Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear rocket erratum

  1. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Erratum for THE LINK BETWEEN USE OF PSYCHEDELIC DRUGS AND MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS BY: Nesvåg R, Bramness JG, Ystrom E. Journal of Psychopharmacology October 2015 29: 1035-1036, doi: 10.1177/0269881115596156. PMID:27166388

  2. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Erratum to Twelve-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of comprehensive physiotherapy following disc herniation operation Owing to errors made at SAGE, the name of one of the authors of the following article was printed incorrectly.Ebenbichler GR, Inschlag S, Pflüger V, et al. Twelve-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of comprehensive physiotherapy following disc herniation operation Clinical Rehabilitation 2015; 29: 548-560 DOI: 10.1177/0269215514552032. PMID:26979482

  3. Erratum.

    PubMed

    1987-01-23

    In Eliot Marshall's article "End game for the N Reactor?" (News & Comment, 2 Jan., p. 17), the environmental group demanding an impact statement on the plant's restart is the Natural Resources Defense Council. The present manager of the N Reactor is UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc., not Rockwell International, which runs the PUREX plant at the same site. Both companies will be replaced by Westinghouse this year. PMID:17810331

  4. Nuclear rocket plume studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Daniel

    1993-05-01

    A description and detailed computational analysis of a vortex cleaning system designed to remove radioactive material from the plumes of nuclear rockets is included. The proposed system is designed to remove both particulates and radioactive gaseous material from the plume. A two part computational model is used to examine the system's ability to remove particulates, and the results indicate that under some conditions, the system can remove over 99% of the particles in the flow. Two critical parameters which govern the effectiveness of the system are identified and the information necessary to estimate cleaning efficiencies for particles of known sizes and densities is provided. A simple steady analytical solution is also developed to examine the system's ability to remove gaseous radioactive material. This analysis, while inconclusive, suggests that the swirl rates necessary to achieve useful efficiencies are too high to be achieved in any practical manner. Therefore, this system is probably not suitable for use, with gaseous radioactive material. It was concluded that the system can cause negligible specific impulse losses, though there may be a substantial mass penalty associated with its use.

  5. Safe testing nuclear rockets economically

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; Travis, B. J.; Zerkle, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  6. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Donald W.; Rochow Wilcox Space; Nuclear Systems, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Earlier this year Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) introduced a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars. This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection (E-D) rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1)Reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2)Eliminate need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3)Practical provision for reactor power control; and (4)Use near term, long life turbopumps.

  7. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Donald W.; Rochow, Richard

    1993-06-01

    In January, 1992, a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars was introduced (Culver, 1992). This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1) the reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2) elimination need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3) a practical provision for reactor power control; and (4) use of near-term, long-life turbopumps.

  8. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, D.W. ); Rochow, R. )

    1993-01-15

    Earlier this year Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) introduced a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars. This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection (E-D) rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1)Reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2)Eliminate need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3)Practical provision for reactor power control; and (4)Use near term, long life turbopumps.

  9. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A detailed description of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) is presented. The contents include: 1) Design Requirements; 2) NTREES Layout; 3) Data Acquisition and Control System Schematics; 4) NTREES System Schematic; and 5) NTREES Setup.

  11. Computational modeling of nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peery, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: rocket engine transient simulation (ROCETS) system; ROCETS performance simulations composed of integrated component models; ROCETS system architecture significant features; ROCETS engineering nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) modules; ROCETS system easily adapts Fortran engineering modules; ROCETS NTR reactor module; ROCETS NTR turbomachinery module; detailed reactor analysis; predicted reactor power profiles; turbine bypass impact on system; and ROCETS NTR engine simulation summary.

  12. Development of nuclear rocket engine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    Research sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission, the USAF, and NASA (later on) in the area of nuclear rocket propulsion is discussed. It was found that a graphite reactor, loaded with highly concentrated Uranium 235, can be used to heat high pressure liquid hydrogen to temperatures of about 4500 R, and to expand the hydrogen through a high expansion ratio rocket nozzle assembly. The results of 20 reactor tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site between July 1959 and June 1969 are analyzed. On the basis of these results, the feasibility of solid graphite reactor/nuclear rocket engines is revealed. It is maintained that this technology will support future space propulsion requirements, using liquid hydrogen as the propellant, for thrust requirements ranging from 25,000 lbs to 250,000 lbs, with vacuum specific impulses of at least 850 sec and with full engine throttle capability. 12 refs.

  13. Dual mode nuclear rocket system applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretz, J. E.; Bell, J. M.; Plebuch, R. K.; Priest, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Mission areas where the dual-mode nuclear rocket system is superior to nondual-mode systems are demonstrated. It is shown that the dual-mode system is competitive with the nondual-mode system even for those specific missions and particular payload configurations where it does not have a clear-cut advantage.

  14. Program For Optimization Of Nuclear Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plebuch, R. K.; Mcdougall, J. K.; Ridolphi, F.; Walton, James T.

    1994-01-01

    NOP is versatile digital-computer program devoloped for parametric analysis of beryllium-reflected, graphite-moderated nuclear rocket engines. Facilitates analysis of performance of engine with respect to such considerations as specific impulse, engine power, type of engine cycle, and engine-design constraints arising from complications of fuel loading and internal gradients of temperature. Predicts minimum weight for specified performance.

  15. Heat transfer in a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Konyukhov, G.V.; Petrov, A.I.

    1995-02-01

    Special features of heat transfer in the reactor of a nuclear rocket engine (NRE) are dealt with. It is shown that the design of the cooling system of the NRE reactor is governed by its stability to small deviations of the parameters from the corresponding calculated values and the possibility of compensating for effects due to nonuniformities and distrubances of various types and scales.

  16. The beginnings. [Of Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicles Application

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, R.J.; Kirk, W.L.; Holman, R.R.; Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA )

    1989-06-01

    The development of the nuclear rocket engine called NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) is described. The choice of fuel element, required rocket parameters, NERVA project objectives, division of responsibilities among different organizations, and NERVA design configuration are reviewed. Progress that has been made in the development of NERVA is addressed.

  17. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2008-01-21

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support the eventual development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  19. Design considerations in clustering nuclear rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    An initial investigation of the design considerations in clustering nuclear rocket engines for space transfer vehicles has been made. The clustering of both propulsion modules (which include start tanks) and nuclear rocket engines installed directly to a vehicle core tank appears to be feasible. Special provisions to shield opposite run tanks and the opposite side of a core tank - in the case of the boost pump concept - are required; the installation of a circumferential reactor side shield sector appears to provide an effective solution to this problem. While the time response to an engine-out event does not appear to be critical, the gimbal displacement required appears to be important. Since an installation of three engines offers a substantial reduction in gimbal requirements for engine-out and it may be possible to further enhance mission reliability with the greater number of engines, it is recommended that a cluster of four engines be considered.

  20. Nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel NIMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    1991-01-01

    In the 1960's, Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engines were developed and ground tested capable of yielding isp of up to 900 s at thrusts up to 250 klb. Numerous trade studies have shown that such traditional hydrogen fueled NTR engines can reduce the inertial mass low earth orbit (IMLEO) of lunar missions by 35 percent and Mars missions by 50 to 65 percent. The same personnel and facilities used to revive the hydrogen NTR can also be used to develop NTR engines capable of using indigenous Martian volatiles as propellant. By putting this capacity of the NTR to work in a Mars descent/acent vehicle, the Nuclear rocket using Indigenous Martian Fuel (NIMF) can greatly reduce the IMLEO of a manned Mars mission, while giving the mission unlimited planetwide mobility.

  1. Steady Nuclear Combustion in Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saenger, E.

    1957-01-01

    The astrophysical theory of stationary nuclear reactions in stars is applied to the conditions that would be met in the practical engineering cases that would differ from the former, particularly with respect to the much lower combustion pressures, dimensions of the reacting volume, and burnup times. This application yields maximum rates of hear production per unit volume of reacting gas occurring at about 10(exp 8) K in the cases of reactions between the hydrogen isotopes, but yields higher rates for heavier atoms. For the former, with chamber pressures of the order of 100 atmospheres, the energy production for nuclear combustion reaches values of about 10(exp 4) kilocalories per cubic meter per second, which approaches the magnitude for the familiar chemical fuels. The values are substantially lower for heavier atoms, and increase with the square of the combustion pressure. The half-life of the burnup in the fastest reactions may drop to values as low as those for chemical fuels so that, despite the high temperature, the radiated energy can remain smaller than the energy produced, particularly if an inefficiently radiating (i.e., easily completely ionized reacting material like hydrogen), is used. On the other hand, the fraction of completely ionized particles in the gases undergoing nuclear combustion must not exceed a certain upper limit because the densities (approximately 10(exp -10) grams per cubic centimeter)) lie in the range of high vacua and only for the previously mentioned fraction of nonionized particles can mean free paths be retained small enough so that the chamber diameters of several dozen meters will suffice. Under these conditions it appears that continuously maintained stable nuclear reactions at practical pressures and dimensions are fundamentally possible and their application can be visualized as energy sources for power plants and propulsion units.

  2. Droplet Core Nuclear Rocket (DCNR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    The most basic design feature of the droplet core nuclear reactor is to spray liquid uranium into the core in the form of droplets on the order of five to ten microns in size, to bring the reactor to critical conditions. The liquid uranium fuel ejector is driven by hydrogen, and more hydrogen is injected from the side of the reactor to about one and a half meters from the top. High temperature hydrogen is expanded through a nozzle to produce thrust. The hydrogen pressure in the system can be somewhere between 50 and 500 atmospheres; the higher pressure is more desirable. In the lower core region, hydrogen is tangentially injected to serve two purposes: (1) to provide a swirling flow to protect the wall from impingement of hot uranium droplets: (2) to generate a vortex flow that can be used for fuel separation. The reactor is designed to maximize the energy generation in the upper region of the core. The system can result in and Isp of 2000 per second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio of 1.6 for the shielded reactor. The nuclear engine system can reduce the Mars mission duration to less than 200 days. It can reduce the hydrogen consumption by a factor of 2 to 3, which reduces the hydrogen load by about 130 to 150 metric tons.

  3. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  4. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  5. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  6. Gas Core Nuclear Rocket Feasibility Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed.

  7. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic- metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  8. Gas core nuclear rocket feasibility project

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-09-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed.

  9. Lunar mission design using nuclear thermal rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Stancati, M.L.; Collins, J.T. ); Borowski, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA-class Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR), with performance nearly double that of advanced chemical engines, has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars. NTR engines address the demanding trip time and payload delivery needs of both cargo-only and piloted flights. But NTR can also reduce the Earth launch requirements for manned lunar missions. First use of NTR for the Moon would be less demanding and would provide a test-bed for early operations experience with this powerful technology. Study of application and design options indicates that NTR propulsion can be integrated with the Space Exploration Initiative scenarios to deliver performance gains while managing controlled, long-term disposal of spent reactors to highly stable orbits.

  10. Laminar flow instability in nuclear rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.L. )

    1993-01-20

    Laminar flow instability (LFI) is a rarely encountered phenomenon, occurring in gaseous heated channels with high exit-to-inlet temperature ratios and a laminar Reynolds Number at the channel exit, as may be experienced in a nuclear rocket. Analytical techniques were developed and programmed for parametric evaluation that had been previously validated by comparison with available experimental data. The four types of transients associated with LFI are described in terms of the governing equations. Parametric evaluations of solid core prismatic and particle bed fuel configurations were made to determine their sensitivities to LFI from temperature ratio, flow rate, orificing, transition Reynolds Number, pressure level, presence of an exit sonic nozzle, power density and heat flux shape. The flow rate at the point of neutral stability and the growth rate of the excursive transient are calculated. The full power design point and the cooldown phases of operation were both evaluated.

  11. Lunar mission design using Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, Michael L.; Collins, John T.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA-class Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR), with performance nearly double that of advanced chemical engines, has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars. NTR engines address the demanding trip time and payload delivery needs of both cargo-only and piloted flights. But NTR can also reduce the Earth launch requirements for manned lunar missions. First use of NTR for the Moon would be less demanding and would provide a test-bed for early operations experience with this powerful technology. Study of application and design options indicates that NTR propulsion can be integrated with the Space Exploration Initiative scenarios to deliver performance gains while managing controlled, long-term disposal of spent reactors to highly stable orbits.

  12. Particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, Hans

    1991-01-01

    The particle bed reactor nuclear rocket concept consists of fuel particles (in this case (U,Zr)C with an outer coat of zirconium carbide). These particles are packed in an annular bed surrounded by two frits (porous tubes) forming a fuel element; the outer one being a cold frit, the inner one being a hot frit. The fuel element are cooled by hydrogen passing in through the moderator. These elements are assembled in a reactor assembly in a hexagonal pattern. The reactor can be either reflected or not, depending on the design, and either 19 or 37 elements, are used. Propellant enters in the top, passes through the moderator fuel element and out through the nozzle. Beryllium used for the moderator in this particular design to withstand the high radiation exposure implied by the long run times.

  13. Rocketdyne/Westinghouse nuclear thermal rocket engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: systems approach needed for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) design optimization; generic NTR engine power balance codes; rocketdyne nuclear thermal system code; software capabilities; steady state model; NTR engine optimizer code-logic; reactor power calculation logic; sample multi-component configuration; NTR design code output; generic NTR code at Rocketdyne; Rocketdyne NTR model; and nuclear thermal rocket modeling directions.

  14. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous extraterrestrial propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary examination of a concept for a Mars and outer solar system exploratory vehicle is presented. Propulsion is provided by utilizing a nuclear thermal reactor to heat a propellant volatile indigenous to the destination world to form a high thrust rocket exhaust. Candidate propellants, whose performance, materials compatibility, and ease of acquisition are examined and include carbon dioxide, water, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and argon. Ballistics and winged supersonic configurations are discussed. It is shown that the use of this method of propulsion potentially offers high payoff to a manned Mars mission. This is accomplished by sharply reducing the initial mission mass required in low earth orbit, and by providing Mars explorers with greatly enhanced mobility in traveling about the planet through the use of a vehicle that can refuel itself each time it lands. Thus, the nuclear landing craft is utilized in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear-thermal interplanetary launch. By utilizing such a system in the outer solar system, a low level aerial reconnaissance of Titan combined with a multiple sample return from nearly every satellite of Saturn can be accomplished in a single launch of a Titan 4 or the Space Transportation System (STS). Similarly a multiple sample return from Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa can also be accomplished in one launch of a Titan 4 or the STS.

  15. Estimates of the radiation environment for a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J.C.; Manohara, H.M.; Williams, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Ambitious missions in deep space, such as manned expeditions to Mars, require nuclear propulsion if they are to be accomplished in a reasonable length of time. Current technology is adequate to support the use of nuclear fission as a source of energy for propulsion; however, problems associated with neutrons and gammas leaking from the rocket engine must be addressed. Before manned or unmanned space flights are attempted, an extensive ground test program on the rocket engine must be completed. This paper compares estimated radiation levels and nuclear heating rates in and around the rocket engine for both a ground test and space environments.

  16. Economical Mars Exploration Supported by a Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, S. D.; O'Brien, R. C.

    2012-06-01

    A nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) developed for human Mars missions could act as a "mother ship" and carry multiple unmanned platforms to Mars for independent deployment. Use of the NTR could increase the science per dollar for each Earth launch.

  17. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Development Risk Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tony

    2014-01-01

    There are clear advantages of development of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) for a crewed mission to Mars. NTR for in-space propulsion enables more ambitious space missions by providing high thrust at high specific impulse (approximately 900 sec) that is 2 times the best theoretical performance possible for chemical rockets. Missions can be optimized for maximum payload capability to take more payload with reduced total mass to orbit; saving cost on reduction of the number of launch vehicles needed. Or missions can be optimized to minimize trip time significantly to reduce the deep space radiation exposure to the crew. NTR propulsion technology is a game changer for space exploration. However, "NUCLEAR" is a word that is feared and vilified by some groups and the hostility towards development of any nuclear systems can meet great opposition by the public as well as from national leaders and people in authority. Communication of nuclear safety will be critical to the success of the development of the NTR. Why is there a fear of nuclear? A bomb that can level a city is a scary weapon. The first and only times the Nuclear Bomb was used in a war was on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War 2. The "Little Boy" atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 and the "Fat Man" on Nagasaki 3 days later on August 9th. Within the first 4 months of bombings, 90- 166 thousand people died in Hiroshima and 60-80 thousand died in Nagasaki. It is important to note for comparison that over 500 thousand people died and 5 million made homeless due to strategic bombing (approximately 150 thousand tons) of Japanese cities and war assets with conventional non-nuclear weapons between 1942- 1945. A major bombing campaign of "firebombing" of Tokyo called "Operation Meetinghouse" on March 9 and 10 consisting of 334 B-29's dropped approximately1,700 tons of bombs around 16 square mile area and over 100 thousand people have been estimated to have died. The declaration of death is very

  19. Nuclear rocket propulsion technology - A joint NASA/DOE project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.

