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Sample records for nuclear transfer affect

  1. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  2. Effect of radiocesium transfer on ambient dose rate in forest environments affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the transfer of canopy-intercepted radiocesium to the forest floor during 3 years following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The cesium-137 (Cs-137) contents in throughfall, stemflow, and litterfall were monitored in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (Japanese oak with red pine). We also measured the ambient dose rate (ADR) at different heights in the forest using a survey meter and a portable Ge gamma-ray detector. Total Cs-137 deposition flux from the canopy to forest floor for the mature cedar, young cedar, and the mixed broad-leaved stands were 166 kBq/m2, 174 kBq/m2, and 60 kBq/m2, respectively. These values correspond to 38%, 40% and 13% of total atmospheric input after the accident. The ambient dose rate in forest exhibited height dependency and its vertical distribution varied with forest type and stand age. The ambient dose rate showed an exponential decrease with time for all the forest sites, however the decreasing trend differed depending on the height of dose measurement and forest type. The ambient dose rate at the canopy (approx. 10 m-height) decreased faster than that expected from physical decay of the two radiocesium isotopes, whereas those at the forest floor varied between the three forest stands. The radiocesium deposition via throughfall seemed to increase ambient dose rate during the first 200 days after the accident, however there was no clear relationship between litterfall and ambient dose rate since 400 days after the accident. These data suggested that the ambient dose rate in forest environment varied both spatially and temporally reflecting the transfer of radiocesium from canopy to forest floor. However, further monitoring investigation and analysis are required to determine the effect of litterfall on long-term trend of ambient dose rate in forest environments.

  3. Nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, G.A.; Lawrence, T.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The state of the art in nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer is discussed. Cryogenic propulsion, electric propulsion, solar-thermal propulsion and direct nuclear propulsion are examined in this context. New technologies with exceptional promise are addressed, emphasizing the particle test bed nuclear engine.

  4. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  5. Nuclear technology transfer to China

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    China has severe power shortages and considerable nuclear expertise available from its military programs. These factors led to great expectations of how fast its nuclear power program might expand. The U.S. recently implemented a controversial nuclear cooperation agreement with China, permitting U.S. companies to compete if this market reopens. The major concern over the agreement was that in the past China apparently showed an alarming disregard for the dangers of nuclear proliferation. It is unlikely that China would use nuclear power equipment to further its nuclear weapons program, but the effectiveness of the U.S. nonproliferation stance has been in part dependent on other countries viewing our position as uncompromising. The vagueness of certain provisions in the agreement with China may have weakened this stance. Another concern is that access to U.S. pressurized water reactor technology could improve their submarine reactors, which could be detrimental to U.S. security interests if relations with China deteriorate. However, it appears that the only significant advantage that would accrue would be a general upgrading of management practices and quality control, which would be available from any other nuclear supplier. If the opportunity for the sale of nuclear equipment to China emerges, the nuclear technology transfer that would be involved, if carefully managed, should contribute to the national interest.

  6. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes. PMID:20336522

  7. In vitro culture and somatic cell nuclear transfer affect imprinting of SNRPN gene in pre- and post-implantation stages of development in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Joao; Therrien, Jacinthe; Filion, France; Lefebvre, Rejean; Goff, Alan K; Smith, Lawrence C

    2009-01-01

    Background Embryo in vitro manipulations during early development are thought to increase mortality by altering the epigenetic regulation of some imprinted genes. Using a bovine interspecies model with a single nucleotide polymorphism, we assessed the imprinting status of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene in bovine embryos produced by artificial insemination (AI), in vitro culture (IVF) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and correlated allelic expression with the DNA methylation patterns of a differentially methylated region (DMR) located on the SNRPN promoter. Results In the AI group, SNRPN maternal expression is silenced at day 17 and 40 of development and a third of the alleles analyzed are methylated in the DMR. In the IVF group, maternal transcripts were identified at day 17 but methylation levels were similar to the AI group. However, day-40 fetuses in the IVF group showed significantly less methylation when compared to the AI group and SNRPN expression was mostly paternal in all fetal tissues studied, except in placenta. Finally, the SCNT group presented severe loss of DMR methylation in both day-17 embryos and 40 fetuses and biallelic expression was observed in all stages and tissues analyzed. Conclusion Together these results suggest that artificial reproductive techniques, such as prolonged in vitro culture and SCNT, lead to abnormal reprogramming of imprinting of SNRPN gene by altering methylation levels at this locus. PMID:19200381

  8. Three-year monitoring study of radiocesium transfer and ambient dose rate in forest environments affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi; Loffredo, Nicolas; Kawamori, Ayumi; Hisadome, Keigo

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the transfer of canopy-intercepted radiocesium to the forest floor during 3 years (July 2011~) following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The cesium-137 (Cs-137) contents of throughfall, stemflow, and litterfall were monitored in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (Japanese oak with red pine). We also measured an ambient dose rate at different height in the forest by using a survey meter (TCS-172B, Hitachi-Aloka Medical, LTD.) and a portable Ge gamma-ray detector (Detective-DX-100T, Ortec, Ametek, Inc.). Furthermore, effects of forest decontamination on the reduction of ambient dose rate were assessed quantitatively. Total Cs-137 deposition flux from the canopy to forest floor for the mature cedar, young cedar, and the mixed broad-leaved stands were 157 kBq/m^2, 167 kBq/m^2, and 54 kBq/m^2, respectively. These values correspond to 36%, 39% and 12% of total atmospheric input after the accident. The ambient dose rate showed an exponential decrease with time for all the forest sites, however the decreasing trend differed depending on the forest type. These data suggested that an ambient dose rate in forest environment can be variable in spatially and temporally reflecting the transfer of radiocesium from canopy to forest floor. We presented the analysis results of the relationship between radiocesium deposition flux and ambient dose rate at the forest floor. In addition to that, we reported the effects of forest decontamination (e.g., tree felling, removal of organic materials, woodchip pavement) on the reduction of ambient dose rate in the forest environment.

  9. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Venta, Patrick J; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-10-01

    We developed a method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish using laser-ablated metaphase II eggs as recipients, the micropyle for transfer of the nucleus and an egg activation protocol after nuclear reconstruction. We produced clones from cells of both embryonic and adult origins, although the latter did not give rise to live adult clones. PMID:19718031

  10. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  11. Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2005-01-01

    To begin the validation process for the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) in Thailand, research replicating Holton, Bates, and Ruona's study (2000) was conducted in Thailand. The LTSI was administered to 1,029 employees. Exploratory factor analysis and MANOVA were used to identify factors. A factor structure almost identical to that of…

  12. Heat transfer in a nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Konyukhov, G.V.; Petrov, A.I.

    1995-02-01

    Special features of heat transfer in the reactor of a nuclear rocket engine (NRE) are dealt with. It is shown that the design of the cooling system of the NRE reactor is governed by its stability to small deviations of the parameters from the corresponding calculated values and the possibility of compensating for effects due to nonuniformities and distrubances of various types and scales.

  13. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  14. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  15. Nuclear transfer and transgenesis in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wuensch, Annegret; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using genetically modified donor cells facilitates the generation of tailored pig models for biomedical research and for xenotransplantation. Up to now, SCNT is the main way to generate gene-targeted pigs, since germ line-competent pluripotent stem cells are not available for this species. In this chapter, we introduce our routine workflow for the production of genetically engineered pigs, especially focused on the genetic modification of somatic donor cells, SCNT using in vitro matured oocytes, and laparoscopic embryo transfer. PMID:25287337

  16. Do Tiers Affect Student Transfer? Examining the Student Admission Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2007-01-01

    This study considers whether formally segmenting 4-year institutions by admissions selectivity affects the admission of transfer students. It develops a new measure, the student admission ratio, to compare the admission of transfer students in formally and highly segmented systems, informally and less segmented systems, and in formally unified…

  17. Factors Affecting Training Transfer: Participants' Motivation to Transfer Training, Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alawneh, Muhammad K.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates factors that motivate participants in learning and training activities to transfer skills, knowledge and attitude from the learning setting to the workplace. Based on training transfer theories hypothesized by Holton (1996), one of the major theories that affect an organization's learning is motivation to transfer theory.…

  18. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers... 970.4402-4 Nuclear material transfers. (a) Management and operating contractors, in preparing... nuclear material, shall be required to assure that each such subcontract or agreement contains a—...

  19. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers... 970.4402-4 Nuclear material transfers. (a) Management and operating contractors, in preparing... nuclear material, shall be required to assure that each such subcontract or agreement contains a—...

  20. Factors affecting the efficiency of embryo transfer in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyi; Sun, Xingshen; Chen, Juan; Leno, Gregory H; Engelhardt, John F

    2006-07-15

    Embryo transfer (ET) to recipient females is a foundational strategy for a number of assisted reproductive technologies, including cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer. In an attempt to develop efficient ET in domestic ferrets, factors affecting development of transferred embryo were investigated. Unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes or blastocysts in the oviduct or uterus was evaluated in recipient nulliparous or primiparous females. Developing fetuses were collected from recipient animals 21 days post-copulation and examined. The percentage of fetal formation was different (P<0.05) for unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes (71%) in nulliparous females with bilateral transfer (56%) in primiparous recipients. The percentage (90%) of fetal formation in nulliparous recipients following unilateral transfer of blastocysts was higher (P<0.05) than that observed in primiparous recipients with bilateral ET (73%). Notably, the percentage of fetal formation was higher (P<0.05) when blastocyts were transferred as compared to zygotes (90% versus 71%). Transuterine migration of embryos occurred following all unilateral transfers and also in approximately 50% of bilateral transfers with different number of embryos in each uterine horn. These data will help to facilitate the development of assisted reproductive strategies in the ferret and could lead to the use of this species for modeling human disease and for conservation of the endangered Mustelidae species such as black-footed ferret and European mink. PMID:16330092

  1. Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, James P.

    1984-01-01

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  2. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  3. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since "Dolly," the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories. PMID:19085136

  4. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL... agreement with the Commission or the Atomic Energy Commission under section 274 of the Act, if the...

  5. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL... agreement with the Commission or the Atomic Energy Commission under section 274 of the Act, if the...

  6. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL... agreement with the Commission or the Atomic Energy Commission under section 274 of the Act, if the...

  7. Two-staged nuclear transfer can enhance the developmental ability of goat-sheep interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Bing; Cai, Lu; Li, Jia-Jia; Chen, Xiu-Li; Ji, Feng-Yu

    2011-02-01

    The technique of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which interspecies cloned embryos can be reconstructed by using domestic animal oocytes as nuclear recipients and endangered animal or human somatic cells as nuclear donors, can afford more opportunities in endangered animal rescue and human tissue transplantation, but the application of this technique is limited by extremely low efficiency which may be attributed to donor nucleus not fully reprogrammed by xenogenic cytoplasm. In this study, goat fetal fibroblasts (GFFs) were used as nuclear donors, in vitro-matured sheep oocytes were used as nuclear recipients, and a two-stage nuclear transfer procedure was performed to improve the developmental ability of goat-sheep interspecies clone embryos. In the first stage nuclear transfer (FSNT), GFFs were injected into the ooplasm of enucleated sheep metaphase-II oocytes, then non-activated reconstructed embryos were cultured in vitro, so that the donor nucleus could be exposed to the ooplasm for a period of time. Subsequently, in the second stage nuclear transfer, FSNT-derived non-activated reconstructed embryo was centrifuged, and the donor nucleus was then transferred into another freshly enucleated sheep oocyte. Compared with the one-stage nuclear transfer, two-stage nuclear transfer could significantly enhance the blastocyst rate of goat-sheep interspecies clone embryos, and this result indicated that longtime exposure to xenogenic ooplasm benefits the donor nucleus to be reprogrammed. The two-stage nuclear transfer procedure has two advantages, one is that the donor nucleus can be exposed to the ooplasm for a long time, the other is that the problem of oocyte aging can be solved. PMID:21082282

  8. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  9. Deletion mutants that affect expression of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen in COS-1 cells after gene transfer with simian virus 40 vectors containing portions of the BamHI K fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Polvino-Bodnar, M; Shedd, D; Miller, G

    1986-01-01

    We have identified sequences that affect the efficient expression of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA 1) when the structural portion of its gene, found within the 2.9-kilobase-pair BamHI/HindIII fragment called Ilf, is expressed from a simian virus 40 vector. A set of nested deletions at the BamHI end of the fragment was constructed by using BAL 31 digestion, the addition of linkers, and ligation into pSVOd. The mutants were tested for their ability to express antigen in COS-1 monkey cells by using indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Deletion endpoints were determined by DNA sequencing of the 5' ends of the mutants. The deletion mutants could be subclassified into four groups based on their ability to express EBNA polypeptide. Mutants that retain more than 106 base pairs upstream from the start of the open reading frame in Ilf exhibit antigen expression indistinguishable from that of wild type. Mutants that invade the structural gene by 1,115 or more bases destroy antigen expression. Mutants that alter the splice acceptor site or invade the open reading frame by a short distance make antigen at a markedly lower frequency. There are three mutants, whose deletions map at -78, -70, and -44 base pairs upstream of the open reading frame, that make reduced levels of EBNA. Since these three mutants differ in the extent to which EBNA expression is impaired, the data suggest that there are several critical regions upstream of the open reading frame that regulate EBNA expression in COS-1 cells. It is not known whether these regulatory sequences, which would be located in an intron in the intact genome, play any role in the expression of EBNA in infected lymphocytes. Images PMID:3009849

  10. Orbital transfer of large space structures with nuclear electric rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential application of electric propulsion for orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure from low earth orbit to geosynchronous altitude in a deployed configuration. The electric power was provided by the spacecraft nuclear reactor space power system on a shared basis during transfer operations. Factors considered with respect to system effectiveness included nuclear power source sizing, electric propulsion thruster concept, spacecraft deployment constraints, and orbital operations and safety. It is shown that the favorable total impulse capability inherent in electric propulsion provides a potential economic advantage over chemical propulsion orbit transfer vehicles by reducing the number of Space Shuttle flights in ground-to-orbit transportation requirements.

  11. Handmade cloning: the future way of nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Vajta, Gábor

    2007-06-01

    The topic of this review is an alternative technique for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Removal of the zona pellucida facilitates manipulations of mammalian oocytes and early embryos, and problems related to their subsequent culture are commonly overestimated. This approach enables radical modifications to somatic cell nuclear transfer, and the handmade cloning (HMC) technique is now successfully applied to an increasing numbers of species. HMC radically decreases costs and the need for a skilled workforce; furthermore, it increases productivity, enables cryopreservation, and results in birth rates comparable, or even higher, than those achievable by micromanipulation-based traditional cloning (TC). The new technique can accelerate technology transfer and standardization and, eventually, might contribute to the widespread application of cloning. Additionally, HMC offers unique possibilities for the automation of somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:17434218

  12. Nuclear interlevel transfer driven by electronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.; Rinker, G.

    1985-01-01

    We show how a gamma-ray laser might be made by optically exciting a transfer of population from a long-lived isomer to an energetically adjacent short-lived state of the same nucleus. We compare the advantages of using transitions of high multipolarity versus transitions of low multi-polarity. Preliminary numerical investigations of the mechanism show it to be somewhat favorable. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Ultrafast Charge Transfer of a Valence Double Hole in Glycine Driven Exclusively by Nuclear Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2015-10-01

    We explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K -shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we find that the double hole is transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. The nuclear displacements along specific vibrational modes are of the order of 15% of a typical chemical bond between carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms and about 30% for bonds involving hydrogen atoms. The time required for the hole transfer corresponds to less than half a vibrational period of the involved nuclear modes. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. It also indicates that in x-ray imaging experiments, in which ionization is unavoidable, valence electron redistribution caused by nuclear dynamics might be much faster than previously anticipated. Thus, non-Born-Oppenheimer effects may affect the apparent electron densities extracted from such measurements.

  14. Disposal modes for Mars transfer nuclear propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, Michael L.; Friedlander, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    A managed disposal approach is proposed that would place the nuclear stage or vehicle in a highly stable orbit at modest cost to mission performance. The approach requires only a small increase in initial mass in LEO, but should be included in preliminary trajectory design and performance calculations. The mass penalty is expected to be larger for all-up flight profiles, or in cases of high-thrust propulsion systems for the cargo vehicle.

  15. Nanocontact electrification: patterned surface charges affecting adhesion, transfer, and printing.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jesse J; Barry, Chad R; Knuesel, Robert J; Wang, Xinyu; Jacobs, Heiko O

    2011-06-01

    Contact electrification creates an invisible mark, overlooked and often undetected by conventional surface spectroscopic measurements. It impacts our daily lives macroscopically during electrostatic discharge and is equally relevant on the nanoscale in areas such as soft lithography, transfer, and printing. This report describes a new conceptual approach to studying and utilizing contact electrification beyond prior surface force apparatus and point-contact implementations. Instead of a single point contact, our process studies nanocontact electrification that occurs between multiple nanocontacts of different sizes and shapes that can be formed using flexible materials, in particular, surface-functionalized poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps and other common dielectrics (PMMA, SU-8, PS, PAA, and SiO(2)). Upon the formation of conformal contacts and forced delamination, contacted regions become charged, which is directly observed using Kelvin probe force microscopy revealing images of charge with sub-100-nm lateral resolution. The experiments reveal chemically driven interfacial proton exchange as the dominant charging mechanism for the materials that have been investigated so far. The recorded levels of uncompensated charges approach the theoretical limit that is set by the dielectric breakdown strength of the air gap that forms as the surfaces are delaminated. The macroscopic presence of the charges is recorded using force-distance curve measurements involving a balance and a micromanipulator to control the distance between the delaminated objects. Coulomb attraction between the delaminated surfaces reaches 150 N/m(2). At such a magnitude, the force finds many applications. We demonstrate the utility of printed charges in the fields of (i) nanoxerography and (ii) nanotransfer printing whereby the smallest objects are ∼10 nm in diameter and the largest objects are in the millimeter to centimeter range. The printed charges are also shown to affect the electronic

  16. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers. 970.4402-4 Section 970.4402-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Management and Operating Contractor...

  17. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers. 970.4402-4 Section 970.4402-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Management and Operating Contractor...

  18. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers. 970.4402-4 Section 970.4402-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Management and Operating Contractor...

  19. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well.

    PubMed

    Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-06-01

    In this issue, Chung et al. (2014) generate human embryonic stem cells by fusing an adult somatic cell to a previously enucleated human oocyte, in agreement with recent reports by the Mitalipov and Egli groups. We can now safely say that human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well. PMID:24905159

  20. Nuclear Waste Cross Site Transfer Pump Operational Resonance Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    HAUCK, F.M.

    1999-12-01

    Two single-volute, multi-stage centrifugal pumps are installed at a nuclear waste transfer station operated by the Department of Energy in Hanford, WA. The two parallel 100% pumps are Variable Frequency Drive operated and designed to transport waste etc.

  1. Theoretical studies on shaking processes in nuclear transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Nandi, Tapan

    2015-09-01

    The probabilities of shaking processes during nuclear transfer reactions have been studied using the Mukoyama formalism after the re-examination of formalism for β-decay processes. Electron shakeoff probabilities have been calculated for the α-transfer reaction in the range of Z = 10- 50. The Z-dependence on the shakeoff probabilities so obtained has been represented by an analytical equation with two parameters. The formalism has been applied on a typical nuclear transfer reaction Fe5626 +C126 →Ni6028 +Be84 and it is found that electron shakeup, shakedown and shakeoff probabilities dominate for low l quantum number of the respective shells of the projectile-like fragment ion. However, for a particular value of l these processes show high probabilities for low values of n quantum number.

  2. Nuclear electric power for multimegawatt orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casagrande, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Multimegawatt nuclear propulsion is an attractive option for orbit transfer vehicles. The masses of these platforms are expected to exceed the capability of a single launch from Earth necessitating assembly in space in a parking orbit. The OTV would transfer the platform from the parking orbit to the operational orbit and then return for the next mission. Electric propulsion is advantageous because of the high specific impulse achieved by the technology, 1000 to 5000 s and beyond, to reduce the propellant required. Nuclear power is attractive as the power system because of the weight savings over solar systems in the multimegawatt regime, and multimegawatts of power are required. A conceptual diagram is shown of an OTV with a command control module using electric thrusters powered from an SP-100 class nuclear reactor power system.

  3. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state. PMID:23683578

  4. Measurement of heat transfer coefficients by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Gore, John C

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate an experimental method for the measurement of heat transfer coefficient for a fluid system by magnetic resonance imaging. In this method, the temporal variation of thermally induced nuclear shielding is monitored and the average heat transfer coefficient is measured as a function of fluid velocity. We examine the cases of natural convection and forced convection at fluid velocity up to 0.8 m s(-1). These cases correspond to low dimensionless Biot (Bi) number where the heat transfer is limited by thermal convection. We demonstrate the NMR method for two simple geometries, a cylinder and a sphere, to experimentally determine the heat transfer coefficient (h) in two NMR imaging and spectroscopy systems through measuring three NMR parameters, the chemical shift, magnetization and spin self diffusion coefficient. PMID:18524523

  5. Do Learning Strategies Affect Adults' Transfer of Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Nina; Taraban, Roman

    A study of 113 graduate students in a college of education explored how readily they would apply their knowledge about transfer of learning to a personally relevant teaching task. One group practiced integration; participants were asked to think about concepts they were learning in terms of the three elements of the integration strategy. A second…

  6. An experimental test of whether habitat corridors affect pollen transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Patricia A.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2005-02-01

    Abstract. Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are thought to be diminished when habitat patches are joined by a corridor. A key assumption is that corridors facilitate exchange rates of organisms between otherwise isolated patches. If the organisms are pollinators, corridors may be important for maintaining genetically viable populations of the plants that they pollinate. We tested the hypothesis that corridors increase the movement of insect pollinators into patches of habitat and thereby increase pollen transfer for two species of plants, one pollinated by butterflies (Lantana camara) and the other by bees and wasps (Rudbeckia hirta). We worked in an experimental landscape consisting of 40 greater than or equal to 1-ha patches of early-successional habitat in a matrix of forest. Within each of eight experimental units, two patches were connected by a corridor (150 X 25 m), and three were not. Patch shape varied to control for the area added by the presence of a corridor. Differences in patch shape also allowed us to test alternative hypotheses of how corridors might function. The Traditional Corridor Hypothesis posits that corridors increase immigration and emigration by functioning as movement conduits between patches. The Drift Fence Hypothesis posits that corridors function by ‘‘capturing’’ organisms dispersing through the matrix, redirecting them into associated habitat patches. Using fluorescent powder to track pollen, we found that pollen transfer by butterflies between patches connected by a corridor was significantly higher than between unconnected patches (all values mean plus or minus 1 SE: 59% plus or minus 9.2% vs. 25% plus or minus 5.2% of flowers receiving pollen). Likewise, pollen transfer by bees and wasps was significantly higher between connected patches than between unconnected patches (30% plus or minus 4.2% vs. 14.5% plus or minus 2.2%). These results support the Traditional Corridor Hypothesis. There was little support, however

  7. Nuclear transfer preserves the nuclear genome of freeze-dried mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Eiji; Li, Chong; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-12-01

    Mouse spermatozoa can be freeze dried without losing genetic integrity and reproductive potential. However, it is not known if freeze-dried mouse cells similarly maintain their genetic integrity and developmental potential following nuclear transfer. Here, we investigated the developmental capacity and embryonic stem (ES) cell derivation of reconstructed oocytes by nuclear transfer using freeze-dried cumulus or ES cells. Cumulus and ES cells were lyophilized overnight and stored at 4 C for up to 1 week. After rehydration, all cells showed membrane damage and were unviable. However, following nuclear transfer, 1-4% of the reconstructed oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage. A total of five nuclear transfer ES (ntES) cell lines were generated from blastocysts and morulae. All ntES cell lines had normal karyotypes and were positive for the ES-cell-specific markers (alkaline phosphatase, Oct3/4 and Nanog). After aggregation of ntES cells with fertilized embryos, chimeric mice with a high level of coat color chimerism were generated. Our findings show that the genomic integrity of cells can be maintained after freeze-drying and that it is possible to produce offspring from the cells using nuclear transfer techniques. PMID:18854641

  8. Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-01-13

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  9. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  11. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  12. Initial solidification phenomena: Factors affecting heat transfer in strip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolli, Paolo

    In the last few years a few companies have announced the final stage of the commercial development of strip casting of steels. In strip casting heat extraction and productivity are limited by the thermal resistance at the interface between processed material and moving mold (rolls for twin-roll strip casters). Among many factors influencing interfacial heat transfer, films of various composition, either formed during casting or deposited before casting on the surface of the rolls, melt superheat and gas atmosphere composition can have a significantly positive or negative effect on the achieved heat transfer rate. From an industrial point view, methods to improve interfacial heat transfer rates must be found, in order to increase productivity. The objective of this research project is to assess if it is feasible to improve heat transfer rates during solidification of steel in direct contact with a copper mold: (1) by the application of thin coatings on the mold surface; (2) by adding a reactive gas species containing sulfur in the gas shrouding where casting is performed. To address the former, solidification experiments were performed with the mold surface either kept uncoated or coated with coatings of different compositions. To address the latter, the experiments were performed in gas shrouding atmospheres with or without sulphydric acid. It was observed that the resulting heat extraction rates were improved by the application of certain coatings and by the addition of H2S to the gas atmosphere. These findings prove that the application of coatings and the use of small amounts of reactive gaseous species containing sulfur may be methods to increase productivity in strip casting. The effect of superheat and the effect of naturally deposited oxides (Mn-oxide) were also evaluated experimentally. A numerical study of the effect of the critical undercooling on the productivity of a twin-roll strip caster showed that the maximum allowable casting speed can be increased

  13. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-21

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  14. Method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, K; Prukudom, S; Cibelli, J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a detailed methodology for somatic cell nuclear transfer-cloning of zebrafish. We aim to place the reader in a virtual lab experience to assist acquisition of the technical skills required for reproducing the published protocol. All materials, including catalog numbers for reagents and techniques for their preparation, are provided. Our protocols describe laser inactivation of egg chromosomes, the transfer of a cell through the oocyte micropyle, and spontaneous activation of the reconstructed embryo. High-quality eggs are the key to cloning success, and Chinook salmon ovarian fluid is indispensable for keeping eggs arrested at the metaphase of meiosis II. This protocol continues to be refined by our laboratory. However, naive investigators should be able to apply it in its present form to generate cloned zebrafish. PMID:27443929

  15. Method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Cibelli, Jose B

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been a well-known technique for decades and widely applied to generate identical animals, including ones with genetic alterations. The system has been demonstrated successfully in zebrafish. The elaborated requirements of SCNT, however, limit reproducibility of the established model to a few groups in zebrafish research community. In this chapter, we meticulously outline each step of the published protocol as well as preparations of equipments and reagents used in zebrafish SCNT. All describable detailed-tips are elaborated in texts and figures. PMID:21924165

  16. Modeling transient heat transfer in nuclear waste repositories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-09-30

    The heat of high-level nuclear waste may be generated and released from a canister at final disposal sites. The waste heat may affect the engineering properties of waste canisters, buffers, and backfill material in the emplacement tunnel and the host rock. This study addresses the problem of the heat generated from the waste canister and analyzes the heat distribution between the buffer and the host rock, which is considered as a radial two-layer heat flux problem. A conceptual model is first constructed for the heat conduction in a nuclear waste repository and then mathematical equations are formulated for modeling heat flow distribution at repository sites. The Laplace transforms are employed to develop a solution for the temperature distributions in the buffer and the host rock in the Laplace domain, which is numerically inverted to the time-domain solution using the modified Crump method. The transient temperature distributions for both the single- and multi-borehole cases are simulated in the hypothetical geological repositories of nuclear waste. The results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal field are significantly affected by the decay heat of the waste canister, the thermal properties of the buffer and the host rock, the disposal spacing, and the thickness of the host rock at a nuclear waste repository. PMID:19376651

  17. Propagation of elite rescue dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of two oocyte activation culture media to produce cloned dogs from an elite rescue dog and to analyze their behavioral tendencies. In somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure, fused couplets were activated by calcium ionophore treatment for 4 min, cultured in two media: modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) with 1.9 mmol/L 6-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) (SOF-DMAP) or porcine zygote medium (PZM-5) with 1.9 mmol/L DMAP (PZM-DMAP) for 4 h, and then were transferred into recipients. After embryo transfer, pregnancy was detected in one out of three surrogate mothers that received cloned embryos from the PZM-DMAP group (33.3%), and one pregnancy (25%) was detected in four surrogate mothers receiving cloned embryos from the SOF-DMAP group. Each pregnant dog gave birth to one healthy cloned puppy by cesarean section. We conducted the puppy aptitude test with two cloned puppies; the two cloned puppies were classified as the same type, accepting humans and leaders easily. The present study indicated that the type of medium used in 6-DMAP culture did not increase in cloning efficiency and dogs cloned using donor cells derived from one elite dog have similar behavioral tendencies. PMID:26387964

  18. Nuclear transfer procedures in the ovine can induce early embryo fragmentation and compromise cloned embryo development.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian; Cheng, Lei; Su, Guanghua; Kang, Feng; Wu, Xia; Bai, Chunling; Zhang, Li; Li, Guang-Peng

    2011-07-01

    Cytoplasmic fragmentations are frequently observed in early mammalian embryos, and especially in the human. In our research we have observed subtle clues that the occurrence of fragmentation was most likely a result of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) protocols, and in particular, the in vitro culture system. In this study we examined various putative factors that might induce early embryo fragmentation in the ovine. The results indicate that nuclear transfer protocols such as the fusion parameter, activation treatment, and especially the choice of culture medium affected embryo cleavage rates and resulted in a higher incidence of fragmented embryos. Upon using the same fusion parameter, activation parameters that were based upon amino acids containing synthetic oviduct fluids (SOFaa) culture system resulted in significantly lower fragmentation rates than when utilizing a Charles Rosenkrans 1 (CR1aa) culture system. Fragmented embryos typically exhibited irregular numbers of blastomeres with the majority of blastomeres devoid of chromatin. Factors such as fusion DC pulse, activation treatment and culture system led to higher fragmentation and also affected in vitro and in vivo embryo development. The SOFaa based culture system produced a higher number of quality NT embryos resulting in higher pregnancy rates and the birth of live lambs as compared to the CR1aa based system (P<0.05). We conclude that early embryo fragmentation in the ovine is caused by suboptimal cloning protocols, and NT embryo development is especially affected by the culture system used. PMID:21700405

  19. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  20. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  1. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos. PMID:27459580

  2. Genetic Drift Can Compromise Mitochondrial Replacement by Nuclear Transfer in Human Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Emmanuele, Valentina; Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J; Sun, Bruce; Lallos, Gregory; Paull, Daniel; Zimmer, Matthew; Pagett, Shardonay; Prosser, Robert W; Sauer, Mark V; Hirano, Michio; Egli, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Replacement of mitochondria through nuclear transfer between oocytes of two different women has emerged recently as a strategy for preventing inheritance of mtDNA diseases. Although experiments in human oocytes have shown effective replacement, the consequences of small amounts of mtDNA carryover have not been studied sufficiently. Using human mitochondrial replacement stem cell lines, we show that, even though the low levels of heteroplasmy introduced into human oocytes by mitochondrial carryover during nuclear transfer often vanish, they can sometimes instead result in mtDNA genotypic drift and reversion to the original genotype. Comparison of cells with identical oocyte-derived nuclear DNA but different mtDNA shows that either mtDNA genotype is compatible with the nucleus and that drift is independent of mitochondrial function. Thus, although functional replacement of the mitochondrial genome is possible, even low levels of heteroplasmy can affect the stability of the mtDNA genotype and compromise the efficacy of mitochondrial replacement. PMID:27212703

  3. Stimulating the cerebellum affects visuomotor adaptation but not intermanual transfer of learning

    PubMed Central

    Block, Hannah; Celnik, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    When systematic movement errors occur, the brain responds with a systematic change in motor behavior. This type of adaptive motor learning can transfer intermanually; adaptation of movements of the right hand in response to training with a perturbed visual signal (visuomotor adaptation) may carry over to the left hand. While visuomotor adaptation has been studied extensively, it is unclear whether the cerebellum, a structure involved in adaptation, is important for intermanual transfer as well. We addressed this question with three experiments in which subjects reached with their right hands as a 30° visuomotor rotation was introduced. Subjects received anodal or sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the trained (Experiment 1) or untrained (Experiment 2) hemisphere of the cerebellum, or, for comparison, motor cortex (M1). After the training period, subjects reached with their left hand, without visual feedback, to assess intermanual transfer of learning aftereffects. Stimulation of the right cerebellum caused faster adaptation, but none of the stimulation sites affected transfer. To ascertain whether cerebellar stimulation would increase transfer if subjects learned faster as well as a larger amount, in Experiment 3 anodal and sham cerebellar groups experienced a shortened training block such that the anodal group learned more than sham. Despite the difference in adaptation magnitude, transfer was similar across these groups, although smaller than in Experiment 1. Our results suggest that intermanual transfer of visuomotor learning does not depend on cerebellar activity, and that the number of movements performed at plateau is an important predictor of transfer. PMID:23625383

  4. Factors affecting transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from made tea to tea infusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Zhu, Lizhong; Luo, Lan

    2006-06-14

    Factors affecting transfer percentages of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated, including tea variety, tea/water ratio (TWR, g/mL), brewing times, washed tea or unwashed tea, and covered cup or uncovered cup. It was observed that %PAH transfer varied with tea variety and increased with the decrease of TWR. The mean %PAH transfer with TWR = 1/150 was 1.12 and 1.65 times higher than that with TWR = 1/100 and 1/50, respectively. %PAH transfer reduced greatly as the brewing times increased. The mean %PAH transfer in the first brewing time occupied 51.6% of the total three mean %PAH transfers in the three brewing times. The mean %PAH transfer decreased by 30.4% after the tea had been washed immediately before brewing. Brewing the tea within uncovered cup diminished %PAH transfer by a degree of 4.31-31.7% compared to brewing the tea within a covered cup. PMID:16756366

  5. Factors affecting the efficiency of foal production in a commercial oocyte transfer program.

    PubMed

    Riera, Fernando L; Roldán, Jaime E; Gomez, José; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    Transfer of donor oocytes to the oviducts of inseminated recipient mares (oocyte transfer, OT) presents a valuable method for production of foals from otherwise infertile mares. Little information is available, however, on factors affecting success of OT in a clinical setting. We report the findings over three breeding seasons in a commercial OT program developed at an equine embryo transfer center in Argentina. Overall, 25 mares were enrolled, and 197 follicle aspiration procedures were performed. The average mare age was 23 years. Follicle aspiration was performed with a needle placed through the flank; the oocyte recovery rate per follicle aspirated was 149 of 227 (66%). Induction of donor ovulation with deslorelin + hCG resulted in a significantly higher oocyte recovery rate than did induction with deslorelin alone (75% vs. 58%). There was no significant effect of mare age (17-20, 21-24, or 25-27 years) on oocyte recovery rate. Twelve oocytes were degenerating or lost during handling; transfer of the remaining 137 oocytes resulted in 42 pregnancies (31%) at 14 days. Of these, 32 (23% per transfer) went on to produce a foal or ongoing pregnancy. Transfer of oocytes recovered with a compact cumulus, without donor follicle induction, or less than 20 hours after induction was associated with a significantly reduced pregnancy rate (1/16, 6%), as was use of noncycling, hormone-treated recipients (2/22, 9%). To evaluate management factors affecting pregnancy rate, noncycling, hormone-treated recipients were disregarded, and only procedures using mature (expanded cumulus) oocytes recovered and transferred on the standard schedule (n = 99) were included. Mare age did not significantly affect rates of pregnancy or pregnancy loss. Similar pregnancy rates were obtained using recipients inseminated from 1 to 27 hours before transfer. Counterintuitively, insemination of recipients immediately (1-2 hours) after aspiration of the recipient follicle was associated with

  6. Trace Metals Affect Early Maternal Transfer of Immune Components in the Feral Pigeon.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Haussy, C; Frantz, A

    2016-01-01

    Maternal early transfers of immune components influence eggs' hatching probability and nestlings' survival. They depend on females' own immunity and, because they are costly, on their physiological state. Therefore, trace metals, whether toxic and immunosuppressive (e.g., lead, cadmium, etc.) or necessary and immunostimulant (e.g., zinc, copper, iron, etc.), are likely to affect the amount of immune components transferred into the eggs. It may also vary with plumage eumelanin level, which is known to be linked to immunity, to transfer of antibodies, and to metal detoxification. In feral pigeons (Columba livia) injected with an antigen and experimentally exposed to lead and/or zinc (two highly abundant trace metals in urban areas), we measured specific antibody transfer and concentrations of two antimicrobial proteins (lysozyme and ovotransferrin) in eggs. As expected, lead had negative effects on specific antibody transfer, while zinc positively affected lysozyme egg concentrations. Moreover, eggs from lead-exposed females exhibited higher ovotransferrin concentrations; because it binds metal ions, ovotransferrin may enable egg detoxification and embryo protection. Finally, eggs' lysozyme concentrations increased with plumage darkness of females not exposed to zinc, while the relation was opposite among zinc-exposed females, suggesting that benefits and costs of plumage melanism depend on trace metal environmental levels. Overall, our study underlines the potential ecotoxicological effects of trace metals on maternal transfers of immune components and the role of plumage melanism in modulating these effects. PMID:27153130

  7. Affective imagery and acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Keller, Carmen; Visschers, Vivianne; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between the content of spontaneous associations with nuclear power plants and the acceptance of using new-generation nuclear power plants to replace old ones. The study also considered gender as a variable. A representative sample of the German- and French-speaking population of Switzerland (N= 1,221) was used. Log-linear models revealed significant two-way interactions between the association content and acceptance, association content and gender, and gender and acceptance. Correspondence analysis revealed that participants who were opposed to nuclear power plants mainly associated nuclear power plants with risk, negative feelings, accidents, radioactivity, waste disposal, military use, and negative consequences for health and environment; whereas participants favoring nuclear power plants mainly associated them with energy, appearance descriptions of nuclear power plants, and necessity. Thus, individuals opposing nuclear power plants had both more concrete and more diverse associations with them than people who were in favor of nuclear power plants. In addition, participants who were undecided often mentioned similar associations to those participants who were in favor. Males more often expressed associations with energy, waste disposal, and negative health effects. Females more often made associations with appearance descriptions, negative feelings, and negative environmental effects. The results further suggest that acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants was higher in the German-speaking part of the country, where all of the Swiss nuclear power plants are physically located. Practical implications for risk communication are discussed. PMID:21977961

  8. Development of porcine tetraploid somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos is influenced by oocyte nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Liu, Di; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Liang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Peng, Fu-Gang; Bai, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Cloning efficiency in mammalian systems remains low because reprogramming of donor cells is frequently incomplete. Nuclear factors in the oocyte are removed by enucleation, and this removal may adversely affect reprogramming efficiency. Here, we investigated the role of porcine oocyte nuclear factors during reprogramming. We introduced somatic cell nuclei into intact MII oocytes to establish tetraploid somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos containing both somatic nuclei and oocyte nuclei. We then examined the influence of the oocyte nucleus on tetraploid SCNT embryo development by assessing characteristics including pronucleus formation, cleavage rate, and blastocyst formation. Overall, tetraploid SCNT embryos have a higher developmental competence than do standard diploid SCNT embryos. Therefore, we have established an embryonic model in which a fetal fibroblast nucleus and an oocyte metaphase II plate coexist. Tetraploid SCNT represents a new research platform that is potentially useful for examining interactions between donor nuclei and oocyte nuclei. This platform should facilitate further understanding of the roles played by nuclear factors during reprogramming. PMID:26503330

  9. Nuclear remodeling in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos using MG132-treated recipient oocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, Daniel; Beaujean, Nathalie; Ruffini, Sylvie; Vignon, Xavier; Gall, Laurence

    2010-12-01

    The early events in the nuclear reprogramming process during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) consist of morphological remodeling of the donor nucleus including premature chromosome condensation (PCC). In the present study, the objective was to increase oocyte M-Phase Promoting Factor (MPF) kinase activity and to examine the fate of the donor nucleus and the development of SCNT embryos thereafter. Indeed, in controls, recipient oocytes activated upon nuclear transfer, undergo a decrease in MPF activity, responsible for the inability to promote PCC in 77.8% of reconstituted embryos. Here we showed that exposure of the recipient oocyte to the proteasome inhibitor MG132 prior to fusion inhibited the degradation of cyclin B, which normally occurred immediately after activation by electro stimulation, and therefore sustained a high level of MPF. Treatment with MG132 also significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos with PCC when compared to the nontreated SCNT control embryos (94.1 vs. 22.2%, respectively, p < 0.01). The frequency of development to the blastocyst stage did not differ between MG132-treated or untreated recipient oocytes. However, we observed a significant increase of the total cells number in embryos produced after MG132 treatment. Investigation of the global nuclear organization by immunodetection of heterochromatin protein 1 (CBX1) showed that SCNT embryos derived from MG132-treated recipient oocytes displayed organization patterns similar to the ones observed in IVF embryos in contrast to the nontreated SCNT controls. Taken together, these results suggest that the PCC induced by MG132 treatment allows reorganization of the chromatin at an appropriate time potentially, leading to better reprogramming. PMID:21108537

  10. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  11. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  12. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  13. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  14. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  15. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  16. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 4: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  18. Factors affecting recognition of cancer risks of nuclear workers.

