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Sample records for nuclear radiation

  1. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  2. Nuclear Radiation Damages Minds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Professors Ernest Sternglass (University of Pittsburgh) and Steven Bell (Berry College) have assembled cogent, conclusive evidence indicating that nuclear radiation is associated with impaired cognition. They suggest that Scholastic Aptitude Scores (SATs), which have declined steadily for 19 years, will begin to rise. Their prediction is based on…

  3. Nuclear Radiation and the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... most radiation-sensitive parts of the body. Most nuclear accidents release radioactive iodine into the atmosphere which can ... works? After the 1986 Chornobyl (formerly called “Chernobyl”) nuclear accident, shifting winds blew a radioactive cloud over Europe. ...

  4. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  5. [Potential radiation hazard in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Guilabert, Nadine; Ricard, Marcel; Chamoulaud, Karen; Mazelier, Carole; Schlumberger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine uses unsealed radioisotopes. The potential radiation hazards depend on the amount of radioactivity administered and the type of radionucleide. Thus, radiation safety instructions will minimize radiation exposure and contamination as low as reasonably achievable. National nuclear safety authority requires rules, regulations and exposure limits for both patients and workers. Good practices and training staff contribute to optimize the radioprotection. PMID:25842441

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 19: Radiation Shielding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course l: Radiation Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    William j. Weber; Lumin Wang; Jonathan Icenhower

    2004-07-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials.

  9. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Dardenne, Yves M.

    2016-02-02

    Apparatus, systems, and methods for nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting include the steps of identifying an area; collecting samples; sample preparation; identification, assay, and analysis; and relating the samples to the area.

  10. Radiation hardening design of nuclear powered spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of space systems utilizing nuclear fueled power systems must consider the radiation environment from the earliest stages of their design. A range of nuclear systems are being considered for present and future satellite systems capable of supplying tens of kilowatts to multimegawatt and generating a corresponding range of radiation environments. The effects of these radiations on electronics and materials can be minimized by implementing early design considerations which maximize the design efficiency and minimize the impact on system mass. Space systems design considerations for the radiation environment must include all sources in addition to the self induced gamma ray and neutron radiation. These include the orbital dependent environment from the high energy electron and protons encountered in natural space. The system trades which the designer must consider in the development of space platforms which utilize nuclear reactor power supplies are discussed.

  11. Non-equilibrium radiation nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An externally moderated thermal nuclear reactor is disclosed which is designed to provide output power in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The reactor is a gaseous fueled nuclear cavity reactor device which can operate over wide ranges of temperature and pressure, and which includes the capability of processing and recycling waste products such as long-lived transuranium actinides. The primary output of the device may be in the form of coherent radiation, so that the reactor may be utilized as a self-critical nuclear pumped laser.

  12. [Nuclear News -- Isotopes and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sinco, P.

    1999-11-01

    The topics discussed in this section are: (1) FDG--a significant development in nuclear medicine; (2) Contamination at Paducah plant prompts actions and reactions; and (3) Drug relieves side effects of cancer therapies in mice.

  13. Radiation chemistry for modern nuclear energy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Szołucha, Monika M.

    2016-07-01

    Radiation chemistry plays a significant role in modern nuclear energy development. Pioneering research in nuclear science, for example the development of generation IV nuclear reactors, cannot be pursued without chemical solutions. Present issues related to light water reactors concern radiolysis of water in the primary circuit; long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel; radiation effects on cables and wire insulation, and on ion exchangers used for water purification; as well as the procedures of radioactive waste reprocessing and storage. Radiation effects on materials and enhanced corrosion are crucial in current (II/III/III+) and future (IV) generation reactors, and in waste management, deep geological disposal and spent fuel reprocessing. The new generation of reactors (III+ and IV) impose new challenges for radiation chemists due to their new conditions of operation and the usage of new types of coolant. In the case of the supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), water chemistry control may be the key factor in preventing corrosion of reactor structural materials. This paper mainly focuses on radiation effects on long-term performance and safety in the development of nuclear power plants.

  14. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Corrales, L. Rene; Ness, Nancy J.; Williford, Ralph E.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Song, Jakyoung; Park, Byeongwon; Jiang, Weilin; Begg, Bruce D.; Birtcher, R. B.; Chen, X.; Conradson, Steven D.

    2000-10-02

    Radiation effects from the decay of radionuclides may impact the long-term performance and stability of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. In an effort to address these concerns, the objective of this project was the development of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, particularly on solid-state radiation effects and their influence on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study has employed experimental, theoretical and computer simulation methods to obtain new results and insights into radiation damage processes and to initiate the development of predictive models. Consequently, the research that has been performed under this project has significant implications for the High-Level Waste and Nuclear Materials focus areas within the current DOE/EM mission. In the High-Level Waste (HLW) focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. Ultimately, this research could result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  15. Initial radiations from tactical nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1985-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray free-field kermas and fluence spectra for ranges between 1 and 2 km are presented for three tactical nuclear weapons and are compared with nuclear radiations at Hiroshima. The three tactical weapons are modeled as near-surface bursts of a fusion explosive, a fission explosive, and a suppressed-neutron explosive represented by the Little Boy bomb used at Hiroshima.

  16. Nuclear radiation analysis for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.

    1980-09-01

    A multi-dimensional analysis of the radiation problems was performed for TFTR using the system established at PPPL. Simple, clean geometries were first used to establish the expected reference level. Different calculational models were compared. The characteristics of streaming and activation were then studied. It is shown that the objectives set forth for the TFTR shielding design are not entirely satisfied, based on our calculation. Using the results of this study as a baseline, a review of the shielding for TFTR and its upgrade, TFM, has been initiated with the objective of a shielding design modified to satisfy both modes of operation.

  17. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  18. Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and…

  19. Covariance Spectroscopy Applied to Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R., Tinsley, J., Keegan, R., Quam, W.

    2011-09-01

    Covariance spectroscopy is a method of processing second order moments of data to obtain information that is usually absent from average spectra. In nuclear radiation detection it represents a generalization of nuclear coincidence techniques. Correlations and fluctuations in data encode valuable information about radiation sources, transport media, and detection systems. Gaining access to the extra information can help to untangle complicated spectra, uncover overlapping peaks, accelerate source identification, and even sense directionality. Correlations existing at the source level are particularly valuable since many radioactive isotopes emit correlated gammas and neutrons. Correlations also arise from interactions within detector systems, and from scattering in the environment. In particular, correlations from Compton scattering and pair production within a detector array can be usefully exploited in scenarios where direct measurement of source correlations would be unfeasible. We present a covariance analysis of a few experimental data sets to illustrate the utility of the concept.

  20. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  1. Recoilless Nuclear Resonance Absorption of Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mössbauer, Rudolf L.

    It is a high distinction to be permitted to address you on the subject of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption of gamma radiation. The methods used in this special branch of experimental physics have recently found acceptance in many areas of science. I take the liberty to confine myself essentially to the work which I was able to carry out in the years 1955-1958 at the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, and which finally led to establishment of the field of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption. Many investigators shared in the preparations of the basis for the research we are concerned with in this lecture. As early as the middle of the last century Stokes observed, in the case of fluorite, the phenomenon now known as fluorescence - namely, that solids, liquids, and gases under certain conditions partially absorb incident electromagnetic radiation which immediately is reradiated. A special case is the so-called resonance fluorescence, a phenomenon in which the re-emitted and the incident radiation both are of the same wavelength. The resonance fluorescence of the yellow D lines of sodium in sodium vapour is a particularly notable and exhaustively studied example. In this optical type of resonance fluorescence, light sources are used in which the atoms undergo transitions from excited states to their ground states (Fig. 1.1). The light quanta emitted in these transitions (A → B) are used to initiate the inverse process of resonance absorption in the atoms of an absorber which are identical with the radiating atoms. The atoms of the absorber undergo a transition here from the ground state (B) to the excited state (A), from which they again return to the ground state, after a certain time delay, by emission of fluorescent light.

  2. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  3. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 20: Radiation Monitoring Techniques (Radiochemical).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 2: Radiation Protection I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 11: Radiation Detection and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  7. Global nuclear radiation monitoring using plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Kostov, Dan; Wang, Wanpeng; Liu, Zhongchi; Hussey, Daniel S.; Baltic, Eli; Jacobson, David L.; Gu, Jerry; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2005-05-01

    Plants exhibit complex responses to changes in environmental conditions such as radiant heat flux, water quality, airborne pollutants, soil contents. We seek to utilize the natural chemical and electrophysiological response of plants to develop novel plant-based sensor networks. Our present work focuses on plant responses to high-energy radiation - with the goal of monitoring natural plant responses for use as benchmarks for detection and dosimetry. For our study, we selected a plants cactus, Arabidopsis, Dwarf mango (pine), Euymus and Azela. We demonstrated that the ratio of Chlorophyll a to Chlorophyll b of the leaves has changed due to the exposure gradually come back to the normal stage after the radiation die. We used blue laser-induced blue fluorescence-emission spectra to characterize the pigment status of the trees. Upon blue laser excitation (400 nm) leaves show a fluorescence emission in the red spectral region between 650 and 800nm (chlorophyll fluorescence with maxima near 690nm and 735 nm). Sample tree subjects were placed at a distance of 1m from NIST-certified 241AmBe neutron source (30 mCi), capable of producing a neutron field of about 13 mrem/h. This corresponds to an actual absorbed dose of ~ 1 mrad/h. Our results shows that all plants are sensitive to nuclear radiation and some take longer time to recover and take less. We can use their characteristics to do differential detection and extract nuclear activity information out of measurement results avoid false alarms produced environmental changes. Certainly the ultimate verification can be obtained from genetic information, which only need to be done when we have seen noticeable changes on plant optical spectra, mechanical strength and electrical characteristics.

  8. Regulation of nuclear radiation exposures in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, U C

    2004-01-01

    India has a long-term program of wide spread applications of nuclear radiations and radioactive sources for peaceful applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research and is already having several thousand places in the country where such sources are being routinely used. These places are mostly outside the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) installations. DAE supplies such sources. The most important application of nuclear energy in DAE is in electricity generation through nuclear power plants. Fourteen such plants are operating and many new plants are at various stages of construction. In view of the above mentioned wide spread applications, Indian parliament through an Act, called Atomic Energy Act, 1964 created an autonomous body called Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) with comprehensive authority and powers. This Board issues codes, guides, manuals, etc., to regulate such installations so as to ensure safe use of such sources and personnel engaged in such installations and environment receives radiation exposures within the upper bounds prescribed by them. Periodic reports are submitted to AERB to demonstrate compliance of its directives. Health, Safety and Environment Group of Bhabha Atomic Research Centres, Mumbai carries out necessary surveillance and monitoring of all installations of the DAE on a routine basis and also periodic inspections of other installations using radiation sources. Some of the nuclear fuel cycle plants like nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing involve large radioactive source inventories and have potential of accidental release of radioactivity into the environment, an Environmental Surveillance Laboratory (ESL) is set up at each such site much before the facility goes into operation. These ESL's collect baseline data and monitor the environment throughout the life of the facilities including the decommissioning stage. The data is provided to AERB and is available to members of the public. In addition, a multi

  9. Nuclear Cross Sections for Space Radiation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, C. M.; Maung, K. M.; Ford, W. P.; Norbury, J. W.; Vera, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The eikonal, partial wave (PW) Lippmann-Schwinger, and three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS3D) methods are compared for nuclear reactions that are relevant for space radiation applications. Numerical convergence of the eikonal method is readily achieved when exact formulas of the optical potential are used for light nuclei (A = 16) and the momentum-space optical potential is used for heavier nuclei. The PW solution method is known to be numerically unstable for systems that require a large number of partial waves, and, as a result, the LS3D method is employed. The effect of relativistic kinematics is studied with the PW and LS3D methods and is compared to eikonal results. It is recommended that the LS3D method be used for high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions and nucleus-nucleus reactions at all energies because of its rapid numerical convergence and stability for both non-relativistic and relativistic kinematics.

  10. Radiation accidents and nuclear energy: medical consequences and therapy.

    PubMed

    Champlin, R E; Kastenberg, W E; Gale, R P

    1988-11-01

    After the accidents at Chernobyl, the Soviet Union, and in Goiania, Brazil, there is increasing concern about the medical risks from radiation accidents. This overview summarizes the principles of nuclear energy, the biologic effects of accidental radiation exposure, the emergency response to nuclear accidents, and approaches to treating radiation injuries. Also discussed are the related issues of reactor safety, the disposal of radioactive waste, and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. With the increasing use of radioactive materials for power, weapons, and medical diagnostics, the medical community needs to understand the health consequences of radiation exposure. PMID:3056171

  11. Review of radiation effects in solid-nuclear-waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Radiation effects on the stability of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms are an important consideration in the development of technology to immobilize high-level radioactive waste because such effects may significantly affect the containment of the radioactive waste. Since the required containment times are long (10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ years), an understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of radiation damage on the waste forms is essential. Radiation damage of nuclear waste forms can result in changes in volume, leach rate, stored energy, structure/microstructure, and mechanical properties. Any one or combination of these changes might significantly affect the long-term stability of the nuclear waste forms. This report defines the general radiation damage problem in nuclear waste forms, describes the simulation techniques currently available for accelerated testing of nuclear waste forms, and reviews the available data on radiation effects in both glass and ceramic (primarily crystalline) waste forms. 76 references.

  12. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  13. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  14. Radiation safety audit of a high volume Nuclear Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Abhijith Mohan; Shetye, Bhakti; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu Chandrakant; Monteiro, Priya; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Professional radiation exposure cannot be avoided in nuclear medicine practices. It can only be minimized up to some extent by implementing good work practices. Aim and Objectives: The aim of our study was to audit the professional radiation exposure and exposure rate of radiation worker working in and around Department of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, Tata Memorial Hospital. Materials and Methods: We calculated the total number of nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) procedures performed in our department and the radiation exposure to the radiation professionals from year 2009 to 2012. Results: We performed an average of 6478 PET/CT scans and 3856 nuclear medicine scans/year from January 2009 to December 2012. The average annual whole body radiation exposure to nuclear medicine physician, technologist and nursing staff are 1.74 mSv, 2.93 mSv and 4.03 mSv respectively. Conclusion: Efficient management and deployment of personnel is of utmost importance to optimize radiation exposure in a high volume nuclear medicine setup in order to work without anxiety of high radiation exposure. PMID:25400361

  15. Radiation and transmutation effects relevant to solid nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, E.R.; Roy, R.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1981-03-15

    Radiation effects in insulating solids are discussed in a general way as an introduction to the quite sparse published work on radiation effects in candidate nuclear waste forms other than glasses. Likely effects of transmutation in crystals and the chemical mitigation strategy are discussed. It seems probable that radiation effects in solidified HLW will not be serious if the actinides can be wholly incorporated in such radiation-resistant phases as monazite or uraninite.

  16. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; Yuan, Ding; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang, Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum tribromide, lanthanum trifluoride, or cerium tribromide. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  17. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald; O'Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel; Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  18. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Letaw, J R; Share, G H; Kinzer, R L; Silberberg, R; Chupp, E L; Forrest, D J; Rieger, E

    1989-02-01

    We present a satellite observation of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the Earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV. The data were accumulated by the gamma ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission over 3 1/2 years, from 1980 to 1983. The excellent statistical accuracy of the data allows 20 atmospheric line features to be identified. The features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with index -1.16. Many of these features contain a blend of more than one nuclear line. All of these lines (with the exception of the 511-keV annihilation line) are Doppler broadened. Line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric 14N and 16O. Although we find no evidence for other production mechanisms, we cannot rule out significant contributions from direct excitation or spallation by primary cosmic ray protons. The relative intensities of the observed line features are in fair agreement with theoretical models; however, existing models are limited by the availability of neutron cross sections, especially at high energies. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, can be explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of approximately 21 g cm-2 of atmosphere. PMID:11537397

  19. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  20. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  1. Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

    1998-05-01

    The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

  2. Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-02

    The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. In this paper, we discuss the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

  3. Radiation effects in a model ceramic for nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-01

    The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. This paper presents the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

  4. Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David R. Lapp

    2008-01-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and…

  6. Radiation safety and nuclear medicine policies and procedures.

    PubMed

    Berman, C G

    1999-07-01

    There is a growing concern over possible adverse effects from medical applications of ionizing radiation. Hospital personnel must be educated in procedures to minimize exposure to themselves and their patients. Basic radiation safety procedures to protect personnel and patients are discussed. Examples of the nuclear medicine policies and procedures used for lymphatic mapping are provided. PMID:10448699

  7. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation - an alternative detection mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  8. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-15

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  9. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: an alternative detection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gopalsami, N; Chien, H T; Heifetz, A; Koehl, E R; Raptis, A C

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam. PMID:19725673

  10. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  11. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  12. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapp, David R.

    2008-03-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and terrible three-week illness. Having the story continue to unfold throughout the next two weeks of the new unit provided a daily opportunity for students to see the relevance of what we were doing in class. My students were able to have meaningful and informed conversations with their peers and parents over an important international event. They even began to feel a bit like authorities themselves when listening to experts respond to media questions about polonium-210 and nuclear radiation in general. This paper discusses some of the ways that the story of Litvinenko was used while presenting the topic of nuclear radiation.

  13. Applications of nuclear data in human radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Eckerman, K.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Individuals are exposed to ionizing radiations in two ways: from radiation sources external to the body or from internal sources. In either case, the magnitude of the radiation dose to the sensitive tissues of the body is of primary concern. Radiation dose (or absorbed dose) is a physical quantity defined as the amount of ionizing energy absorbed per unit mass of material. For radiation protection purposes, however, it is also necessary to use the dose equivalent, which includes modifiers of absorbed dose to more fully reflect the biological considerations associated with different ionizing radiations. A research group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has focused on defining the exposure-dose relationship (i.e., the relationship between radiation exposure from internal or external sources and the radiation dose received by tissues of the body). Although radiation can be readily detected and measured, it is not feasible to make direct measurements of the dose within the organs and tissues of the body. Nuclear data have been extensively used in these studies but improvements are needed in the current nuclear data base. Examples of these applications include studies dealing with (a) the application of the recommendations of Publication 26 of the International Committee on Radiological Protection in the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides and (b) the reassessment of radiation dosimetry for the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  14. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels of radiation effects in glass and ceramics that provides the underpinning science and models for evaluation an...

  15. What Students Think About (Nuclear) Radiation - Before and After Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, S.

    2014-06-01

    Preparing successful science lessons is very demanding. One important aspect a teacher has to consider is the students' previous knowledge about the specific topic. This is why research about students' preconceptions has been, and continues to be, a major field in science education research. Following a constructivistic approach [R. Duit et al., International handbook of research on conceptual change, p. 629 (2008)], helping students learn is only possible if teachers know about students' ideas beforehand. Studies about students' conceptions regarding the major topics in physics education (e.g. mechanics, electrodynamics, optics, thermodynamics), are numerous and well-documented. The topic radiation, however, has seen very little empirical research about students' ideas and misconceptions. Some research was conducted after the events of Chernobyl [P. Lijnse et al., International Journal of Science Education 12, 67 (1990); B. Verplanken, Environment and Behavior 21, 7 (1989)] and provided interesting insight into some of the students' preconceptions about radiation. In order to contribute empirical findings to this field of research, our workgroup has been investigating the conceptions students have about the topic radiation for several years [S. Neumann et al., Journal of Science Education and Technology 21, 826 (2012)]. We used children's drawings and conducted short follow-up interviews with students (9 - 12 years old) and more detailed interviews with 15-year-old students. Both studies were originally done before the events in Fukushima and replicated a year later. We not only asked students about their general associations and emotions regarding the term radiation, but also examined the students' risk perceptions of different types of radiation. Through the use of open-ended questions we were able to examine students' conceptions about different types of radiation (including nuclear) that could be a hindrance to student learning. Our results show that students

  16. Nuclear medicine and the environment: radiation interactions.

    PubMed

    Schmelter, R F

    1986-04-01

    The effect of radiation interactions on the environment may be considered from the perspective of the purely physical phenomena occurring or from the effects the interactions produce in organized biological systems. The physical processes by which radiation interacts with the environment are quite well defined. Although these processes differ depending upon the nature (either electromagnetic or particulate) of the primary radiation, the ultimate result is the production in the medium of high-speed, secondary charged particles. Some of the energy of these particles is absorbed by the medium, while a portion may be lost as bremsstrahlung. The energy that is absorbed produces excitation and ionization, which can be disruptive to biological systems. The effects produced by ionizing radiations at the biochemical, cellular, and organ level are less well defined. Nevertheless, available data indicate that certain generalizations are possible. For example, given the ubiquitous nature of water in tissues, macromolecules, regardless of their structural types, tend to serve as acceptors of the energy and products of water radiolysis. However, a deeper insight into the consequences of irradiation requires an understanding of the interplay of such parameters as the type and energy of the radiation, and the dose and rate of its application. Furthermore, at the cellular level, the type and age of the irradiated cells, the concentration of oxygen in their environment, and their cell-cycle phase are all important factors in determining the consequences of irradiation. PMID:3515567

  17. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  18. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  19. Impact of radiation dose on nuclear shuttle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C. A.; Billings, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The impact of nuclear radiation (from the NERVA propulsion system) on the selection of a reference configuration for each of two classes of the reusable nuclear shuttle is considered. One class was characterized by a single propellant tank, the shape of whose bottom was found to have a pronounced effect on crew radiation levels and associated shield weight requirements. A trade study of shield weight versus structural weight indicated that the minimum-weight configuration for this class had a tank bottom in the shape of a frustum of a 10 deg-half-angle cone. A hybrid version of this configuration was found to affect crew radiation levels in substantially the same manner. The other class of RNS consisted of a propulsion module and eight propellant modules. Radiation analyses of various module arrangements led to a design configuration with no external shield requirements.

  20. Radiation and Nuclear Materials Detection Research and Development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Jim E; Wright, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    Research and development is underway to improve radiation and nuclear detection capabilities. This research and development in radiation and nuclear detection includes areas such as advanced materials, applied research and engineering for designing and fabricating customized detection equipment, and theoretical modeling and computational support. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a distinctive set of detector materials fabrication and characterization capabilities and recently created a Center for Radiation Detection Materials and Systems. Applied research and engineering efforts have led to the development of improved detectors for specific applications including safeguards, treaty monitoring, and science experiments. All sizes, types, and capabilities of detector systems have been addressed from miniature to man-portable and from neutrons to gamma radiation. Dedicated test beds, in-house and in the field, have been established to analyze, characterize, and improve detection systems.

  1. Nuclear Fragmentation Processes Relevant for Human Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for human space explorations such-as a moon base or a trip to Mars. Models have been developed in order to predict the radiation exposure to astronauts and to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials, and a key ingredient in these models is the physics of nuclear fragmentations. We have developed a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the radiation dose behind shielding materials due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  2. Increased occupational radiation doses: nuclear fuel cycle.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Kryuchkov, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The increased occupational doses resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident that occurred in Ukraine in April 1986, the reactor accident of Fukushima that took place in Japan in March 2011, and the early operations of the Mayak Production Association in Russia in the 1940s and 1950s are presented and discussed. For comparison purposes, the occupational doses due to the other two major reactor accidents (Windscale in the United Kingdom in 1957 and Three Mile Island in the United States in 1979) and to the main plutonium-producing facility in the United States (Hanford Works) are also covered but in less detail. Both for the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and the routine operations at Mayak, the considerable efforts made to reconstruct individual doses from external irradiation to a large number of workers revealed that the recorded doses had been overestimated by a factor of about two.Introduction of Increased Occupational Exposures: Nuclear Industry Workers. (Video 1:32, http://links.lww.com/HP/A21). PMID:24378501

  3. Estimates of the radiation environment for a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J.C.; Manohara, H.M.; Williams, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Ambitious missions in deep space, such as manned expeditions to Mars, require nuclear propulsion if they are to be accomplished in a reasonable length of time. Current technology is adequate to support the use of nuclear fission as a source of energy for propulsion; however, problems associated with neutrons and gammas leaking from the rocket engine must be addressed. Before manned or unmanned space flights are attempted, an extensive ground test program on the rocket engine must be completed. This paper compares estimated radiation levels and nuclear heating rates in and around the rocket engine for both a ground test and space environments.

  4. Radiation protection performance indicators at the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko.

    PubMed

    Janzekovic, Helena

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear power plant safety performance indicators are developed "by nuclear operating organisations to monitor their own performance and progress, to set their own challenging goals for improvement, and to gain additional perspective on performance relative to that of other plants". In addition, performance indicators are widely used by regulatory authorities although the use is not harmonised. Two basic performance indicators related to good radiation protection practice are collective radiation exposure and volume of low-level radioactive waste. In 2000, Nuclear Power Plant Krsko, a Westinghouse pressurised water reactor with electrical output 700 MW, finished an extensive modernisation including the replacement of both steam generators. While the annual volume of low-level radioactive waste does not show a specific trend related to modernisation, the annual collective dose reached maximum, i.e. 2.60 man Sv, and dropped to 1.13 man Sv in 2001. During the replacement of the steam generators in 2000, the dose associated with this activity was 1.48 man Sv. The annual doses in 2002 and 2003 were 0.53 and 0.80 man Sv, respectively, nearing thus the goal set by the US Institute of Nuclear Power Operators, which is 0.65 man Sv. Therefore, inasmuch as collective dose as the radiation protection performance indicator are concerned, the modernisation of the Krsko nuclear power plant was a success. PMID:16832974

  5. Nuclear model calculations and their role in space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Cucinotta, F A; Heilbronn, L H

    2002-01-01

    Proper assessments of spacecraft shielding requirements and concomitant estimates of risk to spacecraft crews from energetic space radiation requires accurate, quantitative methods of characterizing the compositional changes in these radiation fields as they pass through thick absorbers. These quantitative methods are also needed for characterizing accelerator beams used in space radiobiology studies. Because of the impracticality/impossibility of measuring these altered radiation fields inside critical internal body organs of biological test specimens and humans, computational methods rather than direct measurements must be used. Since composition changes in the fields arise from nuclear interaction processes (elastic, inelastic and breakup), knowledge of the appropriate cross sections and spectra must be available. Experiments alone cannot provide the necessary cross section and secondary particle (neutron and charged particle) spectral data because of the large number of nuclear species and wide range of energies involved in space radiation research. Hence, nuclear models are needed. In this paper current methods of predicting total and absorption cross sections and secondary particle (neutrons and ions) yields and spectra for space radiation protection analyses are reviewed. Model shortcomings are discussed and future needs presented. PMID:12539757

  6. Nuclear model calculations and their role in space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Heilbronn, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Proper assessments of spacecraft shielding requirements and concomitant estimates of risk to spacecraft crews from energetic space radiation requires accurate, quantitative methods of characterizing the compositional changes in these radiation fields as they pass through thick absorbers. These quantitative methods are also needed for characterizing accelerator beams used in space radiobiology studies. Because of the impracticality/impossibility of measuring these altered radiation fields inside critical internal body organs of biological test specimens and humans, computational methods rather than direct measurements must be used. Since composition changes in the fields arise from nuclear interaction processes (elastic, inelastic and breakup), knowledge of the appropriate cross sections and spectra must be available. Experiments alone cannot provide the necessary cross section and secondary particle (neutron and charged particle) spectral data because of the large number of nuclear species and wide range of energies involved in space radiation research. Hence, nuclear models are needed. In this paper current methods of predicting total and absorption cross sections and secondary particle (neutrons and ions) yields and spectra for space radiation protection analyses are reviewed. Model shortcomings are discussed and future needs presented. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All right reserved.

  7. Radiation imaging technology for nuclear materials safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.; Russo, P.A.; Cheung, C.C.; Christianson, A.D.; Feldman, W.C.; Gavron, A.

    1997-12-01

    Gamma-ray and neutron imaging technology is emerging as a useful tool for nuclear materials safeguards. Principal applications include improvement in accuracy for nondestructive assay of heterogeneous material (e.g., residues) and wide-area imaging of nuclear material in facilities (e.g., holdup). Portable gamma cameras with gamma-ray spectroscopy are available commercially and are being applied to holdup measurements. The technology has the potential to significantly reduce effort and exposure in holdup campaigns; and, with imaging, some of the limiting assumptions required for conventional holdup analysis can be relaxed, resulting in a more general analysis. Methods to analyze spectroscopic-imaging data to assay plutonium and uranium in processing equipment are being development. Results of holdup measurements using a commercial, portable gamma-cameras are presented. The authors are also developing fast neutron imaging techniques for NDA, search, and holdup. Fast neutron imaging provides a direct measurement of the source of neutrons and is relatively insensitive to surroundings when compared to thermal or epithermal neutron imaging. The technology is well-suited for in-process inventory measurements and verification of materials in interim storage, for which gamma-ray measurements may be inadequate due to self-shielding. Results of numerical simulations to predict the performance of fast-neutron telescopes for safeguards applications are presented.

  8. Radiation and Thermal Ageing of Nuclear Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive decay of fission products and actinides incorporated into nuclear waste glass leads to self-heating and self-radiation effects that may affect the stability, structure and performance of the glass in a closed system. Short-lived fission products cause significant self-heating for the first 600 years. Alpha decay of the actinides leads to self-radiation damage that can be significant after a few hundred years, and over the long time periods of geologic disposal, the accumulation of helium and radiation damage from alpha decay may lead to swelling, microstructural evolution and changes in mechanical properties. Four decades of research on the behavior of nuclear waste glass are reviewed.

  9. Calibration of radiation monitors at nuclear power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, L.; Miller, A.D.; Naughton, M.D.

    1994-03-01

    This work was performed to provide guidance to the utilities in the primary and secondary calibration of the radiation monitoring systems (RMS) installed in nuclear power plants. These systems are installed in nuclear power plants to monitor ongoing processes, identify changing radiation fields, predict and limit personnel radiation exposures and measure and control discharge of radioactive materials to the environment. RMS are checked and calibrated on a continuing basis to ensure their precision and accuracy. This report discusses various approaches towards primary and secondary calibrations of the RMS equipment in light of accepted practices at typical power plants and recent interpretations of regulatory guidance. Detailed calibration techniques and overall system responses, trends, and practices are discussed. Industry, utility, and regulatory sources were contacted to create an overall consensus of the most reasonable approaches to optimizing the performance of this equipment.

  10. Thermal Radiation from Nuclear Detonations in Urban Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Moss, W C; Whitlock, B

    2007-06-04

    There are three principal causes of ''prompt'' casualties from a nuclear detonation: nuclear (gamma-ray and neutron) radiation, thermal radiation, and blast. Common estimates of the range of these prompt effects indicate that thermal radiation has the largest lethal range [1]. Non-lethal skin burns, flash blindness, and retinal burns occur out to much greater range. Estimates of casualties from thermal radiation assume air bursts over flat terrain. In urban environments with multiple buildings and terrain features, the extent of thermal radiation may be significantly reduced by shadowing. We have developed a capability for calculating the distribution of thermal energy deposition in urban environments using detailed 3D computer models of actual cities. The size, height, and radiated power from the fireball as a function of time are combined with ray tracing to calculate the energy deposition on all surfaces. For surface bursts less than 100 kt in locations with large buildings or terrain features, the calculations confirm the expected reduction in thermal damage.

  11. Effects of radiation environment on reusable nuclear shuttle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Parametric tradeoff analyses of a wide spectrum of alternate tank configurations to minimize both primary and secondary, direct and scattered radiation sources emanating from the NERVA are reported. The analytical approach utilizing point kernel techniques is described and detailed data are presented on the magnitude of neutron/gamma doses for different locations. Single-tank configurations utilizing smaller cone angles and end cap radii were found to minimize integral radiation levels, hence, stage shielding-weight penalties for shuttle missions. Hybrid configurations employing an upper tank with a reduced cone angle and end cap radius result in low integral payload doses primarily due to the increased separation distance caused by the elongation of the larger capacity upper tank. A preliminary radiation damage assessment is discussed of possible reusable nuclear shuttle materials, components, and subsystems, and the possible effects of the radiation environment on various phases of RNS mission operations.

  12. Institutional Radiation Safety Committee--Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1982-09-13

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is amending its regulations regarding hospitals licensed to use radioactive byproduct material for human applications. Currently, such a license requires that the hospital have a Medical Isotopes Committee to review clinical aspects of the use of radioactive materials within the hospital. The amendment requires instead a Radiation Safety Committee with a simplified membership that will focus on the radiation safety of workers and the general public. The rule change acknowledges the Food and Drug Administration's role in regulating the safety and effectiveness of radioactive drugs with respect to the patient. The membership of the new Radiation Safety Committee will include the hospital management and the nursing staff in decisions affecting radiation safety at the hospital and will be easier for smaller hospitals to recruit. PMID:10259789

  13. R&D for Better Nuclear Security: Radiation Detector Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kammeraad, J E

    2009-04-02

    I am going to talk about the need for better materials for radiation detectors. I believe that government investment in this area can enable transformational technology change that could impact domestic nuclear security and also national nuclear security in some very positive and powerful ways. I'm not going to give you a lecture on how radiation detectors work, but I am going to tell you a bit about today's off-the-shelf technology and why it is not sufficient, what we need, and what security benefit you could get from improvements. I think we're at a critical point in time for some very impactful investments. In particular I'm going to focus on the use of gamma-ray radiation detectors at ports of entry. Not long before DHS was formed, Congress decreed that counter measures against the delivery of radiological and nuclear threats would be put in place at US ports of entry, under the authority of US Customs (later Customs and Border Protection in DHS). This included the screening of all cars and trucks passing through a port of entry. Existing off-the-shelf radiation detectors had to be selected for this purpose. Plans were made to make the most of the available technologies, but there are some inherent limitations of these detectors, plus the operational setting can bring out other limitations.

  14. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  15. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations.

    PubMed

    Harding, L K

    1987-09-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine requires integration of radiation safety with patient care and radiopharmaceutical standards. Nationally there was useful discussion in the UK before the Ionising Radiations Regulations and Approved Code of Practice were published, although such consultation had been lacking when the Medicines Act was implemented. Most of the new considerations relating to nuclear medicine stem from Schedule 6 of the Regulations. Generally, the presence of a single patient does not require a controlled area. However, when several patients are present, or radiopharmaceuticals are being prepared prior to injection, a controlled area is required. Classification of workers is not likely to be required in a typical nuclear medicine department in the UK, although most parts of the nuclear medicine department will need to be controlled areas. These include the radiopharmacy, radionuclide dispensary, injection room, and imaging rooms if patients are injected in them. The importance of finger dose measurements is emphasised. Patient wards, however, need not be controlled areas. A particular concern in nuclear medicine was that patients should not need to be admitted to hospital merely to comply with legislation. This is possibly the case and clarification will probably be available when the Notes for Guidance are published. Most procedures in nuclear medicine departments will remain unchanged. Further information is required, however, on patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy, and breast feeding. Within the hospital, detailed and multidisciplinary discussion will need to take place within the forum of the radiation safety committee. PMID:3664186

  16. Radiation induced corrosion of copper for spent nuclear fuel storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-11-01

    The long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste is one of the main concerns for countries utilizing nuclear power. The integrity of engineered and natural barriers in such repositories must be carefully evaluated in order to minimize the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. One of the most developed concepts of long term storage of spent nuclear fuel is the Swedish KBS-3 method. According to this method, the spent fuel will be sealed inside copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and placed 500 m down in stable bedrock. Despite the importance of the process of radiation induced corrosion of copper, relatively few studies have been reported. In this work the effect of the total gamma dose on radiation induced corrosion of copper in anoxic pure water has been studied experimentally. Copper samples submerged in water were exposed to a series of total doses using three different dose rates. Unirradiated samples were used as reference samples throughout. The copper surfaces were examined qualitatively using IRAS and XPS and quantitatively using cathodic reduction. The concentration of copper in solution after irradiation was measured using ICP-AES. The influence of aqueous radiation chemistry on the corrosion process was evaluated based on numerical simulations. The experiments show that the dissolution as well as the oxide layer thickness increase upon radiation. Interestingly, the evaluation using numerical simulations indicates that aqueous radiation chemistry is not the only process driving the corrosion of copper in these systems.

  17. Compton Radiation for Nuclear Waste Management and Transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    Compton inverse radiation is emitted in the process of backscattering of the laser pulses off the relativistic electrons. This radiation possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons--in hard x-ray up to gammaray energy range--with moderate electron energies (hundreds of MeV up to 1 GeV) due to short wavelength of the laser radiation. The Compton radiation is well collimated: emitting within a narrow cone along the electron beam. A distinct property of the Compton inverse radiation is a steep high-energy cutoff of the spectrum and the maximal intensity just below the cutoff. The Compton sources can attain: spectral density up to 1014 gammas/(s 0.1%bandwidth) in MeV range of energies, and spectral brightness up to 1020 gammas/(smm2mr2 0.1% bw). Applicability of Compton sources for nuclear waste management and detection of radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides are discussed in the report. Also application limits of Compton gamma sources for transmutation of radioactive isotopes are estimated. A recently proposed subtracting method, in which two sets of data obtained by irradiating the object by the Compton beams with slightly different maximal energies are compared, will enhance resolution of detection radioactive elements at the 'atomic' (hundreds of keV) and the 'nuclear' (a few MeV) photon energies.

  18. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Vaughan, A.T.M. . Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  19. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-03-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  20. Lightweight Radiator for in Space Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul; Tomboulian, Briana; SanSoucie, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is a promising option for high-speed in-space travel due to the high energy density of nuclear fission power sources and efficient electric thrusters. Advanced power conversion technologies may require high operating temperatures and would benefit from lightweight radiator materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion systems. Game-changing propulsion systems are often enabled by novel designs using advanced materials. Pitch-based carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in operating temperature, thermal conductivity, and mass. These properties combine to allow advances in operational efficiency and high temperature feasibility. An effort at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to show that woven high thermal conductivity carbon fiber mats can be used to replace standard metal and composite radiator fins to dissipate waste heat from NEP systems is ongoing. The goals of this effort are to demonstrate a proof of concept, to show that a significant improvement of specific power (power/mass) can be achieved, and to develop a thermal model with predictive capabilities making use of constrained input parameter space. A description of this effort is presented.

  1. Modeling of radiation effects on nuclear waste package materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    A methodology is developed for the assessment of radiation effects on nuclear waste package materials. An assessment of the current status of understanding with regard to waste package materials and their behavior in radiation environments is presented. The methodology is used to make prediction as to the chemically induced changes in the groundwater surrounding nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff. The predictions indicate that mechanisms not currently being pursued by the Department of Energy may be a factor in the long-term performance of nuclear waste packages. The methodology embodies a physical model of the effects of radiation on aqueous solutions. Coupled to the physical model is a method for analyzing the complex nature of the physical model using adjoint sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity aid in both the physical understanding of the processes involved as well as aiding in eliminating portions of the model that have no bearing on the desired results. A computer implementation of the methodology is provided. 128 refs.

  2. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  3. Recovery of male fertility after sterilization by nuclear radiation.

    PubMed

    Macleod, J; Hotchkiss, R S; Sitterson, B W

    1964-02-29

    The potential fertility of 6 of 8 men accidentally exposed to radiation on June 16, 1958, was studied over a 3 1/2-year period. It is clear that, as measured by semen quality, evidence of recovery of spermatogenesis may be expected within 21 months, although the sperm counts at this time will probably not be consonant with a reasonable level of fertility. A satisfactory level of fertility will be reached by 30 months and a normal level by 41 months. Review of the male fertility data on the recorded cases of less than lethal nuclear radiation accidents shows that relatively small amounts of radiation will produce pronounced effects on the testes, including disturbances in the morphology of the few spermatozoa present in the ejaculate, but that ultimate recovery of some degree of fertility is possible in most cases. PMID:12255104

  4. Nonisotropic radiation of the 2013 North Korean nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav; Kim, So Gu

    2014-10-01

    On 12 February 2013, North Korea conducted an underground nuclear test in the northeastern mountainous part of the country. The explosion reached magnitude mb = 5.1 being recorded at most of seismic stations around the world and becoming one of the best ever recorded nuclear explosions in history. Similarly, as other nuclear explosions buried in Nevada, Kazakhstan, or China, the 2013 North Korean explosion is characterized by a significant nonisotropic radiation. This radiation is manifested by distinct SH and Love waves in the wave field and is inconsistent with the model of a spherically symmetric source. We show that the Love waves are not generated by a tectonic earthquake triggered on a nearby fault structures but produced by asymmetry of the explosive source caused by presence of deviatoric stress in the surrounding rock. The retrieved moment tensor of the 2013 explosion is characterized by the isotropic component of 57 ± 5%, the double-couple component of 17 ± 9%, and the compensated linear vector dipole component of 24 ± 7%. The P, T, and N axes of the moment tensor are consistent with the principal axes of the regional tectonic stress in the Korean Peninsula. A comparison of waveforms and particle motions of the 2013 explosion and the previous North Korean nuclear explosion buried in 2009 indicates that the 2013 explosion was slightly more nonisotropic.

  5. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  6. Nuclear data needs for radiation protection and therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Haight, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    New nuclear data are required for improved neutron and proton radiotherapy treatment planning as well as future applications of high-energy particle accelerators. Modern neutron radiotherapy employs energies extending to 70 MeV, while industrial applications such as transmutation and tritium breeding may generate neutrons exceeding energies of 100 MeV. Secondary neutrons produced by advanced proton therapy facilities can have energies as high as 250 MeV. Each use requires nuclear data for transport calculations and analysis of radiation effects (dosimetry). We discuss the nuclear data needs supportive of these applications including the different information requirements. As data in this energy region are sparse and likely to remain so, advanced nuclear model calculations can provide some of the needed information. ln this context, we present new evaluated nuclear data for C, N, and O. Additional experimental information, including integral and differential data, are required to confirm these results and to bound further calculations. We indicate the required new data to be measured and the difficulties in carrying out such experiments.

  7. Design of radiation resistant metallic multilayers for advanced nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Gill, Simerjeet E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Stanic, Vesna; DiMasi, Elaine; Kisslinger, Kim; Ecker, Lynne; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Misra, Amit; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-06-16

    Helium implantation from transmutation reactions is a major cause of embrittlement and dimensional instability of structural components in nuclear energy systems. Development of novel materials with improved radiation resistance, which is of the utmost importance for progress in nuclear energy, requires guidelines to arrive at favorable parameters more efficiently. Here, we present a methodology that can be used for the design of radiation tolerant materials. We used synchrotron X-ray reflectivity to nondestructively study radiation effects at buried interfaces and measure swelling induced by He implantation in Cu/Nb multilayers. The results, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show a direct correlation between reduced swelling in nanoscale multilayers and increased interface area per unit volume, consistent with helium storage in Cu/Nb interfaces in forms that minimize dimensional changes. In addition, for Cu/Nb layers, a linear relationship is demonstrated between the measured depth-dependent swelling and implanted He density from simulations, making the reflectivity technique a powerful tool for heuristic material design.