    1991-01-01

    NASA and the DOE have initiated critical technology development for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for SEI human and robotic missions to the moon and to Mars. The activities and project plan of the interagency project planning team in FY 1990 and 1991 are summarized. The project plan includes evolutionary technology development for both nuclear thermal and nuclear electric propulsion systems.

  20. CAC - NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET CORE ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important factors in the development of nuclear rocket engine designs is to be able to accurately predict temperatures and pressures throughout a fission nuclear reactor core with axial hydrogen flow through circular coolant passages. CAC is an analytical prediction program to study the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a circular coolant passage. CAC predicts as a function of time axial and radial fluid conditions, passage wall temperatures, flow rates in each coolant passage, and approximate maximum material temperatures. CAC incorporates the hydrogen properties model STATE to provide fluid-state relations, thermodynamic properties, and transport properties of molecular hydrogen in any fixed ortho-para combination. The program requires the general core geometry, the core material properties as a function of temperature, the core power profile, and the core inlet conditions as function of time. Although CAC was originally developed in FORTRAN IV for use on an IBM 7094, this version is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and is designed to be machine independent. It has been successfully compiled on IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS with Lahey F77L, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS 4.1.1, and a VAX series computer running VMS 5.4-3. CAC requires 300K of RAM under MS-DOS, 422K of RAM under SunOS, and 220K of RAM under VMS. No sample executable is provided on the distribution medium. Sample input and output data are included. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. CAC was developed in 1966, and this machine independent version was released in 1992. IBM-PC and IBM are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Lahey F77L is a registered trademark of Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. VMS is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  1. The solid-core heat-exchanger nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    As measured by the results of its accomplishments, the nuclear rocket program was a success. Why, then, was it cancelled? In my opinion, the cancellation resulted from the success of the Apollo program. President Kennedy declared that putting a man on the moon by 1969 would be a national objective. Upon the Apollo program`s completion, space spectaculars lost their attraction, and the manned exploration of Mars, which could have been accomplished with nuclear rockets, was shelved. Perhaps another generation of physicists and engineers will experience the thrill and satisfaction of participating in a nuclear-propulsion-based program for space exploration in decades to come.

  2. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance characteristics of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  3. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shucheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-20

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at the NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance parameters of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  4. Grooved Fuel Rings for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2009-01-01

    An alternative design concept for nuclear thermal rocket engines for interplanetary spacecraft calls for the use of grooved-ring fuel elements. Beyond spacecraft rocket engines, this concept also has potential for the design of terrestrial and spacecraft nuclear electric-power plants. The grooved ring fuel design attempts to retain the best features of the particle bed fuel element while eliminating most of its design deficiencies. In the grooved ring design, the hydrogen propellant enters the fuel element in a manner similar to that of the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element.

  5. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study has been conducted by the NASA-Lewis Rocket Engine Design Expert System for the convergent-divergent nozzle of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket system, which uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to high temperature and then expands it through the nozzle. It is established by the study that finite-rate chemical reactions lower performance levels from theoretical levels. Major parametric roles are played by chamber temperature and chamber pressure. A maximum performance of 930 sec is projected at 2700 K, and of 1030 at 3100 K.

  6. Nuclear thermal rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket can be enhanced through the use of unconventional nozzles as part of the propulsion system. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program being conducted at the NASA Lewis is outlined and the advantages of a plug nozzle are described. A facility description, experimental designs and schematics are given. Results of pretest performance analyses show that high nozzle performance can be attained despite substantial nozzle length reduction through the use of plug nozzles as compared to a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pretest measurement uncertainty analyses indicate that specific impulse values are expected to be within + or - 1.17 pct.

  7. A case for Mars: A case for nuclear thermal rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, J.E.; Van Haaften, D.H.; Madsen, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    It is now possible to make general comparisons of candidate propulsion systems for human exploration of Mars. Preliminary review indicates that the propulsion system most likely to meet all mission requirements is the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR). Advanced cryogenic chemical propulsion systems achieve a maximum specific impulse (Isp) of about 470 seconds. The Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960's built engines with Isp's of about 825 seconds. Performance of an NTR depends on achievable materials temperatures, but materials has progressed significantly since the 1960's. Also, some of the current research undertaken to improve chemical rocket performance, such as aerobraking or schemes to minify payload, applies to an NTR as well, although it is not essential. The NTR is reusable, and can be developed into a complete space transportation system. Only 3--4% of the nuclear fuel would be used in a Mars mission, and an engine can be used until about 40% of the fuel is expended. Nuclear thermal rockets can take mankind to the moon, to Mars, and beyond, but development must begin now. There is potential for orderly growth into nuclear concepts far beyond NERVA. Using chemical propulsion for lunar missions and delaying NTR development will only result in higher costs and delayed or cancelled Mars missions.

  8. NEW EMPLOYEES ON THE JOB - DONALD E HEGBERG OF THE NUCLEAR REACTOR DIVISION DISCUSSES NUCLEAR ROCKET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    NEW EMPLOYEES ON THE JOB - DONALD E HEGBERG OF THE NUCLEAR REACTOR DIVISION DISCUSSES NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENT EXPERIMENT WITH CHARLES L YOUNGER - THE DISCUSSION IS PREPATORY TO CONDUCTING THE EXPERIMENT AT THE PLUM BROOK STATION REACTOR FACILITY

  9. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  10. Nuclear rocket engine design based on the particle bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.; Lazareth, O. Jr.; Schmidt, E.; Maise, G. )

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine design based on the particle-bed reactor (PBR) concept is described in this paper. This engine is designed to satisfy a mission to Mars and thus must develop a thrust of [approximately]1.75 (6) N. This requirement is satisfied if the reactor generates 2000 MW of power.

  11. U.S./CIS eye joint nuclear rocket venture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Smetanikov, Vladimir; D'Yakov, Evgenij K.; Pavshuk, Vladimir A.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the significance for U.S. spacecraft development of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) reactor concept that has been developed in the (formerly Soviet) Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The CIS NTR reactor employs a hydrogen-cooled zirconium hydride moderator and ternary carbide fuels; the comparatively cool operating temperatures associated with this design promise overall robustness.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics studies of nuclear rocket performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Benson, Thomas J.; Kim, Suk C.

    1991-01-01

    A CFD analysis of a low pressure nuclear rocket concept is presented with the use of an advanced chemical kinetics, Navier-Stokes code. The computations describe the flow field in detail,including gas dynamic, thermodynamic and chemical properties, as well as global performance quantities such as specific impulse. Computational studies of several rocket nozzle shapes are conducted in an attempt to maximize hydrogen recombination. These Navier-Stokes calculations, which include real gas and viscous effects, predict lower performance values than have been reported heretofore.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics studies of nuclear rocket performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A CFD analysis of a low pressure nuclear rocket concept is presented with the use of an advanced chemical kinetics, Navier-Stokes code. The computations describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamic, thermodynamic and chemical properties, as well as global performance quantities such as specific impulse. Computational studies of several rocket nozzle shapes are conducted in an attempt to maximize hydrogen recombination. These Navier-Stokes calculations, which include real gas and viscous effects, predict lower performance values than have been reported heretofore.

  14. Computational neutronic analysis of the nuclear vapor thermal rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, E.T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kuras, S.; Maya, I.; Diaz, N.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Calculational procedures and results are presented for the neutronic analysis of the Nuclear Vapor Thermal Reactor (NVTR) rocket engine. The NVTR, in a rocket engine, uses modified NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by highly enriched (>85%) uranium tetrafluoride (UF[sub 4]) vapor. In the NVTR, the hydrogen propellant is the primary coolant, is physically separated from the UF[sub 4] vapor (which is not circulated), is maintained at high pressure (50 to 100 atm), and exits the core at 3100 to 3500 K.

  15. Pressure Fed Nuclear Thermal Rockets for space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Leyse, C.F. , Idaho Falls, ID ); Madsen, W.W.; Ramsthaler, J.H.; Schnitzler, B.G. )

    1989-08-01

    The National Space Policy includes a long range goal of expanding human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system. This has renewed interest in the potential application of Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) to space flight, particularly for human expeditions to the Moon and Mars. Recent NASA studies consider applications of the previously developed NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology and the more advanced gas core reactors and show their potential advantages in reducing the initial mass in Earth orbit (IMEO) compared to advanced chemical rocket engines. Application of NERVA technology will require reestablishing the prior technological base or extending it to an advanced NERVA type engine, while the gas core NTR will require an extensive high risk research and development program. A technology intermediate between NERVA and the gas core NTR is a low pressure engine based on solid fuel, a Pressure Fed NTR (PFNTR). In addition to the simplicity of the gas pressurized engine cycle, the PFNTR takes advantage of the dissociation of hydrogen-the increases in specific impulse become significant as the chamber pressure decreases below 1.0 MPa (10 atmospheres) and the chamber temperature increases above 3000 K. The developmental status of technology applicable to a Pressure Fed Nuclear Thermal Rocket (PFNTR) lies between that of the NERVA engine and the gas core NTR (GCNTR). This document investigates PFNTR performance and provides typical mission analyses.

  16. RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. O'Brien

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

  17. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  18. Nuclear rocket propulsion. NASA plans and progress, FY 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Miller, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has initiated planning for a technology development project for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for space explorer initiative (SEI) human and robotic missions to the moon and Mars. An interagency project is underway that includes the Department of Energy National Laboratories for nuclear technology development. The activities of the project planning team in FY 1990 and 1991 are summarized. The progress to date is discussed, and the project plan is reviewed. Critical technology issues were identified and include: (1) nuclear fuel temperature, life, and reliability; (2) nuclear system ground test; (3) safety; (4) autonomous system operation and health monitoring; and (5) minimum mass and high specific impulse.

  19. Ground test facility for SEI nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, C.D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.; Shipers, L.R.

    1992-08-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) has been identified as a critical technology in support of the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). In order to safely develop a reliable, reusable, long-lived flight engine, facilities are required that will support ground tests to qualify the nuclear rocket engine design. Initial nuclear fuel element testing will need to be performed in a facility that supports a realistic thermal and neutronic environment in which the fuel elements will operate at a fraction of the power of a flight weight reactor/engine. Ground testing of nuclear rocket engines is not new. New restrictions mandated by the National Environmental Protection Act of 1970, however, now require major changes to be made in the manner in which reactor engines are now tested. These new restrictions now preclude the types of nuclear rocket engine tests that were performed in the past from being done today. A major attribute of a safely operating ground test facility is its ability to prevent fission products from being released in appreciable amounts to the environment. Details of the intricacies and complications involved with the design of a fuel element ground test facility are presented in this report with a strong emphasis on safety and economy.

  20. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The experience base regarding fission product behavior developed during the Rover program, the nuclear rocket development program of 1955--1972, will be useful in planning a renewed nuclear rocket program. During the Rover program, 20 reactors were tested at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Nevada. Nineteen of these discharged effluent directly into the atmosphere; the last reactor tested, a non-flight-prototypic, fuel-element-testing reactor called the Nuclear Furnace (NF-1) was connected to an effluent cleanup system that removed fission products before the hydrogen coolant (propellant) was discharged to the atmosphere. In general, we are able to increase both test duration and fuel temperature during the test series. Therefore fission product data from the later part of the program are more interesting and more applicable to future reactors. We have collected fission product retention (and release) data reported in both formal and informal publications for six of the later reactor tests; five of these were Los Alamos reactors that were firsts of a kind in configuration or operating conditions. We have also, with the cooperation of Westinghouse, included fission product data from the NRX-A6 reactor, the final member of series of developmental reactors with the same basic geometry, but with significant design and fabrication improvements as the series continued. Table 1 lists the six selected reactors and the test parameters for each.

  1. Rover nuclear rocket engine program: Overview of rover engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finseth, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The results of nuclear rocket development activities from the inception of the ROVER program in 1955 through the termination of activities on January 5, 1973 are summarized. This report discusses the nuclear reactor test configurations (non cold flow) along with the nuclear furnace demonstrated during this time frame. Included in the report are brief descriptions of the propulsion systems, test objectives, accomplishments, technical issues, and relevant test results for the various reactor tests. Additionally, this document is specifically aimed at reporting performance data and their relationship to fuel element development with little or no emphasis on other (important) items.

  2. Thermohydraulic modeling of the nuclear thermal rocket: The KLAXON code

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.L.; Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W. )

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) have been proposed as a means of propulsion for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI, the manned mission to Mars). The NTR derives its thrust from the expulsion of hot supersonic hydrogen gas. A large tank on the rocket stores hydrogen in liquid or slush form, which is pumped by a turbopump through a nuclear reactor to provide the necessary heat. The path that the hydrogen takes is most circuitous, making several passes through the reactor and the nozzle itself (to provide cooling), as well as two passes through the turbopump (to transfer momentum). The proposed fuel elements for the reactor have two different configurations: solid prismatic fuel and particle-bed fuel. There are different design concerns for the two types of fuel, but there are also many fluid flow aspects that they share. The KLAXON code was used to model a generic NTR design from the inlet of the reactor core to the exit from the nozzle.

  3. NERVA-Derived Concept for a Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Fusselman, Steven P.; Frye, Patrick E.; Gunn, Stanley V.; Morrison, Calvin Q.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2005-02-06

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an enabling technology for human exploration missions. The 'bimodal' NTR (BNTR) provides a novel approach to meeting both propulsion and power requirements of future manned and robotic missions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tie-tube cooling configurations, NTR performance, Brayton cycle performance, and LOX-Augmented NTR (LANTR) feasibility to arrive at a point of departure BNTR configuration for subsequent system definition.

  4. Thermohydraulic modeling of nuclear thermal rockets: The KLAXON code

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.L.; Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.

    1992-07-01

    The hydrogen flow from the storage tanks, through the reactor core, and out the nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an integral design consideration. To provide an analysis and design tool for this phenomenon, the KLAXON code is being developed. A shock-capturing numerical methodology is used to model the gas flow (the Harten, Lax, and van Leer method, as implemented by Einfeldt). Preliminary results of modeling the flow through the reactor core and nozzle are given in this paper.

  5. Hyperthermal Environments Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Engine Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Clifton, W. B.; Hickman, Robert R.; Wang, Ten-See; Dobson, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    An arc-heater driven hyperthermal convective environments simulator was recently developed and commissioned for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket materials. This newly established non-nuclear testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce hightemperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of nuclear reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects, and is intended to serve as a low-cost facility for supporting non-nuclear developmental testing of hightemperature fissile fuels and structural materials. The resulting reactor environments simulator represents a valuable addition to the available inventory of non-nuclear test facilities and is uniquely capable of investigating and characterizing candidate fuel/structural materials, improving associated processing/fabrication techniques, and simulating reactor thermal hydraulics. This paper summarizes facility design and engineering development efforts and reports baseline operational characteristics as determined from a series of performance mapping and long duration capability demonstration tests. Potential follow-on developmental strategies are also suggested in view of the technical and policy challenges ahead. Keywords: Nuclear Rocket Engine, Reactor Environments, Non-Nuclear Testing, Fissile Fuel Development.

  6. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

  7. Nuclear Thermal Rocket - An Established Space Propulsion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Milton

    2004-02-01

    From the late 1950s to the early 1970s a major program successfully developed the capability to conduct space exploration using the advanced technology of nuclear rocket propulsion. The program had two primary elements: pioneering and advanced technology work-Rover-at Los Alamos National Laboratory and its contractors provided the basic reactor design, fuel materials development, and reactor testing capability; and engine development-NERVA-by the industrial team of Aerojet and Westinghouse building on and extending the Los Alamos efforts to flight system development. This presentation describes the NERVA program, the engine system testing that demonstrated the space-practical operation capabilities of nuclear thermal rockets, and the mission studies that point the way to most effectively use the NTR capabilities. Together, the two programs established a technology base that includes proven NTR capabilities of (1) over twice the specific impulse of chemical propulsion systems, (2) thrust capabilities ranging from 44kN to 1112kN, and (3) practical thrust-to-weight ratios for future NASA space exploration missions, both manned payloads to Mars and unmanned payloads to the outer planets. The overall nuclear rocket program had a unique management structure that integrated the efforts of the two government agencies involved-NASA and the then-existing Atomic Energy Commission. The objective of this paper is to summarize and convey the technical and management lessons learned in this program as the nation considers the design of its future space exploration activities.

  8. Nuclear thermal rocket workshop reference system Rover/NERVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1991-01-01

    The Rover/NERVA engine system is to be used as a reference, against which each of the other concepts presented in the workshop will be compared. The following topics are reviewed: the operational characteristics of the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR); the accomplishments of the Rover/NERVA programs; and performance characteristics of the NERVA-type systems for both Mars and lunar mission applications. Also, the issues of ground testing, NTR safety, NASA's nuclear propulsion project plans, and NTR development cost estimates are briefly discussed.