    PubMed Central

    Kneale, G W; Stewart, A M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To discover whether direct estimates of the risks of cancer for nuclear workers agree with indirect estimates based on survivors of the atomic bomb; whether relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer are the same for workers and survivors, and whether dosimetry standards are sufficiently uniform to allow pooling of data from different nuclear industrial sites. METHOD--Data from five nuclear sites in the United States were included in a cohort analysis that as well as controlling for all the usual factors also allowed for possible effects of three cancer modulating factors (exposure age, cancer latency, and year of exposure). This analysis was first applied to three distinct cohorts, and then to two sets of pooled data. RESULTS--From each study cohort there was evidence of a risk of cancer related to dose, and evidence that the extra radiogenic cancers had the same overall histological manifestations as naturally occurring cancers and were largely the result of exposures after 50 years of age causing deaths after 70 years. There were, however, significant differences between the five sets of risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS--Although the risks of cancer in nuclear workers were appreciably higher than estimates based on the cancer experiences of survivors of the atomic bomb, some uncertainties remained as there were non-uniform standards of dosimetry in the nuclear sites. The differences between nuclear workers and survivors of the atomic bomb were largely the result of relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer being totally different for workers and survivors and, in the occupational data, there were no signs of the special risks of leukaemia found in atomic bomb data and other studies of effects of high doses. PMID:7663636

  19. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  20. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  1. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  2. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7. PMID:26746137

  3. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Phuc T; Renslow, Ryan S; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N; Lindemann, Stephen R; Fredrickson, James K; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  4. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  5. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair. PMID:26042867

  6. Phenotypes of Aging Postovulatory Oocytes After Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Reum; Shimoike, Takashi; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kishigami, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    Oocytes rapidly lose their developmental potential after ovulation, termed postovulatory oocyte aging, and often exhibit characteristic phenotypes, such as cytofragmentation, abnormal spindle shapes, and chromosome misalignments. Here, we reconstructed mouse oocytes using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to reveal the effect of somatic cell-derived nuclei on oocyte physiology during aging. Normal oocytes started undergoing cytofragmentation 24 hours after oocyte collection; however, this occurred earlier in SCNT oocytes and was more severe at 48 hours, suggesting that the transferred somatic cell nuclei affected oocyte physiology. We found no difference in the status of acetylated α-tubulin (Ac-Tub) and α-tubulin (Tub) between normal and SCNT aging oocytes, but unlike normal oocytes, aging SCNT oocytes did not have astral microtubules. Interestingly, aging SCNT oocytes displayed more severely scattered chromosomes or irregularly shaped spindles. Observations of the microfilaments showed that, in normal oocytes, there was a clear actin ring beneath the plasma membrane and condensed microfilaments around the spindle (the actin cap) at 0 hours, and the actin filaments started degenerating at 1 hour, becoming completely disrupted and distributed to the cytoplasm at 24 hours. By contrast, in SCNT oocytes, an actin cap formed around the transplanted nuclei within 1 hour of SCNT, which was still present at 24 hours. Thus, SCNT oocytes age in a similar but distinct way, suggesting that they not only contain nuclei with abnormal epigenetics but are also physiologically different. PMID:27253626

  7. Evaluating recipient and embryo factors that affect pregnancy rates of embryo transfer in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Spell, A R; Beal, W E; Corah, L R; Lamb, G C

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of corpus luteum characteristics, progesterone concentration, donor-recipient synchrony, embryo quality, type, and developmental stage on pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. We synchronized 763 potential recipients for estrus using one of two synchronization protocols: two doses of PGF2alpha (25 mg i.m.) given 11 d apart (Location 1); and, a single norgestomet implant for 7 d with one dose of PGF2alpha (25 mg i.m.) 24 h before implant removal (Location 2). At embryo transfer, ovaries were examined by rectal palpation and ultrasonography. Of the 526 recipients presented for embryo transfer, 122 received a fresh embryo and 326 received a frozen embryo. Pregnancy rates were greater (P < 0.05) with fresh embryos (83%) than frozen-thawed embryos (69%). Pregnancy rates were not affected by embryo grade, embryo stage, donor-recipient synchrony, or the palpated integrity of the CL. Corpus luteum diameter and luteal tissue volume increased as days post-estrus for the recipients increased. However, pregnancy rates did not differ among recipients receiving embryos 6.5 to 8.5 days after estrus (P > 0.1). There was a significant, positive simple correlation between CL diameter or luteal tissue volume and plasma progesterone concentration (r = 0.15, P < 0.01 and r = 0.18, P < 0.01, respectively). There were no significant differences in mean CL diameter, luteal volume or plasma progesterone concentration among recipients that did or did not become pregnant after embryo transfer. We conclude that suitability of a potential embryo transfer recipient is determined by observed estrus and a palpable corpus luteum, regardless of size or quality. PMID:11480620

  8. Inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in serially recloned pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minhwa; Jang, Won-Gu; Hwang, Jeong Hee; Jang, Hoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Shim, Hosup; Hwang, Sung Soo; Oh, Keon Bong; Byun, Sung June; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Lee, Jeong Woong

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We success serial SCNT through the third generation using pig fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Donor-specific mtDNA in the recloned pigs was detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCNT affect mtDNA mounts. -- Abstract: Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established for the transmission of specific nuclear DNA. However, the fate of donor mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) remains unclear. Here, we examined the fate of donor mtDNA in recloned pigs through third generations. Fibroblasts of recloned pigs were obtained from offspring of each generation produced by fusion of cultured fibroblasts from a Minnesota miniature pig (MMP) into enucleated oocytes of a Landrace pig. The D-loop regions from the mtDNA of donor and recipient differ at nucleotide sequence positions 16050 (A{yields}T), 16062 (T{yields}C), and 16135 (G{yields}A). In order to determine the fate of donor mtDNA in recloned pigs, we analyzed the D-loop region of the donor's mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and real-time PCR. Donor mtDNA was successfully detected in all recloned offspring (F1, F2, and F3). These results indicate that heteroplasmy that originate from donor and recipient mtDNA is maintained in recloned pigs, resulting from SCNT, unlike natural reproduction.

  9. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  10. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  11. A background to nuclear transfer and its applications in agriculture and human therapeutic medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Keith HS

    2002-01-01

    The development of a single celled fertilized zygote to an animal capable of reproduction involves not only cell division but the differentiation or specialization to numerous cell types forming each tissue and organ of the adult animal. The technique of nuclear transfer allows the reconstruction of an embryo by the transfer of genetic material from a single donor cell, to an unfertilized egg from which the genetic material has been removed. Successful development of live offspring from such embryos demonstrates that the differentiated state of the donor nucleus is not fixed and can be reprogrammed by the egg cytoplasm to control embryo and fetal development. Nuclear transfer has many applications in agriculture and human medicine. This article will review some of the factors associated with the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer and outline the potential uses of the technology. PMID:12033731

  12. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  13. Reassessment of selected factors affecting siting of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.; Mubayi, V.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1997-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has performed a series of probabilistic consequence assessment calculations for nuclear reactor siting. This study takes into account recent insights into severe accident source terms and examines consequences in a risk based format consistent with the quantitative health objectives (QHOs) of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy. Simplified severe accident source terms developed in this study are based on the risk insights of NUREG-1150. The results of the study indicate that both the quantity of radioactivity released in a severe accident as well as the likelihood of a release are lower than those predicted in earlier studies. The accident risks using the simplified source terms are examined at a series of generic plant sites, that vary in population distribution, meteorological conditions, and exclusion area boundary distances. Sensitivity calculations are performed to evaluate the effects of emergency protective action assumptions on the risk of prompt fatality and latent cancers fatality, and population relocation. The study finds that based on the new source terms the prompt and latent fatality risks at all generic sites meet the QHOs of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy by margins ranging from one to more than three orders of magnitude. 4 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Thermoacoustic sensor for nuclear fuel temperaturemonitoring and heat transfer enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Alli; Steven L. Garrett

    2013-05-01

    A new acoustical sensing system for the nuclear power industry has been developed at The Pennsylvania State University in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratories. This sensor uses the high temperatures of nuclear fuel to convert a nuclear fuel rod into a standing-wave thermoacoustic engine. When a standing wave is generated, the sound wave within the fuel rod will be propagated, by acoustic radiation, through the cooling fluid within the reactor or spent fuel pool and can be monitored a remote location external to the reactor. The frequency of the sound can be correlated to an effective temperature of either the fuel or the surrounding coolant. We will present results for a thermoacoustic resonator built into a Nitonic-60 (stainless steel) fuel rod that requires only one passive component and no heat exchangers.

  15. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-03

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. In conclusion, these data suggested

  16. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-03

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system]more » and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. In conclusion, these data suggested that

  17. Impact of nuclear lattice relaxation on the excitation energy transfer along a chain of π -conjugated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, S. A.; Abbel, R.; Schenning, A. P. H. J.; Meijer, E. W.; Herz, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    We have investigated the extent to which delocalization of the ground-state and excited-state wave functions of a π -conjugated molecule affects the excitation energy transfer (EET) between such molecules. Using femtosecond photoluminescence spectroscopy, we experimentally monitored the EET along well-defined supramolecular chains of extended conjugated molecules. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations reveals that only a model incorporating a localized emitter and delocalized absorber wave function accurately reproduces these data. Our findings demonstrate that self-localization of the initially excited state, following fast relaxation of the nuclear lattice, has a significant impact on the EET dynamics in molecular assemblies.

  18. Fatal attraction: Explaining Russia's sensitive nuclear transfers to Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchinsky, Leah R.

    This paper explores Russia's sensitive nuclear assistance to Iran in an effort to determine why a supplier state might proliferate against its own apparent security interests. The goal is to help readers understand the supply-side dynamics of nuclear proliferation. Through careful reconstruction of the historical narrative, using open source data, this study tests the plausibility of a "fatalistic calculus" explanation, identified by Stephen Sestanovich as a possible driver for Russia's behavior. According to the hypothesis, Russia has cooperated with Iran as a way both to stay in the good graces of a neighbor that is suspected of developing nuclear weapons and to win short-term influence and profits. The paper also examines the role of other factors advanced in the existing supply-side literature, such as economic motives identified by physicist and nonproliferation scholar David Albright. The findings show that bureaucratic, economic and fatalistic factors have each played a role in motivating Russia's cooperation with Iran, with their relative importance shifting over time. Fatalism begets a strategy of Russian "minimaxing," in the lexicon of Russia scholar Robert Freedman, wherein Russia attempts to minimize damage to its relationship with the U.S. while maximizing influence in Iran via nuclear cooperation. Fatalism, as actualized by minimaxing, best explains Russia's behavior after former Russian president Vladmir Putin came to power, when the bureaucratic and economic arguments become less cogent.

  19. Single and Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions for Nuclear Moment Studies Toward Radioactive-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeva, R. L.; Georgiev, G. P.; Audi, G.; Cabaret, S.; Fiori, E.; Gaulard, C.; Hauschilda, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Risegari, L.; Blazhev, A.; Jolie, J.; Moschner, K.; Zell, K.-O.; Daugas, J.-M.; Faul, T.; Morel, P.; Roig, O.; Ferraton, M.; Ibrahim, F.

    2010-04-30

    This study is a part of an experimental program to measure nuclear moments in transfer reactions. It aims to probe for a first time the nuclear -spin orientation in multi-nucleon transfer. Fist experiments were performed to measure the quadrupole moment of an isomeric state in {sup 66}Cu (I{sup p}i 6{sup -}, E{sub x} = 1154 keV, T{sub 1/2} = 595(20) ns) in single nucleon transfer and the population of mus isomers in {sup 66}Cu and {sup 63}Ni in multi-nucleon transfer. The experimentally tested methodology allows broad applications toward more exotic species and feasibility of these reactions to produce species away from stability.

  20. Treating humanity as an inviolable end: an analysis of contraception and altered nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Masek, Lawrence

    2008-04-01

    I argue that contraception is morally wrong but that periodic abstinence (or natural family planning) is not. Further, I argue that altered nuclear transfer -- a proposed technique for creating human stem cells without destroying human embryos -- is morally wrong for the same reason that contraception is. Contrary to what readers might expect, my argument assumes nothing about the morality of cloning or abortion and requires no premises about God or natural teleology. Instead, I argue that contraception and altered nuclear transfer are morally wrong because they fail to treat humanity as an inviolable end. PMID:18480499

  1. Activation of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos by PLCZ cRNA injection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Rodriguez, Ramon M; Iager, Amy E; Beyhan, Zeki; Wang, Kai; Ragina, Neli P; Yoon, Sook-Young; Fissore, Rafael A; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-03-01

    The production of cloned animals by the transfer of a differentiated somatic cell into an enucleated oocyte circumvents fertilization. During fertilization, the sperm delivers a sperm-specific phospholipase C (PLCZ) that is responsible for triggering Ca(2)(+) oscillations and oocyte activation. During bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), oocyte activation is artificially achieved by combined chemical treatments that induce a monotonic rise in intracellular Ca(2)(+) and inhibit either phosphorylation or protein synthesis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that activation of bovine nuclear transfer embryos by PLCZ improves nuclear reprogramming. Injection of PLCZ cRNA into bovine SCNT units induced Ca(2)(+) oscillations similar to those observed after fertilization and supported high rates of blastocyst development similar to that seen in embryos produced by IVF. Furthermore, gene expression analysis at the eight-cell and blastocyst stages revealed a similar expression pattern for a number of genes in both groups of embryos. Lastly, levels of trimethylated lysine 27 at histone H3 in blastocysts were higher in bovine nuclear transfer embryos activated using cycloheximide and 6-dimethylaminopurine (DMAP) than in those activated using PLCZ or derived from IVF. These results demonstrate that exogenous PLCZ can be used to activate bovine SCNT-derived embryos and support the hypothesis that a fertilization-like activation response can enhance some aspects of nuclear reprogramming. PMID:19074500

  2. Effect of Cell Cycle Interactions and Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases on Development of Porcine Embryos Produced by Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Vitor B; Glanzner, Werner G; Mujica, Lady K S; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the positive effects of inhibiting histone deacetylase enzymes on cell reprogramming and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is affected by the cell cycle stage of nuclear donor cells and host oocytes at the time of embryo reconstruction. SCNT embryos were produced with metaphase II (MII) or telophase II (TII) cytoplasts and nuclear donor cells that were either at the G1-0 or G2/M stages. Embryos reconstructed with the different cell cycle combinations were treated or not with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Scriptaid for 15 h and then cultured in vitro for 7 days. Embryos reconstructed with MII-G1-0 and TII-G2/M developed to the blastocyst stage with a higher frequency compared to the other groups, confirming the importance of cell cycle interactions on cell reprogramming and SCNT embryo development. Treatment with HDACi improved development of SCNT embryos produced with MII but not TII cytoplasts, independently of the cell cycle stage of nuclear donor cells. These findings provide evidence that the positive effect of HDACi treatment on development of SCNT embryos depends upon cell cycle interactions between the host cytoplast and the nuclear donor cells. PMID:27281695

  3. How measurement artifacts affect cerebral autoregulation outcomes: A technical note on transfer function analysis.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; de Jong, Daan L K; Lagro, Joep; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is the mechanism that aims to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion during changes in blood pressure (BP). Transfer function analysis (TFA), the most reported method in literature to quantify CA, shows large between-study variability in outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of measurement artifacts in this variation. Specifically, the role of distortion in the BP and/or CBFV measurementon TFA outcomes was investigated. The influence of three types of artifacts on TFA outcomes was studied: loss of signal, motion artifacts, and baseline drifts. TFA metrics of signals without the simulated artifacts were compared with those of signals with artifacts. TFA outcomes scattered highly when more than 10% of BP signal or over 8% of the CBFV signal was lost, or when measurements contained one or more artifacts resulting from head movement. Furthermore, baseline drift affected interpretation of TFA outcomes when the power in the BP signal was 5 times the power in the LF band. In conclusion, loss of signal in BP and loss in CBFV, affects interpretation of TFA outcomes. Therefore, it is vital to validate signal quality to the defined standards before interpreting TFA outcomes. PMID:26935320

  4. One-two step transfer observed in 16O+11B nuclear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Burtebayev, N.

    2015-06-01

    The angular distribution measurements for 16O ion beam elastically scattered from 11B target of thickness 32.9μg/cm2 at energy 22.4 MeV had been performed in the cyclotron DC-60 INP NNC RK. The previous measurements for 16O+11B nuclear system at energies 27, 30, 32.5 and 35 MeV showed an increase in the differential cross-section at backward angles due to the contribution of cluster transfer. Such transfer process could not be described in terms of optical model (OM); it could be described within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation method implemented in FRESCO code. Both one (5Li) and two-step transfer (proton transfer followed by Alpha transfer) were taken into considerations. We have extracted the spectroscopic amplitude (SA) for the configuration 16O→11B+5Li.

  5. Ocean Acidification Affects the Phyto-Zoo Plankton Trophic Transfer Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Gemma; Flynn, Kevin J; Lindeque, Penelope K

    2016-01-01

    The critical role played by copepods in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry warrants an understanding of how these animals may respond to ocean acidification (OA). Whilst an appreciation of the potential direct effects of OA, due to elevated pCO2, on copepods is improving, little is known about the indirect impacts acting via bottom-up (food quality) effects. We assessed, for the first time, the chronic effects of direct and/or indirect exposures to elevated pCO2 on the behaviour, vital rates, chemical and biochemical stoichiometry of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. Bottom-up effects of elevated pCO2 caused species-specific biochemical changes to the phytoplanktonic feed, which adversely affected copepod population structure and decreased recruitment by 30%. The direct impact of elevated pCO2 caused gender-specific respiratory responses in A.tonsa adults, stimulating an enhanced respiration rate in males (> 2-fold), and a suppressed respiratory response in females when coupled with indirect elevated pCO2 exposures. Under the combined indirect+direct exposure, carbon trophic transfer efficiency from phytoplankton-to-zooplankton declined to < 50% of control populations, with a commensurate decrease in recruitment. For the first time an explicit role was demonstrated for biochemical stoichiometry in shaping copepod trophic dynamics. The altered biochemical composition of the CO2-exposed prey affected the biochemical stoichiometry of the copepods, which could have ramifications for production of higher tropic levels, notably fisheries. Our work indicates that the control of phytoplankton and the support of higher trophic levels involving copepods have clear potential to be adversely affected under future OA scenarios. PMID:27082737

  6. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Lea A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Raskopf, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5) directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5) on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell) growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation. PMID:24895598

  7. Ocean Acidification Affects the Phyto-Zoo Plankton Trophic Transfer Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Gemma; Flynn, Kevin J.; Lindeque, Penelope K.

    2016-01-01

    The critical role played by copepods in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry warrants an understanding of how these animals may respond to ocean acidification (OA). Whilst an appreciation of the potential direct effects of OA, due to elevated pCO2, on copepods is improving, little is known about the indirect impacts acting via bottom-up (food quality) effects. We assessed, for the first time, the chronic effects of direct and/or indirect exposures to elevated pCO2 on the behaviour, vital rates, chemical and biochemical stoichiometry of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. Bottom-up effects of elevated pCO2 caused species-specific biochemical changes to the phytoplanktonic feed, which adversely affected copepod population structure and decreased recruitment by 30%. The direct impact of elevated pCO2 caused gender-specific respiratory responses in A.tonsa adults, stimulating an enhanced respiration rate in males (> 2-fold), and a suppressed respiratory response in females when coupled with indirect elevated pCO2 exposures. Under the combined indirect+direct exposure, carbon trophic transfer efficiency from phytoplankton-to-zooplankton declined to < 50% of control populations, with a commensurate decrease in recruitment. For the first time an explicit role was demonstrated for biochemical stoichiometry in shaping copepod trophic dynamics. The altered biochemical composition of the CO2-exposed prey affected the biochemical stoichiometry of the copepods, which could have ramifications for production of higher tropic levels, notably fisheries. Our work indicates that the control of phytoplankton and the support of higher trophic levels involving copepods have clear potential to be adversely affected under future OA scenarios. PMID:27082737

  8. Passive heat-transfer means for nuclear reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, J.P.

    1982-06-10

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  9. Quantum state transfer between an optomechanical cavity and a diamond nuclear spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Hong-Ling; Yan, Run-Ying

    2016-08-01

    We explore an efficient scheme for transferring quantum state between an optomechanical cavity and nuclear spins of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, where quantum information can be efficiently stored (retrieved) into (from) the nuclear spin ensemble assisted by a mechanical resonator in a dispersive regime. Our scheme works for a broad range of cavity frequencies and might have potential applications in employing the nuclear spin ensemble as a memory in quantum information processing. The feasibility of our protocol is analyzed using currently available parameters.

  10. Quantum state transfer between an optomechanical cavity and a diamond nuclear spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Hong-Ling; Yan, Run-Ying

    2016-05-01

    We explore an efficient scheme for transferring quantum state between an optomechanical cavity and nuclear spins of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, where quantum information can be efficiently stored (retrieved) into (from) the nuclear spin ensemble assisted by a mechanical resonator in a dispersive regime. Our scheme works for a broad range of cavity frequencies and might have potential applications in employing the nuclear spin ensemble as a memory in quantum information processing. The feasibility of our protocol is analyzed using currently available parameters.

  11. 78 FR 67925 - Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... process it will follow in the development of such regulations (65 FR 13735). DOE has examined today's rule...-AA82 Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development AGENCY... final rule published on February 29, 2000, 65 FR 10685, as final, with changes. The final...

  12. Tie Tube Heat Transfer Modeling for Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Joshua A.; Starkey, Ryan P.; Lewis, Mark J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2007-01-30

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket systems have been shown to reduce the weight and cost of space vehicles to Mars and beyond by utilizing the reactor for power generation in the relatively long duration between burns in an interplanetary trajectory. No information, however, is available regarding engine and reactor-level operation of such bimodal systems. The purpose of this project is to generate engine and reactor models with sufficient fidelity and flexibility to accurately study the component-level effects of operating a propulsion-designed reactor at power generation levels. Previous development of a 1-D reactor and tie tube model found that ignoring heat generation inside of the tie tube leads to under-prediction of the temperature change and over-prediction of pressure change across the tie tube. This paper will present the development and results of a tie tube model that has been extended to account for heat generation, specifically in the moderator layer. This model is based on a 1-D distribution of power in the fuel elements and tie tubes, as a precursor to an eventual neutron-driven reactor model.

  13. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development? 770.7 Section 770.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7...

  14. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  15. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  16. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  17. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  18. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  19. High-fidelity transfer and storage of photon states in a single nuclear spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Wang, Ya; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Hien Tran, Thai; Momenzadeh, Ali S.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Wang, Ping; Yang, Wen; Stöhr, Rainer; Neumann, Philipp; Kosaka, Hideo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    Long-distance quantum communication requires photons and quantum nodes that comprise qubits for interaction with light and good memory capabilities, as well as processing qubits for the storage and manipulation of photons. Owing to the unavoidable photon losses, robust quantum communication over lossy transmission channels requires quantum repeater networks. A necessary and highly demanding prerequisite for these networks is the existence of quantum memories with long coherence times to reliably store the incident photon states. Here we demonstrate the high-fidelity (∼98%) coherent transfer of a photon polarization state to a single solid-state nuclear spin that has a coherence time of over 10 s. The storage process is achieved by coherently transferring the polarization state of a photon to an entangled electron–nuclear spin state of a nitrogen–vacancy centre in diamond. The nuclear spin-based optical quantum memory demonstrated here paves the way towards an absorption-based quantum repeater network.

  20. Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning.

  1. Noninertial coordinate time: A new concept affecting time standards, time transfers, and clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    Relativity compensations must be made in precise and accurate measurements whenever an observer is accelerated. Although many believe the Earth-centered frame is sufficiently inertial, accelerations of the Earth, as evidenced by the tides, prove that it is technically a noninertial system for even an Earth-based observer. Using the constant speed of light, a set of fixed remote clocks in an inertial frame can be synchronized to a fixed master clock transmitting its time in that frame. The time on the remote clock defines the coordinate time at that coordinate position. However, the synchronization procedure for an accelerated frame is affected, because the distance between the master and remote clocks is altered due to the acceleration of the remote clock toward or away from the master clock during the transmission interval. An exact metric that converts observations from noninertial frames to inertial frames was recently derived. Using this metric with other physical relationships, a new concept of noninertial coordinate time is defined. This noninertial coordinate time includes all relativity compensations. This new issue raises several timekeeping issues, such as proper time standards, time transfer process, and clock synchronization, all in a noninertial frame such as Earth.

  2. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  3. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  4. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  5. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  6. Significant improvement of mouse cloning technique by treatment with trichostatin A after somatic nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi . E-mail: kishigami@cdb.riken.jp; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Wakayama, Sayaka; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2006-02-03

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with epigenetic errors including abnormal DNA hypermethylation. Recently, we elucidated by using round spermatids that, after nuclear transfer, treatment of zygotes with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can remarkably reduce abnormal DNA hypermethylation depending on the origins of transferred nuclei and their genomic regions [S. Kishigami, N. Van Thuan, T. Hikichi, H. Ohta, S. Wakayama. E. Mizutani, T. Wakayama, Epigenetic abnormalities of the mouse paternal zygotic genome associated with microinsemination of round spermatids, Dev. Biol. (2005) in press]. Here, we found that 5-50 nM TSA-treatment for 10 h following oocyte activation resulted in more efficient in vitro development of somatic cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage from 2- to 5-fold depending on the donor cells including tail tip cells, spleen cells, neural stem cells, and cumulus cells. This TSA-treatment also led to more than 5-fold increase in success rate of mouse cloning from cumulus cells without obvious abnormality but failed to improve ES cloning success. Further, we succeeded in establishment of nuclear transfer-embryonic stem (NT-ES) cells from TSA-treated cloned blastocyst at a rate three times higher than those from untreated cloned blastocysts. Thus, our data indicate that TSA-treatment after SCNT in mice can dramatically improve the practical application of current cloning techniques.

  7. Cytoskeletal to Nuclear Strain Transfer Regulates YAP Signaling in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Tristan P.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Heo, Su-Jin; Shurden, Zach E.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces transduced to cells through the extracellular matrix are critical regulators of tissue development, growth, and homeostasis, and can play important roles in directing stem cell differentiation. In addition to force-sensing mechanisms that reside at the cell surface, there is growing evidence that forces transmitted through the cytoskeleton and to the nuclear envelope are important for mechanosensing, including activation of the Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) pathway. Moreover, nuclear shape, mechanics, and deformability change with differentiation state and have been likewise implicated in force sensing and differentiation. However, the significance of force transfer to the nucleus through the mechanosensing cytoskeletal machinery in the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiologic response remains unclear. Here we report that actomyosin-generated cytoskeletal tension regulates nuclear shape and force transmission through the cytoskeleton and demonstrate the differential short- and long-term response of mesenchymal stem cells to dynamic tensile loading based on the contractility state, the patency of the actin cytoskeleton, and the connections it makes with the nucleus. Specifically, we show that while some mechanoactive signaling pathways (e.g., ERK signaling) can be activated in the absence of nuclear strain transfer, cytoskeletal strain transfer to the nucleus is essential for activation of the YAP/TAZ pathway with stretch. PMID:26083918

  8. Nuclear transfer of synchronized african wild cat somatic cells into enucleated domestic cat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Jenkins, Jill A; Giraldo, Angelica; Harris, Rebecca F; King, Amy; Dresser, Betsy L; Pope, Charles Earle

    2003-09-01

    The African wild cat is one of the smallest wild cats and its future is threatened by hybridization with domestic cats. Nuclear transfer, a valuable tool for retaining genetic variability, offers the possibility of species continuation rather than extinction. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of somatic cell nuclei of the African wild cat (AWC) to dedifferentiate within domestic cat (DSH) cytoplasts and to support early development after nuclear transplantation. In experiment 1, distributions of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in each cell-cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry using cells cultured to confluency and disaggregated with pronase, trypsin, or mechanical separation. Trypsin (89.0%) and pronase (93.0%) yielded higher proportions of AWC nuclei in the G0/G1 phase than mechanical separation (82.0%). In contrast, mechanical separation yielded higher percentages of DSH nuclei in the G0/G1 phase (86.6%) than pronase (79.7%) or trypsin (74.2%) treatments. In both species, pronase induced less DNA damage than trypsin. In experiment 2, the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluency, and exposure to roscovitine on the distribution of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in various phases of the cell cycle were determined. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the dynamics of the cell cycle varied as culture conditions were modified. Specifically, a higher percentage of AWC and DSH nuclei were in the G0/G1 phase after cells were serum starved (83% vs. 96%) than were present in cycling cells (50% vs. 64%), after contact inhibition (61% vs. 88%), or after roscovitine (56% vs. 84%) treatment, respectively. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effects of cell synchronization and oocyte maturation (in vivo vs. in vitro) on the reconstruction and development of AWC-DSH- and DSH-DSH-cloned embryos. The method of cell synchronization did not affect the fusion and cleavage rate because only a slightly higher percentage of fused couplets cleaved when donor nuclei

  9. Nuclear transfer of synchronized African wild cat somatic cells into enucleated domestic cat oocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, M.C.; Jenkins, J.A.; Giraldo, A.; Harris, R.F.; King, A.; Dresser, B.L.; Pope, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The African wild cat is one of the smallest wild cats and its future is threatened by hybridization with domestic cats. Nuclear transfer, a valuable tool for retaining genetic variability, offers the possibility of species continuation rather than extinction. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of somatic cell nuclei of the African wild cat (AWC) to dedifferentiate within domestic cat (DSH) cytoplasts and to support early development after nuclear transplantation. In experiment 1, distributions of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in each cell-cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry using cells cultured to confluency and disaggregated with pronase, trypsin, or mechanical separation. Trypsin (89.0%) and pronase (93.0%) yielded higher proportions of AWC nuclei in the G0/G1 phase than mechanical separation (82.0%). In contrast, mechanical separation yielded higher percentages of DSH nuclei in the G0/G1 phase (86.6%) than pronase (79.7%) or trypsin (74.2%) treatments. In both species, pronase induced less DNA damage than trypsin. In experiment 2, the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluency, and exposure to roscovitine on the distribution of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in various phases of the cell cycle were determined. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the dynamics of the cell cycle varied as culture conditions were modified. Specifically, a higher percentage of AWC and DSH nuclei were in the G0/G1 phase after cells were serum starved (83% vs. 96%) than were present in cycling cells (50% vs. 64%), after contact inhibition (61% vs. 88%), or after roscovitine (56% vs. 84%) treatment, respectively. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effects of cell synchronization and oocyte maturation (in vivo vs. in vitro) on the reconstruction and development of AWC-DSH- and DSH-DSH-cloned embryos. The method of cell synchronization did not affect the fusion and cleavage rate because only a slightly higher percentage of fused couplets cleaved when donor nuclei

  10. 43 CFR 2807.15 - How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another Federal agency or out of Federal ownership? 2807.15 Section 2807.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU...

  11. 43 CFR 2807.15 - How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another Federal agency or out of Federal ownership? 2807.15 Section 2807.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU...

  12. 43 CFR 2807.15 - How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another Federal agency or out of Federal ownership? 2807.15 Section 2807.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU...

  13. 43 CFR 2807.15 - How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How is grant administration affected if the land my grant encumbers is transferred to another Federal agency or out of Federal ownership? 2807.15 Section 2807.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU...