  8. Ionizing radiations, underground world and nuclear tests in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chama, Allel

    2010-05-01

    Today, the exposure to ionizing radiations, is still a real great physical hazard in the world at various levels until the nuclear tests which led to a rich and lawful debate, and needs the installation of preventive rules through technical and medical aspects during the use of the radioactive sources, (theradioprotection). Concerning the occupational health, the pathology of the ionizing radiations is repaired under occupational disease. Our interest is to highlight this physical hazard, which represents an important chapter of the occupational pathology in its effects and prevention of the workers exposed in Algeria. The second aim of the paper is to highlight the historical aspect of the risk of ionizing radiations and consequences causes by the French nuclear tests in In Eker (underground galleries of the mountain of Hoggar in the south of Algeria in 1961), whose effects present a great damage on the health of the Algerian captive, and "workers", indigenous population and environment until now. This event deserves its place as much as that of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1945).

  9. THE RADIATION SAFETY INFORMATION COMPUTATIONAL CENTER: A RESOURCE FOR REACTOR DOSIMETRY SOFTWARE AND NUCLEAR DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) was established in 1963 to collect and disseminate computational nuclear technology in the form of radiation transport, shielding and safety software and corresponding nuclear cross sections. Approximately 1700 nuclear software and data packages are in the RSICC collection, and the majority are applicable to reactor dosimetry.

  10. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center:. a Resource for Reactor Dosimetry Software and Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, B. L.

    2009-08-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) was established in 1963 to collect and disseminate computational nuclear technology in the form of radiation transport, shielding and safety software and corresponding nuclear cross sections. Approximately 1700 nuclear software and data packages are in the RSICC collection, and the majority are applicable to reactor dosimetry.

  11. Evaluation of Radiation Impacts of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP - 13495

    SciTech Connect

    Paskevych, Sergiy; Batiy, Valiriy; Sizov, Andriy; Schmieman, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Radiation effects are estimated for the operation of a new dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP RBMK reactors. It is shown that radiation exposure during normal operation, design and beyond design basis accidents are minor and meet the criteria for safe use of radiation and nuclear facilities in Ukraine. (authors)

  12. Radiation doses to staff in a department of nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Harbottle, E A; Parker, R P; Davis, R

    1976-07-01

    A survey of data concerning radiation protection of staff working in the Nuclear Medicine Department and associated sections of the Physics Department at the Royal Marsden Hospital (Surrey Branch) is given for the period 1972 to 1975 inclusive. Results of routine film monitoring and whole-body counting are presented. Additional film monitors were used to check working areas, finger doses and any discrepancies between doses to the upper and lower trunk of personnel. In general, exposure to staff in the Nuclear Medicine Department is below 220 mrad per person per year, and below 1,000 mrad per person per year in the Radioisotope Dispensary. The dose received by radiographers is primarily due to spending time close to patients. Since about 5,000 intravenous injections of radionuclides are given each year in our department, the resulting finger doses to the staff involved may give rise to concern unless the task is shared. PMID:824004

  13. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Blancato, A. A.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Battistoni, G.; Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Nicolosi, D.; Raciti, G.; Tropea, S.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Pandola, L.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; and others

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the {sup 12}C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  14. Nuclear data needed for applications in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Siantar, C.L.H.; Chandler, W.P.

    1994-03-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients in approximately twenty centers worldwide and proton therapy is emerging as a potential treatment of choice for tumors near critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires reaction data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. The cross section databases require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We discuss expansion of our nuclear databases and development of a three-dimensional radiation transport package that uses CT images as the input mesh to an all-particle Monte Carlo code. Called PEREGRINE, this code calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data.

  15. Composite seals for liquid hydrogen and nuclear radiation environments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Auken, R. L.; Chase, V. A.

    1971-01-01

    Description of plastic composite seals for service in a liquid-hydrogen and nuclear-radiation environment. The radiation-resistant aromatic heterocyclic class of polymers, including polyimide, polybenzimidazole, and polyquinoxaline, were evaluated for this application. The seal developed is based on a design involving a resin-starved laminate consisting of alternating layers of woven glass fabric and polymer film. This design imparts a mechanical spring characteristic to the seal, resulting in essentially complete elastic recovery when unloaded, and eliminates cold flow. Encapsulating techniques employing the polyquinoxaline polymer were developed which rendered the seal impervious to liquid hydrogen. The seals were tested before and after gamma irradiation up to 10 to the 10th ergs/g. Load/deflection and leakage tests were performed over a temperature range from -423 through +500 F.

  16. Yang-Mills radiation in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulassy, M.; McLerran, L.

    1997-10-01

    The classical Yang-Mills radiation computed in the McLerran-Venugopalan model is shown to be equivalent to the gluon bremsstrahlung distribution to lowest (g6) order in pQCD. The classical distribution is also shown to match smoothly onto the conventional pQCD minijet distribution at a scale k2⊥~χ, characteristic of the initial parton transverse density of the system. The atomic number and energy dependence of χ is computed from available structure function information. The limits of applicability of the classical Yang-Mills description of nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are discussed.

  17. Circuit design for nuclear radiation test of CMOS multiplier chips

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T.S.; Martin, R.L.; Hughes, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes the design of a microprocessor-based electronic circuit to be used in testing the effects of nuclear radiation on a CMOS 8 x 8 multiplier chip. Knowledge of such effects is important for military and space applications of integrated circuits. The multiplier chip undergoing testing is attached to a DUT (device under test) board which is enclosed in a metal container. The container is then lowered to the cobalt 60 radiation source located at the bottom of a 15-ft-deep pool. The gamma-ray radiation test setup is schematically shown. The in-source test board containing the multiplier chip is attached to an 8085-based, single-board microcomputer (SDK-85) by a 30-ft multiconductor cable. Doses of gamma-ray radiation from cobalt 60 are applied in steps at increasing quantities until the multiplier chip, which is tested between doses, begins to malfunction. An 8085 assembly language program is used for functional test of the multiplier. The leakage current and the propagation delay time are also measured between doses.

  18. Cancer near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: radiation emissions.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M C; Beyea, J; Nieves, J W; Susser, M

    1990-09-01

    As a public charge, cancers among the 159,684 residents living within a 10-mile (16-km) radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant were studied relative to releases of radiation during the March 28, 1979, accident as well as to routine plant emissions. The principal cancers considered were leukemia and childhood malignancies. Estimates of the emissions delivered to small geographic study tracts were derived from mathematical dispersion models which accounted for modifying factors such as wind and terrain; the model of accident emissions was validated by readings from off-site dosimeters. Incident cancers among area residents for the period 1975-1985 (n = 5,493) were identified by a review of the records at all local and regional hospitals; preaccident and postaccident trends in cancer rates were examined. For accident emissions, the authors failed to find definite effects of exposure on the cancer types and population subgroups thought to be most susceptible to radiation. No associations were seen for leukemia in adults or for childhood cancers as a group. For leukemia in children, the odds ratio was raised, but cases were few (n = 4), and the estimate was highly variable. Moreover, rates of childhood leukemia in the Three Mile Island area are low compared with national and regional rates. For exposure to routine emissions, the odds ratios were raised for childhood cancers as a whole and for childhood leukemia, but confidence intervals were wide and included 1.0. For leukemia in adults, there was a negative trend. Trends for two types of cancer ran counter to expectation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed raised risks relative to both accident and routine emissions; lung cancer (adjusted only indirectly for smoking) showed raised risks relative to accident emissions, routine emissions, and background gamma radiation. Overall, the pattern of results does not provide convincing evidence that radiation releases from the Three Mile Island nuclear facility influenced

  19. New Versions of Terahertz Radiation Sources for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratman, V. L.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Makhalov, P. B.; Fedotov, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization in strong-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy requires terahertz radiation with moderate power levels. Nowadays, conventional gyrotrons are used almost exclusively to generate such radiation. In this review paper, we consider alternative variants of electronic microwave oscillators which require much weaker magnetic fields for their operation, namely, large-orbit gyrotrons operated at high cyclotron-frequency harmonics and Čerenkov-type devices, such as a backward-wave oscillator and a klystron frequency multiplier with tubular electron beams. Additionally, we consider the possibility to use the magnetic field created directly by the solenoid of an NMR spectrometer for operation of both the gyrotron and the backward-wave oscillator. Location of the oscillator in the spectrometer magnet makes it superfluous to use an additional superconducting magnet creating a strong field, significantly reduces the length of the radiation transmission line, and, in the case of Čerenkov-type devices, allows one to increase considerably the output-signal power. According to our calculations, all the electronic devices considered are capable of ensuring the power required for dynamic nuclear polarization (10 W or more) at a frequency of 260 GHz, whereas the gyrotrons, including their versions proposed in this paper, remain a single option at higher frequencies.

  20. Radiation dose study in nuclear medicine using GATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguwa, Kasarachi

    Dose as a result of radiation exposure is the notion generally used to disclose the imparted energy in a volume of tissue to a potential biological effect. The basic unit defined by the international system of units (SI system) is the radiation absorbed dose, which is expressed as the mean imparted energy in a mass element of the tissue known as "gray" (Gy) or J/kg. The procedure for ascertaining the absorbed dose is complicated since it involves the radiation transport of numerous types of charged particles and coupled photon interactions. The most precise method is to perform a full 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation transport. There are various Monte Carlo toolkits that have tool compartments for dose calculations and measurements. The dose studies in this thesis were performed using the GEANT4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) software (Jan et al., 2011) GATE simulation toolkit has been used extensively in the medical imaging community, due to the fact that it uses the full capabilities of GEANT4. It also utilizes an easy to-learn GATE macro language, which is more accessible than learning the GEANT4/C++ programming language. This work combines GATE with digital phantoms generated using the NCAT (NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom) toolkit (Segars et al., 2004) to allow efficient and effective estimation of 3D radiation dose maps. The GATE simulation tool has developed into a beneficial tool for Monte Carlo simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging experiments. This work will present an overview of absorbed dose of common radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and serve as a guide to a user who is setting up a GATE simulation for a PET and SPECT study.

  1. Impact of phonon coupling on the radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achakovskiy, Oleg; Avdeenkov, Alexander; Kamerdzhiev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance and photon strength functions (PSF) in stable and unstable Ni and Sn isotopes are calculated within the microscopic self-consistent version of the extended theory of finite Fermi systems in the quasiparticle time blocking approximation. The approach includes phonon coupling (PC) effects in addition to the standard QRPA approach. The Skyrme force SLy4 is used. A pygmy dipole resonance in 72Ni is predicted at the mean energy of 12.4 MeV exhausting 25.7% of the total energy-weighted sum rule. With our microscopic E1 PSFs in the EMPIRE 3.1 code, the following radiative nuclear reaction characteristics have been calculated for several stable and unstable even-even Sn and Ni isotopes: 1) neutron capture cross sections, 2) corresponding neutron capture gamma-spectra, 3) average radiative widths of neutron resonances. Here, three variants of the microscopic nuclear level density models have been used and a comparison with the phenomenological generalized superfluid model has been performed. In all the considered properties, including the recent experimental data for PSF in Sn isotopes, the PC contributions turned out to be significant, as compared with the QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data.

  2. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries.

  3. IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference: Notes on the Early Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Galloway, Kenneth F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper gathers the remembrances of several key contributors who participated in the earliest Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conferences (NSREC).

  4. Radiation and Thermal Stability of Murataite Ceramics Nuclear Waste Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, J.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2006-05-01

    The wide range of complex nuclear wastes requires a variety of robust hosts for long-term storage during disposal. Wastes with high actinide and iron concentrations have generated intense interest in murataite ceramics as a candidate waste form due to its four distinct cation sites as well as cation vacancies. Critical to this application is the radiation stability of the waste host. We have determined both the radiation and thermal stabilities of murataite ceramics using in situ observations in a transmission electron microscope during ion bombardment at the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory. A central issue for structural stability is radiation damage-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transformation that may result in macroscopic swelling, cracking and phase decomposition. Such a response would lead to a significant change in chemical durability and release of incorporated radionuclides. We found that, murataite ceramics are susceptible to ion beam induce ordered-disordered transition and amorphization. The ion dose required for amorphization was determined as a function of temperature and the degree of initial structural disorder. The upper temperature limit for amorphization of murataites was determined to be in the range of 860 K to 1060 K for 1 MeV Kr2+ ion irradiation. Decrease of the susceptibility to irradiation induced amorphization for disordered murataite, suggests that the amorphization susceptibility depends, in part, on the initial degree of intrinsic disorder prior to irradiation. The thermal stability of murataite polytypes was studied by in-situ TEM observation. Phase decomposition with the precipitation of Fe-rich nanocrystals was induced in the murataite structure. The phase decomposition and nanocrystal formation have no significant effects on the radiation resistance of murataite ceramics used as potential host phases for the immobilization of actinides.

  5. Evaluation of gamma radiation shielding for nuclear waste shipping casks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.Y.; Carlson, R.D.; Primeau, S.J.; Wangler, M.E.

    1998-05-01

    A method has been developed for evaluating gamma radiation shielding of shipping casks that are used to transport nuclear waste with ill-defined radionuclide contents. The method is based on calculations that establish individual limits for a comprehensive list of radionuclides in the waste, assuming that each radionuclide is uniformly distributed in a volumetric source in the cask. For multiple radionuclide mixtures, a linear fraction rule is used to restrict the total amount of radionuclides such that the sum of the fractions does not exceed 1. As long as the radionuclide limits and the linear fraction rule are followed, it can be shown that the regulatory dose rate requirements for a cask will be satisfied under normal conditions of transport and in a hypothetical accident during which the shielding thickness of the cask has been reduced by 40%.

  6. Electromagnetic radiation from nuclear collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Gale, Charles; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-02-01

    The hot and dense strongly interacting matter created in collisions of heavy nuclei at RHIC energies is modeled with relativistic hydrodynamics, and the spectra of real and virtual photons produced at midrapidity in these events are calculated. Several different sources are considered, and their relative importance is compared. Specifically, we include jet fragmentation, jet-plasma interactions, the emission of radiation from the thermal medium and from primordial hard collisions. Our calculations consistently take into account jet energy loss, as evaluated in the AMY formalism. We obtain results for the spectra, the nuclear modification factor (RAAγ), and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2γ) that agree with the photon measurements performed by the PHENIX Collaboration at RHIC.

  7. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  8. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  9. Overcoming the specific power limitations of nuclear electric propulsion by laser radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1997-07-01

    It is shown that the specific power of nuclear electric propulsion can be greatly increased by replacing black body radiators with laser radiators. In black body radiators the atomic oscillators have a random phase with the emission rate for black body radiators proportional to the sum of the squared amplitudes. In laser radiators the oscillators are all in phase with the emission rate proportional to the squared sum of the amplitudes, which is the reason for the much larger emission rate of laser radiators. In a laser radiator the low entropy low temperature laser beam removes the waste heat by resonance absorption and isotropic reemission of the laser radiation into space.

  10. Special Radiation Protection Precautions in Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanoyiannis, A. P.; Gerogiannis, J.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine concerns the administration of appropriate amounts of radioactivity of certain isotopes, in order to achieve internal localized irradiation of neoplasmatic cells. Due to the increased level and the specific isotope characteristics of administered radioactivity, special Radiation Protection precautions must be taken. This study addresses such issues, based on national as well as international legislation and guidelines. Application of the principle of optimization is of outmost importance and is based on individual dose planning. The decision about the release of Nuclear Medicine patients after therapy is determined on an individual basis, taking into account patients' pattern of contact with other people, their age and that of persons in the home environment, in addition to other factors. Estimation of the absorbed dose given to the treated organ is based on uptake measurements and other biokinetic data, as well as on the mass of the treated tissue or organ. Concerning pregnant women, the rule of thumb is that they should not be treated, unless the radionuclide therapy is required to save their lives. In that case, the potential absorbed dose and risk to the foetus should be estimated and conveyed to the patient. After radionuclide therapy, a female should be advised to avoid pregnancy for the period of time depending on the specific radionuclide. This is to ensure that the dose to a conceptus/foetus would probably not exceed 1 mGy (the member of the public dose limit). The radiation risk for relatives and caregivers is small and unlikely to exceed the legal dose constraints during the period of the patient's treatment. Solid waste from the patient's stay in hospital is a different matter, and is normally incinerated or held for a period until radioactive decay brings the activity to an acceptable level.

  11. Improved spectrometric characteristics of thallium bromide nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Murayama, T.; Shoji, T.; Suehiro, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    1999-06-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with a high atomic number and wide band gap. In this study, nuclear radiation detectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using the materials purified by many pass zone refining. The crystals were characterized by measuring the resistivity, the mobility-lifetime ( μτ) product and the energy required to create an electron-hole pair (the ɛ value). Improved energy resolution has been obtained by the TlBr radiation detectors. At room temperature the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for the 59.5, 122 and 662 keV γ-ray photo peak obtained from the detectors were 3.3, 8.8 and 29.5 keV, respectively. By comparing the saturated peak position of the TlBr detector with that of the CdTe detector, the ɛ value has been estimated to be about 5.85 eV for the TlBr crystal.

  12. Importance of Bladder Radioactivity for Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Salih Sinan; Şahmaran, Turan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine are excreted via the urinary system. This study evaluated the importance of a reduction in bladder radioactivity for radiation safety. Methods: The study group of 135 patients underwent several organ scintigraphies [40/135; thyroid scintigraphy (TS), 30/135; whole body bone scintigraphy (WBS), 35/135; myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) and 30/135; renal scintigraphy (RS)] by a technologist within 1 month. In full and empty conditions, static bladder images and external dose rate measurements at 0.25, 0.50, 1, 1.5 and 2 m distances were obtained and decline ratios were calculated from these two data sets. Results: External radiation dose rates were highest in patients undergoing MPS. External dose rates at 0.25 m distance for TS, TKS, MPS and BS were measured to be 56, 106, 191 and 72 μSv h-1 for full bladder and 29, 55, 103 and 37 μSv h-1 for empty bladder, respectively. For TS, WBS, MPS and RS, respectively, average decline ratios were calculated to be 52%, 55%, 53% and 54% in the scintigraphic assessment and 49%, 51%, 49%, 50% and 50% in the assessment with Geiger counter. Conclusion: Decline in bladder radioactivity is important in terms of radiation safety. Patients should be encouraged for micturition after each scintigraphic test. Spending time together with radioactive patients at distances less than 1 m should be kept to a minimum where possible. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24416625

  13. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Apley, W.J.; Babb, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6--10%). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the: liquid droplet radiator; fabric radiator; bubble membrane radiator; rotating film radiator; and dust radiator. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Radiation damage microstructures in nuclear ceramics with applications in fusion energy technology and nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, L.W.

    1989-09-01

    This final technical report documents the accomplishments of the program of research entitled Radiation Damage Microstructures in Nuclear Ceramics'' funded between July 1984 and July 1988 under DOE Grant FG02-84ER45090. The initial program, begun at MIT in 1983, had as its objective investigation of the radiation responses of ceramics, heavily-irradiated with electrons, neutrons and ions, with potential applications to fusion energy technology and high-level nuclear waste storage. Materials investigated included SiO{sub 2}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 23}O{sub 27}N{sub 5}, SiC, BeO, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, CaTiO{sub 3}, KTaO{sub 3} and Ca(Zr,Pu)Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The issues involved have been the subject of a series of DOE-sponsored workshops in which the principal investigator has prominently participated, as well as of two informal collaborative meetings among DOE-supported groups at MIT, Los Alamos, University of New Mexico, Boeing, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  15. 48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nuclear criticality. 952.223-72 Section 952.223-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....223-72 Radiation protection and nuclear criticality. As prescribed in 923.7003 the clause set forth... contract or subcontract rather than by reliance upon Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing...

  16. 48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nuclear criticality. 952.223-72 Section 952.223-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF....223-72 Radiation protection and nuclear criticality. As prescribed in 923.7003 the clause set forth... contract or subcontract rather than by reliance upon Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing...

  17. Nuclear Radiation Tolerance of Single Crystal Aluminum Nitride Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Suprock, Andrew

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models, (Rempe et al., 2011; Kazys et al., 2005). These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The irradiation is also supported by a multi-National Laboratory collaboration funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (NEET ASI) program. The results from this irradiation, which started in February 2014, offer the potential to enable the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. Hence, results from this irradiation offer the potential to bridge the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the

  18. Technical Basis Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-05-10

    This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, and radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas.

  19. Modern new nuclear fuel characteristics and radiation protection aspects.

    PubMed

    Terry, Ian R

    2005-01-01

    The glut of fissile material from reprocessing plants and from the conclusion of the cold war has provided the opportunity to design new fuel types to beneficially dispose of such stocks by generating useful power. Thus, in addition to the normal reactor core complement of enriched uranium fuel assemblies, two other types are available on the world market. These are the ERU (enriched recycled uranium) and the MOX (mixed oxide) fuel assemblies. Framatome ANP produces ERU fuel assemblies by taking feed material from reprocessing facilities and blending this with highly enriched uranium from other sources. MOX fuel assemblies contain plutonium isotopes, thus exploiting the higher neutron yield of the plutonium fission process. This paper describes and evaluates the gamma, spontaneous and alpha reaction neutron source terms of these non-irradiated fuel assembly types by defining their nuclear characteristics. The dose rates which arise from these terms are provided along with an overview of radiation protection aspects for consideration in transporting and delivering such fuel assemblies to power generating utilities. PMID:16381693

  20. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  1. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most effect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  2. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space exploration.

  3. Nuclear-Pumped Lasers. [efficient conversion of energy liberated in nuclear reactions to coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear pumped lasers is reviewed. Nuclear pumped laser modeling, nuclear volume and foil excitation of laser plasmas, proton beam simulations, nuclear flashlamp excitation, and reactor laser systems studies are covered.

  4. Nuclear Decay Data in the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) Format

    DOE Data Explorer

    MIRD is a database of evaluated nuclear decay data for over 2,100 radioactive nuclei. Data are extracted from ENSDF, processed by the program RadList, and used for medical internal radiation dose calculations. When using the MIRD interface, tables of nuclear and atomic radiations from nuclear decay and decay scheme drawings will be produced in the MIRD format from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) for the specified nuclide. Output may be either HTML-formatted tables and JPEG drawings, PostScript tables and drawings, or PDF tables and drawings.

  5. 1987 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, Snowmass Village, CO, July 28-31, 1987, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear and space radiation effects are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanisms of radiation effects, single-event phenomena, temperature and field effects, modeling and characterization of radiation effects, IC radiation effects and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Also considered are: dosimetry/energy-dependent effects, sensors in and for radiation environments, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, radiation effects and devices, radiation effects on isolation technologies, and hardness assurance and testing techniques.

  6. Radiation damage studies related to nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.; Wald, J.W.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1981-12-01

    Much of the previously reported work on alpha radiation effects on crystalline phases of importance to nuclear waste forms has been derived from radiation effects studies of composite waste forms. In the present work, two single-phase crystalline materials, Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (pyrochlore) and CaZrTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (zirconolite), of relative importance to current waste forms were studied independently by doping with /sup 244/Cm at the 3 wt % level. Changes in the crystalline structure measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of dose show that damage ingrowth follows an expected exponential relationship of the form ..delta..V/V/sub 0/ = A(1-exp(-BD)). In both cases, the materials became x-ray amorphous before the estimated saturation value was reached. The predicted magnitudes of the unit cell volume changes at saturation are 5.4% and 3.5%, respectively, for Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and CaZrTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/. The later material exhibited anisotropic behavior in which the expansion of the monoclinic cell in the c/sub 0/ direction was over five times that of the a/sub 0/ direction. The effects of transmutations on the properties of high-level waste solids have not been studied until now because of the long half-lives of the important fission products. This problem was circumvented in the present study by preparing materials containing natural cesium and then irradiating them with neutrons to produce /sup 134/Cs, which has only a 2y half-life. The properties monitored at about one year intervals following irradiation have been density, leach rate and microstructure. A small amount of x-ray diffraction work has also been done. Small changes in density and leach rate have been observed for some of the materials, but they were not large enough to be of any consequence for the final disposal of high level wastes.

  7. Remembering Fukushima: PNNL Monitors Radiation from Nuclear Disaster

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Harry

    2014-06-12

    Senior Scientist Harry Miley describes how his work in ultra-trace, nuclear detection technology picked up the first reading of radiological materials over the U.S. following the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan.

  8. Remembering Fukushima: PNNL Monitors Radiation from Nuclear Disaster

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Harry

    2014-03-07

    Senior Scientist Harry Miley describes how his work in ultra-trace, nuclear detection technology picked up the first reading of radiological materials over the U.S. following the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan.

  9. Delayed gamma radiation from lightning induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. B.; Sakuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    An increase in atmospheric gamma radiation observed with NaI and Ge detectors positioned about 15 m above ground was observed following natural lightning near Tokyo, Japan [1]. Background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR following numerous lightning strokes observed since 2001 persisted for a few hours and subsequently decayed with a half-life of about 50 minutes. Using a 3x3 Ge detector, with 2 KeV resolution, positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors increases in GRR were observed minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay. Although most of the increase in activity occured at less than a few 100 KeV, on July 11, 2003 a 1267 +/-2 KeV line was observed. Although the statistics of this event were poor, the appearance of this line with an exponential decay of 50 min half-life suggests the possibility that it may be due to 39Cl (1267 MeV; half-life = 55.5 min) via the 40Ar(gamma,p)39Cl, 40Ar(p,2p)39Cl and/or 40Ar(n,d)39Cl reactions. Observations of > 10 MeV gamma rays observed in NaI detectors within 10s of meters from and coincident with rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing suggest that charged particles accelerated in intense electric fields associated with lightning give rise to photons with sufficient energy to initiate nuclear reactions [2]. Further work to explain the cause of this anomalous activity is underway using natural and triggered lightning. 1. M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-184. 2. J. R. Dwyer et al., Science 299, (2003), pp 694-697 and recent communications

  10. Monitoring of radiation dose rates around a clinical nuclear medicine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chia-Ho; Lu, Cheng-Chang; Chen, Tou-Rong; Weng, Jui-Hung; Kao, Pan-Fu; Dong, Shang-Lung; Chou, Ming-Jen

    2014-11-01

    The monitoring of radiation dose around the nuclear medicine site is an important study issue. In this study, TLD-100H radiation dosimeters were used to measure the ambient radiation dose rates around a clinical nuclear medicine site in order to investigate the latent hot zones of radiation exposure. Results of this study showed that the radiation doses measured from all piping and storage systems were comparable to the background dose. A relatively high dose was observed at the single bend point of waste water piping of the PET/CT. Another important finding was the unexpected high dose rates observed at the non-restricted waiting area (NRWA) of SPECT. To conclude, this study provides useful information for further determination of an appropriate dose reduction strategy to achieve the ALARA principle in a clinical nuclear medicine site.

  11. Radiation injury after a nuclear detonation: medical consequences and the need for scarce resources allocation.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, Andrea L; Maher, Carmen; Hick, John L; Hanfling, Dan; Dainiak, Nicholas; Chao, Nelson; Bader, Judith L; Coleman, C Norman; Weinstock, David M

    2011-03-01

    A 10-kiloton (kT) nuclear detonation within a US city could expose hundreds of thousands of people to radiation. The Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation Project was undertaken to guide community planning and response in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation, when demand will greatly exceed available resources. This article reviews the pertinent literature on radiation injuries from human exposures and animal models to provide a foundation for the triage and management approaches outlined in this special issue. Whole-body doses >2 Gy can produce clinically significant acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which classically involves the hematologic, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and cardiovascular/central nervous systems. The severity and presentation of ARS are affected by several factors, including radiation dose and dose rate, interindividual variability in radiation response, type of radiation (eg, gamma alone, gamma plus neutrons), partial-body shielding, and possibly age, sex, and certain preexisting medical conditions. The combination of radiation with trauma, burns, or both (ie, combined injury) confers a worse prognosis than the same dose of radiation alone. Supportive care measures, including fluid support, antibiotics, and possibly myeloid cytokines (eg, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), can improve the prognosis for some irradiated casualties. Finally, expert guidance and surge capacity for casualties with ARS are available from the Radiation Emergency Medical Management Web site and the Radiation Injury Treatment Network. PMID:21402810

  12. Radiation Injury After a Nuclear Detonation: Medical Consequences and the Need for Scarce Resources Allocation

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, Andrea L.; Maher, Carmen; Hick, John L.; Hanfling, Dan; Dainiak, Nicholas; Chao, Nelson; Bader, Judith L.; Coleman, C. Norman; Weinstock, David M.

    2013-01-01

    A 10-kiloton (kT) nuclear detonation within a US city could expose hundreds of thousands of people to radiation. The Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation Project was undertaken to guide community planning and response in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation, when demand will greatly exceed available resources. This article reviews the pertinent literature on radiation injuries from human exposures and animal models to provide a foundation for the triage and management approaches outlined in this special issue. Whole-body doses >2 Gy can produce clinically significant acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which classically involves the hematologic, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and cardiovascular/central nervous systems. The severity and presentation of ARS are affected by several factors, including radiation dose and dose rate, interindividual variability in radiation response, type of radiation (eg, gamma alone, gamma plus neutrons), partial-body shielding, and possibly age, sex, and certain preexisting medical conditions. The combination of radiation with trauma, burns, or both (ie, combined injury) confers a worse prognosis than the same dose of radiation alone. Supportive care measures, including fluid support, antibiotics, and possibly myeloid cytokines (eg, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), can improve the prognosis for some irradiated casualties. Finally, expert guidance and surge capacity for casualties with ARS are available from the Radiation Emergency Medical Management Web site and the Radiation Injury Treatment Network. PMID:21402810

  13. [Radiation measures and trend after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-02-01

    The radioactive materials spread by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in March, 2011 caused NPP workers to be exposed to radiation above ordinance limits. The number of workers exposed to radiation within ordinance limits is increasing. Decontamination began at many places in Fukushima, although new laws were enforced in the decontamination work, in the current situation, medical examinations for radiation are limited due to a shortage of doctors. In this paper, I introduce the ordinances on the prevention of ionizing radiation hazards and the revised points about radiation exposure doses of the NPP workers, as well as the new ordinance for decontamination. PMID:24605520

  14. Technical Basis Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program

    SciTech Connect

    ELGIN, J.C.

    2000-10-02

    This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD), and radiation surveys of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas.

  15. Synthesis of calculational methods for design and analysis of radiation shields for nuclear rocket systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Disney, R. K.; Jordan, T. A.; Soltesz, R. G.; Woodsum, H. C.

    1969-01-01

    Eight computer programs make up a nine volume synthesis containing two design methods for nuclear rocket radiation shields. The first design method is appropriate for parametric and preliminary studies, while the second accomplishes the verification of a final nuclear rocket reactor design.

  16. Nuclear Technology Series. Radiation Protection Technician. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary radiation protection technician program is designed for use with courses 17-22 of thirty-five included in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians, and operators; and to assist planners,…

  17. A Radiological Assessment Skills Training Program for the Radiation Worker at Shoreham Nuclear Power Station.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Leonard, Jr.

    Radiation workers, by law, have the responsibility to maintain their exposure to radiation levels as low as possible. This responsibility has not been accepted. Instead, they have relied solely on the policing action of health physics (HP) technicians, thereby delegating their lawful responsibility. Continued overexposure in the U.S. nuclear power…

  18. Environmental radiation real-time monitoring system permanently installed near Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Sheng, P; Zhi, Z

    1996-03-01

    An environmental radiation real-time monitoring system with high pressure ionization chamber was developed. It has been installed permanently in the vicinity of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the first built in mainland China. The system consists of four basic components: environmental radiation monitors; data communication network; a data processing center; and a remote terminal computer situated in Hangzhou. It has provided five million readings of environmental radiation levels as of January 1993. PMID:8609035

  19. An intermetallic forming steel under radiation for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, C.; Stergar, E.; Maloy, S. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we investigated the formation and stability of intermetallics formed in a maraging steel PH 13-8 Mo under proton radiation up to 2 dpa utilizing nanoindentation, microcompression testing and atom probe tomography. A comprehensive discussion analyzing the findings utilizing rate theory is introduced, comparing the aging process to radiation induced diffusion. New findings of radiation induced segregation of undersize solute atoms (Si) towards the precipitates are considered.

  20. Nuclear medicine dose equivalent a method for determination of radiation risk

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, W.

    1986-12-01

    Conventional nuclear medicine dosimetry involves specifying individual organ doses. The difficulties that can arise with this approach to radiation dosimetry are discussed. An alternative scheme is described that is based on the ICRP effective dose equivalent, H/sub E/, and which is a direct estimate of the average radiation risk to the patient. The mean value of H/sub E/ for seven common /sup 99m/Tc nuclear medicine procedures is 0.46 rem and the average radiation risk from this level of exposure is estimated to be comparable to the risk from smoking approx. 28 packs of cigarettes or driving approx. 1300 miles.

  1. Internal radiation therapy: a neglected aspect of nuclear medicine in the molecular era

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yansong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With increasing evidence, internal radiation therapy, also known as brachytherapy, has become a neglected aspect of nuclear medicine in the molecular era. In this paper, recent developments regarding internal radiation therapy, including developments in radioiodine-131 (131I) and thyroid, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and radiopharmaceuticals for bone metastases. Relevant differences and status of their applications in China were mentioned as well. These molecular mediated internal radiation therapies are gaining increasing importance by providing palliative and curative treatments for an increasing number of diseases and becoming one of the important parts of molecular nuclear medicine. PMID:26445567

  2. Tracking patient radiation exposure: challenges to integrating nuclear medicine with other modalities.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Mathew; Rehani, Madan M; Einstein, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    The cumulative radiation exposure to the patient from multiple radiological procedures can place some individuals at significantly increased risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. Approaches, such as those in the International Atomic Energy Agency's Smart Card program, have been developed to track cumulative radiation exposures to individuals. These strategies often rely on the availability of structured dose reports, typically found in the DICOM header. Dosimetry information is currently readily available for many individual x-ray-based procedures. Nuclear medicine, of which nuclear cardiology constitutes the majority of the radiation burden in the US, currently lags behind x-ray-based procedures with respect to reporting of radiation dosimetric information. This article discusses qualitative differences between nuclear medicine and x-ray-based procedures, including differences in the radiation source and measurement of its strength, the impact of biokinetics on dosimetry, and the capability of current scanners to record dosimetry information. These differences create challenges in applying, monitoring, and reporting strategies used in x-ray-based procedures to nuclear medicine, and integrating dosimetry information across modalities. A concerted effort by the medical imaging community, dosimetry specialists, and manufacturers of imaging equipment is required to develop strategies to improve the reporting of radiation dosimetry data in nuclear medicine. Some ideas on how to address this issue are suggested. PMID:22695788

  3. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  4. Comparison of radiation safety and nuclear explosive safety disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Winstanley, J. L.

    1998-10-10

    In August 1945, U.S. Navy Captain William Parsons served as the weaponeer aboard the Enola Gay for the mission to Hiroshima (Shelton 1988). In view of the fact that four B-29s had crashed and burned on takeoff from Tinian the night before, Captain Parsons made the decision to arm the gun-type weapon after takeoff for safety reasons (15 kilotons of TNT equivalent). Although he had no control over the success of the takeoff, he could prevent the possibility of a nuclear detonation on Tinian by controlling what we now call the nuclear explosive. As head of the Ordnance Division at Los Alamos and a former gunnery officer, Captain Parsons clearly understood the role of safety in his work. The advent of the pre-assembled implosion weapon where the high explosive and nuclear materials are always in an intimate configuration meant that nuclear explosive safety became a reality at a certain point in development and production not just at the time of delivery by the military. This is the only industry where nuclear materials are intentionally put in contact with high explosives. The agency of the U.S. Government responsible for development and production of U.S. nuclear weapons is the Department of Energy (DOE) (and its predecessor agencies). This paper will be limited to nuclear explosive safety as it is currently practiced within the DOE nuclear weapons

  5. ANNUAL REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study will provide the underpinning science to develop improved gl...

  6. PROGRESS REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study will provide the underpinning science to develop improved gl...

  7. Assessment of radiation safety awareness among nuclear medicine nurses: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunus, N. A.; Abdullah, M. H. R. O.; Said, M. A.; Ch'ng, P. E.

    2014-11-01

    All nuclear medicine nurses need to have some knowledge and awareness on radiation safety. At present, there is no study to address this issue in Malaysia. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the level of knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among nuclear medicine nurses at Putrajaya Hospital in Malaysia and (2) to assess the effectiveness of a training program provided by the hospital to increase the knowledge and awareness of the nuclear medicine nurses. A total of 27 respondents attending a training program on radiation safety were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire consists 16 items and were categorized into two main areas, namely general radiation knowledge and radiation safety. Survey data were collected before and after the training and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Respondents were scored out of a total of 16 marks with 8 marks for each area. The findings showed that the range of total scores obtained by the nuclear medicine nurses before and after the training were 6-14 (with a mean score of 11.19) and 13-16 marks (with a mean score of 14.85), respectively. Findings also revealed that the mean score for the area of general radiation knowledge (7.59) was higher than that of the radiation safety (7.26). Currently, the knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among the nuclear medicine nurses are at the moderate level. It is recommended that a national study be conducted to assess and increase the level of knowledge and awareness among all nuclear medicine nurses in Malaysia.

  8. Summary Report for the Radiation Detection for Nuclear Security Summer School 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-08-22

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted students from across the United States at the inaugural Radiation Detection for Nuclear Security Summer School from June 11 – 22, 2012. The summer school provided students with a unique understanding of nuclear security challenges faced in the field and exposed them to the technical foundations, analyses, and insight that will be required by future leaders in technology development and implementation. The course heavily emphasized laboratory and field demonstrations including direct measurements of special nuclear material. The first week of the summer school focused on the foundational knowledge required by technology practitioners; the second week focused on contemporary applications. Student evaluations and feedback from student advisors indicates that the summer school achieved its objectives of 1) exposing students to the range of nuclear security applications for which radiation detection is necessary, 2) articulating the relevance of student research into the broader context, and 3) exciting students about the possibility of future careers in nuclear security.

  9. Effects of nuclear radiation and elevated temperature storage on electroexplosive devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menichelli, V. J.

    1976-01-01

    Aerospace type electroexplosive devices (EEDs) were subjected to nuclear radiation. Components and chemicals used in the EEDs were also included. The kind of radiation and total dosage administered were those which may be experienced in a space flight of 10 years duration, based on information available at this time. After irradiation, the items were stored in elevated constant-temperature ovens to accelerate early effects of the exposure to radiation. Periodically, samples were withdrawn for visual observation and testing. Significant changes occurred which were attributed to elevated-temperature storage and not radiation.

  10. What Students Think About (Nuclear) Radiation – Before and After Fukushima

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, S.

    2014-06-15

    Preparing successful science lessons is very demanding. One important aspect a teacher has to consider is the students' previous knowledge about the specific topic. This is why research about students' preconceptions has been, and continues to be, a major field in science education research. Following a constructivistic approach [R. Duit et al., International handbook of research on conceptual change, p. 629 (2008)], helping students learn is only possible if teachers know about students' ideas beforehand. Studies about students' conceptions regarding the major topics in physics education (e.g. mechanics, electrodynamics, optics, thermodynamics), are numerous and well-documented. The topic radiation, however, has seen very little empirical research about students' ideas and misconceptions. Some research was conducted after the events of Chernobyl [P. Lijnse et al., International Journal of Science Education 12, 67 (1990); B. Verplanken, Environment and Behavior 21, 7 (1989)] and provided interesting insight into some of the students' preconceptions about radiation. In order to contribute empirical findings to this field of research, our workgroup has been investigating the conceptions students have about the topic radiation for several years [S. Neumann et al., Journal of Science Education and Technology 21, 826 (2012)]. We used children's drawings and conducted short follow-up interviews with students (9 – 12 years old) and more detailed interviews with 15-year-old students. Both studies were originally done before the events in Fukushima and replicated a year later. We not only asked students about their general associations and emotions regarding the term radiation, but also examined the students' risk perceptions of different types of radiation. Through the use of open-ended questions we were able to examine students' conceptions about different types of radiation (including nuclear) that could be a hindrance to student learning. Our results show that

  11. Current global and Korean issues in radiation safety of nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Song, H C

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the management of patient doses in medical imaging has evolved as concern about radiation exposure has increased. Efforts and techniques to reduce radiation doses are focussed not only on the basis of patient safety, but also on the fundamentals of justification and optimisation in cooperation with international organisations such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. The Image Gently campaign in children and Image Wisely campaign in adults to lower radiation doses have been initiated in the USA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine paediatric dosage card, North American consensus guidelines, and Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative have recommended the activities of radiopharmaceuticals that should be administered in children. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), developed predominantly in Europe, may be an important tool to manage patient doses. In Korea, overexposure to radiation, even from the use of medical imaging, has become a public issue, particularly since the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. As a result, the Korean Nuclear Safety and Security Commission revised the technical standards for radiation safety management in medical fields. In parallel, DRLs for nuclear medicine procedures have been collected on a nationwide scale. Notice of total effective dose from positron emission tomography-computed tomography for cancer screening has been mandatory since mid-November 2014. PMID:26960820

  12. Nuclear-radiation-actuated valve. [Patent application; for increasing coolant flow to blanket

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Schively, D.P.

    1982-01-19

    The present invention relates to a breeder reactor blanket fuel assembly coolant system valve which increases coolant flow to the blanket fuel assembly to minimize long-term temperature increases caused by fission of fissile fuel created from fertile fuel through operation of the breeder reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  13. Nuclear Energy and Health: And the Benefits of Low-Dose Radiation Hormesis

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.; Pollycove, Myron

    2009-01-01

    Energy needs worldwide are expected to increase for the foreseeable future, but fuel supplies are limited. Nuclear reactors could supply much of the energy demand in a safe, sustainable manner were it not for fear of potential releases of radioactivity. Such releases would likely deliver a low dose or dose rate of radiation, within the range of naturally occurring radiation, to which life is already accustomed. The key areas of concern are discussed. Studies of actual health effects, especially thyroid cancers, following exposures are assessed. Radiation hormesis is explained, pointing out that beneficial effects are expected following a low dose or dose rate because protective responses against stresses are stimulated. The notions that no amount of radiation is small enough to be harmless and that a nuclear accident could kill hundreds of thousands are challenged in light of experience: more than a century with radiation and six decades with reactors. If nuclear energy is to play a significant role in meeting future needs, regulatory authorities must examine the scientific evidence and communicate the real health effects of nuclear radiation. Negative images and implications of health risks derived by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects of high doses must be dispelled. PMID:19343116

  14. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  15. Radiation environment for rendezvous and docking with nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. R.; Warman, E. A.; Lindsey, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Radiation environment data for the NERVA engine are provided which may be utilized in estimating radiation exposures associated with various space maneuvers. Spatial distributions of neutron and gamma tissue kerma rates produced during full thrust operation of the engine are presented. Final rendezvous with an orbiting space station would be achieved subsequent to full thrust operation during a period of 10 or more hours duration in which impulse is delivered by the propellant used for removal of decay heat. Consequently, post operation radiation levels are of prime importance in estimating space station exposures. Maps of gamma kerma rates around the engine are provided for decay times of 4 and 24 hours after a representative firing. Typical decay curves illustrating the dependence of post operation kerma rates on decay time and operating history are included. Examples of the kerma distributions around the engine which result from integration over specific exposure periods are shown.

