was also developed, which can be easily accessed by users via the web.

  20. Nuclear Photosynthetic Gene Expression Is Synergistically Modulated by Rates of Protein Synthesis in Chloroplasts and Mitochondria[W

    PubMed Central

    Pesaresi, Paolo; Masiero, Simona; Eubel, Holger; Braun, Hans-Peter; Bhushan, Shashi; Glaser, Elzbieta; Salamini, Francesco; Leister, Dario

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana mutants prors1-1 and -2 were identified on the basis of a decrease in effective photosystem II quantum yield. Mutations were localized to the 5?-untranslated region of the nuclear gene PROLYL-tRNA SYNTHETASE1 (PRORS1), which acts in both plastids and mitochondria. In prors1-1 and -2, PRORS1 expression is reduced, along with protein synthesis in both organelles. PRORS1 null alleles (prors1-3 and -4) result in embryo sac and embryo development arrest. In mutants with the leaky prors1-1 and -2 alleles, transcription of nuclear genes for proteins involved in photosynthetic light reactions is downregulated, whereas genes for other chloroplast proteins are upregulated. Downregulation of nuclear photosynthetic genes is not associated with a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species in leaves and persists in the dark, suggesting that the transcriptional response is light and photooxidative stress independent. The mrpl11 and prpl11 mutants are impaired in the mitochondrial and plastid ribosomal L11 proteins, respectively. The prpl11 mrpl11 double mutant, but neither of the single mutants, resulted in strong downregulation of nuclear photosynthetic genes, like that seen in leaky mutants for PRORS1, implying that, when organellar translation is perturbed, signals derived from both types of organelles cooperate in the regulation of nuclear photosynthetic gene expression. PMID:16517761

  1. Requirement for nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein mRNA expression in bovine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Kohri, Nanami; Akizawa, Hiroki; Hoshino, Yumi; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Kono, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Kawahara, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (NASP) is associated with DNA replication, cell proliferation, and cell cycle progression through its specific binding to histones. The aim of this study was to examine the roles of NASP in bovine preimplantation embryonic development. Using NASP gene knockdown (KD), we confirmed the reduction of NASP messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during preimplantation development. NASP KD did not affect cleavage but significantly decreased development of embryos into the blastocyst stage. Furthermore, blastocyst hatching was significantly decreased in NASP KD embryos. Cell numbers in the inner cell mass of NASP KD blastocysts were also decreased compared to those of controls. These results suggest that NASP mRNA expression is required for preimplantation development into the blastocyst stage in cattle. PMID:26690724

  2. Las1 Is an Essential Nuclear Protein Involved in Cell Morphogenesis and Cell Surface Growth

    PubMed Central

    Doseff, A. I.; Arndt, K. T.

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutations that cause a requirement for SSD1-v for viability were isolated, yielding one new gene, LAS1, and three previously identified genes, SIT4, BCK1/SLK1, and SMP3. Three of these genes, LAS1, SIT4, and BCK1/SLK1, encode proteins that have roles in bud formation or morphogenesis. LAS1 is essential and loss of LAS1 function causes the cells to arrest as 80% unbudded cells and 20% large budded cells that accumulate many vesicles at the mother-daughter neck. Overexpression of LAS1 results in extra cell surface projections in the mother cell, alterations in actin and SPA2 localization, and the accumulation of electron-dense structures along the periphery of both the mother cell and the bud. The nuclear localization of LAS1 suggests a role of LAS1 for regulating bud formation and morphogenesis via the expression of components that function directly in these processes. PMID:8582632

  3. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  4. Multiple signal input and output domains of the 160-kilodalton nuclear receptor coactivator proteins.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Hong, H; Huang, S M; Irvine, R A; Webb, P; Kushner, P J; Coetzee, G A; Stallcup, M R

    1999-09-01

    Members of the 160-kDa nuclear receptor coactivator family (p160 coactivators) bind to the conserved AF-2 activation function found in the hormone binding domains of nuclear receptors (NR) and are potent transcriptional coactivators for NRs. Here we report that the C-terminal region of p160 coactivators glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1), steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1a), and SRC-1e binds the N-terminal AF-1 activation function of the androgen receptor (AR), and p160 coactivators can thereby enhance transcriptional activation by AR. While they all interact efficiently with AR AF-1, these same coactivators have vastly different binding strengths with and coactivator effects on AR AF-2. p160 activation domain AD1, which binds secondary coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300, was previously implicated as the principal domain for transmitting the activating signal to the transcription machinery. We identified a new highly conserved motif in the AD1 region which is important for CBP/p300 binding. Deletion of AD1 only partially reduced p160 coactivator function, due to signaling through AD2, another activation domain located at the C-terminal end of p160 coactivators. C-terminal coactivator fragments lacking AD1 but containing AD2 and the AR AF-1 binding site served as efficient coactivators for full-length AR and AR AF-1. The two signal input domains (one that binds NR AF-2 domains and one that binds AF-1 domains of some but not all NRs) and the two signal output domains (AD1 and AD2) of p160 coactivators played different relative roles for two different NRs: AR and thyroid hormone receptor. PMID:10454563

  5. Electron-nuclear interactions as probes of domain motion in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Boaz; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Long range interactions between nuclear spins and paramagnetic ions can serve as a sensitive monitor of internal motion of various parts of proteins, including functional loops and separate domains. In the case of interdomain motion, the interactions between the ion and NMR-observable nuclei are modulated in direction and magnitude mainly by a combination of overall and interdomain motions. The effects on observable parameters such as paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) and pseudocontact shift (PCS) can, in principle, be used to characterize motion. These parameters are frequently used for the purpose of structural refinements. However, their use to probe actual domain motions is less common and is lacking a proper theoretical treatment from a motional perspective. In this work, a suitable spin Hamiltonian is incorporated in a two body diffusion model to produce the time correlation function for the nuclear spin–paramagnetic ion interactions. Simulated observables for nuclei in different positions with respect to the paramagnetic ion are produced. Based on these simulations, it demonstrated that both the PRE and the PCS can be very sensitive probes of domain motion. Results for different nuclei within the protein sense different aspects of the motions. Some are more sensitive to the amplitude of the internal motion, others are more sensitive to overall diffusion rates, allowing separation of these contributions. Experimentally, the interaction strength can also be tuned by substitution of different paramagnetic ions or by varying magnetic field strength (in the case of lanthanides) to allow the use of more detailed diffusion models without reducing the reliability of data fitting. PMID:20331317

  6. Arabidopsis IQD1, a novel calmodulin-binding nuclear protein, stimulates glucosinolate accumulation and plant defense.

    PubMed

    Levy, Maggie; Wang, Qiaomei; Kaspi, Roy; Parrella, Michael P; Abel, Steffen

    2005-07-01

    Glucosinolates are a class of secondary metabolites with important roles in plant defense and human nutrition. To uncover regulatory mechanisms of glucosinolate production, we screened Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA activation-tagged lines and identified a high-glucosinolate mutant caused by overexpression of IQD1 (At3g09710). A series of gain- and loss-of-function IQD1 alleles in different accessions correlates with increased and decreased glucosinolate levels, respectively. IQD1 encodes a novel protein that contains putative nuclear localization signals and several motifs known to mediate calmodulin binding, which are arranged in a plant-specific segment of 67 amino acids, called the IQ67 domain. We demonstrate that an IQD1-GFP fusion protein is targeted to the cell nucleus and that recombinant IQD1 binds to calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. Analysis of steady-state messenger RNA levels of glucosinolate pathway genes indicates that IQD1 affects expression of multiple genes with roles in glucosinolate metabolism. Histochemical analysis of tissue-specific IQD1::GUS expression reveals IQD1 promoter activity mainly in vascular tissues of all organs, consistent with the expression patterns of several glucosinolate-related genes. Interestingly, overexpression of IQD1 reduces insect herbivory, which we demonstrated in dual-choice assays with the generalist phloem-feeding green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), and in weight-gain assays with the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni), a generalist-chewing lepidopteran. As IQD1 is induced by mechanical stimuli, we propose IQD1 to be novel nuclear factor that integrates intracellular Ca(2+) signals to fine-tune glucosinolate accumulation in response to biotic challenge. PMID:15960618

  7. The reaction of proteins with 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid as a possible model for senile nuclear cataract in man.

    PubMed

    Truscott, R J; Martin, F

    1989-12-01

    Proteins, including lens proteins, were incubated in the presence of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (30 HA) under oxidizing conditions. Samples were monitored for alterations in color, fluorescence, sulfhydryl content, lysine availability, methionine content, tryptophan content and protein size. Incubation of proteins with 30 HA produced rapid brown coloration and a correspondingly rapid decrease in sulfhydryl content. Alpha-, beta- and gamma-crystallins were all found to react with 30 HA. An increase in protein fluorescence (excitation 340/emission 425 nm) accompanied the color development. No significant decrease in the content of tryptophan or any other amino acid was detected by amino acid analysis. The levels of available lysine were not affected significantly by treatment with 30 HA. Oxidation of methionine to methionine sulfoxide and the covalent cross-linking of polypeptides was obtained by subsequent treatment of the tanned proteins with H2O2. The modifications observed are very similar to those found in the senile nuclear cataract lens. PMID:2515071

  8. Identification of S1 proteins B2, C1 and D1 as AUF1 isoforms and their major role as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Akira; Arao, Yukitomo; Omori, Akira; Ichinose, Sachiyo; Nishio, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kinoshita, Yosihiro; Mita, Shiro

    2003-01-01

    AUF1 (A+U-rich RNA binding factor) participates in the rapid decay of mRNAs in the cytoplasm. It is sometimes called heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) D0; however, evidence for its characterization as an hnRNP protein has been scarce. S1 proteins A-D are those selectively extracted at pH 4.9 from isolated nuclei pretreated with either RNase A or DNase I. In the present study we identified S1 ('first supernatant') proteins B2, C1 and D1 with p45, p40 and p37 AUF1s respectively, by microsequencing and product analysis of transfected cDNAs. We found, further, that more than 96% of the S1 proteins occurred in the nucleus, and localized largely in RNase-sensitive structures. B2 was confined in the nucleus and C1 directly bound to heterogeneous nuclear RNAs (hnRNAs). These B2 and C1 proteins formed hnRNP structures responsible for the 33 S, and, to lesser extent, the 40 S particles, which were liberated upon mild nucleolytic cleavage. On the other hand, D1 and the remainder of C1 were associated with nuclease-hypersensitive sites of hnRNAs, and comprised the major cytoplasmic AUF1s that may be involved in mRNA decay. Two-dimensional immunoblotting resolved each S1 isoform into up to six spots or more, and suggested that the previous uncertain relationship of hnRNP D0 and hnRNP D is resolved in terms of charge differences and differential splicing arising from one gene. The present results thus indicate that S1 proteins B2, C1 and D1 are identical with AUF1 proteins, but largely occur as hnRNP proteins in the nucleus. That hnRNP D0 is indeed an hnRNP protein was verified. PMID:12625834

  9. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent; Gupta, Ishaan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2015-07-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S. cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation-dependent process. We conclude that Nab2p is required to protect early mRNA and therefore constitutes a crucial nuclear mRNA biogenesis factor. PMID:26119729

  10. G protein-coupled receptor signalling in the cardiac nuclear membrane: evidence and possible roles in physiological and pathophysiological function

    PubMed Central

    Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Vaniotis, George; Allen, Bruce G; Hébert, Terence E; Nattel, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play key physiological roles in numerous tissues, including the heart, and their dysfunction influences a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the notion of nuclear localization and action of GPCRs has become more widely accepted. Nuclear-localized receptors may regulate distinct signalling pathways, suggesting that the biological responses mediated by GPCRs are not solely initiated at the cell surface but may result from the integration of extracellular and intracellular signalling pathways. Many of the observed nuclear effects are not prevented by classical inhibitors that exclusively target cell surface receptors, presumably because of their structures, lipophilic properties, or affinity for nuclear receptors. In this topical review, we discuss specifically how angiotensin-II, endothelin, β-adrenergic and opioid receptors located on the nuclear envelope activate signalling pathways, which convert intracrine stimuli into acute responses such as generation of second messengers and direct genomic effects, and thereby participate in the development of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22183719

  11. Recognition of Transcription Termination Signal by the Nuclear Polyadenylated RNA-binding (NAB) 3 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hobor, Fruzsina; Pergoli, Roberto; Kubicek, Karel; Hrossova, Dominika; Bacikova, Veronika; Zimmermann, Michal; Pasulka, Josef; Hofr, Ctirad; Vanacova, Stepanka; Stefl, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Non-coding RNA polymerase II transcripts are processed by the poly(A)-independent termination pathway that requires the Nrd1 complex. The Nrd1 complex includes two RNA-binding proteins, the nuclear polyadenylated RNA-binding (Nab) 3 and the nuclear pre-mRNA down-regulation (Nrd) 1 that bind their specific termination elements. Here we report the solution structure of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) of Nab3 in complex with a UCUU oligonucleotide, representing the Nab3 termination element. The structure shows that the first three nucleotides of UCUU are accommodated on the β-sheet surface of Nab3 RRM, but reveals a sequence-specific recognition only for the central cytidine and uridine. The specific contacts we identified are important for binding affinity in vitro as well as for yeast viability. Furthermore, we show that both RNA-binding motifs of Nab3 and Nrd1 alone bind their termination elements with a weak affinity. Interestingly, when Nab3 and Nrd1 form a heterodimer, the affinity to RNA is significantly increased due to the cooperative binding. These findings are in accordance with the model of their function in the poly(A) independent termination, in which binding to the combined and/or repetitive termination elements elicits efficient termination. PMID:21084293

  12. Targeted Mutation of Nuclear Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 Impairs Secondary Immune Response in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Daniel S.; Goar, Wesley A.; Nichols, Brandt A.; Bailey, K. Tyson; Christensen, S. Loyd; Merriam, Kayla R.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Wilson, Eric; Weber, K. Scott; Bridgewater, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a nuclear variant of the BMP2 growth factor, called nBMP2. In an effort to understand the function of this variant protein, we generated a mouse line in which BMP2 is expressed and functions normally, but nBMP2 is excluded from the nucleus. This novel mutation allows the study of nBMP2 without compromising BMP2 function. To determine whether nBMP2 plays a role in immune function, we performed a series of experiments in which we compared mouse survival, organ weights, immune cells numbers, and bacterial load in wild type and nBmp2NLStm mice following primary and secondary challenges with Staphylococcus aureus. Following primary challenge with S. aureus, wild type and nBmp2NLStm mice showed no differences in survival or bacterial load and generated similar numbers and types of leukocytes, although mutant spleens were smaller than wild type. Secondary bacterial challenge with S. aureus, however, produced differences in survival, with increased mortality seen in nBmp2NLStm mice. This increased mortality corresponded to higher levels of bacteremia in nBmp2NLStm mice and to a reduced enlargement of mutant spleens in response to the secondary infection. Together, these results suggest that the recently described nuclear variant of BMP2 is necessary for efficient secondary immune responses. PMID:26491697

  13. Specific cleavage of the nuclear pore complex protein Nup62 by a viral protease.

    PubMed

    Park, Nogi; Skern, Tim; Gustin, Kurt E

    2010-09-10

    Previous work has shown that several nucleoporins, including Nup62 are degraded in cells infected with human rhinovirus (HRV) and poliovirus (PV) and that this contributes to the disruption of certain nuclear transport pathways. In this study, the mechanisms underlying proteolysis of Nup62 have been investigated. Analysis of Nup62 in lysates from HRV-infected cells revealed that Nup62 was cleaved at multiple sites during viral infection. The addition of purified HRV2 2A protease (2A(pro)) to uninfected HeLa whole cell lysates resulted in the cleavage of Nup62, suggesting that 2A(pro) is a major contributor to Nup62 processing. The ability of purified 2A(pro) to cleave bacterially expressed and purified Nup62 demonstrated that 2A(pro) directly cleaves Nup62 in vitro. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage sites in Nup62 identified six different positions that are cleaved by 2A(pro) in vitro. This analysis revealed that 2A(pro) cleavage sites were located between amino acids 103 and 298 in Nup62 and suggested that the N-terminal FG-rich region of Nup62 was released from the nuclear pore complex in infected cells. Analysis of HRV- and PV-infected cells using domain-specific antibodies confirmed that this was indeed the case. These results are consistent with a model whereby PV and HRV disrupt nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking by selectively removing FG repeat domains from a subset of nuclear pore complex proteins. PMID:20622012

  14. A Visual Screen of a Gfp-Fusion Library Identifies a New Type of Nuclear Envelope Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Melissa M.; Stein, Pascal A.; Taylor, Stephen S.; Ha, Edward; McKeon, Frank; Rapoport, Tom A.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a distinct subdomain of the ER, but few membrane components have been described that are specific to it. We performed a visual screen in tissue culture cells to identify proteins targeted to the NE. This approach does not require assumptions about the nature of the association with the NE or the physical separation of NE and ER. We confirmed that screening a library of fusions to the green fluorescent protein can be used to identify proteins targeted to various subcompartments of mammalian cells, including the NE. With this approach, we identified a new NE membrane protein, named nurim. Nurim is a multispanning membrane protein without large hydrophilic domains that is very tightly associated with the nucleus. Unlike the known NE membrane proteins, it is neither associated with nuclear pores, nor targeted like lamin-associated membrane proteins. Thus, nurim is a new type of NE membrane protein that is localized to the NE by a distinct mechanism. PMID:10402458

  15. Role of a nuclear localization signal on the minor capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV nuclear entry

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Bosard, Catherine; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. - Highlights: • Polyomaviruses must deliver their genome to the nucleus to replicate. • The minor capsid proteins have a well-conserved nuclear localization signal. • Mutation of this NLS diminishes, but does not completely inhibit, infection.