  14. Learning What Matters: Exploring the Factors Affecting Learning Transfers in Child Welfare Competencies and Career Interest in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Aries Meng-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the factors impacting MSW students' interests and motivation to learn child welfare competencies, and how they affect learning transfer of the subject is important for the development of a knowledgeable, competent, and committed workforce that serves children and families in the United States. Practitioners need to attain…

  15. Effects of donor fibroblasts expressing OCT4 on bovine embryos generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Goissis, Marcelo D; Suhr, Steven T; Cibelli, Jose B

    2013-02-01

    The production of healthy, live, cloned animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been hampered by low efficiencies. Significant epigenetic changes must take place to ensure proper chromatin remodeling in SCNT. We hypothesized that exogenous expression of OCT4 in donor fibroblasts prior to its fusion with enucleated oocytes would facilitate SCNT reprogramming. We infected bovine adult fibroblasts with retroviral vectors containing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) only, or the OCT4 gene fused to YFP (YO). We found that development to the blastocyst stage was not different between NT-YFP and NT-YO groups. NT-YFP embryos had the fewest trophoblast cells, measured by numbers of CDX2-positive cells. Fibroblasts expressing OCT4 had reduced levels of histone 3 lysine 9 or 27 trimethylation (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, respectively). NT-YO blastocysts displayed higher H3K9me3 levels than IVF and NT-YFP embryos; however, they did not have different H3K27me3 levels. Levels of XIST mRNA expression in NT-YO and NT-YF were higher when compared to in vitro-fertilized blastocysts. We observed no differences in the expression of SOX2, NANOG, and CDX2. Although overexpression of OCT4 in donor cells increased H3K9me3 and did not reduce XIST gene expression, we show that a single transcription factor can affect the number of trophectoderm cells in bovine SCNT embryos. PMID:23276226

  16. Polarization Transfer from Ligands Hyperpolarized by Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Screening in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Min, Hlaing; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a valuable technique for ligand screening, because it exhibits high specificity toward chemical structure and interactions. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a recent advance in NMR methodology that enables the creation of non-equilibrium spin states, which can dramatically increase NMR sensitivity. Here, the transfer of such spin polarization from hyperpolarized ligand to protein is observed. Mixing hyperpolarized benzamidine with the serine protease trypsin, a "fingerprint" of enhanced protein signals is observed, which shows a different intensity profile than the equilibrium NMR spectrum of the protein, but coincides closely to the frequency profile of a saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiment. The DNP experiment benefits from hyperpolarization and enables observation of all frequencies in a single, rapid experiment. Based on these merits, it is an interesting alternative to the widely used STD experiment for identification of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:26315550

  17. No differences in sheep somatic cell nuclear transfer outcomes using serum-starved or actively growing donor granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Peura, T T; Hartwich, K M; Hamilton, H M; Walker, S K

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare serum-starved and non-starved donor cells in sheep nuclear transfer with a special emphasis on cloning outcomes. Sheep oocytes, derived either in vivo or in vitro, were fused with cultured serum-starved or actively growing adult granulosa cells. Resulting blastocysts were transferred to recipients fresh or after vitrification, and subsequent pregnancies followed to term. Donor cell treatment did not significantly affect preimplantation development, pregnancy rates, fetal loss or neonate survival rates. Of 22 lambs born, ten survived the immediate perinatal period but all succumbed at various timepoints within the first few weeks of life. The results of the study suggest that the use of serum-starved cells offers no advantages or disadvantages to cloning outcomes. Neither were significant differences in outcomes observed when using either in vivo- or in vitro-derived oocytes or embryos transferred fresh or after vitrification. Yet, these results continue to highlight problems associated with somatic cell cloning as indicated by offspring mortality. It remains unclear whether the high offspring mortality in the current study was related to species, associated with the cell lines used or the result of other causes. PMID:12921702

  18. External and Institutional Factors Affecting Community College Student-Transfer Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Debra L.

    A study was conducted to identify the environmental conditions and relationships between external and institutional conditions that have a significant effect upon student transfer activity. A sample of 78 colleges in 15 states were selected from institutions participating in a national transfer project; 42% were located in Texas or California. The…

  19. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Rudolf X.; Baker, Myles; Melko, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was designed to be propelled by a nuclear-thermal propulsion system. Several Mars transportation system architectures and their associated space vehicles were designed.

  20. Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Allen, J.; Hatarik, R.; Matthews, C.; O'Malley, P.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Howard, J.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rogers, J.; Sissom, D. J.; Pain, S. D.; Adekola, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Liang, F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pittman, S. T.

    2009-03-10

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  1. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  2. An inter-subspecies cloned buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) obtained by transferring of cryopreserved embryos via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, B Z; Yang, C Y; Li, R C; Qin, G S; Zhang, X F; Pang, C Y; Chen, M T; Huang, F X; Li, Z; Zheng, H Y; Huang, Y J; Liang, X W

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of cryopreservation of inter-subspecies cloned embryos in buffalo. In our experiment, river buffalo ear fibroblast nucleus was fused into swamp buffalo oocyte cytoplasm. The blastocyst formation rate for nuclear transfer of freshly thawed cells was not different from those of growing cells, confluent or serum-starved cells. A total of 122 cloned blastocysts derived from cryopreserved fibroblasts were cryopreserved and thawed, 37 were survived, the cryosurvival rate was 30.3%. The survived blastocysts were transferred into 15 recipient buffalos. Five of the recipients established pregnancy, but four of them aborted on day 53, 59, 145 and 179 of gestation respectively. One cross-bred buffalo (Murrah × Swamp buffalo (2n = 49) received three embryos delivered a 40.5 kg female calf by natural delivery on day 320 of gestation. Up to now (13-month old), the cloned calf has been growing well with no abnormity observed. These results demonstrated that cryopreservation of inter-subspecies cloned embryos is feasible to produce buffalo offspring. PMID:19788521

  3. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Park, Jin-Ki; Sorrell, Alice M.; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Woo, Jae-Seok; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Chang, Won-Kyong; Shim, Hosup

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  4. Reprogramming within hours following nuclear transfer into mouse but not human zygotes.

    PubMed

    Egli, Dieter; Chen, Alice E; Saphier, Genevieve; Ichida, Justin; Fitzgerald, Claire; Go, Kathryn J; Acevedo, Nicole; Patel, Jay; Baetscher, Manfred; Kearns, William G; Goland, Robin; Leibel, Rudolph L; Melton, Douglas A; Eggan, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Fertilized mouse zygotes can reprogram somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Human zygotes might therefore be useful for producing patient-derived pluripotent stem cells. However, logistical, legal and social considerations have limited the availability of human eggs for research. Here we show that a significant number of normal fertilized eggs (zygotes) can be obtained for reprogramming studies. Using these zygotes, we found that when the zygotic genome was replaced with that of a somatic cell, development progressed normally throughout the cleavage stages, but then arrested before the morula stage. This arrest was associated with a failure to activate transcription in the transferred somatic genome. In contrast to human zygotes, mouse zygotes reprogrammed the somatic cell genome to a pluripotent state within hours after transfer. Our results suggest that there may be a previously unappreciated barrier to successful human nuclear transfer, and that future studies could focus on the requirements for genome activation. PMID:21971503

  5. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. Thismore » is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.« less

  6. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. This is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.

  7. Nonideal rotations in nuclear magnetic resonance: Estimation of coherence transfer leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Jerschow, Alexej

    2000-07-15

    When spherical tensors are rotated by certain angles, coherence transfer selection rules may apply. For example, a {pi} rotation cleanly inverts the coherence order. A {pi}/2 rotation of a T{sub 0}{sup 1} tensor creates only T{sub {+-}}{sub 1}{sup 1} tensors. In this work estimations are given for the coherence transfer leakage under the action of rotations with small errors in the rotation angle or axis. Although the theory is stated with particular applications to NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in mind it is equally applicable wherever nonideal rotations of spherical tensors are considered (e.g., quantum computing and relaxation theory). In NMR it is useful for the estimation of coherence transfer leakage, especially in pulse sequences with many n{pi} pulses. The results are also applicable to spinors and half-integer representations of the rotation group. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: implications for dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Perras, Frédéric A; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-09-21

    We show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from (1)H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the (1)H channel. This is of particular importance in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced (1)H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity. PMID:26266874

  9. Corrigendum to "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    Figs. 7-9 in "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel" [1] have a consistent error corresponding to the relative proportions of iodine. Reported concentrations of iodine in the original manuscript are approximately ten times higher than expected, and are comparable in atomic proportions to cesium. One would expect that the amount of cesium would be about one order of magnitude greater than iodine based on the difference in fission yields of 235U and 239Pu. A practical consequence of this error would affect the predicted quantity and chemical composition of iodine on the fuel surface, which is related to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking [2].

  10. Artificial intelligence and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Artificial Intelligence Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The Artificial Intelligence Task Team was organized to review the status of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology, identify guidelines for AI work, and to identify work required to allow the nuclear industry to realize maximum benefit from this technology. The state of the nuclear industry was analyzed to determine where the application of AI technology could be of greatest benefit. Guidelines and criteria were established to focus on those particular problem areas where AI could provide the highest possible payoff to the industry. Information was collected from government, academic, and private organizations. Very little AI work is now being done to specifically support the nuclear industry. The AI Task Team determined that the establishment of a Strategic Automation Initiative (SAI) and the expansion of the DOE Technology Transfer program would ensure that AI technology could be used to develop software for the nuclear industry that would have substantial financial payoff to the industry. The SAI includes both long and short term phases. The short-term phase includes projects which would demonstrate that AI can be applied to the nuclear industry safely, and with substantial financial benefit. The long term phase includes projects which would develop AI technologies with specific applicability to the nuclear industry that would not be developed by people working in any other industry.

  11. Rabbit embryonic stem cell lines derived from fertilized, parthenogenetic or somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen F.; Gai, Hui; Huang, You Z.; Li, Shan G.; Chen, Xue J.; Shi, Jian J.; Wu, Li; Liu, Ailian; Xu, Ping; Sheng, Hui Z. . E-mail: hzsheng2003@yahoo.com

    2006-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells were isolated from rabbit blastocysts derived from fertilization (conventional rbES cells), parthenogenesis (pES cells) and nuclear transfer (ntES cells), and propagated in a serum-free culture system. Rabbit ES (rbES) cells proliferated for a prolonged time in an undifferentiated state and maintained a normal karyotype. These cells grew in a monolayer with a high nuclear/cytoplasm ratio and contained a high level of alkaline phosphate activity. In addition, rbES cells expressed the pluripotent marker Oct-4, as well as EBAF2, FGF4, TDGF1, but not antigens recognized by antibodies against SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-10 and TRA-1-81. All 3 types of ES cells formed embryoid bodies and generated teratoma that contained tissue types of all three germ layers. rbES cells exhibited a high cloning efficiency, were genetically modified readily and were used as nuclear donors to generate a viable rabbit through somatic cell nuclear transfer. In combination with genetic engineering, the ES cell technology should facilitate the creation of new rabbit lines.

  12. Interfering with the connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton affects nuclear rotation, mechanotransduction and myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brosig, Michaela; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Gelman, Laurent; Chiquet, Matthias; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical stress controls a broad range of cellular functions. The cytoskeleton is physically connected to the extracellular matrix via integrin receptors, and to the nuclear lamina by the LINC complex that spans both nuclear membranes. We asked here how disruption of this direct link from the cytoskeleton to nuclear chromatin affects mechanotransduction. Fibroblasts grown on flexible silicone membranes reacted to cyclic stretch by nuclear rotation. This rotation was abolished by inhibition of actomyosin contraction as well as by overexpression of dominant-negative versions of nesprin or sun proteins that form the LINC complex. In an in vitro model of muscle differentiation, cyclic strain inhibits differentiation and induces proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interference with the LINC complex in these cells abrogated their stretch-induced proliferation, while stretch increased p38 MAPK and NFkappaB phosphorylation and the transcript levels of myogenic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin. We found that the physical link from the cytoskeleton to the nuclear lamina is crucial for correct mechanotransduction, and that disruption of the LINC complex perturbs the mechanical control of cell differentiation. PMID:20621196

  13. Protein modifications affecting triplet energy transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Laible, P. D.; Chynwat, V.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Schiffer, M.; Hanson, D. K.; Frank, H. A.; Univ.of Connecticut; Univ. of Connecticut

    1998-05-01

    The efficiency of triplet energy transfer from the special pair (P) to the carotenoid (C) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from a large family of mutant strains has been investigated. The mutants carry substitutions at positions L181 and/or M208 near chlorophyll-based cofactors on the inactive and active sides of the complex, respectively. Light-modulated electron paramagnetic resonance at 10 K, where triplet energy transfer is thermally prohibited, reveals that the mutations do not perturb the electronic distribution of P. At temperatures > or = 70 K, we observe reduced signals from the carotenoid in most of the RCs with L181 substitutions. In particular, triplet transfer efficiency is reduced in all RCs in which a lysine at L181 donates a sixth ligand to the monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(B). Replacement of the native Tyr at M208 on the active side of the complex with several polar residues increased transfer efficiency. The difference in the efficiencies of transfer in the RCs demonstrates the ability of the protein environment to influence the electronic overlap of the chromophores and thus the thermal barrier for triplet energy transfer.

  14. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  15. Technological requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems for fast Earth-Mars transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérend, N.; Epenoy, R.; Cliquet, E.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Avril, S.

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in electric propulsion technologies such as magnetoplasma rockets gave a new momentum to the study of nuclear electric propulsion concepts for Mars missions. Some recent works have been focused on very short Earth-to-Mars transfers of about 40 days with high-power, variable specific impulse propulsion systems [1]. While the interest of nuclear electric propulsion appears clearly with regard to the payload mass ratio (due to a high level of specific impulse), its interest with regard to the transfer time is more complex to define, as it depends on many design parameters. In this paper, a general analysis of the capability of nuclear electric propulsion systems considering both criteria (the payload mass ratio and the transfer time) is performed, and the technological requirements for fast Earth-Mars transfers are studied. This analysis has been performed in two steps. First, complete trajectory optimizations have been performed by CNES-DCT in order to obtain the propulsion requirements of the mission for different technological hypotheses regarding the engine technology (specific impulse levels and the throttling capability) and different mission requirements. The methodology used for designing fuel-optimal heliocentric trajectories, based on the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be presented. Trajectories have been computed for various power levels combined with either variable or fixed Isp. The second step consisted in evaluating a simpler method that could easily link the main mission requirements (the transfer time and the payload fraction) to the main technological requirements (the specific mass of the power generation system and the structure mass ratio of the whole vehicle, excluding the power generation system). Indeed, for power-limited systems, propulsion requirements can be characterized through the "trajectory characteristic" parameter, defined as the integral over time of the squared thrust acceleration. Technological requirements for

  16. Stirring the hearts of followers: charismatic leadership as the transferal of affect.

    PubMed

    Erez, Amir; Misangyi, Vilmos F; Johnson, Diane E; LePine, Marcie A; Halverson, Kent C

    2008-05-01

    In 2 studies, the authors found that leader charisma was positively associated with followers' positive affect and negatively associated with followers' negative affect. The authors hypothesized that leaders' positive affect, positive expression, and aroused behavior will mediate these relationships. The results of their lab study suggest that leaders' positive expression and aroused behavior mediated these relationships. A field study showed that firefighters under the command of a charismatic officer were happier than those under the command of a non-charismatic officer and that these relationships were mediated by the leader's positive affect and a tendency to express positivity. PMID:18457489

  17. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-06-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches. PMID:27004264

  18. Establishment of an efficient somatic cell nuclear transfer system for production of transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Vajta, G; Callesen, H

    2012-04-15

    Handmade cloning (HMC) is now an established procedure used in several species for somatic cell nuclear transfer, but only applied in two related laboratories for pigs. The aim of this review is to facilitate widespread application by summarizing the process of establishment and explaining the background of the incorporated special approaches. Optimized steps of traditional cloning in pigs (in vitro maturation, activation, embryo culture) were merged with those of the micromanipulation-free HMC that has been modified according to the specific needs of sensitive porcine oocytes (partial zona digestion before enucleation, two-step zona-free fusion with the somatic cell; initiation of activation with the second fusion). The zona-free approach required embryo culture to the blastocyst stage before surgical transfer of embryos to the uterine horns of recipient sows in the proper phase of an unstimulated cycle. Eventually a competitive, inexpensive and reliable alternative to traditional porcine nuclear transfer cloning techniques evolved that is also suitable to produce transgenic offspring containing various genetic modifications to establish models for several human diseases with genetic background. Further improvements and involvement of additional techniques to increase the overall efficiency and facilitate practical applications are expected in the foreseeable future. PMID:22284219

  19. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-01-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches. PMID:27004264

  20. Identification of Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Carbon Interactions at Low Three-Momentum Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P A; Demgen, J; Miltenberger, E; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Elkins, M; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Leistico, J R; Lovlein, A; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2016-02-19

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current ν_{μ} interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ(1232) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced population of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. PMID:26943528

  1. Identification of Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Carbon Interactions at Low Three-Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, P. A.; Demgen, J.; Miltenberger, E.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Elkins, M.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Leistico, J. R.; Lovlein, A.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current νμ interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ (1232 ) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced population of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  2. Identification of nuclear effects in neutrino-carbon interactions at low three-momentum transfer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2016-02-17

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current νμ interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ(1232) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced populationmore » of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Furthermore, improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.« less

  3. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-01

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N+-Phenyl, N-Phenyl+). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  4. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection.

    PubMed

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J; Robb, Michael A

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N(+)-Phenyl, N-Phenyl(+)). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  5. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D{sub 6h} Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D{sub 2} eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} (N{sup +}-Phenyl, N-Phenyl{sup +}). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled

  6. Reduced transfer of affective value to instrumental behavior in violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Ly, Verena; von Borries, Anna Katinka Louise; Brazil, Inti Angelo; Bulten, Behrend Hendrik; Cools, Roshan; Roelofs, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Instrumental or goal-directed aggression is a core feature in violent offenders with psychopathic tendencies. To understand this type of behavior, previous work in the field of aggression has focused on affective processing, with mixed results. We propose that instrumental aggression is best understood in terms of the consequences of affective processing for instrumental behavior rather than affective processing per se. Therefore, we assessed the degree of affective biasing of instrumental action in a group of violent offenders with psychopathic tendencies and healthy controls using a validated affective decision-making task. Participants learned whole body approach-avoidance actions upon instrumental targets based on monetary feedback, while being primed by aversive versus appetitive facial stimuli. Unlike controls, instrumental behavior in violent offenders was not influenced by the affective stimuli. Specifically, violent offenders showed reduced instrumental avoidance in the context of aversive (vs. appetitive) stimuli relative to controls. This finding suggests that reduced affective biasing of instrumental behavior may underlie the behavioral anomalies observed in violent offenders with psychopathic tendencies. More generally, the finding underscores the relevance of examining the interaction between affect and instrumental behavior for a better understanding of dysfunctional behaviors in psychiatric populations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27214061

  7. How surface roughness affects chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness affects transport processes, e.g., runoff generation, infiltration, sediment detachment, etc., occurring on the surface. Nevertheless, how soil roughness affects chemical transport is less known. In this study, we partitioned roughness elements into mounds which diverge water ...

  8. 42 CFR 37.7 - Transfer of affected miner to less dusty area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... atmosphere is in compliance with the MSHA requirements in 30 CFR 90.3. (b) Any transfer under this section... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic... Secretary based upon the interpretation of one or more of the miner's chest radiographs, shows category 1...

  9. 42 CFR 37.102 - Transfer of affected miner to less dusty area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... its discretion, also accept other medical examinations provided to NIOSH for review, such as computed tomography scans of the chest or lung biopsies, as evidence of the development of pneumoconiosis. (b) Any transfer under this section shall be in accordance with the procedures specified in 30 CFR part 90....

  10. A Remote Mutation Affects the Hydride Transfer by Disrupting Concerted Protein Motions in Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    The role of protein flexibility in enzyme-catalyzed activation of chemical bonds is an evolving perspective in enzymology. Here we examine the role of protein motions in the hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TSase). Being remote from the chemical reaction site, the Y209W mutation of E. coli TSase significantly reduces the protein activity, despite the remarkable similarity between the crystal structures of the wild type and mutant enzymes with ligands representing their Michaelis complexes. The most conspicuous difference between those two crystal structures is in the anisotropic B-factors, which indicates disruption of the correlated atomic vibrations of protein residues in the mutant. This dynamically altered mutant allows a variety of small thiols to compete for the reaction intermediate that precedes the hydride transfer, indicating disruption of motions that preorganize the protein environment for this chemical step. Although the mutation causes higher enthalpy of activation of the hydride transfer, it only shows a small effect on the temperature-dependence of the intrinsic KIE, suggesting marginal changes in the geometry and dynamics of the H-donor and acceptor at the tunneling ready state. These observations suggest that that the mutation disrupts the concerted motions that bring the H-donor and acceptor together during the pre- and re-organization of the protein environment. The integrated structural and kinetic data allow us to probe the impact of protein motions on different timescales on the hydride transfer reaction within a complex enzymatic mechanism. PMID:23034004

  11. Appalachian Bridges to the Baccalaureate: How Community Colleges Affect Transfer Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Amber K.

    2011-01-01

    Statement of the problem. Too few community college students who intend to transfer and earn a baccalaureate degree actually do. This is a problem because postsecondary education is a key factor in economic mobility, and community colleges enroll a disproportionate number of nontraditional, part-time and low-income students. Although individual…

  12. Factors Affecting Persistence of Undergraduate Students in a Fisheries and Wildlife Program: Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Bjorn H. K.; Millenbah, Kelly F.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Schneider, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer students are of recognized importance to postsecondary education and every year feed thousands of students into natural resources programs across America. This influx of students can have a sustaining effect on many academic programs, including fisheries and wildlife programs, which are suffering from a nation-wide decrease in interest…

  13. Cats cloned from fetal and adult somatic cells by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, X J; Lee, H S; Lee, Y H; Seo, Y I; Jeon, S J; Choi, E G; Cho, S J; Cho, S G; Min, W; Kang, S K; Hwang, W S; Kong, I K

    2005-02-01

    This work was undertaken in order to study the developmental competence of nuclear transfer (NT) into cat embryos using fetal fibroblast and adult skin fibroblast cells as donor nuclei. Oocytes were recovered by mincing the ovaries in Hepes-buffered TCM199 and selecting the cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) with compact cumulus cell mass and dark color. Homogenous ooplasm was cultured for maturation in TCM199+10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 12 h and used as a source of recipient cytoplast for exogenous somatic nuclei. In experiment 1, we evaluated the effect of donor cell type on the reconstruction and development of cloned embryos. Fusion, first cleavage and blastocyst developmental rate were not different between fetal fibroblasts and adult skin cells (71.2 vs 66.8; 71.0 vs 57.6; 4.0 vs 6.1% respectively; P < 0.05). In experiment 2, cloned embryos were surgically transferred into the oviducts of recipient queens. One of the seven recipient queens was delivered naturally of 2 healthy cloned cats and 1 stillborn from fetal fibroblast cells of male origin 65 days after embryo transfer. One of three recipient queens was delivered naturally of 1 healthy cloned cat from adult skin cells of female origin 65 days after embryo transfer. The cloned cats showed genotypes identical to the donor cell lines, indicating that adult somatic cells can be used for feline cloning. PMID:15695619

  14. Cytoplasmic Inheritance of Transplantation Antigens In Animals Produced by Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hanekamp, John S.; Okumi, Masayoshi; Tena, Aseda; Arn, Scott; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nuclear transfer has been utilized as a means of selectively modifying the mammalian genome. One possible consequence of this technology is that the oocytes used in nuclear transfer may provide additional antigens via cytoplasmic inheritance of maternally derived, mitochondrial DNA. These studies examine the potential consequences of such inheritance in a large animal transplantation model. Methods Renal transplants were performed between MHC-identical animals differing only in the source of their maternally derived cytoplasmic DNA, using a protocol which uniformly leads to tolerance within standard MHC-inbred lines. In an attempt to correlate transplant results with a putative marker for disparities in cytoplasmically inherited minor histocompatibility antigens, we examined one hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), designated HV1. Results The mtDNA sequence of the HV1 region was found to be invariant among MGH miniature swine of different haplotypes, despite twenty years of selective breeding of the sublines of this colony. In contrast, swine derived by nuclear transfer into outbred oocytes differed in the HV1 region sequence from each other and from MGH swine. Renal transplants from standard, inbred MGH swine to their MHC-identical knockout counterparts derived from outbred oocytes were rejected within two weeks, while transplants in the reverse direction were accepted for over 30 days. Conclusions The HV1 sequence of mtDNA may serve as a marker for the level of diversity of mtDNA. These transplant data are consistent with the existence of mtDNA-encoded mitochondrial minor antigens with a similar level of diversity that can influence the outcome of renal transplantation. PMID:19584677

  15. Nuclear transfer of porcine embryos using cryopreserved delipated blastomeres as donor nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, H; Ashman, R J; Nottle, M B

    1997-11-01

    Nuclear transfer protocol for the pig using cryopreserved delipated four- to eight-cell and morula stage embryos as nucleus donors was developed. Donor embryos, which had been delipated by micromanipulation following centrifugation for polarizing cytoplasmic lipid droplets, were cryopreserved with 1.5 M 1,2-propanediol and 0.1 M sucrose. Recipient cytoplasts were prepared from ovulated oocytes. Activation of oocytes could be induced more efficiently when electric stimulation was given 53 hr after the hCG injection or later (66-83%), compared with 52 hr or earlier (11-16%, P < 0.05), suggesting that aging after ovulation may be required for in vivo matured porcine oocytes to be activated by electric stimuli. Membrane fusion rates between donor blastomeres and enucleated oocytes were 88% (127/144) and 97% (56/58, P > 0.05) for the four- to eight-cell and morula stage embryos, respectively. In vitro developmental rates to the two-cell (53/100 vs. 35/65), four-cell (34/100 vs. 26/65), and morula stage (17/100 vs. 18/65) were the same between the nuclear transfer embryos with four- to eight-cell and morula nuclei. However, more embryos reconstituted with morula nuclei developed to blastocysts (15% vs. 6%, P < 0.05). These data demonstrated that blastomeres of cryopreserved, delipated porcine embryos can be used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer. Frozen-thawed, delipated blastomeres can be efficiently isolated and fused, and therefore provide a useful source of donor nuclei. PMID:9322245

  16. The Nuclear Family: Correspondence in Cognitive and Affective Reactions to the Threat of Nuclear War among Older Adolescents and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Scott B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the relationship between family members' cognitive and affective responses to nuclear war issues, 317 college students and their parents independently completed a multifaceted questionnaire that included items concerning personal reactions, predictions, opinions, and attitudes about nuclear war. (Author/LMO)

  17. Somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cell lines in humans: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Langerova, Alena; Fulka, Helena; Fulka, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The recent paper, published by Mitalipov's group in Cell (Tachibana et al., 2013 ), reporting the production of human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), opens again the debate if, in the era of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the production of these cells is indeed necessary and, if so, whether they are different from ESCs produced from spare embryos and iPSCs. It is our opinion that these questions are very difficult to answer because it is still unclear whether and how normal ESCs differ from iPSCs. PMID:24180743

  18. Nuclear propulsion systems for orbit transfer based on the particle bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.L.; Araj, K.; Benenati, R.; Lazareth, O.; Slovik, G.; Solon, M.; Tappe, W.; Belisle, J.

    1987-01-01

    The technology of nuclear direct propulsion orbit transfer systems based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. A 200 megawatt illustrative design is presented for LEO to GEO and other high ..delta..V missions. The PBR-NOTV can be used in a one-way mode with the shuttle or an expendable launch vehicle, e.g., the Titan 34D7, or as a two-way reusable space tug. In the one-way mode, payload capacity is almost three times greater than that of chemical OTV's. PBR technology status is described and development needs outlined.

  19. Mg2+ binds to the surface of thymidylate synthase and affects hydride transfer at the interior active site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Sapienza, Paul J.; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Luzum, Calvin; Lee, Andrew L.; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) produces the sole intracellular de novo source of thymidine (i.e. the DNA base T) and thus is a common target for antibiotic and anticancer drugs. Mg2+ has been reported to affect TSase activity, but the mechanism of this interaction has not been investigated. Here we show that Mg2+ binds to the surface of Escherichia coli TSase and affects the kinetics of hydride transfer at the interior active site (16 Å away). Examination of the crystal structures identifies a Mg2+ near the glutamyl moiety of the folate cofactor, providing the first structural evidence for Mg2+ binding to TSase. The kinetics and NMR relaxation experiments suggest that the weak binding of Mg2+ to the protein surface stabilizes the closed conformation of the ternary enzyme complex and reduces the entropy of activation on the hydride transfer step. Mg2+ accelerates the hydride transfer by ca. 7-fold but does not affect the magnitude or temperature-dependence of the intrinsic kinetic isotope effect. These results suggest that Mg2+ facilitates the protein motions that bring the hydride donor and acceptor together, but it does not change the tunneling ready state of the hydride transfer. These findings highlight how variations in cellular Mg2+ concentration can modulate enzyme activity through long-range interactions in the protein, rather than binding at the active site. The interaction of Mg2+ with the glutamyl-tail of the folate cofactor and nonconserved residues of bacterial TSase may assist in designing antifolates with poly-glutamyl substitutes as species-specific antibiotic drugs. PMID:23611499

  20. Nuclear event time histories and computed site transfer functions for locations in the Los Angeles region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, A.M.; Covington, P.A.; Park, R.B.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Perkins, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents a collection of Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosion recordings obtained at sites in the greater Los Angeles, Calif., region. The report includes ground velocity time histories, as well as, derived site transfer functions. These data have been collected as part of a study to evaluate the validity of using low-level ground motions to predict the frequency-dependent response of a site during an earthquake. For this study 19 nuclear events were recorded at 98 separate locations. Some of these sites have recorded more than one of the nuclear explosions, and, consequently, there are a total of 159, three-component station records. The location of all the recording sites are shown in figures 1–5, the station coordinates and abbreviations are given in table 1. The station addresses are listed in table 2, and the nuclear explosions that were recorded are listed in table 3. The recording sites were chosen on the basis of three criteria: (1) that the underlying geological conditions were representative of conditions over significant areas of the region, (2) that the site was the location of a strong-motion recording of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, or (3) that more complete geographical coverage was required in that location.

  1. Food availability affects the maternal transfer of androgens and antibodies into eggs of a colonial seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gasparini, J.; Boulinier, T.; Gill, V.A.; Gil, D.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Roulin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mothers can improve the quality of their offspring by increasing the level of certain components in their eggs. To examine whether or not mothers increase deposition of such components in eggs as a function of food availability, we food-supplemented black-legged kittiwake females (Rissa tridactyla) before and during egg laying and compared deposition of androgens and antibodies into eggs of first and experimentally induced replacement clutches. Food-supplemented females transferred lower amounts of androgens and antibodies into eggs of induced replacement clutches than did non-food-supplemented mothers, whereas first clutches presented no differences between treatments. Our results suggest that when females are in lower condition, they transfer more androgens and antibodies into eggs to facilitate chick development despite potential long-term costs for juveniles. Females in prime condition may avoid these potential long-term costs because they can provide their chicks with more and higher quality resources. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  2. Identification and quantification of factors affecting neonatal immunological transfer in dairy calves in the UK.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, J A; Grove-White, D H; Royal, M D; Smith, R F

    2015-06-13

    The object of the study was to quantify the prevalence of failure of passive transfer in UK dairy farms and to identify variables that had a significant impact on the rate of immunological transfer. In a six-month study of 444 calvings from seven UK dairy farms, 26 per cent of calves failed to receive adequate immunoglobulin transfer as judged by a plasma total protein (pTP) concentration less than 5.6 g/dl. Colostrum immunoglobulin concentration, indirectly measured using Brix refractometry, showed wide variations with samples ranging from 10.3 to 34.7 Brix units. Thirty-seven per cent of samples were below the suggested cut-off Brix score for colostrum quality of 22 per cent. Potential associations between covariates and plasma protein concentration were investigated using multiple linear regression models. The covariate with the greatest impact on the pTP concentration was the farm on which the calf was born (P<0.05). A significant but small association was demonstrated between colostrum immunoglobulin concentration and calf pTP concentration (P<0.01). Multiple linear regression models suggested that the time of colostrum collection after calving, parity of the dam, and the individual farm were associated with the Brix measurements (P<0.05). This study suggested that veterinary review of colostrum protocols on farm with emphasis on prompt collection and dosing after calving remains a simple and effective measure to improve passive transfer and thus calf health on UK dairy farms. PMID:25861824

  3. Subsurface mass transport affects the radioxenon signatures that are used to identify clandestine nuclear tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests produce anthropogenic isotopes that provide the only definitive means by which to determine whether a nuclear explosion has taken place. Verification of a suspected test under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty often relies on ratios of radioxenon isotopes. Gas samples are gathered either on-site or off-site with certain ranges of xenon isotope ratios considered to be a signature of a weapons test. It is well established that below ground transport can affect the rate at which Noble gasses will reach the surface. However, the relative abundance of anthropogenic isotopes is has long been assumed to rely solely on fission yield and decay rate. By including in subsurface transport models the effects of mass dependent diffusion, and a time dependent source term for the decay of radioiodine precursors, we show here that this assumption is not true. In fact, certain combinations of geology and atmospheric conditions can alter xenon isotope ratios sufficiently for a weapons test going unconfirmed under the current standards.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Nuclear Transfer Embryo-Derived Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells. Part I: Cellular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kobolak, Julianna; Mamo, Solomon; Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ujhelly, Olga; Csonka, Erika; Hadlaczky, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells derived from nuclear transfer embryos (ntESCs) are particularly valuable for regenerative medicine, as they are a patient-specific and histocompatible cell source for the treatment of varying diseases. However, currently, little is known about their cellular and molecular profile. In the present study, in a mouse model different donor cell-derived ntESCs from various genetic backgrounds were compared with reference ESCs and analyzed comprehensively at the cellular level. A number of pluripotency marker genes were compared by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry analysis. Significant differences at the protein level were observed for POU5F1, SOX2, FGF4, NANOG, and SSEA-1. However, such differences had no effect on in vitro cell differentiation and cell fate: derivatives of the three germ layers were detected in all ntESC lines. The neural and cardiac in vitro differentiation revealed minor differences between the cell lines, both at the mRNA and protein level. Karyotype analyses and cell growth studies did not reveal any significant variations. Despite some differences observed, the present study revealed that ntESC lines had similar differentiation competences compared to other ESCs. The results indicate that the observed differences may be related to the genotype rather than to the nuclear transfer technology. PMID:22204592

  5. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  6. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: Infinite reproduction of a unique diploid genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi Wakayama, Sayaka; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Iritani, Akira; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-06-10

    In mammals, a diploid genome of an individual following fertilization of an egg and a spermatozoon is unique and irreproducible. This implies that the generated unique diploid genome is doomed with the individual ending. Even as cultured cells from the individual, they cannot normally proliferate in perpetuity because of the 'Hayflick limit'. However, Dolly, the sheep cloned from an adult mammary gland cell, changes this scenario. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enables us to produce offspring without germ cells, that is, to 'passage' a unique diploid genome. Animal cloning has also proven to be a powerful research tool for reprogramming in many mammals, notably mouse and cow. The mechanism underlying reprogramming, however, remains largely unknown and, animal cloning has been inefficient as a result. More momentously, in addition to abortion and fetal mortality, some cloned animals display possible premature aging phenotypes including early death and short telomere lengths. Under these inauspicious conditions, is it really possible for SCNT to preserve a diploid genome? Delightfully, in mouse and recently in primate, using SCNT we can produce nuclear transfer ES cells (ntES) more efficiently, which can preserve the eternal lifespan for the 'passage' of a unique diploid genome. Further, new somatic cloning technique using histone-deacetylase inhibitors has been developed which can significantly increase the previous cloning rates two to six times. Here, we introduce SCNT and its value as a preservation tool for a diploid genome while reviewing aging of cloned animals on cellular and individual levels.