  16. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation by 99Ru

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bessas, D.; Merkel, D. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Ruffer, R.; Hermann, Raphael P.; Sergueev, I.; Mahmoud, A.; Klobes, B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sougrati, M. T.; et al

    2014-10-03

    In this study, we measured nuclear forward scattering spectra utilizing the 99Ru transition, 89.571(3) keV, with a notably mixed E2/M1 multipolarity. The extension of the standard evaluation routines to include mixed multipolarity allows us to extract electric and magnetic hyperfine interactions from 99Ru-containing compounds. This paves the way for several other high-energy Mössbauer transitions, E~90 keV. Lastly, the high energy of such transitions allows for operando nuclear forward scattering studies in real devices.

  17. Perception of Radiation Risk by Japanese Radiation Specialists Evaluated as a Safe Dose Before the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Miura, Miwa; Ono, Koji; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Matsuda, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    From October to December 2010, just before the radiological accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, 71 radiation professionals from radiation facilities in Japan were asked what they considered as a "safe dose" of radiation for themselves, their partners, parents, children, siblings, and friends. Although the 'safe dose' they noted varied widely, from less than 1 mSv y to more than 100 mSv y, the average dose was 35.6 mSv y, which is around the middle point between the legal exposure dose limits for the annual average and for any single year. Similar results were obtained from other surveys of members of the Japan Radioisotope Association (36.9 mSv y) and of the Oita Prefectural Hospital (36.8 mSv y). Among family members and friends, the minimum average "safe" dose was 8.5 mSv y for children, for whom 50% of the responders claimed a "safe dose" of less than 1 mSv. Gender, age and specialty of the radiation professional also affected their notion of a "safe dose." These findings suggest that the perception of radiation risk varies widely even for radiation professionals and that the legal exposure dose limits derived from regulatory science may act as an anchor of safety. The different levels of risk perception for different target groups among radiation professionals appear similar to those in the general population. The gap between these characteristics of radiation professionals and the generally accepted picture of radiation professionals might have played a role in the state of confusion after the radiological accident. PMID:27115222

  18. Building the strategic national stockpile through the NIAID Radiation Nuclear Countermeasures Program.

    PubMed

    Rios, Carmen I; Cassatt, David R; Dicarlo, Andrea L; Macchiarini, Francesca; Ramakrishnan, Narayani; Norman, Mai-Kim; Maidment, Bert W

    2014-02-01

    The possibility of a public health radiological or nuclear emergency in the United States remains a concern. Media attention focused on lost radioactive sources and international nuclear threats, as well as the potential for accidents in nuclear power facilities (e.g., Windscale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima) highlight the need to address this critical national security issue. To date, no drugs have been licensed to mitigate/treat the acute and long-term radiation injuries that would result in the event of large-scale, radiation, or nuclear public health emergency. However, recent evaluation of several candidate radiation medical countermeasures (MCMs) has provided initial proof-of-concept of efficacy. The goal of the Radiation Nuclear Countermeasures Program (RNCP) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (National Institutes of Health) is to help ensure the government stockpiling of safe and efficacious MCMs to treat radiation injuries, including, but not limited to, hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, cutaneous, renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems. In addition to supporting research in these areas, the RNCP continues to fund research and development of decorporation agents targeting internal radionuclide contamination, and biodosimetry platforms (e.g., biomarkers and devices) to assess the levels of an individual's radiation exposure, capabilities that would be critical in a mass casualty scenario. New areas of research within the program include a focus on special populations, especially pediatric and geriatric civilians, as well as combination studies, in which drugs are tested within the context of expected medical care management (e.g., antibiotics and growth factors). Moving forward, challenges facing the RNCP, as well as the entire radiation research field, include further advancement and qualification of animal models, dose conversion from animal models to humans, biomarker identification, and

  19. MOX LTA Fuel Cycle Analyses: Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    Tasks of nuclear safety assurance for storage and transport of fresh mixed uranium-plutonium fuel of the VVER-1000 reactor are considered in the view of 3 MOX LTAs introduction into the core. The precise code MCU that realizes the Monte Carlo method is used for calculations.

  20. Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2014-08-26

    This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

  1. Mixed-radiation-field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K.; Iselin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation effects on urea, thiourea, guanidine carbonate and guanine sulfate were evaluated for both photon and neutron irradiations. Hydration of these materials typically provides a greatly increased sensitivity to both forms of radiation exposure, although not all materials lend themselves to this treatment without changing the chemical structure of the compound. Urea was found to be the most stable hydrated compound and provides the best sensitivity for quantifying radiation effects using NQR techniques. Urea permits a straight-forward quantification of each of the important parameters of the observed NQR signal, the FID. Several advanced data analysis methods were developed to assist in quantifying NQR spectra, both from urea and materials having more complex molecular structures, such as thiourea and guanidine sulfate. Unfortunately, these analysis techniques are frequently quite time consuming for the complex NQR spectra that result from some of these materials. The simpler analysis afforded by urea has therefore made it the prime candidate for an NQR dosimetry material. The moderate sensitivity of hydrated urea to photon irradiation does not permit this material to achieve the levels of performance required for a personnel dosimeter. It does, however, demonstrate acceptable sensitivity over dose ranges where it could provide a good biological dosimeter for several areas of radiation processing. The demonstrated photon sensitivity could permit hydrated urea to be used in applications such as food irradiation dosimetry. This material also exhibits a good sensitivity to neutron irradiation. The precise correlation between neutron exposure and the parameters of the resulting NQR spectra are currently being developed.

  2. Application of Radiation Chemistry to Some Selected Technological Issues Related to the Development of Nuclear Energy.

    PubMed

    Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Skotnicki, Konrad; Szreder, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The most important contributions of radiation chemistry to some selected technological issues related to water-cooled reactors, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes, and fuel evolution during final radioactive waste disposal are highlighted. Chemical reactions occurring at the operating temperatures and pressures of reactors and involving primary transients and stable products from water radiolysis are presented and discussed in terms of the kinetic parameters and radiation chemical yields. The knowledge of these parameters is essential since they serve as input data to the models of water radiolysis in the primary loop of light water reactors and super critical water reactors. Selected features of water radiolysis in heterogeneous systems, such as aqueous nanoparticle suspensions and slurries, ceramic oxides surfaces, nanoporous, and cement-based materials, are discussed. They are of particular concern in the primary cooling loops in nuclear reactors and long-term storage of nuclear waste in geological repositories. This also includes radiation-induced processes related to corrosion of cladding materials and copper-coated iron canisters, dissolution of spent nuclear fuel, and changes of bentonite clays properties. Radiation-induced processes affecting stability of solvents and solvent extraction ligands as well oxidation states of actinide metal ions during recycling of the spent nuclear fuel are also briefly summarized. PMID:27573502

  3. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  4. Shadow Radiation Shield Required Thickness Estimation for Space Nuclear Power Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voevodina, E. V.; Martishin, V. M.; Ivanovsky, V. A.; Prasolova, N. O.

    The paper concerns theoretical possibility of visiting orbital transport vehicles based on nuclear power unit and electric propulsion system on the Earth's orbit by astronauts to maintain work with payload from the perspective of radiation safety. There has been done estimation of possible time of the crew's staying in the area of payload of orbital transport vehicles for different reactor powers, which is a consistent part of nuclear power unit.

  5. 169Tm-A new candidate for monochromatization of synchrotron radiation by nuclear Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturhahn, W.; Gerdau, E.; Börger, S.; Guse, W.

    1990-07-01

    Thulium containing crystals with appropriate structure should be feasible for monochromatizing synchrotron radiation by nuclear Bragg diffraction. Thulium iron garnet and thulium gallium garnet were investigated by MB-transmission spectroscopy. The evaluated hyperfine interactions are discussed with respect to the crystal structure. The occurrence of pure nuclear reflections is predicted and theoretical time spectra are calculated by the dynamical theory of MB-optics.

  6. Upgrading of data acquisition software for centralized radiation monitoring system in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yussup, F.; Ibrahim, M. M.; Haris, M. F.; Soh, S. C.; Hasim, H.; Azman, A.; Razalim, F. A. A.; Yapp, R.; Ramli, A. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of technology, many devices and equipments can be connected to the network and internet to enable online data acquisition for real-time data monitoring and control from monitoring devices located at remote sites. Centralized radiation monitoring system (CRMS) is a system that enables area radiation level at various locations in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia) to be monitored centrally by using a web browser. The Local Area Network (LAN) in Nuclear Malaysia is utilized in CRMS as a communication media for data acquisition of the area radiation levels from radiation detectors. The development of the system involves device configuration, wiring, network and hardware installation, software and web development. This paper describes the software upgrading on the system server that is responsible to acquire and record the area radiation readings from the detectors. The recorded readings are called in a web programming to be displayed on a website. Besides the main feature which is acquiring the area radiation levels in Nuclear Malaysia centrally, the upgrading involves new features such as uniform time interval for data recording and exporting, warning system and dose triggering.

  7. Hand exposure to ionising radiation of nuclear medicine workers.

    PubMed

    Wrzesień, M; Olszewski, J; Jankowski, J

    2008-01-01

    The specific nature of work in nuclear medicine departments involves the use of isotopes and handling procedures, which contribute to the considerable value of an equivalent dose received, in particular, by the fingertips. Standard nuclear medicine department uses ring dosemeters placed usually at the base of the middle finger. The main aim of the study was to find out whether a relationship exists between the doses recorded by thermoluminescent detectors placed at various locations on the radiopharmacists' hands and the doses recorded by the ring detectors, and to determine the character of that relationship. The correction factor represents a correction value to be used to calculate the doses which might be received by locations on the hand from the dose recorded by the ring dosemeter. The dose recorded by the ring dosemeter is on the average five times lower than that received by the fingertips of thumb, index and middle fingers. PMID:18310609

  8. Lunar and Martian environmental interactions with nuclear power system radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Katzan, Cynthia M.

    1992-01-01

    Future NASA space missions include a permanent manned presence on the moon and an expedition to the planet Mars. Such steps will require careful consideration of environmental interactions in the selection and design of required power systems. Several environmental constituents may be hazardous to performance integrity. Potential threats common to both the moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings, solar flux, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars provides the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. In this review, the anticipated environmental interactions with surface power system radiators are described, as well as the impacts of these interactions on radiator durability, which were identified at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  9. Lunar and Martian environmental interactions with nuclear power system radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Gaier, J.R.; Katzan, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    In the foreseeable future, NASA space milestones include a permanent manned presence on the Moon and an expedition to the planet Mars. Such steps will require careful consideration of environmental interactions in the selection and design of required power systems. Several environmental constituents may be hazardous to performance integrity. Potential threats common to both the Moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings, solar flux, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars provides the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. In this review, the anticipated environmental interactions with surface power system radiators are described, as well as the impacts of these interactions on radiator durability, which have been identified at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  10. Fabrication techniques for reverse electrode coaxial germanium nuclear radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1980-11-01

    Germanium detectors with reverse polarity coaxial electrodes have been shown to exhibit improved resistance to radiation damage as compared with conventional electrode devices. However, the production of reverse electrode devices involves the development of new handling and fabrication techniques which has limited their wider application. We have developed novel techniques which lead to a device which is simple to fabricate, environmentally passivated and surface state adjusted.

  11. An Overview of the Regulation of Low Dose Radiation in the Nuclear and Non-nuclear Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Shankar; Valencia, Luis; Teunckens, Lucien

    2003-02-27

    Now that increasing numbers of nuclear power stations are reaching the end of their commercially useful lives, the management of the large quantities of very low level radioactive material that arises during their decommissioning has become a major subject of discussion, with very significant economic implications. Much of this material can, in an environmentally advantageous manner, be recycled for reuse without radiological restrictions. Much larger quantities--2-3 orders of magnitude larger--of material, radiologically similar to the candidate material for recycling from the nuclear industry, arise in non-nuclear industries like coal, fertilizer, oil and gas, mining, etc. In such industries, naturally occurring radioactivity is artificially concentrated in products, by-products or waste to form TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material). It is only in the last decade that the international community has become aware of the prevalence of TENORM, specially the activity levels and quantities arising in so many non-nuclear industries. The first reaction of international organizations seems to have been to propose different standards for the nuclear and non-nuclear industries, with very stringent release criteria for radioactive material from the regulated nuclear industry and up to thirty to a hundred times more liberal criteria for the release/exemption of TENORM from the as yet unregulated non-nuclear industries. There are significant strategic issues that need to be discussed and resolved. Some examples of these are: - Disposal aspects of long-lived nuclides, - The use of radioactive residues in building materials, - Commercial aspects of differing and discriminating criteria in competing power industries in a world of deregulated electric power production. Of even greater importance is the need for the discussion of certain basic issues, such as - The quantitative risk levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, - The need for in

  12. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  13. Radiation safety in nuclear medicine: a practical guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sodd, V.J.

    1981-11-01

    This publication brings together, in concise form, information regarding the many recommendations and requirements for safe operation of a nuclear medicine laboratory. The need for such a compendium was perceived by the staff of the Nuclear Medicine Laboratory. This need arises from several sources. Many individuals enter the field with little training in the handling of radioactive materials; for example, a physician trained in cardiology, oncology, or neurology. The increasing development of portable instrumentation has allowed movement of radiopharmaceuticals from the confines of the nuclear medicine lab to coronary and intensive care facilities where personnel may lack adequate knowledge of safe handling procedures. A health physicist, trained to account for all radioactive material placed under his control, may have difficulty adapting to the accepted practice of releasing a patient who has been administered millicurie quantities of radioactivity, with little or no control over subsequent disposal of excreta. Further differences exist between handling practices for radioactive materials in the scientific laboratory and in the medical facility. This guide tries where possible to clarify some of these issues.

  14. Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner

    SciTech Connect

    Yalow, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

  15. Evaluation of 133Xe radiation exposure dosimetry for workers in nuclear medicine laboratories.

    PubMed

    Piltingsrud, H V; Gels, G L

    1982-06-01

    Evaluation of past studies of 133Xe dosimetry and nuclear medicine laboratory air concentrations of 133Xe indicates that significant levels of 133Xe may exist in routine operational environments of a nuclear medicine laboratory. This leads to the question of whether present health physics radiation control methods are adequate to keep occupational personnel exposures within acceptable levels. It would appear that if personnel dosimeters (film and TLD badges) respond properly to the radiation of 133Xe, normal health physics control procedures are probably adequate. If they do not respond adequately, personnel exposures may exceed recommended levels and special instrumentation or administrative procedures are called for. Therefore, the first step in studying potential problems in the subject area is to evaluate the response of a variety of personnel radiation dosimeters to 133Xe. This paper describes the methods and materials used to expose personnel dosimeters to known amounts of 133Xe radiations in an exposure chamber constructed at the BRH Nuclear Medicine Laboratory. Also presented are calculated values for Dose Equivalents (D.E.) in a phantom from external radiation resulting from immersion in clouds having a constant concentration of 133Xe but varying cloud radii. This implies the relative importance of the beta and the X + gamma radiation responses of the personnel dosimeters under various exposure conditions. Results of this study indicate that none of the dosimeter systems evaluated provide adequate performance for use as a primary indicator of the D.E. resulting from 133Xe radiations for a worker in a nuclear medicine laboratory, and that personnel dosimetry considerations in 133Xe-containing atmospheres are very dependent on the radii of the 133Xe clouds. PMID:7107291

  16. Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou

    2013-01-01

    Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12-30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers' resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309-1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1-18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10(-2) mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10(-2)-4.1 x 10(-2) mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure. PMID:24312602

  17. Limited Internal Radiation Exposure Associated with Resettlements to a Radiation-Contaminated Homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou

    2013-01-01

    Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12–30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers’ resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309–1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1–18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10-2 mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10-2-4.1 x 10-2 mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure. PMID:24312602

  18. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Hamilton, Steven P; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Pugmire, Dave; Dilts, Gary; Banfield, James E

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms and boundary conditions of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. In addition, a new nuclear fuel-specific preconditioner was developed to account for the high aspect ratio of each fuel pin (12 feet axially, but 1 4 inches in diameter) with many individual fuel regions (pellets). With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 17 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins; the 25 guide tubes; the top and bottom structural regions; and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final, full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162

  19. Dosimetry experiences and lessons learned for radiation dose assessment in Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young; Son, Jung Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Since the first Korean nuclear power plant (NPP), Kori 1, commenced operation in 1978, a total of 21 NPPs had been put into operation in Korea by the end of 2011. Radiation doses of NPP workers have been periodically evaluated and controlled within the prescribed dose limit. Radiation dose assessment is carried out monthly by reading personal dosemeters for external radiation exposure, which have traceability in compliance with strict technical guidelines. In the case of the internal radiation exposure, workers who have access to the possible area of polluted air are also evaluated for their internal dose after maintenance task. In this article, the overall situation and experience for the assessment and distribution of radiation doses in Korean NPPs is described. PMID:23204558

  20. Real-time noise mitigation algorithms for space and nuclear radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Neal J.; Hill, Janeil; Lowell, Robert; Byers, Wheaton; Retzler, John P.; Andrews, Allen R.; Mackin, Paul R.

    1997-10-01

    This paper addresses small targets and signal processing from the perspective of rejecting radiation noise spikes. Nuclear and space radiation create noise spikes inside infrared detectors causing an overwhelming number of false alarms, if steps are not taken to mitigate the radiation noise spikes. Traditional radiation device/circuit hardening methods are effective, but must be reapplied to each new technology forcing special design point solutions and parts that are increasingly economically nonviable. Real-time noise mitigation algorithms represent a general hardening solution and have been demonstrated for both interceptor seeker and space surveillance sensor applications. A new combined HWIL/radiation synthetic test environment has been developed that enables real-time algorithm evaluation over the total system performance envelope, under flight motion simulation and fully dynamic optical sensor scene stimulation. This work was sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency.

  1. Radiation-hardened CMOS integrated circuit development for space nuclear power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gover, J. E.; Gregory, B. L.

    Examination of the types of systems required for space nuclear power applications suggests a need for microelectronics technology that can function during and after exposure to radiation levels exceeding 1 x 10 to the 16th neutrons/sq cm and gamma ray doses in excess of 1 x 10 to the 7th rad(Si). Radiation-hardened Complimentary Metal Oxide Silicon and Silicon Nitride Oxide Silicon (SNOS) ICs presently in development at Sandia National Laboratories' Center for Radiation-Hardened Microelectronics satisfy these radiation requirements. Future integrated circuit development will further advance the radiation hardness capabilities while extending the IC technology to 32-bit enhanced microprocessors and 1-Mbyte SNOS EEPROM memories.

  2. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  3. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  4. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  5. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  6. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  7. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify tre...

  8. Inactivation of nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus subgroup A) by monochromatic UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Griego, V.M.; Martignoni, M.E.; Claycomb, A.E.

    1985-03-01

    Monochromatic radiation at wavelengths of 290, 300, 310, and 320 nm inactivated occluded nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata. Data indicate that all of the wavelengths are capable of causing virus inactivation; much greater fluences are needed for virus inactivation as the wavelength increases.

  9. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Ionizing Radiation, Unit 2. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 2 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to convey factual information relevant to radioactivity and radiation and relate that information both to the personal lives of students…

  10. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

  11. What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Pediatric Imaging Council of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, as well as over 50 other societies, are members of this group. We are a group of over 700,000 health care professionals in radiology, pediatrics, medical physics and radiation protection. More information can be found ...

  12. Determination of Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Human Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the shielded dose equivalent due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  13. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  14. Radiation fields and dose assessments in Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young; Jeong, Woo Tae; Kim, Seok Tae

    2011-07-01

    In the primary systems of nuclear power plants (NPPs), various radionuclides including fission products and corrosion products are generated due to the complex water chemistry conditions. In particular, (3)H, (14)C, (58)Co, (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (131)I are important or potential radionuclides with respect to dose assessment for workers and the management of radioactive effluents or dose assessment for the public. In this paper, the dominant contributors to the dose for workers and the public were reviewed and the process of dose assessment attributable to those contributors was investigated. Furthermore, an analysis was carried out on some examples of dose to workers during NPP operation. PMID:21498858

  15. [Radiation-related health effects of major nuclear events].

    PubMed

    Orgiazzi, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Three major nuclear events, the Hirosima and Nagasaki bombings and the Chernobyl and Fukushima catastrophes, have been selected to Illustrate the health consequences, observed or anticipated, of irradation of populations. Differences in doses and modalities of irradiation, with the combination of clinical epidemiology and dose estimates, recently revisited, allow for more accurate dose-effect relationship models of the risks. However, extrapolation to the low-doses (< 0.1 Gy) or very low-doses of these models obtained with doses ≥ 0.2 Gy remains hazardous. PMID:25842445

  16. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  17. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  18. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  19. NIAID/NIH radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures product research and development program.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Cassatt, David; Dicarlo, Andrea; Ramakrishnan, Narayani; Kaminski, Joseph; Norman, Mai-Kim; Maidment, Bert; Hatchett, Richard

    2010-06-01

    One of the greatest national security threats to the United States is the detonation of an improvised nuclear device or a radiological dispersal device in a heavily populated area. The U.S. Government has addressed these threats with a two-pronged strategy of preventing organizations from obtaining weapons of mass destruction and preparing in case an event occurs. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) contributes to these preparedness efforts by supporting basic research and development for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear countermeasures for civilian use. The Radiation Countermeasures Program at NIAID has established a broad research agenda focused on the development of new medical products to mitigate and treat acute and long-term radiation injury, promote the clearance of internalized radionuclides, and facilitate accurate individual dose and exposure assessment. This paper reviews the recent work and collaborations supported by the Radiation Countermeasures Program. PMID:20445403

  20. Radiation exposure control from the application of nuclear gauges in the mining industry in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Faanu, A; Darko, E O; Awudu, A R; Schandorf, C; Emi-Reynolds, G; Yeboah, J; Glover, E T; Kattah, V K

    2010-05-01

    The use of nuclear gauges for process control and elemental analysis in the mining industry in Ghana, West Africa, is wide spread and on the increase in recent times. The Ghana Radiation Protection Board regulates nuclear gauges through a system of notification and authorization by registration or licensing, inspection, and enforcement. Safety assessments for authorization and enforcement have been established to ensure the safety and security of radiation sources as well as protection of workers and the general public. Appropriate training of mine staff is part of the efforts to develop the necessary awareness about the safety and security of radiation sources. The knowledge and skills acquired will ensure the required protection and safety at the workplaces. Doses received by workers monitored over a period between 1998 and 2007 are well below the annual dose limit of 20 mSv recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. PMID:20386190

  1. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms, such as neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 1717 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics). A full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 160 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps. The single radiation transport calculation required about 50% of the time required to solve the thermo-mechanics with a single loading step, which demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate, in a single code, a high-fidelity radiation transport capability with a high-fidelity nuclear fuel thermo-mechanics capability and anticipate acceptable computational requirements. The

  2. Radiation litigation and the nuclear industry--the experience in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Leigh, W J; Wakeford, R

    2001-12-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 places a "strict" statutory duty on the operators of nuclear facilities to ensure that any exposure to radiation resulting from operations does not cause injury or damage. A claimant does not have to prove fault to receive compensation under the Act, only causation. The 1965 Act has been fundamental in shaping litigation involving the nuclear industry in the UK. Civil law cases brought under the Act will be heard before a single judge (with no jury or technical assessor) who must present his or her decision in a reasoned judgment. This process leads to a considerable volume of expert evidence being presented to the court and extensive cross-examination of witnesses. The expense and uncertain outcome of cases involving claims by nuclear workers that occupational exposure to radiation had caused the development of cancer has led to employers and trade unions setting up the voluntary Compensation Scheme for Radiation-linked Diseases as an alternative to litigation. This Scheme has worked well and is held up as a model of alternative dispute resolution. However, a few cases concerning personal injury or damage to property have come before the courts when the defendant nuclear operator considered that the claims were technically unjustified and where settlement was not a policy option. As anticipated, these cases were lengthy, complex, and expensive. The radiation doses assessed to have been received by the individuals who were the subject of claims, whether workers or members of the public, have been crucial to the outcome. The technical expertise of health physicists and allied specialists has been vital in establishing defensible estimates of dose, and this contribution can be expected to remain of high importance in radiation litigation in the UK. PMID:11725882

  3. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 19th, Las Vegas, NV, July 20-22, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of research concerning the effects of nuclear and space radiation are presented. Topics discussed include the basic mechanisms of nuclear and space radiation effects, radiation effects in devices, and radiation effects in microcircuits, including studies of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in MOS structures, silicon solar cell damage from electrical overstress, radiation-induced charge dynamics in dielectrics, and the enhanced radiation effects on submicron narrow-channel NMOS. Also examined are topics in SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, hardness assurance and testing, energy deposition, desometry, and radiation transport, and single event phenomena. Among others, studies are presented concerning the limits to hardening electronic boxes to IEMP coupling, transient radiation screening of silicon devices using backside laser irradiation, the damage equivalence of electrons, protons, and gamma rays in MOS devices, and the single event upset sensitivity of low power Schottky devices.

  4. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers. PMID:24366246

  5. Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Background Radiation for Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Ricky; Blackmon, J. C.; Rasco, B. C.; Mumm, H. P.; mTC; NuLat Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Prior measurements of reactor antineutrinos have found a lower flux than expected. Precision measurements of antineutrino energy spectra are important for understanding the anomaly, reactor safeguards, and nuclear nonproliferation. Antineutrino detector designs rely on good characterization of gamma-ray and neutron backgrounds near the reactor core. To study the gamma-ray background at the NIST research reactor, spectra were collected using a 6.25 cm diameter × 5.5 cm germanium detector. We analyzed the measured spectra using simulations of the detector response using the GEANT4 toolkit to determine background fluxes and build a background model that will be used to understand shielding requirements and the impact of backgrounds on potential short-baseline reactor antineutrino studies at NIST. This work supported by the National Science Foundation and LSU.

  6. Constant sensitivity circuit for solid state nuclear radiation counters

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Erkkila, B.

    1985-02-01

    The utilization of solid state counters in tactical radiological instruments for measuring intensities and doses of fallout gamma rays offers advantages over Geiger-Mueller (GM) counters such as a much wider dynamic range and low operating voltages. Their very small size is suitable for use in miniaturized equipment. However, these devices have a serious problem if used in a mixed, fast neutron/gamma environment such as is encountered e.g. in a battlefield where tactical nuclear weapons are used and neutrons, prompt, initial gammas and fallout gammas are killing factors of comparable importance. Exposure to fast neutrons reduces seriously their sensitivity. This makes the solid state counters at this time unacceptable for use in Army tactical surveillance equipment and in other applications where according to requirements the performance must not be impaired by exposure to fast neutrons. It seems to be possible to reduce to some extent this neutron generated damage by improving the crystal counters.

  7. Solid state nuclear radiation detector circuit with constant sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Lux, R. A.

    1985-07-02

    This circuit comprises a solid state crystal radiation counter having its amplified output connected in parallel to a pair of pulse height discriminators with thresholds of V/sub 1/ and 2V/sub 1/ volts, wherein V/sub 1/ is above the counter noise level. A pair of pulse counters are arranged to count the outputs of the discriminators and a processor circuit is connected to the pulse counter outputs and is arranged to calculate the quotient of the square of the output of the pulse counter connected to the discriminator with the lower threshold and the output of the other pulse counter. A display circuit is arranged to provide a reading related to the output of the processor circuit.

  8. Solid state nuclear radiation detector circuit with constant sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Lux, R.A.

    1984-02-06

    This circuit comprises a solid state crystal radiation counter having its amplified output connected in parallel to a pair of pulse height discriminators with thresholds of V sub 1 and V sub 1 volts. Wherein V sub 1 is above the counter noise level. A pair of pulse counters are arranged to count the outputs of the discriminators and a processor circuit is connected to the pulse counter outputs and is arranged to calculate the quotient of the square of the output of the pulse counter connected to the discriminator with the lower threshold and the output of the other pulse counter. A display circuit is arranged to provide a reading related to the output of the processor circuit.

  9. Summary Report for the Radiation Detection for Nuclear Security Summer School 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Baciak, James E.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Jenno, Diana M.

    2014-09-30

    Executive Summary The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted students from across the United States at the 3rd Radiation Detection for Nuclear Security Summer School from 16 – 27 June 2014. The summer school provided students with a unique understanding of nuclear security challenges faced in the field and exposed them to the technical foundations, analyses, and insight that will be required by future leaders in technology development and implementation. The course heavily emphasized laboratory and field demonstrations including direct measurements of special nuclear material. Student evaluations and feedback from student advisors indicates that the summer school achieved its objectives of 1) exposing students to the range of nuclear security applications for which radiation detection is necessary, 2) articulating the relevance of student research into the broader context, and 3) exciting students about the possibility of future careers in nuclear security. In fact, we are beginning to see previous students both enroll in graduate programs (former undergraduates) and complete internships at agencies like the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  10. What Becomes of Nuclear Risk Assessment in Light of Radiation Hormesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cuttler, Jerry M.

    2007-01-01

    A nuclear probabilistic risk or safety assessment (PRA or PSA) is a scientific calculation that uses assumptions and models to determine the likelihood of plant or fuel repository failures and the corresponding releases of radioactivity. Estimated radiation doses to the surrounding population are linked inappropriately to risks of cancer death and congenital malformations. Even though PRAs use very pessimistic assumptions, they demonstrate that nuclear power plants and fuel repositories are very safe compared with the health risks of other generating options or other risks that people readily accept. Because of the frightening negative images and the exaggerated safety and health concerns that are communicated, many people judge nuclear risks to be unacceptable and do not favour nuclear plants. Large-scale tests and experience with nuclear accidents demonstrate that even severe accidents expose the public to only low doses of radiation, and a century of research has demonstrated that such exposures are beneficial to health. A scientific basis for this phenomenon now exists. PRAs are valuable tools for improving plant designs, but if nuclear power is to play a significant role in meeting future energy needs, we must communicate its many real benefits and dispel the negative images formed by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects at high doses. PMID:18648610

  11. What becomes of nuclear risk assessment in light of radiation hormesis?

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Jerry M

    2007-01-01

    A nuclear probabilistic risk or safety assessment (PRA or PSA) is a scientific calculation that uses assumptions and models to determine the likelihood of plant or fuel repository failures and the corresponding releases of radioactivity. Estimated radiation doses to the surrounding population are linked inappropriately to risks of cancer death and congenital malformations. Even though PRAs use very pessimistic assumptions, they demonstrate that nuclear power plants and fuel repositories are very safe compared with the health risks of other generating options or other risks that people readily accept. Because of the frightening negative images and the exaggerated safety and health concerns that are communicated, many people judge nuclear risks to be unacceptable and do not favour nuclear plants. Large-scale tests and experience with nuclear accidents demonstrate that even severe accidents expose the public to only low doses of radiation, and a century of research has demonstrated that such exposures are beneficial to health. A scientific basis for this phenomenon now exists. PRAs are valuable tools for improving plant designs, but if nuclear power is to play a significant role in meeting future energy needs, we must communicate its many real benefits and dispel the negative images formed by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects at high doses. PMID:18648610

  12. Radiation Injury Treatment Network (RITN): Healthcare professionals preparing for a mass casualty radiological or nuclear incident

    PubMed Central

    ROSS, JOEL R.; CASE, CULLEN; CONFER, DENNIS; WEISDORF, DANIEL J.; WEINSTOCK, DAVID; KRAWISZ, ROBERT; CHUTE, JOHN; WILHAUK, JULIE; NAVARRO, WILLIS; HARTZMAN, ROBERT; COLEMAN, C. NORMAN; HATCHETT, RICHARD; CHAO, NELSON

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the history, composition, and activities of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network (RITN). The Radiation Injury Treatment Network® is a cooperative effort of the National Marrow Donor Program and the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. The goals of RITN are to educate hematologists, oncologists, and stem cell transplant practitioners about their potential involvement in the response to a radiation incident and provide treatment expertise. Injuries to the marrow system readily occur when a victim is exposed to ionising radiation. This focus therefore leverages the expertise of these specialists who are accustomed to providing the intensive supportive care required by patients with a suppressed marrow function. Following a radiological incident, RITN centres may be asked to: Accept patient transfers to their institutions; provide treatment expertise to practitioners caring for victims at other centres; travel to other centres to provide medical expertise; or provide data on victims treated at their centres. Moving forward, it is crucial that we develop a coordinated interdisciplinary approach in planning for and responding to radiological and nuclear incidents. The ongoing efforts of radiation biologists, radiation oncologists, and health physicists can and should complement the efforts of RITN and government agencies. Conclusion RITN serves as a vital partner in preparedness and response efforts for potential radiological and nuclear incidents. PMID:21801106

  13. Radiation accidents and their management: emphasis on the role of nuclear medicine professionals

    PubMed Central

    Novruzov, Fuad; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale radiation accidents are few in number, but those that have occurred have subsequently led to strict regulation in most countries. Here, different accident scenarios involving exposure to radiation have been reviewed. A triage of injured persons has been summarized and guidance on management has been provided in accordance with the early symptoms. Types of casualty to be expected in atomic blasts have been discussed. Management at the scene of an accident has been described, with explanation of the role of the radiation protection officer, the nature of contaminants, and monitoring for surface contamination. Methods for early diagnosis of radiation injuries have been then described. The need for individualization of treatment according to the nature and grade of the combined injuries has been emphasized, and different approaches to the treatment of internal contamination have been presented. The role of nuclear medicine professionals, including physicians and physicists, has been reviewed. It has been concluded that the management of radiation accidents is a very challenging process and that nuclear medicine physicians have to be well organized in order to deliver suitable management in any type of radiation accident. PMID:25004166

  14. 1988 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 25th, Portland, OR, July 12-15, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, Peter G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The effects of nuclear and space radiation on the performance of electronic devices are discussed in reviews and reports of recent investigations. Topics addressed include the basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, sensors in and for radiation environments, EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, radiation effects on isolation technologies, and spacecraft charging and space radiation effects. Consideration is given to device radiation effects and hardening, hardness assurance and testing techniques, IC radiation effects and hardening, and single-event phenomena.

  15. Experimental investigation on radiation shielding of high performance concrete for nuclear and radiotherapy facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, Szymon; Gryziński, Michał A.; Maciak, Maciej; Murawski, Łukasz; Tulik, Piotr; Tymińska, Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the set of procedures developed in Radiation Protection Measurements Laboratory at National Centre for Nuclear Research for evaluation of shielding properties of high performance concrete. The purpose of such procedure is to characterize the material behaviour against gamma and neutron radiation. The range of the densities of the concrete specimens was from 2300 to 3900 kg/m3. The shielding properties against photons were evaluated using 137Cs and 60Co sources. The neutron radiation measurements have been performed by measuring the transmitted radiation from 239PuBe source. Scattered neutron radiation has been evaluated using the shadow cone technique. A set up of ionization chambers was used during all experiments. The gamma dose was measured using C-CO2 ionization chamber. The neutron dose was evaluated with recombination chamber of REM-2 type with appropriate recombination method applied. The method to distinguish gamma and neutron absorbed dose components in mixed radiation fields using twin detector method was presented. Also, recombination microdosimetric method was applied for the obtained results. Procedures to establish consecutive half value layers and tenth value layers (HVL and TVL) for gamma and neutron radiation were presented. Measured HVL and TVL values were linked with concrete density to highlight well known dependence. Also, influence of specific admixtures to concrete on neutron attenuation properties was studied. The results confirmed the feasibility of approach for the radiation shielding investigations.

  16. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... doses of radiation, such as radiation from a nuclear power plant accident Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  17. RADIATION HARDNESS / TOLERANCE OF SI SENSORS / DETECTORS FOR NUCLEAR AND HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    LI,Z.

    2002-09-09

    Silicon sensors, widely used in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, suffer severe radiation damage that leads to degradations in sensor performance. These degradations include significant increases in leakage current, bulk resistivity, and space charge concentration. The increase in space charge concentration is particularly damaging since it can significantly increase the sensor full depletion voltage, causing either breakdown if operated at high biases or charge collection loss if operated at lower biases than full depletion. Several strategies can be used to make Si detectors more radiation had tolerant to particle radiations. In this paper, the main radiation induced degradations in Si detectors will be reviewed. The details and specifics of the new engineering strategies: material/impurity/defect engineering (MIDE); device structure engineering (DSE); and device operational mode engineering (DOME) will be given.

  18. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  19. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  20. How Space Radiation Risk from Galactic Cosmic Rays at the International Space Station Relates to Nuclear Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts is a major obstacle for long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have thus been developed to evaluate radiation effects at the International Space Station (ISS) and in missions to the Moon or Mars. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes in such radiation transport affect predictions on the radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays. Taking into account effects of the geomagnetic field on the cosmic ray spectra, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on the radiation risk (represented by dose-equivalent) from galactic cosmic rays behind typical spacecraft materials. These results tell us how the radiation risk at the ISS is related to nuclear cross sections at different energies, and consequently how to most efficiently reduce the physical uncertainty in our predictions on the radiation risk at the ISS.

  1. A Statistical Model for Generating a Population of Unclassified Objects and Radiation Signatures Spanning Nuclear Threats

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K; Sokkappa, P

    2008-10-29

    This report describes an approach for generating a simulated population of plausible nuclear threat radiation signatures spanning a range of variability that could be encountered by radiation detection systems. In this approach, we develop a statistical model for generating random instances of smuggled nuclear material. The model is based on physics principles and bounding cases rather than on intelligence information or actual threat device designs. For this initial stage of work, we focus on random models using fissile material and do not address scenarios using non-fissile materials. The model has several uses. It may be used as a component in a radiation detection system performance simulation to generate threat samples for injection studies. It may also be used to generate a threat population to be used for training classification algorithms. In addition, we intend to use this model to generate an unclassified 'benchmark' threat population that can be openly shared with other organizations, including vendors, for use in radiation detection systems performance studies and algorithm development and evaluation activities. We assume that a quantity of fissile material is being smuggled into the country for final assembly and that shielding may have been placed around the fissile material. In terms of radiation signature, a nuclear weapon is basically a quantity of fissile material surrounded by various layers of shielding. Thus, our model of smuggled material is expected to span the space of potential nuclear weapon signatures as well. For computational efficiency, we use a generic 1-dimensional spherical model consisting of a fissile material core surrounded by various layers of shielding. The shielding layers and their configuration are defined such that the model can represent the potential range of attenuation and scattering that might occur. The materials in each layer and the associated parameters are selected from probability distributions that span the

  2. Advances in Nuclear Cardiac Instrumentation with a View Towards Reduced Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Damini; Duvall, W. Lane; Henzlova, Milena J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Germano, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in nuclear cardiology instrumentation have enabled myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with improved image quality and fast scan times. These developments also can be exploited to reduce the effective radiation dose to the patient. In this review, we discuss these technologies including new single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, as well as novel reconstruction software with regard to their potential for the reduction of the patient radiation dose. New advances in nuclear cardiology instrumentation will allow routine rest/stress MPI imaging with low radiation doses (< 5 mSv) and fast imaging times, even by the software-only solutions. It is possible to further reduce the MPI radiation dose to less than 2 to 3 mSv range with standard acquisition times. PET perfusion imaging also can be performed with very low doses especially by the three-dimensional scanners allowing hybrid PET/computed tomographic angiography (CTA) imaging with low overall dose. In addition, stress-only protocols can be utilized to further reduce the radiation dose and the overall test time. PMID:22327929

  3. Depletion calculations for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R. T.; Newell, D. L.

    1997-12-08

    Depletion calculations have been performed for the McClellan reactor history from January 1990 through August 1996. A database has been generated for continuing use by operations personnel which contains the isotopic inventory for all fuel elements and fuel-followed control rods maintained at McClellan. The calculations are based on the three-dimensional diffusion theory code REBUS-3 which is available through the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). Burnup-dependent cross-sections were developed at zero power temperatures and full power temperatures using the WIMS code (also available through RSICC). WIMS is based on discretized transport theory to calculate the neutron flux as a function of energy and position in a one-dimensional cell. Based on the initial depletion calculations, a method was developed to allow operations personnel to perform depletion calculations and update the database with a minimal amount of effort. Depletion estimates and calculations can be performed by simply entering the core loading configuration, the position of the control rods at the start and end of cycle, the reactor power level, the duration of the reactor cycle, and the time since the last reactor cycle. The depletion and buildup of isotopes of interest (heavy metal isotopes, erbium isotopes, and fission product poisons) are calculated for all fuel elements and fuel-followed control rods in the MNRC inventory. The reactivity loss from burnup and buildup of fission product poisons and the peak xenon buildup after shutdown are also calculated. The reactivity loss from going from cold zero power to hot full power can also be calculated by using the temperature-dependent, burnup-dependent cross-sections. By calculating all of these reactivity effects, operations personnel are able to estimate the total excess reactivity necessary to run the reactor for the given cycle. This method has also been used to estimate the worth of individual control rods. Using this

  4. A brief review of intermediate controlled nuclear syntheses (ICNS) without harmful radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Lanjewar, R. B.

    2015-03-10

    Hadronic mechanics gave birth to new magnecular fuels. The present day demand is of clean energy source that is cheap and abundant. Clean energy can be obtained by harnessing renewable energy sources like solar, wind etc. Nuclear energy conventionally produced by fission reactions emits hazardous radiation and radioactive waste. The requirements of clean and safe energy gets fulfilled by novel fuel that achieved by elevating the traditional quantum mechanics to hadronic mechanics and to hadronic chemistry. In the present paper, a comprehensive review on both the theoretical and experimental aspect of the Intermediate Controlled Nuclear Synthesis (ICNS) as developed by Italian American Scientist Professor R. M. Santilli.

  5. Nuclear modeling for applications in medical radiation therapy and accelerator-driven technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1995-06-01

    An understanding of the interactions of neutrons and protons below a few hundred MeV with nuclei is important for a number of applications. In this paper, two new applications are discussed: radiation transport calculations of energy deposition in fast neutron and proton cancer radiotherapy to optimize the dose given to a tumor; and intermediate-energy proton accelerators which are currently being designed for a range of applications including the destruction of long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. We describe nuclear theory calculations of direct, preequilibrium, and compound nucleus reaction mechanisms important for the modeling of these systems.

  6. Radiation safety review for 511-keV emitters in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Dell, M A

    1997-03-01

    With the advent of high-energy collimators and dual-head coincidence cameras, standard nuclear medicine facilities will soon begin imaging with PET isotopes. The use of 511-keV emitters raises new radiation safety concerns for technologists traditionally limited to handling 99mTc and other low-energy isotopes. This article is a basic review of positron emitters, measurement concerns, exposure rates, shielding requirements and external radiation exposure mitigation. Newly developed PET shielding products are presented and regulatory status is discussed briefly. PMID:9239598

  7. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, W. J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW sub th, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  8. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiolo, Irene; Georgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-09-03

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  9. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors. PMID:24727389

  10. Ab initio simulation of radiation damage in nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Daniel; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Using Kinetic Monte Carlo we developed a code to study point defect hopping in BCC metallic alloys using energetics and attempt frequencies calculated using VASP, an electronic structure software package. Our code provides a way of simulating the effects of neutron radiation on potential reactor materials. Specifically we will compare the Molybdenum-Chromium alloy system to steel alloys for use in nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  11. Graphical user interfaces for McCellan Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC).