  16. Identification of the methylation preference region in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and its implication in regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yuan-I; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chau, Gar-Yang; Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan ; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan ; Sung, Jung-Sung; Hua, Wei-Kai; Lin, Wey-Jinq; Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 103, Taiwan

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Verifying by direct methylation assay the substrate sites of PRMT1 in the hnRNP K protein. {yields} Identifying the preferred PMRT1 methylation regions in hnRNP K by kinetic analysis. {yields} Linking methylation in regulating nuclear localization of hnRNP K. -- Abstract: Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles in numerous cellular processes. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein participating in a variety of cellular functions including transcription and RNA processing. HnRNP K is methylated at multiple sites in the glycine- and arginine-rich (RGG) motif. Using various RGG domain deletion mutants of hnRNP K as substrates, here we show by direct methylation assay that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) methylated preferentially in a.a. 280-307 of the RGG motif. Kinetic analysis revealed that deletion of a.a. 280-307, but not a.a. 308-327, significantly inhibited rate of methylation. Importantly, nuclear localization of hnRNP K was significantly impaired in mutant hnRNP K lacking the PRMT1 methylation region or upon pharmacological inhibition of methylation. Together our results identify preferred PRMT1 methylation sequences of hnRNP K by direct methylation assay and implicate a role of arginine methylation in regulating intracellular distribution of hnRNP K.

  17. A procedure for purifying low-abundance protein components from the brain cytoskeleton-nuclear matrix fraction.

    PubMed

    Shelton, K R; Klann, E; Nixon, G; Egle, P M

    1991-05-01

    We describe a preparative procedure for low-abundance proteins of the cytoskeleton-nuclear matrix fraction from frozen bovine brain. Strigent centrifugation and washing conditions in the preparation of the cytoskeleton-nuclear matrix fraction are avoided to minimize loss of nuclear material. A recently described horizontal isoelectric focusing column, which tolerates appreciable precipitation, is used. In concert with selection of urea concentration and temperature, this isoelectric focusing apparatus provides a new approach to the fractionation of this complex, relatively insoluble mixture of proteins and other components. In addition, a heated, sodium dodecyl sulfate-sizing column has been utilized in order to eliminate interactions between the desired low abundance proteins and more abundant contaminating proteins. Together these procedures purify a specific low-abundance protein sufficiently to be detected by Coomassie blue staining in two-dimensional gels. The methods are robust and can be applied to multiple, relatively large brain samples (150 g of crude grey matter per batch); thus they should facilitate partial peptide sequencing for brain proteins of this operational class. PMID:1943211

  18. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  19. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients. PMID:26469385

  20. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Yoo, Hae Yong; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  1. Nuclear quadrupole interaction of111Cd on type-1 Cu-sites in blue copper proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröger, W.; Butz, T.; Danielsen, E.; Bauer, R.; Thoenes, U.; Messerschmidt, A.; Huber, R.; Canters, G. W.; den Blaauwen, T.

    1993-03-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of111Cd substituted for Cu(II) on type-1 sites in blue copper proteins is characterized by high values of ω0 in the region of 300 Mrad/s, close to that for the catalytic zinc site in alcohol dehydrogenase. Type-1 Cu has usually two sulfur ligands and two nitrogen ligands and in some cases an oxygen ligand in either a distorted tetrahedral geometry or in a trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The near tetrahedral arrangement together with the ligand sphere containing the same number of sulfur ligands explains the value of ω0 in the blue copper proteins. The present work determined the partial NQI for methionine using the known structure of azurin. This value was then used in the angular overlap model to calculate the NQI for ascorbate oxidase the structure of which is also known and gave good agreement with experiment. NQI data for laccase and stellacyanin the structures of which are unknown, are also given.

  2. Fluctuation-based imaging of nuclear Rac1 activation by protein oligomerisation

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gaus, Katharina; Hahn, Klaus M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a fluctuation-based method to quantify how protein oligomerisation modulates signalling activity of a multifunctional protein. By recording fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data of a FRET biosensor in a format that enables concomitant phasor and cross Number and Brightness (cN&B) analysis, we measure the nuclear dynamics of a Rac1 FRET biosensor and assess how Rac1 homo-oligomers (N&B) regulate Rac1 activity (hetero-oligomerisation with the biosensor affinity reagent, PBD, by FLIM-FRET) or interaction with an unknown binding partner (cN&B). The high spatiotemporal resolution of this method allowed us to discover that upon DNA damage monomeric and active Rac1 in the nucleus is segregated from dimeric and inactive Rac1 in the cytoplasm. This reorganisation requires Rac1 GTPase activity and is associated with an importin-α2 redistribution. Only with this multiplexed approach can we assess the oligomeric state a molecular complex must form in order to regulate a complex signalling network. PMID:24573109

  3. SU-E-J-61: Electrodynamics and Nano-Scale Fluid Dynamics in Protein Localization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J; Gatenby, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a simulation to catalyze a reevaluation of common assumptions about 3 dimensional diffusive processes and help cell biologists gain a more nuanced, intuitive understanding of the true physical hurdles of protein signaling cascades. Furthermore, to discuss the possibility of intracellular electrodynamics as a critical, unrecognized component of cellular biology and protein dynamics that is necessary for optimal information flow from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Methods: The Unity 3D gaming physics engine was used to build an accurate virtual scale model of the cytoplasm within a few hundred nanometers of the nuclear membrane. A cloud of simulated pERK proteins is controlled by the physics simulation, where diffusion is based on experimentally measured values and the electrodynamics are based on theoretical nano-fluid dynamics. The trajectories of pERK within the cytoplasm and through the 1250 nuclear pores on the nuclear surface is recorded and analyzed. Results: The simulation quickly demonstrates that pERKs moving solely by diffusion will rarely locate and come within capture distance of a nuclear pore. The addition of intracellular electrodynamics between charges on the nuclear pore complexes and on pERKs increases the number of successful translocations by allowing the electro-physical attractive effects to draw in pERKs from the cytoplasm. The effects of changes in intracellular shielding ion concentrations allowed for estimation of the “capture radius” under varying conditions. Conclusion: The simulation allows a shift in perspective that is paramount in attempting to communicate the scale and dynamics of intracellular protein cascade mechanics. This work has allowed researchers to more fully understand the parameters involved in intracellular electrodynamics, such as shielding anion concentration and protein charge. As these effects are still far below the spatial resolution of currently available measurement technology this simulation is invaluable to researchers to visualize and study current hypotheses concerning protein dynamics.

  4. The GIP gamma-tubulin complex-associated proteins are involved in nuclear architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Batzenschlager, Morgane; Masoud, Kinda; Janski, Natacha; Houlné, Guy; Herzog, Etienne; Evrard, Jean-Luc; Baumberger, Nicolas; Erhardt, Mathieu; Nominé, Yves; Kieffer, Bruno; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2013-01-01

    During interphase, the microtubular cytoskeleton of cycling plant cells is organized in both cortical and perinuclear arrays. Perinuclear microtubules (MTs) are nucleated from γ-Tubulin Complexes (γ-TuCs) located at the surface of the nucleus. The molecular mechanisms of γ-TuC association to the nuclear envelope (NE) are currently unknown. The γ-TuC Protein 3 (GCP3)-Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) is the smallest γ-TuC component identified so far. AtGIP1 and its homologous protein AtGIP2 participate in the localization of active γ-TuCs at interphasic and mitotic MT nucleation sites. Arabidopsis gip1gip2 mutants are impaired in establishing a fully functional mitotic spindle and exhibit severe developmental defects. In this study, gip1gip2 knock down mutants were further characterized at the cellular level. In addition to defects in both the localization of γ-TuC core proteins and MT fiber robustness, gip1gip2 mutants exhibited a severe alteration of the nuclear shape associated with an abnormal distribution of the nuclear pore complexes. Simultaneously, they showed a misorganization of the inner nuclear membrane protein AtSUN1. Furthermore, AtGIP1 was identified as an interacting partner of AtTSA1 which was detected, like the AtGIP proteins, at the NE. These results provide the first evidence for the involvement of a γ-TuC component in both nuclear shaping and NE organization. Functional hypotheses are discussed in order to propose a model for a GIP-dependent nucleo-cytoplasmic continuum. PMID:24348487

  5. Nuclear import of Agrobacterium VirD2 and VirE2 proteins in maize and tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Citovsky, V; Warnick, D; Zambryski, P

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that Agrobacterium-plant cell transferred DNA (T-DNA) transport into the host cell nucleus is likely mediated by two specific bacterial proteins, VirD2 and VirE2. Here, we used these proteins to study molecular pathways of nuclear import. First, the role of VirE2 nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in the T-DNA transport pathway was examined by using tobacco plants transgenic for deletion mutants of VirE2. In these plants, the virulence of wild-type Agrobacterium was reduced possibly by competition for the cellular nuclear import machinery. Second, we analyzed the nuclear localization of VirE2 and VirD2 in the nonhost monocot maize. Part of the known recalcitrance of monocots to transformation by Agrobacterium could be due to a potential selectivity in nuclear import pathways in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Nuclear transport of VirD2 and VirE2 in maize leaves and roots was compared to that in tobacco protoplasts and roots. Both proteins accumulated in maize leaf and tobacco protoplast nuclei as well as in nuclei of immature root cells. In contrast, VirD2 and VirE2 expressed in mature roots of maize and tobacco remained cytoplasmic. Point mutations of VirE2 nuclear localization signals, NSE 1 and NSE 2, also revealed that, in maize, the NSE 1 signal was mainly responsible for nuclear import; in contrast, both signals functioned independently in tobacco protoplasts. Images PMID:8159726

  6. ATM protein physically and functionally interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen to regulate DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gamper, Armin M; Choi, Serah; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Tomkinson, Alan E; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2012-04-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic disease, with a characteristic hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation that is caused by biallelic mutations in A-T mutated (ATM), a gene encoding a protein kinase critical for the induction of cellular responses to DNA damage, particularly to DNA double strand breaks. A long known characteristic of A-T cells is their ability to synthesize DNA even in the presence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, a phenomenon termed radioresistant DNA synthesis. We previously reported that ATM kinase inhibition, but not ATM protein disruption, blocks sister chromatid exchange following DNA damage. We now show that ATM kinase inhibition, but not ATM protein disruption, also inhibits DNA synthesis. Investigating a potential physical interaction of ATM with the DNA replication machinery, we found that ATM co-precipitates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from cellular extracts. Using bacterially purified ATM truncation mutants and in vitro translated PCNA, we showed that the interaction is direct and mediated by the C terminus of ATM. Indeed, a 20-amino acid region close to the kinase domain is sufficient for strong binding to PCNA. This binding is specific to ATM, because the homologous regions of other PIKK members, including the closely related kinase A-T and Rad3-related (ATR), did not bind PCNA. ATM was found to bind two regions in PCNA. To examine the functional significance of the interaction between ATM and PCNA, we tested the ability of ATM to stimulate DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase δ, which is implicated in both DNA replication and DNA repair processes. ATM was observed to stimulate DNA polymerase activity in a PCNA-dependent manner. PMID:22362778

  7. Verification of the Cross Immunoreactivity of A60, a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Neuronal Nuclear Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shanping; Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2016-01-01

    A60, the mouse monoclonal antibody against the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), is the most widely used neuronal marker in neuroscience research and neuropathological assays. Previous studies identified fragments of A60-immunoprecipitated protein as Synapsin I (Syn I), suggesting the antibody will demonstrate cross immunoreactivity. However, the likelihood of cross reactivity has never been verified by immunohistochemical techniques. Using our established tissue processing and immunofluorescent staining protocols, we found that A60 consistently labeled mossy fiber terminals in hippocampal area CA3. These A60-positive mossy fiber terminals could also be labeled by Syn I antibody. After treating brain slices with saponin in order to better preserve various membrane and/or vesicular proteins for immunostaining, we observed that A60 could also label additional synapses in various brain areas. Therefore, we used A60 together with a rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody to confirm the existence of this cross reactivity. We showed that the putative band positive for A60 and Syn I could not be detected by the rabbit anti-NeuN in Western blotting. As efficient as Millipore A60 to recognize neuronal nuclei, the rabbit NeuN antibody demonstrated no labeling of synaptic structures in immunofluorescent staining. The present study successfully verified the cross reactivity present in immunohistochemistry, cautioning that A60 may not be the ideal biomarker to verify neuronal identity due to its cross immunoreactivity. In contrast, the rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody used in this study may be a better candidate to substitute for A60.

  8. Constitutive Nuclear Expression of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Fails to Rescue the Dmp1-null Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuxian; Zhang, Qi; Cao, Zhengguo; Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Liu, Ying; McKee, Marc D.; Qin, Chunlin; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Jian Q.

    2014-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) plays multiple roles in bone, tooth, phosphate homeostasis, kidney, salivary gland, reproductive cycles, and the development of cancer. In vitro studies have indicated two different biological mechanisms: 1) as a matrix protein, DMP1 interacts with αvβ3 integrin and activates MAP kinase signaling; and 2) DMP1 serves as a transcription co-factor. In vivo studies have demonstrated its key role in osteocytes. This study attempted to determine whether DMP1 functions as a transcription co-factor and regulates osteoblast functions. For gene expression comparisons using adenovirus constructs, we targeted the expression of DMP1 either to the nucleus only by replacing the endogenous signal peptide with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence (referred to as NLSDMP1) or to the extracellular matrix as the WT type (referred to as SPDMP1) in MC3T3 osteoblasts. High levels of DMP1 in either form greatly increased osteogenic gene expression in an identical manner. However, the targeted NLSDMP1 transgene driven by a 3.6-kb rat Col 1α1 promoter in the nucleus of osteoblasts and osteocytes failed to rescue the phenotyope of Dmp1-null mice, whereas the SPDMP1 transgene rescued the rickets defect. These studies support the notion that DMP1 functions as an extracellular matrix protein, rather than as a transcription co-factor in vivo. We also show that DMP1 continues its expression in osteoblasts during postnatal development and that the deletion of Dmp1 leads to an increase in osteoblast proliferation. However, poor mineralization in the metaphysis indicates a critical role for DMP1 in both osteoblasts and osteocytes. PMID:24917674

  9. Human T-cell activation by 14- and 18-kilodalton nuclear proteins of Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed Central

    Suffia, I; Quaranta, J F; Eulalio, M C; Ferrua, B; Marty, P; Le Fichoux, Y; Kubar, J

    1995-01-01

    Leishmanial antigens which stimulate T lymphocytes from primed individuals may be candidates for a vaccine. We recently found a significant concordance between the humoral response specific for two proteins from Leishmania infantum promastigotes, p14 and p18, and a positive leishmanin delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, testifying to the occurrence of cell-mediated immunity. In this communication, we describe a partial characterization of these antigens and an in vitro analysis of their capacity to activate primed human T cells. We showed, by immunofluorescent staining and through analysis of subcellular fractions by Western immunoblotting, that in stationary-phase promastigotes, p14 and p18 were located only in the parasite nuclei; in the middle of the log phase, a transitory and only weak expression outside the nucleus was detected. We then showed that p14 and p18 antigens shared a common epitope(s). Finally, we analyzed the in vitro proliferation and interleukin-2 production induced by leishmanial proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from sensitized subjects. We showed that in some individuals who have been exposed to L. infantum the specific response to the whole lysate was mostly due to the nuclear antigens. We demonstrated directly the capacity of nitrocellulose-bound p14 and p18 to activate in vitro all of the tested primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which contrasted with a lack of stimulatory activity of other membrane-bound leishmanial proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that an antigenic determinant(s) dominant for some individuals might exist on both antigens. PMID:7558278

  10. Sde2: A novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Initiative for the Promotion of Young Scientists' Independent Research, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 ; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Initiative for the Promotion of Young Scientists' Independent Research, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577; Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology , Japan Science and Technology Agency , Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Sde2 is essential for telomere silencing. {yields} Sde2 is involved in the maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} Sde2 promotes the recruitment of SHREC, a histone deacetylase complex, to telomeres. -- Abstract: Telomeres, specialized domains assembled at the ends of linear chromosomes, are essential for genomic stability in eukaryotes. The formation and maintenance of telomeres are governed by numerous factors such as telomeric repeats, telomere-binding proteins, heterochromatin proteins, and telomerase. Here, we report Sde2, a novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A deficiency in sde2 results in the derepression of the ura4{sup +} gene inserted near telomeric repeats, and the noncoding transcripts from telomeric regions accumulate in sde2{Delta} cells. The loss of Sde2 function compromises transcriptional silencing at telomeres, and this silencing defect is accompanied by increased levels of acetylated histone H3K14 and RNA polymerase II occupancy at telomeres as well as reduced recruitment of the SNF2 ATPase/histone deacetylase-containing complex SHREC to telomeres. Deletion of sde2 also leads to a higher frequency of mitotic minichromosome loss, and sde2{Delta} cells often form asci that contain spores in abnormal numbers, shapes, or both. In addition, sde2{Delta} cells are highly sensitive to several stresses, including high/low temperatures, bleomycin, which induces DNA damage, and thiabendazole, a microtubule-destabilizing agent. Furthermore, Sde2 genetically interacts with the telomere regulators Taz1, Pof3, and Ccq1. These findings demonstrate that Sde2 cooperates with other telomere regulators to maintain functional telomeres, thereby preventing genomic instability.

  11. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In; Cardiovascular Research Institute, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-422

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  12. TSH stimulates 32P-labeling of thyroid nuclear HMG 14, a protein associated with actively transcribed chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.; Palmer, R.J.; Spaulding, S.W.

    1982-04-01

    Thyroid slices were incubated with 32P with or without TSH. 32P-labeling of acid-soluble nuclear proteins was then examined by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. We found that TSH enhanced the labeling of the high mobility group protein HMG 14, a protein that is preferentially associated with actively transcribed chromatin. This observation suggests that changes in HMG 14 phosphorylation may be involved in mediating TSH-induced effects on the structure and function of active chromatin.