  7. Transfer of 137Cs from Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout to different Swedish population groups.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-08-15

    Data from measurements on the body burden of (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (40)K in various Swedish populations between 1959 and 2001 has been compiled into a national database. The compilation is a co-operation between the Departments of Radiation Physics in Malmö and Göteborg, the National Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI). In a previous study the effective ecological half time and the associated effective dose to various Swedish populations due to internal contamination of (134)Cs and (137)Cs have been assessed using the database. In this study values of human body burden have been combined with data on the local and regional ground deposition of fallout from nuclear weapons tests (only (137)Cs) and Chernobyl debris (both (134)Cs and (137)Cs), which have enabled estimates of the radioecological transfer in the studied populations. The assessment of the database shows that the transfer of radiocesium from Chernobyl fallout to humans varies considerably between various populations in Sweden. In terms of committed effective dose over a 70 y period from internal contamination per unit activity deposition, the general (predominantly urban) Swedish population obtains 20-30 microSv/kBq m(-2). Four categories of populations exhibit higher radioecological transfer than the general population; i.) reindeer herders ( approximately 700 microSv/kBq m(-2)), ii.) hunters in the counties dominated by forest vegetation ( approximately 100 microSv/kBq m(-2)), iii.) rural non-farming populations living in sub-arctic areas (40-150 microSv/kBq m(-2)), and iv.) farmers ( approximately 50 microSv/kBq m(-2)). Two important factors determine the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man; i.) dietary habits (intakes of foodstuff originating from natural and semi-natural ecosystems), and ii.) inclination to follow the recommended food restriction by the authorities. The transfer to the general population is considerably lower

  8. Unusual horizontal transfer of a long interspersed nuclear element between distant vertebrate classes.

    PubMed

    Kordis, D; Gubensek, F

    1998-09-01

    We have shown previously by Southern blot analysis that Bov-B long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) are present in different Viperidae snake species. To address the question as to whether Bov-B LINEs really have been transmitted horizontally between vertebrate classes, the analysis has been extended to a larger number of vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant species. In this paper, the evolutionary origin of Bov-B LINEs is shown unequivocally to be in Squamata. The previously proposed horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs in vertebrates has been confirmed by their discontinuous phylogenetic distribution in Squamata (Serpentes and two lizard infra-orders) as well as in Ruminantia, by the high level of nucleotide identity, and by their phylogenetic relationships. The horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs from Squamata to the ancestor of Ruminantia is evident from the genetic distances and discontinuous phylogenetic distribution. The ancestor of Colubroidea snakes is a possible donor of Bov-B LINEs to Ruminantia. The timing of horizontal transfer has been estimated from the distribution of Bov-B LINEs in Ruminantia and the fossil data of Ruminantia to be 40-50 My ago. The phylogenetic relationships of Bov-B LINEs from the various Squamata species agrees with that of the species phylogeny, suggesting that Bov-B LINEs have been maintained stably by vertical transmission since the origin of Squamata in the Mesozoic era. PMID:9724768

  9. Application of Direct Assessment Approaches and Methodologies to Cathodically Protected Nuclear Waste Transfer Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Megan M.; Pikas, Joseph; Edgemon, Glenn L.; Philo, Sarah

    2013-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 54 million gallons (204 million liters) of radioactive waste generated since the site's inception in 1943. Today, the major structures involved in waste management at Hanford include 149 carbon steel single-shell tanks, 28 carbon-steel double-shell tanks, plus a network of buried metallic transfer lines and ancillary systems (pits, vaults, catch tanks, etc.) required to store, retrieve, and transfer waste within the tank farm system. Many of the waste management systems at Hanford are still in use today. In response to uncertainties regarding the structural integrity of these systems,' an independent, comprehensive integrity assessment of the Hanford Site piping system was performed. It was found that regulators do not require the cathodically protected pipelines located within the Hanford Site to be assessed by External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) or any other method used to ensure integrity. However, a case study is presented discussing the application of the direct assessment process on pipelines in such a nuclear environment. Assessment methodology and assessment results are contained herein. An approach is described for the monitoring, integration of outside data, and analysis of this information in order to identify whether coating deterioration accompanied by external corrosion is a threat for these waste transfer lines.

  10. Piglets born from vitrified cloned blastocysts produced with a simplified method of delipation and nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Du, Yutao; Li, Juan; Kragh, Peter M; Zhang, Yunhai; Schmidt, Mette; Bøgh, Ingrid B; Zhang, Xiuqing; Purup, Stig; Kuwayama, M; Jørgensen, Arne L; Pedersen, Anette M; Villemoes, Klaus; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of porcine embryos offers a promising perspective in the fields of agriculture, animal science, and human medical research. The objective of the present work was to establish a system facilitating the cryopreservation of porcine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Several key techniques including micromanipulator-based enucleation, noninvasive delipation, zona-free fusion, and activation were combined with high efficiency. After a partial zona digestion and high-speed centrifugation, 89.8+/-2.1% (mean+/-SEM) of enucleated oocytes were successfully delipated. Delipated cytoplasts were incubated for an additional 0.5 or 2 h before fusion with somatic cells. After activation and 6 days of in vitro culture, no significant difference in the rate of blastocysts per reconstructed embryo was observed between the two groups (33.1+/-1.8% and 26.0+/-4.3% for 0.5 and 2 h recovery time, respectively). Cryopreservation of the blastocysts was performed with a Cryotop device and factory-prepared vitrification and warming solutions. One hundred fifty-five vitrified SCNT embryos were transferred surgically into two recipient sows to test their developmental capacity in vivo. One recipient became pregnant and delivered six piglets. In conclusion, our simplified delipation and SCNT procedure resulted in viable piglets after vitrification and embryo transfer at the blastocyst stage. PMID:18154508

  11. The algal metabolite yessotoxin affects heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Young, Clifford; Truman, Penelope; Boucher, Magalie; Keyzers, Robert A; Northcote, Peter; Jordan, T William

    2009-05-01

    The dinoflagellate metabolite yessotoxin (YTX) is produced by several species of algae and accumulates in marine food chains, leading to concerns about possible affects on aquaculture industries and human health. In mice used for toxicity testing, YTX is lethal by the intraperitoneal route, but is considerably less toxic when orally administered. The mode of action of YTX and its potential effect on humans is unclear and we therefore conducted the first proteomic analysis of the effects of this compound. We used 2-DE to examine protein changes in HepG2 cell cultures exposed to 1.4 microM YTX for 3, 12.5, 18 and 24 h. After selecting proteins that changed more than three-fold after YTX exposure, 55 spots were deemed significantly affected by the toxin (p<0.05). Major groups of affected proteins include members from the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), lamin, cathepsin and heat shock protein families that often are associated with apoptosis. We therefore confirmed apoptosis using Annexin-V-FLUOS staining of phosphatidylserine exposed at the surface of apoptotic cells. Ingenuity pathways analysis also indicated effects on pathways involved in protein processing, cell cycling and cell death. PMID:19343718

  12. Vector delivery technique affects gene transfer in the cornea in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Cebulko, Tyler C.; Tandon, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study tested whether controlled drying of the cornea increases vector absorption in mouse and rabbit corneas in vivo and human cornea ex vivo, and studied the effects of corneal drying on gene transfer, structure and inflammatory reaction in the mouse cornea in vivo. Methods Female C57 black mice and New Zealand White rabbits were used for in vivo studies. Donor human corneas were used for ex vivo experiments. A hair dryer was used for drying the corneas after removing corneal epithelium by gentle scraping. The corneas received no, once, twice, thrice, or five times warm air for 10 s with a 5 s interval after each 10 s hair dryer application. Thereafter, balanced salt solution (BSS) was topically applied immediately on the cornea for 2 min using a custom-cloning cylinder. The absorbed BSS was quantified using Hamilton microsyringes. The adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vector (1.1×108 genomic copies/µl) expressing marker gene was used to study the effect of corneal drying on gene transfer. Animals were sacrificed on day 14 and gene expression was analyzed using commercial staining kit. Morphological changes and infiltration of inflammatory cells were examined with H & E staining and immunocytochemistry. Results Mice, rabbit or human corneas subjected to no or 10 s drying showed 6%–8% BSS absorption whereas 20, 30, or 50 s corneal drying showed significantly high 14%–19% (p<0.001), 21%–22% (p<0.001), and 25%–27% (p<0.001) BSS absorption, respectively. The AAV8 application on mouse cornea after 50 s drying showed significantly higher transgene delivery (p<0.05) in vivo with mild-to-moderate changes in corneal morphology. The 30 s of drying also showed significantly (p<0.05) high transgene delivery in mouse stroma in vivo without jeopardizing corneal morphology whereas 10 or 20 s drying showed moderate degree of gene transfer with no altered corneal morphology. Corneas that underwent 50 s drying showed high CD11b-positive cells (p<0.01) compared

  13. International remote monitoring project Argentina Nuclear Power Station Spent Fuel Transfer Remote Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; Lucero, R.; Glidewell, D.

    1997-08-01

    The Autoridad Regulataria Nuclear (ARN) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) are cooperating on the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. A Remote Monitoring System for spent fuel transfer will be installed at the Argentina Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. The system has been designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing gamma and neutron sensors. This project will test and evaluate the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguards efficiency. This paper provides a description of the monitoring system and its functions. The Remote Monitoring System consists of gamma and neutron radiation sensors, RF systems, and video systems integrated into a coherent functioning whole. All sensor data communicate over an Echelon LonWorks Network to a single data logger. The Neumann DCM 14 video module is integrated into the Remote Monitoring System. All sensor and image data are stored on a Data Acquisition System (DAS) and archived and reviewed on a Data and Image Review Station (DIRS). Conventional phone lines are used as the telecommunications link to transmit on-site collected data and images to remote locations. The data and images are authenticated before transmission. Data review stations will be installed at ARN in Buenos Aires, Argentina, ABACC in Rio De Janeiro, IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  14. The influence of donor nucleus source on the outcome of zebrafish somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Chang, Eun-Ah; Muñoz, Juan D; Kawakami, Koichi; Cibelli, José B

    2010-01-01

    The success of nuclear reprogramming following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is thought to depend on factors present in the egg. Little is known about the role - if any - played by the somatic cell type on the outcome of the procedure. We tested whether cells of different lineages might have different capacities for reprogramming following SCNT, comparing cells isolated from five different tissues of transgenic zebrafish for their developmental potential when used as SCNT donor cells. We used transgenic zebrafish lines expressing green fluorescence protein under an endogenous tissue-specific promoter: HGn62A-skin, HGn28A-skin, HGn8E-heart, HG21C-fin and notochord and HGn30A-hatch gland. We analyzed the efficiency of cloning, as measured by reconstructed embryos that developed up to the hatched-fry stage. Specifically, donor cells of fin and notochord origin yielded the best rate of cloned fish production. All of the other cell types used were capable of producing cloned fish, albeit with significantly lower efficiency. These results indicate that the type of zebrafish cells used for SCNT can influence the outcome of the procedure. Future epigenetic analysis of these cells will help determine specific chromatin profiles in somatic cells that have an impact on nuclear reprogramming procedures. PMID:21404188

  15. Heat Transfer Enhancement By Three-Dimensional Surface Roughness Technique In Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najeeb, Umair

    This thesis experimentally investigates the enhancement of single-phase heat transfer, frictional loss and pressure drop characteristics in a Single Heater Element Loop Tester (SHELT). The heater element simulates a single fuel rod for Pressurized Nuclear reactor. In this experimental investigation, the effect of the outer surface roughness of a simulated nuclear rod bundle was studied. The outer surface of a simulated fuel rod was created with a three-dimensional (Diamond-shaped blocks) surface roughness. The angle of corrugation for each diamond was 45 degrees. The length of each side of a diamond block is 1 mm. The depth of each diamond block was 0.3 mm. The pitch of the pattern was 1.614 mm. The simulated fuel rod had an outside diameter of 9.5 mm and wall thickness of 1.5 mm and was placed in a test-section made of 38.1 mm inner diameter, wall thickness 6.35 mm aluminum pipe. The Simulated fuel rod was made of Nickel 200 and Inconel 625 materials. The fuel rod was connected to 10 KW DC power supply. The Inconel 625 material of the rod with an electrical resistance of 32.3 kO was used to generate heat inside the test-section. The heat energy dissipated from the Inconel tube due to the flow of electrical current flows into the working fluid across the rod at constant heat flux conditions. The DI water was employed as working fluid for this experimental investigation. The temperature and pressure readings for both smooth and rough regions of the fuel rod were recorded and compared later to find enhancement in heat transfer coefficient and increment in the pressure drops. Tests were conducted for Reynold's Numbers ranging from 10e4 to 10e5. Enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at all Re was recorded. The maximum heat transfer co-efficient enhancement recorded was 86% at Re = 4.18e5. It was also observed that the pressure drop and friction factor increased by 14.7% due to the increased surface roughness.

  16. Factors affecting stepladder stability during a lateral weight transfer: a study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Shiang; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2005-09-01

    A fall from a stepladder is often initiated by a loss of lateral stability. An inverted pendulum model of the human, validated by experiment, was used to determine the feasible range of whole-body center of mass (COM) states for which weight can be transferred laterally on a ladder tread without a ladder rail losing contact with the ground ("no lift-off" stability region). The results show that the size of the feasible no lift-off region was inversely proportional to the height of the tread above the ground, the distance of the stance foot from the ipsilateral rail, and lateral ground inclination angle. For given initial COM kinematics on a tread height equal to 40% human body height, a stance-foot location equal to one-eighth tread width and a 3.5 degrees ground inclination had approximately equivalent effects on the no lift-off region size. Ladder stability was three times more sensitive to tread height than to foot location. Laterally-exerted impulsive hand-tool forces should generally be limited to 8% body weight. These findings can lead to improved ladder designs and safety instructions for stepladder users. PMID:15970205

  17. Charge transfer vs. dimensionality: what affects the transport properties of ferecrystals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemayehu, Matti B.; Ta, Kim; Falmbigl, Matthias; Johnson, David C.

    2015-04-01

    A series of ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)2 compounds with two layers of NbSe2 separated by m bilayers of SnSe, where 1 <= m <= 20, were prepared from modulated precursors by systematically changing the number of SnSe layers in the repeating unit. A change in the c-lattice parameter of 0.579(3) nm per SnSe bilayer was observed. The thickness of the NbSe2 layer was determined to be 1.281(4) nm: twice the value of a single NbSe2 layer. HAADF-STEM images revealed the presence of extensive rotational disorder and the lack of any epitaxial relationship among the constituent layers. Two different coordination environments for the Nb in NbSe2 (trigonal prismatic and octahedral) were observed. The electrical resistivity increases and the carrier concentration decreases in the ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)2 compounds with increasing number of SnSe bilayers. The temperature dependence of the resistivity suggests localization of carriers for higher m values. The decline in carrier concentration as a function of m implies the presence of charge transfer from SnSe to NbSe2. The transport properties of the ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)2 compounds and the previously reported ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)1 compounds both have unusually temperature independent resistivity compared to bulk NbSe2. Compounds with similar m/n ratios exhibit similar transport properties. Consequently, the dominant effect on the transport properties of ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)2 is charge transfer, and there are only subtle differences between a monolayer and a bilayer of NbSe2.A series of ([SnSe]1+δ)m(NbSe2)2 compounds with two layers of NbSe2 separated by m bilayers of SnSe, where 1 <= m <= 20, were prepared from modulated precursors by systematically changing the number of SnSe layers in the repeating unit. A change in the c-lattice parameter of 0.579(3) nm per SnSe bilayer was observed. The thickness of the NbSe2 layer was determined to be 1.281(4) nm: twice the value of a single NbSe2 layer. HAADF-STEM images revealed the presence of

  18. Maternally transferred dioxin-like compounds can affect the reproductive success of European eel.

    PubMed

    Foekema, Edwin M; Kotterman, Michiel; de Vries, Pepijn; Murk, Albertinka J

    2016-01-01

    Reported concentrations of dioxin-like compounds accumulated in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) were used to perform a risk assessment for eel larval survival, taking into account a modeled amplification of tissue concentrations with a factor of 1.33 during spawning migration. The calculated concentrations of dioxin-like compounds finally deposited in the eggs were compared with the internal effect concentrations for survival of early life stages of the European eel; these concentrations, by lack of experimental data, were estimated from a sensitivity distribution based on literature data by assuming that eel larvae are among the 10% most sensitive teleost fish species. Given concentrations of dioxin-like contaminants and assuming a relatively high sensitivity, it can be expected that larvae from eggs produced by eel from highly contaminated locations in Europe will experience increased mortality as a result of maternally transferred dioxin-like contaminants. As historical persistent organic pollutant concentrations in eel tissue were higher, this impact must have been stronger in the past. Potential effects of other compounds or effects on the migration, condition, and fertility of the parental animals were not taken into account. It is important to further study the overall impact of contaminants on the reproductive success of the European eel as this may have been underestimated until now. PMID:26223357

  19. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  20. Method of insecticide delivery affects horizontal transfer of fipronil in the German cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Buczkowski, G; Schal, C

    2001-06-01

    Horizontal transmission of insecticide occurs when foragers contact or ingest an insecticide, return to the aggregation or nest, and translocate the insecticide to the shelter and its vicinity. Relatively more sedentary members of the population then contact or eat the translocated insecticide and die. We evaluated three different methods of delivering fipronil to adult male German cockroaches, Blattella germanica (L.), for their potential to cause such secondary mortality in various developmental stages of the cockroach. Adult males topically treated with 5 ng of fipronil (approximately LD99) caused low mortality in untreated nymphs and no mortality in untreated adults within the same aggregation. Males exposed to residual fipronil on a glass surface translocated more insecticide, resulting in higher mortality of cockroaches they contacted, but only early instars were affected and no adult mortality was observed. Ingested fipronil bait, however, was most effectively translocated, and caused high mortality of untreated adults and nymphs. Ingestion of fipronil also caused greater secondary kill compared with a topical application of 25 ng, approximately the same amount recovered from the exterior of males that ingested 1 mg of 0.05% fipronil bait. Secondary mortality in the untreated population was significantly affected by the duration of contact between the treated and untreated cockroaches, the quantity and freshness of excretions from the treated insects, and the accessibility of the secretions to untreated cockroaches. The mechanisms that cause secondary kill may include ingestion of excreted fipronil residues, cannibalism of bait-fed cockroaches, as well as contact with fipronil-contaminated substrates. PMID:11425023

  1. In vitro development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in different culture media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Yeom, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyo; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Hong-Tea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of three different culture media on the development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Canine cloned embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF), porcine zygote medium-3 (PZM-3), or G1/G2 sequential media. Our results showed that the G1/G2 media yielded significantly higher morula and blastocyst development in canine SCNT embryos (26.1% and 7.8%, respectively) compared to PZM-3 (8.5% and 0%or mSOF (2.3% and 0%) media. In conclusion, this study suggests that blastocysts can be produced more efficiently using G1/G2 media to culture canine SCNT embryos. PMID:25549216

  2. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  3. In vitro development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in different culture media

    PubMed Central

    No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Yeom, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyo; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Hong-Tea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of three different culture media on the development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Canine cloned embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF), porcine zygote medium-3 (PZM-3), or G1/G2 sequential media. Our results showed that the G1/G2 media yielded significantly higher morula and blastocyst development in canine SCNT embryos (26.1% and 7.8%, respectively) compared to PZM-3 (8.5% and 0%) or mSOF (2.3% and 0%) media. In conclusion, this study suggests that blastocysts can be produced more efficiently using G1/G2 media to culture canine SCNT embryos. PMID:25549216

  4. Femtosecond laser based enucleation of porcine oocytes for somatic cell nuclear transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kütemeyer, K.; Lucas-Hahn, A.; Petersen, B.; Hassel, P.; Lemme, E.; Niemann, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2009-07-01

    Cloning of several mammalian species has been achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in recent years. However, this method still results in very low efficiencies around 1% which originate from suboptimal culture conditions and highly invasive techniques for oocyte enucleation and injection of the donor cell using micromanipulators. In this paper, we present a new minimal invasive method for oocyte imaging and enucleation based on the application of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After imaging of the oocyte with multiphoton microscopy, ultrashort pulses are focused onto the metaphase plate of MII-oocytes in order to ablate the DNA molecules. We show that fs laser based enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibits the first mitotic cleavage after parthenogenetic activation while maintaining intact oocyte morphology in most cases. In contrast, control groups without previous irradiation of the metaphase plate are able to develop to the blastocyst stage. Further experiments have to clarify the suitability of fs laser based enucleated oocytes for SCNT.

  5. Heat transfer effects in vertically emplaced high level nuclear waste container

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.; Lei, Y.M.

    1994-05-01

    Modeling free convection heat transfer in an cylindrical annular enclosure is still an active area of research and an important problem to be addressed in the high level nuclear waste repository. For the vertically emplaced waste container, the air gap which is between the container shell and the rock borehole, have an important role of dissipating heat to surrounding rack. These waste containers are vertically emplaced in the borehole 300 meters below ground, and in a horizontal grid of 30 {times} 8 meters apart. The borehole will be capped after the container emplacement. The expected initial heat generated is between 3--4.74 kW per container depending on the type of waste. The goal of this study is to use a computer simulation model to find the borehole wall, air-gap and the container outer wall temperature distributions.

  6. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation. PMID:27472379

  7. Bioactive conformation of stromelysin inhibitors determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnella, N C; Bohacek, R; Zhang, X; Kolossváry, I; Paris, C G; Melton, R; Winter, C; Hu, S I; Ganu, V

    1995-01-01

    The transferred nuclear Overhauser effect has been used to determine the biologically active conformations of two stromelysin inhibitors. Both inhibitors used in this study were hydroxamic acids generated via chemical synthesis. These structures, representing the conformation of each inhibitor bound to stromelysin, superimposed with excellent agreement. The study also provided information on the shape and orientation of the S2' and S1' pockets of the enzyme relative to thermolysin. Comparisons were made between stromelysin and thermolysin inhibitors to critically examine thermolysin as a template for stromelysin-inhibitor design. The enzyme-bound conformations of these stromelysin inhibitors were determined for use as a template in conformationally restricted drug design. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7831311

  8. Live embryo imaging to follow cell cycle and chromosomes stability after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Balbach, Sebastian T; Boiani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) into mouse oocytes yields a transcriptionally and functionally heterogeneous population of cloned embryos. Most studies of NT embryos consider only embryos at predefined key stages (e.g., morula or blastocyst), that is, after the bulk of reprogramming has taken place. These retrospective approaches are of limited use to elucidate mechanisms of reprogramming and to predict developmental success. Observing cloned embryo development using live embryo cinematography has the potential to reveal otherwise undetectable embryo features. However, light exposure necessary for live cell cinematography is highly toxic to cloned embryos. Here we describe a protocol for combined bright-field and fluorescence live-cell imaging of histone H2b-GFP expressing mouse embryos, to record cell divisions up to the blastocyst stage. This protocol, which can be adapted to observe other reporters such as Oct4-GFP or Nanog-GFP, allowed us to quantitatively analyze cleavage kinetics of cloned embryos. PMID:25287344

  9. Deficiency of Genomic Reprogramming in Trophoblast Stem Cells Following Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Atsushi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To examine the genomic reprogrammability of trophoblast stem (TS) cells using a nuclear transfer technique, we produced TS cloned embryos using five TS cell lines from three strains of mice (ICR, B6D2F1, and B6CBF1) as donors and observed developmental ability during preimplantation development. The developmental rates of the TS cloned embryos that developed to the two-cell, four- to eight-cell, morula, and blastocyst stages were 58–83%, 0–38.6%, 0–21.3%, and 0–15.9%, respectively, indicating that more than 50% of TS cloned embryos arrested at the two-cell stage. These TS cloned two-cell embryos were expressed low level of Dappa3 (also known as PGC7/Stella), indicating that zygotic gene activation (ZGA) was disrupted in these embryos. However, a small portion of the TS cloned embryos (0–15.9%) reached the blastocyst stage. In these TS cloned blastocysts, the numbers of trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) cells were 31.9±4.6 and 12.1±3.0, respectively, which were not significantly different from those in the fertilized embryos. In addition, the gene expression analysis showed that Oct3/4, and Cdx2, which are ICM- and TE-specific marker genes, respectively, and Dppa3, and Hdac1, which are zygotic gene activation-related genes, were expressed in TS cloned blastocysts at the same levels as in the fertilized blastocysts. These results indicate that although TS cloned embryos are able to differentiate into ICM cells, the genomic reprogrammability of TS cells is very low following nuclear transfer. PMID:25826724

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  11. Exploiting level anti-crossings for efficient and selective transfer of hyperpolarization in coupled nuclear spin systems.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Kaptein, Robert; Miesel, Karsten; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2013-09-21

    Spin hyperpolarization can be coherently transferred to other nuclei in field-cycling NMR experiments. At low magnetic fields spin polarization is redistributed in a strongly coupled network of spins. Polarization transfer is most efficient at fields where level anti-crossings (LACs) occur for the nuclear spin-states. A further condition is that field switching to the LAC positions is non-adiabatic in order to convert the starting population differences into spin coherences that cause time-dependent mixing of states. The power of this method has been demonstrated by studying transfer of photo-Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (photo-CIDNP) in N-acetyl-tryptophan. We have investigated the magnetic field dependence and time dependence of coherent CIDNP transfer and directly assessed nuclear spin LACs by studying polarization transfer at specific field positions. The proposed approach based on LACs is not limited to CIDNP but is advantageous for enhancing NMR signals by spin order transfer from any type of hyper-polarized nuclei. PMID:23893009

  12. Successful cloning of coyotes through interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic dog oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Mina; Park, Kang Bae; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yeun Wook; Kim, Woo Tae; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is an emerging assisted reproductive technology (ART) for preserving Nature's diversity. The scarcity of oocytes from some species makes utilisation of readily available oocytes inevitable. In the present study, we describe the successful cloning of coyotes (Canis latrans) through iSCNT using oocytes from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris or dingo). Transfer of 320 interspecies-reconstructed embryos into 22 domestic dog recipients resulted in six pregnancies, from which eight viable offspring were delivered. Fusion rate and cloning efficiency during iSCNT cloning of coyotes were not significantly different from those observed during intraspecies cloning of domestic dogs. Using neonatal fibroblasts as donor cells significantly improved the cloning efficiency compared with cloning using adult fibroblast donor cells (P<0.05). The use of domestic dog oocytes in the cloning of coyotes in the present study holds promise for cloning other endangered species in the Canidae family using similar techniques. However, there are still limitations of the iSCNT technology, as demonstrated by births of morphologically abnormal coyotes and the clones' inheritance of maternal domestic dog mitochondrial DNA. PMID:23217630

  13. Production of human apolipoprotein(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Horii, Wataru; Nunoya, Tetsuo; Iwata, Akira; Fan, Jianglin; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of ischemic heart disease and stroke occur as a result of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to produce a new Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pig model by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for studying atherosclerosis. The human apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) genes were transfected into kidney epithelial cells derived from a male and a female piglet. Male cells were used as donors initially, and 275 embryos were transferred to surrogates. Three offspring were delivered, and the production efficiency was 1.1% (3/275). Serial female cells were injected into 937 enucleated oocytes. Eight offspring were delivered (production efficiency: 0.9%) from surrogates. One male and 2 female transgenic miniature pigs matured well. Lipoprotein(a) was found in the male and one of the female transgenic animals. These results demonstrate successful production of human apo(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pigs by SCNT. Our goal is to establish a human apo(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pig colony for studying atherosclerosis. PMID:26411321

  14. Faddeev-type calculation of (d ,n ) transfer reactions in three-body nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2015-12-01

    Exact Faddeev-type three-body equations are applied to the study of the proton transfer reactions (d ,n ) in the system consisting of a nuclear core and two nucleons. The integral equations for the three-body transition operators are solved in the momentum-space framework including the Coulomb interaction via the screening and renormalization method. For a weakly bound final nucleus the calculation of the (d ,n ) reaction is more demanding in terms of the screening radius as compared to the (d ,p ) reaction. Well-converged differential cross section results are obtained for 7Be (d ,n ) 8B, 12C (d ,n ) 13N, and 16O (d ,n ) 17$ reactions. A comparison with the corresponding (d ,p ) reactions is made. The calculations fail to reproduce the shape of the angular distribution for reactions on 12C but provide quite successful description for reactions on 16O, especially for the transfer to the 17F excited state 1 /2+ when using a nonlocal optical potential.

  15. Production of human apolipoprotein(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Horii, Wataru; Nunoya, Tetsuo; Iwata, Akira; Fan, Jianglin; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of ischemic heart disease and stroke occur as a result of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to produce a new Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pig model by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for studying atherosclerosis. The human apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) genes were transfected into kidney epithelial cells derived from a male and a female piglet. Male cells were used as donors initially, and 275 embryos were transferred to surrogates. Three offspring were delivered, and the production efficiency was 1.1% (3/275). Serial female cells were injected into 937 enucleated oocytes. Eight offspring were delivered (production efficiency: 0.9%) from surrogates. One male and 2 female transgenic miniature pigs matured well. Lipoprotein(a) was found in the male and one of the female transgenic animals. These results demonstrate successful production of human apo(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pigs by SCNT. Our goal is to establish a human apo(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pig colony for studying atherosclerosis. PMID:26411321

  16. Fate of centrosomes following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunping; Wang, Lili; Wang, Haiping; Liu, Ying; Li, Ning; Lyu, Qifeng; Keefe, David L; Albertini, David F; Liu, Lin

    2006-06-01

    Cloning mammalians by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) remains inefficient. A majority of clones produced by SCNT fail to develop properly and of those which do survive, some exhibit early aging, premature death, tumors, and other pathologies associated with aneuploidy. Alterations of centrosomes are linked to aberrant cell cycle progression, aneuploidy, and tumorigenesis in many cell types. It remains to be determined how centrosomes are remodeled in cloned bovine embryos. We show that abnormalities in either distribution and/or number of centrosomes were evident in approximately 50% of reconstructed embryos following SCNT. Moreover, centrosome abnormalities and failed 'pronuclear' migration which manifested during the first cell cycle coincided with errors in spindle morphogenesis, chromosome alignment, and cytokinesis. By contrast, nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) exhibited normal expression patterns at metaphase spindle poles and in 'pronucleus' during interphase. The defects in centrosome remodeling and 'pronuclear' migration could lead to chromosome instability and developmental failures associated with embryo production by SCNT. Addressing these fundamental problems may enhance production of normal clones. PMID:16735544

  17. Multi-Scale-Structured Composite Coatings by Plasma-Transferred Arc for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werry, A.; Chazelas, C.; Denoirjean, A.; Valette, S.; Vardelle, A.; Meillot, E.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear plants, the replacement of hardfacing Stellite, a cobalt-based alloy, on parts of the piping system in connection with the reactor has been investigated since the late 60's. Various Fe-based or Ni-based alloys, Co-free or with a low content of Co, have been developed but with mechanical properties generally lower than that of Stellites. The 4th generation nuclear plants impose additional or more stringent requirements for hardfacing materials. Plasma-transferred arc (PTA) coatings of cobalt-free nickel-based alloys with the addition of sub-micrometric or micrometric alumina particles are thought to be a potential solution for tribological applications in the primary system of sodium-cooled fast reactors. In this study, PTA coatings of nickel-based alloys reinforced with alumina particles were deposited on 316L stainless steel substrates. Under the conditions of this study, the addition of alumina particles resulted in a refinement of coating microstructure and the improvement of their resistance to abrasive wear. However, it does not bring about any change in coating micro-hardness.

  18. Transfer-induced fission in inverse kinematics: Impact on experimental and evaluated nuclear data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farget, F.; Caamaño, M.; Ramos, D.; Rodrıguez-Tajes, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Audouin, L.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Clément, E.; Cortina, D.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Doré, D.; Fernández-Domınguez, B.; Gaudefroy, L.; Golabek, C.; Heinz, A.; Jurado, B.; Lemasson, A.; Paradela, C.; Roger, T.; Salsac, M. D.; Schmitt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse kinematics is a new tool to study nuclear fission. Its main advantage is the possibility to measure with an unmatched resolution the atomic number of fission fragments, leading to new observables in the properties of fission-fragment distributions. In addition to the resolution improvement, the study of fission based on nuclear collisions in inverse kinematics beneficiates from a larger view with respect to the neutron-induced fission, as in a single experiment the number of fissioning systems and the excitation energy range are widden. With the use of spectrometers, mass and kinetic-energy distributions may now be investigated as a function of the proton and neutron number sharing. The production of fissioning nuclei in transfer reactions allows studying the isotopic yields of fission fragments as a function of the excitation energy. The higher excitation energy resulting in the fusion reaction leading to the compound nucleus 250Cf at an excitation energy of 45MeV is also presented. With the use of inverse kinematics, the charge polarisation of fragments at scission is now revealed with high precision, and it is shown that it cannot be neglected, even at higher excitation energies. In addition, the kinematical properties of the fragments inform on the deformation configuration at scission.

  19. 3D modeling of heat transfer and gas flow in a grooved ring fuel element for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkett, Laura Ashley

    In the past, fuel elements with multiple axial coolant channels have been used in nuclear propulsion applications. A novel fuel element concept that reduces weight and increases efficiency uses a stack of grooved rings. Each fuel ring consists of a hole on the interior and grooves across the top face. Many grooved ring configurations have been modeled, and a single flow channel for each design has been analyzed. For increased efficiency, a fuel ring with a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio is ideal. When grooves are shallower and they have a lower surface area, the results show that the exit temperature is higher. By coupling the physics of fluid flow with those of heat transfer, the effects on the cooler gas flowing through the grooves of the hot, fissioning ring can be predicted. Models also show differences in velocities and temperatures after dense boundary nodes are applied. Parametric studies were done to show how a pressure drop across the length of the channels will affect the exit temperatures of the gas. Geometric optimization was done to show the temperature distributions and pressure drops that result from the manipulation of various parameters, and the effects of model scaling was also investigated. The inverse Graetz numbers are plotted against Nusselt numbers, and the results of these values suggest that the gas quickly becomes fully developed, laminar flow, rather than constant turbulent conditions.

  20. Heat Transfer in Waste Glass Melts - Measurement and Implications for Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan

    Thermal properties of waste glass melts, such as high temperature density and thermal conductivity, are relevant to heat transfer processes in nuclear waste vitrification. Experimental measurement techniques were developed and applied to four nuclear waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams to study heat flow mechanisms in nuclear waste vitrification. Density measurement results by Archimedes' method indicated that densities of the melts investigated varied considerably with composition and temperature. Thermal diffusivities of waste melts were determined at nominal melter operating temperatures using a temperature-wave technique. Thermal conductivities were obtained by combining diffusivity data with the experimentally-acquired densities of the melts and their known heat capacities. The experimental results display quite large positive dependences of conductivities on temperature for some samples and much weaker positive temperature dependences for others. More importantly, there is observed a big change in the slopes of the conductivities versus temperature as temperature is increased for two of the melts, but not for the other two. This behavior was interpreted in terms of the changing contributions of radiation and conduction with temperature and composition dependence of the absorption coefficient. Based on the obtained thermal conductivities, a simple model for a waste glass melter was set up, which was used to analyze the relative contributions of conduction and radiation individually and collectively to the overall heat flow and to investigate factors and conditions that influence the radiation contribution to heat flow. The modeling results showed that unlike the case at lower temperatures, the radiant energy flow through waste melts could be predominant compared with conduction at temperature of about 900 °C or higher. However, heat flow due to radiation was roughly equal to that from

  1. Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low

  2. Plectin isoform 1-dependent nuclear docking of desmin networks affects myonuclear architecture and expression of mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Staszewska, Ilona; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin is a highly versatile cytoskeletal protein that acts as a mechanical linker between intermediate filament (IF) networks and various cellular structures. The protein is crucial for myofiber integrity. Its deficiency leads to severe pathological changes in skeletal muscle fibers of patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). Skeletal muscle fibers express four major isoforms of plectin which are distinguished solely by alternative, relatively short, first exon-encoded N-terminal sequences. Each one of these isoforms is localized to a different subcellular compartment and plays a specific role in maintaining integrity and proper function(s) of myofibers. The unique role of individual isoforms is supported by distinct phenotypes of isoform-specific knockout mice and recently discovered mutations in first coding exons of plectin that lead to distinct, tissue-specific, pathological abnormalities in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of plectin isoform 1 (P1) in myofibers of mice leads to alterations of nuclear morphology, similar to those observed in various forms of MD. We show that P1-mediated targeting of desmin IFs to myonuclei is essential for maintenance of their typically spheroidal architecture as well as their proper positioning and movement along the myofiber. Furthermore, we show that P1 deficiency affects chromatin modifications and the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions, including signaling pathways mediating mechanotransduction. Mechanistically, P1 is shown to specifically interact with the myonuclear membrane-associated (BAR domain-containing) protein endophilin B. Our results open a new perspective on cytoskeleton-nuclear crosstalk via specific cytolinker proteins. PMID:26487297

  3. Pangenome Evidence for Extensive Interdomain Horizontal Transfer Affecting Lineage Core and Shell Genes in Uncultured Planktonic Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Philippe; Zivanovic, Yvan; Moreira, David; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; López-García, Purificación

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important force in evolution, which may lead, among other things, to the adaptation to new environments by the import of new metabolic functions. Recent studies based on phylogenetic analyses of a few genome fragments containing archaeal 16S rRNA genes and fosmid-end sequences from deep-sea metagenomic libraries have suggested that marine planktonic archaea could be affected by high HGT frequency. Likewise, a composite genome of an uncultured marine euryarchaeote showed high levels of gene sequence similarity to bacterial genes. In this work, we ask whether HGT is frequent and widespread in genomes of these marine archaea, and whether HGT is an ancient and/or recurrent phenomenon. To answer these questions, we sequenced 997 fosmid archaeal clones from metagenomic libraries of deep-Mediterranean waters (1,000 and 3,000 m depth) and built comprehensive pangenomes for planktonic Thaumarchaeota (Group I archaea) and Euryarchaeota belonging to the uncultured Groups II and III Euryarchaeota (GII/III-Euryarchaeota). Comparison with available reference genomes of Thaumarchaeota and a composite marine surface euryarchaeote genome allowed us to define sets of core, lineage-specific core, and shell gene ortholog clusters for the two archaeal lineages. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of all gene clusters showed that 23.9% of marine Thaumarchaeota genes and 29.7% of GII/III-Euryarchaeota genes had been horizontally acquired from bacteria. HGT is not only extensive and directional but also ongoing, with high HGT levels in lineage-specific core (ancient transfers) and shell (recent transfers) genes. Many of the acquired genes are related to metabolism and membrane biogenesis, suggesting an adaptive value for life in cold, oligotrophic oceans. We hypothesize that the acquisition of an important amount of foreign genes by the ancestors of these archaeal groups significantly contributed to their divergence and ecological success. PMID:24923324

  4. Factors affecting the chemical exchange saturation transfer of Creatine as assessed by 11.7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Mori, Yuki; Tanki, Nobuyoshi; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a new contrast enhancement approach for imaging exogenous or endogenous substances such as creatine (Cr), amide protons, and glutamate in the human body. An increase in field strength is beneficial for CEST imaging because of the increased chemical shift and longer longitudinal relaxation time (T1). In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), establishing and evaluating the CEST effect is important for optimizing the magnetization transfer (MT) saturation radio frequency (RF) pulses. In this study, the CEST effect on Cr was evaluated at different concentrations in pH phantoms by appropriately selecting MT saturation RF pulses using 11.7 T MRI. The results showed that the CEST efficiency increased gradually with increasing applied saturation RF pulse power and that it was affected by the number of saturation RF pulses and their bandwidths. However, spillover effects were observed with higher saturation RF pulse powers. In conclusion, we successfully performed in vitro Cr CEST imaging under optimized conditions of MT saturation RF pulses. PMID:25477238

  5. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A.; Rego, Luis G. C.