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1998-08-27

    McClellan's Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC) control console is in the process of being replaced due to spurious scrams, outdated software, and obsolete parts. The intent of the new control console is to eliminate the existing problems by installing a UNIX-based computer system with industry-standard interface software and incorporating human factors during all stages of the graphical user interface (GUI) development and control console design.

  12. Intelligent monitor functional model with ionization chamber for mixed nuclear radiation field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valcov, N.; Purghel, L.; Celarel, A.

    1998-12-31

    By using the statistical discrimination technique, the components of an ionization current, due to a mixed radiation field, may be simultaneously measured. A functional model, including a series manufactured gamma-ray ratemeter was done, as an intermediate step in the design of specialized nuclear instrumentation, in order to check the concept of statistical discrimination method. The obtained results are in good agreement with the estimations of the statistical discrimination method.

  13. Health concerns related to radiation exposure of the female nuclear medicine patient.

    PubMed Central

    Stabin, M G

    1997-01-01

    The female nuclear medicine patient is of special concern in evaluating radiation dose and risk in nuclear medicine. The female's overall body size and organ sizes generally are smaller than those of her male counterpart (thus her radiation doses will be higher, given the same amounts of administered activity and similar biokinetics); female gonads are inside the body instead of outside and are near several organs often important as source organs in internal dosimetry (urinary bladder, liver, kidneys, intestines); risk of breast cancer is significantly higher among females than males; and in the case of pregnancy, exposure to radiation of the embryo/fetus and the nursing infant are of special concern in such an analysis. All these concerns are addressed in this study through a comparative study of radiation doses for males and females over a large number (approximately 60) of nuclear medicine studies and through a study of what is known about radiation dosimetry in pregnancy and breast feeding. It was found that women's critical organ doses and effective doses (as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 [ICRP 60] are about 25% higher than those for men across all these studies. Women's gonad doses, however, may be as much as 10 to 30 times higher than those in men, although 2- to 3-fold differences are common. Many radiopharmaceuticals are administered to women of childbearing age; however, little is known about how much activity crosses the placenta and about the biokinetics in the fetus should it occur. Nonetheless, dose estimates are provided at four stages of pregnancy (early, 3-month, 6-month, and 9-month gestation) for a large number of radiopharmaceuticals, whether or not quantitative estimates of placental crossover can be made. Many radiopharmaceuticals are also excreted in breast milk of nursing mothers. Breast feeding interruption schedules are suggested through analysis of the observed kinetics of these pharmaceuticals and

  14. Fabric composite radiators for space nuclear power applications. Final report, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C.; Al-Baroudi, H.; Gulshan-Ara, Z.; Kiestler, W.C.; Snuggerud, R.D.; Abdul-Hamid, S.A.; Marks, T.S.

    1993-03-24

    Nuclear power systems will be required to provide much greater power levels for both civilian and defense space activities in the future than an currently needed. Limitations on the amount of usable power from radioisotope thermal generators and the limited availability of radioisotope heat source materials lead directly to the conclusion that nuclear power reactors will be needed to enhance the exploration of the solar system as well as to provide for an adequate defense. Lunar bases and travel to the Martian surface will be greatly enhanced by the use of high levels of nuclear power. Space based radar systems requiring many kilowatts of electrical power can provide intercontinental airline traffic control and defense early warning systems. Since the, figure of merit used in defining any space power system is the specific power, the decrease in die mass of any reactor system component will yield a tremendous benefit to the overall system performance. Also, since the heat rejection system of any power system can make up a large portion of the total system mass, any reduction in the mass of the heat rejection radiators will significantly affect the performance of the power system. Composite materials which combine the high strength, flexibility, and low mass characteristics of Si% based fibers with the attractive compatibility and heat transfer features of metallic foils, have been proposed for use m a number of space radiator applications. Thus, the weave of the fabric and the high strength capability of the individual fibers are combined with the high conductivity and chemical stability of a metallic liner to provide a light weight, flexible alternative to heavy, rigid, metallic radiator structural containers. The primary focus of this investigation revolves around two applications of the fabric composite materials, notably a fabric heat pipe radiator design and the Bubble Membrane Radiator concept.

  15. Impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on background radiation doses measured by control dosimeters in Japan.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; King, David L; Kennemur, Lisa K

    2012-05-01

    After the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and subsequent massive tsunami on 11 March 2011 in Japan, several reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered severe damage. There was immediate participation of U.S. Navy vessels and other United States Department of Defense (DoD) teams that were already in the area at the time of the disaster or arrived shortly thereafter. The correct determination of occupational dose equivalent requires estimation of the background dose component measured by control dosimeters, which is subsequently subtracted from the total dose equivalent measured by personal dosimeters. The purpose of the control dosimeters is to determine the amount of radiation dose equivalent that has accumulated on the dosimeter from background or other non-occupational sources while they are in transit or being stored. Given the release of radioactive material and potential exposure to radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and the process by which the U.S. Navy calculates occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, analysis of pre- and post-event control dosimeters is warranted. Several hundred historical dose records from the Naval Dosimetry Center (NDC) database were analyzed and compared with the post-accident dose equivalent data of control dosimeters. As result, it was shown that the dose contribution of the radiation and released radiological materials from the Fukushima nuclear accident to background radiation doses is less than 0.375 μSv d for shallow and deep photon dose equivalent. There is no measurable effect on neutron background exposure. The latter has at least two important conclusions. First, the NDC can use doses measured by control dosimeters at issuing sites in Japan for determination of personnel dose equivalents; second, the dose data from control dosimeters prior to and after the Fukushima accident may be used to assist in dose reconstruction of non-radiological (non-badged) personnel at these locations

  16. Lightweight Damage Tolerant Radiators for In-Space Nuclear Electric Power and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul; SanSoucie, Michael P.; Tomboulian, Briana; Rogers, Jan; Hyers, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is a promising option for high-speed in-space travel due to the high energy density of nuclear power sources and efficient electric thrusters. Advanced power conversion technologies for converting thermal energy from the reactor to electrical energy at high operating temperatures would benefit from lightweight, high temperature radiator materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion systems. Pitch-based carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in operating temperature and mass. An effort at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to show that woven high thermal conductivity carbon fiber mats can be used to replace standard metal and composite radiator fins to dissipate waste heat from NEP systems is ongoing. The goals of this effort are to demonstrate a proof of concept, to show that a significant improvement of specific power (power/mass) can be achieved, and to develop a thermal model with predictive capabilities. A description of this effort is presented.

  17. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-01-01

    The overall goal of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologies who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second year has been on measurements of (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201, (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99, (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists, (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The progress in these areas is described.

  18. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.; Hopper, J.L.

    1982-08-01

    This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years.

  19. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. Annual technical progress report, [1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall goal of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologies who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second year has been on measurements of (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201, (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99, (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists, (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The progress in these areas is described.

  20. Impact of an external radiation field on handheld XRF measurements for nuclear forensics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Mertz, Carol J.; Finck, Martha R.; Engelstad, Gary; Carney, Kevin P.; Chamberlain, David B.

    2015-03-28

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is an attractive technique for nuclear forensics applications. We evaluated a handheld, portable XRF device by applying an external radiation field (10 mR/h to 17 R/h) using two types of radiography sources: a 60Co radiography camera to observe effects from high-energy gamma emissions and an 192Ir radiography camera to observe effects from several low-energy gamma (0.604, 0.468, and 0.317 MeV) and decay daughter x-ray emissions. External radiation tests proved that radiation, in general, has a significant effect on the dead time or background at dose rates over 1 R/hr for both the 192Ir and 60Co sources.

  1. Dynamic friction and wear of a solid film lubricant during radiation exposure in a nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of nuclear reactor radiation on the performance of a solid film lubricant was studied. The film consisted of molybdenum disulfide and graphite in a sodium silicate binder. Radiation levels of fast neutrons (E or = 1 MeV) were fluxed up to 3.5 times 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm-sec (intensity) and fluences up to 2 times 10 to the 18th power n/sq cm (total exposure). Coating wear lives were much shorter and friction coefficients higher in a high flux region of the reactor than in a low flux region. The amount of total exposure did not affect lubrication behavior as severely as the radiation intensity during sliding.

  2. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  3. Legitimating a nuclear critic: John Gofman, radiation safety, and cancer risks.

    PubMed

    Semendeferi, Ioanna

    2008-01-01

    Whether low-level ionizing radiation has an effect on humans has been a polarizing issue for the last fifty years. The epicenter of this controversy has been the validity of the linear non-threshold dose-response model, according to which any amount of radiation, however small, causes damage to human genes and health. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the nuclear scientist and medical researcher John Gofman (1918-2007) played a pivotal role in the debate. Historical accounts have treated Gofman as a radical antinuclear scientist whose unscientific arguments put enormous political pressure on the nuclear power industry and regulatory agencies. Gofman's bitter struggle with the Atomic Energy Commission, which funded his research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, partly accounts for this view. However, my analysis of Gofman's involvement in the low-level radiation debate shows how he also helped shift the focus in radiation safety from the risks of genetic damage or leukemia to somatic or cancer risks. His arguments led to the introduction of the linear non-threshold radiation model as a means of numerically estimating cancer risks. This was a watershed event in radiation-safety science and politics. Gofman's case sheds light on the process by which a scientist could secure legitimation even when his technical arguments threatened the government's interests. I conclude that it also points to an open issue in the history of antinuclear scientists, or of other politically active scientists or technology critics: treating them as critics should not preclude historians from treating them as scientists. PMID:20073123

  4. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  5. Risk Perception of Radiation Exposure of Villagers Living Near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvis-Roberts, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    Connecting scientific data to societal needs is particularly important with the complex environmental issues that face us in the near future, such as global warming and natural hazards. Once the scientific data is collected and analyzed, dissemination of the results needs to be communicated to the public in a way that can be easily understood without glossing over the complexity of the issue. An interesting case study derives from the primary nuclear test site for the former Soviet Union, located near the city of Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan. Villagers living directly adjacent to the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) were exposed continuously to radioactive clouds from atmospheric, above ground and underground nuclear tests. The people living in the region are still exposed to low levels of radiation through the environmental contamination of their food and water and have experienced a higher incidence of cancers and birth defects than people living in other regions of the country. A database of historical environmental data was collected throughout the nuclear testing period by the Soviet government, tracking radiation concentrations through food, water, and soil samples around the SNTS, but this environmental data was never shared with the villagers. In fact, only after the Soviet Union fell apart in 1989 did the people discover that they had been exposed to radiation during the past 40 years. Through preliminary interviews with villagers, physicians, and scientists who live near the SNTS, it was discovered that the three groups viewed the risk of radiation exposure very differently. By developing a risk perception survey to understand how the different groups perceived radiation risk, and then comparing the scientific data to the survey results, a better way to communicate the risk could be developed. The risk perception survey was given to over 800 people in East Kazakhstan Oblast, including villagers living near the SNTS, scientists who study the

  6. Evidence of children's vulnerability to radiation in the context of radiological/nuclear events and considerations for emergency response.

    PubMed

    Lane, Rachel; Reinhardt, Pascale; Thompson, Patsy

    2010-11-01

    International organisations, such as International Atomic Energy Agency, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and World Health Organisation, together with committees of experts such as Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation and Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment, have assessed the effects of radiation on large exposed populations (Chernobyl accident, and Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombings) and on nuclear energy workers and people living near nuclear facilities. Childhood and in utero exposure to moderate and high levels of ionizing radiation, such as those experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan, or from radiotherapy, is an established cause of leukaemia and solid cancer. There is no evidence of increase in solid cancers (excluding thyroid cancer) or leukaemia in the children from Chernobyl, and no evident link between worker's exposure to radiation and leukaemia in their offspring or with the presence of leukaemia clusters around nuclear power plants. It has also not been possible to demonstrate the evidence of radiation hereditary effects in human populations. In accordance with international guidance, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission recommends optimisation of protection strategies to reduce doses to children. The development of credible radiological/nuclear event scenarios would assist in identifying probable sources of radioactivity and pathways of exposure for children. Such scenarios should then be used to identify protection strategies appropriate for children. PMID:20959331

  7. Simulation of beta radiator handling procedures in nuclear medicine by means of a movable hand phantom.

    PubMed

    Blunck, Ch; Becker, F; Urban, M

    2011-03-01

    In nuclear medicine therapies, people working with beta radiators such as (90)Y may be exposed to non-negligible partial body doses. For radiation protection, it is important to know the characteristics of the radiation field and possible dose exposures at relevant positions in the working area. Besides extensive measurements, simulations can provide these data. For this purpose, a movable hand phantom for Monte Carlo simulations was developed. Specific beta radiator handling scenarios can be modelled interactively with forward kinematics or automatically with an inverse kinematics procedure. As a first investigation, the dose distribution on a medical doctor's hand injecting a (90)Y solution was measured and simulated with the phantom. Modelling was done with the interactive method based on five consecutive frames from a video recorded during the injection. Owing to the use of only one camera, not each detail of the radiation scenario is visible in the video. In spite of systematic uncertainties, the measured and simulated dose values are in good agreement. PMID:21044994

  8. Nuclear radiation test of a D flip-flop IC using a single-board microcomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T.S.; Martin, R.L.; Hughes, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a microcomputer-controlled electronic circuit and its use in evaluating the effects of nuclear radiation on a 4013 CMOS D flip-flop (FF) integrated circuit (IC) are described. The IC undergoing testing is attached to a DUT (device under test) board, which is enclosed in a metal container. The container is then lowered to the cobalt 60 radiation source located at the bottom of a 15-ft-deep pool filled to the top with water. The gamma-ray radiation test setup is schematically shown. The in-source test board containing the D FF IC is attached to an 8085-based single-board microcomputer, SDK-85, by a 30-ft multiconductor cable. Doses of gamma-ray radiation from the cobalt 60 are applied in steps at increasing quantities until the D FF IC, which is tested between doses, begins to malfunction. The leakage current and the propagation delay time are measured between doses. An 8085 assembly language program is used for functional test of the IC. The software design and the radiation testing procedure are discussed in detail.

  9. Twinning in the offspring of parents with chronic radiation exposure from nuclear testing in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Mudie, Nadejda Y; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Gusev, Boris I; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Pivina, Ludmila M; Chsherbakova, Svetlana; Mansarina, Almagul; Bauer, Susanne; Jakovlev, Yuri; Apsalikov, Kazbek N

    2010-06-01

    The population of the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan was chronically exposed to radioactive fallout from above-ground nuclear tests conducted during 1949-1956 by the Soviet Union. We investigated the effect of radiation exposure and other factors on risks of twinning overall and of same- and different-sex twinning and hence estimated dizygotic and monozygotic twinning rates in 11,605 deliveries around Semipalatinsk, 141 of which were twin, to 3992 mothers exposed to fallout during 1949-1956. Overall, the same-sex twinning rate was 7.85 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.24, 9.47] per 1000 and the opposite-sex twinning rate was 4.45 (95% CI: 3.23, 5.67). Twinning rates did not differ significantly between radiation exposure categories, parental age at main radiation exposure, or year of birth. Different-sex, but not same-sex, twinning increased with maternal age (P(trend) = 0.04) but not with other demographic factors and was increased soon after radiation exposure [OR = 4.08 (95% CI: 1.11, 15.07)] for births occurring within 5 years compared with more than 20 years after exposure; this effect was similar in villages with low and high radiation exposure, however, so interpretation is uncertain. PMID:20518662

  10. Radiation dose distribution for workers in South Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-il; Kim, So-i; Suh, Dong-hee; Jin, Young-woo; Kim, Jeong-in; Choi, Hoon; Lim, Young-khi

    2010-07-01

    A total of 33 680 nuclear power plants (NPPs) workers were monitored and recorded from 1990 to 2007. According to the record, the average individual radiation dose has been decreasing continually from 3.20 mSv man(-1) in 1990 to 1.12 mSv man(-1) at the end of 2007. After the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 recommendation was generalised in South Korea, no NPP workers received >20 mSv radiation, and the numbers of relatively highly exposed workers have been decreasing continuously. The age distribution of radiation workers in NPPs was composed mainly of 20-30 y olds (83 %) for 1990-1994 and 30-40 y olds (75 %) for 2003-2007. The difference in individual average dose by age was not significant. Most (77 %) of the NPP radiation exposures from 1990 to 2007 occurred mostly during the refueling period. With regard to exposure type, the majority of exposures was external exposures, representing 95 % of the total exposures, whereas internal exposures represented only 5 %. External effective dose was affected mainly by gamma radiation exposure, with an insignificant amount of neutron exposure. As for internal effective dose, tritium in the pressurised heavy water reactor was the biggest cause of exposure. PMID:20223854

  11. Nuclear materials control technology in the post-cold war world: Radiation-based methods and information management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Ensslin, N.; Markin, J.T.

    1993-06-01

    The end of the cold war is providing both opportunities and requirements for improving the control of nuclear materials around the world. The dismantlement of nuclear weapons and the growth of nuclear power, including the use of plutonium in light water reactors and breeder reactor programs, coupled with enhanced proliferation concerns, drive the need for improved nuclear materials control. We describe nuclear materials control and the role of technology in making controls more effective and efficient. The current use and anticipated development in selected radiation-based methods and related information management systems am described briefly.

  12. 1989 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 26th, Marco Island, FL, July 25-29, 1989, Proceedings. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Agustin, Jr. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear science are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanics of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, hardness assurance and testing techniques, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, device radiation effects and hardening, radiation effects on isolation technologies, IC radiation effects and hardening, and single-event phenomena.

  13. 1990 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 27th, Reno, NV, July 16-20, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear and space radiation effects are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, hardness assurance and testing techniques, single-event upset and latchup, isolation technologies, device and integrated circuit effects and hardening, spacecraft charging and electromagnetic effects.

  14. [Principles and methods of evaluation of radiation risk and pilots' health in accidents of nuclear power objects].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Davydov, B I; Soldatov, S K; Zuev, V G

    1999-01-01

    The article deals with methodic approaches to health state evaluation of pilots who participated in liquidation of events following accidents at nuclear power objects. The main approaches are indeterminancy principle for late radiation effects, economic approach to evaluation of radiation risk, principle of risks comparison, consideration of summarized effect of environmental factors, etc. Some authors' viewpoints are presented. PMID:10097562

  15. Test and Evaluation of Fiber Optic Sensors for High-Radiation Space Nuclear Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klemer, Daniel; Fielder, Robert S.; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-07-01

    Fiber optic sensors can be used to measure a number of parameters, including temperature, strain, pressure and flow, for instrumentation and control of space nuclear power systems. In the past, this technology has often been rejected for use in such a high-radiation environment based on early experiments that revealed a number of degradation phenomena, including radiation-induced fiber attenuation, or 'graying', and Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fading and wavelength shift. However, this paper reports the results of recent experimental testing that demonstrates readability of fiber optic sensors to extremely high levels of neutron and gamma radiation. Both distributed Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors and single-point Extrinsic Fabry Perot Interferometer (EFPI) sensors were continuously monitored over a 2-month period, during which they were exposed to combined neutron and gamma radiation in both in-core and ex-core positions within a nuclear reactor. Total exposure reached approximately 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} fast neutron (E > 1 MeV) fluence and 8.7 x 10{sup 8} Gy gamma for in-core sensors. FBG sensors were interrogated using a standard Luna Innovations FBG measurement system, which is based on optical frequency-domain reflectometer (OFDR) technology. Approximately 74% of the 19 FBG sensors located at the core centerline in the in-core position exhibited sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to remain readable even after receiving the maximum dose. EFPI sensors were spectrally interrogated using a broadband probe source operating in the 830 nm wavelength region. While these single-point sensors failed early in the test, important additional fiber spectral transmission data was collected, which indicates that interrogation of EFPI sensors in alternate wavelength regions may allow significant improvement in sensor longevity for operation in high-radiation environments. This work was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the Nasa

  16. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  17. 1986 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 23rd, Providence, RI, July 21-23, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Thomas D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on the effects of nuclear and space radiation on electronic hardware gives attention to topics in the basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, electronic device radiation hardness assurance, SOI/SOS radiation effects, spacecraft charging and space radiation, IC radiation effects and hardening, single-event upset (SEU) phenomena and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Specific treatments encompass the generation of interface states by ionizing radiation in very thin MOS oxides, the microdosimetry of meson energy deposited on 1-micron sites in Si, total dose radiation and engineering studies, plasma interactions with biased concentrator solar cells, the transient imprint memory effect in MOS memories, mechanisms leading to SEU, and the vaporization and breakdown of thin columns of water.

  18. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-29

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder’s intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties’ absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  19. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-01

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder's intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties' absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  20. H 2 inhibition of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Martin; Roth, Olivia; Jonsson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of noble metal clusters in spent nuclear fuel on the kinetics of radiation induced spent fuel dissolution we have used Pd particle doped UO 2 pellets. The catalytic effect of Pd particles on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of UO 2 during γ-irradiation in HCO3- containing solutions purged with N 2 and H 2 was studied in this work. Four pellets with Pd concentrations of 0%, 0.1%, 1% and 3% were produced to mimic spent nuclear fuel. The pellets were placed in 10 mM HCO3- aqueous solutions and γ-irradiated, and the dissolution of UO22+ was measured spectrophotometrically as a function of time. Under N 2 atmosphere, 3% Pd prevent the dissolution of uranium by reduction with the radiolytically produced H 2, while the other pellets show a rate of dissolution of around 1.6 × 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1. Under H 2 atmosphere already 0.1% Pd effectively prevents the dissolution of uranium, while the rate of dissolution for the pellet without Pd is 1.4 × 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1. It is also shown in experiments without radiation in aqueous solutions containing H 2O 2 and O 2 that ɛ-particles catalyze the oxidation of the UO 2 matrix by these molecular oxidants, and that the kinetics of the catalyzed reactions is close to diffusion controlled.

  1. Minimizing nuclear medicine technologist radiation exposure during 131I-MIBG therapy.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Brian K; Morris, Victoria R; Lemen, Lisa; Weiss, Brian D; Gelfand, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine is a norepinephrine analog that concentrates in adrenergic tissue and has been shown to be an effective radiotherapeutic agent used to treat tumors of neural crest origin, particularly neuroblastoma, a sympathetic nervous system malignancy of children. The purpose of this study was to determine the radiation dose received by nuclear medicine technologists while preparing and administering 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy dosages, and if any changes could be implemented that would reduce a technologist's dose. The study involves the collection of total whole body doses received by technologists during the treatment of six patients. Patient dosages ranged from 9.25 to 31.1 GBq, with radiation exposures to the nuclear medicine technologists averaging 0.024 μSv per MBq administered to the patient. Subsequently, the doses received by the technologists were analyzed with respect to specific process steps performed during 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy including package receipt, dosage preparation, and dosage administration. Results show that the largest contribution to the technologist's whole body radiation dose (>83%) is received during the dosage administration process step. After additional shielding was installed for use during the dosage administration process step, technologists' doses decreased 80%. PMID:23287519

  2. Optimization of public and occupational radiation protection at nuclear power plants. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.J.

    1984-09-01

    An area of growing concern in recent years has been the apparent increase in levels of collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants in the USA. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) decisions and rulings related to in-service inspection, retrofits, and plant upgrades have been primarily intended to reduce the risk of public radiation exposure resulting from either routine release of radioactivity or potential accident situations. However, implementation of the required control measures and procedures can often result in increased levels of occupational radiation exposure. Recognizing the need to incorporate occupational dose into probabilistic risk assessments (PRA), value-impact, and cost-benefit analyses, the NRC has sponsored this study with the objective of developing an appropriate methodology to factor potential worker exposures into safety assessments. This report on the study is presented in three volumes. The following are subtitles for Volumes 1 to 3: Volume 1, A Review of Occupational Dose Assessment Considerations in Current Probabilistic Risk Assessments and Cost-Benefit Analyses, Volume 2, Considerations in Factoring Occupational Dose into Value-Impact and Cost-Benefit Analyses, and Volume 3, A Calculation Method.

  3. Measurements of individual radiation doses in residents living around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, Shigenobu; Takamura, Noboru; Kamiya, Kenji; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    At the outset of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, the radiation doses experienced by residents were calculated from the readings at monitoring posts, with several assumptions being made from the point of view of protection and safety. However, health effects should also be estimated by obtaining measurements of the individual radiation doses. The individual external radiation doses, determined by a behavior survey in the "evacuation and deliberate evacuation area" in the first 4 months, were <5 mSv in 97.4% of residents (maximum: 15 mSv). Doses in Fukushima Prefecture were <3 mSv in 99.3% of 386,572 residents analyzed. External doses in Fukushima City determined by personal dosimeters were <1 mSv/3 months (September-November, 2011) in 99.7% of residents (maximum: 2.7 mSv). Thyroid radiation doses, determined in March using a NaI (TI) scintillation survey meter in children in the evacuation and deliberate evacuation area, were <10 mSv in 95.7% of children (maximum: 35 mSv). Therefore, all doses were less than the intervention level of 50 mSv proposed by international organizations. Internal radiation doses determined by cesium-134 ((134)C) and cesium-137 ((137)C) whole-body counters (WBCs) were <1 mSv in 99% of the residents, and the maximum thyroid equivalent dose by iodine-131 WBCs was 20 mSv. The exploratory committee of the Fukushima Health Management Survey mentions on its website that radiation from the accident is unlikely to be a cause of adverse health effects in the future. In any event, sincere scientific efforts must continue to obtain individual radiation doses that are as accurate as possible. However, observation of the health effects of the radiation doses described above will require reevaluation of the protocol used for determining adverse health effects. The dose-response relationship is crucial, and the aim of the survey should be to collect sufficient data to confirm the presence or absence of radiation health

  4. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Pape, Yann Le; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation.

  5. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-05-09

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  6. Public health activities for mitigation of radiation exposures and risk communication challenges after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Robert Svendsen, Erik; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    Herein we summarize the public health actions taken to mitigate exposure of the public to radiation after the Fukushima accident that occurred on 11 March 2011 in order to record valuable lessons learned for disaster preparedness. Evacuations from the radiation-affected areas and control of the distribution of various food products contributed to the reduction of external and internal radiation exposure resulting from the Fukushima incident. However, risk communication is also an important issue during the emergency response effort and subsequent phases of dealiing with a nuclear disaster. To assist with their healing process, sound, reliable scientific information should continue to be disseminated to the radiation-affected communities via two-way communication. We will describe the essential public health actions following a nuclear disaster for the early, intermediate and late phases that will be useful for radiological preparedness planning in response to other nuclear or radiological disasters. PMID:25862700

  7. Public health activities for mitigation of radiation exposures and risk communication challenges after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Robert Svendsen, Erik; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Herein we summarize the public health actions taken to mitigate exposure of the public to radiation after the Fukushima accident that occurred on 11 March 2011 in order to record valuable lessons learned for disaster preparedness. Evacuations from the radiation-affected areas and control of the distribution of various food products contributed to the reduction of external and internal radiation exposure resulting from the Fukushima incident. However, risk communication is also an important issue during the emergency response effort and subsequent phases of dealiing with a nuclear disaster. To assist with their healing process, sound, reliable scientific information should continue to be disseminated to the radiation-affected communities via two-way communication. We will describe the essential public health actions following a nuclear disaster for the early, intermediate and late phases that will be useful for radiological preparedness planning in response to other nuclear or radiological disasters. PMID:25862700

  8. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Tianwu; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, {sup 201}Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of {sup 82}Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: {sup 82}Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to {sup 99m}Tc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice.

  9. External radiation exposure and mortality in a cohort of French nuclear workers

    PubMed Central

    Telle‐Lamberton, M; Samson, E; Caër, S; Bergot, D; Bard, D; Bermann, F; MGélas, J; Giraud, J M; Hubert, P; Metz‐Flamant, C; Néron, M O; Quesne, B; Tirmarche, M; Hill, C

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyse the effect of external radiation exposure on the mortality of French nuclear workers. Methods A cohort of 29 204 workers employed between 1950 and 1994 at the French Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA)) or at the General Company of Nuclear Fuel (COmpagnie GEnérale des MAtières nucléaires (Cogema, now Areva NC)) was followed up for an average of 17.8 years. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed with reference to French mortality rates. Dose‐effect relationship were analysed through trend tests and Poisson regression, with linear and log‐linear models. Results The mean exposure to X and gamma radiation was 8.3 mSv (16.9 mSv for exposed worker population). A total of 1842 deaths occurred between 1968 and 1994. A healthy worker effect was observed, the number of deaths in the cohort being 59% of the number expected from national mortality statistics. Among the 21 main cancer sites studied, a statistically significant excess was observed only for skin melanoma, and an excess of borderline statistical significance was observed for multiple myeloma. A dose‐effect relationship was observed for leukaemia after exclusion of chronic lymphoid leukaemia (CLL). The relative risk observed for non‐CLL leukaemia, n = 20, was 4.1 per 100 mSv (90% CI 1.4 to 12.2), linear model and 2.2 per 100 mSv (90% CI 1.2 to 3.3), log‐linear model. Significant dose‐effect relationship were also observed for causes of deaths associated with alcohol consumption: mouth and pharynx cancer, cirrhosis and alcoholic psychosis and external causes of death. Conclusion The risk of leukaemia increases with increasing exposure to external radiation; this is consistent with published results on other nuclear workers cohorts. PMID:17522135

  10. Generating single-copy nuclear gene data for a recent adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Whittall, Justen B; Medina-Marino, Andrew; Zimmer, Elizabeth A; Hodges, Scott A

    2006-04-01

    Recent adaptive radiations provide an exceptional opportunity to understand the processes of speciation and adaptation. However, reconstructing the phylogenetic history of recent and rapidly evolving clades often requires the use of multiple, independent gene genealogies. Nuclear introns are an obvious source of the necessary data but their use is often limited because degenerate primers can amplify paralogous loci. To identify PCR primers for a large number of loci in an especially rapid adaptive radiation, that of the flowering plant genus Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae), we developed an efficient method for amplifying multiple single-copy nuclear loci by sequencing a modest number of clones from a cDNA library and designing PCR primers; with one primer anchored in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) and one primer in the coding region of each gene. Variation between paralogous loci evolves more quickly in 3'-UTR regions compared to adjacent exons, and therefore we achieved high specificity for isolating orthologous loci. Furthermore, we were able to identify genes containing large introns by amplifying genes from genomic DNA and comparing the PCR product size to that predicted from their cDNA sequence. In Aquilegia eight out of eleven loci were isolated with this method and six of these loci had introns. Among four genes sequenced for samples spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the genus, we found sequence variation at levels similar to that observed in ITS, further supporting the recent and rapid radiation in Aquilegia. We assessed the orthology of amplification products by phylogenetic congruence among loci, the presence of two well established phylogenetic relationships, and similarity among loci for levels of sequence variation. Higher levels of variation among samples for one locus suggest possible paralogy. Overall, this method provides an efficient means of isolating predominantly single-copy loci from both low and high-copy gene families, providing ample

  11. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  12. Nuclear Bragg scattering studies in [sup 57]Fe with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haustein, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of nuclear Bragg x-ray scattering of synchrotron radiation, using crystals of [alpha]-[sup 57]Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3], have been carried out at the NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Cornell University CHESS facility. These studies have demonstrated that nuclear resonance states can be used to produce filtered x-ray beams which have extremely narrow bandwidth, small angular divergence and unique polarization and temporal properties. this combination of characteristics, unobtainable with radioactive sources, makes synchrotron-based Moessbauer spectroscopy feasible and is an important complement to existing methods. A review of the experimental methodology is presented. As well as come suggestions for fuller exploitation of this new technique.

  13. Nuclear Bragg scattering studies in {sup 57}Fe with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haustein, P.E.

    1993-03-01

    Studies of nuclear Bragg x-ray scattering of synchrotron radiation, using crystals of {alpha}-{sup 57}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, have been carried out at the NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Cornell University CHESS facility. These studies have demonstrated that nuclear resonance states can be used to produce filtered x-ray beams which have extremely narrow bandwidth, small angular divergence and unique polarization and temporal properties. this combination of characteristics, unobtainable with radioactive sources, makes synchrotron-based Moessbauer spectroscopy feasible and is an important complement to existing methods. A review of the experimental methodology is presented. As well as come suggestions for fuller exploitation of this new technique.

  14. Mortality among workers monitored for radiation exposure at the French nuclear fuel company.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Rogel, A; Caër, S; Samson, E; Laurier, D; Acker, A; Tirmarche, M

    2009-01-01

    A cohort of 9,285 nuclear workers employed at the French company AREVA NC specializing in the nuclear fuel cycle was established. Vital status, causes of death, employment characteristics and annual exposure to ionizing radiation were reconstructed for each individual over the time period 1977-2004. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed using national mortality rates as an external reference. Tests for trends in mortality with duration of employment and cumulative external dose were performed. The all-cause and all-cancer mortality was significantly lower than expected from the French population. No significant excess among cancer sites studied was observed. Significant positive trends with cumulative dose were observed for colon and liver cancer and for respiratory diseases. Isolated significant trends should be carefully interpreted and considered in line with the large number of trend tests performed. PMID:20007120

  15. Aerial radiation monitoring around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using an unmanned helicopter.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Torii, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 generated a series of large tsunami that seriously damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), which resulted in the release of radioactive materials into the environment. To provide further details regarding the distribution of air dose rate and the distribution of radioactive cesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) deposition on the ground within a radius of approximately 5 km from the nuclear power plant, we carried out measurements using an unmanned helicopter equipped with a radiation detection system. The distribution of the air dose rate at a height of 1 m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground was calculated. Accordingly, the footprint of radioactive plumes that extended from the FDNPP was illustrated. PMID:25053518

  16. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Pape, Yann Le

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) values in the concrete biological shields of the US PWR fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to assure reliable risk assessment for NPPs extended operation.

  17. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

  18. [Implementing new technology in radiation oncology: The French agency for nuclear safety (ASN) report].

    PubMed

    Lartigau, É-F; Lisbona, A; Isambert, A; Cadot, P; Derreumaux, S; Dupuis, O; Gérard, J-P; Ledu, D; Mahé, M-A; Marchesi, V; Mazurier, J; De Oliveira, A; Phare, O; Aubert, B

    2015-10-01

    In August 2013, the French nuclear safety agency (ASN) requested the permanent group of experts in radiation protection in medicine (GPMED) to propose recommendations on the implementation of new technology and techniques in radiation oncology. These recommendations were finalized in February 2015 by the GPMED. In April 2015, the ASN sent a letter to the French ministry of health (DGS/DGOS), and its national health agencies (ANSM, INCa, HAS). In these letters, ASN proposed that, from the 12 recommendations made by the GPMED, an action plan should be established, whose control could be assigned to the French national cancer institute (INCa), as a pilot of the national committee for radiotherapy and that this proposal has to be considered at the next meeting of the national committee of radiotherapy. PMID:26278991

  19. Nonlinear radiation damping of nuclear spin waves and magnetoelastic waves in antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Alexander V.; Safonov, Vladimir L.

    2016-03-01

    Parallel pumping of nuclear spin waves in antiferromagnetic CsMnF3 at liquid helium temperatures and magnetoelastic waves in antiferromagnetic FeBO3 at liquid nitrogen temperature in a helical resonator was studied. It was found that the absorbed microwave power is approximately equal to the irradiated power from the sample and that the main restriction mechanism of absorption in both cases is defined by the nonlinear radiation damping predicted about two decades ago. Nonlinear radiation damping is sure to be a common feature of the parallel pumping technique for all normal magnetic excitations and it must be taken into account for interpretation of nonlinear phenomena in parametrically excited magnetic systems.

  20. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4–15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  1. NUCLEAR RADIATION DOSIMETER USING COMPOSITE FILTER AND A SINGLE ELEMENT FILTER

    DOEpatents

    Storm, E.; Shlaer, S.

    1964-04-21

    A nuclear radiation dosimeter is described that uses, in combination, a composite filter and a single element filter. The composite filter contains a plurality of comminuted metals having K-edges evenly distributed over the energy range of interest and the quantity of each of the metals is selected to result in filtering in an amount inversely proportional to the sensitivity of the film in the range over l00 kev. A copper filter is used that has a thickness to contribute the necessary additional correction in the interval between 40 and 100 kev. (AEC)

  2. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4-15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  3. Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

  4. Radiation Doses to the Public From the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R. E.; Maheras, S. J.; Ross, S. S.; Weiner, R.

    2003-02-25

    This paper reviews issues that have been raised concerning radiological risks and safety of the public exposed to shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to a Yucca Mountain repository. It presents and analyzes the contrasting viewpoints of opponents and proponents, presents facts about radiological exposures and risks, and provides perspective from which to observe the degree of risk that would devolve from the shipments. The paper concludes that the risks to the public's health and safety from being exposed to radiation from the shipments will not be discernable.

  5. Free Radicals Generated by Ionizing Radiation Signal Nuclear Translocation of p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. D.; Pennington, M. E.; Craven, M. T.; Warters, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that regulates several pathways, which function collectively to maintain the integrity of the genome. Nuclear localization is critical for wild-type function. However, the signals that regulate subcellular localization of p53 have not been identified. Here, we examine the effect of ionizing radiation on the subcellular localization of p53 in two cell lines in which p63 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm and found that ionizing radiation caused a biphasic translocation response. p53 entered the nucleus 1-2 hours postirradiation (early response), subsequently emerged from the nucleus, and then again entered the nucleus 12-24 hours after the cells had been irradiated (delayed response). These changes in subcellular localization could be completely blocked by the free radical scavenger, WR1065. By comparison, two DNA-damaging agents that do not generate free radicals, mitomycin C and doxorubicin, caused translocation only after 12-24 h of exposure to the drugs, and this effect could not be inhibited by WR1065. Hence, although all three DNA-damaging agents induced relocalization of p53 to the nucleus, only the translocation caused by radiation was sensitive to free radical scavenging. We suggest that the free radicals generated by ionizing radiation can signal p53 translocation to the nucleus.

  6. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation and mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; Castaño Lara, S; de Andrés Manzano, B; García Ferruelo, M; Iglesias Martín, L; Calero, J R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firstly, to ascertain whether mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board (Junta de Energía Nuclear-JEN) was higher than that for the Spanish population overall; and secondly, if this were so, to ascertain whether this difference was associated with exposure to ionising radiation. METHODS: A retrospective follow up of a cohort of 5657 workers was carried out for the period 1954-92. Cohort mortality was compared with that for the Spanish population overall, with standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) adjusted for sex, age, and calendar period. Also, Poisson models were used to analyse mortality from lung cancer in the cohort by level of exposure to ionising radiation. RESULTS: Workers' median and mean cumulative exposures were 4.04 and 11.42 mSv, respectively. Mean annual exposure was 1.33 mSv. Excess mortality due to bone tumours was found for the cohort as a whole (six deaths observed; SMR 2.95; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.08 to 6.43). Among miners, excess mortality was found for non-malignant respiratory diseases (SMR 2.94; 95% CI 2.27 to 3.75), and for lung cancer bordering on statistical significance (SMR 1.50; 95% CI 0.96 to 2.23; P = 0.055). Relative risks of dying of lung cancer from ionising radiation in the dose quartiles 2, 3, and 4 versus the lowest dose quartile, were 1.00, 1.64, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Excess mortality from lung cancer was found among JEN miners. Nevertheless, no clear relation was found between mortality from lung cancer and level of exposure to ionising radiation in the JEN cohort. Continued follow up of the cohort is required to confirm excess mortality from bone tumours. PMID:9155782

  7. DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses. [DEfense Nuclear Agency (DNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T. ); Whitaker, S.Y. )

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the [plus minus]20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

  8. The effects of nuclear radiation on Schottky power diodes and power MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisek, Jonathan Andrew

    NASA is exploring the potential use of nuclear reactors as power sources for future space missions. These missions will require electrical components, consisting of power circuits and semiconductor devices, to be placed in close vicinity to the reactor, in the midst of a high neutron and gamma-ray radiation field. Therefore, the primary goal of this research is to examine the effects of a mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation field on the static and dynamic electrical performance of power Schottky diodes and power MOSFETs in order to support future design efforts of radiation-hard power semiconductors and circuits. In order to accomplish this, non-radiation hardened commercial power Si and SiC Schottky power diodes, manufactured by International Rectifier and Cree, respectively, were irradiated in the Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR), and their degradation in electrical performance was observed using I-V characterization. Key electrical performance parameters were extracted using least squares curve-fits of the corresponding semiconductor physics model equations to the experimental data, and these electrical performance parameters were used to model the diodes in PSpice. A half-wave rectifier circuit containing Cree SiC Schottky diodes, rated for 5 A DC forward current and 1200 V DC blocking voltage, was also tested and modeled in order to determine and analyze changes in overall circuit performance and diode power dissipation as a function of radiation dose. Also, electrical components will be exposed to charged particle radiation from space, such as high energy protons in the Van Allen Radiation Belts surrounding earth. Therefore, the results from this study, with respect to the Si and SiC Schottky power diodes, were compared to results published by NASA, which had tested the same diode models at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) with a 203 MeV proton beam. The comparison was made on the basis of displacement damage dose, calculated

  9. Mechanism of induction of nuclear anomalies by gamma-radiation in the colonic epithelium of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.; Heddle, J.A.; Blakey, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The induction of karyorrhexis and nuclear anomalies in colonic crypt cells has been correlated positively with the induction of colonic tumors by chemical treatment. These nuclear anomalies occur in the proliferative region of the crypt and exhibit a variety of morphological characteristics. Some nuclear anomalies resemble the micronuclei that arise from chromosomal fragments after mitosis. Here, we report that the nuclear anomalies observed within the first few hr of insult with gamma-radiation are independent of mitosis for their expression, as evidenced by failure of colchicine to inhibit their induction, and do not arise from chromosomal material lost during mitosis.

  10. An analysis of the radiation field characteristics for extremity dose assessment during maintenance periods at nuclear power plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2012-12-01

    Workers who maintain the water chambers of steam generators during maintenance periods in nuclear power plants (NPPs) have a higher likelihood of high radiation exposure, even if they are exposed for a short period of time. In particular, it is expected that the hands of workers would receive the highest radiation exposure as a consequence of hand contact with radioactive materials. In this study, a characteristic analysis of inhomogeneous radiation fields for contact operations was conducted using thermoluminescent dosemeters for the whole body and extremities during maintenance periods at Korean NPPs. It was observed that inhomogeneous radiation fields for contact operations at NPPs were dominated by high-energy photons. PMID:22628525

  11. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. PMID:25413928

  12. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. PMID:25413928

  13. Nuclear Resonance Scattering of Synchrotron Radiation as a Unique Electronic, Structural, and Thermodynamic Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    Discovery of Mössbauer effect [1] in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. Thus, Mössbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Mössbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physicists, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Mössbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or "in-beam" Mössbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Mössbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time.