  13. The Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates the Degradation of Poly-Alanine Expanded Poly (A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 via the Carboxyl Terminus of Heat Shock Protein 70-Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Huang, Xuan; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Dan; Luo, Huqiao; Lu, Quqin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; Luo, Shiwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the identification of poly-alanine expanded poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1) as the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the onset and progression of the disease remain unclear. Results In this study, we show that PABPN1 interacts with and is stabilized by heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Treatment with the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG disrupted the interaction of mutant PABPN1 with HSP90 and reduced the formation of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). Furthermore, mutant PABPN1 was preferentially degraded in the presence of 17-AAG compared with wild-type PABPN1 in vitro and in vivo. The effect of 17-AAG was mediated through an increase in the interaction of PABPN1 with the carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP). The overexpression of CHIP suppressed the aggregation of mutant PABPN1 in transfected cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the HSP90 molecular chaperone system plays a crucial role in the selective elimination of abnormal PABPN1 proteins and also suggest a potential therapeutic application of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG for the treatment of OPMD. PMID:26414348

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease interacting proteins suggest its role in nuclear as well as splicing processes.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Manzar J; Korde, Reshma; Singh, Prashant K; Kanodia, Shivani; Ranjan, Ravi; Ram, Geeta; Kalsey, Gaganjot Singh; Singh, Rita; Malhotra, Pawan

    2010-11-15

    Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease (p100 or SND1), a member of the micronuclease family is a multifunctional protein that plays a key role(s) in transcription and splicing processes in many eukaryotic cells. PfTudor-SN, a Plasmodium homolog of the human p100 protein is a structurally conserved protein; however molecular details of its function are not yet understood. Our previous studies have shown that PfTudor-SN binds RNA and it is possible to selectively inhibit parasite growth by PfTudor-SN specific drugs. In the present study, we identified the molecular interactions between Plasmodium falciparum Tudor-SN and twelve Plasmodium proteins such as Histone h2A, SPT2 (a transcriptional regulator), a Cold-shock DNA binding protein in a bacterial two-hybrid screen. To get further insight into some of these interactions, we mapped the interaction domain in PfTudor-SN protein using the yeast two-hybrid system. Of these proteins, Plasmodium N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor associated protein, PfUbiquitin conjugating enzyme and Cold-shock DNA binding protein showed interaction with the SN domains of PfTudor-SN. Immuno-localization studies of the interacting proteins showed their presence predominantly in the nucleus, which inevitably suggests the molecular interactions between these proteins and PfTudor-SN. Furthermore, we also identified a molecular interaction between the Tudor domain of PfTudor-SN protein and Plasmodium spliceosomal Sm protein, PfSmD1 advocating the role of PfTudor-SN in the spliceosome assembly. Together, these results suggest multiple role(s) for PfTudor-SN protein mainly in nuclear and splicing processes at asexual blood stages of the malaria parasite. PMID:20713134

  15. A predominantly nuclear protein affecting cytoplasmic localization of β-actin mRNA in fibroblasts and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wei; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Honglai; Bassell, Gary J.; Singer, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    The localization of β-actin mRNA to the leading lamellae of chicken fibroblasts and neurite growth cones of developing neurons requires a 54-nt localization signal (the zipcode) within the 3′ untranslated region. In this study we have identified and isolated five proteins binding to the zipcode. One of these we previously identified as zipcode binding protein (ZBP)1, a 4-KH domain protein. A second is now investigated in detail: a 92-kD protein, ZBP2, that is especially abundant in extracts from embryonic brain. We show that ZBP2 is a homologue of the human hnRNP protein, KSRP, that appears to mediate pre-mRNA splicing. However, ZBP2 has a 47–amino acid (aa) sequence not present in KSRP. Various portions of ZBP2 fused to GFP indicate that the protein most likely shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and that the 47-aa insert promotes the nuclear localization. Expression of a truncated ZBP2 inhibits the localization of β-actin mRNA in both fibroblast and neurons. These data suggest that ZBP2, although predominantly a nuclear protein, has a role in the cytoplasmic localization of β-actin mRNA. PMID:11781334

  16. Novel nuclear targeting coiled-coil protein of Helicobacter pylori showing Ca(2+)-independent, Mg(2+)-dependent DNase I activity.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Chul; Kim, Sinil; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Je Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Lee, Woo-Kon; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Song, Jae-Young; Baik, Seung Chul; Ro, Hyeon Su

    2016-05-01

    HP0059, an uncharacterized gene of Helicobacter pylori, encodes a 284-aa-long protein containing a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and multiple leucine-rich heptad repeats. Effects of HP0059 proteins in human stomach cells were assessed by incubation of recombinant HP0059 proteins with the AGS human gastric carcinoma cell line. Wild-type HP0059 proteins showed cytotoxicity in AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas NLS mutant protein showed no effect, suggesting that the cytotoxicity is attributed to host nuclear localization. AGS cells transfected with pEGFP-HP0059 plasmid showed strong GFP signal merged to the chromosomal DNA region. The chromosome was fragmented into multiple distinct dots merged with the GFP signal after 12 h of incubation. The chromosome fragmentation was further explored by incubation of AGS chromosomal DNA with recombinant HP0059 proteins, which leaded to complete degradation of the chromosomal DNA. HP0059 protein also degraded circular plasmid DNA without consensus, being an indication of DNase I activity. The DNase was activated by MgCl2, but not by CaCl2. The activity was completely blocked by EDTA. The optimal pH and temperature for DNase activity were 7.0-8.0 and 55°C, respectively. These results indicate that HP0059 possesses a novel DNase I activity along with a role in the genomic instability of human gastric cells, which may result in the transformation of gastric cells. PMID:27095458

  17. Mbh 1: a novel gelsolin/severin-related protein which binds actin in vitro and exhibits nuclear localization in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Ziff, E B

    1991-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a novel cDNA, mbh1 (myc basic motif homolog-1), which was found during a search for candidate factors which might interact with the c-Myc oncoprotein. Embedded within the amino acid sequence encoded by mbh1 is a region distantly related to the basic/helix-loop-helix (B/HLH) DNA-binding motif and a potential nuclear localization signal. Mbh1 encodes a polypeptide structurally similar to the actin-severing proteins gelsolin and severin. Translation of mbh1 RNA in rabbit reticulocyte extracts produces an approximately 45 kd protein capable of binding actin-coupled agarose beads in vitro in a Ca2(+)-dependent manner. Antiserum raised to a trpE/mbh1 bacterial fusion protein recognizes an approximately 45 kb protein in murine 3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting that the cDNA encodes the complete Mbh1 protein. Examination of Mbh1 localization in 3T3 fibroblasts by indirect immunofluorescence reveals a larger cell population showing diffuse staining, and a smaller population exhibiting a distinct nuclear stain. Western analysis corroborates this intracellular localization and indicates that total cellular levels and localization of Mbh1 are not affected by the cell growth state. The data suggest that Mbh1 may play a role in regulating cytoplasmic and/or nuclear architecture through potential interactions with actin. Images PMID:1849072

  18. A fifth Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein (EBNA3C) is expressed in latently infected growth-transformed lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Petti, L; Sample, J; Wang, F; Kieff, E

    1988-01-01

    Three distantly homologous neighboring long open reading frames in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome are preceded by short open reading frames. The leftmost short and long open reading frames encode EBNA3, a nuclear protein which is slightly smaller (145 kilodaltons [kDa]) than two other nuclear proteins (150 to 155 kDa) detected in Western blots (immunoblots) of latently infected cell protein (K. Hennessy, F. Wang, E. Woodland-Bushman, and E. Kieff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5693-5697, 1986; I. Joab, D. T. Rowe, M. Bodescot, J.-C. Nicolas, P. J. Farrell, and M. Perricaudet, J. Virol. 61:3340-3344, 1987). We have demonstrated that the most rightward short (BERF3) and long (BERF4) open reading frames are spliced in frame at the 3' end of a 5-kilobase latently infected cell RNA and that this RNA begins within or upstream of the EBV long internal repeat. EBV-immune human antibodies specific for the long open reading frame translation product identified a 155-kDa protein on Western blots of latently infected cell protein and specifically reacted with large nonnucleolar nuclear granules in every latently infected cell. Expression of the cDNA in BALB/c 3T3 cells resulted in translation of full-size EBNA3C but had no effect on cell morphology, contact inhibition, or serum independence. Images PMID:2831394

  19. Identification of a nuclear export signal in the KSHV latent protein LANA2 mediating its export from the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Fontela, C.; Collado, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia, M.A.; Alvarez-Barrientos, A.; Arroyo, J.; Nombela, C.; Rivas, C. . E-mail: mdcrivas@farm.ucm.es

    2005-11-15

    LANA2 is a latent protein detected in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected B cells that inhibits p53-dependent transcriptional transactivation and apoptosis and PKR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. It has been reported that LANA2 localizes into the nucleus of both KSHV-infected B cells and transiently transfected HeLa cells. In this study, we show that LANA2 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that requires a Rev-type nuclear export signal located in the C-terminus to direct the protein to the cytoplasm, through an association with the export receptor CRM1. In addition, a functional protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt phosphorylation motif partially overlapping with the nuclear export signal was identified. Nuclear exclusion of LANA2 was negatively regulated by the phosphorylation of threonine 564 by Akt. The ability of LANA2 to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm has implications for the function of this viral protein.

  20. KIFC1-Like Motor Protein Associates with the Cephalopod Manchette and Participates in Sperm Nuclear Morphogenesis in Octopus tankahkeei

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2010-01-01

    Background Nuclear morphogenesis is one of the most fundamental cellular transformations taking place during spermatogenesis. In rodents, a microtubule-based perinuclear structure, the manchette, and a C-terminal kinesin motor KIFC1 are believed to play crucial roles in this process. Spermatogenesis in Octopus tankahkeei is a good model system to explore whether evolution has created a cephalopod prototype of mammalian manchette-based and KIFC1-dependent sperm nuclear shaping machinery. Methodology/Principal Findings We detected the presence of a KIFC1-like protein in the testis, muscle, and liver of O. tankahkeei by Western Blot. Then we tracked its dynamic localization in spermatic cells at various stages using Immunofluorescence and Immunogold Electron Microscopy. The KIFC1-like protein was not expressed at early stages of spermatogenesis when no significant morphological changes occur, began to be present in early spermatid, localized around and in the nucleus of intermediate and late spermatids where the nucleus was dramatically elongated and compressed, and concentrated at one end of final spermatid. Furthermore, distribution of the motor protein during nuclear elongation and condensation overlapped with that of the cephalopod counterpart of manchette at a significant level. Conclusions/Significance The results support the assumption that the protein is actively involved in sperm nuclear morphogenesis in O. tankahkeei possibly through bridging the manchette-like perinuclear microtubules to the nucleus and assisting in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of specific cargoes. This study represents the first description of the role of a motor protein in sperm nuclear shaping in cephalopod. PMID:21187923

  1. The nuclear basket proteins Mlp1p and Mlp2p are part of a dynamic interactome including Esc1p and the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Niepel, Mario; Molloy, Kelly R.; Williams, Rosemary; Farr, Julia C.; Meinema, Anne C.; Vecchietti, Nicholas; Cristea, Ileana M.; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    The basket of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is generally depicted as a discrete structure of eight protein filaments that protrude into the nucleoplasm and converge in a ring distal to the NPC. We show that the yeast proteins Mlp1p and Mlp2p are necessary components of the nuclear basket and that they also embed the NPC within a dynamic protein network, whose extended interactome includes the spindle organizer, silencing factors, the proteasome, and key components of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs). Ultrastructural observations indicate that the basket reduces chromatin crowding around the central transporter of the NPC and might function as a docking site for mRNP during nuclear export. In addition, we show that the Mlps contribute to NPC positioning, nuclear stability, and nuclear envelope morphology. Our results suggest that the Mlps are multifunctional proteins linking the nuclear transport channel to multiple macromolecular complexes involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin maintenance. PMID:24152732

  2. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a strong selection pressure for reversion at the NLS locus of the N protein in vivo. Reversions from NLS-null to functional NLS in the tonsils suggest a possible correlation of viral persistence with N protein nuclear localization. These results show that N protein nuclear localization is non-essential for PRRSV multiplication but may play an important role in viral attenuation and in pathogenesis in vivo.

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  4. Characterization of a novel Dp71 dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) present in the nucleus of HeLa cells: Members of the nuclear DAPC associate with the nuclear matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Rodriguez-Munoz, Rafael; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Gonzalez, Everardo; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro . E-mail: bcisnero@cinvestav.mx

    2006-10-01

    Dystrophin is an essential component in the assembly and maintenance of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), which includes members of the dystroglycan, syntrophin, sarcoglycan and dystrobrevin protein families. Distinctive complexes have been described in the cell membrane of different tissues and cultured cells. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of a novel DAPC present in the nuclei of HeLa cells, which contains dystrophin Dp71 as a key component. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation analyses, we found the presence of Dp71, {beta}-sarcoglycan, {beta}-dystroglycan, {alpha}- and {beta}-syntrophin, {alpha}1- and {beta}-dystrobrevin and nNOS in the nuclei of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that most of these proteins form a complex in the nuclear compartment. Next, we analyze the possible association of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix. We found the presence of Dp71, {beta}-dystroglycan, nNOS, {beta}-sarcoglycan, {alpha}/{beta} syntrophin, {alpha}1-dystrobrevin and {beta}-dystrobrevin in the nuclear matrix protein fractions and in situ nuclear matrix preparations from HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that Dp71, {beta}-dystroglycan and {beta}-dystrobrevin co-immunoprecipitated with the nuclear matrix proteins lamin B1 and actin. The association of members of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix indicates that they may work as scaffolding proteins involved in nuclear architecture.

  5. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs. PMID:27114541

  6. Nuclear HMGA1 nonhistone chromatin proteins directly influence mitochondrial transcription, maintenance, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, Gregory A.; Maloney, Scott C.; Reeves, Raymond . E-mail: reevesr@mail.wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins translocate from the nucleus to mitochondria and bind to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) at the D-loop control region [G.A. Dement, N.R. Treff, N.S. Magnuson, V. Franceschi, R. Reeves, Dynamic mitochondrial localization of nuclear transcription factor HMGA1, Exp. Cell Res. 307 (2005) 388-401.] [11]. To elucidate possible physiological roles for such binding, we employed methods to analyze mtDNA transcription, mitochondrial maintenance, and other organelle functions in transgenic human MCF-7 cells (HA7C) induced to over-express an HA-tagged HMGA1 protein and control (parental) MCF-7 cells. Quantitative real-time (RT) PCR analyses demonstrated that mtDNA levels were reduced approximately 2-fold in HMGA1 over-expressing HA7C cells and flow cytometric analyses further revealed that mitochondrial mass was significantly reduced in these cells. Cellular ATP levels were also reduced in HA7C cells and survival studies showed an increased sensitivity to killing by 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a glycolysis-specific inhibitor. Flow cytometric analyses revealed additional mitochondrial abnormalities in HA7C cells that are consistent with a cancerous phenotype: namely, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}). Additional RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that gene transcripts from both the heavy (ND2, COXI, ATP6) and light (ND6) strands of mtDNA were up-regulated approximately 3-fold in HA7C cells. Together, these mitochondrial changes are consistent with many previous reports and reveal several possible mechanisms by which HMGA1 over-expression, a common feature of naturally occurring cancers, may affect tumor progression.

  7. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs. PMID:27114541

  8. Chromatin-bound NLS proteins recruit membrane vesicles and nucleoporins for nuclear envelope assembly via importin-α/β.

    PubMed

    Lu, Quanlong; Lu, Zhigang; Liu, Qinying; Guo, Li; Ren, He; Fu, Jingyan; Jiang, Qing; Clarke, Paul R; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism for nuclear envelope (NE) assembly is not fully understood. Importin-β and the small GTPase Ran have been implicated in the spatial regulation of NE assembly process. Here we report that chromatin-bound NLS (nuclear localization sequence) proteins provide docking sites for the NE precursor membrane vesicles and nucleoporins via importin-α and -β during NE assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that along with the fast recruitment of the abundant NLS proteins such as nucleoplasmin and histones to the demembranated sperm chromatin in the extracts, importin-α binds the chromatin NLS proteins rapidly. Meanwhile, importin-β binds cytoplasmic NE precursor membrane vesicles and nucleoporins. Through interacting with importin-α on the chromatin NLS proteins, importin-β targets the membrane vesicles and nucleoporins to the chromatin surface. Once encountering Ran-GTP on the chromatin generated by RCC1, importin-β preferentially binds Ran-GTP and releases the membrane vesicles and nucleoporins for NE assembly. NE assembly is disrupted by blocking the interaction between importin-α and NLS proteins with excess soluble NLS proteins or by depletion of importin-β from the extract. Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism for NE assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. PMID:22847741

  9. Using SRM-MS to quantify nuclear protein abundance differences between adipose tissue depots of insulin-resistant mice.