    2015-04-01

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron-nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron-hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures.

  6. Heterozygosity for Nuclear Factor One X Affects Hippocampal-Dependent Behaviour in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lachlan; Dixon, Chantelle; Cato, Kathleen; Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; Janke, Andrew L.; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Richards, Linda J.; Burne, Thomas H. J.; Piper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the genes that regulate the development and subsequent functioning of the hippocampus is pivotal to understanding the role of this cortical structure in learning and memory. One group of genes that has been shown to be critical for the early development of the hippocampus is the Nuclear factor one (Nfi) family, which encodes four site-specific transcription factors, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX. In mice lacking Nfia, Nfib or Nfix, aspects of early hippocampal development, including neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus, are delayed. However, due to the perinatal lethality of these mice, it is not clear whether this hippocampal phenotype persists to adulthood and affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour. To address this we examined the hippocampal phenotype of mice heterozygous for Nfix (Nfix+/−), which survive to adulthood. We found that Nfix+/− mice had reduced expression of NFIX throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, and that early hippocampal development in these mice was disrupted, producing a phenotype intermediate to that of wild-type mice and Nfix−/− mice. The abnormal hippocampal morphology of Nfix+/− mice persisted to adulthood, and these mice displayed a specific performance deficit in the Morris water maze learning and memory task. These findings demonstrate that the level of Nfix expression during development and within the adult is essential for the function of the hippocampus during learning and memory. PMID:23776487

  7. Heterozygosity for nuclear factor one x affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lachlan; Dixon, Chantelle; Cato, Kathleen; Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Janke, Andrew L; Gronostajski, Richard M; Richards, Linda J; Burne, Thomas H J; Piper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the genes that regulate the development and subsequent functioning of the hippocampus is pivotal to understanding the role of this cortical structure in learning and memory. One group of genes that has been shown to be critical for the early development of the hippocampus is the Nuclear factor one (Nfi) family, which encodes four site-specific transcription factors, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX. In mice lacking Nfia, Nfib or Nfix, aspects of early hippocampal development, including neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus, are delayed. However, due to the perinatal lethality of these mice, it is not clear whether this hippocampal phenotype persists to adulthood and affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour. To address this we examined the hippocampal phenotype of mice heterozygous for Nfix (Nfix (+/-)), which survive to adulthood. We found that Nfix (+/-) mice had reduced expression of NFIX throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, and that early hippocampal development in these mice was disrupted, producing a phenotype intermediate to that of wild-type mice and Nfix(-/-) mice. The abnormal hippocampal morphology of Nfix (+/-) mice persisted to adulthood, and these mice displayed a specific performance deficit in the Morris water maze learning and memory task. These findings demonstrate that the level of Nfix expression during development and within the adult is essential for the function of the hippocampus during learning and memory. PMID:23776487

  8. Laughing it off? Humour, affect and emotion work in communities living with nuclear risk.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, K A; Henwood, K L; Pidgeon, N F; Simmons, P

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing number of risk researchers have recognized that risks are not simply objective hazards but that the meanings of risk are discursively negotiated, dynamic and embedded within the wider social relations that constitute everyday life. A growing interest in the complexity and nuances of risk subjectivities has alerted sociocultural researchers not only to what is said in a risk situation, but also to how it is said and to what is unsaid and even, in a particular context, unsayable; to the intangible qualities of discourse that communicate additional meanings. Humour is both an intangible and marks such intangible meanings, yet it has largely been ignored and insufficiently theorized by risk researchers. In this paper, we draw upon insights from the humour literature - suspending the belief that humour is inherently good - to analyse and theorize humour as a way of examining the meanings and functions of risk. We show how humour can both mask and carefully reveal affectively charged states about living with nuclear risk. As such, it helps risk subjects to live with risk by suppressing vulnerabilities, enabling the negotiation of what constitutes a threat, and engendering a sense of empowerment. We conclude that humorous talk can be serious talk which can enrich our understandings of the lived experience of risk and of risk subjectivities. PMID:21631461

  9. Production of transgenic dairy goat expressing human α-lactalbumin by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiujing; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Huili; Meng, Chunhua; Li, Jingxin; Jiang, Jin; Qian, Yong; Su, Lei; He, Qiang; Zhang, Qingxiao

    2015-02-01

    Production of human α-lactalbumin (hα-LA) transgenic cloned dairy goats has great potential in improving the nutritional value and perhaps increasing the yield of dairy goat milk. Here, a mammary-specific expression vector 5A, harboring goat β-lactoglobulin (βLG) promoter, the hα-LA gene, neo(r) and EGFP dual markers, was constructed. Then, it was effectively transfected into goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) and the expression of hα-LA was investigated. Both the hα-LA transcript and protein were detected in the transfected GMECs after the induction of hormonal signals. In addition, the 5A vector was introduced into dairy goat fetal fibroblasts (transfection efficiency ≈60-70%) to prepare competent transgenic donor cells. A total of 121 transgenic fibroblast clones were isolated by 96-well cell culture plates and screened with nested-PCR amplification and EGFP fluorescence. After being frozen for 8 months, the transgenic cells still showed high viabilities, verifying their ability as donor cells. Dairy goat cloned embryos were produced from these hα-LA transgenic donor cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the rates of fusion, cleavage, and the development to blastocyst stages were 81.8, 84.4, and 20.0%, respectively. A total of 726 reconstructed embryos derived from the transgenic cells were transferred to 74 recipients and pregnancy was confirmed at 90 days in 12 goats. Of six female kids born, two carried hα-LA and the hα-LA protein was detected in their milk. This study provides an effective system to prepare SCNT donor cells and transgenic animals for human recombinant proteins. PMID:25139669

  10. Function of donor cell centrosome in intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Zhisheng; Zhang Gang; Meng Xiaoqian; Zhang Yanling; Chen Dayuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun Qingyuan . E-mail: sunqy1@yahoo.com

    2005-05-15

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) in most animal cells, are important for many cellular activities such as assembly of the mitotic spindle, establishment of cell polarity, and cell movement. In nuclear transfer (NT), MTOCs that are located at the poles of the meiotic spindle are removed from the recipient oocyte, while the centrosome of the donor cell is introduced. We used mouse MII oocytes as recipients, mouse fibroblasts, rat fibroblasts, or pig granulosa cells as donor cells to construct intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in order to observe centrosome dynamics and functions. Three antibodies against centrin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA, respectively, were used to stain the centrosome. Centrin was not detected either at the poles of transient spindles or at the poles of first mitotic spindles. {gamma}-tubulin translocated into the two poles of the transient spindles, while no accumulated {gamma}-tubulin aggregates were detected in the area adjacent to the two pseudo-pronuclei. At first mitotic metaphase, {gamma}-tubulin was translocated to the spindle poles. The distribution of {gamma}-tubulin was similar in mouse intraspecies and rat-mouse interspecies embryos. The NuMA antibody that we used can recognize porcine but not murine NuMA protein, so it was used to trace the NuMA protein of donor cell in reconstructed embryos. In the pig-mouse interspecies reconstructed embryos, NuMA concentrated between the disarrayed chromosomes soon after activation and translocated to the transient spindle poles. NuMA then immigrated into pseudo-pronuclei. After pseudo-pronuclear envelope breakdown, NuMA was located between the chromosomes and then translocated to the spindle poles of first mitotic metaphase. {gamma}-tubulin antibody microinjection resulted in spindle disorganization and retardation of the first cell division. NuMA antibody microinjection also resulted in spindle disorganization. Our findings indicate that (1) the

  11. Caffeine treatment prevents age-related changes in ovine oocytes and increases cell numbers in blastocysts produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Campbell, Keith H S

    2008-09-01

    Maturation-promoting factor (MPF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) are key regulators of both meiotic and mitotic cycles. Oocytes arrested at metaphase of the second meiotic division (MII) contain high levels of both kinases; however, these activities decline with age. Caffeine (an inhibitor of Myt1/Wee1 activity) can increase MPF and MAPK activities in ovine oocytes; however, the effects of caffeine treatment on the activation, nuclear configuration and developmental potential of ovine SC nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos were unknown. We examined the effects of aging and caffeine treatment on MPF and MAPK activities, activation, development, and nuclear remodeling of SCNT embryos. Both kinases reached maximum activities at 24-h postonset of maturation (hpm) and then decreased with time. The decline in MPF activity occurred rapidly, whereas MAPK activity declined more slowly. Caffeine treatment (10.0 mM) of aging oocytes prevented the decline in activities associated with both kinases and prevented the acquisition of activation competence by a single activation stimulus. However, treatment of aged oocytes with caffeine could not increase kinase activities or reverse the acquisition of activation competence. Enucleation did not affect kinase activities, but caffeine treatment significantly increased both. Caffeine treatment did not affect the decline in MPF or MAPK activities following activation or significantly affect development of parthenogenetically activated oocytes. When SCNT reconstructed embryos were treated with caffeine following fusion, no increase in the frequency of development to blastocyst was observed; however, a significant increase in the occurrence of nuclear envelope break-down (NEBD) and an increase in total cell numbers occurred. PMID:18673075

  12. Reprogrammed Transcriptome in Rhesus-Bovine Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Otu, Hasan H.; Chen, Ying; Lee, Young; Latham, Keith; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Global activation of the embryonic genome (EGA), one of the most critical steps in early mammalian embryo development, is recognized as the time when interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos fail to thrive. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed the EGA-related transcriptome of rhesus-bovine iSCNT 8- to 16-cell embryos and dissected the reprogramming process in terms of embryonic gene activation, somatic gene silencing, and maternal RNA degradation. Compared with fibroblast donor cells, two thousand and seven genes were activated in iSCNT embryos, one quarter of them reaching expression levels comparable to those found in in vitro fertilized (IVF) rhesus embryos. This suggested that EGA in iSCNT embryos had partially recapitulated rhesus embryonic development. Eight hundred and sixty somatic genes were not silenced properly and continued to be expressed in iSCNT embryos, which indicated incomplete nuclear reprogramming. We compared maternal RNA degradation in bovine oocytes between bovine-bovine SCNT and iSCNT embryos. While maternal RNA degradation occurred in both SCNT and iSCNT embryos, we saw more limited overall degradation of maternal RNA in iSCNT embryos than in SCNT embryos. Several important maternal RNAs, like GPF9, were not properly processed in SCNT embryos. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggested that iSCNT embryos are capable of triggering EGA, while a portion of somatic cell-associated genes maintain their expression. Maternal RNA degradation seems to be impaired in iSCNT embryos. Further understanding of the biological roles of these genes, networks, and pathways revealed by iSCNT may expand our knowledge about cell reprogramming, pluripotency, and differentiation. PMID:21799794

  13. Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Oxamflatin on In Vitro Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Liming; Ma, Fanhua; Yang, Jinzeng; Riaz, Hasan; Wang, Yongliang; Wu, Wangjun; Xia, Xiaoliang; Ma, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Lin; Ying, Wenqin; Xu, Dequan; Zuo, Bo; Ren, Zhuqing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Low cloning efficiency is considered to be caused by the incomplete or aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of differentiated donor cells in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Oxamflatin, a novel class of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), has been found to improve the in vitro and full-term developmental potential of SCNT embryos. In the present study, we studied the effects of oxamflatin treatment on in vitro porcine SCNT embryos. Our results indicated that the rate of in vitro blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos treated with 1 μM oxamflatin for 15 h postactivation was significantly higher than all other treatments. Treatment of oxamflatin decreased the relative histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in cloned embryos and resulted in hyperacetylation levels of histone H3 at lysine 9 (AcH3K9) and histone H4 at lysine 5 (AcH4K5) at pronuclear, two-cell, and four-cell stages partly through downregulating HDAC1. The suppression of HDAC6 through oxamflatin increased the nonhistone acetylation level of α-tubulin during the mitotic cell cycle of early SCNT embryos. In addition, we demonstrated that oxamflatin downregulated DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) expression and global DNA methylation level (5-methylcytosine) in two-cell-stage porcine SCNT embryos. The pluripotency-related gene POU5F1 was found to be upregulated in the oxamflatin-treated group with a decreased DNA methylation tendency in its promoter regions. Treatment of oxamflatin did not change the locus-specific DNA methylation levels of Sus scrofa heterochromatic satellite DNA sequences at the blastocyst stage. Meanwhile, our findings suggest that treatment with HDACi may contribute to maintaining the stable status of cytoskeleton-associated elements, such as acetylated α-tubulin, which may be the crucial determinants of donor nuclear reprogramming in early SCNT embryos. In summary, oxamflatin treatment improves the developmental potential of porcine SCNT embryos in vitro. PMID

  14. Lymphoid lineage differentiation potential of mouse nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eslami-Arshaghi, Tarlan; Salehi, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud; Gholipourmalekabadi, Mazaher; Mossahebi-Mohammadi, Majid; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Rajabi, Hoda

    2015-09-01

    Stem cells therapy is considered as an efficient strategy for the treatment of some diseases. Nevertheless, some obstacles such as probability of rejection by the immune system limit applications of this strategy. Therefore, several efforts have been made to overcome this among which using the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell (nt-ESCs) are the most efficient strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differentiation potential of the nt-ESCs to lymphoid lineage in the presence of IL-7, IL-3, FLT3-ligand and TPO growth factors in vitro. To this end, the nt-ESCs cells were prepared and treated with aforementioned growth factors for 7 and 14 days. Then, the cells were examined for expression of lymphoid markers (CD3, CD25, CD127 and CD19) by quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and flow cytometry. An increased expression of CD19 and CD25 markers was observed in the treated cells compared with the negative control samples by day 7. After 14 days, the expression level of all the tested CD markers significantly increased in the treated groups in comparison with the control. The current study reveals the potential of the nt-ESCs in differentiation to lymphoid lineage in the presence of defined growth factors. PMID:26239678

  15. TEMP: A finite line heat transfer code for geologic repositories for nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, K.J.; Bloom, S.G.; Atterbury, W.G.; Hetteberg, J.R.

    1987-10-01

    TEMP is a FORTRAN computer code for calculating temperatures in a geologic repository for nuclear waste. It will calculate the incremental temperature contributed by a single heat source, by an infinite array of heat sources, or by heat sources geometrically arranged in a finite array. In the finite array geometry, different types of heat sources can be placed in different regions at different times to more closely approximate the emplacement of waste in a repository. TEMP uses a semi-analytical technique for solving the equation for a heat producing finite length line source in an infinite and isotropic medium. Temperature contributions from individual heat sources are superimposed to determine the temperature at a specific location and time in a repository of multiple heat sources. Thermal conductivity of the geologic medium can be a function of temperature, and, when it is, an approximation is made for the temperature dependence of thermal diffusivity. This report derives the equations solved by TEMP and documents its accuracy by comparing its results to known analytical solutions and to the finite-difference and finite-element heat transfer codes HEATING5, HEATING6, THAC-SIP-3D, SPECTROM-41, and STEALTH-2D. The temperature results from TEMP are shown to be very accurate when compared to the analytical solutions and to the results from the finite-difference and finite-element codes. 8 refs., 97 figs., 39 tabs.

  16. Functional enucleation of porcine oocytes for somatic cell nuclear transfer using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, K.; Lucas-Hahn, A.; Petersen, B.; Hassel, P.; Lemme, E.; Niemann, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2010-02-01

    Cloning of several mammalian species has been achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer over the last decade. However, this method still results in very low efficiencies originating from biological and technical aspects. The highly-invasive mechanical enucleation belongs to the technical aspects and requires considerable micromanipulation skill. In this paper, we present a novel non-invasive method for combined oocyte imaging and automated functional enucleation using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After three-dimensional imaging of Hoechst-labeled porcine oocytes by multiphoton microscopy, our self-developed software automatically determined the metaphase plate position and shape. Subsequent irradiation of this volume with the very same laser at higher pulse energies in the low-density-plasma regime was used for metaphase plate ablation. We show that functional fs laser-based enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibited further embryonic development while maintaining intact oocyte morphology. In contrast, non-irradiated oocytes were able to develop to the blastocyst stage without significant differences to control oocytes. Our results indicate that fs laser systems offer great potential for oocyte imaging and enucleation as a fast, easy to use and reliable tool which may improve the efficiency of somatic cell clone production.

  17. The ability of mouse nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Vahid; Salehi, Mohammad; Nourozian, Mohsen; Fadaei, Fatemeh; Farahani, Reza Mastery; Piryaei, Abbas; Delbari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) show stem cell characteristics such as pluripotency but cause no immunological disorders. Although ntESCs are able to differentiate into somatic cells, the ability of ntESCs to differentiate into primordial germ cells (PGCs) has not been examined. In this work, we examined the capacity of mouse ntESCs to differentiate into PGCs in vitro. ntESCs aggregated to form embryoid bodies (EB) in EB culture medium supplemented with bone morphogenetic protein 4(BMP4) as the differentiation factor. The expression level of specific PGC genes was compared at days 4 and 8 using real time PCR. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical staining were used to detect Mvh as a specific PGC marker. ntESCs expressed particular genes related to different stages of PGC development. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical staining confirmed the presence of Mvh protein in a small number of cells. There were significant differences between cells that differentiated into PGCs in the group treated with Bmp4 compared to non-treated cells. These findings indicate that ntESCs can differentiate into putative PGCs. Improvement of ntESC differentiation into PGCs may be a reliable means of producing mature germ cells. PMID:26273226

  18. Abnormal dynamic changes in β-tubulin in somatic nuclear transfer cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jingling; Wang, Zhendong; Shen, Xinghui; Zheng, Zhong; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xiuqing; Hu, Lili; Lei, Lei

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning remains low, thus limiting the applications of this technique. In this study, we used immunochemistry and confocal microscopy to detect the microtubule component, β-tubulin, in SCNT, parthenogenetic (PA), and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) embryos before the first mitotic division. β-Tubulin is the component subunit of microtubule, which plays critical roles in regulating localization of cellular organelles, and the growth, maturation and fertilization of oocytes. Our results demonstrated similar changes of spindle patterns in PA and ICSI embryos. The second meiotic division resumed 1 h post-treatment, and the cytoplasmic asters (CAs) disappeared. After about 4-6 h of treatment, pronuclei formed with the midbodies connecting each other. Meanwhile, the CAs reappeared and a microtubule network developed in the cytoplasm. However, SCNT embryos showed abnormal multipolar spindles, and the pseudopronuclei that contained many nucleoli existed after 6 h of SrCl2 activation. Enucleated oocytes alone did not form spindle-like structures when they were artificially activated for 6 h, indicating that somatic cell chromosomes might be necessary for spindle formation in SCNT embryos. These results demonstrated abnormal changes of β-tubulin in mouse SCNT embryos, compared with PA and ICSI embryos. PMID:24345634

  19. Establishment, differentiation, electroporation, viral transduction, and nuclear transfer of bovine and porcine mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Colleoni, S; Donofrio, G; Lagutina, I; Duchi, R; Galli, C; Lazzari, G

    2005-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reside in the bone marrow and have the potential for multilineage differentiation, into bone, cartilage, and fat, for example. In this study, bovine and porcine MSCs were isolated, cultured to determine their replication ability, and differentiated with osteogenic medium and 5-azacytine. Both bovine and porcine undifferentiated MSCs were electroporated and virally transduced to test the efficiency of genetic modification and the maintainance of differentiation ability thereafter. Nuclear transfer experiments were carried out with bovine and porcine MSCs, both at the undifferentiated state and following differentiation. Our results indicate that bovine and porcine MSCs have limited lifespans in vitro--approximately 50 population doublings. They can be efficiently differentiated and characterized along the osteogenic lineage by morphology, alkaline phosphatase, Von Kossa, oil red stainings, and RT-PCR. Electroporation and selection induce high levels of EGFP expression in porcine but not in bovine MSCs. Following genetic modification, MSCs retain their pluridifferentiation ability as parental cells. Cloned embryos derived from bovine and porcine undifferentiated MSCs and their derivatives along the osteogenic lineage give rise to consistently high preimplantation development comparable to adult fibroblasts. PMID:16176125

  20. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency. PMID:26342001

  1. Production of myostatin-targeted goat by nuclear transfer from cultured adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Rong; Zhong, Bu-Shuai; Jia, Ruo-Xin; Wan, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Li; Fan, Yi-Xuan; Wang, Li-Zhong; You, Ji-Hao; Wang, Zi-Yu; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-15

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β family, acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. In this study, myostatin-targeted caprine fibroblasts were obtained and subjected to SCNT to determine whether myostatin-knockout goats could be created. Fibroblasts from a 2-mo-old goat were transfected with a myostatin-targeted vector to prepare transgenic donor cells for nuclear transfer. After serum-starvation (for synchronization of the cell cycle), the percentage of transgenic fibroblasts in the G(0)/G(1) phase increased (66.2% vs. 82.9%; P < 0.05) compared with that in the control group, whereas the apoptosis rate and mitochondrial membrane potential were unaffected (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes as recipient cytoplasts for rates of fusion (86.5% vs. 78.4%), pregnancy (21.6% vs. 16.7%), or kidding (2.7% vs. 0%). One female kid from an in vivo-matured oocyte was born, but died a few hours later. Microsatellite analysis and polymerase chain reaction identification confirmed that this kid was genetically identical to the donor cells. Based on Western blot analysis, myostatin of the cloned kid was not expressed compared with that of nontransgenic kids. In conclusion, SCNT using myostatin-targeted 2-mo-old goat fibroblasts as donors has potential as a method for producing myostatin-targeted goats. PMID:23174778

  2. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-12-01

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency. PMID:26342001

  3. TRANSFER OF EXCESS NUCLEAR MATERIAL FROM LOS ALAMOS TO SAVANNAH RIVER SITE FOR LONG-TERM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    C. W. HOTH; L. A. FOSTER; T. F YARBRO

    2001-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is preparing excess nuclear material for shipment to Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition. Prior to shipment the nuclear material will be stabilized and packaged to meet strict criteria. The criterion that must be met include: (1) the DOE stabilization, packaging and storage requirements for plutonium bearing materials, DOE-STD-3013, (2) shipping container packaging requirements, (3) SRS packaging and storage criteria, and (4) DOE Material Disposition criteria for either immobilization or MOX reactor fuel. Another issue in preparing for this transfer is the DOE certification of shipping containers and the availability of shipping containers. This transfer of the nuclear material is fully supported by the EM, DP and NN Sections of the DOE, as well as, by LANL and SRS, yet a strong collaboration is needed to meet all established requirements relating to stabilization, packaging, shipment, storage and final disposition. This paper will present the overall objectives, the issues and the planned strategy to accomplish this nuclear material transfer.

  4. Operational safety enhancement of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors via development of nuclear power plant simulators and transfer of related technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohut, P.; Epel, L.G.; Tutu, N.K.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under the US government`s International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper.

  5. Different types of stainless steel used in equipment in meat plants do not affect the initial microbial transfer, including pathogens, from pork skin

    PubMed Central

    Larivière-Gauthier, Guillaume; Quessy, Sylvain; Fournaise, Sylvain; Letellier, Ann; Fravalo, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This study describes and measures the impact of different compositions and finishes of stainless steel used in equipment in the meat industry on the transfer of natural flora and selected pathogens from artificially contaminated pork skin. It is known that the adhesion to surfaces of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, 2 pathogens frequently found in contaminated pork meat, depends on the nature and roughness of the surface. Our results show no statistically significant differences in microbial transfer regardless of the types of stainless steel considered, with the highest measured transfer difference being 0.18 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/800 cm2. Moreover, no differences in total microbial community were observed after transfer on the 5 types of stainless steel using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). It was concluded that the different characteristics of the stainless steel tested did not affect the initial bacterial transfer in this study. PMID:26130860

  6. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Larmonier, C. B.; McFadden, R.-M. T.; Hill, F. M.; Schreiner, R.; Ramalingam, R.; Besselsen, D. G.; Ghishan, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D3 has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D3 plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D3 supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10−/− CD4+ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D3 diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D3 group. Our data suggest that vitamin D3, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  7. Absence of nucleolus formation in raccoon dog-porcine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos results in embryonic developmental failure.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yubyeol; Nam, Yeong-Hee; Cheong, Seung-A; Kwak, Seong-Sung; Lee, Eunsong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2016-08-25

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) can be a solution for preservation of endangered species that have limited oocytes. It has been reported that blastocyst production by iSCNT is successful even if the genetic distances between donors and recipients are large. In particular, domestic pig oocytes can support the development of canine to porcine iSCNT embryos. Therefore, we examined whether porcine oocytes may be suitable recipient oocytes for Korean raccoon dog iSCNT. We investigated the effects of trichostatin A (TSA) treatment on iSCNT embryo developmental patterns and nucleolus formation. Enucleated porcine oocytes were fused with raccoon dog fibroblasts by electrofusion and cleavage, and blastocyst development and nucleolus formation were evaluated. To our knowledge, this study is the first in which raccoon dog iSCNT was performed using porcine oocytes; we found that 68.5% of 158 iSCNT embryos had the ability to cleave. However, these iSCNT embryos did not develop past the 4-cell stage. Treatment with TSA did not affect iSCNT embryonic development; moreover, the nuclei failed to form nucleoli at 48 and 72 h post-activation (hpa). In contrast, pig SCNT embryos of the control group showed 18.8% and 87.9% nucleolus formation at 48 and 72 hpa, respectively. Our results demonstrated that porcine cytoplasts efficiently supported the development of raccoon dog iSCNT embryos to the 4-cell stage, the stage of porcine embryonic genome activation (EGA); however, these embryos failed to reach the blastocyst stage and showed defects in nucleolus formation. PMID:27064112

  8. Absence of nucleolus formation in raccoon dog-porcine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos results in embryonic developmental failure

    PubMed Central

    JEON, Yubyeol; NAM, Yeong-Hee; CHEONG, Seung-A; KWAK, Seong-Sung; LEE, Eunsong; HYUN, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) can be a solution for preservation of endangered species that have limited oocytes. It has been reported that blastocyst production by iSCNT is successful even if the genetic distances between donors and recipients are large. In particular, domestic pig oocytes can support the development of canine to porcine iSCNT embryos. Therefore, we examined whether porcine oocytes may be suitable recipient oocytes for Korean raccoon dog iSCNT. We investigated the effects of trichostatin A (TSA) treatment on iSCNT embryo developmental patterns and nucleolus formation. Enucleated porcine oocytes were fused with raccoon dog fibroblasts by electrofusion and cleavage, and blastocyst development and nucleolus formation were evaluated. To our knowledge, this study is the first in which raccoon dog iSCNT was performed using porcine oocytes; we found that 68.5% of 158 iSCNT embryos had the ability to cleave. However, these iSCNT embryos did not develop past the 4-cell stage. Treatment with TSA did not affect iSCNT embryonic development; moreover, the nuclei failed to form nucleoli at 48 and 72 h post-activation (hpa). In contrast, pig SCNT embryos of the control group showed 18.8% and 87.9% nucleolus formation at 48 and 72 hpa, respectively. Our results demonstrated that porcine cytoplasts efficiently supported the development of raccoon dog iSCNT embryos to the 4-cell stage, the stage of porcine embryonic genome activation (EGA); however, these embryos failed to reach the blastocyst stage and showed defects in nucleolus formation. PMID:27064112

  9. Fluctuations in Electronic Energy Affecting Singlet Fission Dynamics and Mixing with Charge-Transfer State: Quantum Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed process by which a singlet excited state is converted to two triplet states. To understand mechanisms of the ultrafast fission via a charge transfer (CT) state, one has investigated the dynamics through quantum-dynamical calculations with the uncorrelated fluctuation model; however, the electronic states are expected to experience the same fluctuations induced by the surrounding molecules because the electronic structure of the triplet pair state is similar to that of the singlet state except for the spin configuration. Therefore, the fluctuations in the electronic energies could be correlated, and the 1D reaction coordinate model may adequately describe the fission dynamics. In this work we develop a model for describing the fission dynamics to explain the experimentally observed behaviors. We also explore impacts of fluctuations in the energy of the CT state on the fission dynamics and the mixing with the CT state. The overall behavior of the dynamics is insensitive to values of the reorganization energy associated with the transition from the singlet state to the CT state, although the coherent oscillation is affected by the fluctuations. This result indicates that the mixing with the CT state is rather robust under the fluctuations in the energy of the CT state as well as the high-lying CT state. PMID:26732701

  10. Molecular analyses of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions affecting plant growth and yield. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in the production of cellular energy. The biogenesis and functioning of mitochondria depends on the expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. One approach to investigating the role of nuclear-mitochondrial cooperation in plant growth and development is to identify combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that result in altered but sublethal phenotypes. Plants that have certain maize nuclear genotypes in combination with cytoplasmic genomes from more distantly-related teosintes can exhibit incompatible phenotypes, such as reduced plant growth and yield and cytoplasmic male sterility, as well as altered mitochondrial gene expression. The characterization of these nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions was the focus of this grant. The authors were investigating the effects of two maize nuclear genes, RcmI and Mct, on mitochondrial function and gene expression. Plants with the teosinte cytoplasms and homozygous for the recessive rcm allele are small (miniature) and-slow-growing and the kernels are reduced in size. The authors mapped this locus to molecular markers on chromosome 7 and attempted to clone this locus by transposon tagging. The effects of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein profiles were also studied.

  11. Bovine ooplasm partially remodels primate somatic nuclei following somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Beyhan, Zeki; Rodriguez, Ramon M; Ross, Pablo J; Iager, Amy E; Kaiser, German G; Chen, Ying; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-03-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) has the potential to become a useful tool to address basic questions about the nucleus-cytoplasm interactions between species. It has also been proposed as an alternative for the preservation of endangered species and to derive autologous embryonic stem cells. Using chimpanzee/ bovine iSCNT as our experimental model we studied the early epigenetic events that take place soon after cell fusion until embryonic genome activation (EGA). Our analysis suggested partial EGA in iSCNT embryos at the eight-cell stage, as indicated by Br-UTP incorporation and expression of chimpanzee embryonic genes. Oct4, Stella, Crabp1, CCNE2, CXCL6, PTGER4, H2AFZ, c-MYC, KLF4, and GAPDH transcripts were expressed, while Nanog, Glut1, DSC2, USF2, Adrbk1, and Lin28 failed to be activated. Although development of iSCNT embryos did not progress beyond the 8- to 16-cell stage, chromatin remodeling events, monitored by H3K27 methylation, H4K5 acetylation, and global DNA methylation, were similar in both intra- and interspecies SCNT embryos. However, bisulfite sequencing indicated incomplete demethylation of Oct4 and Nanog promoters in eight-cell iSCNT embryos. ATP production levels were significantly higher in bovine SCNT embryos than in iSCNT embryos, TUNEL assays did not reveal any difference in the apoptotic status of the nuclei from both types of embryos. Collectively, our results suggest that bovine ooplasm can partially remodel chimpanzee somatic nuclei, and provides insight into some of the current barriers iSCNT must overcome if further embryonic development is to be expected. PMID:19196039

  12. Ovine induced pluripotent stem cells are resistant to reprogramming after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    German, Sergio D; Campbell, Keith H S; Thornton, Elisabeth; McLachlan, Gerry; Sweetman, Dylan; Alberio, Ramiro

    2015-02-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) share similar characteristics of indefinite in vitro growth with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and may therefore serve as a useful tool for the targeted genetic modification of farm animals via nuclear transfer (NT). Derivation of stable ESC lines from farm animals has not been possible, therefore, it is important to determine whether iPSCs can be used as substitutes for ESCs in generating genetically modified cloned farm animals. We generated ovine iPSCs by conventional retroviral transduction using the four Yamanaka factors. These cells were basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)- and activin A-dependent, showed persistent expression of the transgenes, acquired chromosomal abnormalities, and failed to activate endogenous NANOG. Nonetheless, iPSCs could differentiate into the three somatic germ layers in vitro. Because cloning of farm animals is best achieved with diploid cells (G1/G0), we synchronized the iPSCs in G1 prior to NT. Despite the cell cycle synchronization, preimplantation development of iPSC-NT embryos was lower than with somatic cells (2% vs. 10% blastocysts, p<0.01). Furthermore, analysis of the blastocysts produced demonstrated persistent expression of the transgenes, aberrant expression of endogenous SOX2, and a failure to activate NANOG consistently. In contrast, gene expression in blastocysts produced with the parental fetal fibroblasts was similar to those generated by in vitro fertilization. Taken together, our data suggest that the persistent expression of the exogenous factors and the acquisition of chromosomal abnormalities are incompatible with normal development of NT embryos produced with iPSCs. PMID:25513856

  13. Vitamin C enhances in vitro and in vivo development of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Yuan, Ting; Lai, Liangxue; Pang, Daxin; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Report for the first time that vitamin C has a beneficial effect on the development of porcine SCNT embryos. {yields} The level of acH4K5 and Oct4 expression at blastocyst-stage was up-regulated after treatment. {yields} A higher rate of gestation and increased number of piglets born were harvested in the treated group. -- Abstract: The reprogramming of differentiated cells into a totipotent embryonic state through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still an inefficient process. Previous studies revealed that the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts could be significantly enhanced with vitamin C treatment. Here, we investigated the effects of vitamin C, to our knowledge for the first time, on the in vitro and in vivo development of porcine SCNT embryos. The rate of blastocyst development in SCNT embryos treated with 50 {mu}g/mL vitamin C 15 h after activation (36.0%) was significantly higher than that of untreated SCNT embryos (11.5%). The enhanced in vitro development rate of vitamin C-treated embryos was associated with an increased acetylation level of histone H4 lysine 5 and higher Oct4, Sox2 and Klf4 expression levels in blastocysts, as determined by real-time PCR. In addition, treatment with vitamin C resulted in an increased pregnancy rate in pigs. These findings suggest that treatment with vitamin C is beneficial for enhancement of the in vitro and in vivo development of porcine SCNT embryos.