  9. Open cycle gas core nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The open cycle gas core engine is a nuclear propulsion device. Propulsion is provided by hot hydrogen which is heated directly by thermal radiation from the nuclear fuel. Critical mass is sustained in the uranium plasma in the center. It has typically 30 to 50 kg of fuel. It is a thermal reactor in the sense that fissions are caused by absorption of thermal neutrons. The fast neutrons go out to an external moderator/reflector material and, by collision, slow down to thermal energy levels, and then come back in and cause fission. The hydrogen propellant is stored in a tank. The advantage of the concept is very high specific impulse because you can take the plasma to any temperature desired by increasing the fission level by withdrawing or turning control rods or control drums.

  10. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.

  11. Low Pressure Nuclear Thermal Rocket (LPNTR) concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsthaler, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A background and a description of the low pressure nuclear thermal system are presented. Performance, mission analysis, development, critical issues, and some conclusions are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: LPNTR's inherent advantages in critical NTR requirement; reactor trade studies; reference LPNTR; internal configuration and flow of preliminary LPNTR; particle bed fuel assembly; preliminary LPNTR neutronic study results; multiple LPNTR engine concept; tank and engine configuration for mission analysis; LPNTR reliability potential; LPNTR development program; and LPNTR program costs.

  12. Analysis of a Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket for Earth to Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian; Brown, Norman (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed engine concept is the Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket (NEAR). The NEAR concept uses a fission reactor to thermally heat a propellant in a rocket plenum. The rocket is shrouded, thus the exhaust mixes with ingested air to provide additional thermal energy through combustion. The combusted flow is then expanded through a nozzle to provide thrust.

  13. History of the Development of NERVA Nuclear Rocket Engine Technology

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Black

    2000-06-04

    During the 17 yr between 1955 and 1972, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) collaborated on an effort to develop a nuclear rocket engine. Based on studies conducted in 1946, the concept selected was a fully enriched uranium-filled, graphite-moderated, beryllium-reflected reactor, cooled by a monopropellant, hydrogen. The program, known as Rover, was centered at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), funded jointly by the AEC and the USAF, with the intent of designing a rocket engine for long-range ballistic missiles. Other nuclear rocket concepts were studied during these years, such as cermet and gas cores, but are not reviewed herein. Even thought the program went through the termination phase in a very short time, the technology may still be fully recoverable/retrievable to the state of its prior technological readiness in a reasonably short time. Documents; drawings; and technical, purchasing, manufacturing, and materials specifications were all stored for ease of retrieval. If the U.S. space program were to discover a need/mission for this engine, its 1972 'pencils down' status could be updated for the technology developments of the past 28 yr for flight demonstration in 8 or fewer years. Depending on today's performance requirements, temperatures and pressures could be increased and weight decreased considerably.

  14. Advanced nuclear rocket engine mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Farbman, G.; Sulmeisters, T.; Buden, D.; Harris, P.

    1987-12-01

    The use of a derivative of the NERVA engine developed from 1955 to 1973 was evluated for potential application to Air Force orbital transfer and maneuvering missions in the time period 1995 to 2020. The NERVA stge was found to have lower life cycle costs (LCC) than an advanced chemical stage for performing low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO0 missions at any level of activity greater than three missions per year. It had lower life cycle costs than a high performance nuclear electric engine at any level of LEO to GEO mission activity. An examination of all unmanned orbital transfer and maneuvering missions from the Space Transportation Architecture study (STAS 111-3) indicated a LCC advantage for the NERVA stage over the advanced chemical stage of fifteen million dollars. The cost advanced accured from both the orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. Parametric analyses showed that the specific impulse of the NERVA stage and the cost of delivering material to low earth orbit were the most significant factors in the LCC advantage over the chemical stage. Lower development costs and a higher thrust gave the NERVA engine an LCC advantage over the nuclear electric stage. An examination of technical data from the Rover/NERVA program indicated that development of the NERVA stage has a low technical risk, and the potential for high reliability and safe operation. The data indicated the NERVA engine had a great flexibility which would permit a single stage to perform all Air Force missions.

  15. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  16. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames.1,2 Conventional storable propellants produce average specific impulse. Nuclear thermal rockets capable of producing high specific impulse are proposed. Nuclear thermal rockets employ heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K), and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited.3 The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. The purpose of the testing is to obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials, as-fabricated, and determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures. The fission process of the planned fissile material and the resulting heating performance is well known and does not therefore require that active fissile material be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  17. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear propulsion has been identified as one of the key technologies needed for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to a high temperature followed by expansion through a conventional convergent-divergent nozzle. A parametric study of NTR nozzles was performed using the Rocket Engine Design Expert System (REDES) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The REDES used the JANNAF standard rigorous methodology to determine nozzle performance over a range of chamber temperatures, chamber pressures, thrust levels, and different nozzle configurations. A design condition was set by fixing the propulsion system exit radius at five meters and throat radius was varied to achieve a target thrust level. An adiabatic wall was assumed for the nozzle, and its length was assumed to be 80 percent of a 15 degree cone. The results conclude that although the performance of the NTR, based on infinite reaction rates, looks promising at low chamber pressures, finite rate chemical reactions will cause the actual performance to be considerably lower. Parameters which have a major influence on the delivered specific impulse value include the chamber temperature and the chamber pressures in the high thrust domain. Other parameters, such as 2-D and boundary layer effects, kinetic rates, and number of nozzles, affect the deliverable performance of an NTR nozzle to a lesser degree. For a single nozzle, maximum performance of 930 seconds and 1030 seconds occur at chamber temperatures of 2700 and 3100 K, respectively.

  18. Long Duration Hot Hydrogen Exposure of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Hickman, Robert; Dobson, Chris; Clifton, Scooter

    2007-01-01

    An arc-heater driven hyper-thermal convective environments simulator was recently developed and commissioned for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket materials. This newly established non-nuclear testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to .produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of nuclear reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects, and is intended to serve as a low cost test facility for the purpose of investigating and characterizing candidate fuel/structural materials and improving associated processing/fabrication techniques. Design and engineering development efforts are fully summarized, and facility operating characteristics are reported as determined from a series of baseline performance mapping runs and long duration capability demonstration tests.

  19. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, David E.; Mireles, Omar R.; Hickman, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (Isp) and relatively high thrust in order to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average Isp. Nuclear thermal rockets (NTR) capable of high Isp thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements is limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements which employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact RF heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  20. Safety aspects of ground testing for large nuclear rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.I.

    1988-02-01

    Present nuclear rocket reactors under test in Nevada are operated at nominal power levels of 1000 Mw. It does not seem unreasonable in the future to anticipate reactors with power levels in the range up to 5,000 Mw for space applications. It has been shown that the normal testing of large nuclear rocket engines at NRDS could impose some restrictions on the fuel performance which would not otherwise be required by space flight operation. The only apparent alternative would require a capability for decontaminating effluent gases prior to release to the atmosphere. In addition to the source restrictions, tests will almost certainly be controlled by wind and atmospheric stability conditions, and the requirements for monitoring and control of off-site exposures will be much more stringent than those presently in force. An analysis of maximum accidents indicates that projections of present credible occurrences cannot be tolerated in larger engine tests. The apparent alternatives to a significant (order of magnitude or better) reduction in credible accident consequences, are the establishment of an underground test facility, a facility in an area equivalent to the Pacific weapons proving ground, or in space.

  1. A review of the Los Alamos effort in the development of nuclear rocket propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, F.P.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the achievements of the Los Alamos nuclear rocket propulsion program and describes some specific reactor design and testing problems encountered during the development program along with the progress made in solving these problems. The relevance of these problems to a renewed nuclear thermal rocket development program for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is discussed. 11 figs.

  2. Los Alamos studies of the Nevada test site facilities for the testing of nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, Michael V.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Nevada test site geographic location; location of NRDA facilities, area 25; assessment program plan; program goal, scope, and process -- the New Nuclear Rocket Program; nuclear rocket engine test facilities; EMAD Facility; summary of final assessment results; ETS-1 Facility; and facilities cost summary.

  3. Synthesis of calculational methods for design and analysis of radiation shields for nuclear rocket systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Disney, R. K.; Jordan, T. A.; Soltesz, R. G.; Woodsum, H. C.

    1969-01-01

    Eight computer programs make up a nine volume synthesis containing two design methods for nuclear rocket radiation shields. The first design method is appropriate for parametric and preliminary studies, while the second accomplishes the verification of a final nuclear rocket reactor design.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  5. Injection of Nuclear Rocket Engine Exhaust into Deep Unsaturated Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Decker, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear rocket engine technology is being considered as a means of interplanetary vehicle propulsion for a manned mission to Mars. To achieve this, a test and development facility must be constructed to safely run nuclear engines. The testing of nuclear engines in the 1950's and 1960's was accomplished by exhausting the engine gases into the atmosphere, a practice that is no longer acceptable. Injection into deep unsaturated zones of radioactive exhaust gases and water vapor associated with the testing of nuclear rocket engines is being considered as a way of sequestering radionuclides from the environment. Numerical simulations were conducted to determine the ability of an unsaturated zone with the hydraulic properties of Frenchman Flat alluvium at the Nevada Test Site to contain gas-phase radionuclides. Gas and water vapor were injected for two hours at rates of 14.5 kg s-1 and 15 kg s-1, respectively, in an interval between 100 and 430 m below the land surface into alluvium with an intrinsic permeability of 10-11 m2 and porosity of 0.35. The results show that during a test of an engine, radionuclides with at least greater than 10-year half-lives may reach the land surface within several years after injection. Radionuclide transport is primarily controlled by the upward pressure gradient from the point of injection to the lower (atmospheric) pressure boundary condition at the land surface. Radionuclides with half-lives on the order of days should undergo enough decay prior to reaching the land surface. A cooling water vapor injected into the unsaturated zone simultaneously with the exhaust gas will condense within several meters of the injection point and drain downward toward the water table. However, the nearly horizontal hydraulic groundwater gradient present in several of the basins at NTS should limit lateral migration of radionuclides away from the vicinity of injection.

  6. Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2010-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASA’s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564

  7. Numerical study of nozzle wall cooling for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Suk C.; Stubbs, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfields and performance of nuclear thermal rockets, which utilize radiation and film-cooling to cool the nozzle extension, are studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and species equations. The thrust level of the rocket for the present study is about 75,000 lb(f) for a chamber pressure of 68 atm(l,000 psi) and a chamber temperature of 2700 K. The throat radius of the nozzle is 0.0936 m and the area ratios of the nozzles are 300 and 500. It is assumed that the flow is chemically frozen and the turbulence is simulated by the modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The calculated results for various area ratios and film mass-flow rates are presented as Mach number contours, variations of nozzle wall temperature, exit profiles, and vacuum specific impulses. The present study shows that by selecting the flow rate of the film-cooling hydrogen and area ratio of the nozzle correctly, high area ratio nozzle extensions can be cooled effectively with radiation and film-cooling without significant penalty in performance.

  8. Erratum: A Relationship between Nuclear Black Hole Mass and Galaxy Velocity Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Karl; Bender, Ralf; Bower, Gary; Dressler, Alan; Faber, S. M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Green, Richard; Grillmair, Carl; Ho, Luis C.; Kormendy, John; Lauer, Tod R.; Magorrian, John; Pinkney, Jason; Richstone, Douglas; Tremaine, Scott

    2001-07-01

    In the Letter ``A Relationship between Nuclear Black Hole Mass and Galaxy Velocity Dispersion'' by Karl Gebhardt, Ralf Bender, Gary Bower, Alan Dressler, S. M. Faber, Alexei V. Filippenko, Richard Green, Carl Grillmair, Luis C. Ho, John Kormendy, Tod R. Lauer, John Magorrian, Jason Pinkney, Douglas Richstone, and Scott Tremaine (ApJ, 539, L13 [2000]), there is a misprint in the received date. The correct date is 2000 June 20. The Press sincerely regrets this error.

  9. The Story of the Nuclear Rocket: Back to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The United States had a nuclear rocket development program from 1955-1973 called Project Rover/NERVA. Twenty reactor tests demonstrated conclusively the superiority, flexibility and reliability of nuclear rocket engines over their chemical counterparts. This paper surveys the technical accomplishments from that perspective, to help illustrate why many call for the program's reestablishment. Most focus on the large NERVA, but this review will consider the little known Small Nuclear Engine. KIWI-B1B was one of the first tests in which nuclear rockets demonstrated their superiority. It ejected its core as it rose to 1000MW (a megawatt equals 50 pounds of thrust). This seems contradictory, how can a `failure' demonstrate superiority? Precisely in this: the reactor remained controllable going to and from 1000MW, still ejecting its core, but still turning out power. That gave insurance to a mission. A solid or liquid chemical engine suffering similar damage would likely shutdown or blow up. KIWI-TNT and Phoebus-1A had planned and unplanned accidents. That verified the safety of nuclear engines in launch operations. NRX/EST and XE-Prime proved they could startup reliably under their own power in a simulated space environment and change power without loss of specific impulse or control, from 20MW to 1000MW and back. That gave flexibility for mid-course corrections, maneuvering between orbits or breaking into orbit. Pewee and the Nuclear Furnace tested fuels to achieve 10 hours of engine operation with 60 recycles (stops and starts). That meant an engine could perform multiple missions. Work started on fuels promising1000 seconds of specific impulse. That meant increased power and payload capacity and speed. This contrasts with the 450 seconds of LOX/LH2. The NERVA of 1971 would be 1500MW, with 10/60 capability and 825 seconds of a specific impulse. Later generation NERVAs would be in excess of 1000 seconds, 3000MW and 10/60. The Nixon Administration cancelled it in 1971

  10. An Analysis of Nuclear-Rocket Nozzle Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Bachkin, Daniel; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1960-01-01

    A nuclear-rocket regenerative-cooling analysis was conducted over a range of reactor power of 46 to 1600 megawatts and is summarized herein. Although the propellant (hydrogen) is characterized by a large heat-sink capacity, an analysis of the local heat-flux capability of the coolant at the nozzle throat indicated that, for conventional values of system pressure drop, the cooling capability was inadequate to maintain a selected wall temperature of 1440 R. Several techniques for improving the cooling capability were discussed, for example, high pressure drop, high wall temperature, refractory wall coatings, thin highly conductive walls, and film cooling. In any specific design a combination of methods will probably be utilized to achieve successful cooling.

  11. Particle bed reactor central to SDI nuclear rocket project

    SciTech Connect

    Asker, J.R.

    1991-04-01

    A classified SDI project designated 'Timberwind' and funded with an estimated $7-8 billion over the project's life is charged with the development and flight testing of nuclear reactor-powered rockets. Timberwind's novel 'particle-bed reactor' technology will employ small pellets of reactor fuel to heat a low molecular weight working fluid, such as hydrogen. The fuel pellets would be 0.5 mm in diameter and may be composed of a kernel of fissionable U together with a carbon alloy, coated by layers of carbon and a sealant. A covering of zirconium carbide would prevent chemical degradation of the pellets by the hydrogen working fluid. Performace projection comparisons are conducted for Timberwind, an advanced Atlas-Centaur, and an advanced Titan launch vehicle.

  12. XNR2000---A near term nuclear thermal rocket concept

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C. ); Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J. )

    1993-01-20

    A conceptual nuclear thermal rocket (NTR), the XNR2000, has been developed that is powered by a fast spectrum, cermet fueled reactor core. The baseline XNR2000 system delivers 25000 Ibf of thrust at a specific impulse of 900 seconds. The cermet fueled reactor heats hydrogen propellant to a maximum temperature of 2668K in a two-pass reactor flow configuration. Thermal hydraulic and neutronic analyses were performed to assess the basic design characteristics of the reactor core and engine system. Temperature, flow, and pressure distribution throughout the engine system at full power operating conditions were also determined. The two-pass reactor design and the utilization of cermet fuels allow for a compact and high power density 25000 Ibf thrust system with a thrust to weight ratio of larger than 5.3. This paper summarizes the XNR2000 conceptual design, the supporting thermal hydraulic and neutronic analyses, and the rational that lead to the baseline design.

  13. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  14. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, S. D.; Devolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. We have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  15. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-15

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. We have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  16. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-12-31

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  17. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. )

    1993-01-15

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  18. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweig, Herbert R.; Fischler, Stanley; Wagner, William R.

    1993-01-01

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  19. Nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application to Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, W. J., Jr.; Young, A. C.; Mulqueen, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Options for vehicle configurations are reviewed in which nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is used for a reference mission to Mars. The scenario assumes an opposition-class Mars transfer trajectory, a 435-day mission, and the use of a single nuclear engine with 75,000 lbs of thrust. Engine parameters are examined by calculating mission variables for a range of specific impulses and thrust/weight ratios. The reference mission is found to have optimal values of 925 s for the specific impulse and thrust/weight ratios of 4.0 and 0.06 for the engine and total stage ratios respectively. When the engine thrust/weight ratio is at least 4/1 the most critical engine parameter is engine specific impulse for reducing overall stage weight. In the context of this trans-Mars three-burn maneuver the NTR engine with an expander engine cycle is considered a more effective alternative than chemical/aerobrake and other propulsion options.