    PubMed

    Ota, Asuka; Kovary, Kyle M; Wu, Olivia H; Ahrends, Robert; Shen, Wen-Jun; Costa, Maria J; Feldman, Brian J; Kraemer, Fredric B; Teruel, Mary N

    2015-05-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) underlies metabolic disease. Visceral, but not subcutaneous, white adipose tissue (WAT) has been linked to the development of IR, potentially due to differences in regulatory protein abundance. Here we investigate how protein levels are changed in IR in different WAT depots by developing a targeted proteomics approach to quantitatively compare the abundance of 42 nuclear proteins in subcutaneous and visceral WAT from a commonly used insulin-resistant mouse model, Lepr(db/db), and from C57BL/6J control mice. The most differentially expressed proteins were important in adipogenesis, as confirmed by siRNA-mediated depletion experiments, suggesting a defect in adipogenesis in visceral, but not subcutaneous, insulin-resistant WAT. Furthermore, differentiation of visceral, but not subcutaneous, insulin-resistant stromal vascular cells (SVCs) was impaired. In an in vitro approach to understand the cause of this impaired differentiation, we compared insulin-resistant visceral SVCs to preadipocyte cell culture models made insulin resistant by different stimuli. The insulin-resistant visceral SVC protein abundance profile correlated most with preadipocyte cell culture cells treated with both palmitate and TNFα. Together, our study introduces a method to simultaneously measure and quantitatively compare nuclear protein expression patterns in primary adipose tissue and adipocyte cell cultures, which we show can reveal relationships between differentiation and disease states of different adipocyte tissue types. PMID:25840986

  10. The Role of Nuclear Matrix Proteins Binding to Matrix Attachment Regions (MARs) in Prostate Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Barboro, Paola; Repaci, Erica; D’Arrigo, Cristina; Balbi, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In tumor progression definite alterations in nuclear matrix (NM) protein composition as well as in chromatin structure occur. The NM interacts with chromatin via specialized DNA sequences called matrix attachment regions (MARs). In the present study, using a proteomic approach along with a two-dimensional Southwestern assay and confocal laser microscopy, we show that the differentiation of stabilized human prostate carcinoma cells is marked out by modifications both NM protein composition and bond between NM proteins and MARs. Well-differentiated androgen-responsive and slowly growing LNCaP cells are characterized by a less complex pattern and by a major number of proteins binding MAR sequences in comparison to 22Rv1 cells expressing androgen receptor but androgen-independent. Finally, in the poorly differentiated and strongly aggressive androgen-independent PC3 cells the complexity of NM pattern further increases and a minor number of proteins bind the MARs. Furthermore, in this cell line with respect to LNCaP cells, these changes are synchronous with modifications in both the nuclear distribution of the MAR sequences and in the average loop dimensions that significantly increase. Although the expression of many NM proteins changes during dedifferentiation, only a very limited group of MAR-binding proteins seem to play a key role in this process. Variations in the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (SATB1) along with an increase in the phosphorylation of lamin B represent changes that might trigger passage towards a more aggressive phenotype. These results suggest that elucidating the MAR-binding proteins that are involved in the differentiation of prostate cancer cells could be an important tool to improve our understanding of this carcinogenesis process, and they could also be novel targets for prostate cancer therapy. PMID:22808207

  11. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  12. Polyphyly of nuclear lamin genes indicates an early eukaryotic origin of the metazoan-type intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Kollmar, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a protein meshwork associated with the inner side of the nuclear envelope contributing structural, signalling and regulatory functions. Here, I report on the evolution of an important component of the lamina, the lamin intermediate filament proteins, across the eukaryotic tree of life. The lamins show a variety of protein domain and sequence motif architectures beyond the classical ?-helical rod, nuclear localisation signal, immunoglobulin domain and CaaX motif organisation, suggesting extension and adaptation of functions in many species. I identified lamin genes not only in metazoa and Amoebozoa as previously described, but also in other opisthokonts including Ichthyosporea and choanoflagellates, in oomycetes, a sub-family of Stramenopiles, and in Rhizaria, implying that they must have been present very early in eukaryotic evolution if not even the last common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes. These data considerably extend the current perception of lamin evolution and have important implications with regard to the evolution of the nuclear envelope. PMID:26024016

  13. Interaction between the inner nuclear membrane lamin B receptor and the heterochromatic methyl binding protein, MeCP2

    SciTech Connect

    Guarda, Alessia; Bolognese, Fabrizio; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Badaracco, Gianfranco

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear membrane has an important role for the dynamic regulation of the genome, besides the well-established cytoskeletal function. The nuclear lamina is emerging as an important player in the organization of the position and functional state of interphase chromosomes. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications are required for genome reprogramming during development, tissue-specific gene expression and global gene silencing. The Methyl-CpG binding protein MeCP2 binds methyl-CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome and functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo by interacting with Sin3A, thereby recruiting histone deacetylases (HDAC). MeCP2 also mediates the formation of higher-order chromatin structures contributing to determine the architectural organization of the nucleus. In this paper, we show that MeCP2 interacts in vitro and in vivo with the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR and that the unstructured aminoacidic sequence linking the MBD and TRD domains of MeCP2 is responsible for this association. The formation of an LBR-MeCP2 protein complex might help providing a molecular explanation to the distribution of part of the heterochromatin at the nuclear periphery linked to inner membrane.

  14. Polyphyly of nuclear lamin genes indicates an early eukaryotic origin of the metazoan-type intermediate filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kollmar, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a protein meshwork associated with the inner side of the nuclear envelope contributing structural, signalling and regulatory functions. Here, I report on the evolution of an important component of the lamina, the lamin intermediate filament proteins, across the eukaryotic tree of life. The lamins show a variety of protein domain and sequence motif architectures beyond the classical α-helical rod, nuclear localisation signal, immunoglobulin domain and CaaX motif organisation, suggesting extension and adaptation of functions in many species. I identified lamin genes not only in metazoa and Amoebozoa as previously described, but also in other opisthokonts including Ichthyosporea and choanoflagellates, in oomycetes, a sub-family of Stramenopiles, and in Rhizaria, implying that they must have been present very early in eukaryotic evolution if not even the last common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes. These data considerably extend the current perception of lamin evolution and have important implications with regard to the evolution of the nuclear envelope. PMID:26024016

  15. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of "blue eye disease", causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β. PMID:26546155

  16. Nuclear localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase small subunit requires a karyopherin and a WD40 repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; An, Xiuxiang; Yang, Kui; Perlstein, Deborah L.; Hicks, Leslie; Kelleher, Neil; Stubbe, JoAnne; Huang, Mingxia

    2006-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides and is an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair. Cells have evolved intricate mechanisms to regulate RNR activity to ensure high fidelity of DNA replication during normal cell-cycle progression and of DNA repair upon genotoxic stress. The RNR holoenzyme is composed of a large subunit R1 (α, oligomeric state unknown) and a small subunit R2 (β2). R1 binds substrates and allosteric effectors; R2 contains a diferric-tyrosyl radical [(Fe)2-Y·] cofactor that is required for catalysis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, R1 is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, whereas R2, which is a heterodimer (ββ′), is predominantly in the nucleus. When cells encounter DNA damage or stress during replication, ββ′ is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a checkpoint-dependent manner, resulting in the colocalization of R1 and R2. We have identified two proteins that have an important role in ββ′ nuclear localization: the importin β homolog Kap122 and the WD40 repeat protein Wtm1. Deletion of either WTM1 or KAP122 leads to loss of ββ′ nuclear localization. Wtm1 and its paralog Wtm2 are both nuclear proteins that are in the same protein complex with ββ′. Wtm1 also interacts with Kap122 in vivo and requires Kap122 for its nuclear localization. Our results suggest that Wtm1 acts either as an adaptor to facilitate nuclear import of ββ′ by Kap122 or as an anchor to retain ββ′ in the nucleus. PMID:16432237

  17. The transcriptional integrator CREB-binding protein mediates positive cross talk between nuclear hormone receptors and the hematopoietic bZip protein p45/NF-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, X; Reginato, M J; Andrews, N C; Lazar, M A

    1997-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) and retinoic acid (RA) play important roles in erythropoiesis. We found that the hematopoietic cell-specific bZip protein p45/NF-E2 interacts with T3 receptor (TR) and RA receptor (RAR) but not retinoid X receptor. The interaction is between the DNA-binding domain of the nuclear receptor and the leucine zipper region of p45/NF-E2 but is markedly enhanced by cognate ligand. Remarkably, ligand-dependent transactivation by TR and RAR is markedly potentiated by p45/NF-E2. This effect of p45/NF-E2 is prevented by maf-like protein p18, which functions positively as a heterodimer with p45/NF-E2 on DNA. Potentiation of hormone action by p45/NF-E2 requires its activation domain, which interacts strongly with the multifaceted coactivator cyclic AMP response element protein-binding protein (CBP). The region of CBP which interacts with p45/NF-E2 is the same interaction domain that mediates inhibition of hormone-stimulated transcription by AP1 transcription factors. Overexpression of the bZip interaction domain of CBP specifically abolishes the positive cross talk between TR and p45/NF-E2. Thus, positive cross talk between p45/NF-E2 and nuclear hormone receptors requires direct protein-protein interactions between these factors and with CBP, whose integration of positive signals from two transactivation domains provides a novel mechanism for potentiation of hormone action in hematopoietic cells. PMID:9032267

  18. Formation of nuclear bodies by the lncRNA Gomafu-associating proteins Celf3 and SF1

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuko; Ishida, Kentaro; Yanaka, Kaori; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is a long noncoding RNA that has been proposed to control retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and alternative splicing of schizophrenia-related genes. However, how Gomafu controls these biological processes at the molecular level has remained largely unknown. In this study, we identified the RNA-binding protein Celf3 as a novel Gomafu-associating protein. Knockdown of Celf3 led to the down-regulation of Gomafu, and cross-link RNA precipitation analysis confirmed specific binding between Celf3 and Gomafu. In the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2A, Celf3 formed novel nuclear bodies (named CS bodies) that colocalized with SF1, another Gomafu-binding protein. Gomafu, however, was not enriched in the CS bodies; instead, it formed distinct nuclear bodies in separate regions in the nucleus. These observations suggest that Gomafu indirectly modulates the function of the splicing factors SF1 and Celf3 by sequestering these proteins into separate nuclear bodies. PMID:25145264

  19. The N-terminus of porcine circovirus type 2 replication protein is required for nuclear localization and ori binding activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-L.; Chien, M.-S.; Du, Y.-W.; Wu, P.-C.; Huang Chienjin

    2009-02-20

    Porcine circovirus type 2 possesses a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for virus replication. To characterize the DNA binding potential and the significant region that confers the nuclear localization of the Rep protein, the defined coding regions of rep gene were cloned and expressed. All of the recombinant proteins except for the N-terminal 110 residues deletion mutant could bind to the double-stranded minimal binding site of replication origin (ori). In addition, the N-terminal deletion mutant lacking 110 residues exhibited mainly cytoplasmic staining in the transfected cells in contrast to the others, which localized dominantly in the nucleus, suggesting that this N-terminal domain is essential for nuclear localization. Furthermore, a series of green fluorescence proteins (GFP) containing potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences were tested for their cellular distribution. The ability of the utmost 20 residues of the N-terminal region to target the GFP to the nucleus confirmed its role as a functional NLS.

  20. Poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 levels affect alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Venema, Andrea; Anvar, S. Yahya; Goeman, Jelle J.; Hu, OuHua; Trollet, Capucine; Dickson, George; den Dunnen, Johan T.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Raz, Vered; ‘t Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    The choice for a polyadenylation site determines the length of the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTRs) of an mRNA. Inclusion or exclusion of regulatory sequences in the 3′-UTR may ultimately affect gene expression levels. Poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is involved in polyadenylation of pre-mRNAs. An alanine repeat expansion in PABPN1 (exp-PABPN1) causes oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). We hypothesized that previously observed disturbed gene expression patterns in OPMD muscles may have been the result of an effect of PABPN1 on alternative polyadenylation, influencing mRNA stability, localization and translation. A single molecule polyadenylation site sequencing method was developed to explore polyadenylation site usage on a genome-wide level in mice overexpressing exp-PABPN1. We identified 2012 transcripts with altered polyadenylation site usage. In the far majority, more proximal alternative polyadenylation sites were used, resulting in shorter 3′-UTRs. 3′-UTR shortening was generally associated with increased expression. Similar changes in polyadenylation site usage were observed after knockdown or overexpression of expanded but not wild-type PABPN1 in cultured myogenic cells. Our data indicate that PABPN1 is important for polyadenylation site selection and that reduced availability of functional PABPN1 in OPMD muscles results in use of alternative polyadenylation sites, leading to large-scale deregulation of gene expression. PMID:22772983

  1. Mitochondrial Genome Maintenance: Roles for Nuclear Nonhomologous End-Joining Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kalifa, Lidza; Quintana, Daniel F.; Schiraldi, Laura K.; Phadnis, Naina; Coles, Garry L.; Sia, Rey A.; Sia, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are associated with sporadic and inherited diseases and age-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Approximately 85% of mtDNA deletions identified in humans are flanked by short directly repeated sequences; however, mechanisms by which these deletions arise are unknown. A limitation in deciphering these mechanisms is the essential nature of the mitochondrial genome in most living cells. One exception is budding yeast, which are facultative anaerobes and one of the few organisms for which directed mtDNA manipulation is possible. Using this model system, we have developed a system to simultaneously monitor spontaneous direct-repeat–mediated deletions (DRMDs) in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In addition, the mitochondrial DRMD reporter contains a unique KpnI restriction endonuclease recognition site that is not present in otherwise wild-type (WT) mtDNA. We have expressed KpnI fused to a mitochondrial localization signal to induce a specific mitochondrial double-strand break (mtDSB). Here we report that loss of the MRX (Mre11p, Rad50p, Xrs2p) and Ku70/80 (Ku70p, Ku80p) complexes significantly impacts the rate of spontaneous deletion events in mtDNA, and these proteins contribute to the repair of induced mtDSBs. Furthermore, our data support homologous recombination (HR) as the predominant pathway by which mtDNA deletions arise in yeast, and suggest that the MRX and Ku70/80 complexes are partially redundant in mitochondria. PMID:22214610

  2. Nuclear receptor binding protein 1 regulates intestinal progenitor cell homeostasis and tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Catherine H; Crombie, Catriona; van der Weyden, Louise; Poulogiannis, George; Rust, Alistair G; Pardo, Mercedes; Gracia, Tannia; Yu, Lu; Choudhary, Jyoti; Poulin, Gino B; McIntyre, Rebecca E; Winton, Douglas J; March, H Nikki; Arends, Mark J; Fraser, Andrew G; Adams, David J

    2012-01-01

    Genetic screens in simple model organisms have identified many of the key components of the conserved signal transduction pathways that are oncogenic when misregulated. Here, we identify H37N21.1 as a gene that regulates vulval induction in let-60(n1046gf), a strain with a gain-of-function mutation in the Caenorhabditis elegans Ras orthologue, and show that somatic deletion of Nrbp1, the mouse orthologue of this gene, results in an intestinal progenitor cell phenotype that leads to profound changes in the proliferation and differentiation of all intestinal cell lineages. We show that Nrbp1 interacts with key components of the ubiquitination machinery and that loss of Nrbp1 in the intestine results in the accumulation of Sall4, a key mediator of stem cell fate, and of Tsc22d2. We also reveal that somatic loss of Nrbp1 results in tumourigenesis, with haematological and intestinal tumours predominating, and that nuclear receptor binding protein 1 (NRBP1) is downregulated in a range of human tumours, where low expression correlates with a poor prognosis. Thus NRBP1 is a conserved regulator of cell fate, that plays an important role in tumour suppression. PMID:22510880

  3. Nuclear protein I{kappa}B-{zeta} inhibits the activity of STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Xiaoai; Yang, Juntao; Wu, Guangzhou; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Chang, Zhijie; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu; Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032

    2009-09-18

    STAT3 (Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) is a key transcription factor of the JAK-STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. Activation of STAT3 is under tight regulation, and yet the different signaling pathways and the mechanisms that regulate its activity remain to be elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified a nuclear protein I{kappa}B-{zeta} that interacts in a novel way with STAT3. This physical interaction was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assays. The interaction regions were mapped to the coiled-coil domain of STAT3 and the C-terminal of I{kappa}B-{zeta}. Overexpression of I{kappa}B-{zeta} inhibited the transcriptional activity of STAT3. It also suppressed cell growth and induced cell apoptosis in SRC-simulated cells, which is partially mediated by down-regulation of expression of a known STAT3 target gene, MCL1. Our results suggest that I{kappa}B-{zeta} is a negative regulator of STAT3, and demonstrate a novel mechanism in which a component of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway inhibits the activation of STAT3.