  14. Best Practices for Finite Element Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer, Storage, and Transportation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Piotter, Jason; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2010-08-11

    Storage casks and transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are designed to confine SNF in sealed canisters or casks, provide structural integrity during accidents, and remove decay through a storage or transportation overpack. The transfer, storage, and transportation of SNF in dry storage casks and transport packages is regulated under 10 CFR Part 72 and 10 CFR Part 71, respectively. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is used with increasing frequency in Safety Analysis Reports and other regulatory technical evaluations related to SNF casks and packages and their associated systems. Advances in computing power have made increasingly sophisticated FEA models more feasible, and as a result, the need for careful review of such models has also increased. This paper identifies best practice recommendations that stem from recent NRC review experience. The scope covers issues common to all commercially available FEA software, and the recommendations are applicable to any FEA software package. Three specific topics are addressed: general FEA practices, issues specific to thermal analyses, and issues specific to structural analyses. General FEA practices covers appropriate documentation of the model and results, which is important for an efficient review process. The thermal analysis best practices are related to cask analysis for steady state conditions and transient scenarios. The structural analysis best practices are related to the analysis of casks and associated payload during standard handling and drop scenarios. The best practices described in this paper are intended to identify FEA modeling issues and provide insights that can help minimize associated uncertainties and errors, in order to facilitate the NRC licensing review process.

  15. Protein profiles of bovine placenta derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Rye; Kang, Jae Ku; Yoon, Jong Taek; Seong, Hwan Hoo; Jung, Jin Kwan; Lee, Hong Mie; Sik Park, Chang; Jin, Dong Il

    2005-11-01

    Practical application of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been hampered by an extremely low success rate. To address whether placental dysfunction in SCNT causes fetal loss during pregnancy, we have used a global proteomics approach using 2-DE and MS to analyze the differential protein patterns of three placentae from the afterbirth of cases of postnatal death, derived from SCNT of Korean Native cattle, and three normal placentae obtained from the afterbirth of fetuses derived from artificial insemination. Proteins within a pI range of 4.0-7.0 and 6.0-9.0 were analyzed separately by 2-DE in triplicate. A total of approximately 2000 spots were detected in placental 2-DE gels stained with CBB. In the comparison of normal and SCNT samples, 60 spots were identified as differentially expressed proteins, of which 33 spots were up-regulated proteins in SCNT placentae, while 27 spots were down-regulated proteins. Most of the proteins identified in this analysis appeared to be related with protein repair or protection, cytoskeleton, signal transduction, immune system, metabolism, extracellular matrix and remodeling, transcription regulation, cell structure or differentiation and ion transport. One of up-regulated proteins in SCNT was TIMP-2 protein known to be related to extracellular matrix and remodeling during pregnancy. Western blot analysis showed an increased level of TIMP-2 in SCNT placenta compared to normal. Our results revealed composite profiles of key proteins involved in abnormal placenta derived from SCNT, and suggested expression abnormality of these genes in SCNT placenta, resulting in fetal losses following SCNT. PMID:16196098

  16. [Dynamic changes of γ-tubulin in mouse somatic cell nuclear transferred embryos].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Hua; Lei, Lei

    2013-04-25

    The aim of the present study is to observe the dynamic changes of γ-tubulin in mouse somatic nuclear transferred (SCNT) embryos. The γ-tubulin was detected and analyzed in the enucleated oocyte and SCNT embryos by immunofluorescence and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that γ-tubulin distributed in the cortex of the enucleated MII oocytes, and decreased in this area during the activation of oocytes. Meanwhile cytoplasmic asters appeared, but there was no spindle formed. Spindle formation could be observed in the enucleated oocytes which were injected with cumulus cells and activated by SrCl2. The spots-like γ-tubulin signals spread between chromosomes at the prophase, and the signals arrayed with spindle or aggregated at two poles of the spindle at the early metaphase. Furthermore, γ-tubulin signals were localized between the segregated sister chromatids at anaphase or telophase. Some reconstructed embryos exhibited advanced activation, showing abnormal spindles and aberrant distribution of γ-tubulin and chromosomes. Two spindles would be formed when the cumulus cell was injected into an intact oocyte, and the distribution of γ-tubulin was similar to that of the normal SCNT. Moreover, advanced activation also occurred in this case and formed either two small spindles or one big barrel-shaped spindle. These results suggest that γ-tubulin plays a pivotal role in spindle assembling in mouse SCNT embryos. The reconstructed oocytes were easily to be activated, and aberrant distribution of γ-tubulin is associated with formation of abnormal spindles and chromosome misalignment. PMID:23598871

  17. Improving the development of early bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos by treating adult donor cells with vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zekun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Rongjun; Qin, Yumin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin C (Vc) has been widely studied in cell and embryo culture, and has recently been demonstrated to promote cellular reprogramming. The objective of this study was to identify a suitable Vc concentration that, when used to treat adult bovine fibroblasts serving as donor cells for nuclear transfer, improved donor-cell physiology and the developmental potential of the cloned embryos that the donor nuclei were used to create. A Vc concentration of 0.15 mM promoted cell proliferation and increased donor-cell 5-hydroxy methyl cytosine levels 2.73-fold (P < 0.05). The blastocyst rate was also significantly improved after nuclear transfer (39.6% treated vs. 26.0% control, P < 0.05); the average number of apoptotic cells in cloned blastocysts was significantly reduced (2.2 vs. 4.4, P < 0.05); and the inner cell mass-to-trophectoderm ratio (38.25% vs. 30.75%, P < 0.05) and expression of SOX2 (3.71-fold, P < 0.05) and POU5F1 (3.15-fold, P < 0.05) were significantly increased. These results suggested that Vc promotes cell proliferation, decreases DNA methylation levels in donor cells, and improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos. PMID:26212732

  18. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  19. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  20. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) and lamins alter nuclear membrane structure without affecting phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Karsten; Ridgway, Neale D

    2011-06-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the CDP-choline pathway for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. Lipid activation of CCTα results in its translocation to the nuclear envelope and expansion of an intranuclear membrane network termed the nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR) by a mechanism involving membrane deformation. Nuclear lamins are also required for stability and proliferation of the NR, but whether this unique structure, or the nuclear lamina in general, is required for PC synthesis is not known. To examine this relationship, the nuclear lamina was depleted by RNAi or disrupted by expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) mutant lamin A (progerin), and the effect on CCTα and choline metabolism was analyzed. siRNA-mediated silencing of lamin A/C or lamin B1 in CHO cells to diminish the NR had no effect on PC synthesis, while double knockdown non-specifically inhibited the pathway. Confirming this minor role in PC synthesis, only 10% of transiently overexpressed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase was detected in the NR. In CHO cells, CCTα was nucleoplasmic and co-localized with GFP-progerin in nuclear folds and invaginations; however, HGPS fibroblasts displayed an abnormal distribution of CCTα in the cytoplasm and nuclear envelope that was accompanied by a 2-fold reduction in PC synthesis. In spite of its altered localization, choline-labeling experiments showed that CCT activity was unaffected, and inhibition of PC synthesis was traced to reduced activity of a hemicholinium-sensitive choline transporter. We conclude that CCTα and lamins specifically cooperate to form the NR, but the overall structure of the nuclear envelope has a minimal impact on CCT activity and PC synthesis. PMID:21504799

  1. Comparison of microinjection (piezo-electric) and cell fusion for nuclear transfer success with different cell types in cattle.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Lagutina, Irina; Vassiliev, Ivan; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    Amongst the many variables that can determine success of cloning, the source of nuclei, the procedure used for nuclear transfer, and the activation of the reconstructed embryo are very important aspects. In this study, we have compared the two most common procedures for transferring nuclei to enucleated oocytes--cell fusion (CF) and piezoelectric microinjection (PEM) using different somatic cells--and we have investigated the effect of different activation procedures. Granulosa cells and fibroblasts were grown to confluency or in low serum to induce a quiescent state, while lymphocytes were thawed immediately prior to use. Enucleated oocytes were reconstructed either with CF or PME by 21-23 h postmaturation. For cell fusion, one pulse of 1 kVolt/cm for 30 microsec was used; for PEM, the cell membrane was broken by repeated pipetting and transferred in a 12% PVP solution to facilitate injection. Manipulated oocytes were activated with ionomycin and cycloheximide (CHX) or 6-DMAP (DMAP) and cultured in microdrops of SOF-BSA-AA. On day 7 (day 0: nuclear transfer), embryo development was evaluated and embryos were either transferred fresh or were frozen. More embryos were successfully reconstructed with PEM than CF, but a higher number of reconstructed embryos by CF developed to blastocyst at D + 7. In addition, in both systems more embryos were obtained after activation with DMAP than with CHX. The transfer of 141 embryos to recipients resulted in a pregnancy rate of 50%, and no differences were observed between the source of donor cell, the reconstruction methods, or the activation protocol. Six calves were delivered at term, and four survived. High pregnancy losses were observed throughout the gestation period. PMID:12398800

  2. Nuclear pore components affect distinct stages of intron-containing gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Amandine; Bretes, Hugo; Palancade, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Several nuclear pore-associated factors, including the SUMO-protease Ulp1, have been proposed to prevent the export of intron-containing messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) in yeast. However, the molecular mechanisms of this nuclear pore-dependent mRNA quality control, including the sumoylated targets of Ulp1, have remained unidentified. Here, we demonstrate that the apparent ‘pre-mRNA leakage’ phenotype arising upon ULP1 inactivation is shared by sumoylation mutants of the THO complex, an early mRNP biogenesis factor. Importantly, we establish that alteration of THO complex activity differentially impairs the expression of intronless and intron-containing reporter genes, rather than triggering bona fide ‘pre-mRNA leakage’. Indeed, we show that the presence of introns within THO target genes attenuates the effect of THO inactivation on their transcription. Epistasis analyses further clarify that different nuclear pore components influence intron-containing gene expression at distinct stages. Ulp1, whose maintenance at nuclear pores depends on the Nup84 complex, impacts on THO-dependent gene expression, whereas the nuclear basket-associated Mlp1/Pml39 proteins prevent pre-mRNA export at a later stage, contributing to mRNA quality control. Our study thus highlights the multiplicity of mechanisms by which nuclear pores contribute to gene expression, and further provides the first evidence that intronic sequences can alleviate early mRNP biogenesis defects. PMID:25845599

  3. The Arabidopsis repressor of light signaling, COP1, is regulated by nuclear exclusion: Mutational analysis by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Chitra; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Xu, Xiaodong; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; von Arnim, Albrecht G.

    2004-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase and yellow fluorescent protein has been adapted to serve as a real-time reporter on protein-protein interactions in live plant cells by using the Arabidopsis Constitutive photomorphogenesis 1 (COP1) protein as a model system. COP1 is a repressor of light signal transduction that functions as part of a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase. COP1 possesses a leucine-rich nuclear-exclusion signal that resides in a domain implicated in COP1 dimerization. BRET was applied in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis to explore the respective contributions of the nuclear-exclusion and dimerization motifs to the regulation of COP1 activity in vivo. One specific mutant protein, COP1L105A, showed increased nuclear accumulation but retained the ability to dimerize, as monitored by BRET, whereas other mutations inhibited both nuclear exclusion and COP1 dimerization. Mutant rescue and overexpression experiments indicated that nuclear exclusion of COP1 protein is a rate-limiting step in light signal transduction. PMID:15084749

  4. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  5. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  6. Animal embryonic stem (ES) cells: self-renewal, pluripotency, transgenesis and nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeo; Liu, Bingbing; Yokoyama, Kazunari

    2004-09-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be maintained indefinitely in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and they express markers of self-renewal and pluripotency, which include the transcription factor Oct 4, STAT-3, stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-1, and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Upon removal of LIF, from the culture medium they cease to express markers such as Oct 4, rapidly losing the capacity for self-renewal and differentiating into a variety of cell types. Gene targeting is feasible in murine ES cells because these cells can be maintained in an undifferentiated state long enough to allow selection of properly targeted cell colonies with a high frequency of homologous recombination. Furthermore, blastocysts cloned from cultured murine ES cells develop to term at an efficiency (10-30%) that is three to ten times higher than blastocysts cloned from the nuclei of differentiated somatic cells. It seems likely that ES cells require less extensive reprogramming than do somatic cells, perhaps because in ES cells, many genes that are essential for early development are already active and thus do not require reactivation. Recently, we succeeded in isolating immortalized equine and bovine ES cells with a normal karyotype, that exhibit features similar to those of murine ES cells and express Oct 4, STAT-3, SSEA-1 and AP. We further confirmed the pluripotential ability of these cells, which were able to undergo somatic differentiation in vitro to neural progenitors and to endothelial or hematopoietic lineages. We were able to use bovine ES cells, as a source of nuclei for nuclear transfer (NT) and we generated cloned cattle with a higher frequency of pregnancies to term than has been achieved with differentiated somatic cells. Moreover, bovine ES cells that expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were incorporated into both the inner cell mass (ICM) and the trophectdermal cells of developing blastocysts. These findings should facilitate

  7. Effective Oocyte Vitrification and Survival Techniques for Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jee; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2015-06-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using vitrified-thawed (VT) oocytes has been studied; however, the cloning efficiency of these oocytes is not comparable with that of nonvitrified (non-V) fresh oocytes. This study sought to optimize the survival and cryopreservation of VT oocytes for SCNT. Co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 15 h significantly improved the survival of VT oocytes and their in vitro developmental potential following SCNT in comparison to co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 2, 5, or 24 h (p<0.05). Spindle assessment via the Oosight Microscopy Imaging System and microtubule staining revealed that vitrified metaphase II oocytes (VT group) were not suitable for SCNT. However, enucleating and/or activating oocytes prior to freezing enhanced their developmental potential and suitability for SCNT. The cloning efficiency of the enucleated-activated-vitrified-thawed (EAVT) group (21.6%) was better than that of the other vitrification groups [enucleated-vitrified-thawed (EVT) group, 13.7%; VT group, 15.0%; p<0.05] and was comparable with that of the non-V group (25.9%). The reactive oxygen species level was significantly lower in the EAVT group than in the other vitrification groups (p<0.05). mRNA levels of maternal genes (ZAR1, BMP15, and NLRP5) and a stress gene (HSF1) were lower in the vitrification groups than in the non-V group (p<0.05), whereas the level of phospho-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not differ among the groups. Among the vitrification groups, blastocysts in the EAVT group had the best developmental potential, as judged by their high mRNA expression of developmental potential-related genes (POU5f1, Interferon-tau, and SLC2A5) and their low expression of proapoptotic (CASP3) and stress (Hsp70) genes. This study demonstrates that SCNT using bovine frozen-thawed oocytes can be successfully achieved using optimized vitrification and co-culture techniques. PMID:25984830

  8. Rex Rabbit Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer with In Vitro-Matured Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Wang, Huili; Lu, Jinhua; Miao, Yiliang; Cao, Xinyan; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Fengrui; Ding, Biao; Wang, Rong; Luo, Mingjiu; Li, Wenyong; Tan, Jinghe

    2016-06-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) requires large numbers of matured oocytes. In vitro-matured (IVM) oocytes have been used in SCNT in many animals. We investigated the use of IVM oocytes in Rex rabbit SCNT using Rex rabbit ovaries obtained from a local abattoir. The meiotic ability of oocytes isolated from follicles of different diameters was studied. Rex rabbit SCNT was optimized for denucleation, activation, and donor cell synchronization. Rex rabbit oocytes grew to the largest diameter (110 μm) when the follicle diameter was 1.0 mm. Oocytes isolated from <0.5-mm follicles lacked the ability to resume meiosis. More than 90% of these oocytes remained in the germinal vesicle (GV) stage after in vitro culture (IVC) for 18 h. Oocytes isolated from >0.7-mm follicles acquired maturation ability. More than 90% of these oocytes matured after IVC for 18 h. The developmental potential of oocytes isolated from >1-mm follicles was greater than that of oocytes isolated from 0.7- to 1.0-mm follicles. The highest activation rates for IVM Rex rabbit oocytes were seen after treatment with 2.5 μM ionomycin for 5 min followed by 2 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) and 5 μg/mL cycloheximide (CHX) for 1 h. Ionomycin induced the chromatin of IVM oocytes to protrude from the oocyte surface, promoting denucleation. Fetal fibroblast cells (FFCs) and cumulus cells (CCs) were more suitable for Rex rabbit SCNT than skin fibroblast cells (SFCs) (blastocyst rate was 35.6 ± 2.2% and 38.0 ± 6.0% vs. 19.7 ± 3.1%). The best fusion condition was a 2DC interval for 1 sec, 1.6 kV/cm voltages, and 40 μsec duration in 0.28 M mannitol. In conclusion, the in vitro maturation of Rex rabbit oocytes and SCNT procedures were studied systematically and optimized in this study. PMID:27159389

  9. Nuclear transfer nTreg model reveals fate-determining TCR-β and novel peripheral nTreg precursors.

    PubMed

    Ku, Manching; Chang, Shih-En; Hernandez, Julio; Abadejos, Justin R; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Muenchmeier, Niklas J; Schwarz, Anna; Valencia, Anna M; Kirak, Oktay

    2016-04-19

    To study the development and function of "natural-arising" T regulatory (nTreg) cells, we developed a novel nTreg model on pure nonobese diabetic background using epigenetic reprogramming via somatic cell nuclear transfer. On RAG1-deficient background, we found that monoclonal FoxP3(+)CD4(+)Treg cells developed in the thymus in the absence of other T cells. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that the thymic niche is not a limiting factor in nTreg development. In addition, we showed that the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain of our nTreg model was not only sufficient to bias T-cell development toward the CD4 lineage, but we also demonstrated that this TCR β-chain was able to provide stronger TCR signals. This TCR-β-driven mechanism would thus unify former per se contradicting hypotheses of TCR-dependent and -independent nTreg development. Strikingly, peripheral FoxP3(-)CD4(+)T cells expressing the same TCR as this somatic cell nuclear transfer nTreg model had a reduced capability to differentiate into Th1 cells but were poised to differentiate better into induced nTreg cells, both in vitro and in vivo, representing a novel peripheral precursor subset of nTreg cells to which we refer to as pre-nTreg cells. PMID:27044095

  10. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) polymorphisms affect mRNA splicing, HDL levels, and sex-dependent cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Papp, Audrey C; Pinsonneault, Julia K; Wang, Danxin; Newman, Leslie C; Gong, Yan; Johnson, Julie A; Pepine, Carl J; Kumari, Meena; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Shah, Sonia; Humphries, Steve E; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in and around the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene have been associated with HDL levels, risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), and response to therapy. The mechanism of action of these polymorphisms has yet to be defined. We used mRNA allelic expression and splice isoform measurements in human liver tissues to identify the genetic variants affecting CETP levels. Allelic CETP mRNA expression ratios in 56 human livers were strongly associated with several variants 2.5-7 kb upstream of the transcription start site (e.g., rs247616 p = 6.4 × 10(-5), allele frequency 33%). In addition, a common alternatively spliced CETP isoform lacking exon 9 (Δ9), has been shown to prevent CETP secretion in a dominant-negative manner. The Δ 9 expression ranged from 10 to 48% of total CETP mRNA in 94 livers. Increased formation of this isoform was exclusively associated with an exon 9 polymorphism rs5883-C>T (p = 6.8 × 10(-10)) and intron 8 polymorphism rs9930761-T>C (5.6 × 10(-8)) (in high linkage disequilibrium with allele frequencies 6-7%). rs9930761 changes a key splicing branch point nucleotide in intron 8, while rs5883 alters an exonic splicing enhancer sequence in exon 9.The effect of these polymorphisms was evaluated in two clinical studies. In the Whitehall II study of 4745 subjects, both rs247616 and rs5883T/rs9930761C were independently associated with increased HDL-C levels in males with similar effect size (rs247616 p = 9.6 × 10(-28) and rs5883 p = 8.6 × 10(-10), adjusted for rs247616). In an independent multiethnic US cohort of hypertensive subjects with CAD (INVEST-GENE), rs5883T/rs9930761C alone were significantly associated with increased incidence of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality in males (rs5883: OR 2.36 (CI 1.29-4.30), p = 0.005, n = 866). These variants did not reach significance in females in either study. Similar to earlier results linking low CETP activity with poor outcomes in males, our results suggest genetic, sex

  11. Specific features of external heat and mass transfer in the vibration apparatuses used for regenerating spent fuel from nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, B. G.; Gorbunova, A. M.; Zelenkova, Yu. O.; Sapozhnikov, G. B.; Shiryaeva, N. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present experimental data on the coefficients of heat and mass transfer for freely floating bodies simulating fragments of cladding and large conglomerates of fuel, as well as on the local coefficients of heat and mass transfer over the bed height, which point to high intensity of heat and mass transfer processes that take place in the elements of vibration apparatuses intended for subjecting spent fuel from nuclear power plants to oxidative recrystallization.

  12. Quantitative assessment of in situ microbial communities affecting nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |

    1996-05-01

    Microbes in the environments surrounding nuclear waste depositories pose several questions regarding the protection of the surrounding communities. microbes can facilitate microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), mobilize and facilitate the transport of nuclides as well as produce gaseous emissions which can compromise containment. We have developed an analysis of the extant microbiota that is independent of quantitative recovery and subsequent growth, based on signature biomarkers analysis (SBA).

  13. Disrupting Mitochondrial–Nuclear Coevolution Affects OXPHOS Complex I Integrity and Impacts Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. PMID:25245408

  14. Disrupting mitochondrial-nuclear coevolution affects OXPHOS complex I integrity and impacts human health.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-10-01

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. PMID:25245408

  15. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.A

    2006-01-01

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers (‘environmentally assisted tunnelling’), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and C12/C13 kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus ‘over-the-barrier’ paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs. PMID:16873131

  16. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  17. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  18. Adiabatic transfer of coherences in a cluster of coupled nuclear spins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Cardwell, Kate E.; Khitrin, A. K.

    2005-12-15

    It is experimentally demonstrated that quantum coherences can be efficiently transferred using adiabatic energy-level crossing. In a cluster of six dipolar-coupled proton spins of benzene, oriented by a liquid-crystalline matrix, a single-quantum coherence between one pair of states has been adiabatically transferred to another pair of states, and the superposition survived even after ten successive energy-level crossings.

  19. Sensors and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Sensors Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The existing sensor systems for the basic process parameters in nuclear power plant operation have limitations with respect to accuracy, ease of maintenance and signal processing. These limitations comprise the economy of nuclear power generation. To reduce the costs and improve performance of nuclear power plant fabrication, operation, maintenance and repair we need to advance the sensor technology being applied in the nuclear industry. The economic viability and public acceptance of nuclear power will depend on how well we direct and apply technological advances to the industry. This report was prepared by a team with members representing a wide range of the nuclear industry embracing the university programs, national laboratories, architect engineers and reactor manufacturers. An intensive effort was made to survey current sensor technology, evaluate future trends and determine development needs. This included literature surveys, visits with utilities, universities, laboratories and organizations outside the nuclear industry. Several conferences were attended to take advantage of the access to experts in selected topics and to obtain opinions. Numerous telephone contacts and exchanges by mail supplemented the above efforts. Finally, the broad technical depth of the team members provided the basis for the stimulating working sessions during which this report was organized and drafted.

  20. Away-from-reactor storage of spent nuclear fuel: factors affecting demand

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, P.M.; Solomon, K.A.; Triplett, M.B.

    1980-10-01

    This report analyzes factors that affect the magnitude and timing of demand for government AFRs, relative to the demand for other storage options, to assist policymakers in predicting this demand. Past predictions of AFT demand range widely and often appear to conflict. This report helps to explain the apparent conflicts among existing demand predictions by demonstrating their sensitivity to changes in key assumptions. Specifically, the report analyzes factors affecting the demand for government AFR storage facilities; illustrates why demand estimates may vary; and identifies actions that may be undertaken by groups, within and outside the government, to influence the level and timing of demands.

  1. Nuclear spectroscopy study of the isotopes populated via multinucleon transfer in the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Pollarolo, G.

    2006-08-14

    The present work takes advantage of the multinucleon transfer mechanism between heavy reaction partners to study the population pattern of excited nuclear states in near spherical Zirconium isotopes following the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction at an energy closed to the Coulomb barrier. Both the projectile and the target are well known closed shell nuclei offering an optimum situation for clean experimental and theoretical conditions. Total kinetic energy loss (TKEL) distributions were compared with calculations performed with the GRAZING code. The ability to use the TKEL as a selection tool for the states at different excitation energies was shown.

  2. Thermal expansion of UO2+x nuclear fuel rods from a model coupling heat transfer and oxygen diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bogden; Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Stan, Marius; Ramirez, Juan

    2008-01-01

    We study the thermal expansion of UO{sub 2+x} nuclear fuel rod in the context of a model coupling heat transfer and oxygen diffusion discussed previously by J.C. Ramirez, M. Stan and P. Cristea [J. Nucl. Mat. 359 (2006) 174]. We report results of simulations performed for steady-state and time-dependent regimes in one-dimensional configurations. A variety of initial- and boundary-value scenarios are considered. We use material properties obtained from previously published correlations or from analysis of previously published data. All simulations were performed using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics{sup TM} and are readily extendable to include multidimensional effects.

  3. Engineering design elements of a two-phase thermosyphon to transfer nuclear thermal energy to a hydrogen plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabharwall, Piyush

    Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis utilizing both heat and electricity and the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur-iodine process primarily utilizing heat. Both processes require high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100m. There are several options to transferring multi-megawatt thermal power over such a distance. One option is simply to produce only electricity, transfer by wire to the hydrogen plant, and then reconvert the electric energy to heat via Joule or induction heating. Electrical transport, however, suffers energy losses of 60-70% due to the thermal to electric conversion inherent in the Brayton cycle. A second option is thermal energy transport via a single-phase forced convection loop where a fluid is mechanically pumped between heat exchangers at the nuclear and hydrogen plants. High temperatures, however, present unique materials and pumping challenges. Single phase, low pressure helium is an attractive option for NGNP, but is not suitable for a single purpose facility dictated to hydrogen production because low pressure helium requires higher pumping power and makes the process very inefficient. A third option is two-phase heat transfer utilizing a high temperature thermosyphon. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. Thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are desired to transfer heat from

  4. Conventional and Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Artificial Gravity Mars Transfer Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of countermeasures have been developed to address the debilitating physiological effects of "zero-gravity" (0-g) experienced by cosmonauts and astronauts during their approximately 0.5-1.2 year long stays in LEO (Low Earth Orbit). Longer interplanetary flights, combined with possible prolonged stays in Mars orbit, could subject crewmembers to up to approximately 2.5 years of weightlessness. In view of known and recently diagnosed problems associated with 0-g, an artificial gravity spacecraft offers many advantages and may indeed be an enabling technology for human flights to Mars. A number of important human factors must be taken into account in selecting the rotation radius, rotation rate, and orientation of the habitation module or modules. These factors include the gravity gradient effect, radial and tangential Coriolis forces, along with cross-coupled acceleration effects. Artificial gravity (AG) Mars transfer vehicle (MTV) concepts are presented that utilize both conventional NTR, as well as, enhanced "bimodal" nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) propulsion. The NTR is a proven technology that generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (I (sub sp)) capability of approximately 900 s - twice that of today's best chemical rockets. The AG/MTV concepts using conventional NTP carry twin cylindrical "ISS-type" habitation modules with their long axes oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the longitudinal spin axis of the MTV and utilize photovoltaic arrays (PVAs) for spacecraft power. The twin habitat modules are connected to a central operations hub located at the front of the MTV via two pressurized tunnels that provide the rotation radius for the habitat modules. For the BNTR AG/MTV option, each engine has its own "closed" secondary helium-xenon gas loop and Brayton rotating unit that can generate tens of kilowatts (kW (sub e)) of spacecraft electrical power during the mission coast phase eliminating the need for large PVAs. A single inflatable

  5. Male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes use JH III transferred during copulation to influence previtellogenic ovary physiology and affect the reproductive output of female mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Mark E; Correa, Stefano; Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriega, Fernando G

    2014-05-01

    The effect of male accessory gland substances on female reproductive physiology has been previously described as "activating" egg development. However, no mechanism has been described that can explain how male mosquitoes are able to influence egg development in female mosquitoes. To investigate how male mosquitoes are able to influence ovarian physiology and reproductive output we explored three main questions: (1) Do mating and male accessory gland substances affect ovarian physiology and alter markers of oocyte quality during the previtellogenic resting stage? (2) Does the male accessory gland contain JH III and is JH III transferred to the female during copulation? (3) Finally, does the nutritional history of the male affect the amount of JH III transferred to the female and alter reproductive output? By answering these questions it is clear that male mosquitoes are able to alter the female's resource allocation priorities towards reproduction by transferring JH III during copulation; reducing the rate of previtellogenic resorption and increasing the amount of stored ovarian lipids. These changes improve an individual follicle's likelihood of development after a blood meal. In addition, males maintained under better nutritional conditions make and transfer more JH III, prevent more follicular resorption and realize higher fecundities than other males. Together these results illustrate one mechanism behind the "activating" effect of mating described as well as the role sugar feeding plays in male mosquitoes. PMID:24657670

  6. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  7. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  8. MicroRNA-34c Expression in Donor Cells Influences the Early Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Man; Du, Yue; Zhang, Yijun; Xing, Xupeng; Zhang, Lei; Su, JianMin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The essence of the reprogramming activity of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is to produce normal fertilized embryos. However, reprogramming of somatic cells is not as efficient as the reprogramming of sperm. In this report, we describe the effect of an inducible, specific miR-34 microRNA expression in donor cells that enables a similar level of sperm:transgene expression on the early development of SCNT embryos. Our results showed that donor cells with doxycycline (dox)-induced miR-34c expression for the preparation of SCNT embryos resulted in altered developmental rates, histone modification (H3K9ac and H3K4me3), and extent of apoptosis. The cleavage rate and blastocyst formation of the induced nuclear transfer (NT) group were significantly increased. The immunofluorescence signal of H3K9ac in embryos in the induced NT group significantly increased in two-cell- and eight-cell-stage embryos; that of H3K4me3 increased significantly in eight-cell-stage embryos. Although significant differences in staining signals of apoptosis were not detected between groups, lower apoptosis levels were observed in the induced NT group. In conclusion, miR-34c expression induced by dox treatment enhances the developmental potential of SCNT embryos, modifies the epigenetic status, and changes blastocyst quality. PMID:25437869

  9. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the “Yamanaka method.” However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning. PMID:25692793

  10. Examining Factors Affecting Beginning Teachers' Transfer of Learning of ICT-Enhanced Learning Activities in Their Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agyei, Douglas D.; Voogt, Joke

    2014-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers' transfer of learning when utilising Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program that was characterised by "learning technology by collaborative design" in their final year of…

  11. Large nuclear vacuoles in spermatozoa negatively affect pregnancy rate in IVF cycles

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Shahin; Talebi, Ali Reza; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Esfandiari, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME) criteria as a new real time tool for evaluation of spermatozoa in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles has been considered. Objective: The aim was to investigate the predictive value of MSOME in in vitro fertilization (IVF) in comparison to ICSI cycles and evaluation of the association between MSOME parameters and traditional sperm parameters in both groups. Materials and Methods: This is a cross sectional prospective analysis of MSOME parameters in IVF (n=31) and ICSI cycles (n=35). MSOME parameters were also evaluated as the presence of vacuole (none, small, medium, large or mix); head size (normal, small or large); cytoplasmic droplet; head shape and acrosome normality. In sub-analysis, MSOME parameters were compared between two groups with successful or failed clinical pregnancy in each group. Results: In IVF group, the rate of large nuclear vacuole showed significant increase in failed as compared to successful pregnancies (13.81±9.7vs7.38±4.4, respectively, p=0.045) while MSOME parameters were the same between successful and failed pregnancies in ICSI group. Moreover, a negative correlation was noticed between LNV and sperm shape normalcy. In ICSI group, a negative correlation was established between cytoplasmic droplet and sperm shape normalcy. In addition, there was a positive correlation between sperm shape normalcy and non-vacuolated spermatozoa. Conclusion: The high rate of large nuclear vacuoles in sperm used in IVF cycles with failed pregnancies confirms that MSOME, is a helpful tool for fine sperm morphology assessment, and its application may enhance the assisted reproduction technology success rates. PMID:26494990

  12. Factors Determining the Efficiency of Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Data Analysis with Over 200,000 Reconstructed Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbin; Dou, Hongwei; Xiang, Xi; Li, Lin; Li, Yong; Lin, Lin; Pang, Xinzhi; Zhang, Yijie; Chen, Yu; Luan, Jing; Xu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenxian; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; Wang, Hui; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gabor; Du, Yutao

    2015-12-01

    Data analysis in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research is usually limited to several hundreds or thousands of reconstructed embryos. Here, we report mass results obtained with an established and consistent porcine SCNT system (handmade cloning [HMC]). During the experimental period, 228,230 reconstructed embryos and 82,969 blastocysts were produced. After being transferred into 656 recipients, 1070 piglets were obtained. First, the effects of different types of donor cells, including fetal fibroblasts (FFs), adult fibroblasts (AFs), adult preadipocytes (APs), and adult blood mesenchymal (BM) cells, were investigated on the further in vitro and in vivo development. Compared to adult donor cells (AFs, APs, BM cells, respectively), FF cells resulted in a lower blastocyst/reconstructed embryo rate (30.38% vs. 37.94%, 34.65%, and 34.87%, respectively), but a higher overall efficiency on the number of piglets born alive per total blastocysts transferred (1.50% vs. 0.86%, 1.03%, and 0.91%, respectively) and a lower rate of developmental abnormalities (10.87% vs. 56.57%, 24.39%, and 51.85%, respectively). Second, recloning was performed with cloned adult fibroblasts (CAFs) and cloned fetal fibroblasts (CFFs). When CAFs were used as the nuclear donor, fewer developmental abnormalities and higher overall efficiency were observed compared to AFs (56.57% vs. 28.13% and 0.86% vs. 1.59%, respectively). However, CFFs had an opposite effect on these parameters when compared with CAFs (94.12% vs. 10.87% and 0.31% vs. 1.50%, respectively). Third, effects of genetic modification on the efficiency of SCNT were investigated with transgenic fetal fibroblasts (TFFs) and gene knockout fetal fibroblasts (KOFFs). Genetic modification of FFs increased developmental abnormalities (38.96% and 25.24% vs. 10.87% for KOFFs, TFFs, and FFs, respectively). KOFFs resulted in lower overall efficiency compared to TFFs and FFs (0.68% vs. 1.62% and 1.50%, respectively). In conclusion, this is the

  13. Nuclear and Q{sup 2} dependence of quaselastic (e,e{prime}p) scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    An experiment was completed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in which measurements of the (e,e{prime}p) coincidence quasielastic cross section in nuclei were extended to the largest possible Q{sup 2} attainable with the Nuclear Physics Injector and the End Station A spectrometers. Coincidence measurements of the quasielastic (e,e{prime}p) cross section were made on nuclei from carbon to gold in the Q{sup 2} range of 1-7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Several papers describing the results were published or submitted. Analysis of the data is in its final stages. In summary, the cross section for quasielastic {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p) scattering was measured at momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=1, 3, 5, and 6.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are consistent with scattering from a single nucleon as the dominant process. The nuclear transparency is obtained and compared with theoretical calculations that incorporate color transparency effects. No significant rise of the transparency with Q{sup 2} is observed. Cross sections were reported for the reaction {sup 2}H(e,e{prime}p)n for momentum transfers in the range 1.2 {<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}6.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and for missing momenta from 0 to 250 MeV/c. The longitudinal-transverse interference structure function was separated at Q{sup 2}=1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The observables were compared to calculations performed in nonrelativistic and relativistic frameworks. The data are best described by a fully relativistic calculation. The A-dependence of the quasielastic A(e,e{prime}p) reaction was studied with {sup 2}H, C, Fe, and Au nuclei at momentum transfers Q{sup 2}=1, 3, 5, and 6.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The nuclear transparency T A,Q{sup 2}, a measure of the average probability that the struck proton escapes from the nucleu A without interaction, was extracted. Several calculations predict a significant increase in T with momentum transfer, a phenomenon known as color transparency. No significant rise within errors is seen for any of the nuclei studied.

  14. Robotics and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Robotics Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    A task team was formed at the request of the Department of Energy to evaluate and assess technology development needed for advanced robotics in the nuclear industry. The mission of these technologies is to provide the nuclear industry with the support for the application of advanced robotics to reduce nuclear power generating costs and enhance the safety of the personnel in the industry. The investigation included robotic and teleoperated systems. A robotic system is defined as a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks. A teleoperated system includes an operator who remotely controls the system by direct viewing or through a vision system.