  20. Integrated propulsion and power modeling for bimodal nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Joshua

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) engines have been shown to reduce the weight of space vehicles to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by utilizing a common reactor for propulsion and power generation. These savings lead to reduced launch vehicle costs and/or increased mission safety and capability. Experimental work of the Rover/NERVA program demonstrated the feasibility of NTR systems for trajectories to Mars. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated the economic and performance benefits of BNTR operation. Relatively little, however, is known about the reactor-level operation of a BNTR engine. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a numerical BNTR engine model in order to study the feasibility and component-level impact of utilizing a NERVA-derived reactor as a heat source for both propulsion and power. The primary contribution is to provide the first-of-its-kind model and analysis of a NERVA-derived BNTR engine. Numerical component models have been modified and created for the NERVA reactor fuel elements and tie tubes, including 1-D coolant thermodynamics and radial thermal conduction with heat generation. A BNTR engine system model has been created in order to design and analyze an engine employing an expander-cycle nuclear rocket and Brayton cycle power generator using the same reactor. Design point results show that a 316 MWt reactor produces a thrust and specific impulse of 66.6 kN and 917 s, respectively. The same reactor can be run at 73.8 kWt to produce the necessary 16.7 kW electric power with a Brayton cycle generator. This demonstrates the feasibility of BNTR operation with a NERVA-derived reactor but also indicates that the reactor control system must be able to operate with precision across a wide power range, and that the transient analysis of reactor decay heat merits future investigation. Results also identify a significant reactor pressure-drop limitation during propulsion and power-generation operation that is caused by poor tie tube

  1. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  2. Tie Tube Heat Transfer Modeling for Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Joshua A.; Starkey, Ryan P.; Lewis, Mark J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2007-01-30

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket systems have been shown to reduce the weight and cost of space vehicles to Mars and beyond by utilizing the reactor for power generation in the relatively long duration between burns in an interplanetary trajectory. No information, however, is available regarding engine and reactor-level operation of such bimodal systems. The purpose of this project is to generate engine and reactor models with sufficient fidelity and flexibility to accurately study the component-level effects of operating a propulsion-designed reactor at power generation levels. Previous development of a 1-D reactor and tie tube model found that ignoring heat generation inside of the tie tube leads to under-prediction of the temperature change and over-prediction of pressure change across the tie tube. This paper will present the development and results of a tie tube model that has been extended to account for heat generation, specifically in the moderator layer. This model is based on a 1-D distribution of power in the fuel elements and tie tubes, as a precursor to an eventual neutron-driven reactor model.

  3. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH/sub 2/ systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B.

  4. Hydrogen recombination kinetics and nuclear thermal rocket performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, K.K.; Solomon, W.C.

    1994-07-01

    The rate constants for the hydrogen three-body collisional recombination reaction with atomic and molecular hydrogen acting as third bodies have been determined by numerous investigators during the past 30 yr, but these rates exhibit significant scatter. The discrepancies in the rate constants determined by different investigators are as great as two orders of magnitude in the temperature range of interest for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) operation, namely, 2000-3300 K. The impact of this scatter on our ability to predict the specific impulse (I(sub sp)) delivered by a 30-klbf NTR has been determined for chamber pressures and temperatures from, respectively, 20-1000 psia and 2700-3300 K. The variation in I(sub sp) produced by using the different rate constants is as great as 10%, or 100 s. This variation also obscures the influence of chamber pressure on I(sub sp); using fast kinetics, low pressures yield significantly improved performance, while using slow or nominal kinetics, the pressure dependence of I(sub sp) is negligible. Because the flow composition freezes at very small area ratios, optimization of the nozzle contour in the near-throat region maximizes recombination. Vibrational relaxation is found to produce negligible losses in I(sub sp). 36 refs.

  5. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X.

    1997-05-01

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions.

  6. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  7. Performance Capability of Single-Cavity Vortex Gaseous Nuclear Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, Robert G.

    1963-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the maximum powerplant thrust-to-weight ratio possible with a single-cavity vortex gaseous reactor in which all the hydrogen propellant must diffuse through a fuel-rich region. An assumed radial temperature profile was used to represent conduction, convection, and radiation heat-transfer effects. The effect of hydrogen property changes due to dissociation and ionization was taken into account in a hydrodynamic computer program. It is shown that, even for extremely optimistic assumptions of reactor criticality and operating conditions, such a system is limited to reactor thrust-to-weight ratios of about 1.2 x 10(exp -3) for laminar flow. For turbulent flow, the maximum thrust-to-weight ratio is less than 10(exp -3). These low thrusts result from the fact that the hydrogen flow rate is limited by the diffusion process. The performance of a gas-core system with a specific impulse of 3000 seconds and a powerplant thrust-to-weight ratio of 10(exp -2) is shown to be equivalent to that of a 1000-second advanced solid-core system. It is therefore concluded that a single-cavity vortex gaseous reactor in which all the hydrogen must diffuse through the nuclear fuel is a low-thrust device and offers no improvement over a solid-core nuclear-rocket engine. To achieve higher thrust, additional hydrogen flow must be introduced in such a manner that it will by-pass the nuclear fuel. Obviously, such flow must be heated by thermal radiation. An illustrative model of a single-cavity vortex system employing supplementary flow of hydrogen through the core region is briefly examined. Such a system appears capable of thrust-to-weight ratios of approximately 1 to 10. For a high-impulse engine, this capability would be a considerable improvement over solid-core performance. Limits imposed by thermal radiation heat transfer to cavity walls are acknowledged but not evaluated. Alternate vortex concepts that employ many parallel vortices to achieve higher

  8. Ablation study of tungsten-based nuclear thermal rocket fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tabitha Elizabeth Rose

    The research described in this thesis has been performed in order to support the materials research and development efforts of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), of Tungsten-based Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) fuel. The NTR was developed to a point of flight readiness nearly six decades ago and has been undergoing gradual modification and upgrading since then. Due to the simplicity in design of the NTR, and also in the modernization of the materials fabrication processes of nuclear fuel since the 1960's, the fuel of the NTR has been upgraded continuously. Tungsten-based fuel is of great interest to the NTR community, seeking to determine its advantages over the Carbide-based fuel of the previous NTR programs. The materials development and fabrication process contains failure testing, which is currently being conducted at MSFC in the form of heating the material externally and internally to replicate operation within the nuclear reactor of the NTR, such as with hot gas and RF coils. In order to expand on these efforts, experiments and computational studies of Tungsten and a Tungsten Zirconium Oxide sample provided by NASA have been conducted for this dissertation within a plasma arc-jet, meant to induce ablation on the material. Mathematical analysis was also conducted, for purposes of verifying experiments and making predictions. The computational method utilizes Anisimov's kinetic method of plasma ablation, including a thermal conduction parameter from the Chapman Enskog expansion of the Maxwell Boltzmann equations, and has been modified to include a tangential velocity component. Experimental data matches that of the computational data, in which plasma ablation at an angle shows nearly half the ablation of plasma ablation at no angle. Fuel failure analysis of two NASA samples post-testing was conducted, and suggestions have been made for future materials fabrication processes. These studies, including the computational kinetic model at an angle and the

  9. High Performance Ultra-light Nuclear Rockets for NEO (Near Earth Objects) Interaction Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Maise, G.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1996-12-31

    The performance capabilities and technology features of ultra compact nuclear thermal rockets based on very high power density ({approximately} 30 Megawatts per liter) fuel elements are described. Nuclear rockets appear particularly attractive for carrying out missions to investigate or intercept Near Earth Objects (NEOS) that potentially could impact on the Earth. Many of these NEO threats, whether asteroids or comets, have extremely high closing velocities, i.e., tens of kilometers per second relative to the Earth. Nuclear rockets using hydrogen propellant enable flight velocities 2 to 3 times those achievable with chemical rockets, allowing interaction with a potential NEO threat at a much shorter time, and at much greater range. Two versions of an ultra compact nuclear rocket based on very high heat transfer rates are described: the PBR (Particle Bed Reactor), which has undergone substantial hardware development effort, and MITEE (Miniature Reactor Engine) which is a design derivative of the PBR. Nominal performance capabilities for the PBR are: thermal power - 1000 MW thrust - 45,000 lbsf, and weight - 500 kg. For MITEE, nominal capabilities are: thermal power - 100 MW; thrust {approx} 4500 lbsf, and weight - 50 kg. Development of operational PBR/MITEE systems would enable spacecraft launched from LEO (Low Earth Orbit) to investigate intercept NEO`s at a range of {approximately} 100 million kilometers in times of {approximately} 30 days.

  10. An historical perspective of the NERVA nuclear rocket engine technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Finger, H. B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear rocket research and development was initiated in the United States in 1955 and is still being pursued to a limited extent. The major technology emphasis occurred in the decade of the 1960s and was primarily associated with the Rover/NERVA Program where the technology for a nuclear rocket engine system for space application was developed and demonstrated. The NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology developed twenty years ago provides a comprehensive and viable propulsion technology base that can be applied and will prove to be valuable for application to the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). This paper, which is historical in scope, provides an overview of the conduct of the NERVA Engine Program, its organization and management, development philosophy, the engine configuration, and significant accomplishments.

  11. An Historical Perspective of the NERVA Nuclear Rocket Engine Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Finger, H. B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear rocket research and development was initiated in the United States in 1955 and is still being pursued to a limited extent. The major technology emphasis occurred in the decade of the 1960s and was primarily associated with the Rover/NERVA Program where the technology for a nuclear rocket engine system for space application was developed and demonstrated. The NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology developed twenty years ago provides a comprehensive and viable propulsion technology base that can be applied and will prove to be valuable for application to the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). This paper, which is historical in scope, provides an overview of the conduct of the NERVA Engine Program, its organization and management, development philosophy, the engine configuration, and significant accomplishments.

  12. An historical perspective of the NERVA nuclear rocket engine technology program. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, W.H.; Finger, H.B.

    1991-07-01

    Nuclear rocket research and development was initiated in the United States in 1955 and is still being pursued to a limited extent. The major technology emphasis occurred in the decade of the 1960s and was primarily associated with the Rover/NERVA Program where the technology for a nuclear rocket engine system for space application was developed and demonstrated. The NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology developed twenty years ago provides a comprehensive and viable propulsion technology base that can be applied and will prove to be valuable for application to the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). This paper, which is historical in scope, provides an overview of the conduct of the NERVA Engine Program, its organization and management, development philosophy, the engine configuration, and significant accomplishments.

  13. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  14. Initial Operation and Shakedown of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Prototypical fuel elements mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission in addition to being exposed to flowing hydrogen. Recent upgrades to NTREES now allow power levels 24 times greater than those achievable in the previous facility configuration. This higher power operation will allow near prototypical power densities and flows to finally be achieved in most prototypical fuel elements.

  15. "Bimodal" Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) Propulsion for Future Human Mars Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Propulsion program is discussed. The Rover/NERVA program from 1959-1972 is compared with the current program. A key technology description, bimodal vehicle design for Mars Cargo and the crew transfer vehicle with inflatable module and artificial gravity capability, including diagrams are included. The LOX-Augmented NTR concept/operational features and characteristics are discussed.

  16. The open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine - Some engineering considerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyk, L. C.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-MW open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 44,200 lb and a specific impulse of 4400 sec. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel) and the waste heat rejection system were considered conceptually and were sized.

  17. The NASA/DOE/DOD nuclear rocket propulsion project - FY 1991 status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Miller, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has initiated planning and critical technology development for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for Space Exploration Initiative missions to the moon and to Mars. Interagency agreements are being negotiated between NASA, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Defense for joint technology development activities. This paper summarizes the activities of the NASA project planning team in FY 1990 that led to the draft Nuclear Propulsion Project Plan, outlines the FY 1991 Interagency activities, and describes the current status of the project plan.

  18. Calculated concentrations of any radionuclide deposited on the ground by release from underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rockets, and tests of nuclear ramjet engines

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.G.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from three types of event that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex, namely, underground nuclear detonations, tests of nuclear rocket engines and tests of nuclear ramjet engines.

  19. Modeling and Testing of Non-Nuclear, Highpower Simulated Nuclear Thermal Rocket Reactor Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    When the President offered his new vision for space exploration in January of 2004, he said, "Our third goal is to return to the moon by 2020, as the launching point for missions beyond," and, "With the experience and knowledge gained on the moon, we will then be ready to take the next steps of space exploration: human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond." A human mission to Mars implies the need to move large payloads as rapidly as possible, in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, with the scientific advancements possible with Project Prometheus and its Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), (these use electric propulsion), there is a renewed interest in deep space exploration propulsion systems. According to many mission analyses, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), with its relatively high thrust and high specific impulse, is a serious candidate for such missions. Nuclear rockets utilize fission energy to heat a reactor core to very high temperatures. Hydrogen gas flowing through the core then becomes superheated and exits the engine at very high exhaust velocities. The combination of temperature and low molecular weight results in an engine with specific impulses above 900 seconds. This is almost twice the performance of the LOX/LH2 space shuttle engines, and the impact of this performance would be to reduce the trip time of a manned Mars mission from the 2.5 years, possible with chemical engines, to about 12-14 months.

  20. Thermal hydraulic design analysis of ternary carbide fueled square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Eric M.; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-22

    A computational analysis is conducted to determine the optimum thermal-hydraulic design parameters for a square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine core that will incorporate ternary carbide based uranium fuels. Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of processing solid solution, ternary carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, (U, Zr, Ta)C, (U, Zr, Hf)C and (U, Zr, W)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. A parametric analysis is conducted to examine how core geometry, fuel thickness and the propellant flow area effect the thermal performance of the nuclear rocket engine. The principal variables include core size (length and diameter) and fuel element dimensions. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. A nuclear rocket engine simulation code is developed and used to examine the system performance as well as the performance of the main reactor core components. The system simulation code was originally developed for analysis of NERVA-Derivative and Pratt and Whitney XNR-2000 nuclear thermal rockets. The code is modified and adopted to the square-lattice geometry of the new fuel design. Thrust levels ranging from 44,500 to 222,400 N (10,000 to 50,000 lbf) are considered. The average hydrogen exit temperature is kept at 2800 K, which is well below the melting point of these fuels. For a nozzle area ratio of 300 and a thrust chamber pressure of 4.8 Mpa (700 psi), the specific impulse is 930 s. Hydrogen temperature and pressure distributions in the core and the fuel maximum temperatures are calculated.

  1. How useful is neutron diffusion theory for nuclear rocket engine design

    SciTech Connect

    Hilsmeier, T.A.; Aithal, S.M.; Aldemir, T. )

    1992-01-01

    Correct modeling of neutron leakage and geometry effects is important in the design of a nuclear rocket engine because of the need for small reactor cores in space applications. In principle, there are generalized procedures that can account for these effects in a reliable manner (e.g., a three-dimensional, continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculation with all core components explicitly modeled). However, these generalized procedures are not usually suitable for parametric design studies because of the long computational times required, and the feasibility of using faster running, more approrimate neutronic modeling approaches needs to be investigated. Faster running neutronic models are also needed for simulator development to assess the engine performance during startup and power level changes. This paper investigates the potential of the few-group diffusion approach for nuclear rocket engine core design and optimization by comparing the k[sub eff] and power distributions obtained by the MCNP code against those obtained from the LEOPARD and 2DB codes for the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept described. The PBRs have been identified as one of the two near-term options for nuclear thermal propulsion by the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/US Department of Energy/US Department of Defense program that was recently set up at the NASA Lewis Research Center to develop a flight-rated nuclear rocket engine by the 2020s.

  2. Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy: The Fusion Driven Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony; Kirtley, David; Pihl, Christopher; Pfaff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The future of manned space exploration and development of space depends critically on the creation of a dramatically more proficient propulsion architecture for in-space transportation. A very persuasive reason for investigating the applicability of nuclear power in rockets is the vast energy density gain of nuclear fuel when compared to chemical combustion energy. Current nuclear fusion efforts have focused on the generation of electric grid power and are wholly inappropriate for space transportation as the application of a reactor based fusion-electric system creates a colossal mass and heat rejection problem for space application.

  3. Dynamic analysis of an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, G. E.; Kieffer, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Reactivity and flow disturbances were used to investigate the transient response of a conceptual open cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine. The disturbances were made with the system initially operating at its steady state design point. Results of the study show that the feedbacks associated with the propellant density and propellant temperature have a dominant effect on the response of the system. Furthermore, there appears to be a rather limited range of values of these propellant feedback coefficients for which the gas core nuclear rocket has a stable response. The system was rather insensitive to a fuel flow rate disturbance, whereas a similar disturbance in the propellant flow rate caused large changes in reactor power. For a similar disturbance in the propellant flow rate caused large changes in reactor power. For most reactivity and flow rate disturbances, the response showed oscillations of various intensity.

  4. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  5. Nuclear thermal rocket clustering: 1, A summary of previous work and relevant issues

    SciTech Connect

    Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G.

    1991-07-14

    A general review of the technical merits of nuclear thermal rocket clustering is presented. A summary of previous analyses performed during the Rover program is presented and used to assess clustering in the context of projected Space Exploration Initiative missions. A number of technical issues are discussed including cluster reliability, engine-out operation, neutronic coupling, shutdown core power generation, shutdown reactivity requirements, reactor kinetics, and radiation shielding. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. A fusion-driven gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, T.; Godfroy, T.