  4. Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2016-02-23

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (oriP) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an oriP luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced oriP complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and oriP-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced oriP DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of oriP-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444

  5. APPL proteins promote TGFβ-induced nuclear transport of the TGFβ type I receptor intracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Bergh, Anders; Miaczynska, Marta; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Landström, Marene

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is produced by several types of cancers, including prostate cancer, and promote tumour progression in autocrine and paracrine manners. In response to ligand binding, the TGFβ type I receptor (TβRI) activates Smad and non-Smad signalling pathways. The ubiquitin-ligase tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) was recently linked to regulate intramembrane proteolytic cleavage of the TβRI in cancer cells. Subsequently, the intracellular domain (ICD) of TβRI enters in an unknown manner into the nucleus, where it promotes the transcription of pro-invasive genes, such as MMP2 and MMP9. Here we show that the endocytic adaptor molecules APPL1 and APPL2 are required for TGFβ-induced nuclear translocation of TβRI-ICD and for cancer cell invasiveness of human prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, APPL proteins were found to be expressed at high levels in aggressive prostate cancer tissues, and to be associated with TβRI in a TRAF6-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the APPL–TβRI complex promotes prostate tumour progression, and may serve as a prognostic marker. PMID:26583432

  6. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the phospholipid-protein interface in cell membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yeagle, P L

    1982-01-01

    Both native and recombined membrane systems from the human erythrocyte membrane and the rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum have been studied with 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We compare intensities of the anisotropic 31P resonance exhibited by these membranes with the intensity expected from the known phospholipid content of the membranous sample. In a recombinant with human erythrocyte glycophorin, a component of the phospholipid is "missing" from the 31P NMR resonance, apparently due to a severe broadening of the resonance of that component. Approximately 29 phospholipid molecules were found immobilized per glycophorin molecule in the membrane, regardless of the phospholipid:protein ratio. Cholesterol may inhibit the immobilization of phospholipids by glycophorin. Recombinants with band three from the human erythrocyte membrane contain an immobilized phospholipid component, analogous to the results with glycophorin. 31P NMR data from the native sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane also revealed an immobilized phospholipid component whose magnitude is independent of temperature between 30 degrees C and 45 degrees C. Extensive papain proteolysis of the membrane completely digests the Ca++ Mg++ ATPase and removes the immobilization of phospholipids noted in the intact membrane. Limited trypsin cleavage, however, does not completely remove the immobilized component; salt reduces the immobilized component. PMID:6120013

  7. ERN1, a novel ethylene-regulated nuclear protein of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trentmann, S M

    2000-09-01

    Employing differential display of mRNA to investigate the transcriptionally regulated part of the ethylene response pathway in etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana, a novel ethylene-regulated nuclear-localized protein, designated ERN1, was identified. ERN1 is one of four genes whose differential expression was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. ERN1 is represented by a single-copy gene in the Arabidopsis genome. Its expression is suppressed by ethylene in wild-type Arabidopsis but not in the ethylene-insensitive etr1-1 mutant. To gain first insight into the biological role of ERN1, a promoter-beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene fusion was constructed and the expression in various organs from early to late developmental stages was examined. The analysis revealed spatial and temporal expression patterns that correlate with developmental processes known to be affected by ethylene. Evidence is given that the level of expression of ERN1 is regulated through the ethylene signal transduction pathway via CTR1 and EIN3, indicating that ERN1 acts downstream of EIN3. PMID:11094976

  8. A Bromodomain-Containing Host Protein Mediates the Nuclear Importation of a Satellite RNA of Cucumber Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2014-01-01

    Replication of the satellite RNA (satRNA) of Cucumber Mosaic Virus is dependent on replicase proteins of helper virus (HV). However, we recently demonstrated that like with Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), a satRNA associated with Cucumber Mosaic Virus strain Q (Q-satRNA) has the propensity to localize in the nucleus and generate multimers that subsequently serve as templates for HV-dependent replication. But the mechanism regulating the nuclear importation of Q-satRNA is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear importation of Q-satRNA is mediated by a bromodomain-containing host protein (BRP1), which is also apparently involved in the nuclear localization of PSTVd. A comparative analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions from Nicotiana benthamiana plants coinfected with Q-satRNA and its HV confirmed the association of Q-satRNA but not HV with the nuclear compartment. A combination of the MS2-capsid protein-based RNA tagging assay and confocal microscopy demonstrated that the nuclear localization of Q-satRNA was completely blocked in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana (ph5.2nb) that are defective in BRP1 expression. This defect, however, was restored when the ph5.2nb lines of N. benthamiana were trans-complemented by ectopically expressed BRP1. The binding specificity of BRP1 with Q-satRNA was confirmed in vivo and in vitro by coimmunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. Finally, infectivity assays involving coexpression of Q-satRNA and its HV in wild-type and ph5.2nb lines of N. benthamiana accentuated a biological role for BRP1 in the Q-satRNA infection cycle. The significance of these results in relation to a possible evolutionary relationship to viroids is discussed. PMID:24284314

  9. Accumulation, activity and localization of cell cycle regulatory proteins and the chloroplast division protein FtsZ in the alga Scenedesmus quadricauda under inhibition of nuclear DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Vítová, Milada; Hendrychová, Jana; Cízková, Mária; Cepák, Vladislav; Umen, James G; Zachleder, Vilém; Bisová, Katerina

    2008-12-01

    Synchronized cultures of the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda were grown in the absence (untreated cultures) or in the presence (FdUrd-treated cultures) of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, the specific inhibitor of nuclear DNA replication. The attainment of commitment points, at which the cells become committed to nuclear DNA replication, mitosis and cellular division, and the course of committed processes themselves were determined for cell cycle characterization. FdUrd-treated cultures showed nearly unaffected growth and attainment of the commitment points, while DNA replication(s), nuclear division(s) and protoplast fission(s) were blocked. Interestingly, the FdUrd-treated cells possessed a very high mitotic histone H1 kinase activity in the absence of any nuclear division(s). Compared with the untreated cultures, the kinase activity as well as mitotic cyclin B accumulation increased continuously to high values without any oscillation. Division of chloroplasts was not blocked but occurred delayed and over a longer time span than in the untreated culture. The FtsZ protein level in the FdUrd-treated culture did not exceed the level in the untreated culture, but rather, in contrast to the untreated culture, remained elevated. FtsZ structures were both localized around pyrenoids and spread inside of the chloroplast in the form of spots and mini-rings. The abundance and localization of the FtsZ protein were comparable in untreated and FdUrd-treated cells until the end of the untreated cell cycle. However, in the inhibitor-treated culture, the signal did not decrease and was localized in intense spots surrounding the chloroplast/cell perimeter; this was in agreement with both the elevated protein level and persisting chloroplast division. PMID:18977763

  10. Levels of synthesis of primate-specific nuclear proteins differ between growth-arrested and proliferating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celis, J.E.; Madsen, P.; Nielsen, S.; Ratz, G.P.; Lauridsen, J.B.; Celis, A.

    1987-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody that reacts specifically with the proliferation-sensitive nuclear proteins, isoelectric focusing (IEF) 8Z31 (molecular weight (MW), 76,000 charge variants, HeLa protein catalogue number) has been characterized. As determined by indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody stains the nucleolus and nucleoplasm of interphase-cultured cells of primate origin, but does not react with cells of other species. Proteins having similar MWs and isoelectric points as the human or monkey (primates) proteins were not observed in cultured cells of the following species: aves, bat, dog, dolphin, goat, hamster, mink, mouse, pisces, potoroo, rabbit and rat. Quantitative two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoretic analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labelled proteins synthesized by normal (quiescent, proliferating) and SV40-transformed human MRC-5 fibroblasts revealed significant differences in the levels of synthesis of both IEF 8Z30 and 8Z31. In quiescent cells the main labelled product corresponded to IEF 8Z31 (ratio IEF 8Z31/8Z30, 2.3), while in the transformed cells the major product was IEF 8Z30 (ratio, 0.62). Normal proliferating fibroblasts exhibited similar levels of both proteins (ratio, 1.21). Combined levels of synthesis of both proteins were 1.50 and 1.20 times as high in the transformed cells as in the quiescent and proliferating cells, respectively. Modulation of the levels of synthesis of these proteins may play a role in cell proliferation.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion. PMID:26451841

  12. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  13. Formation of nucleoplasmic protein aggregates impairs nuclear function in response to SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Min; Mikecz, Anna von . E-mail: mikecz@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2005-04-15

    Despite of their exponentially growing use, little is known about cell biological effects of nanoparticles. Here, we report uptake of silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles to the cell nucleus where they induce aberrant clusters of topoisomerase I (topo I) in the nucleoplasm that additionally contain signature proteins of nuclear domains, and protein aggregation such as ubiquitin, proteasomes, cellular glutamine repeat (polyQ) proteins, and huntingtin. Formation of intranuclear protein aggregates (1) inhibits replication, transcription, and cell proliferation; (2) does not significantly alter proteasomal activity or cell viability; and (3) is reversible by Congo red and trehalose. Since SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles trigger a subnuclear pathology resembling the one occurring in expanded polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorders, we suggest that integrity of the functional architecture of the cell nucleus should be used as a read out for cytotoxicity and considered in the development of safe nanotechnology.

  14. The nuclear localization of SOCS6 requires the N-terminal region and negatively regulates Stat3 protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Mi-Na; Min, Chan-Hee; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Ho; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Eun Sook; Yoon, Sungpil . E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr

    2007-08-24

    We determined that endogenous- and overexpressed- SOCS6 was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The localization of SOCS6 depended on amino acids 1-210 in the N-terminal region of the protein, which contains an unidentified domain. GFP-tagged SOCS6 or the N-terminal region, was exclusively localized and widely distributed throughout the entire nucleus, whereas the C-terminal region displayed a nuclear omission pattern. We also demonstrated that the SOCS6 protein could decrease the levels of the Stat3 protein in the nucleus, and that its negative regulation of the Stat3 protein level was dependent on its C-terminal region. These observations suggest that SOCS6 is composed of at least two functional domains required for its biological role in localizing and degrading Stat3 in the nucleus.

  15. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  16. Regulation of Stress-Inducible Phosphoprotein 1 Nuclear Retention by Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT PIAS1

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Iaci N.; Caetano, Fabiana A.; Pinder, Jordan; Rodrigues, Bruna Roz; Beraldo, Flavio H.; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Durette, Chantal; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Lopes, Marilene H.; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle; Cunha, Isabela W.; Sanematsu, Paulo I.; Suzuki, Sergio; Bleggi-Torres, Luiz F.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Thibault, Pierre; Dellaire, Graham; Martins, Vilma R.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1), a cochaperone for Hsp90, has been shown to regulate multiple pathways in astrocytes, but its contributions to cellular stress responses are not fully understood. We show that in response to irradiation-mediated DNA damage stress STI1 accumulates in the nucleus of astrocytes. Also, STI1 haploinsufficiency decreases astrocyte survival after irradiation. Using yeast two-hybrid screenings we identified several nuclear proteins as STI1 interactors. Overexpression of one of these interactors, PIAS1, seems to be specifically involved in STI1 nuclear retention and in directing STI1 and Hsp90 to specific sub-nuclear regions. PIAS1 and STI1 co-immunoprecipitate and PIAS1 can function as an E3 SUMO ligase for STI. Using mass spectrometry we identified five SUMOylation sites in STI1. A STI1 mutant lacking these five sites is not SUMOylated, but still accumulates in the nucleus in response to increased expression of PIAS1, suggesting the possibility that a direct interaction with PIAS1 could be responsible for STI1 nuclear retention. To test this possibility, we mapped the interaction sites between PIAS1 and STI1 using yeast-two hybrid assays and surface plasmon resonance and found that a large domain in the N-terminal region of STI1 interacts with high affinity with amino acids 450–480 of PIAS1. Knockdown of PIAS1 in astrocytes impairs the accumulation of nuclear STI1 in response to irradiation. Moreover, a PIAS1 mutant lacking the STI1 binding site is unable to increase STI1 nuclear retention. Interestingly, in human glioblastoma multiforme PIAS1 expression is increased and we found a significant correlation between increased PIAS1 expression and STI1 nuclear localization. These experiments provide evidence that direct interaction between STI1 and PIAS1 is involved in the accumulation of nuclear STI1. This retention mechanism could facilitate nuclear chaperone activity. PMID:23938469

  17. Nuclear Relocalization of Polyadenylate Binding Protein during Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection Involves Expression of the NSs Gene

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Altamura, Louis A.; Van Deusen, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), an ambisense member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever, an important zoonotic infection in Africa and the Middle East. Phlebovirus proteins are translated from virally transcribed mRNAs that, like host mRNA, are capped but, unlike host mRNAs, are not polyadenylated. Here, we investigated the role of PABP1 during RVFV infection of HeLa cells. Immunofluorescence studies of infected cells demonstrated a gross relocalization of PABP1 to the nucleus late in infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies of nuclear proteins revealed costaining between PABP1 and markers of nuclear speckles. PABP1 relocalization was sharply decreased in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding the RVFV nonstructural protein S (NSs). To determine whether PABP1 was required for RVFV infection, we measured the production of nucleocapsid protein (N) in cells transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting PABP1. We found that the overall percentage of RVFV N-positive cells was not changed by siRNA treatment, indicating that PABP1 was not required for RVFV infection. However, when we analyzed populations of cells producing high versus low levels of PABP1, we found that the percentage of RVFV N-positive cells was decreased in cell populations producing physiologic levels of PABP1 and increased in cells with reduced levels of PABP1. Together, these results suggest that production of the NSs protein during RVFV infection leads to sequestration of PABP1 in the nuclear speckles, creating a state within the cell that favors viral protein production. PMID:23966414

  18. Characterization of specific antigenic epitopes and the nuclear export signal of the Porcine circovirus 2 ORF3 protein.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinyan; Wang, Lun; Jin, Yulan; Lin, Cui; Wang, Huijuan; Zhou, Niu; Xing, Gang; Liao, Min; Zhou, Jiyong

    2016-02-29

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the etiological agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. PCV2 ORF3 protein is a nonstructural protein known to induce apoptosis, but little is known about the biological function of ORF3 protein. Therefore, we undertook this study to map ORF3 protein epitopes recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and to characterize putative nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) sequences in ORF3. The linear epitopes targeted by two previously published mAbs 3B1 and 1H3 and a novel mouse mAb 3C3 were defined using overlapping pools of peptides. Here, we find that ORF3 in PCV2 infected cells contains a conformational epitope targeted by the antibody 3C3, which is distinct from linear epitopes recognized by the antibodies 3B1 and 1H3 in recombinant ORF3 protein. These results suggest that the linear epitope recognized by 3B1 and 1H3 is masked in PCV2 infected cells, and that the conformational epitope is unique to PCV2 infection. Furthermore, we find that ORF3 protein expressed in cytoplasm in early stages of PCV2 infection and then accumulated in nucleus over time. Moreover, we localize a NES at the N-terminus (residues 1-35aa) of ORF3 which plays critical role in nuclear export activity. These findings provide a novel insight that deepens our understanding of the biological function of PCV2 ORF3. PMID:26854343

  19. PolyQ proteins interfere with nuclear degradation of cytosolic proteins by sequestering the Sis1p chaperone.

    PubMed

    Park, Sae-Hun; Kukushkin, Yury; Gupta, Rajat; Chen, Taotao; Konagai, Ayano; Hipp, Mark S; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F Ulrich

    2013-07-01

    Dysfunction of protein quality control contributes to the cellular pathology of polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders associated with aggregate deposition. Here we analyzed how polyQ aggregation interferes with the clearance of misfolded proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We show in a yeast model that polyQ-expanded proteins inhibit the UPS-mediated degradation of misfolded cytosolic carboxypeptidase Y(∗) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (CG(∗)) without blocking ubiquitylation or proteasome function. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the polyQ aggregates sequester the low-abundant and essential Hsp40 chaperone Sis1p. Overexpression of Sis1p restores CG(∗) degradation. Surprisingly, we find that Sis1p, and its homolog DnaJB1 in mammalian cells, mediates the delivery of misfolded proteins into the nucleus for proteasomal degradation. Sis1p shuttles between cytosol and nucleus, and its cellular level limits the capacity of this quality control pathway. Upon depletion of Sis1p by polyQ aggregation, misfolded proteins are barred from entering the nucleus and form cytoplasmic inclusions. PMID:23791384

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K interacts with Sindbis virus nonstructural proteins and viral subgenomic mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Gong, Lei; Hardy, Richard W.

    2007-10-10

    Alphaviruses are a group of arthropod-borne human and animal pathogens that can cause epidemics of significant public health and economic consequence. Alphavirus RNA synthesis requires four virally encoded nonstructural proteins and probably a number of cellular proteins. Using comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis we were able to identify proteins enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions containing viral RNA synthetic complexes following infection with Sindbis virus. Our studies demonstrated the following: (i) the host protein hnRNP K is enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions following Sindbis virus infection, (ii) viral nonstructural proteins co-immunoprecipitate with hnRNP K, (iii) nsP2 and hnRNP K co-localize in the cytoplasm of Sindbis virus infected cells, (iv) Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA, but not genomic RNA co-immunoprecipitates with hnRNP K, (v) viral RNA does not appear to be required for the interaction of hnRNP K with the nonstructural proteins. Potential functions of hnRNP K during virus replication are discussed.

  1. RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) Proteins PACT, TRBP, and Dicer are SRA binding nuclear receptor coregulators

    PubMed Central

    Redfern, Andrew D.; Colley, Shane M.; Beveridge, Dianne J.; Ikeda, Naoya; Epis, Michael R.; Li, Xia; Foulds, Charles E.; Stuart, Lisa M.; Barker, Andrew; Russell, Victoria J.; Ramsay, Kerry; Kobelke, Simon J.; Li, Xiaotao; Hatchell, Esme C.; Payne, Christine; Giles, Keith M.; Messineo, Adriana; Gatignol, Anne; Lanz, Rainer B.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Leedman, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytoplasmic RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) contains dsRNA binding proteins, including protein kinase RNA activator (PACT), transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP), and Dicer, that process pre-microRNAs into mature microRNAs (miRNAs) that target specific mRNA species for regulation. There is increasing evidence for important functional interactions between the miRNA and nuclear receptor (NR) signaling networks, with recent data showing that estrogen, acting through the estrogen receptor, can modulate initial aspects of nuclear miRNA processing. Here, we show that the cytoplasmic RISC proteins PACT, TRBP, and Dicer are steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) binding NR coregulators that target steroid-responsive promoters and regulate NR activity and downstream gene expression. Furthermore, each of the RISC proteins, together with Argonaute 2, associates with SRA and specific pre-microRNAs in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, providing evidence for links between NR-mediated transcription and some of the factors involved in miRNA processing. PMID:23550157

  2. RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) Proteins PACT, TRBP, and Dicer are SRA binding nuclear receptor coregulators.