  15. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 Improves the Development of Mouse Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Dong; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Song, Si-Hang; Bai, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Na; Shen, Xing-Hui; Shen, Jing-Ling; Lei, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins (MBPs) connect DNA methylation and histone modification, which are the key changes of somatic cell reprogramming. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) was the first discovered MBP that has been extensively studied in the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome. However, a role for MeCP2 during cellular reprogramming associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has not been examined. In this study, we discovered that MeCP2 expression was significantly lower in embryos generated by SCNT compared with those generated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). We genetically modified mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to overexpress MeCP2 and serve as donor cells for nuclear transfer (NT) to investigate the effects of MeCP2 on preimplantation development of SCNT embryos. The blastocyst rate (35.71%) of MeCP2 overexpressed embryos (NT(+)) was significantly greater than in nontransgenic embryos (NT(-), 24.29%). Furthermore, immunofluorescence experiments revealed that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) was transferred to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) to a greater extent in NT(+) embryos than in NT(-) embryos. Real-time PCR evaluation of gene expression also showed that embryonic development-associated genes, such as Oct4 and Nanog, were significantly higher in the NT(+) group compared to the NT(-) group. Collectively, these results suggested that MeCP2 facilitated Tet3 activity, enhanced expression of pluripotency-related genes, and eventually improved the development of NT embryos. Finally, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify direct targets of MeCP2 and constructed a protein interaction network to elucidate several putative MeCP2 targets. PMID:26982160

  16. Herpes simplex virus type 1 protein IE63 affects the nuclear export of virus intron-containing transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, A; Dunlop, J; Clements, J B

    1996-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization labelling methods, we have determined that the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein IE63 (ICP27) affects the cellular localization of virus transcripts. Intronless transcripts from the IE63, UL38, and UL44 genes are rapidly exported to and accumulate in the cytoplasm throughout infection, in either the presence or absence of IE63 expression. The intron-containing transcripts from the IE110 and UL15 genes, while initially cytoplasmic, are increasingly retained in the nucleus in distinct clumps as infection proceeds, and the clumps colocalize with the redistributed small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Infections with the IE63 mutant virus 27-lacZ demonstrated that in the absence of IE63 expression, nuclear retention of intron-containing transcripts was lost. The nuclear retention of UL15 transcripts, which demonstrated both nuclear and cytoplasmic label, was not as pronounced as that of the IE110 transcripts, and we propose that this is due to the late expression of UL15. Infections with the mutant virus 110C1, in which both introns of IE110 have been precisely removed (R.D. Everett, J. Gen. Virol. 72:651-659, 1991), demonstrated IE110 transcripts in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm; thus, exon definition sequences which regulate viral RNA transport are present in the IE110 transcript. By in situ hybridization a stable population of polyadenylated RNAs was found to accumulate in the nucleus in spots, most of which were separate from the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle clumps. The IE63 protein has an involvement, either direct or indirect, in the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport of viral transcripts, a function which contrasts with the recently proposed role of herpes simplex virus type 1 Us11 in promoting the nuclear export of partially spliced or unspliced transcripts (J.-J. Diaz, M. Duc Dodon, N. Schaerer-Uthurraly, D. Simonin, K. Kindbeiter, L. Gazzolo, and J.-J. Madjar, Nature [London] 379

  17. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. PMID:26363398

  18. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of (137)Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of (137)Cs in forest surface (0-3 cm) soils. The K(2)SO(4) extraction process liberated 2.1%-12.8% of the total (137)Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher (137)Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the (137)Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout (137)Cs. The results indicate that uptake of (137)Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile (137)Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  19. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and adverse cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Medzikovic, Lejla; Schumacher, Cees A.; Verkerk, Arie O.; van Deel, Elza D.; Wolswinkel, Rianne; van der Made, Ingeborg; Bleeker, Natascha; Cakici, Daniella; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Meggouh, Farid; Creemers, Esther E.; Ann Remme, Carol; Baartscheer, Antonius; de Winter, Robbert J.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Arkenbout, E. Karin; de Waard, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Distinct stressors may induce heart failure. As compensation, β-adrenergic stimulation enhances myocardial contractility by elevating cardiomyocyte intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). However, chronic β-adrenergic stimulation promotes adverse cardiac remodelling. Cardiac expression of nuclear receptor Nur77 is enhanced by β-adrenergic stimulation, but its role in cardiac remodelling is still unclear. We show high and rapid Nur77 upregulation in cardiomyocytes stimulated with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Nur77 knockdown in culture resulted in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Ventricular cardiomyocytes from Nur77-deficient (Nur77-KO) mice exhibited elevated diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i and prolonged action potentials compared to wild type (WT). In vivo, these differences resulted in larger cardiomyocytes, increased expression of hypertrophic genes, and more cardiac fibrosis in Nur77-KO mice upon chronic isoproterenol stimulation. In line with the observed elevated [Ca2+]i, Ca2+-activated phosphatase calcineurin was more active in Nur77-KO mice compared to WT. In contrast, after cardiac pressure overload by aortic constriction, Nur77-KO mice exhibited attenuated remodelling compared to WT. Concluding, Nur77-deficiency results in significantly altered cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis and distinct remodelling outcome depending on the type of insult. Detailed knowledge on the role of Nur77 in maintaining cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis and the dual role Nur77 plays in cardiac remodelling will aid in developing personalized therapies against heart failure. PMID:26486271

  20. Estimating Annual Individual Doses for Evacuees Returning Home to Areas Affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Takada, Masashi; Omori, Yasutaka; Akahane, Keiichi; Kim, Eunjoo; Torikoshi, Masami; Yonehara, Hidenori; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    To contribute to the reconstruction and revitalization of Fukushima Prefecture following the 2011 nuclear power disaster, annual individual doses were estimated for evacuees who will return home to Tamura City, Kawauchi Village, and Iitate Village in Fukushima. Ambient external dose rates and individual doses obtained with personal dosimeters were measured at many residential and occupational sites throughout the study areas to obtain fundamental data needed for the estimation. The measurement results indicated that the ratio of individual dose based on a personal dosimeter to the ambient external dose measurement was 0.7 with 10% uncertainty. Multiplying the ambient external dose by 0.7 may be an appropriate measure of the effective dose to an individual in the investigated area. Annual individual doses were estimated for representative lifestyles and occupations based on the ambient external dose rates at the measurement sites, taking into account the relationship between the ambient external dose and individual dose. The results were as follows: 0.6-2.3 mSv y in Tamura, 1.1-5.5 mSv y in Kawauchi, and 3.8-17 mSv y in Iitate. For all areas investigated, the estimated dose to outdoor workers was higher than that to indoor workers. Identifying ways to reduce the amount of time that an outdoor worker spends outdoors would provide an effective measure to reduce dose. PMID:26107433

  1. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of 137Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of 137Cs in forest surface (0–3 cm) soils. The K2SO4 extraction process liberated 2.1%–12.8% of the total 137Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher 137Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the 137Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout 137Cs. The results indicate that uptake of 137Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile 137Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  2. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  3. Adoptive transfer of natural antibodies to non-immunized chickens affects subsequent antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Aart; Klomp, Marcel E V; Nieuwland, Mike G B; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Parmentier, Henk K

    2004-01-01

    To determine a regulatory function of natural antibodies in the immune response of chickens, pooled plasma obtained from non-immunized (naïve) 15 months old hens was subjected to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antigen-affinity chromatography. Purified KLH-binding antibodies were adoptively transferred intravenously to 5 weeks-old cocks that were subsequently immunized subcutaneously 24 h later with KLH. Control groups consisted of birds that were either adoptively transferred with KLH-binding antibodies purified from plasma of KLH-immunized chickens, or PBS, or a salt precipitated total immunoglobulin fraction obtained from the corresponding pooled nai;ve chicken plasma, respectively.Total, IgM and IgY antibody titers to KLH in the plasma of recipients adoptively transferred with KLH-NAb, but not in the plasma of the groups transferred with salt precipitate or KLH-binding specific antibodies, were significantly enhanced as compared to the non-treated, KLH immunized group. Titers of IgA antibodies binding KLH were decreased in the plasma of the group that received specific KLH-binding antibodies, but not in the plasma of the other groups. Proliferation from peripheral blood leucocytes in whole blood from the KLH-NAb treated group, the group treated with KLH-binding specific antibodies and the group treated with salt precipitate, respectively, to both concanavalin A and KLH were significantly decreased as compared to the group receiving PBS. Our data show that antigen-specific antibodies can be isolated from plasma obtained from non-immunized chickens. Such antibodies that resemble natural antibodies as described in mammals may perform an important role in the enhancement of subsequent antigen-specific antibody responses or the maturation of the immune system, which may differ from the role of specific antibodies. PMID:12962982

  4. Selective ploidy ablation, a high-throughput plasmid transfer protocol, identifies new genes affecting topoisomerase I–induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Robert J.D.; González-Barrera, Sergio; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Alvaro, David; Ciccone, Samantha; Wagner, Marisa; Rothstein, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    We have streamlined the process of transferring plasmids into any yeast strain library by developing a novel mating-based, high-throughput method called selective ploidy ablation (SPA). SPA uses a universal plasmid donor strain that contains conditional centromeres on every chromosome. The plasmid-bearing donor is mated to a recipient, followed by removal of all donor-strain chromosomes, producing a haploid strain containing the transferred plasmid. As proof of principle, we used SPA to transfer plasmids containing wild-type and mutant alleles of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) into the haploid yeast gene-disruption library. Overexpression of Top1 identified only one sensitive mutation, rpa34, while overexpression of top1-T722A allele, a camptothecin mimetic, identified 190 sensitive gene-disruption strains along with rpa34. In addition to known camptothecin-sensitive strains, this set contained mutations in genes involved in the Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex, the kinetochore, and vesicle trafficking. We further show that mutations in several ESCRT vesicle trafficking components increase Top1 levels, which is dependent on SUMO modification. These findings demonstrate the utility of the SPA technique to introduce plasmids into the haploid gene-disruption library to discover new interacting pathways. PMID:21173034

  5. Radiocesium transfer from hillslopes to the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident: A review.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J Patrick; Lepage, Hugo; Onda, Yuichi; Cerdan, Olivier; Ayrault, Sophie

    2015-10-01

    The devastating tsunami triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 inundated the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) resulting in a loss of cooling and a series of explosions releasing the largest quantity of radioactive material into the atmosphere since the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Although 80% of the radionuclides from this accidental release were transported over the Pacific Ocean, 20% were deposited over Japanese coastal catchments that are subject to frequent typhoons. Among the radioisotopes released during the FDNPP accident, radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) is considered the most serious current and future health risk for the local population. The goal of this review is to synthesize research relevant to the transfer of FDNPP derived radiocesium from hillslopes to the Pacific Ocean. After radiocesium fallout deposition on vegetation and soils, the contamination may remain stored in forest canopies, in vegetative litter on the ground, or in the soil. Once radiocesium contacts soil, it is quickly and almost irreversibly bound to fine soil particles. The kinetic energy of raindrops instigates the displacement of soil particles, and their bound radiocesium, which may be mobilized and transported with overland flow. Soil erosion is one of the main processes transferring particle-bound radiocesium from hillslopes through rivers and streams, and ultimately to the Pacific Ocean. Accordingly this review will summarize results regarding the fundamental processes and dynamics that govern radiocesium transfer from hillslopes to the Pacific Ocean published in the literature within the first four years after the FDNPP accident. The majority of radiocesium is reported to be transported in the particulate fraction, attached to fine particles. The contribution of the dissolved fraction to radiocesium migration is only relevant in base flows and is hypothesized to decline over time. Owing to the hydro-meteorological context of the

  6. 137Cesium Exposure and Spirometry Measures in Ukrainian Children Affected by the Chernobyl Nuclear Incident

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Erik R.; Kolpakov, Igor E.; Stepanova, Yevgenia I.; Vdovenko, Vitaliy Y.; Naboka, Maryna V.; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Mohr, Lawrence C.; Hoel, David G.; Karmaus, Wilfried J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, children of the contaminated Narodichesky region of Ukraine were obliged to participate in a yearly medical screening. They have been exposed to 137cesium (137Cs; half-life = 30 years) in contaminated soils, air, and food. Objective Using a “natural experiment” approach and a longitudinal prospective cohort study design, we investigated the association of soil 137Cs and spirometry measures for 415 children using 1,888 repeated measurements from 1993 to 1998. Methods Mean baseline village soil 137Cs measurements, which varied from 29.0 to 879 kBq/m2, were used as exposure indicators. A standardized spirometry protocol and prediction equations specific to Ukrainian children were used by the same pulmonologist in all screenings. Results Children living in villages with the highest quintile of soil 137Cs were 2.60 times more likely to have forced vital capacity (FVC) < 80% of predicted [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07–6.34] and 5.08 times more likely to have a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) to FVC% < 80% (95% CI, 1.02–25.19). We found statistically significant evidence of both airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC%, peak expiratory flow, and maximum expiratory flow at 25%, 50%, and 75% of FVC) and restriction (FVC) with increasing soil 137Cs. Conclusions These findings are unique and suggest significant airway obstruction and restriction consequences for children chronically exposed to low-dose radioactive contaminants such as those found downwind of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. PMID:20100677

  7. In vitro developmental competence of pig nuclear transferred embryos: effects of GFP transfection, refrigeration, cell cycle synchronization and shapes of donor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Hai; Pan, Deng-Ke; Sun, Xiu-Zhu; Sun, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tian, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan; Dai, Yun-Ping; Li, Ning

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of producing pig transgenic blastocysts expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to examine the effects of shape and preparation methods of donor cells on in vitro developmental ability of pig nuclear transferred embryos (NTEs). In experiment 1, the effect of GFP transfection on development of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage and blastocyst rates showed no significant difference between NTEs derived from transfected and non-transfected donors. In experiment 2, the effect of different nuclear donor preparation methods on in vitro development of NTEs was examined. The cleavage rate showed no statistically significant differences among three preparation methods. The blastocyst rates of donor cells treated once at -4 degrees C and those of freshly digested cells were similar to each other (26.3% vs 17.9%). The lowest blastocyst rates (5.88%) were observed when cells cryopreserved at -196 degrees C were used as donors. In experiment 3, the effect of different cell cycle synchronization methods on the in vitro development potential of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage rate of NTEs derived from cycling cells was much better than that of NTEs derived from serum-starved cells (64.4% vs 50.5%, p < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between the the blastocyst rates of the two groups. In experiment 4, the effect of different shapes of cultured fibroblast cells on the in vitro development of pig NTEs was examined. The fusion rate for couplets derived from rough cells was poorer than that observed in couplets derived from round smooth cells (47.8% vs 76.8%, p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences observed in the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate. In conclusion, the present study indicated that (i) refrigerated pig GFP-transfected cells could be used as donors in nuclear transfer and these NTEs could be effectively developed to blastocyst stage; (ii) serum starvation

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist for oocyte triggering in endometrial preparation of letrozole stimulation protocols does not affect clinical outcome of frozen-thawed embryo transfer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Xiu; Wei, Ji-Hong; Wei, Li-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of GnRH agonist in comparison with hCG for triggering final oocyte maturation in endometrial preparation of letrozole stimulation protocols for frozen-thawed embryo transfer. Methods: The frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles (FET) that use the letrozole stimulation protocols for endometrial preparation were divided into two groups according the different method of triggering final oocyte maturation. The serum LH and E2 levels, and the endometrial thickness on the day of triggering, the clinical pregnancy rates, the miscarriage rates and live birth rates were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the age, the endometrial thickness, the number of embryos transferred between the two groups. The clinical pregnancy rate, abortion rate and live birth rates of the group A were similar compared with the group B, P<0.05. Conclusion: Using GnRH agonist for oocyte triggering in endometrial preparation of letrozole stimulation protocols for frozen-thawed embryo transfer does not affect the clinical outcome compared with hCG under the same luteal phase support. PMID:26770535

  9. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  10. Retrograde transfer RNA nuclear import provides a new level of tRNA quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Emily B.; Hopper, Anita K.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are transcribed in the nucleus yet function in the cytoplasm; thus, tRNA movement within the cell was believed to be unidirectional—from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. It is now known that mature tRNAs also move in a retrograde direction from the cytoplasm to the nucleus via retrograde tRNA nuclear import, a process that is conserved from yeast to vertebrates. The biological significance of this tRNA nuclear import is not entirely clear. We hypothesized that retrograde tRNA nuclear import might function in proofreading tRNAs to ensure that only proper tRNAs reside in the cytoplasm and interact with the translational machinery. Here we identify two major types of aberrant tRNAs in yeast: a 5′, 3′ end-extended, spliced tRNA and hypomodified tRNAs. We show that both types of aberrant tRNAs accumulate in mutant cells that are defective in tRNA nuclear traffic, suggesting that they are normally imported into the nucleus and are repaired or degraded. The retrograde pathway functions in parallel with the cytoplasmic rapid tRNA decay pathway previously demonstrated to monitor tRNA quality, and cells are not viable if they lack both pathways. Our data support the hypothesis that the retrograde process provides a newly discovered level of tRNA quality control as a pathway that monitors both end processing of pre-tRNAs and the modification state of mature tRNAs. PMID:24297920

  11. 7SK small nuclear RNA directly affects HMGA1 function in transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Wegert, Thomas; Urlaub, Henning; Benecke, Bernd-Joachim; Benecke, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    Non-coding (nc) RNAs are increasingly recognized to play important regulatory roles in eukaryotic gene expression. The highly abundant and essential 7SK ncRNA has been shown to negatively regulate RNA Polymerase II transcription by inactivating the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in cellular and Tat-dependent HIV transcription. Here, we identify a more general, P-TEFb-independent role of 7SK RNA in directly affecting the function of the architectural transcription factor and chromatin regulator HMGA1. An important regulatory role of 7SK RNA in HMGA1-dependent cell differentiation and proliferation regulation is uncovered with the identification of over 1500 7SK-responsive HMGA1 target genes. Elevated HMGA1 expression is observed in nearly every type of cancer making the use of a 7SK substructure in the inhibition of HMGA1 activity, as pioneered here, potentially useful in therapy. The 7SK-HMGA1 interaction not only adds an essential facet to the comprehension of transcriptional plasticity at the coupling of initiation and elongation, but also might provide a molecular link between HIV reprogramming of cellular gene expression-associated oncogenesis. PMID:21087998

  12. High Power Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) for Cargo and Propellant Transfer Missions in Cislunar Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falck, Robert D.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) in transporting cargo and propellant from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the first Earth-Moon Lagrange point (EML1) is examined. The baseline NEP vehicle utilizes a fission reactor system with Brayton power conversion for electric power generation to power multiple liquid hydrogen magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Vehicle characteristics and performance levels are based on technology availability in a fifteen to twenty year timeframe. Results of numerical trajectory analyses are also provided.

  13. Frame-of-reference training effectiveness: effects of goal orientation and self-efficacy on affective, cognitive, skill-based, and transfer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dierdorff, Erich C; Surface, Eric A; Brown, Kenneth G

    2010-11-01

    Empirical evidence supporting frame-of-reference (FOR) training as an effective intervention for calibrating raters is convincing. Yet very little is known about who does better or worse in FOR training. We conducted a field study of how motivational factors influence affective, cognitive, and behavioral learning outcomes, as well as near transfer indexed by achieving professional certification. Relying on goal orientation theory, we hypothesized effects for 3 goal orientations: learning, prove performance, and avoid performance. Results were generally supportive across learning outcomes and transfer. Findings further supported a hypothesized interaction between learning self-efficacy and avoid performance goal orientation, such that higher levels of learning self-efficacy mitigated the negative effects of higher performance avoid tendencies. PMID:20853944

  14. Place of Learning, Place of Practice: Elements That Affect the Transfer of Teachers' Professional Development to Students' Learning in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murrill, Leslie D.; Thomas, Timothy G.; Reynolds, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring to light elements that teachers require in order for learning gained during professional development sessions to find a place in their classroom practices and to affect student learning. Through their inquiry with K-12 educators at the Margaret Sue Copenhaver Institute for Teaching and Learning, a professional…

  15. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Courtney R.; Tapley, Erin C.; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Starr, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect—live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus. PMID:25057012

  16. Photoprotection and triplet energy transfer in higher plants: the role of electronic and nuclear fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Jurinovich, Sandro; Prandi, Ingrid G; Caprasecca, Stefano; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-20

    Photosynthetic organisms employ several photoprotection strategies to avoid damage due to the excess energy in high light conditions. Among these, quenching of triplet chlorophylls by neighboring carotenoids (Cars) is fundamental in preventing the formation of singlet oxygen. Cars are able to accept the triplets from chlorophylls by triplet energy transfer (TET). We have here studied TET rates in CP29, a minor light-harvesting complex (LHC) of the Photosystem II in plants. A fully atomistic strategy combining classical molecular dynamics of the LHC in its natural environment with a hybrid time-dependent density functional theory/polarizable MM description of the TET is used. We find that the structural fluctuations of the pigment-protein complex can largely enhance the transfer rates with respect to those predicted using the crystal structure, reducing the triplet quenching times in the subnanosecond scale. These findings add a new perspective for the interpretation of the photoprotection function and its relation with structural motions of the LHC. PMID:27052105

  17. Differences in Water Vapor Radiative Transfer among 1D Models Can Significantly Affect the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Leconte, Jérémy; Wolf, Eric T.; Goldblatt, Colin; Feldl, Nicole; Merlis, Timothy; Wang, Yuwei; Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Forget, François; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4_Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μm) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μm. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m‑2 differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m‑2, especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m‑2 in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  18. A Multi-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model of a Tie-Tube and Hexagonal Fuel Element for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, C. F.; Mireles, O. R.; Stewart, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Capable Cryogenic Thermal Engine (SCCTE) effort considers a nuclear thermal rocket design based around a Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) design fission reactor. The reactor core is comprised of bundled hexagonal fuel elements that directly heat hydrogen for expansion in a thrust chamber and hexagonal tie-tubes that house zirconium hydride moderator mass for the purpose of thermalizing fast neutrons resulting from fission events. Created 3D steady state Hex fuel rod model with 1D flow channels. Hand Calculation were used to set up initial conditions for fluid flow. The Hex Fuel rod uses 1D flow paths to model the channels using empirical correlations for heat transfer in a pipe. Created a 2-D axisymmetric transient to steady state model using the CFD turbulent flow and Heat Transfer module in COMSOL. This model was developed to find and understand the hydrogen flow that might effect the thermal gradients axially and at the end of the tie tube where the flow turns and enters an annulus. The Hex fuel rod and Tie tube models were made based on requirements given to us by CSNR and the SCCTE team. The models helped simplify and understand the physics and assumptions. Using pipe correlations reduced the complexity of the 3-D fuel rod model and is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The 2-D axisymmetric tie tube model can be used as a reference "Virtual test model" for comparing and improving 3-D Models.

  19. Production of Bovine Embryos and Calves Cloned by Nuclear Transfer Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Amniotic Fluid and Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carolina Gonzales; Martins, Carlos Frederico; Cardoso, Tereza Cristina; da Cunha, Elisa Ribeiro; Bessler, Heidi Christina; Martins, George Henrique Lima; Pivato, Ivo; Báo, Sônia Nair

    2016-04-01

    The less differentiated the donor cells are used in nuclear transfer (NT), the more easily are they reprogrammed by the recipient cytoplasm. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear as an alternative to donor nuclei for NT. The amniotic fluid and adipose tissue are sources of MSCs that have not been tested for the production of cloned embryos in cattle. The objective of this study was to isolate, characterize, and use MSCs derived from amniotic fluid (MSC-AF) and adipose tissue (MSC-AT) to produce cloned calves. Isolation of MSC-AF was performed using in vivo ultrasound-guided transvaginal amniocentesis, and MSC-AT were isolated by explant culture. Cellular phenotypic and genotypic characterization by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR were performed, as well as induction in different cell lineages. The NT was performed using MSC-AF and MSC-AT as nuclear donors. The mesenchymal markers of MSC were expressed in bovine MSC-AF and MSC-AT cultures, as evidenced by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. When induced, these cells differentiated into osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Embryo production was similar between the cell types, and two calves were born. The calf from MSC-AT was born healthy, and this fact opens a new possibility of using this type of cell to produce cloned cattle by NT. PMID:27055630

  20. Rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation of oocytes improves embryonic development after parthenogenesis and somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyeong; Park, Jong-Im; Yun, Jung Im; Lee, Yongjin; Yong, Hwanyul; Lee, Seung Tae; Park, Choon-Keun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Geun-Shik

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte maturation and embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. Morphologically good (MGCOCs) and poor oocytes (MPCOCs) were untreated or treated with 1 nM rapamycin during 0-22 h, 22-42 h, or 0-42 h of IVM. Rapamycin had no significant effects on nuclear maturation and blastocyst formation after PA of MGCOCs. Blastocyst formation after PA was significantly increased by rapamycin treatment during 22-42 h and 0-42 h (46.6% and 46.5%, respectively) relative to the control (33.3%) and 0-22 h groups (38.6%) in MPCOCs. In SCNT, blastocyst formation tended to increase in MPCOCs treated with rapamycin during 0-42 h of IVM relative to untreated oocytes (20.3% vs. 14.3%, 0.05 < p < 0.1), while no improvement was observed in MGCOCs. Gene expression analysis revealed that transcript abundance of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 mRNAs was significantly increased in MPCOCs by rapamycin relative to the control. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induction by rapamycin during IVM improved developmental competence of oocytes derived from MPCOCs. PMID:25797293

  1. Transfer of infrared thermography predictive maintenance technologies to Soviet-designed nuclear power plants: experience at Chernobyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Ray; Huff, Roy

    1999-03-01

    The importance of infrared (IR) technology and analysis in today's world of predictive maintenance and reliability- centered maintenance cannot be understated. The use of infrared is especially important in facilities that are required to maintain a high degree of equipment reliability because of plant or public safety concerns. As with all maintenance tools, particularly those used in predictive maintenance approaches, training plays a key role in their effectiveness and the benefit gained from their use. This paper details an effort to transfer IR technology to Soviet- designed nuclear power plants in Russia, Ukraine, and Lithuania. Delivery of this technology and post-delivery training activities have been completed recently at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. Many interesting challenges were encountered during this effort. Hardware procurement and delivery of IR technology to a sensitive country were complicated by United States regulations. Freight and shipping infrastructure and host-country customs policies complicated hardware transport. Training activities were complicated by special hardware, software and training material translation needs, limited communication opportunities, and site logistical concerns. These challenges and others encountered while supplying the Chornobyl plant with state-of-the-art IR technology are described in this paper.

  2. Impact of different sources of donor cells upon the nuclear transfer efficiency in Chinese indigenous Meishan pig.

    PubMed

    Hua, Z; Xu, G; Liu, X; Bi, Y; Xiao, H; Hua, W; Li, L; Zhang, L; Ren, H; Zheng, X

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for both agricultural and biomedical research. However, its efficiency is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we compared the cloning efficiency by using three lines of donor cells that are derived from fetal, newborn and adult fibroblasts of Chinese indigenous Meishan pig. We showed that cleavage rate and blastocyst formation rate of the reconstructed embryos were not significantly different between the fetal (80.7% and 15.6%) and newborn ear skin (77.5% and 12.3%) fibroblast groups (p>0.05), but in both groups these indices were significantly higher than that found in the adult ear skin (70.5% and 8.8%; p<0.05). Reconstructed embryos derived from fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts were transferred to four surrogates, respectively. For the fetal, newborn, and adult ear skin fibroblasts, the number of pregnancies were two (50.0%), two (50.0%), and one (25.0%), respectively, and the number of deliveries were two (50.0%), one (25.0%), and zero (0.0%), respectively. Seven and two cloned piglets were obtained from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts respectively, while no piglets were obtained from the adult ear skin fibroblasts. Two cloned piglets from the newborn ear skin fibroblasts died shortly after birth because of neonatal asphyxia caused by dystocia. The birth weights of the piglets derived from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts were 1230.5 and 1310.0 g, respectively, which were statistically insignificant (p>0.05), but both were significantly higher than that of the control groups (p<0.05). Microsatellite analyses demonstrated that the genotypes of all cloned piglets were identical to their donor cells. Therefore, cloned pigs were successfully produced using two sources of donor cells isolated from the fetal and newborn ear skin fibroblasts of Meishan piglet, and

  3. Does Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Adversely Affect Long-Term Welfare following Transfer to Furnished Cages?

    PubMed Central

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Hansen, Tone Beate; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Moe, Randi O.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that hens that are reared in aviaries but produce in furnished cages experience poorer welfare in production than hens reared in caged systems. This hypothesis is based on the suggestion that the spatial restriction associated with the transfer from aviaries to cages results in frustration or stress for the aviary reared birds. To assess the difference in welfare between aviary and cage reared hens in production, non-beak trimmed white leghorn birds from both rearing backgrounds were filmed at a commercial farm that used furnished cage housing. The videos were taken at 19 and 21 weeks of age, following the birds' transition to the production environment at 16 weeks. Videos were analysed in terms of the performance of aversion-related behaviour in undisturbed birds, comfort behaviour in undisturbed birds, and alert behaviour directed to a novel object in the home cage. A decrease in the performance of the former behaviour and increase in the performance of the latter two behaviours indicates improved welfare. The results showed that aviary reared birds performed more alert behaviour near to the object than did cage reared birds at 19 but not at 21 weeks of age (P = 0.03). Blood glucose concentrations did not differ between the treatments (P>0.10). There was a significant difference in mortality between treatments (P = 0.000), with more death in aviary reared birds (5.52%) compared to cage birds (2.48%). The higher mortality of aviary-reared birds indicates a negative effect of aviary rearing on bird welfare, whereas the higher duration of alert behavior suggests a positive effect of aviary rearing. PMID:25229879

  4. Cationic screening of charged surface groups (carboxylates) affects electron transfer steps in photosystem-II water oxidation and quinone reduction.

    PubMed

    Karge, Oliver; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Dau, Holger

    2014-10-01

    The functional or regulatory role of long-distance interactions between protein surface and interior represents an insufficiently understood aspect of protein function. Cationic screening of surface charges determines the morphology of thylakoid membrane stacks. We show that it also influences directly the light-driven reactions in the interior of photosystem II (PSII). After laser-flash excitation of PSII membrane particles from spinach, time courses of the delayed recombination fluorescence (10μs-10ms) and the variable chlorophyll-fluorescence yield (100μs-1s) were recorded in the presence of chloride salts. At low salt-concentrations, a stimulating effect was observed for the S-state transition efficiency, the time constant of O2-formation at the Mn4Ca-complex of PSII, and the halftime of re-oxidation of the primary quinone acceptor (Qa) by the secondary quinone acceptor (Qb). The cation valence determined the half-effect concentrations of the stimulating salt effect, which were around 6μM, 200μM and 10mM for trivalent (LaCl3), bivalent (MgCl2, CaCl2), and monovalent cations (NaCl, KCl), respectively. A depressing high-salt effect also depended strongly on the cation valence (onset concentrations around 2mM, 50mM, and 500mM). These salt effects are proposed to originate from electrostatic screening of negatively charged carboxylate sidechains, which are found in the form of carboxylate clusters at the solvent-exposed protein surface. We conclude that the influence of electrostatic screening by solvent cations manifests a functionally relevant long-distance interaction between protein surface and electron-transfer reactions in the protein interior. A relation to regulation and adaptation in response to environmental changes is conceivable. PMID:25062950

  5. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-22

    The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, culminating in a research reactor which operated for 15,000 hours without major error. This technical success has garnished interest in modern, high temperature, reactor schemes. Research using molten fluoride salts for nuclear applications requires a steady supply of high grade molten salts. There is no bulk supplier of research grade fluoride salts in the world, so a facility which could provide all the salt needed for testing at the University of Wisconsin had to be produced. Two salt purification devices were made for this purpose, a large scale purifier, and a small scale purifier, each designed to clean the salts from impurities and reduce their corrosion potential. As of now, the small scale has performed with flibe salt, hydrogen, and hydrogen fluoride, yielding clean salt. This salt is currently being used in corrosion testing facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. Working with the beryllium based salts requires extensive safety measures and health monitoring to prevent the development of acute or chronic beryllium disease, two pulmonary diseases created by an allergic reaction to beryllium in the lungs. Extensive health monitoring, engineering controls, and environment monitoring had to be set up with the University of Wisconsin department of Environment, Health and Safety. The hydrogen fluoride required for purification was also an extreme health hazard requiring thoughtful planning and execution. These dangers have made research a slow and tedious process. Simple processes, such as chemical handling and clean-up, can take large amounts of ingenuity and time. Other work has complemented the experimental research at Wisconsin to advance high temperature reactor goals. Modeling work has been performed in house to re

  6. In vitro decondensation of the sperm chromatin in Holothuria tubulosa (sea cucumber) not affecting proteolysis of basic nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    del Valle, Luis J

    2005-06-01

    Sea urchin and sea star oocyte extracts contain proteolytic activities that are active against sperm basic nuclear proteins (SNBP). This SNBP degradation has been related to the decondensation of sperm chromatin as a possible model to male pronuclei formation. We have studied the presence of this proteolytic activity in Holothuria tubulosa (sea cucumber) and its possible relationship with sperm nuclei decondensation. The mature oocyte extracts from H. tubulosa contain a proteolytic activity to SNBP located in the macromolecular fraction of the egg-jelly layer. SNBP degradation occurred both on sperm nuclei and on purified SNBP, histones being more easily degraded than protein Ø(o) (sperm-specific protein). SNBP degradation was found to be dependent on concentration, incubation time, presence of Ca(2+), pH, and this activity could be a serine-proteinase. Thermal denaturalization of the oocyte extracts (80 degrees C, 10-15 min) inactivates its proteolytic activity on SNBP but does not affect sperm nuclei decondensation. These results would suggest that sperm nuclei decondensation occurs by a mechanism different from SNBP degradation. Thus, the sperm nuclei decondensation occurs by a thermostable factor(s) and the removal of linker SNBP (H1 and protein Ø(o)) will be a first condition in the process of sperm chromatin remodeling. PMID:16026541

  7. Full-term development of gaur-bovine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos: effect of trichostatin A treatment.

    PubMed

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; Imsoonthornruksa, Sumeth; Laowtammathron, Chuti; Sangmalee, Anawat; Tunwattana, Wanchai; Thongprapai, Thamnoon; Chaimongkol, Chockchai; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2012-06-01

    Trichostatin A (TSA) has previously been used in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to improve the cloning efficiency in several species, which led our team to investigate the effects of TSA on the full-term development of bovine SCNT and gaur-bovine interspecies SCNT (gaur iSCNT; gaur somatic cells as donors and bovine oocytes as recipients) embryos. Treatment with 50 nM TSA for 10 h after fusion had no positive effects on the rates of fusion, cleavage, or the development to eight-cell or morula stages in both bovine SCNT and gaur iSCNT embryos. However, TSA treatment significantly enhanced the blastocyst formation rate in bovine SCNT embryos (44 vs. 32-34% in the TSA-treated and TSA-untreated groups, respectively), but had no effects on gaur iSCNT embryos. The fresh blastocysts derived from bovine SCNT and gaur iSCNT embryos (fresh groups), as well as vitrified bovine SCNT blastocysts (vitrified group), were transferred to bovine recipients. We found that TSA treatment increased the pregnancy rates only in recipients receiving fresh bovine SCNT embryos. In recipients receiving TSA-treated bovine SCNT embryos, three cloned calves from the fresh group and twin cloned calves from the vitrified group were delivered; however, no calf was born from the TSA-untreated bovine SCNT embryos. In contrast, one gaur iSCNT calf was born from a recipient receiving blastocysts from the TSA-untreated group. In summary, TSA improved the preimplantation development and pregnancy rates of bovine SCNT embryos, but did not have any beneficial effect on gaur iSCNT embryos. However, one gaur iSCNT calf reached full-term development. PMID:22578161

  8. High-resolution imaging of magnetisation transfer and nuclear Overhauser effect in the human visual cortex at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Olivier; Clemence, Matthew; Peters, Andrew; Pitiot, Alain; Gowland, Penny

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise a pulse sequence for high-resolution imaging sensitive to the effects of conventional macromolecular magnetisation transfer (MT(m)) and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), and to use it to investigate variations in these parameters across the cerebral cortex. A high-spatial-resolution magnetisation transfer-prepared turbo field echo (MT-TFE) sequence was designed to have high sensitivity to MT(m) and NOE effects, whilst being robust to B0 and B1 inhomogeneities, and producing a good point spread function across the cortex. This was achieved by optimising the saturation and imaging components of the sequence using simulations based on the Bloch equations, including exchange and an image simulator. This was used to study variations in these parameters across the cortex. Using the sequence designed to be sensitive to NOE and MT(m), a variation in signals corresponding to a variation in MT(m) and NOE across the cortex, consistent with a reduction in myelination from the white matter surface to the pial surface of the cortex, was observed. In regions in which the stria was visible on T2*-weighted images, it could also be detected in signals sensitive to MT(m) and NOE. There was greater variation in signals sensitive to NOE, suggesting that the NOE signal is more sensitive to myelination. A sequence has been designed to image variations in MT(m) and NOE at high spatial resolution and has been used to investigate variations in contrast in these parameters across the cortex. PMID:23801569

  9. Differences during the first lactation between cows cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer and noncloned cows.