  14. Radiation-Induced Survivin Nuclear Accumulation is Linked to DNA Damage Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Reichert, Sebastian; Roedel, Claus

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Increased expression of survivin has been identified as a negative prognostic marker in a variety of human cancers. We have previously shown that survivin is a radiation-resistance factor and that the therapeutic effect of survivin knock-down might result from an impaired DNA repair capacity. In this study, we aimed to elucidate an interrelationship between survivin's cellular localization and DNA double-strand break repair. Methods and Materials: Survivin's cellular distribution and nuclear complex formation were assayed by Western blotting of subcellular fractions, by immunofluorescence staining, and co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 colorectal cancer cells. DNA repair capacity was analyzed by kinetics of gamma-H2AX foci formation, and by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) assays in the presence of survivin-specific or nonspecific control siRNA. Results: Following irradiation, we observed a rapid nuclear accumulation of survivin and subsequent phosphorylation of the protein in the nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses from nuclear extracts revealed an interaction among survivin, Ku70, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, and DNA-PKcs that was confirmed by immunofluorescence co-localization in nuclear foci. Survivin knock down by siRNA resulted in an impaired DNA double strand break repair, as demonstrated by an increased detection of gamma-H2AX foci/nucleus at 60 min and a higher amount of residual gamma-H2AX foci at 24 hr postirradiation. Furthermore, we detected in survivin-depleted cells a hampered S2056 autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs and a significantly decreased DNA-PKcs kinase activity. Conclusion: These data indicate that nuclear survivin is linked to DNA double-strand break repair by interaction with members of the DNA double-strand breaks repair machinery, thus regulating DNA-PKcs activity.

  15. EDISTR: a computer program to obtain a nuclear decay data base for radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    This report provides documentation for the computer program EDISTR. EDISTR uses basic radioactive decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File developed and maintained by the Nuclear Data Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as input, and calculates the mean energies and absolute intensities of all principal radiations associated with the radioactive decay of a nuclide. The program is intended to provide a physical data base for internal dosimetry calculations. The principal calculations performed by EDISTR are the determination of (1) the average energy of beta particles in a beta transition, (2) the beta spectrum as function of energy, (3) the energies and intensities of x-rays and Auger electrons generated by radioactive decay processes, (4) the bremsstrahlung spectra accompanying beta decay and monoenergetic Auger and internal conversion electrons, and (5) the radiations accompanying spontaneous fission. This report discusses the theoretical and empirical methods used in EDISTR and also practical aspects of the computer implementation of the theory. Detailed instructions for preparing input data for the computer program are included, along with examples and discussion of the output data generated by EDISTR.

  16. From nuclear power to coal power: Aerosol-induced health and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Laakso, Anton; Karhunen, Anni; Kokkola, Harri; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Korhonen, Hannele; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated what would be the climate and PM-induced air quality consequences if all nuclear reactors worldwide were closed down and replaced by coal combustion. In a way, this presents a "worst-case scenario" since less polluting energy sources are available. We studied simultaneously the radiative and health effects of coal power emissions using a global 3-D aerosol-climate model (ECHAM-HAMMOZ). This approach allowed us to estimate the effects of a major global energy production change from low carbon source to a high carbon one using detailed spatially resolved population density information. We included the radiative effects of both CO2 and PM2.5 but limited the study of health effects to PM2.5 only. Our results show that the replacement of nuclear power with coal power would have globally caused an average of 150,000 premature deaths per year during the period 2005-2009 with two thirds of them in Europe. For 37 years the aerosol emissions from the additional coal power plants would cool the climate but after that the accumulating CO2 emissions would accelerate the warming of the climate.

  17. Preliminary Results from an Investigation into Nanostructured Nuclear Radiation Detectors for Non-Proliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of embedding composite scintillators consisting of nanosized inorganic crystals in an organic matrix has been actively pursued. Nanocomposite detectors have the potential to meet many of the homeland security, non-proliferation, and border and cargo-screening needs of the nation and, by virtue of their superior nuclear identification capability over plastic, at roughly the same cost as plastic, have the potential to replace all plastic detectors. Nanocomposites clearly have the potential of being a gamma ray detection material that would be sensitive yet less expensive and easier to produce on a large scale than growing large, whole crystals of similar sensitivity. These detectors would have a broad energy range and a sufficient energy resolution to perform isotopic identification. The material can also be fabricated on an industrial scale, further reducing cost. This investigation focused on designing and fabricating prototype core/shell and quantum dot (QD) detectors. Fourteen core/shell and four QD detectors, all with the basic consistency of a mixture of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix with different densities of nanoparticles, were prepared. Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated, embedded in a polystyrene matrix, and the resultant scintillators’ radiation detector properties were characterized. This work also attempted to extend the gamma energy response on both low- and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy and high-energy gamma rays. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with a significant response of these materials to nuclear radiation.

  18. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M.; Field, Kevin G.; Le Pape, Yann

    2016-02-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  19. Radiation resistant concrete for applications in nuclear power and radioactive waste industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Steven Robert

    Elemental components of ordinary concrete contain a variety of metals and rare earth elements that are susceptible to neutron activation. This activation occurs by means of radiative capture, a neutron interaction that results in formation of radioisotopes such as Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154. Studies have shown that these three radioisotopes are responsible for the residual radioactivity found in nuclear power plant concrete reactor dome and shielding walls. Such concrete is classified as Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and requires disposal at appropriate disposal sites. There are only three such sites in the USA, and every nuclear power plant will produce at the time of decommissioning approximately 1,500 tonnes of activated concrete classified as LLRW and VLLW. NAVA ALIGA (ancient word for a new stone) is a new concrete mixture developed mainly by research as presented in this thesis. The purpose of NAVA ALIGA is to satisfy IAEA clearance levels if used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, or radioactive waste canisters. NAVA ALIGA will never be activated above the IAEA clearance level after long-term exposure to neutron radiation when used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, and radioactive waste canisters. Components of NAVA ALIGA were identified using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ISP-MS) to determine trace element composition. In addition, it was tested for compressive strength and permeability, important for nuclear infrastructure. The studied mixture had a high water to cement ratio of 0.56, which likely resulted in the high measured permeability, yet the mixture also showed a compressive strength greater than 6 000 psi after 28 days. In addition to this experimental analysis, which goal was to develop a standard approach to define the concrete mixtures in satisfying the IAEA

  20. Absence of internal radiation contamination by radioactive cesium among children affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Morita, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Amina; Gilmour, Stuart; Kami, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic internal radiation contamination accounts for a substantial fraction of long-term cumulative radiation exposure among residents in radiation-contaminated areas. However, little information is available on ongoing chronic internal radiation contamination among residents near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Using a whole body counter, internal radiation contamination levels among elementary and middle school students who commute to 22 schools located within Minamisoma city were assessed between May and July 2013 (26 to 28 mo after the disaster). Of 3,299 elementary and middle school students in the city, 3,255 individuals (98%) were screened through school health check-ups. Not a single student was detected with internal radiation contamination due to radioactive cesium. The study found no risk of chronic internal radiation exposure among residents near the crippled nuclear power plant. Current food inspection by local governments, volunteers, and farmers has been functioning well within Fukushima prefecture. However, food management by screening suspected contamination along with whole body counter screening are key public health interventions and should be continued to avoid further internal radiation exposure in radiation-contaminated areas. PMID:25437518

  1. Radiation doses to local populations near nuclear weapons test sites worldwide.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing was conducted in the atmosphere at numerous sites worldwide between 1946 and 1980, which resulted in exposures to local populations as a consequence of fallout of radioactive debris. The nuclear tests were conducted by five nations (United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France, and China) primarily at 16 sites. The 16 testing sites, located in nine different countries on five continents (plus Oceania) contributed nearly all of the radioactive materials released to the environment by atmospheric testing; only small amounts were released at a fewother minor testing sites. The 16 sites discussed here are Nevada Test Site, USA (North American continent), Bikini and Enewetak, Marshall Islands (Oceania); Johnston Island, USA (Oceania), Christmas and Malden Island, Kiribati (Oceania); Emu Field, Maralinga, and Monte Bello Islands, Australia (Australian continent); Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia (Oceania), Reggane, Algeria (Africa), Novaya Zemlya and Kapustin Yar, Russia (Europe), Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan (Asia), and Lop Nor, China (Asia). There were large differences in the numbers of tests conducted at each location and in the total explosive yields. Those factors, as well as differences in population density, lifestyle, environment, and climate at each site, led to large differences in the doses received by local populations. In general, the tests conducted earliest led to the highest individual and population exposures, although the amount of information available for a few of these sites is insufficient to provide any detailed evaluation of radiation exposures. The most comprehensive information for any site is for the Nevada Test Site. The disparities in available information add difficulty to determining the radiation exposures of local populations at each site. It is the goal of this paper to summarize the available information on external and internal doses received by the public living in the regions near each of the

  2. The Role of Nuclear Fragmentation in Particle Therapy and Space Radiation Protection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Cary; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transport of the so-called HZE particles (those having high charge, Z, and energy, E) through matter is crucially important both in space radiation protection and in the clinical setting where heavy ions are used for cancer treatment. HZE particles are usually considered those having Z > 1, though sometimes Z > 2 is meant. Transport physics is governed by two types of interactions, electromagnetic (ionization energy loss) and nuclear. Models of transport, such as those used in treatment planning and space mission planning must account for both effects in detail. The theory of electromagnetic interactions is well developed, but nucleus-nucleus collisions are so complex that no fundamental physical theory currently describes them. Instead, interaction models are generally anchored to experimental data, which in some areas are far from complete. The lack of fundamental physics knowledge introduces uncertainties in the calculations of exposures and their associated risks. These uncertainties are greatly compounded by the much larger uncertainties in biological response to HZE particles. In this article, we discuss the role of nucleus-nucleus interactions in heavy charged particle therapy and in deep space, where astronauts will receive a chronic low dose from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and potentially higher short-term doses from sporadic, unpredictable solar energetic particles (SEPs). GCRs include HZE particles; SEPs typically do not and we, therefore, exclude them from consideration in this article. Nucleus-nucleus collisions can result in the breakup of heavy ions into lighter ions. In space, this is generally beneficial because dose and dose equivalent are, on the whole, reduced in the process. The GCRs can be considered a radiation field with a significant high-LET component; when they pass through matter, the high-LET component is attenuated, at the cost of a slight increase in the low-LET component. Not only are the standard measures of risk

  3. The Role of Nuclear Fragmentation in Particle Therapy and Space Radiation Protection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Cary; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transport of the so-called HZE particles (those having high charge, Z, and energy, E) through matter is crucially important both in space radiation protection and in the clinical setting where heavy ions are used for cancer treatment. HZE particles are usually considered those having Z > 1, though sometimes Z > 2 is meant. Transport physics is governed by two types of interactions, electromagnetic (ionization energy loss) and nuclear. Models of transport, such as those used in treatment planning and space mission planning must account for both effects in detail. The theory of electromagnetic interactions is well developed, but nucleus–nucleus collisions are so complex that no fundamental physical theory currently describes them. Instead, interaction models are generally anchored to experimental data, which in some areas are far from complete. The lack of fundamental physics knowledge introduces uncertainties in the calculations of exposures and their associated risks. These uncertainties are greatly compounded by the much larger uncertainties in biological response to HZE particles. In this article, we discuss the role of nucleus–nucleus interactions in heavy charged particle therapy and in deep space, where astronauts will receive a chronic low dose from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and potentially higher short-term doses from sporadic, unpredictable solar energetic particles (SEPs). GCRs include HZE particles; SEPs typically do not and we, therefore, exclude them from consideration in this article. Nucleus–nucleus collisions can result in the breakup of heavy ions into lighter ions. In space, this is generally beneficial because dose and dose equivalent are, on the whole, reduced in the process. The GCRs can be considered a radiation field with a significant high-LET component; when they pass through matter, the high-LET component is attenuated, at the cost of a slight increase in the low-LET component. Not only are the standard measures of risk

  4. Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author`s responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A.

  5. Microscopic calculations of the characteristics of radiative nuclear reactions for double-magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achakovskiy, Oleg; Kamerdzhiev, Sergei; Tselyaev, Victor; Shitov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections and average radiative widths Γγ of neutron resonances for two double-magic nuclei 132Sn and 208Pb have been calculated using the microscopic photon strength functions (PSF), which were obtained within the microscopic self-consistent version of the extended theory of finite Fermi systems in the time blocking approximation. For the first time, the microscopic PSFs have been obtained within the fully self-consistent approach with exact accounting for the single particle continuum (for 208Pb). The approach includes phonon coupling effects in addition to the standard RPA approach. The known Skyrme force has been used. The calculations of nuclear reaction characteristics have been performed with the EMPIRE 3.1 nuclear reaction code. Here, three nuclear level density (NLD) models have been used: the so-called phenomenological GSM, the EMPIRE specific (or Enhanced GSM) and the microscopical combinatorial HFB NLD models. For both considered characteristics we found a significant disagreement between the results obtained with the GSM and HFB NLD models. For 208Pb, a reasonable agreement has been found with systematic for the Γγ values with HFB NLD and with the experimental data for the HFB NLD average resonance spacing D0, while for these two quantities the differences between the values obtained with GSM and HFB NLD are of several orders of magnitude. The discrepancies between the results with the phenomenological EGLO PSF and microscopic RPA or TBA are much less for the same NLD model.

  6. Complex composite engineering architectures for nuclear and high-radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, Drew E; Vaidya, Rajendra U; Ammerman, Curtt N

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) is a novel overarching approach to bridge length and time scales in computational materials science and engineering. This approach integrates all elements of multi-scale modeling (including various empirical and science-based models) with materials informatics to provide users the opportunity to tailor material selections based on stringent application needs. Typically, materials engineering has focused on structural requirements (stress, strain, modulus, fracture toughness etc.) while multi-scale modeling has been science focused (mechanical threshold strength model, grain-size models, solid-solution strengthening models etc.). Materials informatics (mechanical property inventories) on the other hand, is extensively data focused. All of these elements are combined within the framework of ICME to create architecture for the development, selection and design new composite materials for challenging environments. We propose development of the foundations for applying ICME to composite materials development for nuclear and high-radiation environments (including nuclear-fusion energy reactors, nuclear-fission reactors, and accelerators). We expect to combine all elements of current material models (including thermo-mechanical and finite-element models) into the ICME framework. This will be accomplished through the use of a various mathematical modeling constructs. These constructs will allow the integration of constituent models, which in tum would allow us to use the adaptive strengths of using a combinatorial scheme (fabrication and computational) for creating new composite materials. A sample problem where these concepts are used is provided in this summary.

  7. Radiation situation in Kamchatka after the Fukushima nuclear power station accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    The chronology of events in Kamchatka related to the threat of radioactive contamination of the territory as a result of the Fukushima-1 nuclear power station (NPS) accident in Japan is briefly reviewed based on the published data. The accident happened on March 11, 2011, after a strong earthquake near the coast of Japan and the giant tsunami followed by the earthquake. The power supply was damaged and, as a result, the cooling system of NPS reactors was destroyed. Although the reactors did not explode, radioactive emissions from the damaged NPS discharged into the atmosphere and spread over large areas by the air flows. Information about the radiation situation in Kamchatka is controversial. Therefore, the author carried out regular monitoring of the radiation background during a hiking trip in Kamchatka in August 2011. The data are presented in this paper. It was concluded that the radiation background along the route of the trip was consistent (within the accuracy of measurement methods) with the normal values of a natural background. A thorough analysis of air, soil, food samples, etc., is required for a more detailed study to identify the presence of radionuclides in the atmospheric emissions from the damaged NPS in Japan.

  8. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  9. Radiation Dose Reduction Efficiency of Buildings after the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55±0.04, 0.15±0.02, and 0.19±0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites. PMID:24999992

  10. Radiation does from medical in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Chen, C P; Chang, P S

    1988-10-01

    A method of medical diagnosis of toxic elements, using a neutron beam from a mobile nuclear reactor to perform partial-body in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation technique, has been developed. Both neutron and gamma-ray dose equivalents in an irradiated phantom and around medical researchers were measured and evaluated. Neutron flux at various kinetic energies was measured using an activation foil technique, and the neutron dose equivalents at tissues of risk inside the irradiated phantom were calculated by neutron transport code. Gamma-ray dose equivalents inside the irradiated phantom and around the nuclear reactor were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The risk associated with the neutron and gamma radiation dose equivalents received by both the irradiated phantom and medical researchers were evaluated in detail. The radiation safety of the in-vivo medical diagnosis using the mobile nuclear reactor, under the context of radiation protection guidelines, is discussed. PMID:3170218

  11. Health effects of radiation and other health problems in the aftermath of nuclear accidents, with an emphasis on Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Arifumi; Tanigawa, Koichi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yabe, Hirooki; Maeda, Masaharu; Shigemura, Jun; Ohira, Tetsuya; Tominaga, Takako; Akashi, Makoto; Hirohashi, Nobuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Shibuya, Kenji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Chhem, Rethy K

    2015-08-01

    437 nuclear power plants are in operation at present around the world to meet increasing energy demands. Unfortunately, five major nuclear accidents have occurred in the past--ie, at Kyshtym (Russia [then USSR], 1957), Windscale Piles (UK, 1957), Three Mile Island (USA, 1979), Chernobyl (Ukraine [then USSR], 1986), and Fukushima (Japan, 2011). The effects of these accidents on individuals and societies are diverse and enduring. Accumulated evidence about radiation health effects on atomic bomb survivors and other radiation-exposed people has formed the basis for national and international regulations about radiation protection. However, past experiences suggest that common issues were not necessarily physical health problems directly attributable to radiation exposure, but rather psychological and social effects. Additionally, evacuation and long-term displacement created severe health-care problems for the most vulnerable people, such as hospital inpatients and elderly people. PMID:26251393

  12. Nuclear reactor pulse tracing using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kyle A.; Geuther, Jeffrey A.; Neihart, James L.; Riedel, Todd A.; Rojeski, Ronald A.; Ugorowski, Philip B.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2012-07-01

    CdZnTe has previously been shown to operate as an electro-optic radiation detector by utilizing the Pockels effect to measure steady-state nuclear reactor power levels. In the present work, the detector response to reactor power excursion experiments was investigated. Peak power levels during an excursion were predicted to be between 965 MW and 1009 MW using the Fuchs-Nordheim and Fuchs-Hansen models and confirmed with experimental data from the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor. The experimental arrangement of the Pockels cell detector includes collimated laser light passing through a transparent birefringent crystal, located between crossed polarizers, and focused upon a photodiode. The birefringent crystal, CdZnTe in this case, is placed in a neutron beam emanating from a nuclear reactor beam port. After obtaining the voltage-dependent Pockels characteristic response curve with a photodiode, neutron measurements were conducted from reactor pulses with the Pockels cell set at the 1/4 and 3/4 wave bias voltages. The detector responses to nuclear reactor pulses were recorded in real-time using data logging electronics, each showing a sharp increase in photodiode current for the 1/4 wave bias, and a sharp decrease in photodiode current for the 3/4 wave bias. The polarizers were readjusted to equal angles in which the maximum light transmission occurred at 0 V bias, thereby, inverting the detector response to reactor pulses. A high sample rate oscilloscope was also used to more accurately measure the FWHM of the pulse from the electro-optic detector, 64 ms, and is compared to the experimentally obtained FWHM of 16.0 ms obtained with the 10B-lined counter.

  13. Radiation survey on Fukushima Medical University premises about four years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yasutaka; Wakamatsu, Hiroaki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted on the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) premises (in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture) about four years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Its objectives were (1) to create a map of the ambient gamma dose rate (air-kerma rate) distribution, (2) to evaluate the air-kerma rate originating from natural radionuclides, and (3) to investigate the effects of snow cover on changes in the air-kerma rate. This man-borne survey revealed that the air-kerma rate varies widely, ranging from 0.038 μGy h(-1) to 0.520 μGy h(-1), and is higher on grass than on the other investigated surface types, such as soil, asphalt, and bricks. In this area, the mean air-kerma rate from natural radiation was evaluated to be 0.03 ± 0.01 μGy h(-1), which is close to 0.04 μGy h(-1), which was measured in central Fukushima City by a local authority.Furthermore, snowfall was found to reduce the air-kerma rate by 5%-30%. This reduction was attributed to attenuation of the primary radiation while passing through the snow cover, and the measured contribution of scattered radiation to the air-kerma rate reduction was small. The reduction rate was found to depend on the initial snow depth but to maintain a similar value for a couple of days, after the snow had partially melted and its depth had decreased. Finally, analysis of the daily dose due to external exposure received on the FMU premises revealed that no further health effects due to chronic radiation exposure at this site are to be expected. PMID:26911302

  14. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  15. A possible approach to large-scale laboratory testing for acute radiation sickness after a nuclear detonation.

    PubMed

    Adalja, Amesh A; Watson, Matthew; Wollner, Samuel; Toner, Eric

    2011-12-01

    After the detonation of an improvised nuclear device, several key actions will be necessary to save the greatest number of lives possible. Among these tasks, the identification of patients with impending acute radiation sickness is a critical problem that so far has lacked a clear solution in national planning. We present one possible solution: the formation of a public-private partnership to augment the capacity to identify those at risk for acute radiation sickness. PMID:21988186

  16. Radiative Lifetime for Nuclear Spin Conversion of Water-Ion H_2O^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Harada, Kensuke; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear spin conversion interaction of the water ion, H_2O^+, has been studied to derive the spontaneous emission lifetime between the ortho- and para-levels. The H_2O^+ ion is a radical with ^2 B _1 electronic ground state and the off-diagonal electron spin-nuclear spin interaction term, T_{ab} (S_aΔ I_b + S_bΔ I_a), connects para and ortho levels, because Δ {I} = {I}_1 - {I}_2 has nonvanishing matrix elements between I = 0 and 1. The T_{ab} coupling constant, derived by an ab initio calculation in MRD-CI/Bk level to be 72 MHz, is larger than that of H_2O by 4 orders of magnitude, makes the ortho to para conversion of H_2O^+ faster than that of H_2O by 8 orders of magnitude and possibly competitive with other astrophysical processes. Last year we reported ortho and para coupling channels below 900 cm^{-1} caused by accidental near degeneracy of rotational levels. For example, hyperfine components of the 4_{2,2}(o) and 3_{3,0}(p) levels mix each other by 1.2 x 10^{-3} due to the near degeneracy (Δ E = 0.417 cm^{-1}), but the lower lying 1_{0,1}(p) and 1_{1,1}(o) levels mix only by 8.9 x 10^{-5} because of their large separation (Δ E = 16.27 cm^{-1}). In the present study, we solved the radiative rate equations including all the rotational levels below 900 cm^{-1} to give the o-p conversion lifetime to be 0.451, 3.27, 398 and 910 years for the equilibrium o/p ratio of 3.00, 3.00, 4.52, and 406 when the radiation temperature T_r is 100, 60, 20 and 5 K. These results qualitatively help to understand the observed high o/p ratio of 4.8 ± 0.5 (corresponding to the nuclear spin temperature of 21 K) toward Sgr B2, but they are too slow to compete with the reaction by collision unless the number of density of H_2 in the region is very low (n˜1 cm^{-3}) or the radiative temperature is very high (T_r > 50K). K. Tanaka, K. Harada, and T. Oka, the 67th OSU Symposium MG06, 2012. P. Schilke, et al., A&A 521, L11 (2010). K. Tanaka, K. Harada, and T. Oka, J. Phys. Chem. A

  17. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor

  18. Resolving the H 2 effect on radiation induced dissolution of UO 2-based spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Martin; Jonsson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the impact of H2 on α-radiation induced dissolution of UO2-based spent nuclear fuel has been studied and debated extensively. Experimental results on the effect of H2 on the concentration of H2O2 during α-radiolysis have been shown to disagree with numerical simulations. For this reason, the reaction scheme used in simulations of aqueous radiation chemistry has sometimes been questioned. In this work, we have studied the impact of H2 on the H2O2 concentration in α-irradiated aqueous solution using numerical simulations. The effects of H2 pressure, α-dose rate and HCO3- concentration were investigated by performing systematic variations in these parameters. The simulations show that the discrepancy between the previously published experimental result and numerical simulations is due to the use of a homogeneous dose rate (the energy is assumed to be equally distributed in the whole volume). Taking the actual dose rate of the α-irradiated volume into account, the simulation is in perfect agreement with the experimental results. This shows that the H2 effect is strongly α-dose rate dependent, and proves the reliability of the reaction scheme used in the simulations. The simulations also show that H2 influences the H2O2 concentration under α-radiolysis. The magnitude of the effect depends on the dose rate and the H2 pressure as well as on the concentration of HCO 3-. The impact of the radiolytic H2 effect on the rate of α-radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel is discussed along with other (α- and γ-) radiation induced processes capable of reducing the concentration of uranium in solution. The radiolytic H2 effect is quantitatively compared to the previously presented noble metal catalyzed H2 effect. This comparison shows that the noble metal catalyzed H2 effect is far more efficient than the radiolytic H2 effect. Reduction of U(VI) in solution due to low dose rate γ-radiolysis in the presence of H2 is proposed to be the cause of

  19. Radiologic and nuclear medicine studies in the United States and worldwide: frequency, radiation dose, and comparison with other radiation sources--1950-2007.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Fred A; Bhargavan, Mythreyi; Faulkner, Keith; Gilley, Debbie B; Gray, Joel E; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Lipoti, Jill A; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; McCrohan, John L; Stabin, Michael G; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation each conducted respective assessments of all radiation sources in the United States and worldwide. The goal of this article is to summarize and combine the results of these two publicly available surveys and to compare the results with historical information. In the United States in 2006, about 377 million diagnostic and interventional radiologic examinations and 18 million nuclear medicine examinations were performed. The United States accounts for about 12% of radiologic procedures and about one-half of nuclear medicine procedures performed worldwide. In the United States, the frequency of diagnostic radiologic examinations has increased almost 10-fold (1950-2006). The U.S. per-capita annual effective dose from medical procedures has increased about sixfold (0.5 mSv [1980] to 3.0 mSv [2006]). Worldwide estimates for 2000-2007 indicate that 3.6 billion medical procedures with ionizing radiation (3.1 billion diagnostic radiologic, 0.5 billion dental, and 37 million nuclear medicine examinations) are performed annually. Worldwide, the average annual per-capita effective dose from medicine (about 0.6 mSv of the total 3.0 mSv received from all sources) has approximately doubled in the past 10-15 years. PMID:19789227

  20. Little impact of tsunami-stricken nuclear accident on awareness of radiation dose of cardiac computed tomography: A questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increased use of cardiac computed tomography (CT), radiation dose remains a major issue, although physicians are trying to reduce the substantial risks associated with use of this diagnostic tool. This study was performed to investigate recognition of the level of radiation exposure from cardiac CT and the differences in the level of awareness of radiation before and after the Fukushima nuclear plant accident. Methods We asked 30 physicians who were undergoing training in internal medicine to determine the equivalent doses of radiation for common radiological examinations when a normal chest X-ray is accepted as one unit; questions about the absolute radiation dose of cardiac CT data were also asked. Results According to the results, 86.6% of respondents believed the exposure to be 1 mSv at most, and 93.3% thought that the exposure was less than that of 100 chest X-rays. This finding indicates that their perceptions were far lower than the actual amounts. Even after the occurrence of such a large nuclear disaster in Fukushima, there were no significant differences in the same subjects’ overall awareness of radiation amounts. Conclusions Even after such a major social issue as the Fukushima nuclear accident, the level of awareness of the accurate radiation amount used in 64-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) by clinical physicians who order this test was not satisfactory. Thus, there is a need for the development of effective continuing education programs to improve awareness of radiation from ionizing radiation devices, including cardiac CT, and emphasis on risk-benefit evaluation based on accurate knowledge during medical training. PMID:23631688

  1. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning'Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  2. Application of MORSE to radiation analysis of nuclear flight propulsion modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolson, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Several modifications and additions were made to the multigroup Monte Carlo code (MORSE) to implement its use in a computational procedure for performing radiation analyses of NERVA nuclear flight propulsion modules. These changes include the incorporation of a new general geometry module; the inclusion of an expectation tracklength estimator; and the option to obtain source information from two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations. Computations comparing MORSE and a point cross section Monte Carlo code, COHORT, were made in which a coupled discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo procedure was used to calculate the gamma dose rate at tank top locations of a typical propulsion module. The dose rates obtained from the MORSE computation agreed with the dose rates obtained from the COHORT computation to within the limits of the statistical accuracy of the calculations.

  3. Manned mars rover powered by a nuclear reactor; Radiation shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, M. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This paper discusses a key element in the conceptual design of a nuclear reactor power system for a manned Mars rover is the analysis, design, and integration of the radiation shield. A shield analysis is carried out to characterize the thickness and spacing of shield layers to provide the minimum mass configuration that meets a dose rate requirement of 300 mSv/yr. The analysis utilizes a two-dimensional transport code to model the reactor and to provide a source term that is subsequently used to calculate dose rates as a function of reactor power level and shield layer thickness. Results show that a multilayered tungsten and lithium hydride (LiH) shield would satisfy the dose rate limit of 300 mSv/yr (30 rem/yr) to the rover crew. The position of two tungsten and LiH layers is varied to minimize secondary gamma-ray production and to optimize shield mass.

  4. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars sprint mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Qualls, Garry D.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flame environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  5. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars SPRINT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flare environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  6. Improved fabrication of HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors by machine-cleaving

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, A.; Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Vandenberg, L.; Yellon, W.B.; Alkire, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The perfection of machine-cleaved sections from HgI/sub 2/ bulk crystals was examined. The perfection of the machine-cleaved sections as established by gamma diffraction rocking curves was found to be much better than the perfection of hand-cleaved sections or as grown thin platelets, reaching a perfection similar to that of the wire-sawn sections of HgI/sub 2/. A correlation between the perfection and the thickness of the machine-cleaved section was also found, i.e., the thicker the cleaved-section the more perfect it is. The reproducibility of the fabrication was significantly improved by using machine cleaving in the process of fabrication. Large single crystals of HgI/sub 2/ weighing 20 to 200 g, can be grown from the vapor phase using the TOM Technique. In order to fabricate nuclear radiation detectors from these single crystals, thin sections of about 0.4 to 0.8 mm thickness have to be prepared. Up till now, the state-of-the-art of fabricating HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors involved two methods to get thin sections from the large single crystals: (1) hand-cleaving using a razor-blade and (2) solution wire sawing. The chemical wire sawing method involves a loss of about 50% of the crystal volume and is usually followed by a chemical polishing process which involves a significant loss of volume of the original volume. This procedure is complicated and wasteful. The traditional fabrication method, i.e., hand-cleaving followed by rapid nonselective chemical etching, is simpler and less wasteful.

  7. Current worldwide nuclear cardiology practices and radiation exposure: results from the 65 country IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Cross-Sectional Study (INCAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Mercuri, Mathew; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Mahmarian, John J.; Better, Nathan; Bouyoucef, Salah E.; Hee-Seung Bom, Henry; Lele, Vikram; Magboo, V. Peter C.; Alexánderson, Erick; Allam, Adel H.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Flotats, Albert; Jerome, Scott; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Luxenburg, Osnat; Shaw, Leslee J.; Underwood, S. Richard; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Dondi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims To characterize patient radiation doses from nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and the use of radiation-optimizing ‘best practices’ worldwide, and to evaluate the relationship between laboratory use of best practices and patient radiation dose. Methods and results We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of protocols used for all 7911 MPI studies performed in 308 nuclear cardiology laboratories in 65 countries for a single week in March–April 2013. Eight ‘best practices’ relating to radiation exposure were identified a priori by an expert committee, and a radiation-related quality index (QI) devised indicating the number of best practices used by a laboratory. Patient radiation effective dose (ED) ranged between 0.8 and 35.6 mSv (median 10.0 mSv). Average laboratory ED ranged from 2.2 to 24.4 mSv (median 10.4 mSv); only 91 (30%) laboratories achieved the median ED ≤ 9 mSv recommended by guidelines. Laboratory QIs ranged from 2 to 8 (median 5). Both ED and QI differed significantly between laboratories, countries, and world regions. The lowest median ED (8.0 mSv), in Europe, coincided with high best-practice adherence (mean laboratory QI 6.2). The highest doses (median 12.1 mSv) and low QI (4.9) occurred in Latin America. In hierarchical regression modelling, patients undergoing MPI at laboratories following more ‘best practices’ had lower EDs. Conclusion Marked worldwide variation exists in radiation safety practices pertaining to MPI, with targeted EDs currently achieved in a minority of laboratories. The significant relationship between best-practice implementation and lower doses indicates numerous opportunities to reduce radiation exposure from MPI globally. PMID:25898845

  8. Studies of atmosphere radio-sounding for monitoring of radiation environments around nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchuk, Kirill; Karelin, Alexander; Tumanov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    The nuclear power plants practically do not discharge to the atmosphere any products causing significant radioactive contaminations. However, during the years of the nuclear power industry, some large accidents occurred at the nuclear objects, and that caused enormous environmental contamination. Among the most significant accidents are: thermal explosion of a reservoir with high-level wastes at the Mayak enterprise in the South Ural region, near the town of Kyshtym, in the end of September 1957; accident at the nuclear power plant in Windscale, UK, in October 1957; accident at the Three-Mile Island, USA, in 1979; accident at the Chernobyl power plant in April 1986. In March of 2011, a large earthquake and the following tsunami caused the largest nuclear catastrophe of XXI century, the accident at the Fucushima-1 power plant. The last accident highlighted the need to review seriously the safety issues at the active power plants and to develop the new effective methods for remote detection and control over radioactive environmental contamination and over general geophysical situation in the areas. The main influence of the fission products on the environment is its ionisation, and therefore various detectable biological and physical processes that are caused by ions. Presence of an ionisation source within the area under study may cause significant changes of absolute humidity and, that is especially important, changes of the chemical potential of atmosphere vapours indicating presence of charged condensation centres. These effects may cause anomalies in the IR radiation emitted from the Earth surface and jumps in the chemical potentials of water vapours that may be observed by means of the satellite remote sensing by specialized equipment (works by Dimitar Ouzounov, Sergey Pulinets, e.a.). In the current study, the theoretical description is presented from positions of the molecular-kinetic condensation theory that shows significant changes of the absolute and

  9. Study on effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive source material to the radiation intensity of betavoltaic nuclear battery

    SciTech Connect

    Badrianto, Muldani Dwi; Riupassa, Robi D.; Basar, Khairul

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear batteries have strategic applications and very high economic potential. One Important problem in application of nuclear betavoltaic battery is its low efficiency. Current efficiency of betavoltaic nuclear battery reaches only arround 2%. One aspect that can influence the efficiency of betavoltaic nuclear battery is the geometrical configuration of radioactive source. In this study we discuss the effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive source material to the radiation intensity in betavoltaic nuclear battery system. received by the detector. By obtaining the optimum configurations, the optimum usage of radioactive materials can be determined. Various geometrical configurations of radioactive source material are simulated. It is obtained that usage of radioactive source will be optimum for circular configuration.

  10. The association betweeen cancers and low level radiation: An evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J. |

    1993-05-01

    Cancer has traditionally been linked to exposure to high doses of radiation, but there is considerable controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans. Over the past 30 years there have been 14 studies conducted on employees at the Hanford nuclear weapons facility to investigate the relationship between exposure to low doses of radiation and mortality due to cancer (1-14). Interest in this issue was originally stimulated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which was trying to determine whether the linear extrapolation of health effects from high to low dose exposure was accurate. If the risk has been underestimated, then the maximum permissible occupational radiation exposure in the United States had been set too high. Because the health risk associated with low level radiation are unclear and controversial it seems appropriate to review the studies relating to Hanford at this time.

  11. Daily variation of radiation dose rate after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi

    2015-04-01

    After the radioactive contamination of the lands from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, the radiation dose rates observed by the dosimeters often shows daily variations, at different local times at different places or time. These variations are caused by different reasons: the temperature-dependent characteristics of the dosimeter (instrumental effect), the daily convective wind that lifts up the radioactive small particle on the ground (local effect), and the daily sea-land wind that transports the radioactive small particle from highly contaminated area (regional effect). The last type is most important in understanding the internal dose by air taking. However, while very regular patterns can easily be judged as instrumental effect, variations that strongly depend on the weather conditions are not easily judged. Combining the atmospheric electric field measurement near the ground (potential gradient, PG) with the wind and weather data, some of these unclear cases can be classified into above three reasoning, which will be shown in the presentation. Thus, the PG measurement is important right after any nuclear accidents in the future.

  12. A short latency between radiation exposure from nuclear plants and cancer in young children.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    Previous reports document a short latency of cancer onset in young children exposed to low doses of radioactivity. The standard mortality ratio (SMR) for cancer in children dying before age ten rose in the period 6-10 years after the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents in populations most exposed to fallout. SMRs near most nuclear power plants were elevated 6-10 years after startup, particularly for leukemia. Cancer incidence in children under age ten living near New York and New Jersey nuclear plants increased 4-5 years after increases in average strontium-90 in baby teeth, and declined 4-5 years after Sr-90 averages dropped. The assumption that Sr-90 and childhood cancer are correlated is best supported for a supralinear dose-response, meaning the greatest per-dose risks are at the lowest doses. Findings document that the very young are especially susceptible to adverse effects of radiation exposure, even at relatively low doses. PMID:16524167

  13. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  14. Radiation-driven migration: the case of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, Japan, after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yan, Wanglin; Oba, Akihiro; Zhang, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The emigration of residents following the Fukushima nuclear accident has resulted in aging and depopulation problems in radiation-contaminated areas. The recovery of affected areas, and even those areas with low radioactive pollution levels, is still heavily affected by this problem. This slow recovery consequently affects immigration patterns. This review aims to present possible factors that have contributed to this dilemma. We first present an overview of the evacuation protocol that was administered in the study area following the Fukushima accident. We then analyze characteristics of the subsequent exodus by comparing population data for both before and after the accident. Based on the findings of existing literature, we identify three causes of emigration: (1) The health risks of living in a low radiation zone are still unknown; (2) The post-disaster psychological disturbance and distrust of government information promotes the emigration of evacuees; (3) an absence of economic vitality and of a leading industry renders the area less attractive to individuals residing outside of the city. Further research is needed on this issue, especially with respect to countermeasures for addressing this problem. PMID:25207491

  15. Medical radiation countermeasures for nuclear and radiological emergencies: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Marwah, Rohit; Kumar, Vinod; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Preeti; Jaiswal, Sarita; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs) occurred globally and recent incidences in India are indicating toward the need for comprehensive medical preparedness required both at incident site and hospitals. The enhanced threat attributed toward insurgency is another causative factor of worry. The response capabilities and operational readiness of responders (both health and non-health service providers) in contaminated environment need to be supported by advancement in R & D and technological efforts to develop prophylactics and radiation mitigators. It is essential to develop phase 1 alternatives of such drugs for unseen threats as a part of initial preparedness. At the incident site and hospital level, external decontamination procedures need to be standardized and supported by protective clothing and Shudika kits developed by INMAS. The medical management of exposure requires systematic approach to perform triage, resuscitation and curative care. The internal contamination requires decorporation agents to be administered based on procedural diagnostics. Various key issues pertaining to policy decisions, R & D promotion, community awareness, specialized infrastructure for NREs preparedness has been discussed. The present review is an attempt to provide vital information about the current status of various radiation countermeasures and future perspective(s) ahead. PMID:21829316

  16. Nuclear heating, radiation damage, and waste management options for the HYLIFE-II final focus magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Moir, R W; House, P A

    1999-08-09

    Heavy-ion fusion (HIF) designs for inertial fusion energy (XFE) power plants typically require final focusing magnets just outside the reaction chamber and blanket. Due to penetrations within the chamber and blanket, the magnets are exposed to a radiation environment. Although the magnet bores would be sized to avoid line-of-sight irradiation, the magnets still would be susceptible to nuclear heating and radiation damage from neutrons and y-rays. Additionally, the magnets must be included in waste management considerations due to neutron activation. Modified versions of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant featuring two-sided illumination by arrays of 32 or 96 beams from each side are presented. A simple, point-of-departure quadrupole magnet design is assumed, and a three-dimensional neutronics model is created for the Flibe pocket, first wall, blanket, shield, and final two focusing magnets. This work details state-of-the-art neutronics calculations and shows that the final focus system needs to be included in the economic and environmental considerations for the driver-chamber interface of any HIF IFE power plant design.

  17. Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

    1999-11-01

    Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

  18. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II:Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le Pape, Yann; Field, Kevin G; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgentbecause of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Currentknowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These data are inher-ently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanicalapproach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separationof the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although thescarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that,more » without negating a possiblegamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominantrole on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. The radiation-induced volu-metric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cementpaste.« less

  19. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Pruet, Jason A.