    PubMed

    Redfern, Andrew D; Colley, Shane M; Beveridge, Dianne J; Ikeda, Naoya; Epis, Michael R; Li, Xia; Foulds, Charles E; Stuart, Lisa M; Barker, Andrew; Russell, Victoria J; Ramsay, Kerry; Kobelke, Simon J; Li, Xiaotao; Hatchell, Esme C; Payne, Christine; Giles, Keith M; Messineo, Adriana; Gatignol, Anne; Lanz, Rainer B; O'Malley, Bert W; Leedman, Peter J

    2013-04-16

    The cytoplasmic RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) contains dsRNA binding proteins, including protein kinase RNA activator (PACT), transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP), and Dicer, that process pre-microRNAs into mature microRNAs (miRNAs) that target specific mRNA species for regulation. There is increasing evidence for important functional interactions between the miRNA and nuclear receptor (NR) signaling networks, with recent data showing that estrogen, acting through the estrogen receptor, can modulate initial aspects of nuclear miRNA processing. Here, we show that the cytoplasmic RISC proteins PACT, TRBP, and Dicer are steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) binding NR coregulators that target steroid-responsive promoters and regulate NR activity and downstream gene expression. Furthermore, each of the RISC proteins, together with Argonaute 2, associates with SRA and specific pre-microRNAs in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, providing evidence for links between NR-mediated transcription and some of the factors involved in miRNA processing. PMID:23550157

  3. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the rabies virus P protein requires a nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pasdeloup, David; Poisson, Nicolas; Raux, Helene; Gaudin, Yves; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. . E-mail: danielle.blondel@vms.cnrs-gif.fr

    2005-04-10

    Rabies virus P protein is a co-factor of the viral RNA polymerase. It has been shown previously that P mRNA directs the synthesis of four N-terminally truncated P products P2, P3, P4, and P5 due to translational initiation by a leaky scanning mechanism at internal Met codons. Whereas P and P2 are located in the cytoplasm, P3, P4, and P5 are found in the nucleus. Here, we have analyzed the molecular basis of the subcellular localization of these proteins. Using deletion mutants fused to GFP protein, we show the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal part of P (172-297). This domain contains a short lysine-rich stretch ({sup 211}KKYK{sup 214}) located in close proximity with arginine 260 as revealed by the crystal structure of P. We demonstrate the critical role of lysine 214 and arginine 260 in NLS activity. In the presence of Leptomycin B, P is retained in the nucleus indicating that it contains a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). The subcellular distribution of P deletion mutants indicates that the domain responsible for export is the amino-terminal part of the protein. The use of fusion proteins that have amino terminal fragments of P fused to {beta}-galactosidase containing the NLS of SV40 T antigen allows us to identify a NES between residues 49 and 58. The localization of NLS and NES determines the cellular distribution of the P gene products.

  4. Nuclear Translocation and Regulation of Intranuclear Distribution of Cytoplasmic Poly(A)-Binding Protein Are Distinct Processes Mediated by Two Epstein Barr Virus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Richard; El-Guindy, Ayman; Heston, Lee; Lin, Su-Fang; Yu, Kuan-Ping; Nagy, Mate; Borah, Sumit; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Steitz, Joan; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC) to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs). During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E), was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors. PMID:24705134

  5. Proteomic analysis for nuclear proteins related to tumour malignant progression: a comparative proteomic study between malignant progressive cells and regressive cells.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Eiko; Okada, Futoshi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Xiulian; Ueyama, Yoshiya; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2010-06-01

    Tumour development and progression consists a series of multiple changes in gene expression. Progressive tumour cells acquire more aggressive properties manifested by rapid growth, invasiveness and metastatic ability, as well as increased genetic instability leading to multiple genetic alterations. Therefore, it is crucial to identify the possible intracellular and extracellular molecular mechanisms that accelerate tumour progression, in particular to identify nuclear proteins which interact with DNA. Nuclear proteomics provides an opportunity to qualitatively and quantitatively examine protein effectors that contribute to cellular phenotype. This study performed a differential display analysis for the expression of nuclear proteome between regressive tumour cell clone QR-32 and malignant progressive tumour cell clone QRsP-11 using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Eight nuclear proteins whose expressions were different between QR-32 and QRsP-11 cells were identified. Seven of those protein spots, zinc finger protein ZXDC, lamin-A/C, far upstream clement-binding protein 1, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-1, were down-regulated in QRsP-11, while one protein, nucleolin, was up-regulated in QRsP-11. PMID:20651356

  6. Analysis of epitope-tagged forms of the dyskeratosis congenital protein (dyskerin): identification of a nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Youssoufian, H; Gharibyan, V; Qatanani, M

    1999-01-01

    The X-linked form of the bone marrow failure syndrome Dyskeratosis congenital is caused by mutations in dyskerin, a 514 amino acid protein that is presumed to play a role in ribosome biogenesis. Here we report that dyskerin tagged with the human immunoglobulin epitope localizes to nuclei of transfected HeLa and COS-1 cells. A carboxyl-terminal domain consisting of amino acids 467-475 and encoding KKEKKKSKK is both necessary and sufficient to mediate nuclear entry. Immunoglobulin-tagged dyskerin did not interact with the Fanconi anemia group A protein, FANCA. These results suggest a nuclear role for dyskerin. Moreover, hematopoietic failure observed in both Dyskeratosis congenital and the most common type of Fanconi anemia is unlikely to have a common mechanism resulting from abnormal physical interactions between the respective gene products of these disorders. PMID:10744426

  7. Leishmania major Telomerase TERT Protein Has a Nuclear/Mitochondrial Eclipsed Distribution That Is Affected by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Campelo, Riward; Díaz Lozano, Isabel; Figarella, Katherine; Osuna, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In its canonical role the reverse transcriptase telomerase recovers the telomeric repeats that are lost during DNA replication. Other locations and activities have been recently described for the telomerase protein subunit TERT in mammalian cells. In the present work, using biochemistry, molecular biology, and electron microscopy techniques, we found that in the human parasite Leishmania major, TERT (and telomerase activity) shared locations between the nuclear, mitochondrial, and cytoplasmic compartments. Also, some telomerase activity and TERT protein could be found in ∼100-nm nanovesicles. In the mitochondrial compartment, TERT appears to be mainly associated with the kinetoplast DNA. When Leishmania cells were exposed to H2O2, TERT changed its relative abundance and activity between the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments, with the majority of activity residing in the mitochondrion. Finally, overexpression of TERT in Leishmania transfected cells not only increased the parasitic cell growth rate but also increased their resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:25312950

  8. Propiverine-induced accumulation of nuclear and cytosolic protein in F344 rat kidneys: Isolation and identification of the accumulating protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D.R. Heussner, A.H.; O'Brien, E.; Gramatte, T.; Runkel, M.; Rumpf, S.; Day, B.W.

    2008-12-15

    Male and female F344 rats but not B6C3F1 mice exposed for 104 weeks to propiverine hydrochloride (1-methylpiperid-4-yl 2,2-diphenyl-2-(1-propoxy)acetate hydrochloride), used for treatment of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and overactive bladder (OAB), presented with an accumulation of proteins in the cytosol and nuclei of renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, yet despite this, no increased renal tumor incidence was observed. In order to provide an improved interpretation of these findings and a better basis for human health risk assessment, male and female F344 rats were exposed for 16 weeks to 1000 ppm propiverine in the diet, the accumulating protein was isolated from the kidneys via cytosolic and nuclear preparations or laser-capture microdissection and analyzed using molecular weight determination and mass spectrometry. The accumulating protein was found to be D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), an enzyme involved in amino and fatty acid metabolism. Subsequent reanalysis of kidney homogenate and nuclear samples as well as tissue sections using western blot and DAAO-immunohistochemistry, confirmed the presence and localization of DAAO in propiverine-treated male and female F344 rats. The accumulation of DAAO only in rats, and the limited similarity of rat DAAO with other species, including humans, suggests a rat-specific mechanism underlying the drug-induced renal DAAO accumulation with little relevance for patients chronically treated with propiverine.

  9. Expression of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 2 in rodent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dambaugh, T; Wang, F; Hennessy, K; Woodland, E; Rickinson, A; Kieff, E

    1986-01-01

    A 3.0-kilobase-pair Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA segment necessary for lymphocyte immortalization encodes at least part of a nuclear protein (EBNA2) which is characteristically expressed in latently infected, immortalized cells. A 1.5-kilobase open reading frame within this DNA segment has now been inserted into a murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-derived expression vector (pZIP-NEO-SV(X)1) which provides for transcription of heterologous DNA but not for translational start. Transfection of the recombinant DNA into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in expression of a full-sized EBNA2 which localized to the cell nucleus. Significant new evidence is thereby provided that this 1.5 kilobase open reading frame includes a translational start site and encodes the entire EBNA2 protein. Transfection of the recombinant DNA into a helper cell line (psi am22b) providing amphotropic MuLV-packaging functions resulted in the release of a recombinant MuLV carrying the EBNA2 gene. This recombinant virus can infect rodent cells and convert them to stable EBNA2 expression. Rat-1 cells infected with the MuLV EBNA2 recombinant expressed EBNA2 and grew more rapidly in medium supplemented with 1 or 0.5% fetal calf serum than did Rat-1 cells infected with MuLV vector lacking EBNA2. The Rat-1 cells expressing EBNA2 remained contact inhibited, anchorage dependent, and nontumorigenic in nude mice. Different EBV isolates have one of at least two EBNA2 alleles. Despite divergence between the two alleles, a human serum recognized the prototype EBNA2 allele (EBNA2A) as well as the variant EBNA2B allele characteristic of some Burkitt tumor EBV isolates. The EBNA2B allele was also expressed from the MuLV-derived vector. The reproducible expression of EBNA2A or EBNA2B from these recombinant vectors will facilitate analysis of the EBNA2A and EBNA2B phenotypes. Images PMID:2426468

  10. Structural basis of nucleic acid recognition by FK506-binding protein 25 (FKBP25), a nuclear immunophilin.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ajit; Shin, Joon; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear immunophilin FKBP25 interacts with chromatin-related proteins and transcription factors and is suggested to interact with nucleic acids. Currently the structural basis of nucleic acid binding by FKBP25 is unknown. Here we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of full-length human FKBP25 and studied its interaction with DNA. The FKBP25 structure revealed that the N-terminal helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain and C-terminal FK506-binding domain (FKBD) interact with each other and that both of the domains are involved in DNA binding. The HLH domain forms major-groove interactions and the basic FKBD loop cooperates to form interactions with an adjacent minor-groove of DNA. The FKBP25-DNA complex model, supported by NMR and mutational studies, provides structural and mechanistic insights into the nuclear immunophilin-mediated nucleic acid recognition. PMID:26762975

  11. Structural basis of nucleic acid recognition by FK506-binding protein 25 (FKBP25), a nuclear immunophilin

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ajit; Shin, Joon; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear immunophilin FKBP25 interacts with chromatin-related proteins and transcription factors and is suggested to interact with nucleic acids. Currently the structural basis of nucleic acid binding by FKBP25 is unknown. Here we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of full-length human FKBP25 and studied its interaction with DNA. The FKBP25 structure revealed that the N-terminal helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain and C-terminal FK506-binding domain (FKBD) interact with each other and that both of the domains are involved in DNA binding. The HLH domain forms major-groove interactions and the basic FKBD loop cooperates to form interactions with an adjacent minor-groove of DNA. The FKBP25–DNA complex model, supported by NMR and mutational studies, provides structural and mechanistic insights into the nuclear immunophilin-mediated nucleic acid recognition. PMID:26762975

  12. Purifying selection in mammalian mitochondrial protein-coding genes is highly effective and congruent with evolution of nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Popadin, Konstantin Yu; Nikolaev, Sergey I; Junier, Thomas; Baranova, Maria; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2013-02-01

    The mammalian mitochondrial genomes differ from the nuclear genomes by maternal inheritance, absence of recombination, and higher mutation rate. All these differences decrease the effective population size of mitochondrial genome and make it more susceptible to accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations. It was hypothesized that mitochondrial genes, especially in species with low effective population size, irreversibly degrade leading to decrease of organismal fitness and even to extinction of species through the mutational meltdown. To interrogate this hypothesis, we compared the purifying selections acting on the representative set of mitochondrial (potentially degrading) and nuclear (potentially not degrading) protein-coding genes in species with different effective population size. For 21 mammalian species, we calculated the ratios of accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations approximated by Kn/Ks separately for mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The 75% of variation in Kn/Ks is explained by two independent variables: type of a genome (mitochondrial or nuclear) and effective population size of species approximated by generation time. First, we observed that purifying selection is more effective in mitochondria than in the nucleus that implies strong evolutionary constraints of mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial de novo nonsynonymous mutations have at least 5-fold more harmful effect when compared with nuclear. Second, Kn/Ks of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is positively correlated with generation time of species, indicating relaxation of purifying selection with decrease of species-specific effective population size. Most importantly, the linear regression lines of mitochondrial and nuclear Kn/Ks's from generation times of species are parallel, indicating congruent relaxation of purifying selection in both genomes. Thus, our results reveal that the distribution of selection coefficients of de novo nonsynonymous mitochondrial mutations has a similar shape with the distribution of de novo nonsynonymous nuclear mutations, but its mean is five times smaller. The harmful effect of mitochondrial de novo nonsynonymous mutations triggers highly effective purifying selection, which maintains the fitness of the mammalian mitochondrial genome. PMID:22983951

  13. Laminin isoforms: biological roles and effects on the intracellular distribution of nuclear proteins in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, Natacha; Gross, Isabelle; Gendry, Patrick; Stutzmann, Jeanne; Freund, Jean-Noel; Kedinger, Michele; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Launay, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Launay@inserm.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-02-15

    Laminins are structurally and functionally major components of the extracellular matrix. Four isoforms of laminins (laminin-1, -2, -5 and -10) are expressed in a specific pattern along the crypt-villus axis of the intestine. Previous works indicated that expression of these isoforms is developmentally regulated and that laminins could modulate the behaviour of intestinal cells, but the exact role of each isoform remained unclear. Here, we report the first systematic analysis of the cellular functions of the four isoforms using the human colon adenocarcinoma Caco2/TC7 cell line as a model. We compared the respective abilities of each isoform to modulate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. We found that the isoforms were functionally distinct, with laminin-10 being the most adhesive substratum, laminin-2, laminin-5 and laminin-10 enhancing cellular proliferation and at the opposite, laminin-1 stimulating intestinal cell differentiation. To begin to characterise the molecular events induced by the different isoforms, we examined by immunofluorescence the intracellular distribution of several nuclear proteins, recently highlighted by a nuclear proteomic approach. We observed clear nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of these proteins, which depended on the laminin isoform. These results provide evidence for a distinct functional role of laminins in intestinal cell functions characterised by specific localisation of nuclear proteins.

  14. Characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein, highly conserved in metazoans, and essential for embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qiongmei; Huang, C.-H. . E-mail: chuang@nybloodcenter.org; Peng Jianbin; Hashmi, Sarwar; Ye Tianzhang; Chen Ying

    2007-04-15

    We report here the identification and characterization of STIP, a multi-domain nuclear protein that contains a G-patch, a coiled-coil, and several short tryptophan-tryptophan repeats highly conserved in metazoan species. To analyze their functional role in vivo, we cloned nematode stip-1 genes and determined the spatiotemporal pattern of Caenorhabditis elegans STIP-1 protein. RNA analyses and Western blots revealed that stip-1 mRNA was produced via trans-splicing and translated as a 95-kDa protein. Using reporter constructs, we found STIP-1 to be expressed at all developmental stages and in many tissue/cell types including worm oocyte nuclei. We found that STIP-1 is targeted to the nucleus and forms large polymers with a rod-like shape when expressed in mammalian cells. Using deletion mutants, we mapped the regions of STIP-1 involved in nuclear import and polymer assembly. We further showed that knockdown of C. elegans stip-1 by RNA interference arrested development and resulted in morphologic abnormalities around the 16-cell stage followed by 100% lethality, suggesting its essential role in worm embryogenesis. Importantly, the embryonic lethal phenotype could be faithfully rescued with Drosophila and human genes via transgenic expression. Our data provide the first direct evidence that STIP have a conserved essential nuclear function across metazoans from worms to humans.

  15. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration.

    PubMed

    Bone, Courtney R; Tapley, Erin C; Gorjncz, Mtys; Starr, Daniel A

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect-live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus. PMID:25057012

  16. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Courtney R.; Tapley, Erin C.; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Starr, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect—live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus. PMID:25057012

  17. A Human Nuclear Shuttling Protein That Interacts with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Matrix Is Packaged into Virions

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kalpana; Ott, David; Hope, Thomas J.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2000-01-01

    Active nuclear import of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preintegration complex (PIC) is essential for the productive infection of nondividing cells. Nuclear import of the PIC is mediated by the HIV-1 matrix protein, which also plays several critical roles during viral entry and possibly during virion production facilitating the export of Pr55Gag and genomic RNA. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified a novel human virion-associated matrix-interacting protein (VAN) that is highly conserved in vertebrates and expressed in most human tissues. Its expression is upregulated upon activation of CD4+ T cells. VAN is efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 virions and, like matrix, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, overexpression of VAN significantly inhibits HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. We propose that VAN regulates matrix nuclear localization and, by extension, both nuclear import of the PIC and export of Pr55Gag and viral genomic RNA during virion production. Our data suggest that this regulatory mechanism reflects a more global process for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:11090181

  18. Nuclear Export of Smads by RanBP3L Regulates Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fenfang; Lin, Xia; Xu, Pinglong; Zhang, Zhengmao; Chen, Yanzhen; Wang, Chao; Han, Jiahuai; Zhao, Bin; Xiao, Mu

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play vital roles in regulating stem cell maintenance and differentiation. BMPs can induce osteogenesis and inhibit myogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Canonical BMP signaling is stringently controlled through reversible phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 (Smad1/5/8). However, how the nuclear export of Smad1/5/8 is regulated remains unclear. Here we report that the Ran-binding protein RanBP3L acts as a nuclear export factor for Smad1/5/8. RanBP3L directly recognizes dephosphorylated Smad1/5/8 and mediates their nuclear export in a Ran-dependent manner. Increased expression of RanBP3L blocks BMP-induced osteogenesis of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and promotes myogenic induction of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, whereas depletion of RanBP3L expression enhances BMP-dependent stem cell differentiation activity and transcriptional responses. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that RanBP3L, as a nuclear exporter for BMP-specific Smads, plays a critical role in terminating BMP signaling and regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. PMID:25755279

  19. Nuclear Export of Smads by RanBP3L Regulates Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenfang; Lin, Xia; Xu, Pinglong; Zhang, Zhengmao; Chen, Yanzhen; Wang, Chao; Han, Jiahuai; Zhao, Bin; Xiao, Mu; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play vital roles in regulating stem cell maintenance and differentiation. BMPs can induce osteogenesis and inhibit myogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Canonical BMP signaling is stringently controlled through reversible phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 (Smad1/5/8). However, how the nuclear export of Smad1/5/8 is regulated remains unclear. Here we report that the Ran-binding protein RanBP3L acts as a nuclear export factor for Smad1/5/8. RanBP3L directly recognizes dephosphorylated Smad1/5/8 and mediates their nuclear export in a Ran-dependent manner. Increased expression of RanBP3L blocks BMP-induced osteogenesis of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and promotes myogenic induction of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, whereas depletion of RanBP3L expression enhances BMP-dependent stem cell differentiation activity and transcriptional responses. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that RanBP3L, as a nuclear exporter for BMP-specific Smads, plays a critical role in terminating BMP signaling and regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. PMID:25755279

  20. Domains involved in calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and nuclear localisation in the African swine fever virus A238L protein

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Charles C.; Chapman, Dave A.G.; Silk, Rhiannon; Liverani, Elisabetta; Dixon, Linda K.