    1998-01-15

    A magnetic confinement scheme is investigated as a potential propulsion device in which thrust is generated by a propellant heated by radiation emanating from a fusion plasma. The device in question is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) machine in which a hot dense plasma is confined long enough to generate fusion energy while allowing a certain fraction of its charged particle population to go through one end to a direct converter. The energy of these particles is converted into electric power which is recirculated to sustain the steady state operation of the system. The injected power heats the plasma to thermonuclear temperatures where the resulting fusion energy appears a charged particle power, neutron power, and radiated power in the form of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation. The neutron power can be converted through a thermal converter to electric power that can be combined with the direct converter power before being fed into the injector. The radiated power, on the other hand, can be used to heat a hydrogen propellant introduced into the system at a specified pressure and mass flow rate. This propellant can be pre-heated by regeneratively cooling the (mirror) nozzle or other components of the system if feasible, or by an electrothermal unit powered by portions of the recirculated power. Using a simple heat transfer model that ignores the heat flux to the wall, and assuming total absorption of radiation energy by the propellant it is shown that such a gas core rocket is capable of producing tens of kilonewtons of thrust and several thousands of seconds of specific impulse. It is also shown that the familiar Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which arises from the relative motion of the neutral hydrogen to the ionized fuel is not likely to occur in this system due to the presence of the confining magnetic field.

  7. A fusion-driven gas core nuclear rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, T.; Godfroy, T.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetic confinement scheme is investigated as a potential propulsion device in which thrust is generated by a propellant heated by radiation emanating from a fusion plasma. The device in question is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) machine in which a hot dense plasma is confined long enough to generate fusion energy while allowing a certain fraction of its charged particle population to go through one end to a direct converter. The energy of these particles is converted into electric power which is recirculated to sustain the steady state operation of the system. The injected power heats the plasma to thermonuclear temperatures where the resulting fusion energy appears a charged particle power, neutron power, and radiated power in the form of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation. The neutron power can be converted through a thermal converter to electric power that can be combined with the direct converter power before being fed into the injector. The radiated power, on the other hand, can be used to heat a hydrogen propellant introduced into the system at a specified pressure and mass flow rate. This propellant can be pre-heated by regeneratively cooling the (mirror) nozzle or other components of the system if feasible, or by an electrothermal unit powered by portions of the recirculated power. Using a simple heat transfer model that ignores the heat flux to the wall, and assuming total absorption of radiation energy by the propellant it is shown that such a gas core rocket is capable of producing tens of kilonewtons of thrust and several thousands of seconds of specific impulse. It is also shown that the familiar Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which arises from the relative motion of the neutral hydrogen to the ionized fuel is not likely to occur in this system due to the presence of the confining magnetic field.

  8. The nuclear thermal electric rocket: a proposed innovative propulsion concept for manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujarric, C.; Santovincenzo, A.; Summerer, L.

    2013-03-01

    Conventional propulsion technology (chemical and electric) currently limits the possibilities for human space exploration to the neighborhood of the Earth. If farther destinations (such as Mars) are to be reached with humans on board, a more capable interplanetary transfer engine featuring high thrust, high specific impulse is required. The source of energy which could in principle best meet these engine requirements is nuclear thermal. However, the nuclear thermal rocket technology is not yet ready for flight application. The development of new materials which is necessary for the nuclear core will require further testing on ground of full-scale nuclear rocket engines. Such testing is a powerful inhibitor to the nuclear rocket development, as the risks of nuclear contamination of the environment cannot be entirely avoided with current concepts. Alongside already further matured activities in the field of space nuclear power sources for generating on-board power, a low level investigation on nuclear propulsion has been running since long within ESA, and innovative concepts have already been proposed at an IAF conference in 1999 [1, 2]. Following a slow maturation process, a new concept was defined which was submitted to a concurrent design exercise in ESTEC in 2007. Great care was taken in the selection of the design parameters to ensure that this quite innovative concept would in all respects likely be feasible with margins. However, a thorough feasibility demonstration will require a more detailed design including the selection of appropriate materials and the verification that these can withstand the expected mechanical, thermal, and chemical environment. So far, the predefinition work made clear that, based on conservative technology assumptions, a specific impulse of 920 s could be obtained with a thrust of 110 kN. Despite the heavy engine dry mass, a preliminary mission analysis using conservative assumptions showed that the concept was reducing the required

  9. Orbital transfer of large space structures with nuclear electric rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential application of electric propulsion for orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure from low earth orbit to geosynchronous altitude in a deployed configuration. The electric power was provided by the spacecraft nuclear reactor space power system on a shared basis during transfer operations. Factors considered with respect to system effectiveness included nuclear power source sizing, electric propulsion thruster concept, spacecraft deployment constraints, and orbital operations and safety. It is shown that the favorable total impulse capability inherent in electric propulsion provides a potential economic advantage over chemical propulsion orbit transfer vehicles by reducing the number of Space Shuttle flights in ground-to-orbit transportation requirements.

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  11. Nuclear Thermal Rocket - Arc Jet Integrated System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian D.; Emrich, William

    2016-01-01

    In the post-shuttle era, space exploration is moving into a new regime. Commercial space flight is in development and is planned to take on much of the low earth orbit space flight missions. With the development of a heavy lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch, System, NASA has become focused on deep space exploration. Exploration into deep space has traditionally been done with robotic probes. More ambitious missions such as manned missions to asteroids and Mars will require significant technology development. Propulsion system performance is tied to the achievability of these missions and the requirements of other developing technologies that will be required. Nuclear thermal propulsion offers a significant improvement over chemical propulsion while still achieving high levels of thrust. Opportunities exist; however, to build upon what would be considered a standard nuclear thermal engine to attain improved performance, thus further enabling deep space missions. This paper discuss the modeling of a nuclear thermal system integrated with an arc jet to further augment performance. The performance predictions and systems impacts are discussed.

  12. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  13. Design Considerations for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill; Kirk, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today s best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Currently, such a simulator is nearing completion at the Marshall Space Flight Center, and will shortly be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of he1 element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator or NTREES and some of the design considerations which were considered prior to and during its construction.

  14. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (Ntr) Propulsion: A Proven Game-Changing Technology for Future Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The NTR represents the next evolutionary step in high performance rocket propulsion. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (Isp) of approx.900 seconds (s) or more V twice that of today s best chemical rockets. The technology is also proven. During the previous Rover and NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications) nuclear rocket programs, 20 rocket reactors were designed, built and ground tested. These tests demonstrated: (1) a wide range of thrust; (2) high temperature carbide-based nuclear fuel; (3) sustained engine operation; (4) accumulated lifetime; and (5) restart capability V all the requirements needed for a human mission to Mars. Ceramic metal cermet fuel was also pursued, as a backup option. The NTR also has significant growth and evolution potential. Configured as a bimodal system, it can generate electrical power for the spacecraft. Adding an oxygen afterburner nozzle introduces a variable thrust and Isp capability and allows bipropellant operation. In NASA s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the NTR was selected as the preferred propulsion option because of its proven technology, higher performance, lower launch mass, simple assembly and mission operations. In contrast to other advanced propulsion options, NTP requires no large technology scale-ups. In fact, the smallest engine tested during the Rover program V the 25,000 lbf (25 klbf) Pewee engine is sufficient for human Mars missions when used in a clustered engine arrangement. The Copernicus crewed spacecraft design developed in DRA 5.0 has significant capability and a human exploration strategy is outlined here that uses Copernicus and its key components for precursor near Earth asteroid (NEA) and Mars orbital missions prior to a Mars landing mission. Initially, the basic Copernicus vehicle can enable reusable 1-year round trip human missions to candidate NEAs like 1991 JW and Apophis in the late 2020 s to check out vehicle systems. Afterwards, the

  15. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-09-16

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D&D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D&D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C.

  16. Arc-Heater Facility for Hot Hydrogen Exposure of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Wang,Ten-See; Hickman, Robert; Panda, Binayak; Dobson, Chris; Osborne, Robin; Clifton, Scooter

    2006-01-01

    A hyper-thermal environment simulator is described for hot hydrogen exposure of nuclear thermal rocket material specimens and component development. This newly established testing capability uses a high-power, multi-gas, segmented arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of practical reactor core environments and is intended to serve. as a low cost test facility for the purpose of investigating and characterizing candidate fueUstructura1 materials and improving associated processing/fabrication techniques. Design and development efforts are thoroughly summarized, including thermal hydraulics analysis and simulation results, and facility operating characteristics are reported, as determined from a series of baseline performance mapping tests.

  17. The Rationale/Benefits of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion for NASA's Lunar Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-01-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  18. Analysis of plume backflow around a nozzle lip in a nuclear rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chan H.; Kim, Suk C.; Stubbs, Robert M.; de Witt, Kenneth J.

    1993-06-01

    The structure of the flow around a nuclear thermal rocket nozzle lip has been investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Special attention has been paid to the behavior of a small amount of harmful particles that may be present in the rocket exhaust gas. The harmful fission product particles are modeled by four inert gases whose molecular weights are in a range of 4 131. Atomic hydrogen, which exists in the flow due to the extremely high nuclear fuel temperature in the reactor, is also included. It is shown that the plume backflow is primarily determined by the thin subsonic fluid layer adjacent to the surface of the nozzle lip, and that the inflow boundary in the plume region has negligible effect on the backflow. It is also shown that a relatively large amount of the lighter species is scattered into the backflow region while the amount of the heavier species becomes negligible in this region due to extreme separation between the species. Results indicate that the backscattered molecules are very energetic and are fast-moving along the surface in the backflow region near the nozzle lip.

  19. Zero Boil-Off System Design and Thermal Analysis of the Bimodal Thermal Nuclear Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.

    2006-01-20

    Mars exploration studies at NASA are evaluating vehicles that incorporate Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion which use a high temperature nuclear fission reactor and hydrogen to produce thermal propulsion. The hydrogen propellant is to be stored in liquid state for periods up to 18 months. To prevent boil-off of the liquid hydrogen, a system of passive and active components are needed to prevent heat from entering the tanks and to remove any heat that does. This report describes the design of the system components used for the BNTR Crew Transfer Vehicle and the thermal analysis performed. The results show that Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) can be achieved with the electrical power allocated for the ZBO system.

  20. A Programmatic and Engineering Approach to the Development of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordelon, Wayne J., Jr.; Ballard, Rick O.; Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    With the announcement of the Vision for Space Exploration on January 14, 2004, there has been a renewed interest in nuclear thermal propulsion. Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions; however, the cost to develop a nuclear thermal rocket engine system is uncertain. Key to determining the engine development cost will be the engine requirements, the technology used in the development and the development approach. The engine requirements and technology selection have not been defined and are awaiting definition of the Mars architecture and vehicle definitions. The paper discusses an engine development approach in light of top-level strategic questions and considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion and provides a suggested approach based on work conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to support planning and requirements for the Prometheus Power and Propulsion Office. This work is intended to help support the development of a comprehensive strategy for nuclear thermal propulsion, to help reduce the uncertainty in the development cost estimate, and to help assess the potential value of and need for nuclear thermal propulsion for a human Mars mission.

  1. Design analysis and risk assessment for a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labib, Satira I.

    Recent advances in high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This thesis describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1-15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 700 seconds. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. At the same power level, the 40 cm reactor results in the lowest radiation dose rate of the three reactors. Radiation dose rates decrease to background levels ~3.5 km from the launch site. After a one-year decay time, all of the activated materials produced by an NTR launch would be classified as Class A low-level waste. The activation of air produces significant amounts of argon-41 and nitrogen-16 within 100 m of the launch. The derived air concentration, DAC, from the activation products decays to less than unity within two days, with only argon-41 remaining. After 10 minutes of full power operation the 120 cm core corresponding to a 15 MT payload contains 2.5 x 1013, 1.4 x 1012, 1.5 x 1012, and 7.8 x 10 7 Bq of 131I, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 239Pu respectively. The decay heat after shutdown increases with increasing reactor power with a maximum decay heat of 108 kW immediately after shutdown for the 15 MT payload.

  2. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  3. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  4. KINETIC -- a system code for analyzing Nuclear Thermal Propulsion rocket engine transients

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Lazareth, O.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-07-01

    A system code suitable for analyzing Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket engines is described in this paper. The code consists of a point reactor model and nodes to describe the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanism. Feedback from the fuel coolant, moderator and reflector are allowed for, and the control of the reactor is by motion of control elements (drums or rods). The worth of the control clement and feedback coefficients are predetermined. Separate models for the turbo-pump assembly (TPA) and nozzle are also included. The model to be described in this paper is specific for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). An illustrative problem is solved. This problem consists of a PBR operating in a blowdown mode.

  5. Kinetic---a system code for analyzing nuclear thermal propulsion rocket engine transients

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Lazareth, O.; Ludewig, H. )

    1993-01-20

    A system code suitable for analyzing Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket engines is described in this paper. The code consists of a point reactor model and nodes to describe the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanism. Feedback from the fuel, coolant, moderator and reflector are allowed for, and the control of the reactor is by motion of controls element (drums or rods). The worth of the control element and feedback coefficients are predetermined. Separate models for the turbo-pump assembly (TPA) and nozzle are also included. The model to be described in this paper is specific for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). An illustrative problem is solved. This problem consists of a PBR operating in a blowdown mode.

  6. Bleed cycle propellant pumping in a gas-core nuclear rocket engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.; Easley, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of ideal and real staged primary propellant pumps and bleed-powered turbines was calculated for gas-core nuclear rocket engines over a range of operating pressures from 500 to 5000 atm. This study showed that for a required engine operating pressure of 1000 atm the pump work was about 0.8 hp/(lb/sec), the specific impulse penalty resulting from the turbine propellant bleed flow as about 10 percent; and the heat required to preheat the propellant was about 7.8 MN/(lb/sec). For a specific impulse above 2400 sec, there is an excess of energy available in the moderator due to the gamma and neutron heating that occurs there. Possible alternative pumping cycles are the Rankine or Brayton cycles.

  7. Decay heat removal from a Particle Bed Reactor Nuclear Thermal Rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, E.

    1993-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets used in propulsion systems for planetary exploration will generate significant amounts of heat following normal engine shutdown due to the buildup of and decay of radioactive fission products. The amount of energy that is generated as decay heat is approximately 2-5 percent of the energy released during nominal operation. Various schemes are possible for removing this heat, including using primary coolant (hydrogen) to cool the reactor. Depending on the amount of coolant required, this may result in a large weight penalty for the mission. This paper quantifies the amount of decay heat that must be removed from the engine, shows the resulting impact on the vehicle design for particular missions, and examines possible approaches for reducing the amount of coolant required for decay heat removal. The costs and benefits of these schemes will be shown for several different missions. The missions that will be considered include both manned Mars missions and unmanned planetary exploration missions. 6 refs.

  8. Fuel/propellant mixing in an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xu; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Three different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-ɛ model, RNG k-V model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained.

  9. Mars Sample Return and Flight Test of a Small Bimodal Nuclear Rocket and ISRU Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.; Wolinsky, Jason J.; Bilyeu, Michael B.; Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    A combined Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) flight test and Mars Sample Return mission (MSR) is explored as a means of "jump-starting" NTR development. Development of a small-scale engine with relevant fuel and performance could more affordably and quickly "pathfind" the way to larger scale engines. A flight test with subsequent inflight postirradiation evaluation may also be more affordable and expedient compared to ground testing and associated facilities and approvals. Mission trades and a reference scenario based upon a single expendable launch vehicle (ELV) are discussed. A novel "single stack" spacecraft/lander/ascent vehicle concept is described configured around a "top-mounted" downward firing NTR, reusable common tank, and "bottom-mount" bus, payload and landing gear. Requirements for a hypothetical NTR engine are described that would be capable of direct thermal propulsion with either hydrogen or methane propellant, and modest electrical power generation during cruise and Mars surface insitu resource utilization (ISRU) propellant production.

  10. Fuel/propellant mixing in an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Three different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-{var_epsilon} model, RNG k-{var_epsilon} model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. A unique nuclear thermal rocket engine using a particle bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Donald W.; Dahl, Wayne B.; McIlwain, Melvin C.

    1992-01-01

    Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) studied 75-klb thrust Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines (NTRE) with particle bed reactors (PBR) for application to NASA's manned Mars mission and prepared a conceptual design description of a unique engine that best satisfied mission-defined propulsion requirements and customer criteria. This paper describes the selection of a sprint-type Mars transfer mission and its impact on propulsion system design and operation. It shows how our NTRE concept was developed from this information. The resulting, unusual engine design is short, lightweight, and capable of high specific impulse operation, all factors that decrease Earth to orbit launch costs. Many unusual features of the NTRE are discussed, including nozzle area ratio variation and nozzle closure for closed loop after cooling. Mission performance calculations reveal that other well known engine options do not support this mission.