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  20. Medical radiation countermeasures for nuclear and radiological emergencies: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Marwah, Rohit; Kumar, Vinod; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Preeti; Jaiswal, Sarita; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs) occurred globally and recent incidences in India are indicating toward the need for comprehensive medical preparedness required both at incident site and hospitals. The enhanced threat attributed toward insurgency is another causative factor of worry. The response capabilities and operational readiness of responders (both health and non-health service providers) in contaminated environment need to be supported by advancement in R & D and technological efforts to develop prophylactics and radiation mitigators. It is essential to develop phase 1 alternatives of such drugs for unseen threats as a part of initial preparedness. At the incident site and hospital level, external decontamination procedures need to be standardized and supported by protective clothing and Shudika kits developed by INMAS. The medical management of exposure requires systematic approach to perform triage, resuscitation and curative care. The internal contamination requires decorporation agents to be administered based on procedural diagnostics. Various key issues pertaining to policy decisions, R & D promotion, community awareness, specialized infrastructure for NREs preparedness has been discussed. The present review is an attempt to provide vital information about the current status of various radiation countermeasures and future perspective(s) ahead. PMID:21829316

  1. The relationship of thyroid cancer with radiation exposure from nuclear weapon testing in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuya; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Trott, Klaus R; Simon, Steven L; Fujimori, Keisei; Nakashima, Noriaki; Fukao, Akira; Saito, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The US nuclear weapons testing program in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands. The potentially widespread radiation exposure from radio-iodines of fallout has raised concerns about the risk of thyroid cancer in the Marshallese population. The most serious exposures and its health hazards resulted from the hydrogen-thermonuclear bomb test, the Castle BRAVO, on March 1, 1954. Between 1993 and 1997, we screened 3,709 Marshallese for thyroid disease who were born before the BRAVO test. It was 60% of the entire population at risk and who were still alive at the time of our examinations. We diagnosed 30 thyroid cancers and found 27 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before our screening in this group. Fifty-seven Marshallese born before 1954 (1.5%) had thyroid cancer or had been operated for thyroid cancer. Nearly all (92%) of these cancers were papillary carcinoma. We derived estimates of individual thyroid dose proxy from the BRAVO test in 1954 on the basis of published age-specific doses estimated on Utirik atoll and 137Cs deposition levels on the atolls where the participants came from. There was suggestive evidence that the prevalence of thyroid cancer increased with category of estimated dose to the thyroid. PMID:12675119

  2. Influence of nuclear structure on the formation of radiation-induced lethal lesions.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Daniel A; Tait, Lauren; Vaughan, Andrew T M

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The rejoining of fragmented nuclear DNA caused by ionizing radiation may lead to lethal chromosome rearrangements, such as rings or dicentrics. The clinically useful linear quadratic relationship between dose and cell survival has been interpreted as the generation of lethal lesions secondary to damage occurring in two separate chromosomes simultaneously (α component), or as potentially repairable separate events (β component). Here, the generation of such lesions is discussed, synthesizing existing knowledge with new insights gleaned from spatial proximity data made possible by high-throughput sequencing of chromosome conformation capture experiments. Over a range of several Mbp, the linear DNA strand is organized as a fractal globule generating multiple sites of contact that may facilitate deletions or inversions if the points of contact are damaged. On a larger scale, transcriptionally active euchromatin occupies a physically identifiable space separate from inactive areas and is preferentially susceptible to free radical attack after irradiation. Specific transcriptional programs link genomic locations within that space, potentially enhancing their interaction if subject to simultaneous fragmentation by a single radiation event. Conclusions High throughput spatial analysis of the factors that control chromosome proximity has the potential to better describe the formation of the lethal chromosome aberrations that kill irradiated cells. PMID:26917327

  3. GdBr3: CE in a glass wafer as a nuclear radiation monitor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhitao; Rosson, Robert; Barta, M Brooke; Nadler, Jason; Wagner, Brent; Kahn, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    A glass wafer that contains cerium-activated gadolinium-based scintillator has been tested as a nuclear radiation monitor. The detector is prepared by mixing powdered gadolinium and cerium (3+) bromides with alumina, silica, and lithium fluoride, melting the mixture at 1,400°C, and then quenching and annealing the glass. The resulting clear glass matrix emits stimulated blue light that can be collected by a conventional photomultiplier tube. Spectral analysis of radionuclides with this detector shows the energy peaks for alpha particles, the energy continuum for beta particles, the Compton continuum and full-energy peaks for gamma rays, and an energy continuum with specific reaction-product peaks for neutrons. Energy resolution for the 5.5-MeV alpha particle and 0.662-MeV gamma-ray peaks is about 20%. This resolution, although threefold poorer than for single-crystal NaI(Tl) scintillators, contributes to radionuclide identification and quantification. Application of this detector to radiation monitoring is proposed, as well as approaches for improving light collection and energy resolution that will facilitate radionuclide identification and monitoring, especially for alpha particles, beta particles, and low-energy gamma rays. PMID:23532079

  4. Radiation-Driven Migration: The Case of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, Japan, after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Yan, Wanglin; Oba, Akihiro; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The emigration of residents following the Fukushima nuclear accident has resulted in aging and depopulation problems in radiation-contaminated areas. The recovery of affected areas, and even those areas with low radioactive pollution levels, is still heavily affected by this problem. This slow recovery consequently affects immigration patterns. This review aims to present possible factors that have contributed to this dilemma. We first present an overview of the evacuation protocol that was administered in the study area following the Fukushima accident. We then analyze characteristics of the subsequent exodus by comparing population data for both before and after the accident. Based on the findings of existing literature, we identify three causes of emigration: (1) The health risks of living in a low radiation zone are still unknown; (2) The post-disaster psychological disturbance and distrust of government information promotes the emigration of evacuees; (3) an absence of economic vitality and of a leading industry renders the area less attractive to individuals residing outside of the city. Further research is needed on this issue, especially with respect to countermeasures for addressing this problem. PMID:25207491

  5. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

  6. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

  7. Radiation monitoring using an unmanned helicopter in the evacuation zone around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Kondo, Atsuya; Sugita, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Yukiyasu; Yuuki, Youichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Shoji, Yasunori; Torii, Tatsuo

    2014-11-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 generated a series of large tsunami waves that caused serious damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, following which a large amount of radioactive material was discharged from the nuclear power plant into the environment. In recent years, technologies for unmanned helicopters have been developed and applied in various fields. In expectation of the application of unmanned helicopters in airborne radiation monitoring, in this study we developed a radiation monitoring system for aerial use. We then measured the radiation level by using unmanned helicopters in areas where the soil had been contaminated by radioactive caesium emitted from the nuclear power plant to evaluate the ambient dose rate distribution around the site. We found that in dry riverbeds near the nuclear power plant, the dose rate was higher than that in the surrounding areas. The results of our measurements show that radiation monitoring using this system was useful in measuring radioactivity in contaminated areas.

  8. Double copper sheath multiconductor instrumentation cable is durable and easily installed in high thermal or nuclear radiation area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Crae, A. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Multiconductor instrumentation cable in which the conducting wires are routed through two concentric copper tube sheaths, employing a compressed insulator between the conductors and between the inner and outer sheaths, is durable and easily installed in high thermal or nuclear radiation area. The double sheath is a barrier against moisture, abrasion, and vibration.

  9. Lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident: efficient education items of radiation safety for general public.

    PubMed

    Ohno, K; Endo, K

    2015-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FNP-1) accident, while as tragic as the tsunami, was a man-made disaster created by the ignorance of the effects of radiation and radioactive materials. Therefore, it is important that all specialists in radiation protection in medicine sympathize with the anxiety of the general public regarding the harmful effects of radiation and advise people accordingly. All questions and answers were collected related to inquiries from the general public that were posted to reliable websites, including those of the government and radiation-related organizations, from March 2011 to November 2012. The questions were summarized and classified by similarity of content. (1) The total number of questions is 372. The content was broadly classified into three categories: inquiries for radiation-related knowledge and about health effects and foods. The questions asked to obtain radiation-related knowledge were the most common, accounting for 38 %. Thirty-six percentage of the questions were related to health effects, and 26 % involved foods, whereas 18 % of the questions were related to children and pregnancy. (2) The change over time was investigated in 290 questions for which the time of inquiry was known. Directly after the earthquake, the questions were primarily from people seeking radiation-related knowledge. Later, questions related to health effects increased. The anxiety experienced by residents following the nuclear accident was caused primarily by insufficient knowledge related to radiation, concerns about health effects and uncertainties about food and water safety. The development of educational materials focusing on such content will be important for risk communication with the general public in countries with nuclear power plants. Physicians and medical physicist should possess the ability to respond to questions such as these and should continue with medical examinations and treatments in a safe and appropriate manner. PMID

  10. Radiation risks in lung cancer screening programs: a comparison with nuclear industry workers and atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    McCunney, Robert J; Li, Jessica

    2014-03-01

    The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with low-dose CT (LDCT) scan reduced lung cancer and overall mortality by 20% and 7%, respectively. The LDCT scanning involves an approximate 2-mSv dose, whereas full-chest CT scanning, the major diagnostic study used to follow up nodules, may involve a dose of 8 mSv. Radiation associated with CT scanning and other diagnostic studies to follow up nodules may present an independent risk of lung cancer. On the basis of the NLST, we estimated the incidence and prevalence of nodules detected in screening programs. We followed the Fleischner guidelines for follow-up of nodules to assess cumulative radiation exposure over 20- and 30-year periods. We then evaluated nuclear worker cohort studies and atomic bomb survivor studies to assess the risk of lung cancer from radiation associated with long-term lung cancer screening programs. The findings indicate that a 55-year-old lung screening participant may experience a cumulative radiation exposure of up to 280 mSv over a 20-year period and 420 mSv over 30 years. These exposures exceed those of nuclear workers and atomic bomb survivors. This assessment suggests that long-term (20-30 years) LDCT screening programs are associated with nontrivial cumulative radiation doses. Current lung cancer screening protocols, if conducted over 20- to 30-year periods, can independently increase the risk of lung cancer beyond cigarette smoking as a result of cumulative radiation exposure. Radiation exposures from LDCT screening and follow-up diagnostic procedures exceed lifetime radiation exposures among nuclear power workers and atomic bomb survivors. PMID:24590022

  11. Development of Thin Film Germanium-Gold Thermistors for Calorimetric Detection of Nuclear Radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xunxie

    1995-01-01

    The present work is to produce thin film semiconductor thermistors which can be directly fabricated on radiation absorbers to act as ultra low-mass, highly sensitive cryogenic phonon sensors for detecting single nuclear radiation interaction invents. The specific application envisioned for these devices is in the search for galactic Dark Matter, which is proposed to exist in the form of weakly interacting massive particles in the galaxy. Thin film Au doped Ge thermistors were directly fabricated on single crystal silicon absorbers using vacuum filament evaporation and microfabrication techniques. The fabrication procedure developed in the present work gives micron-scale thin film GeAu thermistors with highly reproducible characteristics. Electrical and thermal properties of thin film Ge_{rm 1-x}Au _{rm x} for 0.019 < x < 0.17 were studied between room temperature and 0.019K and in magnetic fields up to 4.0T. Measurements indicated that variable-range-hopping dominates the conductivity of GeAu thin film at temperatures below 10K. Metal-insulator transition of the film is found to occur for x > 0.17. The observed magnetoresistance is explained by using a field-dependent hopping exponent proposed in the present work combined with Mott's hopping conductivity theory. A new treatment of electrical field-induced nonlinearity in variable-range-hopping is also given which quantitatively reproduced the observed nonlinear resistivity. Electrical heat pulse and particle detection measurements showed that the total effective heat capacity of the device was dominated by the silicon absorber substrate at a bath temperature of 1.5 K and by electron system of the thermistor itself of the device when the bath temperatures were below 100 mK. Excellent responsivity of GeAu thin film calorimeters has been demonstrated in AC electrical pulse and nuclear radiation detection experiments. At optimal bias power, the responsivity (|DeltaV/ DeltaE|) of the present devices reaches 10^8 V/J at

  12. Correlation between effective and ambient neutron doses in radiation fields of nuclear-physics facilities at the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, S. V.; Lesovaya, E. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    The questions of a correlation between normative and operational quantities in the dosimetry of ionizing radiation still attract the attention of professionals working in the field. Since the neutron fields of nuclear-physics facilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are highly varied, the question of whether the ambient neutron dose always serves as a conservative estimate of the effective dose (in the terms of which the dose limits are set) is of practical importance for radiation monitoring at JINR. We studied the correlation between the calculated values of effective and ambient neutron doses obtained based on a representative set of neutron spectra measured at JINR with the use of a multisphere neutron spectrometer. It is demonstrated that measuring the ambient neutron dose may not serve as a confirmation of compliance with the set dose limits in "hard" neutron fields.

  13. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  14. Nuclear Physics Issues in Space Radiation Risk Assessment-The FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code Used for Space Radiation Measurement and Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. T.

    2007-02-12

    The long term human exploration goals that NASA has embraced, requires the need to understand the primary radiation and secondary particle production under a variety of environmental conditions. In order to perform accurate transport simulations for the incident particles found in the space environment, accurate nucleus-nucleus inelastic event generators are needed, and NASA is funding their development. For the first time, NASA is including the radiation problem into the . design of the next manned exploration vehicle. The NASA-funded FLUER-S (FLUKA Executing Under ROOT-Space) project has several goals beyond the improvement of the internal nuclear physics simulations. These include making FLUKA more user-friendly. Several tools have been developed to simplify the use of FLUKA without compromising its accuracy or versatility. Among these tools are a general source input, ability of distributive computing, simplification of geometry input, geometry and event visualization, and standard FLUKA scoring output analysis using a ROOT GUI. In addition to describing these tools we will show how they have been used for space radiation environment data analysis in MARIE, IVCPDS, and EVCPDS. Similar analyses can be performed for future radiation measurement detectors before they are deployed in order to optimize their design. These tools can also be used in the design of nuclear-based power systems on manned exploration vehicles and planetary surfaces. In addition to these space applications, the simulations are being used to support accelerator based experiments like the cross-section measurements being performed at HIMAC and NSRL at BNL.

  15. 1991 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 28th, San Diego, CA, July 15-19, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millward, Douglas G. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear science are presented. The general topics addressed are: basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, isolation technologies, device radiation response and hardening, microcircuit radiation response and hardening, single-event phenomena, hardness assurance and testing techniques, spacecraft charging, space environments and effects.

  16. Nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 121 Sb at 37.13 keV.

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, H. C.; Shvydko, Y. V.; Alp, E. E.; Ruter, H. D.; Leupold, O.; Sergueev, I.; Ruffer, R.; Barla, A.; Sanchez, J. P.; X-Ray Science Division; European Synchrotron Radiation Facility; Univ. of Hamburg; Hamburder Synchrotronstrahlungslabor

    2006-02-22

    We report on the observation of nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from {sup 121}Sb nuclei. A temperature stabilized {alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal Bragg backscattering high-resolution monochromator with a relative energy resolution of 2 x 10{sup -7} was introduced. As first spectroscopic applications the hyperfine parameters in Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, USb and DySb were determined. The energy of the nuclear transition in {sup 121}Sb was measured to be 37.1298(2)keV, 40 times more precisely than reported before. The results open the field of nuclear resonance spectroscopy on antimony compounds taking advantage of the outstanding features of 3rd-generation synchrotron sources. Nuclear resonance scattering on Sb compounds at these sources allows element-specific dynamical studies on thermoelectric materials as well as studies on magnetism in micro- and nanometer dimensional systems like spintronic devices.

  17. Crew radiation dose from the plume of a high impulse gas-core nuclear rocket during a Mars mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masser, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Analytical calculations are performed to determine the radiation dose rate and total dose to the crew of a gas-core nuclear rocket from the fission fragments located throughout the plume volume. The radiation dose from the plume fission fragments to two crew locations of 100 and 200 meters from the nozzle exit are calculated. It is found that, in the case of the most probable fission fragment retention time of 100 seconds, the crew must be protected from the radiation dose. Five centimeters of lead shielding would reduce the radiation dose by two orders of magnitude thereby protecting the crew. The increase in vehicle weight would be insignificant (7150 kg to a vehicle gross weight of 0.94 million kg).

  18. Investigation of the potential of 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to predict radiation sensitivity. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, C.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (31-PNMR) Spectroscopy to predict radiation sensitivity following both single and fractionated therapy was evaluated in this study. For Radiation Induced Fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors either, in their natural state or treated with the vasodilator, hydralazine, an increase in the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) and tumor pH were shown to be significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with radiation sensitivity to a single dose of 15 Grays (Gy) of radiation. After administration of hydralazine to reduce tumor blood flow or flunarizine to increase tumor blood flow, time dependent changes were observed in the 31-P NMR spectrum. After hydralazine, there was a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in PCr/Pi over time. The opposite pattern was seen for flunarizine i.e., decline in Pi, and an increase tumors was substantially greater (p < 0.05) than that of hydralazine treated tumors.

  19. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  20. Thermodynamics of post-growth annealing of cadmium zinc telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Aaron Lee

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors are used for detecting, tracking, and identifying radioactive materials which emit high-energy gamma and X-rays. The use of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is particularly attractive because of the detector's ability to operate at room temperature and measure the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources with a high resolution, typically less than 1% at 662 keV. While CdZnTe detectors are acceptable imperfections in the crystals limit their full market potential. One of the major imperfections are Tellurium inclusions generated during the crystal growth process by the retrograde solubility of Tellurium and Tellurium-rich melt trapped at the growth interface. Tellurium inclusions trap charge carriers generated by gamma and X-ray photons and thus reduce the portion of generated charge carriers that reach the electrodes for collection and conversion into a readable signal which is representative of the ionizing radiation's energy and intensity. One approach in resolving this problem is post-growth annealing which has the potential of removing the Tellurium inclusions and associated impurities. The goal of this project is to use experimental techniques to study the thermodynamics of Tellurium inclusion migration in post-growth annealing of CdZnTe nuclear detectors with the temperature gradient zone migration (TGZM) technique. Systematic experiments will be carried out to provide adequate thermodynamic data that will inform the engineering community of the optimum annealing parameters. Additionally, multivariable correlations that involve the Tellurium diffusion coefficient, annealing parameters, and CdZnTe properties will be analyzed. The experimental approach will involve systematic annealing experiments (in Cd vapor overpressure) on different sizes of CdZnTe crystals at varying temperature gradients ranging from 0 to 60°C/mm (used to migrate the Tellurium inclusion to one side of the crystal), and at annealing temperatures ranging

  1. [A questionnaire about radiation safety management of the draining-water system at nuclear medicine facilities].

    PubMed

    Shizukuishi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Narita, Hiroto; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tsukada, Masaru; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ikebuchi, Shuji; Kusama, Keiji; Tanaka, Mamoru; Namiki, Norio; Fuiimura, Youko; Horikoshi, Akiko; Inoue, Tomio; Kusakabe, Kiyoko

    2004-05-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey about radiation-safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities to make materials of proposition for more reasonable management of medical radioactive waste. We distributed a questionnaire to institutions equipped with Nuclear Medicine facilities. Of 1,125 institutions, 642 institutes (52.8%) returned effective answers. The questionnaire covered the following areas: 1) scale of an institution, 2) presence of enforcement of radiotherapy, 3) system of a tank, 4) size and number of each tank, 5) a form of draining-water system, 6) a displacement in a radioactive rays management area, 7) a measurement method of the concentration of medical radioactive waste in draining water system, 8) planned and used quantity of radioisotopes for medical examination and treatment, 9) an average displacement of hospital for one month. In most institutions, a ratio of dose limitation of radioisotope in draining-water system was less than 1.0, defined as an upper limitation in ordinance. In 499 hospitals without facilities of hospitalization for unsealed radioisotope therapy, 473 hospitals reported that sum of ratios of dose limits in a draining-water system was less than 1.0. It was calculated by used dose of radioisotope and monthly displacement from hospital, on the premise that all used radioisotope entered in the general draining-water system. When a drainage including radioactivity from a controlled area join with that from other area before it flows out of a institution, it may be diluted and its radioactive concentration should be less than its upper limitation defined in the rule. Especially, in all institutions with a monthly displacement of more than 25,000 m3, the sum of ratio of the concentration of each radionuclide to the concentration limit dose calculated by used dose of radioisotope, indicated less than 1.0. PMID:15354724

  2. Multiple nuclear gene sequences identify phylogenetic species boundaries in the rapidly radiating clade of Mexican ambystomatid salamanders.

    PubMed

    Weisrock, David W; Shaffer, H Bradley; Storz, Brian L; Storz, Shonna R; Voss, S Randal

    2006-08-01

    Delimiting the boundaries of species involved in radiations is critical to understanding the tempo and mode of lineage formation. Single locus gene trees may or may not reflect the underlying pattern of population divergence and lineage formation, yet they constitute the vast majority of the empirical data in species radiations. In this study we make use of an expressed sequence tag (EST) database to perform nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genealogical tests of species boundaries in Ambystoma ordinarium, a member of an adaptive radiation of metamorphic and paedomorphic salamanders (the Ambystoma tigrinum complex) that have diversified across terrestrial and aquatic environments. Gene tree comparisons demonstrate extensive nonmonophyly in the mtDNA genealogy of A. ordinarium, while seven of eight independent nuclear loci resolve the species as monophyletic or nearly so, and diagnose it as a well-resolved genealogical species. A differential introgression hypothesis is supported by the observation that western A. ordinarium localities contain mtDNA haplotypes that are identical or minimally diverged from haplotypes sampled from a nearby paedomorphic species, Ambystoma dumerilii, while most nDNA trees place these species in distant phylogenetic positions. These results provide a strong example of how historical introgression can lead to radical differences between gene trees and species histories, even among currently allopatric species with divergent life history adaptations and morphologies. They also demonstrate how EST-based nuclear resources can be used to more fully resolve the phylogenetic history of species radiations. PMID:16842422

  3. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14

    SciTech Connect

    Raddatz, C.T.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

  4. The nuclear aryl hydocarbon receptor is involved in regulation of DNA repair and cell survival following treatment with ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, K H; Rothmund, M C; Paasch, A; Mayer, C; Fehrenbacher, B; Schaller, M; Frauenstein, K; Fritsche, E; Haarmann-Stemmann, T; Braeuning, A; Rodemann, H P

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we explored the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) for γ-H2AX associated DNA repair in response to treatment with ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation was able to stabilize AhR protein and to induce a nuclear translocation in a similar way as described for exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons. A comparable AhR protein stabilization was obtained by treatment with hydroxyl-nonenal-generated by radiation-induced lipid peroxidation. AhR knockdown resulted in significant radio-sensitization of both A549- and HaCaT cells. Under these conditions an increased amount of residual γ-H2AX foci and a delayed decline of γ-H2AX foci was observed. Knockdown of the co-activator ARNT, which is essential for transcriptional activation of AhR target genes, reduced AhR-dependent CYP1A expression in response to irradiation, but was without effect on the amount of residual γ-H2AX foci. Nuclear AhR was found in complex with γ-H2AX, DNA-PK, ATM and Lamin A. AhR and γ-H2AX form together nuclear foci, which disappear during DNA repair. Presence of nuclear AhR protein is associated with ATM activation and chromatin relaxation indicated by acetylation of histone H3. Taken together, we could show, that beyond the function as a transcription factor the nuclear AhR is involved in the regulation of DNA repair. Reduction of nuclear AhR inhibits DNA-double stand repair and radiosensitizes cells. First hints for its molecular mechanism suggest a role during ATM activation and chromatin relaxation, both essential for DNA repair. PMID:26520184

  5. Modeling the Action of Protons and Heavier Ions in Biological Targets: Nuclear Interactions in Hadrontherapy and Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M. V.; Ottolenghi, A.; Parini, V.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.

    2005-05-01

    Tumor treatment with protons and Carbon ions can allow for a better optimization of Tumor Control Probability and Normal Tissue Complication Probability, especially for radio-resistant tumors. Exposure to protons and heavier ions is also of concern for manned space missions such as future travels to the Moon and Mars. Nuclear reactions with the human body constituents, the beam line components (for hadrontherapy), and the spacecraft walls and shielding (for space radiation protection) can significantly modify the characteristics of the primary radiation field and thus the dose distributions in the various target tissues. In this context the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code, integrated with radiobiological data and coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms, was applied to the characterization of therapeutic proton beams and the calculation of space radiation organ doses, with focus on the role of nuclear interactions. Besides absorbed and equivalent doses, distributions of ``biological'' dose (modeled as the average number of DNA clustered lesions per cell induced in a given organ or tissue) were calculated as well. Concerning space radiation protection, exposure to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) under different shielding conditions was simulated. Both for hadrontherapy and for space radiation exposure, nuclear reaction products were found to play a more important role for the equivalent and ``biological'' dose than for the absorbed dose. Furthermore, while for SPEs the doses (both absorbed and equivalent/``biological'') decreased dramatically by increasing the shield thickness, the GCR doses showed a slight shielding dependence. Overall, these examples of application of FLUKA to radiotherapy and radiation protection problems emphasized the need of further models and data, typically double-differential cross sections for nucleus-nucleus interactions at energies below a few hundred MeV/n.

  6. Modeling the Action of Protons and Heavier Ions in Biological Targets: Nuclear Interactions in Hadrontherapy and Space Radiation Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.; Scannicchio, D.; Battistoni, G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Cerutti, F.; Gadioli, E.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M. V.; Parini, V.; Pinsky, L.

    2005-05-24

    Tumor treatment with protons and Carbon ions can allow for a better optimization of Tumor Control Probability and Normal Tissue Complication Probability, especially for radio-resistant tumors. Exposure to protons and heavier ions is also of concern for manned space missions such as future travels to the Moon and Mars. Nuclear reactions with the human body constituents, the beam line components (for hadrontherapy), and the spacecraft walls and shielding (for space radiation protection) can significantly modify the characteristics of the primary radiation field and thus the dose distributions in the various target tissues. In this context the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code, integrated with radiobiological data and coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms, was applied to the characterization of therapeutic proton beams and the calculation of space radiation organ doses, with focus on the role of nuclear interactions. Besides absorbed and equivalent doses, distributions of 'biological' dose (modeled as the average number of DNA clustered lesions per cell induced in a given organ or tissue) were calculated as well. Concerning space radiation protection, exposure to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) under different shielding conditions was simulated. Both for hadrontherapy and for space radiation exposure, nuclear reaction products were found to play a more important role for the equivalent and 'biological' dose than for the absorbed dose. Furthermore, while for SPEs the doses (both absorbed and equivalent/'biological') decreased dramatically by increasing the shield thickness, the GCR doses showed a slight shielding dependence. Overall, these examples of application of FLUKA to radiotherapy and radiation protection problems emphasized the need of further models and data, typically double-differential cross sections for nucleus-nucleus interactions at energies below a few hundred MeV/n.

  7. An evaluation of early countermeasures to reduce the risk of internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Gilmour, Stuart; Hayano, Ryugo S; Watanabe, Yuni N; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-05-01

    After a radiation-release incident, intake of radionuclides in the initial stage immediately following the incident may be the major contributor to total internal radiation exposure for individuals in affected areas. However, evaluation of early internal contamination risk is greatly lacking. This study assessed the relationship between initial stage evacuation/indoor sheltering and internal radiation contamination levels 4 months after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan and estimated potential pathways of the contamination. The study population comprised 525 participants in the internal radiation screening program at Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital, 23 km north of the Fukushima nuclear plant. The analysed dataset included the results of a screening performed in July 2011, 4 months after the incident, and of a questionnaire on early-incident response behaviours, such as sheltering indoors and evacuations, completed by participants. Association between such early countermeasures and internal contamination levels of cesium-134 were assessed using Tobit multiple regression analyses. Our study shows that individuals who evacuated to areas outside Fukushima Prefecture had similar contamination levels of cesium-134 to individuals who stayed in Fukushima (relative risk: 0.86; 95% confidence interval: 0.74-0.99). Time spent outdoors had no significant relationship with contamination levels. The effects of inhalation from radiological plumes released from the nuclear plant on total internal radiation contamination might be so low as to be undetectable by the whole-body counting unit used to examine participants. Given the apparent limited effectiveness of evacuation and indoor sheltering on internal contamination, the decision to implement such early responses to a radiation-release incident should be made by carefully balancing their potential benefits and health risks. PMID:26363171

  8. Design and analysis of a radiatively-cooled, inertially-driven nuclear generator system for space-based applications

    SciTech Connect

    Apley, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    The RING (Radiatively-Cooled, Inertially-Driven Nuclear Generator) radiator is proposed as a novel heat rejection system for advanced space reactor power applications in the 1 to 25 MW(t) range. The RING radiator system employs four counter-rotating, hollow, cylindrical, ring-shaped tubes filled with liquid lithium. The rings pass through a cavity heat exchanger, absorb heat, and then re-radiate that absorbed heat to space. Each ring is made of thin-walled, corrugated Nb-1%Zr tubing with external fins, segmented to minimize the consequence of coolant loss. To examine both the system transient and steady-state thermal hydraulic response, a set of detailed, analytical computer codes was developed (RINGSYS-System Thermal Hydraulics and Power Rating/RINGDYN-System Dynamics/RINGRAD-Radiation Damage and Void Gas Formation/RINGDATG-Data Handling). An additional code (TEMPEST) was obtained to examine the impact of augmented, internal ring convective heat transfer on overall system performance. Performance results and a cumulative uncertainty analysis including analytical, computational, property, and environmental condition errors are presented. The optimized radiator configuration at a cavity temperature of 1500 K results in a 3.3 MW(t) heat removal capacity at a minimum radiator weight ratio of 2.1 kg/kW(t); or a radiator weight ratio of 4.0 kg/kW(t) at a maximum achievable capacity of 5.6 MW(t). Despite a higher kg/kW(t) ratio than reported for other comparable temperature radiator designs, the concept is an attractive option for use with high-temperature reactors in high or geosynchronous earth orbit, specifically where the essential design criteria emphasize reliability, safety, and repairability. This dissertation also describes the confirmatory research, especially related to the material and thermal characteristics of key components, necessary to ensure successful RING radiator system deployment.

  9. 1992 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 29th, New Orleans, LA, July 13-17, 1992, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Vonno, Nick W. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of recent theoretical and experimental research related to nuclear and space radiation effects. Topics dicussed include single event phenomena, radiation effects in particle detectors and associated electronics for accelerators, spacecraft charging, and space environments and effects. The discussion also covers hardness assurance and testing techniques, electromagnetic effects, radiation effects in devices and integrated circuits, dosimetry and radiation facilities, isolation techniques, and basic mechanisms.

  10. Resolution of Brassicaceae Phylogeny Using Nuclear Genes Uncovers Nested Radiations and Supports Convergent Morphological Evolution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Sun, Renran; Hu, Yi; Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Liming; Zhang, Qiang; Koch, Marcus A; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan; Edger, Patrick P; Pires, J Chris; Tan, Dun-Yan; Zhong, Yang; Ma, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Brassicaceae is one of the most diverse and economically valuable angiosperm families with widely cultivated vegetable crops and scientifically important model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. The evolutionary history, ecological, morphological, and genetic diversity, and abundant resources and knowledge of Brassicaceae make it an excellent model family for evolutionary studies. Recent phylogenetic analyses of the family revealed three major lineages (I, II, and III), but relationships among and within these lineages remain largely unclear. Here, we present a highly supported phylogeny with six major clades using nuclear markers from newly sequenced transcriptomes of 32 Brassicaceae species and large data sets from additional taxa for a total of 55 species spanning 29 out of 51 tribes. Clade A consisting of Lineage I and Macropodium nivale is sister to combined Clade B (with Lineage II and others) and a new Clade C. The ABC clade is sister to Clade D with species previously weakly associated with Lineage II and Clade E (Lineage III) is sister to the ABCD clade. Clade F (the tribe Aethionemeae) is sister to the remainder of the entire family. Molecular clock estimation reveals an early radiation of major clades near or shortly after the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and subsequent nested divergences of several tribes of the previously polytomous Expanded Lineage II. Reconstruction of ancestral morphological states during the Brassicaceae evolution indicates prevalent parallel (convergent) evolution of several traits over deep times across the entire family. These results form a foundation for future evolutionary analyses of structures and functions across Brassicaceae. PMID:26516094

  11. First measurement of proton-induced low-momentum dielectron radiation off cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HADES Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of proton-induced dielectron radiation from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p + p data, we observe for e+e- momenta Pee<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectrum, which we attribute to an additional ρ-like contribution and a decrease of ω yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the ρ meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the ω meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  12. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.S. . School of Public Health)

    1990-01-01

    This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and other.'' The category, other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs.

  13. Resolution of Brassicaceae Phylogeny Using Nuclear Genes Uncovers Nested Radiations and Supports Convergent Morphological Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Sun, Renran; Hu, Yi; Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Liming; Zhang, Qiang; Koch, Marcus A.; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan; Edger, Patrick P.; Pires, J. Chris; Tan, Dun-Yan; Zhong, Yang; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Brassicaceae is one of the most diverse and economically valuable angiosperm families with widely cultivated vegetable crops and scientifically important model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. The evolutionary history, ecological, morphological, and genetic diversity, and abundant resources and knowledge of Brassicaceae make it an excellent model family for evolutionary studies. Recent phylogenetic analyses of the family revealed three major lineages (I, II, and III), but relationships among and within these lineages remain largely unclear. Here, we present a highly supported phylogeny with six major clades using nuclear markers from newly sequenced transcriptomes of 32 Brassicaceae species and large data sets from additional taxa for a total of 55 species spanning 29 out of 51 tribes. Clade A consisting of Lineage I and Macropodium nivale is sister to combined Clade B (with Lineage II and others) and a new Clade C. The ABC clade is sister to Clade D with species previously weakly associated with Lineage II and Clade E (Lineage III) is sister to the ABCD clade. Clade F (the tribe Aethionemeae) is sister to the remainder of the entire family. Molecular clock estimation reveals an early radiation of major clades near or shortly after the Eocene–Oligocene boundary and subsequent nested divergences of several tribes of the previously polytomous Expanded Lineage II. Reconstruction of ancestral morphological states during the Brassicaceae evolution indicates prevalent parallel (convergent) evolution of several traits over deep times across the entire family. These results form a foundation for future evolutionary analyses of structures and functions across Brassicaceae. PMID:26516094

  14. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff involved in PET/CT practice in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Antic, V; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Stankovic, J; Arandjic, D; Todorovic, N; Lucic, S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the radiation exposure to nuclear medicine (NM) staff in the two positron emission tomography-computed tomography centres in Serbia and to investigate the possibilities for dose reduction. Dose levels in terms of Hp(10) for whole body and Hp(0.07) for hands of NM staff were assessed using thermoluminescence and electronic personal dosemeters. The assessed doses per procedure in terms of Hp(10) were 4.2-7 and 5-6 μSv, in two centres, respectively, whereas the extremity doses in terms of Hp(0.07) in one of the centres was 34-126 μSv procedure(-1). The whole-body doses per unit activity were 17-19 and 21-26 μSv GBq(-1) in two centres, respectively, and the normalised finger dose in one centre was 170-680 μSv GBq(-1). The maximal estimated annual whole-body doses in two centres were 3.4 and 2.0 mSv, while the corresponding extremity dose in the later one was 45 mSv. Improvements as introduction of automatic dispensing system and injection and optimisation of working practice resulted in dose reduction ranging from 12 up to 67 %. PMID:24464817

  15. Analyzing and sense making of human factors in the Malaysian radiation and nuclear emergency planning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, A. H. A.; Rozan, M. Z. A.; Deris, S.; Ibrahim, R.; Abdullah, W. S. W.; Rahman, A. A.; Yunus, M. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of current Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework (RANEPF) simulator emphasizes on the human factors to be analyzed and interpreted according to the stakeholder's tacit and explicit knowledge. These human factor criteria are analyzed and interpreted according to the "sense making theory" and Disaster Emergency Response Management Information System (DERMIS) design premises. These criteria are corroborated by the statistical criteria. In recent findings, there were no differences of distributions among the stakeholders according to gender and organizational expertise. These criteria are incrementally accepted and agreed the research elements indicated in the respective emergency planning frameworks and simulator (i.e. 78.18 to 84.32, p-value <0.05). This paper suggested these human factors criteria in the associated analyses and theoretical perspectives to be further acomodated in the future simulator development. This development is in conjunction with the proposed hypothesis building of the process factors and responses diagram. We proposed that future work which implies the additional functionality of the simulator, as strategized, condensed and concise, comprehensive public disaster preparedness and intervention guidelines, to be a useful and efficient computer simulation.

  16. Up-stream events in the nuclear factor κB activation cascade in response to sparsely ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Langen, Britta; Klimow, Galina; Ruscher, Roland; Schmitz, Claudia; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Günther

    2009-10-01

    Radiation is a potentially limiting factor for manned long-term space missions. Prolonged exposure to galactic cosmic rays may shorten the healthy life-span after return to Earth due to cancer induction. During the mission, a solar flare can be life threatening. For better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures, the study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. Since apoptosis may be a mechanism the body uses to eliminate damaged cells, the induction by cosmic radiation of the nuclear anti-apoptotic transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) could influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to cosmic radiation by improving the survival of radiation-damaged cells. In previous studies using a screening assay for the detection of NF-κB-dependent gene induction (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells), the activation of this transcription factor by heavy ions was shown [Baumstark-Khan, C., Hellweg, C.E., Arenz, A., Meier, M.M. Cellular monitoring of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway for assessment of space environmental radiation. Radiat. Res. 164, 527-530, 2005]. Studies with NF-κB inhibitors can map functional details of the NF-κB pathway and the influence of radiation-induced NF-κB activation on various cellular outcomes such as survival or cell cycle arrest. In this work, the efficacy and cytotoxicity of four different NF-κB inhibitors, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), capsaicin, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132, and the cell permeable peptide NF-κB SN50 were analyzed using HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. In the recommended concentration range, only CAPE displayed considerable cytotoxicity. CAPE and capsaicin partially inhibited NF-κB activation by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor α. MG-132 completely abolished the activation and was therefore used for experiments with X-rays. NF-κB SN-50 could not reduce NF-κB dependent expression of the reporter destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP). MG-132

  17. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destouches, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND) and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  18. Release of man-made radionuclides into seawater from dumped and sunken nuclear- and radiation-hazardous objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotsky, V. L.; Sivintsev, Yu. V.; Sotnikov, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.

    2014-12-01

    The methodology and results of a weighted average evaluation of the release of man-made radio-nuclides into seawater out of nuclear- and radiation-hazardous objects located on the sea bottom over a long period of time (from dumping/sinking to complete destruction of their structural elements) are presented in the paper. The expected radio-ecological implications of environmental contamination are estimated for the main stages of destruction.

  19. Effects of nuclear radiation on a high-reliability silicon power diode. 4: Analysis of reverse bias characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on the reverse bias electrical characteristics of one hundred silicon power diodes were investigated. On a percentage basis, the changes in reverse currents were large but, due to very low initial values, this electrical characteristic was not the limiting factor in use of these diodes. These changes were interpreted in terms of decreasing minority carrier lifetimes as related to generation-recombination currents. The magnitudes of reverse voltage breakdown were unaffected by irradiation.

  20. Bipolarization of Risk Perception about the Health Effects of Radiation in Residents after the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nakayama, Yumi; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Urata, Hideko; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Endo, Yuuko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    The late health effects of low-dose rate radiation exposure are still a serious public concern in the Fukushima area even four years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). To clarify the factors associated with residents' risk perception of radiation exposure and consequent health effects, we conducted a survey among residents of Kawauchi village in May and June 2014, which is located within 30 km of FNPP. 85 of 285 residents (29.8%) answered that acute radiation syndrome might develop in residents after the accident, 154 (54.0%) residents responded that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on children, and 140 (49.1%) residents indicated that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on offspring. Furthermore, 107 (37.5%) residents answered that they had concerns about health effects that would appear in the general population simply by living in an environment with a 0.23 μSv per hour ambient dose for one year, 149 (52.2%) residents reported that they were reluctant to eat locally produced foods, and 164 (57.5%) residents believed that adverse health effects would occur in the general population by eating 100 Bq per kg of mushrooms every day for one year. The present study shows that a marked bipolarization of the risk perception about the health effects of radiation among residents could have a major impact on social well-being after the accident at FNPP. PMID:26057539

  1. Radiation exposure and central nervous system cancers: A case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Fry, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities to investigate the possible association of primary malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. Eighty-nine white male and female workers, who according to the information on death certificates dies of primary CNS cancers, were identified as cases. Four matched controls were selected for each case. External radiation exposure data were available from film badge readings for individual workers, whereas radiation dose to lung from internally deposited radionuclides, mainly uranium, was estimated from area and personnel monitoring data and was used in analyses in lieu of the dose to the brain. Matched sets were included in the analyses only if information was available for the case and at least one of the corresponding controls. Thus, the analyses of external radiation included 27 cases and 90 matched controls, and 47 cases and 120 matched controls were analyzed for the effects of radiation from internally deposited uranium. No association was observed between deaths fron CNS cancers and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external or internal sources. However, due to the small number of monitored subjects and low doses, a weak association could not be ruled out. 43 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs.

  2. Bipolarization of Risk Perception about the Health Effects of Radiation in Residents after the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nakayama, Yumi; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Urata, Hideko; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Endo, Yuuko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    The late health effects of low-dose rate radiation exposure are still a serious public concern in the Fukushima area even four years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). To clarify the factors associated with residents’ risk perception of radiation exposure and consequent health effects, we conducted a survey among residents of Kawauchi village in May and June 2014, which is located within 30 km of FNPP. 85 of 285 residents (29.8%) answered that acute radiation syndrome might develop in residents after the accident, 154 (54.0%) residents responded that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on children, and 140 (49.1%) residents indicated that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on offspring. Furthermore, 107 (37.5%) residents answered that they had concerns about health effects that would appear in the general population simply by living in an environment with a 0.23 μSv per hour ambient dose for one year, 149 (52.2%) residents reported that they were reluctant to eat locally produced foods, and 164 (57.5%) residents believed that adverse health effects would occur in the general population by eating 100 Bq per kg of mushrooms every day for one year. The present study shows that a marked bipolarization of the risk perception about the health effects of radiation among residents could have a major impact on social well-being after the accident at FNPP. PMID:26057539

  3. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine personnel handling positron emitters from Ge-68/Ga-68 generator

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Durgesh Kumar; Snehlata; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar; Lochab, Satya Pal; Kumar, Rakesh; Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Malhotra, Arun; Bandopadhayaya, Guru Pad; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Pant, Gauri Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To measure the radiation exposure to nuclear medicine personnel during synthesis and injection to the patients of Ga-68 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N″′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-1-Nal3-octreotide (NOC)- (DOTA-NOC) using ring thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Materials and Methods: Synthesis of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC was done on a semi-automated system. Finger doses were measured during synthesis and injection of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC. The occupational workers wore TLDs at the base of ring finger of both hands. The finger doses of two radio chemists were measured during synthesis of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC while that of a physician during its injection to the patients. Results: Duration of the study was eight months and a total of 20 samples were prepared. During synthesis, the mean dose to base of left ring finger was 3.02 ± 1.01 mSv and to base of right ring finger was 1.96 ± 0.86 mSv. Mean dose to base of left ring finger was 1.26 ± 0.35 mSv while that to base of right ring finger was 1.03 ± 0.13 mSv during injection. The mean dose was observed to be higher during synthesis than injection. However, the difference was not significant (P = 0.27 and P = 0.18, respectively). Overall mean finger dose of left hand was 2.43 ± 1.21 mSv, whereas for the right hand the same was 1.65± 0.82 mSv. Conclusion: Finger doses to radio chemists during semi-automated synthesis of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC and that to the physician involved in injection of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC were found to be within permissible limits. Ring dosimeters must be worn for the safety of the nuclear medicine personnel involved in synthesis and injection of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC. PMID:22174513

  4. Evolving societal risks and necessary precautions in the age of nuclear power and therapeutic radiation: an American perspective.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Yu, Cheng; Rusch, Mairead; Holloway, Charles; Chang, Eric; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2014-12-01

    Terrorism involving nuclear or radiologic weapons can devastate populations, city infrastructures, and entire sociopolitical systems. In our age of nuclear medicine and therapeutic radiation delivery, the unauthorized and illegal acquisition of radioactive materials needed for such an attack is always a possibility and risk. Physicians handling high-energy isotopes for medical radiotherapy must be aware of the basic security requirements as outlined by the Nuclear Regulation Commission, which include background checks and authorized access, physical protection during radionuclide use, and physical protection during its transit. The Leksell Gamma Knife and its Category 1 cobalt-60 radioactive source are discussed because of their significant potential for deployment in a weaponized device. Although this article presents a perspective relating to American rules and regulations, these precautions are applicable anywhere that similar situations exist. Understanding these materials and the security they require is essential to preventing the disastrous outcomes should these isotopes fall into terrorists' hands. PMID:25218709

  5. Results of a Direct Search Using Synchrotron Radiation for the Low-Energy (229)Th Nuclear Isomeric Transition.

    PubMed

    Jeet, Justin; Schneider, Christian; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-06-26

    We report the results of a direct search for the (229)Th (I(π)=3/2(+)←5/2(+)) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing (229)Th-doped LiSrAlF(6) crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between 7.3 eV and 8.8 eV with transition lifetime (1-2) s≲τ≲(2000-5600)  s. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches. PMID:26197124

  6. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. Final performance report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall goal of our research was to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we studied hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologists who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second and third years was on measurements of: (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201; (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99; (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists; and (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The completed work has been published and is described below in more detail.