    2008-05-10

    The African swine fever virus A238L protein inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity and activation of NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator. An 82 amino acid domain containing residues 157 to 238 at the C-terminus of A238L was expressed in E. coli and purified. This purified A238L fragment acted as a potent inhibitor of calcineurin phosphatase in vitro with an IC{sub 50} of approximately 70 nM. Two putative nuclear localisation signals were identified between residues 80 to 86 (NLS-1) and between residues 203 to 207 overlapping with the N-terminus of the calcineurin docking motif (NLS-2). Mutation of these motifs independently did not reduce nuclear localisation compared to the wild type A238L protein, whereas mutation of both motifs significantly reduced nuclear localisation of A238L. Mutation of the calcineurin docking motif resulted in a dramatic increase in the nuclear localisation of A238L provided an intact NLS was present. We propose that binding of calcineurin to A238L masks NLS-2 contributing to the cytoplasmic retention of A238L.

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase CARM1 attenuates the paraspeckle-mediated nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shi-Bin; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yefen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Min; Wong, Catharine C.; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    In many cells, mRNAs containing inverted repeated Alu elements (IRAlus) in their 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) are inefficiently exported to the cytoplasm. Such nuclear retention correlates with paraspeckle-associated protein complexes containing p54nrb. However, nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus is variable, and how regulation of retention and export is achieved is poorly understood. Here we show one mechanism of such regulation via the arginine methyltransferase CARM1 (coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1). We demonstrate that disruption of CARM1 enhances the nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus. CARM1 regulates this nuclear retention pathway at two levels: CARM1 methylates the coiled-coil domain of p54nrb, resulting in reduced binding of p54nrb to mRNAs containing IRAlus, and also acts as a transcription regulator to suppress NEAT1 transcription, leading to reduced paraspeckle formation. These actions of CARM1 work together synergistically to regulate the export of transcripts containing IRAlus from paraspeckles under certain cellular stresses, such as poly(I:C) treatment. This work demonstrates how a post-translational modification of an RNA-binding protein affects protein–RNA interaction and also uncovers a mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the long noncoding RNA NEAT1. PMID:25792598

  2. Arthropod relationships revealed by phylogenomic analysis of nuclear protein-coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Regier, Jerome C; Shultz, Jeffrey W; Zwick, Andreas; Hussey, April; Ball, Bernard; Wetzer, Regina; Martin, Joel W; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2010-02-25

    The remarkable antiquity, diversity and ecological significance of arthropods have inspired numerous attempts to resolve their deep phylogenetic history, but the results of two decades of intensive molecular phylogenetics have been mixed. The discovery that terrestrial insects (Hexapoda) are more closely related to aquatic Crustacea than to the terrestrial centipedes and millipedes (Myriapoda) was an early, if exceptional, success. More typically, analyses based on limited samples of taxa and genes have generated results that are inconsistent, weakly supported and highly sensitive to analytical conditions. Here we present strongly supported results from likelihood, Bayesian and parsimony analyses of over 41 kilobases of aligned DNA sequence from 62 single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from 75 arthropod species. These species represent every major arthropod lineage, plus five species of tardigrades and onychophorans as outgroups. Our results strongly support Pancrustacea (Hexapoda plus Crustacea) but also strongly favour the traditional morphology-based Mandibulata (Myriapoda plus Pancrustacea) over the molecule-based Paradoxopoda (Myriapoda plus Chelicerata). In addition to Hexapoda, Pancrustacea includes three major extant lineages of 'crustaceans', each spanning a significant range of morphological disparity. These are Oligostraca (ostracods, mystacocarids, branchiurans and pentastomids), Vericrustacea (malacostracans, thecostracans, copepods and branchiopods) and Xenocarida (cephalocarids and remipedes). Finally, within Pancrustacea we identify Xenocarida as the long-sought sister group to the Hexapoda, a result confirming that 'crustaceans' are not monophyletic. These results provide a statistically well-supported phylogenetic framework for the largest animal phylum and represent a step towards ending the often-heated, century-long debate on arthropod relationships. PMID:20147900

  3. HCC-DETECT: a combination of nuclear, cytoplasmic, and oncofetal proteins as biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M; El-Far, Mohamed; Malak, Camelia A Abdel; Omran, Mohamed M; Shiha, Gamal E; Farid, Khaled; Barakat, Lamiaa A; Albannan, Mohamed S; Attallah, Ahmed A; Abdelrazek, Mohamed A; Elbendary, Mohamed S; Sabry, Refaat; Hamoda, Gehan A; Elshemy, Mohamed M; Ragab, Abdallah A; Foda, Basma M; Abdallah, Sanaa O

    2015-09-01

    Currently, the search for suitable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers is very intensive. Besides, efficacy and cost/effectiveness of screening and surveillance of cirrhotics for the diagnosis of HCC is still debated. So, the present study is concerned with the evaluation of cytokeratin-1 (CK-1) and nuclear matrix protein-52 (NMP-52) for identifying HCC. Two-hundred and eighty individuals categorized into three groups [liver fibrosis (F1-F3), cirrhosis (F4), and HCC] constituted this study. Western blot was used for identifying CK-1 and NMP-52 in serum samples. As a result, a single immunoreactive band was shown at 67 and 52 kDa corresponding to CK-1 and NMP-52, respectively. Both CK-1 and NMP-52 bands were cut and electroeluted separately. These markers were quantified in sera using ELISA. Patients with HCC were associated with higher concentrations of CK-1 and NMP-52 than those without HCC with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). CK-1 showed an area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83 with 75 % sensitivity and 82 % specificity while NMP-52 yielded 0.72 AUC with 62 % sensitivity and 70 % specificity for identifying HCC. HCC-DETECT comprising CK-1 and NMP-52 together with AFP was then constructed yielding 0.90 AUC for identifying HCC with 80 % sensitivity and 92 % specificity. HCC-DETECT was then tested for separating HCC from F1-F3 showing 0.94 AUC with 80 % sensitivity and 93 % specificity. In conclusion, CK-1 in conjunction with NMP-52 and AFP could have a potential role for improving the detection of HCC with a high degree of accuracy. PMID:25929809

  4. Nuclear AgNOR protein enhancement in nucleoplasms of peripheral blood lymphocytes of babies/children with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imamoglu, Nalan; Eroz, Recep; Canatan, Halit; Demirtas, Halil; Saatci, Çetin

    2016-03-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common chromosomal disorders. The factors contributing to the mental retardation together with other defects in this syndrome have not been fully explained. Individuals with DS have extra rRNA gene family since they carry an extra chromosome 21. The few reports available are on the relationship between the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) and DS phenotype. The in vivo regulation of NORs expression on the extra chromosome 21 is not completely understood. Previous studies have shown that nucleoli of lymphocytes from infants (mostly neonates) with DS contain more in vivo and in vitro nucleolar AgNOR proteins when compared with healthy infants. The objective of this study is to compare the in vivo nuclear AgNOR protein level in nucleoplasms (also called as karyoplasm) of nonstimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes from babies/children with DS and healthy controls. Peripheral blood samples obtained from 20 babies/children with DS and 20 matched healthy controls were smeared on clean glass slides and then AgNOR staining was performed. The AgNOR protein level in nucleoplasms of lymphocytes from both groups was calculated using a computer program. Nearly 100 interphase nuclei per individual were analysed. Average nuclear AgNOR protein levels in nucleoplasms of lymphocytes from babies/children with DS were found to be significantly higher than those of the controls (P < 0.001). On the basis of our present results, we propose that the increase of nuclear AgNOR protein in in vivo conditions may contribute to the formation of DS phenotypes. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:133-139, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26748985

  5. Spatial and temporal changes in the subcellular localization of the nuclear protein-tyrosine kinase, c-Fes.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Anne; Yates, Karen E; Slamon, Dennis J; Gasson, Judith C

    2005-04-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has emerged as a mechanism to control cellular events in the nucleus. The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase is an important regulator of cell growth and differentiation in several cell types, and is found in the nucleus of hematopoietic cells. In this study, we showed nuclear localization of c-Fes in both hematopoietic (K562, TF-1, HEL, U937, and HL-60) and nonhematopoietic cell lines (293T, CaOv3, TfxH, MG-63, HeLa, DU-145) by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. c-Fes showed striking changes in subcellular localization at specific stages of mitosis. In interphase cells, the intranuclear distribution of c-Fes was diffuse with occasional bright foci. Some c-Fes was present in the cytosol after breakdown of the nuclear membrane, in prometaphase. At prometaphase and metaphase c-Fes was also associated with the chromosomes, in a punctate pattern that partially overlapped with the centromere. Further comparison with proteins that are known components of the kinetochore suggested that some c-Fes protein was located at the centromeric alpha-satellite DNA, between the kinetochores. At anaphase and telophase, c-Fes was entirely cytoplasmic and no protein was found associated with the chromosomes. The timing of c-Fes' appearance at the centromere coincides with the period of kinetochore assembly. These data suggest that c-Fes is recruited to the kinetochore during mitosis. PMID:15812239

  6. A nuclear localization for Avr2 from Fusarium oxysporum is required to activate the tomato resistance protein I-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lisong; Cornelissen, Ben J. C.; Takken, Frank L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to promote host colonization. During infection of tomato xylem vessels, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) secretes the Avr2 effector protein. Besides being a virulence factor, Avr2 is recognized intracellularly by the tomato I-2 resistance protein, resulting in the induction of host defenses. Here, we show that AVR2 is highly expressed in root- and xylem-colonizing hyphae three days post inoculation of roots. Co-expression of I-2 with AVR2 deletion constructs using agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves revealed that, except for the N-terminal 17 amino acids, the entire AVR2 protein is required to trigger I-2-mediated cell death. The truncated Avr2 variants are still able to form homo-dimers, showing that the central region of Avr2 is required for dimerization. Simultaneous production of I-2 and Avr2 chimeras carrying various subcellular localization signals in N. benthamiana leaves revealed that a nuclear localization of Avr2 is required to trigger I-2-dependent cell death. Nuclear exclusion of Avr2 prevented its activation of I-2, suggesting that Avr2 is recognized by I-2 in the nucleus. PMID:23596453

  7. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation. PMID:26429916

  8. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation. PMID:26429916

  9. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Agonist G-1 Inhibits Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Activity and Stimulates Novel Phosphoproteomic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Cody; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen exerts cellular effects through both nuclear (ESR1 and ESR2) and membrane-bound estrogen receptors (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, GPER); however, it is unclear if they act independently or engage in crosstalk to influence hormonal responses. To investigate each receptor's role in proliferation, transcriptional activation, and protein phosphorylation in breast cancer cells (MCF-7), we employed selective agonists for ESR1 propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), ESR2 diarylpropionitrile (DPN), and GPER (G-1) and also determined the impact of xenoestrogens bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein on these effects. As anticipated, 17β-estradiol (E2), PPT, DPN, BPA, and genistein each enhanced proliferation and activation of an ERE-driven reporter gene whereas G-1 had no significant impact. However, G-1 significantly reduced E2-, PPT-, DPN-, BPA-, and genistein-induced proliferation and ERE activation at doses greater than 500 nM indicating that G-1 mediated inhibition is not ESR isotype specific. As membrane receptors initiate cascades of phosphorylation events, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis on cells exposed to E2 or G-1 to identify potential targets of receptor crosstalk via downstream protein phosphorylation targets. Of the 211 phosphorylated proteins identified, 40 and 13 phosphoproteins were specifically modified by E2 and G-1, respectively. Subnetwork enrichment analysis revealed several processes related to cell cycle were specifically enriched by G-1 compared with E2. Further there existed a number of newly identified proteins that were specifically phosphorylated by G-1. These phosphorylation networks highlight specific proteins that may modulate the inhibitory effects of G-1 and suggest a novel role for interference with nuclear receptor activity driven by E2 and xenoestrogens. PMID:27026707

  10. Tissue-specific binding of testis nuclear proteins to a sequence element within the promoter of the testis-specific histone H1t gene.

    PubMed

    Grimes, S R; Wolfe, S A; Koppel, D A

    1992-08-01

    The rat histone H1t gene is transcribed only in testis germinal cells. This testis-specific chromosomal protein is first synthesized during spermatogenesis in pachytene spermatocytes and the entire complement of testis histones is replaced during the midspermatid stage of spermiogenesis by positively charged transition nuclear proteins TP1 and TP2. Mobility shift assays conducted using crude nuclear protein extracts from different tissues and an 18-bp DNA sequence element within the H1t promoter as a probe reveal binding only with nuclear proteins from testis. The binding is specifically competed with an excess of the same unlabeled DNA fragment but not with heterologous competitors. A larger oligonucleotide corresponding to the same sequence element plus 18 bp of the adjacent downstream H1/CCAAT element binds nuclear proteins from all tissues tested, but a unique low mobility band is formed only with testis extracts. Protein-DNA crosslinking experiments reveal that two major polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 13 and 30 kDa bind to the 18-bp H1t promoter sequence element. This strong correlation between the tissue where the H1t gene is transcribed and the presence of testis-specific nuclear proteins that bind to a sequence element within the testis histone H1t promoter supports the possibility that these DNA-binding proteins may participate in formation of an active transcription initiation complex with the testis H1t promoter. PMID:1632632

  11. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP){sub 3} reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import.

  12. Systematic Identification of Protein-Metabolite Interactions in Complex Metabolite Mixtures by Ligand-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Yaroslav V; Kochanowski, Karl; Link, Hannes; Sauer, Uwe; Allain, Frederic H-T

    2016-05-10

    Protein-metabolite interactions play a vital role in the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Consequently, identifying such interactions is a key prerequisite for understanding cellular regulation. However, the noncovalent nature of the binding between proteins and metabolites has so far hampered the development of methods for systematically mapping protein-metabolite interactions. The few available, largely mass spectrometry-based, approaches are restricted to specific metabolite classes, such as lipids. In this study, we address this issue and show the potential of ligand-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is routinely used in drug development, to systematically identify protein-metabolite interactions. As a proof of concept, we selected four well-characterized bacterial and mammalian proteins (AroG, Eno, PfkA, and bovine serum albumin) and identified metabolite binders in complex mixes of up to 33 metabolites. Ligand-detected NMR captured all of the reported protein-metabolite interactions, spanning a full range of physiologically relevant Kd values (low micromolar to low millimolar). We also detected a number of novel interactions, such as promiscuous binding of the negatively charged metabolites citrate, AMP, and ATP, as well as binding of aromatic amino acids to AroG protein. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, we assessed the functional relevance of these novel interactions in the case of AroG and show that l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, and l-histidine act as novel inhibitors of AroG activity. Thus, we conclude that ligand-detected NMR is suitable for the systematic identification of functionally relevant protein-metabolite interactions. PMID:27065204

  13. A Novel Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein-Like Protein Interacts with NS1 of the Minute Virus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Colin E.; Boden, Richard A.; Astell, Caroline R.