  12. Instabilities in uranium plasma and the gas-core nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of unstable sound waves in a uranium plasma has been calculated using a multiple time-scale asymptotic expansion scheme. The fluid equations used include the fission power density, radiation diffusion, and the effects of the changing degree of ionization of the uranium atoms. The nonlinear growth of unstable waves is shown to be limited by mode coupling to shorter wavelength waves which are damped by radiation diffusion. This mechanism limits the wave pressure fluctuations to values of order delta P/P approximates 0.00001 in the plasma of a typical gas-core nuclear rocket engine. The instability is thus not expected to present a control problem for this engine.

  13. Reactor moderator, pressure vessel, and heat rejection system of an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyke, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-megawatt open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 196,600 newtons (44,200 lb) and a specific impulse of 4400 seconds. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel, and waste heat rejection system) were considered conceptually and were sized.

  14. Design, qualification and operation of nuclear rockets for safe Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buden, D.; Madsen, W. W.; Olson, T. S.; Redd, L. R.

    Nuclear thermal propulsion modules planned for use on crew missions to Mars improve mission reliability and overall safety of the mission. This is greatly enhanced if the system specifications take into account safety from initiation of the design. For instance, the use of multiple engines in the propulsion module can lead to very high system safety and reliability. Operational safety enhancements may include the following: the use of multiple perigee burns, thus allowing time to ensure that all systems are functioning properly prior to departure from Earth orbit; the ability to perform all other parts of the mission in a degraded mode with little or no degradation of the mission; and the safe disposal of the nuclear propulsion module in a heliocentric orbit out of the ecliptic plane. The standards used to qualify nuclear rockets are one of the main cost drivers of the program. Concepts and systems that minimize cost and risk will rely on use of the element and component levels to demonstrate technology readiness and validation. Subsystem or systems testing then is only needed for verification of performance. Also, these will be the safest concepts because they will be more thoroughly understood, and the safety margins will be well established and confirmed by tests.

  15. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  16. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/Vehicle Design Options for Future NASA Missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; Mcguire, Melissa L.; Beke, Erik G.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides a unique propulsion capability to planners/designers of future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to its high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight ratio (approximately 3-10), the NTR can also be configured as a 'dual mode' system capable of generating electrical power for spacecraft environmental systems, communications, and enhanced stage operations (e.g., refrigeration for long-term liquid hydrogen storage). At present the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) is examining a variety of mission applications for the NTR ranging from an expendable, single-burn, trans-lunar injection (TLI) stage for NASA's First Lunar Outpost (FLO) mission to all propulsive, multiburn, NTR-powered spacecraft supporting a 'split cargo-piloted sprint' Mars mission architecture. Each application results in a particular set of requirements in areas such as the number of engines and their respective thrust levels, restart capability, fuel operating temperature and lifetime, cryofluid storage, and stage size. Two solid core NTR concepts are examined -- one based on NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor (NDR) technology, and a second concept which utilizes a ternary carbide 'twisted ribbon' fuel form developed by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The NDR and CIS concepts have an established technology database involving significant nuclear testing at or near representative operating conditions. Integrated systems and mission studies indicate that clusters of two to four 15 to 25 klbf NDR or CIS engines are sufficient for most of the lunar and Mars mission scenarios currently under consideration. This paper provides descriptions and performance characteristics for the NDR and CIS concepts, summarizes NASA's First Lunar Outpost and Mars mission scenarios, and describes characteristics for representative cargo and piloted vehicles compatible with a

  17. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/vehicle design options for future NASA missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Beke, Erik G.

    1995-09-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides a unique propulsion capability to planners/designers of future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to its high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight ratio (approximately 3-10), the NTR can also be configured as a 'dual mode' system capable of generating electrical power for spacecraft environmental systems, communications, and enhanced stage operations (e.g., refrigeration for long-term liquid hydrogen storage). At present the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) is examining a variety of mission applications for the NTR ranging from an expendable, single-burn, trans-lunar injection (TLI) stage for NASA's First Lunar Outpost (FLO) mission to all propulsive, multiburn, NTR-powered spacecraft supporting a 'split cargo-piloted sprint' Mars mission architecture. Each application results in a particular set of requirements in areas such as the number of engines and their respective thrust levels, restart capability, fuel operating temperature and lifetime, cryofluid storage, and stage size. Two solid core NTR concepts are examined -- one based on NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor (NDR) technology, and a second concept which utilizes a ternary carbide 'twisted ribbon' fuel form developed by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The NDR and CIS concepts have an established technology database involving significant nuclear testing at or near representative operating conditions. Integrated systems and mission studies indicate that clusters of two to four 15 to 25 klbf NDR or CIS engines are sufficient for most of the lunar and Mars mission scenarios currently under consideration. This paper provides descriptions and performance characteristics for the NDR and CIS concepts, summarizes NASA's First Lunar Outpost and Mars mission scenarios, and describes characteristics for representative cargo and piloted vehicles compatible with a

  18. Gas core nuclear thermal rocket engine research and development in the former USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Koehlinger, M.W.; Bennett, R.G.; Motloch, C.G.; Gurfink, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    Beginning in 1957 and continuing into the mid 1970s, the USSR conducted an extensive investigation into the use of both solid and gas core nuclear thermal rocket engines for space missions. During this time the scientific and engineering. problems associated with the development of a solid core engine were resolved. At the same time research was undertaken on a gas core engine, and some of the basic engineering problems associated with the concept were investigated. At the conclusion of the program, the basic principles of the solid core concept were established. However, a prototype solid core engine was not built because no established mission required such an engine. For the gas core concept, some of the basic physical processes involved were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, no simple method of conducting proof-of-principle tests in a neutron flux was devised. This report focuses primarily on the development of the. gas core concept in the former USSR. A variety of gas core engine system parameters and designs are presented, along with a summary discussion of the basic physical principles and limitations involved in their design. The parallel development of the solid core concept is briefly described to provide an overall perspective of the magnitude of the nuclear thermal propulsion program and a technical comparison with the gas core concept.

  19. A comparison of nuclear thermal rocket development cost and schedule for piloted missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Miller, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 1992, NASA led a team, including DOE, universities, and industry, that evaluated various schedule and cost scenarios for development of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion systems for piloted Mars exploration. This paper summarizes the results of two of these studies: (1) a so-called 'Fast Track' approach, that would result in technology readiness level 6 (TRL-6-system ground testing complete) by the year 2000, and (2) a slower program that results in TRL-6 by 2006. Both scenarios included a concurrent engineering approach. Costs and schedules for the two scenarios are compared. In addition to the six-year schedule delay, the TRL-6 in 2006 scenario is estimated to increase the cost of the program from $4.7 billion to $5.8 billion (in real-year dollars). On the positive side, the technical program should be better, since nuclear testing of fuel elements may be possible prior to concept down-select, resulting in a more informed decision.

  20. A preliminary stage configuration for a low pressure nuclear thermal rocket (LPNTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Leyse, C.F.; Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.; Ramsthaler, J.H.; Schnitzler, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    A low pressure nuclear thermal rocket (LPNTR) is configured to meet the requirements of a nuclear stage for manned Mars exploration. Safety, reliability and performance are given equal consideration in selecting the stage configuration. Preliminary trade studies are conducted to size the engine thrust and determine the thrust chamber pressure. A weight breakdown and mechanical configuration for the selected LPNTR concept are defined. A seven engine stage configuration is selected which gives a two engine out capability and eliminates the need for engine gimbaling. The stage can be ground assembled and launched as a unit including tankage for trans Earth injection and Earth orbital capture. The tankage is configured to eliminate the need for an inert shield. The small engine will be cheaper to develop than a single engine providing full thrust, and will be compatible with stages for Earth orbital, Lunar and deep space missions. Mission analyses are presented with engine operation in a high thrust mode and in a dual range high thrust-low thrust mode. Mass savings over a reference NERVA stage are projected to be 45--55% for the high thrust operating mode and 50--60% for the dual range mode. Potential exists for further increases in performance by optimizing the thrust chamber/nozzle design. 6 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-20

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data.

  2. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code.

  3. Near Earth Asteroid Human Mission Possibilities Using Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The NTR is a proven technology that generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (Isp (is) approximately 900 s) twice that of today's best chemical rockets. During the Rover and NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications) programs, twenty rocket reactors were designed, built and ground tested. These tests demonstrated: (1) a wide range of thrust; (2) high temperature carbide-based nuclear fuel; (3) sustained engine operation; (4) accumulated lifetime; and (5) restart capability - all the requirements needed for a human mission to Mars. Ceramic metal fuel was also evaluated as a backup option. In NASA's recent Mars Design reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the NTR was selected as the preferred propulsion option because of its proven technology, higher performance, lower launch mass, versatile vehicle design, simple assembly, and growth potential. In contrast to other advanced propulsion options, NTP requires no large technology scale-ups. In fact, the smallest engine tested during the Rover program - the 25 klbf 'Pewee' engine is sufficient for a human Mars mission when used in a clustered engine configuration. The 'Copernicus crewed NTR Mars transfer vehicle design developed for DRA 5.0 has significant capability that can enable reusable '1-year' round trip human missions to candidate near Earth asteroids (NEAs) like 1991 JW in 2027, or 2000 SG344 and Apophis in 2028. A robotic precursor mission to 2000 SG344 in late 2023 could provide an attractive Flight Technology Demonstration of a small NTR engine that is scalable to the 25 klbf-class engine used for human missions 5 years later. In addition to the detailed scientific data gathered from on-site inspection, human NEA missions would also provide a valuable 'check out' function for key elements of the NTR transfer vehicle (its propulsion module, TransHab and life support systems, etc.) in a 'deep space' environment prior to undertaking the longer duration Mars orbital and landing missions that

  4. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket for a manned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Steven D.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission was investigted. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the Earth-orbit assemble mass compared to LOX/LH2 systems. The mass savings were 36 and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7 billion will easily pay for the NTR. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5 billion. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4 billion.

  5. Structural Analyses of the Support Trusses for the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines and Drop Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2006-01-01

    Finite element structural analyses were performed on the support trusses of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engines and drop tanks to verify that the proper amount of mass was allocated for these components in the vehicle sizing model. The verification included a static stress analysis, a modal analysis, and a buckling analysis using the MSC/NASTRAN™ structural analysis software package. In addition, a crippling stress analysis was performed on the truss beams using a handbook equation. Two truss configurations were examined as possible candidates for the drop tanks truss while a baseline was examined for the engine support thrust structure. For the drop tanks trusses, results showed that both truss configurations produced similar results although one performed slightly better in buckling. In addition, it was shown that the mass allocated in the vehicle sizing model was adequate although the engine thrust structure may need to be modified slightly to increase its lateral natural frequency above the minimum requirement of 8 Hz that is specified in the Delta IV Payload Planners Guide.

  6. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Propulsion and Power Systems for Outer Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, S. K.; Cataldo, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The high specific impulse (I sp) and engine thrust generated using liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) propulsion makes them attractive for upper stage applications for difficult robotic science missions to the outer planets. Besides high (I sp) and thrust, NTR engines can also be designed for "bimodal" operation allowing substantial amounts of electrical power (10's of kWe ) to be generated for onboard spacecraft systems and high data rate communications with Earth during the course of the mission. Two possible options for using the NTR are examined here. A high performance injection stage utilizing a single 15 klbf thrust engine can inject large payloads to the outer planets using a 20 t-class launch vehicle when operated in an "expendable mode". A smaller bimodal NTR stage generating approx. 1 klbf of thrust and 20 to 40 kWe for electric propulsion can deliver approx. 100 kg using lower cost launch vehicles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.C.; Mulqueen, J.A.; Nishimuta, E.L.; Emrich, W.J. )

    1993-01-10

    President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design.

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Propulsion and Power Systems for Outer Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, S. K.; Cataldo, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The high specific impulse (I (sub sp)) and engine thrust generated using liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) propulsion makes them attractive for upper stage applications for difficult robotic science missions to the outer planets. Besides high (I (sub sp)) and thrust, NTR engines can also be designed for "bimodal" operation allowing substantial amounts of electrical power (10's of kWe ) to be generated for onboard spacecraft systems and high data rate communications with Earth during the course of the mission. Two possible options for using the NTR are examined here. A high performance injection stage utilizing a single 15 klbf thrust engine can inject large payloads to the outer planets using a 20 t-class launch vehicle when operated in an "expendable mode". A smaller bimodal NTR stage generating approx. 1 klbf of thrust and 20 to 40 kWe for electric propulsion can deliver approx. 100 kg using lower cost launch vehicles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Water supply for the Nuclear Rocket Development Station at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Richard Arden

    1972-01-01

    The Nuclear Rocket Development Station, in Jackass Flats, occupies about 123 square miles in the southwestern part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site. Jackass Flats, an intermontane valley bordered by highlands on all sides except for a drainage outlet in the southwestern corner, has an average annual rainfall of 4 inches. Jackass Flats is underlain by alluvium, colluvium, and volcanic rocks of Cenozoic age and, at greater depth, by sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The alluvium and the colluvium lie above the saturated zone throughout nearly all of Jackass Flats. The Paleozoic sedimentary rocks contain limestone and dolomite units that are excellent water producers elsewhere ; however, these units are too deep in Jackass Flats to be economic sources of water. The only important water-producing unit known in the vicinity of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is a welded-tuff aquifer, the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, which receives no significant recharge. This member contains about 500 feet of highly fractured rock underlying an area 11 miles long and 3 miles wide in western Jackass Flats. Permeability of the aquifer is derived mostly from joints and fractures; however, some permeability may be derived from gas bubbles in the upper part of the unit. Transmissivity, obtained from pumping tests, ranges from 68,000 to 488,000 gallons per day per foot. Volume of the saturated part of the aquifer is about 3.5 cubic miles, and the average specific yield probably ranges from 1 to 5 percent. The volume of ground water in storage is probably within the range of 37-187 billion gallons. This large amount of water should be sufficient to supply the needs of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station for many years. Water at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is used for public supply, construction, test-cell coolant, exhaust cooling, and thermal shielding during nuclear reactor and engine testing, and washdown. Present (1967) average

  10. Conventional and Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Artificial Gravity Mars Transfer Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of countermeasures have been developed to address the debilitating physiological effects of "zero-gravity" (0-g) experienced by cosmonauts and astronauts during their approximately 0.5-1.2 year long stays in LEO (Low Earth Orbit). Longer interplanetary flights, combined with possible prolonged stays in Mars orbit, could subject crewmembers to up to approximately 2.5 years of weightlessness. In view of known and recently diagnosed problems associated with 0-g, an artificial gravity spacecraft offers many advantages and may indeed be an enabling technology for human flights to Mars. A number of important human factors must be taken into account in selecting the rotation radius, rotation rate, and orientation of the habitation module or modules. These factors include the gravity gradient effect, radial and tangential Coriolis forces, along with cross-coupled acceleration effects. Artificial gravity (AG) Mars transfer vehicle (MTV) concepts are presented that utilize both conventional NTR, as well as, enhanced "bimodal" nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) propulsion. The NTR is a proven technology that generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (I (sub sp)) capability of approximately 900 s - twice that of today's best chemical rockets. The AG/MTV concepts using conventional NTP carry twin cylindrical "ISS-type" habitation modules with their long axes oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the longitudinal spin axis of the MTV and utilize photovoltaic arrays (PVAs) for spacecraft power. The twin habitat modules are connected to a central operations hub located at the front of the MTV via two pressurized tunnels that provide the rotation radius for the habitat modules. For the BNTR AG/MTV option, each engine has its own "closed" secondary helium-xenon gas loop and Brayton rotating unit that can generate tens of kilowatts (kW (sub e)) of spacecraft electrical power during the mission coast phase eliminating the need for large PVAs. A single inflatable

  11. Erratum.

    PubMed

    1982-07-30

    The publisher of The Biology of Seaweeds, edited by Christopher S. Lobban and Michael J. Wynne, listed in the Books Received column of 16 July (p. 272), should have been given as University of California Press, Berkeley. PMID:17782962

  12. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-05-10

    The overall goal of this study is a short introduction into the Hungarian legal basis, and practical circumstances of informed consent trough the cases of the Data Protection Commissioner of Hungary, the Supreme Court of Hungary, and the Constitutional Court. The author begins by describing the basic law with an introduction to the dogmatic background of informed consent, as a common law category. PMID:26039920

  13. Erratum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ‘BESS/BOA Patient Care Pathways, Traumatic anterior shoulder instability’ by Peter Brownson, Oliver Donaldson, Michael Fox et al. published in Shoulder & Elbow 2015, Vol. 7(3) 214–226. DOI: 10.1177/1758573215585656.