  7. A system for the calculation and visualisation of radiation field for maintenance support in nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Yukiharu; Fukuda, Mitsuko; Shibata, Kiyotaka; Kawakami, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Tomokazu

    2005-01-01

    A system has been developed to improve the efficiency of maintenance work while decreasing the radiation exposure of maintenance personnel in nuclear power plants. The input data for dose rate calculation are automatically generated by using computer-aided design data. Changes for the input data corresponding to the progress of maintenance work, such as installation of a radiation shield and removal of a component, are easily input interactively on a graphical user interface (GUI). A new method was proposed which searches the sets of source and detector points between which gamma-ray attenuation is changed by the component movement. The calculation is performed only for the changed sets, so that the change of the three-dimensional dose rate distribution is calculated rapidly according to the work progress. The dose rate distribution and the radiation exposure of maintenance personnel are displayed three-dimensionally in colour with plant components and pipes on the GUI. PMID:16604706

  8. On the effects of fission product noble metal inclusions on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Martin; Nilsson, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2008-08-01

    Radiation induced oxidative dissolution of UO 2 is a key process for the safety assessment of future geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. This process is expected to govern the rate of radionuclide release to the biosphere. In this work, we have studied the catalytic effects of fission product noble metal inclusions on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The experimental studies were performed using UO 2 pellets containing 0%, 0.1%, 1% and 3% Pd as a model for spent nuclear fuel. H 2O 2 was used as a model for radiolytical oxidants (previous studies have shown that H 2O 2 is the most important oxidant in such systems). The pellets were immersed in aqueous solution containing H 2O 2 and HCO3- and the consumption of H 2O 2 and the dissolution of uranium were analyzed as a function of H 2 pressure (0-40 bar). The noble metal inclusions were found to catalyze oxidation of UO 2 as well as reduction of surface bound oxidized UO 2 by H 2. In both cases the rate of the process increases with increasing Pd content. The reduction process was found to be close to diffusion controlled. This process can fully account for the inhibiting effect of H 2 observed in several studies on spent nuclear fuel dissolution.

  9. BRCC36 is essential for ionizing radiation-induced BRCA1 phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei; Arciero, Cletus A; Wang, Chunrong; Broccoli, Dominique; Godwin, Andrew K

    2006-05-15

    We have previously reported the identification and characterization of a novel BRCA1/2 interacting protein complex, BRCC (BRCA1/2-containing complex). BRCC36, one of the proteins in BRCC, directly interacts with BRCA1, and regulates the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of BRCC. Importantly, BRCC36 is aberrantly expressed in the vast majority of breast tumors, indicating a potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. To further elucidate the functional consequence of abnormal BRCC36 expression in breast cancer, we have done in vivo silencing studies using small interfering RNAs targeting BRCC36 in breast cancer cell lines, i.e., MCF-7, ZR-75-1, and T47D. Knock-down of BRCC36 alone does not affect cell growth, but when combined with ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, it leads to an increase in the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis when compared with the small interfering RNA control group in breast cancer cells. Immunoblot analysis shows that inhibition of BRCC36 has no effect on the activation of ATM, expression of p21 and p53, or BRCA1-BARD1 interaction following IR exposure. Importantly, BRCC36 depletion disrupts IR-induced phosphorylation of BRCA1. Immunofluorescent staining of BRCA1 and gamma-H2AX indicates that BRCC36 depletion prevents the formation of BRCA1 nuclear foci in response to DNA damage in breast cancer cells. These results show that down-regulation of BRCC36 expression impairs the DNA repair pathway activated in response to IR by inhibiting BRCA1 activation, thereby sensitizing breast cancer cells to IR-induced apoptosis. PMID:16707425

  10. Characterization of amorphous selenium alloy detectors for x-rays and high energy nuclear radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Mehta, Abhinav; Chaudhuri, Sandeep K.; Cui, Yunlong; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold

    2013-09-01

    Synthesized amorphous selenium (a-Se) alloy materials have been characterized for room temperature high-energy nuclear radiation detector and x-ray detection applications. The alloy composition has been optimized to ensure good charge transport properties and detector performance. The synthesis of a-Se (As, Cl) alloys has been carried out by thoroughly mixing zone-refined (ZR) Se (~7N) with previously synthesized a-Se(As) and a-Se(Cl) master alloys (MS). The synthesized alloys have been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics measurements. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the a-Se(As) master alloy samples were in metastable monoclinic Se8 states, in which seven vibrational modes are located at 40(41), 59(60), 77, 110, 133, 227(228) and 251(252) cm-1. However, a-Se(Cl) master alloy samples are in stable form of trigonal structure of Se8 ring, in which two modes at 142 and 234 cm-1 were found. Both Raman and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) exhibited that a small amount of tellurium (Te) existed in a-Se (As, Cl) master alloy samples. DSC measurements showed that a-Se (Cl) MS and a-Se (As) MS samples have one melting point, located at ~219.6°C, whereas a-Se-As (0.52%)-Cl and Se- As(10.2%)-Cl(60 ppm) both possess two melting points, located at 221 and 220.3°C respectively. The a-Se alloy plate detectors have been fabricated and tested and the results showed high dark resistivity (1012 - 1013 Ω-cm) with good charge transport properties and cost-effective large-area scalability.

  11. Living with Radiation. The Problems of the Nuclear Age for the Layman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannigan, Francis L.

    The text takes a practical approach to the understanding of industrial radiation hazards. It is intended for the layman who requires a basic understanding of the relationship of radiation problems to his own field. Discussion includes such topics as: uses which benefit mankind; radiation energy versus fission energy; effects of excessive radiation…

  12. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  13. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barattino, W.J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW/sub th/, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  14. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a ...

  15. IDENTIFYING AND QUANTIFYING ACTINIDE RADIATION DAMAGE IN ZrSiO4 MINERALS AND CERAMICS WITH NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Farnan, Ian E.; Cho, Herman M.; Weber, William J.

    2006-11-01

    This paper discusses how high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can be used to characterise and quantify radiation damage in natural minerals and ceramic nuclear waste forms that contain actinides. The scientific goal is to identify the nature of the amorphous component of the radiation damaged material through similar approaches to those where NMR has been used to study glasses and amorphous materials1. NMR also allows the amount of amorphous material to be quantified as an atomic number fraction of the total. This is in contrast to traditional methods that express the damaged amorphous component as volume fractions of the total. Very old mineral samples of ZrSiO4 (zircon) containing 238U and 232Th with varying alpha radiation doses can be used to provide samples with differing levels of radiation damage2,3. Radiation damage due to the emission of an alpha particle by an actinide nucleus is believed to occur through two distinct processes4. The alpha particle itself (4.5 – 5.5 MeV), will mainly cause ionisations during its flight through a material, it is also thought to cause a few hundred atomic displacements (Frenkel defects) as it is stopped by collision with atomic nuclei. The recoil of the heavy actinide nucleus (70 -100 keV) is believed to cause the majority of the localised structural damage (amorphisation) as it creates a cascade of collisions with surrounding ions. The extent and nature of this ‘displacement cascade’ is the subject of extensive modelling by both ballistic5,6 and increasingly molecular dynamics7-15 methods. There is a profound need for experimental data to distinguish between these models.

  16. The effects of internal radiation exposure on cancer mortality in nuclear workers at Rocketdyne/Atomics International.

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, B; Morgenstern, H; Crawford-Brown, D; Young, B

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides, primarily uranium and mixed-fission products, on cancer mortality in a retrospective cohort study of workers enrolled in the radiation-monitoring program of a nuclear research and development facility. Between 1950 and 1994, 2,297 workers were monitored for internal radiation exposures, and 441 workers died, 134 (30.4%) of them from cancer as the underlying cause. We calculated internal lung-dose estimates based on urinalysis and whole-body and lung counts reported for individual workers. We examined cancer mortality of workers exposed at different cumulative lung-dose levels using complete risk-set analysis for cohort data, adjusting for age, pay type, time since first radiation monitored, and external radiation. In addition, we examined the potential for confounding due to chemical exposures and smoking, explored whether external radiation exposure modifies the effects of internal exposure, and estimated effects after excluding exposures likely to have been unrelated to disease onset. Dose-response relations were observed for death from hemato- and lymphopoietic cancers and from upper aerodigestive tract cancers, adjusting for age, time since first monitored, pay type, and external (gamma) radiation dose. No association was found for other cancers, including cancers of the lung. Despite the small number of exposed deaths from specific cancer types and possible bias due to measurement error and confounding, the positive findings and strong dose-response gradients observed suggest carcinogenic effects of internal radiation to the upper aerodigestive tract and the blood and lymph system in this occupational cohort. However, causal inferences require replication of our results in other populations or confirmation with an extended follow-up of this cohort. PMID:10964795

  17. Solid cancer mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure at the French atomic energy commission and nuclear fuel company.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2011-07-01

    Studies of nuclear workers make it possible to directly quantify the risks associated with ionizing radiation exposure at low doses and low dose rates. Studies of the CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) and AREVA Nuclear Cycle (AREVA NC) cohort, currently the most informative such group in France, describe the long-term risk to nuclear workers associated with external exposure. Our aim is to assess the risk of mortality from solid cancers among CEA and AREVA NC nuclear workers and its association with external radiation exposure. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated and internal Poisson regressions were conducted, controlling for the main confounding factors [sex, attained age, calendar period, company and socioeconomic status (SES)]. During the period 1968-2004, there were 2,035 solid cancers among the 36,769 CEA-AREVA NC workers. Cumulative external radiation exposure was assessed for the period 1950-2004, and the mean cumulative dose was 12.1 mSv. Mortality rates for all causes and all solid cancers were both significantly lower in this cohort than in the general population. A significant excess of deaths from pleural cancer, not associated with cumulative external dose, was observed, probably due to past asbestos exposure. We observed a significant excess of melanoma, also unassociated with dose. Although cumulative external dose was not associated with mortality from all solid cancers, the central estimated excess relative risk (ERR) per Sv of 0.46 for solid cancer mortality was higher than the 0.26 calculated for male Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors 50 years or older and exposed at the age of 30 years or older. The modification of our results after stratification for SES demonstrates the importance of this characteristic in occupational studies, because it makes it possible to take class-based lifestyle differences into account, at least partly. These results show the great potential of a further joint international study of

  18. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, Gatlinburg, TN, July 18-21, 1983, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include radiation effects in devices; the basic mechanisms of radiation effects in structures and materials; radiation effects in integrated circuits; spacecraft charging and space radiation effects; hardness assurance for devices and systems; and radiation transport, energy deposition and charge collection. Papers are presented on the mechanisms of small instabilities in irradiated MOS transistors, on the radiation effects on oxynitride gate dielectrics, on the discharge characteristics of a simulated solar cell array, and on latchup in CMOS devices from heavy ions. Attention is also given to proton upsets in orbit, to the modeling of single-event upset in bipolar integrated circuits, to high-resolution studies of the electrical breakdown of soil, and to a finite-difference solution of Maxwell's equations in generalized nonorthogonal coordinates.

  19. Monitoring human factor risk characteristics at nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia in support of radiation safety regulation.

    PubMed

    Scheblanov, V Y; Sneve, M K; Bobrov, A F

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes research aimed at improving regulatory supervision of radiation safety during work associated with the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at legacy sites in northwest Russia through timely identification of employees presenting unfavourable human factor risk characteristics. The legacy sites of interest include sites of temporary storage now operated by SevRAO on behalf of Rosatom. The sites were previously operational bases for servicing nuclear powered submarines and are now subject to major remediation activities. These activities include hazardous operations for recovery of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from sub-optimal storage conditions. The paper describes the results of analysis of methods, procedures, techniques and informational issues leading to the development of an expert-diagnostic information system for monitoring of workers involved in carrying out the most hazardous operations. The system serves as a tool for human factor and professional reliability risk monitoring and has been tested in practical working environments and implemented as part of regulatory supervision. The work has been carried out by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center, within the framework of the regulatory cooperation programme between the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of Russia and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. PMID:23186692

  20. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  1. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  2. Calculation of ionospheric effects due to acoustic radiation from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, G. V.; Uralov, A. M.

    1995-03-01

    Within the framework of the ionospheric detection of underground nuclear tests, we have developed analytic computing technique for the acoustic effect of a confined nuclear explosion on upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The relationship is obtained, which relates the nuclear test parameters (depth, explosion yield, and mechanical properties of the rock) to the vertical displacement of the ionosphere produced by the shock wave over the explosion's epicenter. It is also shown that most of the acoustic energy produced by a confined underground nuclear explosion escapes upward, with only a small fraction being captured by the atmospheric waveguide.

  3. Radiation hardening of components and systems for nuclear rocket vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhow, W. A.; Cheever, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the S-2 and S-4B components, although incomplete, indicate that many Saturn 5 components and subsystems, e.g., pumps, valves, etc., can be radiation hardened to meet NRV requirements by material substitution and minor design modifications. Results of these analyses include (1) recommended radiation tolerance limits for over 100 material applications; (2) design data which describes the components of each system; (3) presentation of radiation hardening examples of systems; and (4) designing radiation effects tests to supply data for selecting materials.

  4. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  5. Biokinetics of nuclear fuel compounds and biological effects of nonuniform radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, S; Servomaa, K; Kosma, V M; Rytömaa, T

    1995-01-01

    Environmental releases of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds may occur at nuclear power plants during normal operation, after nuclear power plant accidents, and as a consequence of nuclear weapons testing. For example, the Chernobyl fallout contained extensive amounts of pulverized nuclear fuel composed of uranium and its nonvolatile fission products. The effects of these highly radioactive particles, also called hot particles, on humans are not well known due to lack of reliable data on the extent of the exposure. However, the biokinetics and biological effects of nuclear fuel compounds have been investigated in a number of experimental studies using various cellular systems and laboratory animals. In this article, we review the biokinetic properties and effects of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds, with special reference to UO2, PuO2, and nonvolatile, long-lived beta-emitters Zr, Nb, Ru, and Ce. First, the data on hot particles, including sources, dosimetry, and human exposure are discussed. Second, the biokinetics of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds in the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract are reviewed. Finally, short- and long-term biological effects of nonuniform alpha- and beta-irradiation on the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and skin are discussed. Images p920-a Figure 1. PMID:8529589

  6. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  7. Historical Patterns in the Types of Procedures Performed and Radiation Safety Practices Used in Nuclear Medicine From 1945-2009.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Miriam E; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Doody, Michele M; Lim, Hyeyeun; Bolus, Norman E; Simon, Steven L; Alexander, Bruce H; Kitahara, Cari M

    2016-07-01

    The authors evaluated historical patterns in the types of procedures performed in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine and the associated radiation safety practices used from 1945-2009 in a sample of U.S. radiologic technologists. In 2013-2014, 4,406 participants from the U.S. Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Study who previously reported working with medical radionuclides completed a detailed survey inquiring about the performance of 23 diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide procedures and the use of radiation safety practices when performing radionuclide procedure-related tasks during five time periods: 1945-1964, 1965-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, and 2000-2009. An overall increase in the proportion of technologists who performed specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures was observed across the five time periods. Between 1945-1964 and 2000-2009, the median frequency of diagnostic procedures performed substantially increased (from 5 wk to 30 wk), attributable mainly to an increasing frequency of cardiac and non-brain PET scans, while the median frequency of therapeutic procedures performed modestly decreased (from 4 mo to 3 mo). Also a notable increase was observed in the use of most radiation safety practices from 1945-1964 to 2000-2009 (e.g., use of lead-shielded vials during diagnostic radiopharmaceutical preparation increased from 56 to 96%), although lead apron use dramatically decreased (e.g., during diagnostic imaging procedures, from 81 to 7%). These data describe historical practices in nuclear medicine and can be used to support studies of health risks for nuclear medicine technologists. PMID:27218293

  8. Residual radionuclide concentrations and estimated radiation doses at the former French nuclear weapons test sites in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Danesi, P R; Moreno, J; Makarewicz, M; Louvat, D

    2008-11-01

    In order to assess the level of residual radioactivity and evaluate the radiological conditions at the former French nuclear testing sites of Reggane and Taourirt Tan Afella in the south of Algeria, the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the request of the government of Algeria, conducted a field mission to the sites in 1999. At these locations, France conducted a number of nuclear tests in the early 1960s. At the ground zero locality of the ''Gerboise Blanche'' atmospheric test (Reggane) and in the vicinity of a tunnel where radioactive lava was ejected during a poorly contained explosion (Taourirt Tan Afella), non-negligible levels of radioactive material could still be measured. Using the information collected and using realistic potential exposure scenarios, radiation doses to potential occupants and visitors to the sites were estimated. PMID:18513985

  9. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C P; Butler, D J; Webb, D V

    2012-03-01

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA. PMID:22302465

  10. Aspects of operational radiation protection during dismantling of nuclear facilities relevant for the estimation of internal doses.

    PubMed

    Labarta, T

    2007-01-01

    Operational radiation protection of workers during the dismantling of nuclear facilities is based on the same radiation protection principles as that applied in its exploitation period with the objective of ensuring proper implementation of the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) principle. These principles are: prior determination of the nature and magnitude of radiological risk; classification of workplaces and workers depending on the risks; implementation of control measures; monitoring of zones and working conditions, including, if necessary, individual monitoring. From the experiences and the lessons learned during the dismantling processes carried out in Spain, several important aspects in the practical implementation of these principles that directly influence and ensure an adequate prevention of exposures and the estimation of internal doses are pointed out, with special emphasis on the estimation of internal doses due to transuranic intakes. PMID:17951606

  11. Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident: experiences of the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Homma, T; Takahara, S; Kimura, M; Kinase, S

    2015-06-01

    Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident are discussed in this paper based on the experiences following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The criteria for use in nuclear emergencies in the Japanese emergency preparedness guide were based on the recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 63. Although the decision-making process for implementing protective actions relied heavily on computer-based predictive models prior to the accident, urgent protective actions, such as evacuation and sheltering, were implemented effectively based on the plant conditions. As there were no recommendations and criteria for long-term protective actions in the emergency preparedness guide, the recommendations of ICRP Publications 103, 109, and 111 were taken into consideration in determining the temporary relocation of inhabitants of heavily contaminated areas. These recommendations were very useful in deciding the emergency protective actions to take in the early stages of the Fukushima accident. However, some suggestions have been made for improving emergency preparedness and response in the early stages of a severe nuclear accident. PMID:25915551

  12. A framework for the systematic realisation of phenomena for enhanced sensing of radiological and nuclear materials, and radiation.

    PubMed

    Healy, M J F

    2015-09-01

    The quest for new sensing phenomena continues because detecting, discriminating, identifying, measuring and monitoring nuclear materials and their radiation from greater range, at lower concentrations, and in a more timely fashion brings greater safety, security and efficiency. The potential phenomena are diverse, and those that have been realised can be found in disparate fields of science, engineering and medicine, which makes the full range difficult to realise and record. The framework presented here offers a means to systematically and comprehensively explore nuclear sensing phenomena. The approach is based on the fundamental concepts of matter and energy, where the sequence starts with the original nuclear material and its emissions, and progressively considers signatures arising from secondary effects and the emissions from associated materials and the environment. Concepts of operations such as active and passive interrogation, and networked sensing are considered. In this operational light, unpacking nuclear signatures forces a fresh look at the sensing concept. It also exposes how some phenomena that exist in established technology may be considered novel based on how they could be exploited rather than what they fundamentally are. This article selects phenomena purely to illustrate the framework and how it can be best used to foster creativity in the quest for novel phenomena rather than exhaustively listing, categorising or comparing any practical aspects of candidate phenomena. PMID:26270745

  13. On the radiation safety studies of space nuclear sources at the Scientific-Research Institute of Thermal Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Koroteev, A.S.; Gafarov, A.A.; Bakhtin, B.I.; Kosov, A.V. )

    1991-01-01

    The main directions and some results of the theoretical and experimental studies, carried out at the Scientific-Research Institute of Thermal Processes on the radiation safety (RS) problem of the space nuclear power sources (SNPS), are stated. The experimental base for SNPS aerodynamic heating and breakup research is described. Some results of studies on the development of RS system for SNPS of Cosmos-954''-type satellites and SNPS Topaz'' are represented. The main directions and results of research on the RS problem of radioisotope SNPS is showen. Some aspects of SNPS possible collisions with space debris in near-earth orbits is examined.

  14. Controlled manipulation of elastomers with radiation: Insights from multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance data and mechanical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T.; Dinh, L. N.; Gee, R. H.; Wilson, T.; Chinn, S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-03-15

    Filled and cross-linked elastomeric rubbers are versatile network materials with a multitude of applications ranging from artificial organs and biomedical devices to cushions, coatings, adhesives, interconnects, and seismic-isolation, thermal, and electrical barriers. External factors such as mechanical stress, temperature fluctuations, or radiation are known to create chemical changes in such materials that can directly affect the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer between cross-links and alter the structural and mechanical properties. From a materials science point of view it is highly desirable to understand, affect, and manipulate such property changes in a controlled manner. Unfortunately, that has not yet been possible due to the lack of experimental characterization of such networks under controlled environments. In this work we expose a known rubber material to controlled dosages of {gamma} radiation and utilize a newly developed multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance technique to characterize the MWD as a function of radiation. We show that such data along with mechanical stress-strain measurements are amenable to accurate analysis by simple network models and yield important insights into radiation-induced molecular-level processes.

  15. Comprehensive Assessment of Host Responses to Ionizing Radiation by Nuclear Factor-κB Bioluminescence Imaging-Guided Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Ta; Lin, Ho; Ho, Tin-Yun; Li, Chia-Cheng; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Shih-Lu; Huang, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the host responses to ionizing radiation by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) bioluminescence imaging-guided transcriptomic tool. Transgenic mice carrying the NF-κB-driven luciferase gene were exposed to a single dose of 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation. In vivo imaging showed that a maximal NF-κB-dependent bioluminescent intensity was observed at 3 h after irradiation and ex vivo imaging showed that liver, intestine, and brain displayed strong NF-κB activations. Microarray analysis of these organs showed that irradiation altered gene expression signatures in an organ-specific manner and several pathways associated with metabolism and immune system were significantly altered. Additionally, the upregulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, serum amyloid A2, and serum amyloid A3 genes, which participate in both inflammation and lipid metabolism, suggested that irradiation might affect the cross pathways of metabolism and inflammation. Moreover, the alteration of chemokine (CC-motif) ligand 5, chemokine (CC-motif) ligand 20, and Jagged 1 genes, which are involved in the inflammation and enterocyte proliferation, suggested that these genes might be involved in the radiation enteropathy. In conclusion, this report describes the comprehensive evaluation of host responses to ionizing radiation. Our findings provide the fundamental information about the in vivo NF-κB activity and transcriptomic pattern after irradiation. Moreover, novel targets involved in radiation injury are also suggested. PMID:21887294

  16. The Nuclear Factor kappaB Pathway: A Link to the Immune System in the Radiation Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Guenther; Chishti, Arif Ali; Koch, Kristina; Manchanda, Kashish

    Understanding the cellular radiation response is an essential prerequisite for the risk assessment of astronauts’ space radiation exposure during long-term space missions and for effective countermeasure development. In addition to the space radiation effects, other environmental factors during space missions such as microgravity have profound effects on the body, e.g. suppression of the innate and acquired immune response. Exposure to ionizing radiation modulates immune responses in a complex dose-dependent pattern, with possible anti-inflammatory effects in the low dose range, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines at moderate doses and immunosuppression after exposure to higher doses due to precursor cell death together with concomitant exacerbated innate immune responses. A central regulator in the immune system is the transcription factor Nuclear Factor kB (NF-kappaB). In this work, the role of NF-kappaB in the cellular response to space relevant radiation qualities was analyzed. It was shown with a recombinant human NF-kappaB reporter cell line that heavy ions with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 100-300 keV/µm have a nine times higher potential to activate the NF-kappaB pathway compared to X-rays (150 kV). ATM was essential for NF-kappaB activation in response to X-rays and heavy ions. Knockdown of the NF-kappaB subunit RelA (p65) resulted in higher sensitivity towards X-rays. Reverse Transcriptase real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) experiments showed that after exposure to radiation, NF-kappaB predominantly upregulates genes involved in intercellular communication processes, especially genes coding for chemokines, suggesting an important contribution of NF-kappaB in the molecular profile of the reaction to radiation, which can comprise features of inflammation and wound healing processes. This is process is strictly NF-kappaB dependent as this response is completely absent in RelA knockdown cells. These results show that the role of NF-kappaB in

  17. [Investigation of radiation safety management of nuclear medicine facilities in Japan; contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system. A Working Group of Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine for the Guidelines of Nuclear Medicine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Koizumi, M; Kinoshita, F; Nakazawa, K

    1999-12-01

    Radiation safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities were investigated by the questionnaire method. The first questionnaire was asked in all Japanese 1,401 Nuclear Medicine facilities. Answers from 624 institutes (44.5%) were received and analyzed. The radiation-safety management in nuclear medicine institutes was considered to be very well performed everyday. Opinion for the present legal control of nuclear medicine institutes was that the regulation in Japan was too strict for the clinical use of radionuclides. The current regulation is based on the assumption that 1% of all radioactivity used in nuclear medicine institutes contaminates into the draining-water system. The second questionnaire detailing the contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system was sent to 128 institutes, and 64 answers were received. Of them, 42 institutes were considered to be enough to evaluate the contamination of radioactivity in the draining-water system. There was no difference between 624 institutes answered to the first questionnaire and 42 institutes, where the radioactivity in the draining-water system was measured, in the distribution of the institute size, draining-water system equipment and the radioactivity measuring method, and these 42 institutes seemed to be representative of Japanese nuclear medicine institutes. Contamination rate of radioactivity into the draining system was calculated by the value of radioactivity in the collecting tank divided by the amount of radionuclides used daily in each institute. The institutes were divided into two categories on the basis of nuclear medicine practice pattern; type A: in-vivo use only and type B: both in-vivo and in-vitro use. The contamination rate in 27 type A institutes did not exceed 0.01%, whereas in 15 type B institutes the contamination rate distributed widely from undetectable to above 1%. These results indicated that the present regulation for the draining-water system, which

  18. New functionality of chalcogenide glasses for radiation sensing of nuclear wastes.

    PubMed

    Ailavajhala, M S; Gonzalez-Velo, Y; Poweleit, C D; Barnaby, H J; Kozicki, M N; Butt, D P; Mitkova, M

    2014-03-30

    Data about gamma radiation induced effects in Ge40Se60 chalcogenide thin films and radiation induced silver diffusion within these are presented. Blanket films and devices were created to study the structural changes, diffusion products, and device performance. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, current vs. voltage (I-V) and impedance measurements expound the behavior of Ge40Se60 glass and silver diffusion within this glass under radiation. Raman study shows that there is a decrease in the area ratio between edge shared and corner shared structural units revealing structural reorganization occurring in the glasses as a result of gamma radiation. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that with sufficiently radiation dose it is also possible to create Ag2Se in selenium-depleted systems. Oxidation of the Ge enriched chalcogenide backbone is confirmed through the electrical performance of the sensing elements based on these films. Combination of these structural and diffusion products influences the device performance. The I-V behavior is characterized by increase in current and then stabilization as a function of radiation dose. Additionally, device modeling is also presented using Silvaco software and analytical methods to shed light on the device behavior. This type of sensor design and material characterizations facilitate in improving the radiation sensing capabilities of silver containing chalcogenide glass thin films. PMID:24332317

  19. The evolutionary radiation of Arvicolinae rodents (voles and lemmings): relative contribution of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Galewski, Thomas; Tilak, Marie-ka; Sanchez, Sophie; Chevret, Pascale; Paradis, Emmanuel; Douzery, Emmanuel JP

    2006-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial and nuclear genes have generally been employed for different purposes in molecular systematics, the former to resolve relationships within recently evolved groups and the latter to investigate phylogenies at a deeper level. In the case of rapid and recent evolutionary radiations, mitochondrial genes like cytochrome b (CYB) are often inefficient for resolving phylogenetic relationships. One of the best examples is illustrated by Arvicolinae rodents (Rodentia; Muridae), the most impressive mammalian radiation of the Northern Hemisphere which produced voles, lemmings and muskrats. Here, we compare the relative contribution of a nuclear marker – the exon 10 of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene – to the one of the mitochondrial CYB for inferring phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages of arvicoline rodents. Results The analysis of GHR sequences improves the overall resolution of the Arvicolinae phylogeny. Our results show that the Caucasian long-clawed vole (Prometheomys schaposnikowi) is one of the basalmost arvicolines, and confirm that true lemmings (Lemmus) and collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx) are not closely related as suggested by morphology. Red-backed voles (Myodini) are found as the sister-group of a clade encompassing water vole (Arvicola), snow vole (Chionomys), and meadow voles (Microtus and allies). Within the latter, no support is recovered for the generic recognition of Blanfordimys, Lasiopodomys, Neodon, and Phaiomys as suggested by morphology. Comparisons of parameter estimates for branch lengths, base composition, among sites rate heterogeneity, and GTR relative substitution rates indicate that CYB sequences consistently exhibit more heterogeneity among codon positions than GHR. By analyzing the contribution of each codon position to node resolution, we show that the apparent higher efficiency of GHR is due to their third positions. Although we focus on speciation events spanning the last 10 million years

  20. Radiation protection, radioactive waste management and site monitoring at the nuclear scientific experimental and educational centre IRT-Sofia at INRNE-BAS.

    PubMed

    Mladenov, Al; Stankov, D; Nonova, Tz; Krezhov, K

    2014-11-01

    This article identifies important components and describes the safe practices in implementing radiation protection and radioactive waste management programmes, and in their optimisation at the Nuclear Scientific Experimental and Educational Centre with research reactor IRT at INRNE-BAS. It covers the instrumentation and personal protective equipment and organisational issues related to the continuous site monitoring. The reactor is under major reconstruction and the measures applied to radiation monitoring of environment and working area focused on restricting the radiation exposure of the staff as well as compliance with international good practices related to the environmental and public radiation safety requirements are also addressed. PMID:25071246

  1. Reactor control system upgrade for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Sacramento, CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, M. A.

    1999-03-10

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new reactor control system for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Facility. This new control system not only provides the same functionality as the existing control system in terms of graphic displays of reactor process variables, data archival capability, and manual, automatic, pulse and square-wave modes of operation, but adds to the functionality of the previous control system by incorporating signal processing algorithms for the validation of sensors and automatic calibration and verification of control rod worth curves. With the inclusion of these automated features, the intent of this control system is not to replace the operator but to make the process of controlling the reactor easier and safer for the operator. For instance, an automatic control rod calibration method reduces the amount of time to calibrate control rods from days to minutes, increasing overall reactor utilization. The control rod calibration curve, determined using the automatic calibration system, can be validated anytime after the calibration, as long as the reactor power is between 50W and 500W. This is done by banking all of the rods simultaneously and comparing the tabulated rod worth curves with a reactivity computer estimate. As long as the deviation between the tabulated values and the reactivity estimate is within a prescribed error band, then the system is in calibration. In order to minimize the amount of information displayed, only the essential flux-related data are displayed in graphical format on the control screen. Information from the sensor validation methods is communicated to the operators via messages, which appear in a message window. The messages inform the operators that the actual process variables do not correlate within the allowed uncertainty in the reactor system. These warnings, however, cannot cause the reactor to shutdown automatically. The reactor operator has the ultimate responsibility of using this

  2. 48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ENERGY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 952... (including agreements with states under section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act): Radiation Protection...

  3. 48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ENERGY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 952... (including agreements with states under section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act): Radiation Protection...

  4. 48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ENERGY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 952... (including agreements with states under section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act): Radiation Protection...

  5. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  6. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff. PMID:17316078

  7. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Philippe; Clinton, Eric; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, Dave; Miskimen, Rory; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Asaturyan, Arshak; Baker, O.; Benton, LaRay; Bernstein, Aron; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Dale, Daniel; Danagoulian, Samuel; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, Raphael; Deur, Alexandre; DOLGOLENKO, A.; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Evdokimov, Anatoly; Feng, JIng; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hardy, K.; Ito, Mark; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kingsberry, Paul; Kolarkar, Ameya; Konchatnyi, Mykhailo; Korchin, O.; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kubantsev, Mikhail; Kubarovsky, Valery; LARIN, Ilya; MATVEEV, V.; McNulty, Dustin; Milbrath, Brian; Minehart, Ralph; Mochalov, Vasiliy; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Nakagawa, Itaru; Overby, Steven; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Payen, Marvin; Pedroni, Ronald; Prok, Yelena; Ritchie, Barry; Salgado, Carlos; Sitnikov, Anatoly; Sober, Daniel; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, Aram; Underwood, Jarreas; VASILIEV, A.; VEREBRYUSOV, V.; Vishnyakov, Vladimir; Wood, Michael

    2009-12-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  8. Nuclear targets for a precision measurement of the neutral pion radiative width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, P.; Clinton, E.; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, D.; Miskimen, R.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Bernstein, A.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, O.; Goryachev, V.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hardy, K.; Ito, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kingsberry, P.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, O.; Korsch, W.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Mochalov, V.; Mtingwa, S.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, A.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Verebryusov, V.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.

    2009-12-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, ρT, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is ±0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an X-ray attenuation technique is ±0.43%.

  9. Fast-forward genetics by radiation hybrids to saturate the locus regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in Triticum.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Filippo M; Ghavami, Farhad; Hayden, Matthew J; Wang, Yi; Forrest, Kerrie L; Kong, Stephan; Dizon, Rhoderissa; Michalak de Jimenez, Monika K; Meinhardt, Steven W; Mergoum, Mohamed; Gu, Yong Q; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded species cytoplasm specific (scs) genes control nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in wheat (genus Triticum). Alloplasmic cells, which have nucleus and cytoplasm derived from different species, produce vigorous and vital organisms only when the correct version of scs is present in their nucleus. In this study, bulks of in vivo radiation hybrids segregating for the scs phenotype have been genotyped by sequencing with over 1.9 million markers. The high marker saturation obtained for a critical region of chromosome 1D allowed identification of 3318 reads that mapped in close proximity of the scs. A novel in silico approach was deployed to extend these short reads to sequences of up to 70 Kb in length and identify candidate open reading frames (ORFs). Markers were developed to anchor the short contigs containing ORFs to a radiation hybrid map of 650 individuals with resolution of 288 Kb. The region containing the scs locus was narrowed to a single Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) contig of Aegilops tauschii. Its sequencing and assembly by nano-mapping allowed rapid identification of a rhomboid gene as the only ORF existing within the refined scs locus. Resequencing of this gene from multiple germplasm sources identified a single nucleotide mutation, which gives rise to a functional amino acid change. Gene expression characterization revealed that an active copy of this rhomboid exists on all homoeologous chromosomes of wheat, and depending on the specific cytoplasm each copy is preferentially expressed. Therefore, a new methodology was applied to unique genetic stocks to rapidly identify a strong candidate gene for the control of nuclear-cytoplasmic compatibility in wheat. PMID:26915753

  10. Leukemia risk associated with chronic external exposure to ionizing radiation in a French cohort of nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2012-11-01

    Leukemia is one of the earliest cancer effects observed after acute exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Leukemia mortality after external exposure at low doses and low-dose rates has been investigated at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Nuclear Fuel Company (AREVA NC) after an additional follow-up of 10 years. The cohort included radiation-monitored workers employed for at least one year during 1950-1994 at CEA or AREVA NC and followed during 1968-2004. Association between external exposure and leukemia mortality was estimated with excess relative risk (ERR) models and time-dependent modifying factors were investigated with time windows. The cohort included 36,769 workers, followed for an average of 28 years, among whom 73 leukemia deaths occurred. Among the workers with a positive recorded dose, the mean cumulative external dose was 21.7 mSv. Results under a 2-year lag assumption suggested that the risk of leukemia (except chronic lymphatic leukemia) increased significantly by 8% per 10 mSv. The magnitude of the association for myeloid leukemia was larger. The higher ERR/Sv for doses received 2-14 years earlier suggest that time since exposure modifies the effect. The ERR/Sv also appeared higher for doses received at exposure rates ≥20 mSv per year. These results are consistent with those found in other studies of nuclear workers. However, confidence intervals are still wide. Further analyses should be conducted in pooled cohorts of nuclear workers. PMID:23050984

  11. Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Wang, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

  12. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  13. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  14. The influence of radiation and nonradiation factors on the lung cancer incidence among the workers of the nuclear enterprise Mayak

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Okladnikova, N.D.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Drozhko, E.G.

    1995-09-01

    For the estimation of radiation lung cancer risk for a human being it is important to take into account different etiological factors because of the polyetiology of this disease. This work was the aim of a retrospective investigation ({open_quotes}case-control{close_quotes}) of 500 workers of a nuclear enterprise that had been gamma-irradiated in a wide dose range and had had exposure to airborne {sup 239}Pu. One hundred sixty-two persons contracted lung cancer (morbidity), and 338 persons that had not fallen ill served as pair control. Eleven potential risk factors were evaluated using a logistic regression model, five insignificant factors were excluded, and the remaining factors were arranged (by odds ratio) in decreasing order: smoking > plutonium pneumosclerosis > plutonium incorporation in body > chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) > decrease of body mass > external gamma-irradiation. The percentage of histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma among the nuclear enterprise workers was 74% which is significantly higher than 33% among the population that did not work at the enterprise, particularly in the case of high (more than 11 kBq) plutonium incorporation by the nuclear workers. The localization of tumors in this cohort is more frequently in the lower and middle lung lobes at the periphery. Each of the histological types of lung cancer has manifested a different degree of correlation with particular factors. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Experimental simulation of possible radiation-corrosive processes in container with spent nuclear fuel after groundwater ingress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufuss, S.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Múčka, V.; Pospíšil, M.; Vokál, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation corrosion in deaerated water/carbon steel systems has been studied. Kinetics of releasing corrosion products into the water and their sorption on the surface of steel tablets is affected by various factors (redox potential, absorbed dose, temperature, irradiation duration). Concentration of corrosion products in the solution was evaluated using various chemical methods. Total concentration of Fe2+/Fe3+ ions in liquid phase was determined by UV/VIS spectrometry. Solid phase was analysed using X-ray diffraction method. Corrosion processes were studied in deaerated distilled water and synthetic granitic water. Corrosion cells consisted of glass ampoules with inserted steel tablets, completely filled with deoxygenated water. Corrosion cells were carefully enclosed so that air diffusion into system during experiment was kept at minimum. 60Co gamma sources with various dose rates were used for irradiation. The obtained results indicated that radiation noticeably contributed to the formation of corrosion products. Kinetics of radiation corrosion was strongly dependent on the parameters under study. The obtained experimental data should be taken into consideration when predicting effects of corrosion on containers with spent nuclear fuel using mathematical models.

  16. Internal Radiation Exposure Dose in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture after the Accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nukui, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Naoko; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuda, Naoki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Takamura, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) on 11 March 2011, a huge amount of radionuclides, including radiocesium, was released and spread over a wide area of eastern Japan. Although three years have passed since the accident, residents around the FNPP are anxious about internal radiation exposure due to radiocesium. In this study, we screened internal radiation exposure doses in Iwaki city of Fukushima prefecture, using a whole-body counter. The first screening was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013, and the second screening was conducted from May to November 2013. Study participants were employees of ALPINE and their families who underwent examination. A total of 2,839 participants (1,366 men and 1,473 women, 1–86 years old) underwent the first screening, and 2,092 (1,022 men and 1,070 women, 1–86 years old) underwent the second screening. The results showed that 99% of subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the first screening, and all subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the second screening. The committed effective dose ranged from 0.01–0.06 mSv in the first screening and 0.01–0.02 mSv in the second screening. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to avoid unnecessary chronic internal exposure and to reduce anxiety among the residents by communicating radiation health risks. PMID:25478794

  17. Systems and methods for detecting nuclear radiation in the presence of backgrounds

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2005-06-21

    Systems and methods for the simultaneous detection and identification of radiation species, including neutrons, gammas/x-rays and minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). A plurality of rectangular and/or triangularly shaped radiation sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of nano-sized particles, dopants and an extruded plastic material. A wavelength-shifting fiber can then be located within a central hole of each extruded scintillator, wherein the wavelength-shifting fiber absorbs scintillation light and re-emits the light at a longer wavelength, thereby piping the light to a photodetector whose response to the light indicates the presence of radiation The resulting method and system can simultaneously detect neutrons, gamma rays, x-rays and cosmic rays (MIPs) and identify each.

  18. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation by 99Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Bessas, D.; Merkel, D. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Ruffer, R.; Hermann, Raphael P.; Sergueev, I.; Mahmoud, A.; Klobes, B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sougrati, M. T.; Stievano, L.

    2014-10-03

    In this study, we measured nuclear forward scattering spectra utilizing the 99Ru transition, 89.571(3) keV, with a notably mixed E2/M1 multipolarity. The extension of the standard evaluation routines to include mixed multipolarity allows us to extract electric and magnetic hyperfine interactions from 99Ru-containing compounds. This paves the way for several other high-energy Mössbauer transitions, E~90 keV. Lastly, the high energy of such transitions allows for operando nuclear forward scattering studies in real devices.

  19. Evaluation of a Radiation Worker Safety Training Program at a nuclear facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiation safety course was evaluated using the Kirkpatrick criteria of training evaluation as a guide. Thirty-nine employees were given the two-day training course and were compared with 15 employees in a control group who did not receive the training. Cognitive results show an immediate gain in knowledge, and substantial retention at 6 months. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of applications to current radiation safety training was well as follow-on training research and development requirements.

  20. Radiator Heat Pipes with Carbon-Carbon Fins and Armor for Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed

    2005-02-06

    Technologies for Space Reactor Power Systems are being developed to enable future NASA's missions early next decade to explore the farthest planets in the solar system. The choices of the energy conversion technology for these power systems require radiator temperatures that span a wide range, from 350 K to 800 K. Heat pipes with carbon-carbon fins and armor are the preferred choice for these radiators because of inherent redundancy and efficient spreading and rejection of waste heat into space at a relatively small mass penalty. The performance results and specific masses of radiator heat pipes with cesium, rubidium, and potassium working fluids are presented and compared in this paper. The heat pipes operate at 40% of the prevailing operation limit (a design margin of 60%), typically the sonic and/or capillary limit. The thickness of the carbon-carbon fins is 0.5 mm but the width is varied, and the evaporator and condenser sections are 0.15 and 1.35 m long, respectively. The 400-mesh wick and the heat pipe thin metal wall are titanium, and the carbon-carbon armor ({approx} 2 mm-thick) provides both structural strength and protection against meteoroids impacts. The cross-section area of the D-shaped radiator heat pipes is optimized for minimum mass. Because of the low vapor pressure of potassium and its very high Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), radiator potassium heat pipes are the best performers at temperatures above 800 K, where the sonic limit is no longer an issue. On the other hand, rubidium heat pipes are limited by the sonic limit below 762 K and by the capillary limit at higher temperature. The transition temperature between these two limits for the cesium heat pipes occurs at a lower temperature of 724 K, since cesium has lower FOM than rubidium. The present results show that with a design margin of 60%, the cesium heat pipes radiator is best at 680-720 K, the rubidium heat pipes radiator is best at 720-800 K, while the potassium heat pipes radiator is the best

  1. Nuclear radiation interference and damage effects in charged particle experiments for extended space missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration that meaningful galactic and solar cosmic radiation measurements can be carried out on deep space missions. The radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTGs) which must be used as a source of power and perhaps of heat are a problem, but with proper separation from the experiments, with orientation, and with some shielding the damage effects can be reduced to an acceptable level. The Pioneer spacecraft are crucial in that they are targeted at the heart of Jupiter's radiation belts, and should supply the details of those belts. The subsequent Grand Tour opportunities can be selected for those periods which result in larger distances of closest approach to Jupiter if necessary.