    1999-01-01

    NS1, the major nonstructural parvovirus protein of the minute virus of mice, is a multifunctional protein responsible for several aspects of viral replication. NS1 transactivates the P38 promoter (used to express the structural proteins), as well as its own strong promoter, P4. To study the mechanism of activation and to map regions of NS1 responsible for transactivation, NS1 and various deletions of NS1 were cloned in frame with the GAL4DB and cotransfected into COS-7 and LA9 cells with a synthetic GAL4-responsive reporter plasmid. These studies showed NS1 can directly activate transcription through its 129 carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues. Any deletion from this region of the C terminus, even as few as 8 amino acids, completely abolishes transactivation. A yeast two-hybrid system used to identify protein-protein interactions demonstrated that NS1 is able to dimerize when expressed in yeast cells. However, only an almost complete NS11–638 bait was able to interact with the full-length NS1. A two-hybrid screen identified a HeLa cell cDNA clone (NS1-associated protein 1 [NSAP1]) that interacts with NS11–276 and NS11–638. An additional sequence was predicted from human EST (expressed sequence tag) data, and the cDNA was estimated to be at least 2,221 bp long, potentially encoding a 562-amino-acid protein product. A polyclonal antibody raised to a synthetic peptide within NSAP1 recognizes an ∼65-kDa cellular protein. This NSAP1 cDNA has not previously been characterized, but the predicted protein sequence is 80% identical to the recently identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) R (W. Hassfeld et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 26:439–445, 1998). NSAP1 contains four ribonucleoprotein domains, as well as a highly repetitive C-terminal region. A closely related mouse cDNA (deduced from murine EST data) encodes a protein with only a single amino acid residue change from the human protein. NSAP1 is predicted to be a 65-kDa polynucleotide binding protein, and it likely functions in the regulation of splicing and/or transport of mRNAs from the nucleus. PMID:9847309

  14. FoxO proteins' nuclear retention and BH3-only protein Bim induction evoke mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated apoptosis in berberine-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shatrunajay; Rizvi, Fatima; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Mammalian forkhead-box family members belonging to the 'O' category (FoxO) manipulate a plethora of genes modulating a wide array of cellular functions including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage repair, and energy metabolism. FoxO overexpression and nuclear accumulation have been reported to show correlation with hindered tumor growth in vitro and size in vivo, while FoxO's downregulation via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway has been linked with tumor promotion. In this study, we have explored for the first time intervention of berberine, a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid, with FoxO family proteins in hepatoma cells. We observed that berberine significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of both FoxO1 and FoxO3a. Their phosphorylation-mediated cytoplasmic sequestration followed by degradation was prevented by berberine-induced downmodulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway which promoted FoxO nuclear retention. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene and negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt axis, was upregulated while phosphorylation of its Ser380 residue (possible mechanism of PTEN degradation) was significantly decreased in treated HepG2 cells. Exposure to berberine induced a significant increase in transcriptional activity of FoxO, as shown by GFP reporter assay. FoxO transcription factors effectively heightened BH3-only protein Bim expression, which in turn, being a direct activator of proapoptotic protein Bax, altered Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, culminating into mitochondrial dysfunction, caspases activation, and DNA fragmentation. The pivotal role of Bim in berberine-mediated cytotoxicity was further corroborated by knockdown experiments where Bim-silencing partially restored HepG2 cell viability during berberine exposure. In addition, a correlation between oxidative overload and FoxO's nuclear accumulation via JNK activation was evident as berberine treatment led to a pronounced increase in JNK phosphorylation together with enhanced ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, decreased activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, and diminished glutathione levels. Thus, our findings suggest that the antiproliferative effect of berberine may in part be due to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis with Bim acting as a pivotal downstream factor of FoxO-induced transcriptional activation. PMID:25128467

  15. Specific binding of nuclear proteins to a bifunctional promoter element upstream of the H1/AC box of the testis-specific histone H1t gene.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Steven A; Grimes, Sidney R

    2003-06-01

    The testis-specific histone H1t gene is transcribed exclusively in primary spermatocytes during spermatogenesis. Studies with transgenic mice show that 141 base pairs (bp) of the H1t proximal promoter accompanied with 800 bp of downstream sequence are sufficient for tissue-specific transcription. Nuclear proteins from testis and pachytene spermatocytes produce footprints spanning the region covering the repressor element (RE) from 100 to 125 nucleotides upstream of the H1t transcriptional initiation site. Only testis nuclear proteins bind to the 5'-end of the element and produce a unique, low-mobility complex in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This testis complex is distinct from the complex formed by a repressor protein derived from several cell lines that binds to the 3'-end of the element. The testis complex band is formed when using nuclear proteins from primary spermatocytes, where the H1t gene is transcribed, and band intensity drops 70%-80% when using nuclear proteins from early spermatids, where H1t gene transcription ceases. Protein-DNA cross-linking experiments using testis nuclear proteins produce electrophoretic bands of 59, 52, and 50 kDa on SDS/PAGE gels. PMID:12606375

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS2 Encodes a Membrane Protein Localized at the Spindle Pole Body and the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muoz-Centeno, Mara de la Cruz; McBratney, Susan; Monterrosa, Antonio; Byers, Breck; Mann, Carl; Winey, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The MPS2 (monopolar spindle two) gene is one of several genes required for the proper execution of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Winey et al., 1991). We report here that the MPS2 gene encodes an essential 44-kDa protein with two putative coiled-coil regions and a hydrophobic sequence. Although MPS2 is required for normal mitotic growth, some null strains can survive; these survivors exhibit slow growth and abnormal ploidy. The MPS2 protein was tagged with nine copies of the myc epitope, and biochemical fractionation experiments show that it is an integral membrane protein. Visualization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) Mps2p fusion protein in living cells and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of 9xmyc-Mps2p revealed a perinuclear localization with one or two brighter foci of staining corresponding to the SPB. Additionally, immunoelectron microscopy shows that GFP-Mps2p localizes to the SPB. Our analysis suggests that Mps2p is required as a component of the SPB for insertion of the nascent SPB into the nuclear envelope. PMID:10397772

  17. Isolation of the nuclear yeast genes for citrate synthase and fifteen other mitochondrial proteins by a new screening method.

    PubMed Central

    Suissa, M; Suda, K; Schatz, G

    1984-01-01

    To isolate nuclear genes specifying imported mitochondrial proteins, a yeast genomic clone bank was screened by an RNA hybridization-competition assay. This assay exploited the fact that mRNAs for imported mitochondrial proteins are enriched in polysomes which are bound to the mitochondrial surface in cycloheximide-inhibited yeast cells. Clones selectively hybridizing to these enriched mRNAs were further screened by hybrid-selected translation and immunoprecipitation with monospecific antisera against individual mitochondrial proteins. Thirty-six clones were isolated which contained complete or partial copies of 16 different genes for imported mitochondrial proteins. Several of these clones caused expression of the corresponding precursor polypeptide in Escherichia coli or over-expression of the corresponding mature protein in yeast. The gene for the matrix enzyme citrate synthase was sequenced; the derived amino acid sequence of the precursor polypeptide revealed an amino-terminal extension containing basic but no acidic residues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6090126

  18. Resveratrol Decreases TXNIP mRNA and Protein Nuclear Expressions With an Arterial Function Improvement in Old Mice.

    PubMed

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vibert, Françoise; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Thioulouse, Elizabeth; Marchiol, Carmen; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    Aging leads to a high prevalence of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular diseases, with oxidative stress playing a potential role. Resveratrol has shown promising effects on glucose tolerance and tends to improve endothelial function in elderly patients. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) was recently proposed as a potential link connecting glucose metabolism to oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the resveratrol-induced improvement of arterial aging phenotype in old mice and the expression of aortic TXNIP. Using an in vivo model of old mice with or without 3-month resveratrol treatment, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on age-related impairments from a cardiovascular Doppler analysis, to a molecular level, by studying inflammation and oxidative stress factors. We found a dual effect of resveratrol, with a decrease of age-related glucose intolerance and oxidative stress imbalance leading to reduced matrix remodeling that forestalls arterial aging phenotype in terms of intima-media thickness and arterial distensibility. These results provide the first evidence that aortic TXNIP mRNA and protein nuclear expressions are increased in the arterial aging and decreased by resveratrol treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrated that resveratrol helped to restore several aging impaired processes in old mice, with a decrease of aortic TXNIP mRNA and protein nuclear expressions. PMID:26041427

  19. Mitogenic and Oncogenic Stimulation of K433 Acetylation Promotes PKM2 Protein Kinase Activity and Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Lei; Xu, Yan-Ping; Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Wang, Wei; Sasaki, Naoya; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Xin; Li, Ting-Ting; Guan, Kun-Liang; Lei, Qun-Ying; Xiong, Yue

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing of the PKM2 gene produces two isoforms, M1 and M2, which are preferentially expressed in adult and embryonic tissues, respectively. The M2 isoform is reexpressed in human cancer and has nonmetabolic functions in the nucleus as a protein kinase. Here, we report that PKM2 is acetylated by p300 acetyltransferase at K433, which is unique to PKM2 and directly contacts its allosteric activator, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). Acetylation prevents PKM2 activation by interfering with FBP binding and promotes the nuclear accumulation and protein kinase activity of PKM2. Acetylationmimetic PKM2(K433) mutant promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. K433 acetylation is decreased by serum starvation and cell-cell contact, increased by cell cycle stimulation, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and oncoprotein E7, and enriched in breast cancers. Hence, K433 acetylation links cell proliferation and transformation to the switch of PKM2 from a cytoplasmic metabolite kinase to a nuclear protein kinase. PMID:24120661

  20. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  1. The Zinc-Finger Protein SOP1 Is Required for a Subset of the Nuclear Exosome Functions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hématy, Kian; Bellec, Yannick; Podicheti, Ram; Bouteiller, Nathalie; Anne, Pauline; Morineau, Céline; Haslam, Richard P; Beaudoin, Frederic; Napier, Johnathan A; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Gagliardi, Dominique; Vaucheret, Hervé; Lange, Heike; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-02-01

    Correct gene expression requires tight RNA quality control both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Using a splicing-defective allele of PASTICCINO2 (PAS2), a gene essential for plant development, we isolated suppressor mutations modifying pas2-1 mRNA profiles and restoring wild-type growth. Three suppressor of pas2 (sop) mutations modified the degradation of mis-spliced pas2-1 mRNA species, allowing the synthesis of a functional protein. Cloning of the suppressor mutations identified the core subunit of the exosome SOP2/RRP4, the exosome nucleoplasmic cofactor SOP3/HEN2 and a novel zinc-finger protein SOP1 that colocalizes with HEN2 in nucleoplasmic foci. The three SOP proteins counteract post-transcriptional (trans)gene silencing (PTGS), which suggests that they all act in RNA quality control. In addition, sop1 mutants accumulate some, but not all of the misprocessed mRNAs and other types of RNAs that are observed in exosome mutants. Taken together, our data show that SOP1 is a new component of nuclear RNA surveillance that is required for the degradation of a specific subset of nuclear exosome targets. PMID:26828932

  2. The Zinc-Finger Protein SOP1 Is Required for a Subset of the Nuclear Exosome Functions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hématy, Kian; Bellec, Yannick; Podicheti, Ram; Bouteiller, Nathalie; Anne, Pauline; Morineau, Céline; Haslam, Richard P.; Beaudoin, Frederic; Napier, Johnathan A.; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Gagliardi, Dominique; Vaucheret, Hervé; Lange, Heike; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-01-01

    Correct gene expression requires tight RNA quality control both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Using a splicing-defective allele of PASTICCINO2 (PAS2), a gene essential for plant development, we isolated suppressor mutations modifying pas2-1 mRNA profiles and restoring wild-type growth. Three suppressor of pas2 (sop) mutations modified the degradation of mis-spliced pas2-1 mRNA species, allowing the synthesis of a functional protein. Cloning of the suppressor mutations identified the core subunit of the exosome SOP2/RRP4, the exosome nucleoplasmic cofactor SOP3/HEN2 and a novel zinc-finger protein SOP1 that colocalizes with HEN2 in nucleoplasmic foci. The three SOP proteins counteract post-transcriptional (trans)gene silencing (PTGS), which suggests that they all act in RNA quality control. In addition, sop1 mutants accumulate some, but not all of the misprocessed mRNAs and other types of RNAs that are observed in exosome mutants. Taken together, our data show that SOP1 is a new component of nuclear RNA surveillance that is required for the degradation of a specific subset of nuclear exosome targets. PMID:26828932

  3. Nuclear Bodies: Random Aggregates of Sticky Proteins or Crucibles of Macromolecular Assembly?

    PubMed Central

    Matera, A. Gregory; Izaguire-Sierra, Mario; Praveen, Kavita; Rajendra, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    The principles of self-assembly and self-organization are major tenets of molecular and cellular biology. Governed by these principles, the eukaryotic nucleus is composed of numerous subdomains and compartments, collectively described as nuclear bodies. Emerging evidence reveals that associations within and between various nuclear bodies and genomic loci are dynamic and can change in response to cellular signals. This review will discuss recent progress in our understanding of how nuclear body components come together, what happens when they form, and what benefit these subcellular structures may provide to the tissues or organisms in which they are found. PMID:19922869

  4. ALBINO3, an Arabidopsis nuclear gene essential for chloroplast differentiation, encodes a chloroplast protein that shows homology to proteins present in bacterial membranes and yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, E; Slagter, J G; Fridborg, I; Cleary, S P; Robinson, C; Coupland, G

    1997-01-01

    The albino3 (alb3) mutant of Arabidopsis forms white or light yellow cotyledons and leaves and when germinated on soil does not survive beyond the seedling stage. The chloroplasts of the mutant are abnormal, as determined by electron microscopy, and contain reduced levels of chlorophyll. However, the chloroplasts of alb3 mutants are sufficiently differentiated to enable the expression of two nuclear genes whose transcription requires the presence of chloroplasts. The ALB3 gene was isolated by transposon tagging with the Activator/Dissociation transposable element system. ALB3 is a novel plant gene whose product shows homology to a bacterial membrane protein previously identified in five bacterial species and to a yeast protein, OXA1, and its human homolog. OXA1 is required in the mitochondria for proper assembly of the cytochrome oxidase complex. ALB3 does not have a function identical to OXA1 because mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity is not affected in the mutant, and immunogold labeling as well as chloroplast import experiments performed in vitro demonstrated that the ALB3 protein is present in chloroplast membranes. ALB3 might have a function related to that of OXA1 and be involved in the assembly of a chloroplast enzyme complex. PMID:9165749

  5. Identification and characterization of the nuclear import and export signals of the mammalian Ste20-like protein kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Shu; Hsu, Chiung-Yueh; Wang, Pei-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying Fred; Chang, Chia-Hua; Yuan, Chiun-Jye

    2004-08-13

    Mst3, a human Ste20-like protein kinase, has been recently demonstrated to undergo a caspase-mediated cleavage during apoptosis. The proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminus of Mst3 caused nuclear translocation of its kinase domain. This work provides evidence that Mst3 may contain a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) at the C-terminus of its kinase domain (residues 278-292). The removal of NLS from the kinase domain of Mst3 led to the cytoplasmic accumulation of EGFP-Mst3(Delta277). The presence of nuclear exporting signals in the Mst3 was also demonstrated by leptomycin B-treatment and serial deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain of Mst3. A nuclear export signal was also postulated to be in the regions of amino acids 335-386. In conclusion, Mst3 contains both NLS and NES signals, which may cooperate to control the subcellular distribution of Mst3. PMID:15304321

  6. Yeast Importin-α (Srp1) Performs Distinct Roles in the Import of Nuclear Proteins and in Targeting Proteasomes to the Nucleus*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Madura, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    Srp1 (importin-α) can translocate proteins that contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS) into the nucleus. The loss of Srp1 is lethal, although several temperature-sensitive mutants have been described. Among these mutants, srp1-31 displays the characteristic nuclear import defect of importin-α mutants, whereas srp1-49 shows a defect in protein degradation. We characterized these and additional srp1 mutants to determine whether distinct mechanisms were required for intracellular proteolysis and the import of NLS-containing proteins. We determined that srp1 mutants that failed to import NLS-containing proteins (srp1-31 and srp1-55) successfully localized proteasomes to the nucleus. In contrast, srp1 mutants that did not target proteasomes to the nucleus (srp1-49 and srp1-E402Q) were able to import NLS-containing proteins. The proteasome targeting defect of specific srp1 mutants caused stabilization of nuclear substrates and overall accumulation of multiubiquitylated proteins. Co-expression of a member of each class of srp1 mutants corrected both the proteasome localization defect and the import of NLS-containing proteins. These findings indicate that the targeting of proteasomes to the nucleus occurs by a mechanism distinct from the Srp1-mediated import of nuclear proteins. PMID:25274630

  7. The nuclear localization signal of mitotic kinesin-like protein Mklp-1: Effect on Mklp-1 function during cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaoqi; E-mail: liu8@purdue.edu; Erikson, Raymond L.

    2007-02-23

    The mitotic kinesin-like protein (Mklp-1) localizes in the nucleus during interphase due to the presence of nuclear localization signal(s) [NLS(s)] within its sequence. Here, we mapped two NLSs to be {sub 899}SRKRRSST{sub 906} and {sub 949}KRKKP{sub 953} in the tail domain of Mklp-1, and showed that ectopic expression of a mutant Mklp-1 without the NLSs leads to cell cycle arrest at cytokinesis, indicating that the NLSs are necessary for Mklp-1 to execute its normal function during cell division. Furthermore, mutation of two serine residues in First NLS to aspartic acid, which mimics phosphorylation, attenuated its nuclear localization function, suggesting that the function of this NLS might be regulated by phosphorylation.

  8. Fibrillarin, a nucleolar protein, is required for normal nuclear morphology and cellular growth in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mohammed Abdullahel; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Ma, Nan; Takata, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Masami; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi . E-mail: kfukui@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Fibrillarin is a key small nucleolar protein in eukaryotes, which has an important role in pre-rRNA processing during ribosomal biogenesis. Though several functions of fibrillarin are known, its function during the cell cycle is still unknown. In this study, we confirmed the dynamic localization of fibrillarin during the cell cycle of HeLa cells and also performed functional studies by using a combination of immunofluorescence microscopy and RNAi technique. We observed that depletion of fibrillarin has almost no effect on the nucleolar structure. However, fibrillarin-depleted cells showed abnormal nuclear morphology. Moreover, fibrillarin depletion resulted in the reduction of the cellular growth and modest accumulation of cells with 4n DNA content. Our data suggest that fibrillarin would play a critical role in the maintenance of nuclear shape and cellular growth.

  9. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X.

    2015-01-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division. PMID:26714316

  10. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Singh, Shree Ram; Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X

    2015-12-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division. PMID:26714316

  11. Nuclear Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II Signaling Enhances Cardiac Progenitor Cell Survival and Cardiac Lineage Commitment.

    PubMed

    Quijada, Pearl; Hariharan, Nirmala; Cubillo, Jonathan D; Bala, Kristin M; Emathinger, Jacqueline M; Wang, Bingyan J; Ormachea, Lucia; Bers, Donald M; Sussman, Mark A; Poizat, Coralie

    2015-10-16

    Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling in the heart regulates cardiomyocyte contractility and growth in response to elevated intracellular Ca(2+). The δB isoform of CaMKII is the predominant nuclear splice variant in the adult heart and regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophic gene expression by signaling to the histone deacetylase HDAC4.