  14. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The publisher found that the following CE tests were published with incorrect DOIs:In the CE Test for "The Baltimore Buprenorphine Initiative: Understanding the Role of Buprenorphine in Addressing Heroin Addiction in an Urban-Based Community." (2014). Journal of Addictions Nursing, 25(1), 26Y27, doi: 10.1097/JAN.0000000000000013 should have been doi: 10.1097/JAN.0000000000000024. In the CE Test for "Substance Abuse Treatment Processes and Outcomes in Day/Outpatient Health Maintenance Organization Setting." (2014). Journal of Addictions Nursing, 25(3), 137Y138, doi: 10.1097/JAN.0000000000000013 should have been doi: 10.1097/JAN.0000000000000044. In the CE Test for "NADA Protocol: Integrative Acupuncture in Addictions." (2014). Journal of Addictions Nursing, 25(4), 188Y189, doi: 10.1097/JAN.0000000000000013 should have been doi: 10.1097/JAN.0000000000000057. PMID:25920103

  15. Erratum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmin

    2015-04-01

    In "Ractopamine Residues in Urine, Plasma and Hair of Cattle During and After Treatment" by Tang et al. [Journal of Analytical Toxicology (2014) 38: 149-154], there were errors in referenced information from papers by Smith and Shelver (8) and Pleadin et al. (12,14) in the Introduction and Discussion sections. The dosage concentration from the Smith and Shelver paper was incorrect. The type of animal hair from the Pleadin et al. papers was incorrect. The corrected Introduction and Discussion sections are reproduced here. The authors regret the errors. PMID:25656534

  16. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    Syed, M. I., Rutka, J. A. & Pothier, D. D.(2015) Clin. Otolaryngol. 40, 69. Application of phenol as topical anaesthesia using the Derlacki elevator for myringotomy. In the title of this article, the word ‘myringotomy’ was incorrectly spelt as ‘miringotomy’. We apologise for this typographical error. Lachanas, V.A., Tsea, M., Tsiouvaka, S., Exarchos, S.T., Skoulakis, C.E. & Bizakis, J.G.(2015) Clin. Otolaryngol. 40, 56. The effect of active cigarette smoking on Sino-Nasal Outcome Test in 127 subjects without rhinologic disease. A prospective study. In the Results section, paragraph 2, line 3, the result "SNOT-20 +/- SD was 15.75 +/- 1.68 and 8.65 +/- 0.95" should have read "SNOT-22 +/- SD was 17.59 +/- 1.79 and 9.76 +/- 1.06". We apologise for this error. PMID:25927086

  17. Erratum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Susanne Ozegowski. Effective policy mechanisms for an equitable geographical distribution of general practitioners: a qualitative comparative analysis of the accessibility of primary care in Europe. Journal of Health Services Research & Policy July 2013, vol. 18 no. 3, pages 151–159 [doi: 10.1177/1355819613482885

  18. Erratum.

    PubMed

    1991-04-26

    In Constance Holden's News & Comment artide "Kuwait's unjust deserts: Damage to its deserts" (8 Mar., p. 1175), the second sentence of the fifth paragraph should have read, "Any rock that has sat on the desert for a long time develops a shiny ;desert varnish' of light-absorbing manganese and iron oxides." PMID:17838467

  19. Erratum

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective By Robert W. Johnston, Marie-José Alvarez-Pasquin, Marc Bijl, Elisabetta Franco, Jacques Gaillat, João G. Clara, Marc Labetoulle, Jean-Pierre Michel, Luigi Naldi, Luis S. Sanmarti and Thomas Weinke. Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines 2015, Vol. 3(4) 109–120. PMID:27551430

  20. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Platts, L. G., Webb, E., Zins, M., Goldberg, M., & Netuveli, G. (2014). Mid-life occupational grade and quality of life following retirement: a 16-year follow-up of the French GAZEL study. Aging & Mental Health. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/ 13607863.2014.955458. When the above article was first published online, Loretta Platts' affiliation was erroneously listed as Department of Social Science, Institute of Gerontology, Health & Medicine. This has now been corrected in both the print and online versions to Institute of Gerontology, Department of Social Science, Health & Medicine. Taylor & Francis apologises for this error. PMID:25368902

  1. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    JUDY OU, SEBASTIEN HAIART, STEVEN GALLUCCIO, JULIAN WHITE, and SCOTT A. WEINSTEIN. (2015) An instructive case of presumed brown snake ( Pseudonaja spp.) Envenoming Clinical Toxicology, 53(08), pp. 834-839. http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15563650.2015.1059947 When the above article was first published online, there was an inadvertent omission from the authors’ Conflict of Interest statement. This unintentional omission is corrected below: The public teaching hospital that employs two of the authors (JW and SAW) has a long-standing contract with CSL Ltd, the company that produces brown snake antivenom. The hospital provides advice to health practitioners pertaining to the diagnosis and management of envenoming and related toxinology diseases. The contract with CSL Ltd allows such queries to CSL to be addressed through our hospital service. Our department provides this service on behalf of the hospital. Dr. White occasionally receives travel support to attend toxinology meetings from CSL Ltd. However, neither he nor his family receives any financial remuneration or other compensation from CSL Ltd. CSL Ltd had no role or input into this work. PMID:26413790

  2. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    In the editorial by Cohen et al. , the incorrect affiliation was given for two of the co-authors. The correct affiliation for Dr Smita Pattanaik and Dr Praveen Kumar is the Department of Pharmacology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. The Journal apologises for this error. Reference Cohen A, Pattanaik S, Kumar P, Bies RR, de Boer A, Ferro A, et al. Organised crime against the academic peer review system. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2016; 81: 1012-7. PMID:27424872

  3. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The guest editors of the June 2016 special issue of the Journal of Biomolecular Screening (Vol. 21, No. 5) (JBS) on "Innovative Screening Methodologies to Identify New Compounds for the Treatment of Central Nervous System Disorders" were not acknowledged in the final published issue. JBS gratefully thanks Drs. Kevin Burris and Steven Dworetzky for their valued contributions and apologizes for the oversight. (Original DOI: 10.1177/1087057116644231). Please visit the table of contents for this special issue at http://jbx.sagepub.com/content/21/5.toc. PMID:27439661

  4. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Correction to: Effectiveness and compliance of oral liposomal iron (Sideral Forte) treatment for iron deficiency anemia: a valid alternative to iv. iron therapies. M. Paola Campanella, Antonio Ebbli, Daniele Gaibazzi, Viviana Panunzio & Andrea Tomasini. Published as part of the 3rd Mediterranean Multidisciplinary Course on Iron Anemia abstract book May 2015 Vol. 8, No. S1. Following publication of this article the below error has been identified in three tables and figure 2. The authors apologize for any confusion caused.The revised tables and figure have been prepared (see below). Errors in data in the tables have now been corrected, and figure 2 has been corrected to amend the previously incorrect legend. The description of figure 2 has also been corrected. PMID:26343894

  5. Erratum.

    PubMed

    1979-07-20

    In the Research News article "Tournament competition fuels computer chess" (29 June, p. 1396), the figure was reprodeced incorrectly. Black has a third pawn on the black square immediately in front of the black king. The figure and its legend are reproduced herewith. One limitation offull-width search methods in computer chess is called the horizon effect. A human easily sees that white, although it has one less pawn, can win the game by advancing its leftmost pawn across the board, whereupon it is promoted, by the rules of chess, to a queen. The computer, if it does not search enough moves into the future, will not see this outcome and will be excessively concerned about black's apparent material advantage. [Drawing by Eleanor Warner] [See figure in the PDF file]. PMID:17747029

  6. Effect of buoyancy on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putre, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis aimed at determining the scaling laws for the buoyancy effect on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine, so conducted that experimental conditions can be related to engine conditions. The fuel volume fraction in a short coaxial flow cavity is calculated with a programmed numerical solution of the steady Navier-Stokes equations for isothermal, variable density fluid mixing. A dimensionless parameter B, called the Buoyancy number, was found to correlate the fuel volume fraction for large accelerations and various density ratios. This parameter has the value B = 0 for zero acceleration, and B = 350 for typical engine conditions.

  7. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-12-01

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation.

  8. Congreve Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the 'rocket's red glare.' Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

  9. Rocket Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  10. REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, RIchard O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the Fundamental Root Causes that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTF). This paper will discuss the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system

  11. Crew radiation dose from the plume of a high impulse gas-core nuclear rocket during a Mars mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masser, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Analytical calculations are performed to determine the radiation dose rate and total dose to the crew of a gas-core nuclear rocket from the fission fragments located throughout the plume volume. The radiation dose from the plume fission fragments to two crew locations of 100 and 200 meters from the nozzle exit are calculated. It is found that, in the case of the most probable fission fragment retention time of 100 seconds, the crew must be protected from the radiation dose. Five centimeters of lead shielding would reduce the radiation dose by two orders of magnitude thereby protecting the crew. The increase in vehicle weight would be insignificant (7150 kg to a vehicle gross weight of 0.94 million kg).

  12. REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2006-01-20

    This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the 'Fundamental Root Causes' that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). This paper will discus the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system.

  13. REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented `Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the ``Fundamental Root Causes'' that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). This paper will discus the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system.

  14. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/Stage Technology Options for NASA's Future Human Exploration Missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Beke, Erik G.

    1994-07-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides a unique propulsion capability to planners and designers of future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to its high specific impulse (Isp ~ 850-1000 seconds) and engine thrust-to-weight ratio (~ 3-10), the NTR can also be configured as a ``dual mode'' system capable of generating stage electrical power. At present, NASA is examining a variety of mission applications for the NTR ranging from an expendable, ``single burn'' trans-lunar injection (TLI) stage for NASA's ``First Lunar Outpost'' (FLO) mission to all propulsive, ``multi-burn,'' spacecraft supporting a ``split cargo/piloted sprint'' Mars mission architecture. Two ``proven'' solid core NTR concepts are examined -one based on NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application)-derivative reactor (NDR) technology, and a second concept which utilizes a ternary carbide ``twisted ribbon'' fuel form developed by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Integrated systems and mission study results are used in designing ``aerobraked'' and ``all propulsive'' Mars vehicle concepts which are mass-, and volume-compatible with both a reference 240 metric tonne (t) heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) and a smaller 120 t HLLV option. For the ``aerobraked'' scenario, the 2010 piloted mission determines the size of the expendable trans-Mars injection (TMI) stage which is a growth version of the FLO TLI stage. An ``all-propulsive'' Moon/Mars mission architecture is also described which uses common ``modular'' engine and stage hardware consisting of: (1) clustered 15 thousand pounds force (klbf) NDR or CIS engines; (2) two ``standardized'' liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank sizes; and (3) ``dual mode'' NTR and refrigeration system technologies for long duration missions. The ``modular'' NTR approach can form the basis for a ``faster, safer, and cheaper'' space transportation system for tomorrow's piloted missions to the Moon and Mars.

  15. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada test site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, George; Collins, Donald; Dye, Ken; Eberhart, Craig; Hynes, Michael; Kovach, Richard; Ortiz, Robert; Perea, Jake; Sherman, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research & Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. In particular we have assumed that the program goal will be to certify a full engine system design as flight test ready. All nuclear and non-nuclear components will be individually certified as ready for such a test at sites remote from the NRDA facilities, the components transported to NRDA, and the engine assembled. We also assume that engines of 25,000-100,000 lb thrust levels will be tested with burn times of 1 hour or longer. After a test, the engine will be disassembled, time critical inspections will be executed, and a selection of components will be transported to remote inspection sites. The majority of the components will be stored for future inspection at Jackass Flats. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about 253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect

  16. Fuel containment and stability in the gas core nuclear rocket. Final report, April 15, 1993--April 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, T.

    1996-02-01

    One of the most promising approaches to advanced propulsion that could meet the objectives of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is the open cycle gas core nuclear rocket (GCR). The energy in this device is generated by a fissioning uranium plasma which heats, through radiation, a propellant that flows around the core and exits through a nozzle, thereby converting thermal energy into thrust. Although such a scheme can produce very attractive propulsion parameters in the form of high specific impulse and high thrust, it does suffer from serious physics and engineering problems that must be addressed if it is to become a viable propulsion system. Among the major problems that must be solved are the confinement of the uranium plasma, potential instabilities and control problems associated with the dynamics of the uranium core, and the question of startup and fueling of such a reactor. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on the problems of equilibria and stability of the uranium care, and examine the potential use of an externally applied magnetic field for these purposes. They find that steady state operation of the reactor is possible only for certain care profiles that may not be compatible with the radiative aspect of the system. The authors also find that the system is susceptible to hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities that could deplete the uranium fuel in a short time if not properly suppressed.

  17. Erratum: 0.5 gigapixel microscopy using a flatbed scanner: erratum.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiaoze; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-02-01

    When one uses USAF target to calibrate the resolution of an imaging system, the periodicity of the smallest resolvable line should be used to define the limit. However, in the original paper, the line width of the resolution target was used to characterize the resolution of our microscope system, resulting in an overestimation of the performance of the imaging system. In this erratum, we correct the parts that state incorrect resolution and also re-evaluate the performance of our micoscope.[This corrects the article on p. 1 in vol. 5, PMID: 24466471.]. PMID:26977368

  18. Coolant flows in prismatic fuel and particle bed nuclear reactors for rocket applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1993-01-01

    Semiempirical expressions for pressure losses in prismatic and particle bed reactors for nuclear propulsion are combined with the geometric characteristics of core configurations and coolant flow patterns. The results are used to illustrate a limitation on the coolant velocity and to develop a unified approach to a quantitative comparison of merits and demerits of different reactor core concepts intended for space applications.

  19. ELM - A SIMPLE TOOL FOR THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  20. An investigation of dual-mode operation of a nuclear-thermal rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, W.L.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Moore, S.W.; McFarland, R.D.; Merrigan, M.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Hanson, D.L.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1991-06-01

    A preliminary assessment of the technical feasibility and mass competitiveness of a dual-mode nuclear propulsion and power system based on Rover-type reactors has been completed. Earlier studies have indicated that dual-mode systems appear attractive for electrical power levels of a few kilowatts. However, at the megawatt electrical power level considered in this study, it appears that extensive modifications to the nuclear-thermal engines would be required, the feasibility of which is unclear. Mass competitiveness at high electrical power levels is also uncertain. Further study of reactor and shield design in conjuction with mission and vehicle studies is necessary in order to determine a useful dual-mode power range. 9 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Rockets Away!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaahaaina, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project that involved a rocket-design competition where students played the roles of McDonnell Douglas employees competing for NASA contracts. Provides a real world experience involving deadlines, design and performance specifications, and budgets. (JRH)

  2. Erratum: maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This erratum corrects article: "Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report." The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;21:16. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.21.16.3912[This corrects the article on p. 16 in vol. 21, PMID: 26401210.]. PMID:26816561

  3. Optimal configuration of static polarization imagers for target detection: erratum.

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    In our recently published article [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A33, 9 (2016)JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.33.000009], there was an error of reasoning that changes some of the results and conclusions, although the key message of the article remains unaltered. We correct these errors in the present erratum. PMID:27607504

  4. Erratum to: Korean American Women and Mammogram Uptake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunice E; Nandy, Karabi; Szalacha, Laura; Park, HanJong; Oh, Kyeung Mi; Lee, Jongwon; Menon, Usha

    2016-02-01

    Erratum to: J Immigrant Minority Health, DOI 10.1007/s10903-015-0164-6. The names of two of the authors (Eunice E. Lee and Kyeung Mi Oh) were incorrect in the original publication. The correct names are shown here. PMID:25762116

  5. ``Bimodal'' Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) Propulsion for an Artificial Gravity HOPE Mission to Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Mason, Lee M.; Gilland, James H.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a year long, multi-center NASA study which examined the viability of nuclear fission propulsion systems for Human Outer Planet Exploration (HOPE). The HOPE mission assumes a crew of six is sent to Callisto. Jupiter's outermost large moon, to establish a surface base and propellant production facility. The Asgard asteroid formation, a region potentially rich in water-ice, is selected as the landing site. High thrust BNTR propulsion is used to transport the crew from the Earth-Moon L1 staging node to Callisto then back to Earth in less than 5 years. Cargo and LH2 ``return'' propellant for the piloted Callisto transfer vehicle (PCTV) is pre-deployed at the moon (before the crew's departure) using low thrust, high power, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) cargo and tanker vehicles powered by hydrogen magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. The PCTV is powered by three 25 klbf BNTR engines which also produce 50 kWe of power for crew life support and spacecraft operational needs. To counter the debilitating effects of long duration space flight (~855 days out and ~836 days back) under ``0-gE'' conditions, the PCTV generates an artificial gravity environment of ``1-gE'' via rotation of the vehicle about its center-of-mass at a rate of ~4 rpm. After ~123 days at Callisto, the ``refueled'' PCTV leaves orbit for the trip home. Direct capsule re-entry of the crew at mission end is assumed. Dynamic Brayton power conversion and high temperature uranium dioxide (UO2) in tungsten metal ``cermet'' fuel is used in both the BNTR and NEP vehicles to maximize hardware commonality. Technology performance levels and vehicle characteristics are presented, and requirements for PCTV reusability are also discussed.