  2. Comparison of radiation hazard of HLW in several spent nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochkin, A.; Gladilov, D.; Stefanovsky, S.

    2012-10-01

    Radiation hazard of radionuclide has been calculated as a product of Aɛ where A is an activity of radionuclide and ɛ is a dose coefficient through ingestion. The values Aɛ of 18 radionuclide in spent fuel of WWER-440 are calculated. Because the full division of americium and curium from HLW is very complicated a separation americium from curium is considered. It is shown that a separation of americium in a special fraction allows decreasing the radiation hazard of HLW by 97.6% after 1000 years.

  3. Recommendations for quality assurance programs in nuclear medicine facilities. Radiation recommendations series

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, P.; Hamilton, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    The publication provides the elements that should be considered by nuclear medicine facilities to improve their existing programs or develop new quality assurance programs. The important administrative aspects of quality assurance programs are stressed. Each facility is encouraged to adopt those elements of the recommended program that are appropriate to its individual needs and resources.

  4. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne ...

  5. Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P.

    2012-07-16

    This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

  6. Evaluation of cryogenic insulation materials and composites for use in nuclear radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The following subjects are studied: (1) composite materials tests; (2) test of liquid level sensors and fission couples; (3) test of valve-seal materials; (4) boron epoxy composites; (5) radiation analysis of explosive materials and bifuels for RNS applications; and (6) test of thermal insulation.

  7. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional modeling of the TFTR for nuclear radiation transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.; Liew, S.L.

    1985-09-01

    The computational models of the TFTR constructed for the radiation transport analysis for the Q approx. 1 demonstration are summarized and reviewed. These models can be characterized by the dimensionality required to describe the geometry, and by the numerical methods of solving the transport equation. Results obtained with these models in the test cell are compared and discussed.

  8. Students' Ideas about Nuclear Radiation -- Before and After Fukushima

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Susanne; Hopf, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a trend study investigating what students associate with the term radiation and what ideas they have about this topic. The first part of the interview study was conducted in June 2010 and its results were reported in a previously published article (Neumann & Hopf, 2012). Two years later (June 2012, 15…

  9. THREE MILE ISLAND NUCLEAR REACTOR ACCIDENT OF MARCH 1979. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION DATA: UPDATE 2, VOLUME III

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem St...

  10. THREE MILE ISLAND NUCLEAR REACTOR ACCIDENT OF MARCH 1979. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION DATA: UPDATE 2, VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem St...

  11. THREE MILE ISLAND NUCLEAR REACTOR ACCIDENT OF MARCH 1979. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION DATA: UPDATE 2, VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem St...

  12. High temperature, radiation hardened electronics for application to nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic circuits were developed and built at Sandia for many aerospace and energy systems applications. Among recent developments were high temperature electronics for geothermal well logging and radiation hardened electronics for a variety of aerospace applications. Sandia has also been active in technology transfer to commercial industry in both of these areas.

  13. Staff radiation doses during eight years in a nuclear medicine radiopharmacy.

    PubMed

    Jansen, S E; Van Aswegen, A; Lötter, M G; Herbst, C P; Otto, A C

    1994-02-01

    It is important that staff radiation doses be kept 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). Staff working in the radiopharmacy and nursing staff responsible for injecting radionuclides are being monitored constantly in our department. We report here on the effective doses and doses to the hands received by staff at two hospitals during 8 years from January 1985 to December 1992. In addition to the doses determined monthly by the South African Bureau of Standards' Radiation Protection Service (SABS), radiation doses received to the hands and whole body were measured every week using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). The workload (number of patient studies each year) and the estimated amount of 99Tcm received per month were also established, and results have been expressed in relation to these where possible. The combined radiation doses and the absorbed dose per unit activity a single radiographer would have received, since 1988 when radiopharmacy duties were centralized, were calculated. The highest total radiation dose received in any one year by any one person at hospital A was 223.53 mSv to the hands, and 10.20 mSv and 8.37 mSv to the whole body depending on the dosimeter used. The corresponding values for hospital B were 54.05 mSv to the hands and 6.94 mSv and 4.43 mSv to the whole body. If only one radiographer should do all the work the calculated highest dose received would be 447.06 mSv to the hands and 9.68 mSv SABS effective dose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8170638

  14. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

  15. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a long time, it raises your risk ...

  16. The Effects of High Temperature and Nuclear Radiation on the Optical Transmission of Silica Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawn, David P.

    Distributed measurements made with fiber optic instrumentation have the potential to revolutionize data collection for facility monitoring and process control in industrial environments. Dozens of sensors etched into a single optical fiber can be used to instrument equipment and structures so that dozens of spatially distributed temperature measurements, for example, can be made quickly using one optical fiber. Optically based sensors are commercially available to measure temperature, strain, and other physical quantities that can be related to strain, such as pressure and acceleration. Other commercially available technology eliminates the need to etch discrete sensors into an optical fiber and allows temperature measurements to be made along the length of an ordinary silica fiber. Distributed sensing with optical instrumentation is commonly used in the petroleum industry to measure the temperature and pressure profiles in down hole applications. The U.S. Department of Energy is interested in extending the distributed sensing capabilities of optical instrumentation to high temperature reactor radiation environments. For this technology extension to be possible, the survivability of silica optical fibers needed to be determined in this environment. In this work the optical attenuation added to silica optical fiber exposed simultaneously to reactor radiation and temperatures to 1000°C was experimentally determined. Optical transmission measurements were made in-situ from 400nm-2300nm. For easy visualization, all of the results generated in this work were processed into movies that are available publicly [1]. In this investigation, silica optical fibers were shown to survive optically and mechanically in a reactor radiation environment to 1000°C. For the combined high temperature reactor irradiation experiments completed in this investigation, the maximum attenuation increase in the low-OH optical fibers was around 0.5db/m at 1550nm and 0.6dB/m at 1300nm. The

  17. A framework for estimating radiation-related cancer risks in Japan from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Walsh, L; Zhang, W; Shore, R E; Auvinen, A; Laurier, D; Wakeford, R; Jacob, P; Gent, N; Anspaugh, L R; Schüz, J; Kesminiene, A; van Deventer, E; Tritscher, A; del Rosarion Pérez, M

    2014-11-01

    We present here a methodology for health risk assessment adopted by the World Health Organization that provides a framework for estimating risks from the Fukushima nuclear accident after the March 11, 2011 Japanese major earthquake and tsunami. Substantial attention has been given to the possible health risks associated with human exposure to radiation from damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. Cumulative doses were estimated and applied for each post-accident year of life, based on a reference level of exposure during the first year after the earthquake. A lifetime cumulative dose of twice the first year dose was estimated for the primary radionuclide contaminants ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) and are based on Chernobyl data, relative abundances of cesium isotopes, and cleanup efforts. Risks for particularly radiosensitive cancer sites (leukemia, thyroid and breast cancer), as well as the combined risk for all solid cancers were considered. The male and female cumulative risks of cancer incidence attributed to radiation doses from the accident, for those exposed at various ages, were estimated in terms of the lifetime attributable risk (LAR). Calculations of LAR were based on recent Japanese population statistics for cancer incidence and current radiation risk models from the Life Span Study of Japanese A-bomb survivors. Cancer risks over an initial period of 15 years after first exposure were also considered. LAR results were also given as a percentage of the lifetime baseline risk (i.e., the cancer risk in the absence of radiation exposure from the accident). The LAR results were based on either a reference first year dose (10 mGy) or a reference lifetime dose (20 mGy) so that risk assessment may be applied for relocated and non-relocated members of the public, as well as for adult male emergency workers. The results show that the major contribution to LAR from the reference lifetime dose comes from the first year dose. For a dose of 10 mGy in

  18. Insight on the inconsistencies of Barkhausen signal measurements for radiation damage on nuclear reactor steel

    SciTech Connect

    Barroso, Soraia Pirfo; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.; Gillemot, Ferenc; Horváth, Marta; Horváth, Ákos; Szekely, Richard

    2014-02-18

    This paper focuses on the use of magnetic measurements, using Barkhausen signals to determine the irradiation effects, attempting to predict fracture toughness changes on nuclear reactor structural materials and correlating these measurements to mechanical testing and microstructure. For this study, two types of nuclear reactor materials were investigated: one sensitive to irradiation effects, the JRQ IAEA's reference material (A533B- -type); and one resistant material, 15KH2MFA WWER's reactor pressure vessel steel. The samples were carefully identified within the original heat block, i.e. forged or rolled plate. These calibrated samples were irradiated at different neutron fluences up to 10{sup 23} n/m{sup 2}. We show how microstructural anisotropy can mask the irradiation effects in the magnetic measurements. A correlation between irradiation effects and the magnetic measurements is explained based on this study.

  19. Insight on the inconsistencies of Barkhausen signal measurements for radiation damage on nuclear reactor steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, Soraia Pirfo; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.; Gillemot, Ferenc; Horváth, Marta; Horváth, Ákos; Szekely, Richard

    2014-02-01

    This paper focuses on the use of magnetic measurements, using Barkhausen signals to determine the irradiation effects, attempting to predict fracture toughness changes on nuclear reactor structural materials and correlating these measurements to mechanical testing and microstructure. For this study, two types of nuclear reactor materials were investigated: one sensitive to irradiation effects, the JRQ IAEA's reference material (A533B- -type); and one resistant material, 15KH2MFA WWER's reactor pressure vessel steel. The samples were carefully identified within the original heat block, i.e. forged or rolled plate. These calibrated samples were irradiated at different neutron fluences up to 1023 n/m2. We show how microstructural anisotropy can mask the irradiation effects in the magnetic measurements. A correlation between irradiation effects and the magnetic measurements is explained based on this study.

  20. Effect of extreme radiation fluences on parameters of SiC nuclear particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. M. Lebedev, A. A.; Strokan, N. B.

    2006-10-15

    Detectors based on modern CVD-grown films were irradiated with 8 MeV protons at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. The concentration of primary radiation defects was {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of the initially present uncompensated donors. The resulting deep compensation of SiC enabled measurements of detector parameters in two modes: under reverse and forward bias. The basic parameters of the detectors degraded by no more than a factor of 1.7, compared with the fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. However, there appeared a polarization voltage, which indicates that a space charge is accumulated by radiation defects.

  1. Radiation-modified natural zeolites for cleaning liquid nuclear waste (irradiation against radioactivity)

    PubMed Central

    Yeritsyan, Hrant; Sahakyan, Aram; Harutyunyan, Vachagan; Nikoghosyan, Sergey; Hakhverdyan, Eleonora; Grigoryan, Norair; Hovhannisyan, Aghasi; Atoyan, Vovik; Keheyan, Yeghis; Rhodes, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    There have been comparatively few investigations reported of radiation effects in zeolites, although it is known that these materials may be modified substantially by exposure to ionizing radiation. Thus, by exposure to γ-rays or high-energy particles, the charge states of atoms may be changed so to create, and accumulate, lattice point defects, and to form structurally disordered regions. Such a technique may permit the creation, in a controlled fashion, of additionally useful properties of the material while preserving its essential stoichiometry and structure. Accordingly, we present an application, in which the cation-exchange capacity of a natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) is substantially enhanced, for the treatment/decontamination of water contaminated with radionuclides e.g. 134Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr, by its exposure to high-energy (8 MeV) electrons, and to different total doses. PMID:24132177

  2. Radiation-modified natural zeolites for cleaning liquid nuclear waste (irradiation against radioactivity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeritsyan, Hrant; Sahakyan, Aram; Harutyunyan, Vachagan; Nikoghosyan, Sergey; Hakhverdyan, Eleonora; Grigoryan, Norair; Hovhannisyan, Aghasi; Atoyan, Vovik; Keheyan, Yeghis; Rhodes, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    There have been comparatively few investigations reported of radiation effects in zeolites, although it is known that these materials may be modified substantially by exposure to ionizing radiation. Thus, by exposure to γ-rays or high-energy particles, the charge states of atoms may be changed so to create, and accumulate, lattice point defects, and to form structurally disordered regions. Such a technique may permit the creation, in a controlled fashion, of additionally useful properties of the material while preserving its essential stoichiometry and structure. Accordingly, we present an application, in which the cation-exchange capacity of a natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) is substantially enhanced, for the treatment/decontamination of water contaminated with radionuclides e.g. 134Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr, by its exposure to high-energy (8 MeV) electrons, and to different total doses.

  3. Radiation-modified natural zeolites for cleaning liquid nuclear waste (irradiation against radioactivity).

    PubMed

    Yeritsyan, Hrant; Sahakyan, Aram; Harutyunyan, Vachagan; Nikoghosyan, Sergey; Hakhverdyan, Eleonora; Grigoryan, Norair; Hovhannisyan, Aghasi; Atoyan, Vovik; Keheyan, Yeghis; Rhodes, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    There have been comparatively few investigations reported of radiation effects in zeolites, although it is known that these materials may be modified substantially by exposure to ionizing radiation. Thus, by exposure to γ-rays or high-energy particles, the charge states of atoms may be changed so to create, and accumulate, lattice point defects, and to form structurally disordered regions. Such a technique may permit the creation, in a controlled fashion, of additionally useful properties of the material while preserving its essential stoichiometry and structure. Accordingly, we present an application, in which the cation-exchange capacity of a natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) is substantially enhanced, for the treatment/decontamination of water contaminated with radionuclides e.g. (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (90)Sr, by its exposure to high-energy (8 MeV) electrons, and to different total doses. PMID:24132177

  4. Multiple nuclear and mitochondrial genes resolve the branching order of a rapid radiation of crested newts (Triturus arntzenii) (corrected).

    PubMed

    Espregueira Themudo, G; Wielstra, B; Arntzen, J W

    2009-08-01

    Newts of the genus Triturus are parapatrically distributed across Europe. Within this group, the crested newts (Triturus cristatus superspecies) radiated in a short temporal interval. Given the relatively short timespan in between branching events and to address the gene tree-species tree problem, we sequenced two mitochondrial and five nuclear genes from populations representing the distribution range of all the five crested newt species. We built gene trees using non-hierarchical Bayesian phylogenetics and phylogenetic networks, and a species tree with a recently developed method, which uses a hierarchical Bayesian approach. While the single gene trees did not provide resolution, the hierarchical Bayesian method yielded an almost fully resolved species tree, even though branching events followed one another closely. Results show a previously undetected basal dichotomy between T. karelinii and the other four species and a deep differentiation of T. karelinii in two lineages, here raised to full species status. PMID:19348957

  5. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A; Ha, S; Joshirao, P; Manchanda, V; Bak, M S; Kim, T

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ⋅ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories. PMID:26133876

  6. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S. E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Kim, T. E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  7. McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC) TRIGA reactor: The national organization of test research and training reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kiger, Kevin M.

    1994-07-01

    This year's TRTR conference is being hosted by the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center. The conference will be held at the Red Lion Hotel in Sacramento, CA. The conference dates are scheduled for October 11-14, 1994. Deadlines for sponsorship commitment and papers have not been set, but are forthcoming. The newly remodeled Red Lion Hotel provides up-to-date conference facilities and one of the most desirable locations for dining, shopping and entertainment in the Sacramento area. While attendees are busy with the conference activities, a spouses program will be available. Although the agenda has not been set, the Sacramento area offers outings to San Francisco, Pier 39, Ghirardelli Square (famous for their chocolate), and a chance to discover 'El Dorado' in the gold country. Not to forget our own bit of history with visits to 'Old Sacramento and Old Folsom', where antiquities abound, to the world renown train museum and incredible eating establishments. (author)

  8. NUSTART: A PC code for NUclear STructure And Radiative Transition analysis and supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.L.; Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    NUSTART is a computer program for the IBM PC/At. It is designed for use with the nuclear reaction cross-section code STAPLUS, which is a STAPRE-based CRAY computer code that is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NUSTART code was developed to handle large sets of discrete nuclear levels and the multipole transitions among these levels; it operates in three modes. The Data File Error Analysis mode analyzes an existing STAPLUS input file containing the levels and their multipole transition branches for a number of physics and/or typographical errors. The Interactive Data File Generation mode allows the user to create input files of discrete levels and their branching fractions in the format required by STAPLUS, even though the user enters the information in the (different) format used by many people in the nuclear structure field. In the Branching Fractions Calculations mode, the discrete nuclear level set is read, and the multipole transitions among the levels are computed under one of two possible assumptions: (1) the levels have no collective character, or (2) the levels are all rotational band heads. Only E1, M1, and E2 transitions are considered, and the respective strength functions may be constants or, in the case of E1 transitions, the strength function may be energy dependent. The first option is used for nuclei closed shells; the bandhead option may be used to vary the E1, M1, and E2 strengths for interband transitions. K-quantum number selection rules may be invoked if desired. 19 refs.

  9. Radiation chemistry in the reprocessing and recycling of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with solvent extraction solutions results in the ionization, excitation, and decay to neutral radicals of mainly diluent molecules. These produced reactive species diffuse into the bulk solution to react with solvent extraction ligands. Ligand reactions often result in deleterious effects such as loss in ligand concentration or the production of decomposition products that may also be complexing agents. This often interferes with desired separations. The common radiolysis reactions and their potential effects on solvent extraction are reviewed here.

  10. Code System for Calculating Radiation Exposure to Man from Routine Release of Nuclear Reactor Liquid Effluents.

    SciTech Connect

    1980-02-29

    Version 00 LADTAP II calculates the radiation exposure to man from potable water, aquatic foods, shoreline deposits, swimming, boating, and irrigated foods, and also the dose to biota. Doses are calculated for both the maximum individual and for the population and are summarized for each pathway by age group and organ. It also calculates the doses to certain representative biota other than man in the aquatic environment such as fish, invertebrates, algae, muskrats, raccoons, herons, and ducks using models presented in WASH-1258.

  11. Investigation into Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr{sub 3} for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P., Guise, R., Mukhopadhyay, S., Yuan, D.

    2011-06-22

    This slide-show presents work on radiation detection with nanostructured lanthanum halides and CeBr{sub 3}. The goal is to extend the gamma energy response on both low and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy x-rays and relatively high-energy activation prompt gamma rays simultaneously using the nano-structured lanthanum bromide, lanthanum fluoride, cerium bromide, or other nanocrystal material. Homogeneous and nano structure cases are compared.

  12. Radiation exposure from diagnostic nuclear medicine in Alagoas (Brazil) in 2002-2005.

    PubMed

    Yano, V F; Lima, F F

    2010-01-01

    Use of radionuclides in medical practice has grown steadily in recent years due to the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals and new equipments. This paper presents a survey of nuclear medicine procedures performed in Alagoas, State of Brazil, in order to help establish reference levels for nuclear medicine patients. Data were gathered on the type of radiopharmaceuticals used and administered activity of each kind of examination, and the age and sex of the patients involved over the period 2002-2005. Based on ICRP-60, the effective dose (E) and collective effective dose (Ecol) have been calculated. The results showed an annual increase in the nuclear medicine examinations during the period of study and cardiac scintigraphy are the most common procedure. The results also indicated that the activities administered to patients are higher than the guidance levels of the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) in most of the kind of examinations. The differences found in the administered activities may reflect the differences in the quality assurance programs implemented. It was observed that the Ecol and E/inhabitant are higher than other countries. Therefore, it is suggested that the protocols have been revised in order to reduce the patient dose without reduce the image quality. PMID:20525455

  13. Proposed radiation hardened mobile vehicle for Chernobyl dismantlement and nuclear accident response

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, M.S.; Holliday, M.A.; Karpachov, J.A.; Ivanov, A.

    1995-01-01

    Researchers are developing a radiation hardened, Telerobotic Dismantling System (TDS) to remediate the Chernobyl facility. To withstand the severe radiation fields, the robotic system, will rely on electrical motors, actuators, and relays proven in the Chernobyl power station. Due to its dust suppression characteristics and ability to cut arbitrary materials the authors propose using a water knife as the principle tool to slice up the large fuel containing masses. The front end of the robot will use a minimum number of moving parts by locating most of the susceptible and bulky components outside the work area. Hardened and shielded video cameras will be designed for remote control and viewing of the robotic functions. Operators will supervise and control robot movements based on feedback from a suite of sensory systems that would include vision systems, radiation detection and measurement systems and force reflection systems. A gripper will be instrumented with a variety of sensors (e.g. force, torque, or tactile), allowing varying debris surface properties to be grasped. The gripper will allow the operator to manipulate and segregate debris items without entering the radiologically and physically dangerous dismantlement operations area. The robots will initially size reduce the FCM`s to reduce the primary sources of the airborne radionuclides. The robot will then remove the high level waste for packaging or decontamination, and storage nearby.

  14. A summary of evidence on radiation exposures received near to the Semipalatinsk nuclear weapons test site in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Baverstock, Keith F; Lindholm, Carita

    2003-06-01

    The presently available evidence about the magnitude of doses received by members of the public living in villages in the vicinity of Semipalatinsk nuclear test in Kazakhstan, particularly with respect to external radiation, while preliminary, is conflicting. The village of Dolon, in particular, has been identified for many years as the most highly exposed location in the vicinity of the test site. Previous publications cited external doses of more than 2 Gy to residents of Dolon while an expert group assembled by the WHO in 1997 estimated that external doses were likely to have been less than 0.5 Gy. In 2001, a larger expert group workshop was held in Helsinki jointly by the WHO, the National Cancer Institute of the United States, and the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland, with the expressed purpose to acquire data to evaluate the state of knowledge concerning doses received in Kazakhstan. This paper summarizes evidence presented at that workshop. External dose estimates from calculations based on sparse physical measurements and bio-dosimetric estimates based on chromosome abnormalities and electron paramagnetic resonance from a relatively small sample of teeth do not agree well. The physical dose estimates are generally higher than the biodosimetric estimates (1 Gy or more compared to 0.5 Gy or less). When viewed in its entirety, the present body of evidence does not appear to support external doses greater than 0.5 Gy; however, research is continuing to try and resolve the difference in dose estimates from the different methods. Thyroid doses from internal irradiation, which can only be estimated via calculation, are expected to have been several times greater than the doses from external irradiation, especially where received by small children. PMID:12822581

  15. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  16. Box model of radionuclide dispersion and radiation risk estimation for population in case of radioactivity release from nuclear submarine {number_sign}601 dumped in the Kara Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Yefimov, E.I.; Pankratov, D.V.; Ignatiev, S.V.

    1997-12-31

    When ships with nuclear reactors or nuclear materials aboard suffer shipwreck or in the case of burial or dumping of radioactive wastes, atmospheric fallout, etc., radionuclides may be released and spread in the sea, contaminating the sea water and the sea bottom. When a nuclear submarine (NS) is dumped this spread of activity may occur due to gradual core destruction by corrosion over many years. The objective of this paper is to develop a mathematical model of radionuclide dispersion and to assess the population dose and radiation risk for radionuclide release from the NS No. 601, with Pb-Bi coolant that was dumped in the Kara Sea.

  17. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Measurement of radiation dose at the north interaction point of BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiao-Hu; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Tian-Bao; Zhang, Qing-Jiang; Achasov, Mikhail; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Muchnoi, Nikolay; Qin, Qing; Qu, Hua-Min; Wang, Yi-Fang; Wu, Jing-Min; Xu, Jin-Qiang; Yu, Bo-Xiang

    2009-10-01

    The technique details for measuring radiation dose are expounded. The results of gamma and neutron radiation levels are presented and the corresponding radiation shielding is discussed based on the simplified estimation. In addition, the photon radiation level move as background for future experiments is measured by a NaI(Tl) detector.

  18. On the mechanism of the interactions of neutrons and gamma radiation with nuclear graphite—Implications to HTGRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, C.; Barkatt, A.; Al-Sheikhly, M.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear-grade varieties of graphite being considered for use in high-temperature gas reactors were exposed to gamma radiation (up to 87 MGy) and to fast neutrons (up to 5.4×1017 n/cm2 in air, 8.8×1011 n/cm2 in water-saturated helium). Results of XPS measurements indicated that gamma or mixed-field irradiation initially enhances the oxygen content in the surface region of the graphite, but this content decreases at higher doses, probably due to decomposition of surface CO complexes. Results of EPR measurements showed that gamma irradiation at low doses causes a decrease in the concentration of unpaired spins, but higher doses cause this concentration to rise. SQUID measurements of magnetic susceptibility support the EPR findings. At the dose range explored in this study, no structural changes were observed using XRD and Raman spectroscopy. In general, no significant differences were observed among the five varieties of graphite with respect to the effects of irradiation. Impurity analysis by means of GDMS and ICP-AES showed that impurity concentrations that concentrations of impurities, particularly those of neutron-absorbing impurities, were within the range specified for high-purity nuclear graphite. Activation relevant impurity concentrations, too, were very low.

  19. Father's occupational exposure to radiation and the raised level of childhood leukemia near the Sellafield Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The first indications that childhood leukemia rates may be raised near the Sellafield nuclear plant in West Cumbria, England, came from largely anecdotal evidence in a television program Windscale: The Nuclear Laundry shown during 1983. During subsequent years, various epidemiological studies have investigated the claim in more detail. Geographical analyses of childhood leukemia incidence in the northern region and mortality in England and Wales using routinely available data made the first contribution. As a result, it was confirmed that leukemia rates in the area, particularly the neighboring village of Seascale, were high compared to other districts, although not totally extreme. Cohort studies of children born in Seascale or attending schools in Seascale were carried out to resolve some of the difficulties of interpretation of geographical analysis. Cohort studies indicated that the excess of leukemia was concentrated among children born in Seascale and was not found among those moving in after birth and suggested that any causal factors may be acting before birth or very early in life. A case-control study of leukemia (and lymphoma) among young people in West Cumbria has examined potentially important individual factors in detail. The study demonstrated a relationship between the raised incidence of leukemia in children and father's recorded external radiation dose during work at Sellafield before his child's conception. The association can effectively explain statistically the observed geographical excess.

  20. Resonant nuclear scattering of synchrotron radiation: Detector development and specular scattering from a thin layer of {sup 57}Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, A.Q.R.

    1995-04-01

    This thesis explores resonant nudear scattering of synchrotron radiation. An introductory chapter describes some useful concepts, such as speedup and coherent enhancement, in the context of some basic physical principles. Methods of producing highly monochromatic synchrotron beams usmg either electronic or nuclear scattering are also discussed. The body of the thesis concentrates on detector development and specular scattering from iynthetic layered materials. A detector employing n-dcrochannel plate electron multipliers is shown to have good ({approximately}50%) effidency for detecting 14.4 key x-rays incident at small ({approximately}0.5 degree) grazing angles onto Au or CsI photocathodes. However, being complicated to use, it was replaced with a large area (>=lan2) avalanche photodiode (APD) detector. The APD`s are simpler to use and have comparable (30--70%) efficiencies at 14.4 key, subnanosecond time resolution, large dynan-dc range (usable at rates up to {approximately}10{sup 8} photons/second) and low (<{approximately}0.01 cts/sec) background rates. Maxwell`s equations are used to derive the specular x-ray reflectivity of layered materials with resonant transitions and complex polarization dependencies. The effects of interfadal roughness are treated with some care, and the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) used to describe electronic scattering is generalized to the nuclear case. The implications of the theory are discussed in the context of grazing incidence measurements with emphasis on the kinematic and dynamical aspects of the scattering.

  1. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  2. Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Niisoe, Tamon; Imanaka, Mie; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Amako, Katsumi; Fujii, Yukiko; Kanameishi, Masatoshi; Ohse, Kenji; Nakai, Yasumichi; Nishikawa, Tamami; Saito, Yuuichi; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Ueyama, Keiko; Hisaki, Kumiko; Ohara, Eiji; Inoue, Tokiko; Yamamoto, Kanako; Matsuoka, Yukiyo; Ohata, Hitomi; Toshima, Kazue; Okada, Ayumi; Sato, Hitomi; Kuwamori, Toyomi; Tani, Hiroko; Suzuki, Reiko; Kashikura, Mai; Nezu, Michiko; Miyachi, Yoko; Arai, Fusako; Kuwamori, Masanori; Harada, Sumiko; Ohmori, Akira; Ishikawa, Hirohiko; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose rates were evaluated in three areas neighboring a restricted area within a 20- to 50-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in August–September 2012 and projected to 2022 and 2062. Study participants wore personal dosimeters measuring external dose equivalents, almost entirely from deposited radionuclides (groundshine). External dose rate equivalents owing to the accident averaged 1.03, 2.75, and 1.66 mSv/y in the village of Kawauchi, the Tamano area of Soma, and the Haramachi area of Minamisoma, respectively. Internal dose rates estimated from dietary intake of radiocesium averaged 0.0058, 0.019, and 0.0088 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. Dose rates from inhalation of resuspended radiocesium were lower than 0.001 mSv/y. In 2012, the average annual doses from radiocesium were close to the average background radiation exposure (2 mSv/y) in Japan. Accounting only for the physical decay of radiocesium, mean annual dose rates in 2022 were estimated as 0.31, 0.87, and 0.53 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. The simple and conservative estimates are comparable with variations in the background dose, and unlikely to exceed the ordinary permissible dose rate (1 mSv/y) for the majority of the Fukushima population. Health risk assessment indicates that post-2012 doses will increase lifetime solid cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer incidences by 1.06%, 0.03% and 0.28% respectively, in Tamano. This assessment was derived from short-term observation with uncertainties and did not evaluate the first-year dose and radioiodine exposure. Nevertheless, this estimate provides perspective on the long-term radiation exposure levels in the three regions. PMID:24567380

  3. Extremity dosimetry for radiation workers handling unsealed radionuclides in nuclear medicine departments in India.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Pankaj; Venkatesh, Meera; Bhatt, B C

    2007-02-01

    In India, for the past five decades, whole body radiation dose of radiation workers has been monitored by means of film and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges worn on the body. However, there are no provision/regulatory requirements to monitor doses received at the extremities, i.e., to fingers. Finger dose monitoring is essential for controlling the extremity dose limits for occupational personnel handling unsealed radioactive sources. In order to estimate the doses received in various types of procedures using unsealed sources, finger dose monitoring was carried out in 54 major institutions in the country using a specially designed plastic finger ring embedded with a TLD. The maximum finger dose of occupational workers involved in handling Tc in such activities as extraction and radiopharmacy work is 0.35 mSv GBq; during injection of radiopharmaceuticals and scintigraphy, the doses were observed to be 1 and 0.95 mSv GBq, respectively. Similarly, while handling F-FDG, the maximum doses received during dispensing, injection, and scintigraphy were 0.098, 0.324, and 0.56 mSv GBq, respectively. The maximum radiation dose received during Re/Re balloon angioplasty and while handling Sm was 3.92 and 6.5 mSv GBq, respectively. All the doses recorded were well within the prescribed limit. However, monitoring of these doses periodically would help in compiling the feedback regarding the work practices followed in institutions handling radioisotopes in the country and would also help in maintaining a record of safe work procedures while handling radioisotopes. PMID:17220712

  4. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing /sup 235/U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing /sup 238/U (designated tuballoy). 4 references.

  5. Nuclear war: short-term chemical and radiative effects of stratospheric injections

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, F.M.

    1983-10-01

    Earlier investigations of the atmospheric effects of a nuclear war focused primarily on the potential reduction in stratospheric ozone. The numerical models used in those assessments were one-dimensional and calculated the average ozone reduction over the Northern Hemisphere. The results presented here are the first assessment of the potential reduction in total ozone on a subcontinental scale. The purpose is to determine whether regions of large ozone reduction (sometimes called ozone holes) are possible, and to identify the important parameters affecting the magnitude of the ozone reduction and rate of recovery.

  6. Code System for Calculating Radiation Exposure to Man from Routine Release of Nuclear Reactor Liquid Effluents.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-02-29

    Version 00 LADTAP II calculates the radiation exposure to man from potable water, aquatic foods, shoreline deposits, swimming, boating, and irrigated foods, and also the dose to biota. Doses are calculated for both the maximum individual and for the population and are summarized for each pathway by age group and organ. It also calculates the doses to certain representative biota other than man in the aquatic environment such as fish, invertebrates, algae, muskrats, raccoons, herons,more » and ducks using models presented in WASH-1258.« less

  7. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  8. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  9. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of <0.5mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30cm(2) scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned. PMID:27484945

  10. Nuclear-Reaction-Based Radiation Source For Explosives-And SNM-Detection In Massive Cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandis, Michal; Dangendorf, Volker; Piel, Christian; Vartsky, David; Bromberger, Benjamin; Bar, Doron; Friedman, Eliahu; Mardor, Israel; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Goldberg, Mark B.

    2011-06-01

    An automatic, nuclear-reaction-based, few-view transmission radiography method and system concept is presented, that will simultaneously detect small, operationally-relevant quantities of chemical explosives and special nuclear materials (SNM) in objects up to the size of LD-3 aviation containers. Detection of all threat materials is performed via the 11B(d,n+γ) reaction on thick, isotopically-enriched targets; SNM are primarily detected via Dual Discrete-Energy Radiography (DDER), using 15.11 MeV and 4.43 MeV 12C γ-rays, whereas explosives are primarily detected via Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), employing the broad-energy neutron spectra produced in a thick 11B-target. To achieve a reasonable throughput of ˜20 containers per hour, ns-pulsed deuteron beam of the order of 0.5 mA intensity at energies of 5-7 MeV is required. As a first step towards optimizing parameters and sensitivities of an operational system, the 0° spectra and yields of both γ-rays and neutrons in this reaction have been measured up to Ed = 6.65 MeV.

  11. Radiation risk models for all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring individual assessments after a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In the assessment of health risks after nuclear accidents, some health consequences require special attention. For example, in their 2013 report on health risk assessment after the Fukushima nuclear accident, the World Health Organisation (WHO) panel of experts considered risks of breast cancer, thyroid cancer and leukaemia. For these specific cancer types, use was made of already published excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models for radiation-related cancer incidence fitted to the epidemiological data from the Japanese A-bomb Life Span Study (LSS). However, it was also considered important to assess all other types of solid cancer together and the WHO, in their above-mentioned report, stated "No model to calculate the risk for all other solid cancer excluding breast and thyroid cancer risks is available from the LSS data". Applying the LSS models for all solid cancers along with the models for the specific sites means that some cancers have an overlap in the risk evaluations. Thus, calculating the total solid cancer risk plus the breast cancer risk plus the thyroid cancer risk can overestimate the total risk by several per cent. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to publish the required models for all other solid cancers, i.e. all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring special attention after a nuclear accident. The new models presented here have been fitted to the same LSS data set from which the risks provided by the WHO were derived. Although it is known already that the EAR and ERR effect modifications by sex are statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer", it is shown here that sex modification is not statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer other than thyroid and breast cancer". It is also shown here that the sex-averaged solid cancer risks with and without the sex modification are very similar once breast and thyroid cancers are factored out. Some other notable model

  12. Environmental and health impacts of February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Thakur, P; Lemons, B G; Ballard, S; Hardy, R

    2015-08-01

    The environmental impact of the February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was assessed using monitoring data from an independent monitoring program conducted by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC). After almost 15 years of safe and efficient operations, the WIPP had one of its waste drums rupture underground resulting in the release of moderate levels of radioactivity into the underground air. A small amount of radioactivity also escaped to the surface through the ventilation system and was detected above ground. It was the first unambiguous release from the WIPP repository. The dominant radionuclides released were americium and plutonium, in a ratio that matches the content of the breached drum. The accelerated air monitoring campaign, which began following the accident, indicates that releases were low and localized, and no radiation-related health effects among local workers or the public would be expected. The highest activity detected was 115.2 μBq/m(3) for (241)Am and 10.2 μBq/m(3) for (239+240)Pu at a sampling station located 91 m away from the underground air exhaust point and 81.4 μBq/m(3) of (241)Am and 5.8 μBq/m(3) of (239+240)Pu at a monitoring station located approximately one kilometer northwest of the WIPP facility. CEMRC's recent monitoring data show that the concentration levels of these radionuclides have returned to normal background levels and in many instances, are not even detectable, demonstrating no long-term environmental impacts of the recent radiation release event at the WIPP. This article presents an evaluation of almost one year of environmental monitoring data that informed the public that the levels of radiation that got out to the environment were very low and did not, and will not harm anyone or have any long-term environmental consequence. In terms of radiological risk at or in the vicinity of the

  13. Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions for nuclear radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Luke, P.N.; Wang, N.W.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1996-10-01

    Results on characterization of electrical properties of amorphous Si films for the 3 different growth methods (RF sputtering, PECVD [plasma enhanced], LPCVD [low pressure]) are reported. Performance of these a-Si films as heterojunctions on high resistivity p-type and n- type crystalline Si is examined by measuring the noise, leakage current, and the alpha particle response of 5mm dia detector structures. It is demonstrated that heterojunction detectors formed by RF sputtered films and PECVD films are comparable in performance with conventional surface barrier detectors. Results indicate that the a-Si/c-Si heterojunctions have the potential to greatly simplify detector fabrication. Directions for future avenues of nuclear particle detector development are indicated.

  14. Outstanding conference paper award 2014 IEEE nuclear and space radiation effects conference

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, Michael; Blackmore, Ewart W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Reed, Robert A.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; et al

    2014-12-01

    The recipients of the 2014 NSREC Outstanding Conference Paper Award are Nathaniel A. Dodds, James R. Schwank, Marty R. Shaneyfelt, Paul E. Dodd, Barney L. Doyle, Michael Trinczek, Ewart W. Blackmore, Kenneth P. Rodbell, Michael S. Gordon, Robert A. Reed, Jonathan A. Pellish, Kenneth A. LaBel, Paul W. Marshall, Scot E. Swanson, Gyorgy Vizkelethy, Stuart Van Deusen, Frederick W. Sexton, and M. John Martinez, for their paper entitled "Hardness Assurance for Proton Direct Ionization-Induced SEEs Using a High-Energy Proton Beam." For older CMOS technologies, protons could only cause single-event effects (SEEs) through nuclear interactions. Numerous recent studies on 90 nmmore » and newer CMOS technologies have shown that protons can also cause SEEs through direct ionization. Furthermore, this paper develops and demonstrates an accurate and practical method for predicting the error rate caused by proton direct ionization (PDI).« less

  15. Development of stable nuclear radiation detectors based on n-silicon/cobalt-phthalocyanine heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Prasad, R.; Betty, C. A.; Chandrasekhar Rao, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    n-silicon/cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc) heterojunction based nuclear detectors have been fabricated using thermally evaporated CoPc films. Two different thicknesses of CoPc film (viz. 100 nm and 200 nm) were tried out to make detectors by depositing on chemically polished n-Si wafers. Gold film on CoPc was used as electrical contact. The detectors were characterized by measuring their current-voltage (I-V) and leakage current-time (I-t) characteristics, followed by alpha energy spectra obtained on exposure to α-particles. Variation of alpha energy resolution with applied reverse bias voltage for each of the detectors was also studied. The detectors showed very low leakage current and high breakdown voltage as compared to conventional Au/n-Si surface barrier detectors. Finally, the durability of the detectors was established by measuring their I-V characteristics and energy resolution for nearly 15 months.

  16. Outstanding conference paper award 2014 IEEE nuclear and space radiation effects conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, Michael; Blackmore, Ewart W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Reed, Robert A.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino John

    2014-12-01

    The recipients of the 2014 NSREC Outstanding Conference Paper Award are Nathaniel A. Dodds, James R. Schwank, Marty R. Shaneyfelt, Paul E. Dodd, Barney L. Doyle, Michael Trinczek, Ewart W. Blackmore, Kenneth P. Rodbell, Michael S. Gordon, Robert A. Reed, Jonathan A. Pellish, Kenneth A. LaBel, Paul W. Marshall, Scot E. Swanson, Gyorgy Vizkelethy, Stuart Van Deusen, Frederick W. Sexton, and M. John Martinez, for their paper entitled "Hardness Assurance for Proton Direct Ionization-Induced SEEs Using a High-Energy Proton Beam." For older CMOS technologies, protons could only cause single-event effects (SEEs) through nuclear interactions. Numerous recent studies on 90 nm and newer CMOS technologies have shown that protons can also cause SEEs through direct ionization. Furthermore, this paper develops and demonstrates an accurate and practical method for predicting the error rate caused by proton direct ionization (PDI).

  17. Nuclear Radiation Fields on the Mars Surface: Risk Analysis for Long-term Living Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Qualls, Garry D.; Nealy, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Mars, our nearest planet outward from the sun, has been targeted for several decades as a prospective site for expanded human habitation. Background space radiation exposures on Mars are expected to be orders of magnitude higher than on Earth. Recent risk analysis procedures based on detailed dosimetric techniques applicable to sensitive human organs have been developed along with experimental data regarding cell mutation rates resulting from exposures to a broad range of particle types and energy spectra. In this context, simulated exposure and subsequent risk for humans in residence on Mars are examined. A conceptual habitat structure, CAD-modeled with duly considered inherent shielding properties, has been implemented. Body self-shielding is evaluated using NASA standard computerized male and female models. The background environment is taken to consist not only of exposure from incident cosmic ray ions and their secondaries, but also include the contribution from secondary neutron fields produced in the tenuous atmosphere and the underlying regolith.

  18. A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

    1990-06-01

    The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Methodology for testing infrared focal plane arrays in simulated nuclear radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divita, E. L.; Mills, R. E.; Koch, T. L.; Gordon, M. J.; Wilcox, R. A.; Williams, R. E.

    1992-07-01

    This paper summarizes test methodology for focal plane array (FPA) testing that can be used for benign (clear) and radiation environments, and describes the use of custom dewars and integrated test equipment in an example environment. The test methodology, consistent with American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) standards, is presented for the total accumulated gamma dose, transient dose rate, gamma flux, and neutron fluence environments. The merits and limitations of using Cobalt 60 for gamma environment simulations and of using various fast-neutron reactors and neutron sources for neutron simulations are presented. Test result examples are presented to demonstrate test data acquisition and FPA parameter performance under different measurement conditions and environmental simulations.

  20. Radiation attenuation and nuclear properties of high density concrete made with steel aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashter, I. I.

    The fast neutron and gamma ray spectra measured behind different thickness of steel scrap concrete with density of 4 g/cm3 have been studied. The mix proportions by weight of this type of concrete were 1 cement: 6.89 steel scrap: 2.9 sand and 0.5 Water. Comparison with a standard ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm3 have been carried out. The measurements were made using a collimated beam of both gamma rays and neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channel of the Egyptian Research Reactor-1. A fast neutron and gamma ray spectrometer with a stilbene crystal was used to measure the spectra of fast neutrons and gamma rays. Pulse shape discrimination using the zero cross over technique was used to separate the photon pulses from the electron pulses. The equation due to Schmidt has been modified and applied for determining the neutron effective removal cross sections (˜R) for steel scrap, ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes. This equation gives results which are in good agreement with the measured values. The derived empirical equation in a previous work to calculate the neutron integral flux behind different thicknesses of different types of concretes, gives good results for steel scrap concrete under investigation comparing with the corresponding experimental data. Total neutron macroscopic cross sections, linear attenuation coefficients for gamma rays and the half-value layers for both radiations at different energies have been obtained for steel scrap concrete and comparing with the corresponding values of ordinary concrete. The results show that steel scrap concrete is better than ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes from the radiation shielding point of view.