  6. Air-Powered Rockets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Charley; Raynovic, Jim

    This document describes methods for designing and building two types of rockets--rockets from paper and rockets from bottles. Devices used for measuring the heights that the rockets obtain are also discussed. (KHR)

  7. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Sizing and Trade Matrix for Lunar, Near Earth Asteroid and Mars Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, David R.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Roche, Joseph M.; Zinolabedini, Reza

    2006-01-01

    The concept of a human rated transport vehicle for various near earth missions is evaluated using a liquid hydrogen fueled Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (BNTP) approach. In an effort to determine the preliminary sizing and optimal propulsion system configuration, as well as the key operating design points, an initial investigation into the main system level parameters was conducted. This assessment considered not only the performance variables but also the more subjective reliability, operability, and maintainability attributes. The SIZER preliminary sizing tool was used to facilitate rapid modeling of the trade studies, which included tank materials, propulsive versus an aero-capture trajectory, use of artificial gravity, reactor chamber operating pressure and temperature, fuel element scaling, engine thrust rating, engine thrust augmentation by adding oxygen to the flow in the nozzle for supersonic combustion, and the baseline turbopump configuration to address mission redundancy and safety requirements. A high level system perspective was maintained to avoid focusing solely on individual component optimization at the expense of system level performance, operability, and development cost.

  8. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 3: Nuclear thermal rocket vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the NTR concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  9. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/Vehicle Characteristics And Sensitivity Trades For NASA's Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes Phase I and II analysis results from NASA's recent Mars DRA 5.0 study which re-examined mission, payload and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system over chemical/aerobrake because of its higher specific impulse (I(sub sp)) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) which is important for reducing the number of Ares-V heavy lift launches and overall mission cost. DRA 5.0 features a long surface stay (approximately 500 days) split mission using separate cargo and crewed Mars transfer vehicles (MTVs). All vehicles utilize a common core propulsion stage with three 25 klbf composite fuel NERVA-derived NTR engines (T(sub ex) approximately 2650 - 2700 K, p(sub ch) approximately 1000 psia, epsilon approximately 300:1, I(sub sp) approximately 900 - 910 s, engine thrust-toweight ratio approximately 3.43) to perform all primary mission maneuvers. Two cargo flights, utilizing 1-way minimum energy trajectories, pre-deploy a cargo lander to the surface and a habitat lander into a 24-hour elliptical Mars parking orbit where it remains until the arrival of the crewed MTV during the next mission opportunity (approximately 26 months later). The cargo payload elements aerocapture (AC) into Mars orbit and are enclosed within a large triconicshaped aeroshell which functions as payload shroud during launch, then as an aerobrake and thermal protection system during Mars orbit capture and subsequent entry, descent and landing (EDL) on Mars. The all propulsive crewed MTV is a 0-gE vehicle design that utilizes a fast conjunction trajectory that allows approximately 6-7 month 1-way transit times to and from Mars. Four 12.5 kW(sub e) per 125 square meter rectangular photovoltaic arrays provide the crewed MTV with

  10. Analytical Investigation of the Effect of Turbopump Design on Gross-Weight Characteristics of a Hydrogen-Propelled Nuclear Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlik, Harold E.; Crouse, James E.

    1959-01-01

    The effect of turbopump design on rocket gross weight was investigated for a high-pressure bleed-type hydrogen-reactor long-range rocket with a fixed mission. Axial-flow, mixed-flow, and centrifugal pumps driven by single and twin turbines were considered. With an efficiency of 0.7 assumed for all pumps, the lowest rocket gross weights were obtained with an axial-flow or a mixed-flow pump driven by a single turbine of at least eight stages. All turbopump combinations could be used, however, with gross weight varying less than 8 percent for a given payload. Turbopump efficiencies have a significant effect on the ratio of gross weight to payload with the magnitude of the effect determined by the ratio of rocket structural weight to total propellant weight. One point in pump efficiency is worth 0.2 percent in gross weight for a given payload with a structural weight parameter of 0.1 and 0.6 percent with a structural weight parameter of 0.2. Turbine and pump weights are much less significant in terms of gross-to-pay weight ratio than the efficiencies of these components. One point in pump efficiency is equivalent to approximately 13 percent in pump weight, while 1 point in turbine efficiency is equivalent to about 7 percent in turbine weight.

  11. 0.5 gigapixel microscopy using a flatbed scanner: erratum

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    When one uses USAF target to calibrate the resolution of an imaging system, the periodicity of the smallest resolvable line should be used to define the limit. However, in the original paper, the line width of the resolution target was used to characterize the resolution of our microscope system, resulting in an overestimation of the performance of the imaging system. In this erratum, we correct the parts that state incorrect resolution and also re-evaluate the performance of our micoscope. PMID:26977368

  12. Supersonic-combustion rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. J.; Franciscus, L. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A supersonic combustion rocket is provided in which a small rocket motor is substituted for heavy turbo pumps in a conventional rocket engine. The substitution results in a substantial reduction in rocket engine weight. The flame emanating from the small rocket motor can act to ignite non-hypergolic fuels.

  13. Erratum to: Loss of glucocorticoid receptor activation is a hallmark of BRCA1-mutated breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Vilasco, Myriam; Communal, Laudine; Hugon-Rodin, Justine; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Mourra, Najat; Wu, Zherui; Forgez, Patricia; Gompel, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Erratum to: Breast Cancer Res Treat (2013),142:283–296,DOI 10.1007/s10549-013-2722-8. In the original publication of the article, the blot corresponding to the total P38 protein content for the conditions siCtl and siBRCA1 in Fig. 7a was incorrectly laid out. The corrected Fig. 7a is given in this erratum.The PMID:26956972

  14. Hybrid Rocket Propulsion for Sounding Rocket Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of the H-225K hybrid rocket motor, produced by the American Rocket Company, is given. The H-225K motor is presented in terms of the following topics: (1) hybrid rocket fundamentals; (2) hybrid characteristics; and (3) hybrid advantages.

  15. Erratum: cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration Erratum: cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio

    2013-07-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles alm's via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In ref. [1] we checked the validity of this assumption in parameter estimation for a Planck-like angular resolution, both for a full-sky ideal experiment and also when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations with a sky fraction similar to the Planck satellite. The result to this analysis was that aberration and Doppler have a sizable impact on a CMB based parameter estimation. In this erratum we correct an error made in ref. [1] when comparing pseudo angular power spectra computed in the CMB rest frame with the ones measured by a moving observer. Properly comparing the two spectra we find now that although the corrections to the Cl due to aberration and Doppler are larger than the cosmic variance at l > 1000 and potentially important, the resulting bias on the parameters is negligible for Planck.

  16. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  17. American Rocket Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  18. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A 10,000-pound thrust hybrid rocket motor is tested at Stennis Space Center's E-1 test facility. A hybrid rocket motor is a cross between a solid rocket and a liquid-fueled engine. It uses environmentally safe solid fuel and liquid oxygen.

  19. Dumbo: A pachydermal rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Bill

    1991-01-01

    A brief historical account is given of the Dumbo nuclear reactor, a type of folded flow reactor that could be used for rocket propulsion. Much of the information is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs show details of the reactor system, fuel geometry, and key characteristics of the system (folded flow, use of fuel washers, large flow area, small fuel volume, hybrid modulator, and cermet fuel).

  20. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  1. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  2. Rocket pollution reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Geisler, R.L.

    1994-01-04

    A system is provided for reducing the emissions of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from solid fuel rockets, especially during ground disposal. An aqueous solution of an alkali metal hydroxide is injected as a mist into the rocket chamber as the rocket fuel is burned. The reaction of the alkali metal with hydrogen chloride (HCl) produces a salt and thereby minimizes the presence of hydrochloric acid in the rocket exhaust. An injected neutralizing material which reduces hydrochloric acid, but which produces less thrust than an equal weight of rocket fuel, can be injected into an operating rocket which carries a payload high above the earth, with the injected material being injected only while the rocket is at a lower altitude when hydrochloric acid is most undesirable. The injected material can be produced by a small auxiliary rocket device whose exhaust is delivered directly to the main rocket chamber, and with the exhaust of the auxiliary rocket device including a high proportion of magnesium to react with the hydrochloric acid with minimal degradation of rocket performance. 4 figs.

  3. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  4. Kauai Test Facility two experiment rocket campaign. [Kauai Test Facility; Two Experiment Rocket Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Kauai Test Facility (KTF) is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility located at Barking Sands, on the west coast of the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The KTF has a rocket preparation and launching capability for both rail-launched and vertical-launched capability for both rail-launched and vertical-launched rockets. Launches primarily support high altitude scientific research and re-entry vehicle systems and carry experimental non-nuclear payloads. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared for the Two Experiment Rocket Campaign, during which the STRYPI/LACE (STRYPI is not an acronym -- its the name of the rocket; LACE is the acronym for Low Altitude Compensation Experiment) and the RAP-501 (Rocket Accelerated Penetration) will be flown in conjunction from the KTF in February 1991 to reduce costs. There have been numerous rocket campaigns at the KTF in prior years that have used the same motors to be used in the current two experiment rocket campaign. The main difference noted in this environmental documentation is that the two rockets have not previously been flown in conjunction. Previous National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) approvals of launches using these motors were limited to different and separate campaigns with diverse sources of funding. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Performance potential of gas-core and fusion rockets - A mission applications survey.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    This paper reports an evaluation of the performance potential of five nuclear rocket engines for four mission classes. These engines are: the regeneratively cooled gas-core nuclear rocket; the light bulb gas-core nuclear rocket; the space-radiator cooled gas-core nuclear rocket; the fusion rocket; and an advanced solid-core nuclear rocket which is included for comparison. The missions considered are: earth-to-orbit launch; near-earth space missions; close interplanetary missions; and distant interplanetary missions. For each of these missions, the capabilities of each rocket engine type are compared in terms of payload ratio for the earth launch mission or by the initial vehicle mass in earth orbit for space missions (a measure of initial cost). Other factors which might determine the engine choice are discussed. It is shown that a 60 day manned round trip to Mars is conceivable.-

  6. Optimization of the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm on a spectral optical coherence tomography system: erratum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Simon S; Liu, Gangjun; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2016-02-01

    An erratum is presented to include conflict of interest disclosures that were unintentionally left out of our recent Letter [Opt. Lett.40, 2305 (2015)10.1364/OL.40.002305OPLEDP0146-9592]. PMID:26907406

  7. Erratum to “The dimension formula for the Lorenz attractor” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (8) (2011) 1179

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, G. A.; Pogromsky, A. Yu.; Starkov, K. E.

    2012-10-01

    In our recent publication (G.A. Leonov et al., 2011 [1]) we formulated a result on Lyapunov dimension formula for the Lorenz system. The proof of this result contains a flaw which is corrected in this Erratum.

  8. Relativistic rocket: Dream and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, Oleg G.

    2014-06-01

    The dream of interstellar flights persists since the first pioneers in astronautics and has never died. Many concepts of thruster capable to propel a rocket to the stars have been proposed and the most suitable among them are thought to be photon propulsion and propulsion by the products of proton-antiproton annihilation in magnetic nozzle. This article addresses both concepts allowing for cross-section of annihilation among other issues in order to show their vulnerability and to indicate the problems. The concept of relativistic matter propulsion is substantiated and discussed. The latter is argued to be the most straightforward way to build-up a relativistic rocket firstly because it is based on the existing technology of ion generators and accelerators and secondly because it can be stepped up in efflux power starting from interplanetary spacecrafts powered by nuclear reactors to interstellar starships powered by annihilation reactors. The problems imposed by thermodynamics and heat disposal are accentuated.

  9. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  10. Erratum: "The Mean Electromotive Force Resulting from Magnetic Buoyancy Instability" (2011, ApJ, 727, 112)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W.

    2011-03-01

    Due to a technical error during the production process, several vector symbols were omitted from the published version of this paper. A full corrected version of the paper is included with this Erratum. See the accompanying PDF and HTML files. IOP Publishing sincerely regrets this error.

  11. Erratum: Wise Detections of Known Qsos at Redshifts Greater than Six

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blain, Andrew W.; Assef, Roberto; Stern, Daniel K.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic J; Jarrett, Tom; Cutri, Roc; Petty, Sara; Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    In the published version of this paper, Roberto Assef was mistakenly affiliated with the Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Los Angeles. This is incorrect. Dr. Assef's affiliation correctly appears in this erratum as the Nucleo de Astronomia de la Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito 441, Santiago, Chile. IOP Publishing sincerely regrets this error.

  12. Erratum: A Simple, Analytical Model of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in a Pair Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Masha; Klimas, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The following describes a list of errata in our paper, "A simple, analytical model of collisionless magnetic reconnection in a pair plasma." It supersedes an earlier erratum. We recently discovered an error in the derivation of the outflow-to-inflow density ratio.

  13. Life Saving Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    By 1870, American and British inventors had found other ways to use rockets. For example, the Congreve rocket was capable of carrying a line over 1,000 feet to a stranded ship. In 1914, an estimated 1,000 lives were saved by this technique.

  14. Postal Rocket Stamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the 19th Century, experiments in America, Europe, and elsewhere attempted to build postal rockets to deliver mail from one location to another. The idea was more novel than successful. Many stamps used in these early postal rockets have become collector's items.

  15. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  16. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  17. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  18. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  19. Nova Sagittarii 2014 = PNV J18250860-2236024 AND Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-02-01

    Details of discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2014 (PNV J18250860-2236024) and procedures for observing and reporting observations are announced. Discovered by Sigeru Furuyama (Tone-machi, Ibaraki-ken, Japan) andreported by S. Nakano (Sumoto, Japan) at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.7 on 2014 Jan. 26.857 UT. Coordinates: R.A. 18 25 08.60 Decl. = -22 36 02.4 (2000.0). Nova Sgr 2014 is Fe II-type classical nova past maximum, per low-resolution spectra obtained by A. Arai on 2014 Jan. 30.87 UT. Announced in IAU CBAT CBET 3802 (D. W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations. Also, an Erratum is reported. In AAVSO Alert Notice 496, Mati Morel (MMAT, Thornton, NSW, Australia) was credited with the discovery of the 1989 outburst of V745 Sco. The discoverer was William Liller (LIW, Vina del Mar, Chile), who observed V745 Sco on 1989 July 30.08 UT at magnitude 9.7 (PROBLICOM discovery using 2415 film with orange filter).

  20. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-02-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors1,2 that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the experimentally measured rocket height. Baking soda and vinegar rockets present fewer safety concerns and require a smaller launch area than rapid combustion chemical rockets. Both kits were of nearly identical design, costing ˜20. The rockets required roughly 30 minutes of assembly time consisting of mostly taping the soft plastic fuselage to the Styrofoam nose cone.

  1. ASTRID rocket flight test

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Pittenger, L.C.; Colella, N.J.

    1994-07-01

    On February 4, 1994, we successfully flight tested the ASTRID rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The technology for this rocket originated in the Brilliant Pebbles program and represents a five-year development effort. This rocket demonstrated how our new pumped-propulsion technology-which reduced the total effective engine mass by more than one half and cut the tank mass to one fifth previous requirements-would perform in atmospheric flight. This demonstration paves the way for potential cost-effective uses of the new propulsion system in commercial aerospace vehicles, exploration of the planets, and defense applications.

  2. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  3. Antares Rocket Lifts Off!

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA commercial space partner Orbital Sciences Corp. of Dulles, Va., launched its Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard its Antares rocket at 10:58 a.m. EDT Wednesday from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spacep...

  4. Robust Rocket Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    The potential for a revolutionary step in the durability of reusable rocket engines is made possible by the combination of several emerging technologies. The recent creation and analytical demonstration of life extending (or damage mitigating) control technology enables rapid rocket engine transients with minimum fatigue and creep damage. This technology has been further enhanced by the formulation of very simple but conservative continuum damage models. These new ideas when combined with recent advances in multidisciplinary optimization provide the potential for a large (revolutionary) step in reusable rocket engine durability. This concept has been named the robust rocket engine concept (RREC) and is the basic contribution of this paper. The concept also includes consideration of design innovations to minimize critical point damage.

  5. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust.

  6. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  7. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Stennis Space Center conducts a test on a hybrid rocket motor fed by a liquid oxygen turbopump. The test occurred at the E-1 test facility. The test was believed to be the first of its kind in the world.

  8. Rocket University at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.

  9. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  10. Infrasound Rocket Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation reviews the work performed by our research group at the Geophysical Institute as we have applied the tools of infrasound research to rocket studies. This report represents one aspect of the effort associated with work done for the National Consortium for MASINT Research (NCMR) program operated by the National MASINT Office (NMO) of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Infrasound, the study of acoustic signals and their propagation in a frequency band below 15 Hz, enables an investigator to collect and diagnose acoustic signals from distant sources. Absorption of acoustic energy in the atmosphere decreases as the frequency is reduced. In the infrasound band signals can propagate hundreds and thousands of kilometers with little degradation. We will present an overview of signatures from rockets ranging from small sounding rockets such as the Black Brandt and Orion series to larger rockets such as Delta 2,4 and Atlas V. Analysis of the ignition transients provides information that can uniquely identify the motor type. After the rocket ascends infrasound signals can be used to characterize the rocket and identify the various events that take place along a trajectory such as staging and maneuvering. We have also collected information on atmospheric shocks and sonic booms from the passage of supersonic vehicles such as the shuttle. This review is intended to show the richness of the unique signal set that occurs in the low-frequency infrasound band.