    PubMed

    Montazer-Torbati, F; Boutinaud, M; Brun, N; Richard, C; Neveu, A; Jaffrézic, F; Laloë, D; LeBourhis, D; Nguyen, M; Chadi, S; Jammes, H; Renard, J-P; Chat, S; Boukadiri, A; Devinoy, E

    2016-06-01

    Lactation performance is dependent on both the genetic characteristics and the environmental conditions surrounding lactating cows. However, individual variations can still be observed within a given breed under similar environmental conditions. The role of the environment between birth and lactation could be better appreciated in cloned cows, which are presumed to be genetically identical, but differences in lactation performance between cloned and noncloned cows first need to be clearly evaluated. Conflicting results have been described in the literature, so our aim was to clarify this situation. Nine cloned Prim' Holstein cows were produced by the transfer of nuclei from a single fibroblast cell line after cell fusion with enucleated oocytes. The cloned cows and 9 noncloned counterparts were raised under similar conditions. Milk production and composition were recorded monthly from calving until 200d in milk. At 67d in milk, biopsies were sampled from the rear quarter of the udder, their mammary epithelial cell content was evaluated, and mammary cell renewal, RNA, and DNA were then analyzed in relevant samples. The results showed that milk production did not differ significantly between cloned and noncloned cows, but milk protein and fat contents were less variable in cloned cows. Furthermore, milk fat yield and contents were lower in cloned cows during early lactation. At around 67 DIM, milk fat and protein yields, as well as milk fat, protein, and lactose contents, were also lower in cloned cows. These lower yields could be linked to the higher apoptotic rate observed in cloned cows. Apoptosis is triggered by insulin-like factor growth binding protein 5 (IGFBP5) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), which both interact with CSN1S2. During our experiments, CSN1S2 transcript levels were lower in the mammary gland of cloned cows. The mammary cell apoptotic rate observed in cloned cows may have been related to the higher levels of DNA (cytosine-5

  10. Highly efficient EIAV-mediated in utero gene transfer and expression in the major muscle groups affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gregory, L G; Waddington, S N; Holder, M V; Mitrophanous, K A; Buckley, S M K; Mosley, K L; Bigger, B W; Ellard, F M; Walmsley, L E; Lawrence, L; Al-Allaf, F; Kingsman, S; Coutelle, C; Themis, M

    2004-07-01

    Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has so far not been successful because of the difficulty in achieving efficient and permanent gene transfer to the large number of affected muscles and the development of immune reactions against vector and transgenic protein. In addition, the prenatal onset of disease complicates postnatal gene therapy. We have therefore proposed a fetal approach to overcome these barriers. We have applied beta-galactosidase expressing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) lentiviruses pseudotyped with VSV-G by single or combined injection via different routes to the MF1 mouse fetus on day 15 of gestation and describe substantial gene delivery to the musculature. Highly efficient gene transfer to skeletal muscles, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles, as well as to cardiac myocytes was observed and gene expression persisted for at least 15 months after administration of this integrating vector. These findings support the concept of in utero gene delivery for therapeutic and long-term prevention/correction of muscular dystrophies and pave the way for a future application in the clinic. PMID:15141156

  11. Altered xylem-phloem transfer of amino acids affects metabolism and leads to increased seed yield and oil content in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhi; Tan, Qiumin; Lee, Raymond; Trethewy, Alexander; Lee, Yong-Hwa; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2010-11-01

    Seed development and nitrogen (N) storage depend on delivery of amino acids to seed sinks. For efficient translocation to seeds, amino acids are loaded into the phloem in source leaves and along the long distance transport pathway through xylem-phloem transfer. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana AMINO ACID PERMEASE2 (AAP2) localizes to the phloem throughout the plant. AAP2 T-DNA insertion lines showed changes in source-sink translocation of amino acids and a decrease in the amount of seed total N and storage proteins, supporting AAP2 function in phloem loading and amino acid distribution to the embryo. Interestingly, in aap2 seeds, total carbon (C) levels were unchanged, while fatty acid levels were elevated. Moreover, branch and silique numbers per plant and seed yield were strongly increased. This suggests changes in N and C delivery to sinks and subsequent modulations of sink development and seed metabolism. This is supported by tracer experiments, expression studies of genes of N/C transport and metabolism in source and sink, and by phenotypic and metabolite analyses of aap2 plants. Thus, AAP2 is key for xylem to phloem transfer and sink N and C supply; moreover, modifications of N allocation can positively affect C assimilation and source-sink transport and benefit sink development and oil yield. PMID:21075769

  12. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer of the Obesity-Associated Gene Etv5 in Rat Midbrain Does Not Affect Energy Balance or Motivated Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Boender, Arjen J.; Koning, Nivard A.; van den Heuvel, José K.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; van Rozen, Andrea J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have implicated the transcription factor E-twenty- six version 5 (Etv5) in the regulation of body mass index. Further substantiating the role of Etv5 in feeding behavior are the findings that targeted disruption of Etv5 in mice leads to decreased body weight gain and that expression of Etv5 is decreased in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNpc) after food restriction. As Etv5 has been suggested to influence dopaminergic neurotransmission by driving the expression of genes that are responsible for the synthesis and release of dopamine, we investigated if expression levels of Etv5 are dependent on nutritional state and subsequently influence the expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase. While it was shown that Etv5 expression in the VTA/SNpc increases after central administration of leptin and that Etv5 was able to drive expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vitro, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 into the VTA/SNpc of rats did not alter expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vivo. Moreover, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc did not affect measures of energy balance or performances in a progressive ratio schedule. Thus, these data do not support a role for increased expression of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc in the regulation of feeding behavior. PMID:24710089

  13. Pregnancy rates and corpus luteum-related factors affecting pregnancy establishment in bovine recipients synchronized for fixed-time embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, L G B; Torres, C A A; Souza, E D; Monteiro, P L J; Arashiro, E K N; Camargo, L S A; Fernandes, C A C; Viana, J H M

    2009-10-15

    The objective was to investigate the influence of corpora lutea physical and functional characteristics on pregnancy rates in bovine recipients synchronized for fixed-time embryo transfer (FTET). Crossbred (Bos taurus taurus x Bos taurus indicus) nonlactating cows and heifers (n=259) were treated with the following protocol: 2mg estradiol benzoate (EB) plus an intravaginal progesterone device (CIDR 1.9g progesterone; Day 0); 400 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG; Day 5); prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and CIDR withdrawal (Day 8); and 1mg EB (Day 9). Ovarian ultrasonography and blood sample collections were performed on Day 17. Of the 259 cattle initially treated, 197 (76.1%) were suitable recipients; they received a single, fresh, quality grade 1 or 2 in vivo-derived (n=90) or in vitro-produced (n=87) embryo on Day 17. Pregnancy rates (23 d after embryo transfer) were higher for in vivo-derived embryos than for in vitro-produced embryos (58.8% vs. 31.0%, respectively; P<0.001). Mean (+/-SD) plasma progesterone (P(4)) concentration was higher in cattle that became pregnant than that in nonpregnant cattle (5.2+/-5.0 vs. 3.8+/-2.4 ng/mL; P=0.02). Mean pixel values (71.8+/-1.3 vs. 71.2+/-1.1) and pixel heterogeneity (14.8+/-0.3 vs. 14.5+/-0.5) were similar between pregnant and nonpregnant recipients (P>0.10). No significant relationship was detected between pregnancy outcome and plasma P(4), corpus luteum area, or corpus luteum echotexture. Embryo type, however, affected the odds of pregnancy. In conclusion, corpus luteum-related traits were poor predictors of pregnancy in recipients. The type of embryo, however, was a major factor affecting pregnancy outcome. PMID:19709722

  14. Generation of porcine fetal fibroblasts expressing the tetracycline-inducible Cas9 gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqian; Liu, Kai; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Shouquan

    2016-09-01

    Cas9 endonuclease, from so-called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems of Streptococcus pyogenes, type II functions as an RNA-guided endonuclease and edits the genomes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, including deletion and insertion by DNA double‑stranded break repair mechanisms. In previous studies, it was observed that Cas9, with a genome‑scale lentiviral single‑guide RNA library, could be applied to a loss‑of‑function genetic screen, although the loss‑of‑function genes have yet to be verified in vitro and this approach has not been used in porcine cells. Based on these observations, lentiviral Cas9 was used to infect porcine primary fibroblasts to achieve cell colonies carrying Cas9 endonuclease. Subsequently, porcine fetal fibroblasts expressing the tetracycline‑inducible Cas9 gene were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer, and three 30 day transgenic porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) were obtained. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcription‑PCR and western blot analysis indicated that the PFFs were Cas9‑positive. In addition, one of the three integrations was located near to known functional genes in the PFF1 cell line, whereas neither of the integrations was located in the PFF1 or PFF2 cell lines. It was hypothesized that these transgenic PFFs may be useful for conditional genomic editing in pigs, and for generating ideal modified porcine models. PMID:27430306

  15. Histone Demethylase Expression Enhances Human Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Efficiency and Promotes Derivation of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Young Gie; Matoba, Shogo; Liu, Yuting; Eum, Jin Hee; Lu, Falong; Jiang, Wei; Lee, Jeoung Eun; Sepilian, Vicken; Cha, Kwang Yul; Lee, Dong Ryul; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    The extremely low efficiency of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivation using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) limits its potential application. Blastocyst formation from human SCNT embryos occurs at a low rate and with only some oocyte donors. We previously showed in mice that reduction of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) through ectopic expression of the H3K9me3 demethylase Kdm4d greatly improves SCNT embryo development. Here we show that overexpression of a related H3K9me3 demethylase KDM4A improves human SCNT, and that, as in mice, H3K9me3 in the human somatic cell genome is an SCNT reprogramming barrier. Overexpression of KDM4A significantly improves the blastocyst formation rate in human SCNT embryos by facilitating transcriptional reprogramming, allowing efficient derivation of SCNT-derived ESCs using adult Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patient somatic nuclei donors. This conserved mechanistic insight has potential applications for improving SCNT in a variety of contexts, including regenerative medicine. PMID:26526725

  16. Dynamic aspects of antibody:oligosaccharide complexes characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Theillet, François-Xavier; Frank, Martin; Vulliez-Le Normand, Brigitte; Simenel, Catherine; Hoos, Sylviane; Chaffotte, Alain; Bélot, Frédéric; Guerreiro, Catherine; Nato, Farida; Phalipon, Armelle; Mulard, Laurence A; Delepierre, Muriel

    2011-12-01

    Carbohydrates are likely to maintain significant conformational flexibility in antibody (Ab):carbohydrate complexes. As demonstrated herein for the protective monoclonal Ab (mAb) F22-4 recognizing the Shigella flexneri 2a O-antigen (O-Ag) and numerous synthetic oligosaccharide fragments thereof, the combination of molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance saturation transfer difference experiments, supported by physicochemical analysis, allows us to determine the binding epitope and its various contributions to affinity without using any modified oligosaccharides. Moreover, the methods used provide insights into ligand flexibility in the complex, thus enabling a better understanding of the Ab affinities observed for a representative set of synthetic O-Ag fragments. Additionally, these complementary pieces of information give evidence to the ability of the studied mAb to recognize internal as well as terminal epitopes of its cognate polysaccharide antigen. Hence, we show that an appropriate combination of computational and experimental methods provides a basis to explore carbohydrate functional mimicry and receptor binding. The strategy may facilitate the design of either ligands or carbohydrate recognition domains, according to needed improvements of the natural carbohydrate:receptor properties. PMID:21610193

  17. Stochastic anomaly of methylome but persistent SRY hypermethylation in disorder of sex development in canine somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Lu, Hanlin; Park, Chi-Hun; Li, Meiyan; Luo, Huijuan; Kim, Joung Joo; Liu, Siyang; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Huang, Shujia; Hwang, In Sung; Kang, Mi Na; Gong, Desheng; Park, Kang Bae; Choi, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yang, Huanming; Hwang, Woo Suk; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides an excellent model for studying epigenomic reprogramming during mammalian development. We mapped the whole genome and whole methylome for potential anomalies of mutations or epimutations in SCNT-generated dogs with XY chromosomal sex but complete gonadal dysgenesis, which is classified as 78, XY disorder of sex development (DSD). Whole genome sequencing revealed no potential genomic variations that could explain the pathogenesis of DSD. However, extensive but stochastic anomalies of genome-wide DNA methylation were discovered in these SCNT DSD dogs. Persistent abnormal hypermethylation of the SRY gene was observed together with its down-regulated mRNA and protein expression. Failure of SRY expression due to hypermethylation was further correlated with silencing of a serial of testis determining genes, including SOX9, SF1, SOX8, AMH and DMRT1 in an early embryonic development stage at E34 in the XYDSD gonad, and high activation of the female specific genes, including FOXL2, RSPO1, CYP19A1, WNT4, ERα and ERβ, after one postnatal year in the ovotestis. Our results demonstrate that incomplete demethylation on the SRY gene is the driving cause of XYDSD in these XY DSD dogs, indicating a central role of epigenetic regulation in sex determination. PMID:27501986

  18. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  19. Relationships of survival time, productivity and cause of death with telomere lengths of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kazuyuki; Yonai, Miharu; Kaneyama, Kanako; Ito, Satoshi; Matsuda, Hideo; Yoshioka, Hajime; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2011-10-01

    The reproductive ability, milk-producing capacity, survival time and relationships of these parameters with telomere length were investigated in 4 groups of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Each group was produced using the same donor cells (6 Holstein (1H), 3 Holstein (2H), 4 Jersey (1J) and 5 Japanese Black (1B) cows). As controls, 47 Holstein cows produced by artificial insemination were used. The SCNT cows were artificially inseminated, and multiple deliveries were performed after successive rounds of breeding and conception. No correlation was observed between the telomere length and survival time in the SCNT cows. Causes of death of SCNT cows included accidents, accident-associated infections, inappropriate management, acute mastitis and hypocalcemia. The lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was superior to those of the controls and cell donor cows. All SCNT beef cows with a relatively light burden of lactation remained alive and showed significantly prolonged survival time compared with the cows in the SCNT dairy breeds. These results suggest that the lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was favorable, and their survival time was more strongly influenced by environmental burdens, such as pregnancy, delivery, lactation and feeding management, than by the telomere length. PMID:21666348

  20. Analysis of ENPP2 in the Uterine Endometrium of Pigs Carrying Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Heewon; Choi, Yohan; Yu, Inkyu; Shim, Jangsoo; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Eunsong; Ka, Hakhyun

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful tool for animal cloning, but the efficiency of producing viable offspring by SCNT is very low. To improve this efficiency in the production of cloned pigs, it is critical to understand the interactions between uterine function and cloned embryos during implantation. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that plays an important role in the establishment of pregnancy in pigs; however, LPA production in the uterine endometrium of pigs carrying SCNT-cloned conceptuses has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated expression of ENPP2, an LPA-generating enzyme, in the uterine endometrium of gilts with conceptuses derived from SCNT during the implantation period. Uterine endometrial tissue and uterine flushing were obtained from gilts carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses and from gilts carrying conceptuses resulting from natural mating on d 12 of pregnancy. Our results demonstrated no difference in the level of ENPP2 mRNA expression in the uterine endometrium between gilts carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses and gilts carrying naturally-conceived conceptuses, but secretion of ENPP2 protein into the uterine lumen did decrease significantly in pigs with SCNT-derived conceptuses. These results indicate that expression and secretion of ENPP2, which are critical for appropriate LPA production and successful pregnancy, are dysregulated in the uterine endometrium of pigs carrying SCNT-derived conceptuses. PMID:25049907

  1. Improved Cloning Efficiency and Developmental Potential in Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer with the Oosight Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Noh, Eun Ji; Noh, Eun Hyung; Park, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Riu, Key Zung

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures, exquisite enucleation of the recipient oocyte is critical to cloning efficiency. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two enucleation systems, Hoechst staining and UV irradiation (hereafter, irradiation group) and Oosight imaging (hereafter, Oosight group), on the in vitro production of bovine SCNT embryos. In the Oosight group, the apoptotic index (2.8±0.5 vs. 7.3±1.2) was lower, and the fusion rate (75.6% vs. 62.9%), cleavage rate (78.0% vs. 63.7%), blastocyst rate (40.2% vs. 29.2%), and total cell number (128.3±4.8 vs. 112.2±7.6) were higher than those in the irradiation group (all p<0.05). The overall efficiency after SCNT was twice as high in the Oosight group as that in the irradiation group (p<0.05). The relative mRNA expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Interferon-tau, and Dnmt3A were higher and those of Caspase-3 and Hsp70 were lower in the Oosight group compared with the irradiation group (p<0.05). This is the first report to show the positive effect of the Oosight imaging system on molecular gene expression in the SCNT embryo. The Oosight imaging system may become the preferred choice for enucleation because it is less detrimental to the developmental potential of bovine SCNT embryos. PMID:22816525

  2. Stochastic anomaly of methylome but persistent SRY hypermethylation in disorder of sex development in canine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Lu, Hanlin; Park, Chi-Hun; Li, Meiyan; Luo, Huijuan; Kim, Joung Joo; Liu, Siyang; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Huang, Shujia; Hwang, In Sung; Kang, Mi Na; Gong, Desheng; Park, Kang Bae; Choi, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yang, Huanming; Hwang, Woo Suk; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides an excellent model for studying epigenomic reprogramming during mammalian development. We mapped the whole genome and whole methylome for potential anomalies of mutations or epimutations in SCNT-generated dogs with XY chromosomal sex but complete gonadal dysgenesis, which is classified as 78, XY disorder of sex development (DSD). Whole genome sequencing revealed no potential genomic variations that could explain the pathogenesis of DSD. However, extensive but stochastic anomalies of genome-wide DNA methylation were discovered in these SCNT DSD dogs. Persistent abnormal hypermethylation of the SRY gene was observed together with its down-regulated mRNA and protein expression. Failure of SRY expression due to hypermethylation was further correlated with silencing of a serial of testis determining genes, including SOX9, SF1, SOX8, AMH and DMRT1 in an early embryonic development stage at E34 in the XY(DSD) gonad, and high activation of the female specific genes, including FOXL2, RSPO1, CYP19A1, WNT4, ERα and ERβ, after one postnatal year in the ovotestis. Our results demonstrate that incomplete demethylation on the SRY gene is the driving cause of XY(DSD) in these XY DSD dogs, indicating a central role of epigenetic regulation in sex determination. PMID:27501986

  3. Generation of porcine fetal fibroblasts expressing the tetracycline-inducible Cas9 gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqian; Liu, Kai; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Shouquan

    2016-01-01

    Cas9 endonuclease, from so-called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems of Streptococcus pyogenes, type II functions as an RNA-guided endonuclease and edits the genomes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, including deletion and insertion by DNA double-stranded break repair mechanisms. In previous studies, it was observed that Cas9, with a genome-scale lentiviral single-guide RNA library, could be applied to a loss-of-function genetic screen, although the loss-of-function genes have yet to be verified in vitro and this approach has not been used in porcine cells. Based on these observations, lentiviral Cas9 was used to infect porcine primary fibroblasts to achieve cell colonies carrying Cas9 endonuclease. Subsequently, porcine fetal fibroblasts expressing the tetracycline-inducible Cas9 gene were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer, and three 30 day transgenic porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) were obtained. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analysis indicated that the PFFs were Cas9-positive. In addition, one of the three integrations was located near to known functional genes in the PFF1 cell line, whereas neither of the integrations was located in the PFF1 or PFF2 cell lines. It was hypothesized that these transgenic PFFs may be useful for conditional genomic editing in pigs, and for generating ideal modified porcine models. PMID:27430306

  4. Generation of GGTA1 biallelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Chen, HaiDe; Jong, UiMyong; Rim, CholHo; Li, WenLing; Lin, XiJuan; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Qiong; Cui, Chun; Huang, HeFeng; Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lei; Fu, ZhiXin

    2014-02-01

    Genetically modified pigs are valuable models of human disease and donors of xenotransplanted organs. Conventional gene targeting in pig somatic cells is extremely inefficient. Zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has been shown to be a powerful tool for efficiently inducing mutations in the genome. However, ZFN-mediated targeting in pigs has rarely been achieved. Here, we used ZFNs to knock out the porcine α-1, 3-galactosyl-transferase (GGTA1) gene, which generates Gal epitopes that trigger hyperacute immune rejection in pig-to-human transplantation. Primary pig fibroblasts were transfected with ZFNs targeting the coding region of GGTA1. Eighteen mono-allelic and four biallelic knockout cell clones were obtained after drug selection with efficiencies of 23.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The biallelic cells were used to produce cloned pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Three GGTA1 null piglets were born, and one knockout primary fibroblast cell line was established from a cloned fetus. Gal epitopes on GGTA1 null pig cells were completely eliminated from the cell membrane. Functionally, GGTA1 knockout cells were protected from complement-mediated immune attacks when incubated with human serum. This study demonstrated that ZFN is an efficient tool in creating gene-modified pigs. GGTA1 null pigs and GGTA1 null fetal fibroblasts would benefit research and pig-to-human transplantation. PMID:24430555

  5. MicroRNA-145 Inhibitor Significantly Improves the Development of Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhe; Xiong, Yongjie; Wang, Fengyu; Liu, Xin; Gao, Yang; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Yaping

    2016-08-01

    Directly regulating the translation of POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4, and miRNA-145 plays an important role in maintaining the pluripotency of stem cells and the development of early embryos. In the present study, the expression model of miRNA-145 on bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos were investigated and compared. Results indicated that (1) the expression level of miRNA-145 was significantly higher in SCNT embryos than that in IVF embryos after the eight-cell stage; (2) miRNA-145 negatively regulated the POU5F1, SOX2, and KLF4 in bovine embryos; (3) decreasing the expression of miRNA-145 by the miRNA-145 inhibitor significantly enhanced the expression of these three genes and the blastocyst formation rate; it also increased the total cell number and inner cell mass ratio of the bovine day 7 SCNT embryos. In conclusion, decreasing miRNA-145 expression might be a feasible means to enhance SCNT efficiency in bovines. PMID:27459582

  6. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  7. Potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer mediated transgenesis in Arbas Cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Wu, Haiqing; Ma, Yuzhen; Yuan, Jianlong; Liang, Hao; Liu, Dongjun

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer is used to generate genetic models for research and new, genetically modified livestock varieties. Goat fetal fibroblast cells (gFFCs) are the predominant nuclear donors in Cashmere goat transgenic cloning, but have disadvantages. We evaluated the potential of goat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (gADSCs) and goat skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells (gMDSCs) for somatic cell nuclear transfer, evaluating their proliferation, pluripotency, transfection efficiency and capacity to support full term development of embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. gADSCs and gMDSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion and differentiated into neurocytes, myotube cells and insulin-producing cells. Neuron-specific enolase, fast muscle myosin and insulin expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer with donor cells derived from gADSCs, gMDSCs and gFFCs, transfection and cloning efficiencies were compared. Red fluorescent protein levels were determined by quantitative PCR and western blotting. 5-Methylcytosine, H4K5, H4K12 and H3K18 were determined immunohistochemically. gADSCs and gMDSCs were maintained in culture for up to 65 passages, whereas gFFCs could be passaged barely more than 15 times. gADSCs and gMDSCs had higher fluorescent colony forming efficiency and greater convergence (20%) and cleavage (10%) rates than gFFCs, and exhibited differing H4K5 histone modification patterns after somatic cell nuclear transfer and in vitro cultivation. After transfection with a pDsRed2-1 expression plasmid, the integrated exogenous genes did not influence the pluripotency of gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1. DsRed2 mRNA expression by cloned embryos derived from gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1 was more than twice that of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 embryos (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates of gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 and gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1 recipients were higher than those of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 recipients (P

  8. Potential of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Skeletal Muscle-Derived Satellite Cells for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Mediated Transgenesis in Arbas Cashmere Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianlong; Liang, Hao; Liu, Dongjun

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer is used to generate genetic models for research and new, genetically modified livestock varieties. Goat fetal fibroblast cells (gFFCs) are the predominant nuclear donors in Cashmere goat transgenic cloning, but have disadvantages. We evaluated the potential of goat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (gADSCs) and goat skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells (gMDSCs) for somatic cell nuclear transfer, evaluating their proliferation, pluripotency, transfection efficiency and capacity to support full term development of embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. gADSCs and gMDSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion and differentiated into neurocytes, myotube cells and insulin-producing cells. Neuron-specific enolase, fast muscle myosin and insulin expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer with donor cells derived from gADSCs, gMDSCs and gFFCs, transfection and cloning efficiencies were compared. Red fluorescent protein levels were determined by quantitative PCR and western blotting. 5-Methylcytosine, H4K5, H4K12 and H3K18 were determined immunohistochemically. gADSCs and gMDSCs were maintained in culture for up to 65 passages, whereas gFFCs could be passaged barely more than 15 times. gADSCs and gMDSCs had higher fluorescent colony forming efficiency and greater convergence (20%) and cleavage (10%) rates than gFFCs, and exhibited differing H4K5 histone modification patterns after somatic cell nuclear transfer and in vitro cultivation. After transfection with a pDsRed2-1 expression plasmid, the integrated exogenous genes did not influence the pluripotency of gADSCs–pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs–pDsRed2-1. DsRed2 mRNA expression by cloned embryos derived from gADSCs–pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs–pDsRed2-1 was more than twice that of gFFCs–pDsRed2-1 embryos (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates of gADSCs–pDsRed2-1 and gMDSCs–pDsRed2-1 recipients were higher than those of gFFCs–pDsRed2

  9. Proteomic analysis of the major cellular proteins of bovine trophectoderm cell lines derived from IVP, parthenogenetic, and nuclear transfer embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear cloning of cattle is currently very inefficient in terms of the production and survival of nuclear cloned calves. Because of the great promise of using nuclear cloning technology in farm animals to genetically improve their production and quality traits, nuclear cloning in cattle, and other...

  10. Development and investigations of compact heat-transfer equipment for a nuclear power station equipped with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovko, V. F.; Dmitrieva, I. V.; Kodochigov, N. G.; Bykh, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The project of a nuclear power station the reactor coolant system of which includes a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor combined with a gas-turbine energy conversion unit supposes the use of high-efficient gas-cycle-based heat-transfer equipment. An analysis aimed at selecting the optimal heat-transfer surfaces is presented together with the results from their calculated and experimental investigation. The design features of recuperators arranged integrally with end and intermediate coolers and placed in a vertical sealed high-pressure vessel of limited sizes are considered.

  11. The expression of β-galactosidase during long-term cultured goat skin fibroblasts and the effect of donor cell passage on in vitro development of nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijun; Peng, Hui; Liu, Fang; Ma, Qun; Zhang, Wenchang

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to detect the expression of β-galactosidase during long-term cultured goat skin fibroblasts and investigate the effects of donor goat age, sex, and cell passage on senescence and the effects of donor cell passage on in vitro development of nuclear transfer embryos. The results showed that, in the same cell passage, more β-galactosidase-positive cells were detected in cells from older donors than younger donors. Irrespective of the donor age, the number of positive cells was higher in later passages from passages 20 to 50. In the same passage from 20 to 50, the β-galactosidase-positive rate was higher in cells from 5-yr female goat than 5-yr male goat. Using fibroblasts from male goats at various passages as donor cells, reconstructed embryos had similar fusion and cleavage rates, but the blastocyst rate was higher for cells at passages 10 and 20 than passage 30. In conclusion, donor goat age and cell passage had significant effects on the β-galactosidase-positive rate; also, cells from 5-yr female goat had a higher β-galactosidase-positive rate than those from 5-yr male goat, and the donor cell passage affected the developmental potential of nuclear transfer embryos. PMID:26944897

  12. Transgenic cattle produced by nuclear transfer of fetal fibroblasts carrying Ipr1 gene at a specific locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Sheng; He, Xiaoning; Du, Yue; Su, Jianmin; Gao, Mingqing; Ma, Yefei; Hua, Song; Quan, Fusheng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of the intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) transgene on preventing infection of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle. A specific expression vector for the Ipr1 gene was constructed and inserted in the genome between surfactant protein A and methionine adenosyltransferase I of bovine fetal fibroblasts. After SCNT, cleavage (86.9% vs. 87.4%, P > 0.05) and blastocyst developmental rates (34.6% vs. 33.5%, P > 0.05) were similar between transgenic and nontransgenic bovine fetal fibroblasts. Four surviving and one dead Ipr1-transgenic female cattle were produced by transfer of the SCNT blastocysts. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the Ipr1 transgene of the cattle was located at the expected site. Inserting Ipr1 gene did not affect the expression of the surrounding genes. Main death modality of M bovis-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from Ipr1-transgenic cattle was apoptosis, whereas that of PBMCs from control cattle was necrosis. In addition, the number of colony-forming units in PBMCs of Ipr1-transgenic cattle was significantly lower than that of the control cattle (P < 0.05). The finding that expression of Ipr1 transgene in PBMCs significantly increased anti-M bovis activity suggested breeding anti-M bovis cattle population by the transgenic SCNT technique could be a feasible strategy. PMID:25998271

  13. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 5: Nuclear electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study is presented. The evolution of the NEP concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines, and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  14. Specific features of corrosion damage to heat-transfer tubes of steam generators used at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemytov, D. S.; Tyapkov, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    Specific features of corrosion damage occurring to the heat-transfer tubes of steam generators used at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are considered. The results obtained from metallographic studies of flaws found in samples cut out from steam-generator tubes are analyzed. Regularities with which flaws of steam-generator tubes are distributed over the tube bundle volume are discussed. Approaches for assessing the technical state and remaining service life of steam-generator tubes are presented.

  15. Using a nano-flare probe to detect RNA in live donor cells prior to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Many transgenes are silenced in mammalian cells (donor cells used for somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]). Silencing correlated with a repressed chromatin structure or suppressed promoter, and it impeded the production of transgenic animals. Gene transcription studies in live cells are challenging because of the drawbacks of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nano-flare probes provide an effective approach to detect RNA in living cells. We used 18S RNA, a housekeeping gene, as a reference gene. This study aimed to establish a platform to detect RNA in single living donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT and to verify the safety and validity of the Nano-flare probe in order to provide a technical foundation for rescuing silenced transgenes in transgenic cloned embryos. We investigated cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts, characterized the distribution of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe in living cells and investigated the effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on the development of cloned embryos after SCNT. The cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts was dose-dependent, and 18S RNA was detected using the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe. In addition, treating donor cells with 500 pM 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe did not have adverse effects on the development of SCNT embryos at the pre-implantation stage. In conclusion, we established a preliminary platform to detect RNA in live donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT. PMID:26109144

  16. Ultrastructural comparison of porcine putative embryonic stem cells derived by in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyunju; Kim, Eunhye; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Yoon, Junchul David; Jeon, Yubyeol; Park, Kyu-Mi; Kim, Kyu-Jun; Jin, Minghui; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Eunsong; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Gonhyung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2016-04-22

    The ultrastructure of porcine putative embryonic stem cells and porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The aim of this study was to compare the features of organelles in in vitro fertilization (IVF) derived porcine embryonic stem cells (IVF-pESCs) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) derived pESCs (SCNT-pESCs). Also, the features of organelles in high-passage IVF-pESCs were compared with those in low-passage cells. The ultrastructure of PFFs showed rare microvilli on the cell surfaces, polygonal or irregular nuclei with one to two reticular-shaped nucleoli and euchromatin, low cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratios, rare ribosomes, rare rough endoplasmic reticulum, elongated mitochondria, rich lysosomes and rich phagocytic vacuoles. IVF-pESCs showed rare microvilli on the cell surfaces, round or irregular nuclei with one to two reticular-shaped nucleoli and euchromatin, low cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratios, rich ribosomes, long stacks of rough endoplasmic reticulum, elongated mitochondria, rare lysosomes and rare autophagic vacuoles. By contrast, SCNT-pESCs showed rich microvilli with various lengths and frequencies on the cell surfaces, polygonal nuclei with one reticular shaped nucleoli and heterochromatin, high cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratios, rare ribosomes, rare rough endoplasmic reticulum, round mitochondria, rich lysosomes and rich phagocytic vacuoles with clear intercellular junctions. Furthermore, high-passage IVF-pESCs showed irregularly shaped colonies, pyknosis and numerous lysosomes associated with autophagic vacuoles showing signs of apoptosis. In conclusion, this study confirms that the ultrastructural characteristics of pESCs differ depending on their origin. These ultrastructural characteristics might be useful in biomedical research using pESCs, leading to new insights regarding regenerative medicine and tissue repair. PMID:26821870

  17. Plutonium from Above-Ground Nuclear Tests in Milk Teeth: Investigation of Placental Transfer in Children Born between 1951 and 1995 in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Froidevaux, Pascal; Haldimann, Max

    2008-01-01

    Background Occupational risks, the present nuclear threat, and the potential danger associated with nuclear power have raised concerns regarding the metabolism of plutonium in pregnant women. Objective We measured plutonium levels in the milk teeth of children born between 1951 and 1995 to assess the potential risk that plutonium incorporated by pregnant women might pose to the radiosensitive tissues of the fetus through placenta transfer. Methods We used milk teeth, whose enamel is formed during pregnancy, to investigate the transfer of plutonium from the mother’s blood plasma to the fetus. We measured plutonium using sensitive sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. We compared our results with those of a previous study on strontium-90 (90Sr) released into the atmosphere after nuclear bomb tests. Results Results show that plutonium activity peaks in the milk teeth of children born about 10 years before the highest recorded levels of plutonium fallout. By contrast, 90Sr, which is known to cross the placenta barrier, manifests differently in milk teeth, in accordance with 90Sr fallout deposition as a function of time. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that plutonium found in milk teeth is caused by fallout that was inhaled around the time the milk teeth were shed and not from any accumulation during pregnancy through placenta transfer. Thus, plutonium may not represent a radiologic risk for the radiosensitive tissues of the fetus. PMID:19079728

  18. Coherence in electron transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence). PMID:23833692

  19. Interaction between yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes: null alleles of RTG genes affect resistance to the alkaloid lycorine in rho0 petites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Wolf, Klaus

    2005-07-18

    Some nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) respond to signals from the mitochondria in a process called by Butow (Cell Death Differ. 9 (2002) 1043-1045) retrograde regulation. Expression of these genes is activated in cells lacking mitochondrial function by involvement of RTG1, RTG2 and RTG3 genes whose protein products bind to "R-boxes" in the promoter region; RTG2p is a cytoplasmic protein. Since S. cerevisiae rho0 strains, lacking the entire mitochondrial genome, are resistant to lycorine, an alkaloid extracted from Amaryllis plants, it could be hypothesized that in rho0 cells the dysfunctional mitochondrial status stimulates overexpression of nuclear genes very likely involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication. In this report we show that the resistance of rho0 cells to lycorine is affected by the deletion of RTG genes. PMID:15893890

  20. Arabidopsis NMD3 Is Required for Nuclear Export of 60S Ribosomal Subunits and Affects Secondary Cell Wall Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Qin; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Bao-Cai; Nan, Jie; Li, Xia; Liu, Na; Qu, Hong; Lu, Cong-Ming; Sudmorgen; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2012-01-01

    NMD3 is required for nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit in yeast and vertebrate cells, but no corresponding function of NMD3 has been reported in plants. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana NMD3 (AtNMD3) showed a similar function in the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Interference with AtNMD3 function by overexpressing a truncated dominant negative form of the protein lacking the nuclear export signal sequence caused retainment of the 60S ribosomal subunits in the nuclei. More interestingly, the transgenic Arabidopsis with dominant negative interference of AtNMD3 function showed a striking failure of secondary cell wall thickening, consistent with the altered expression of related genes and composition of cell wall components. Observation of a significant decrease of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in the differentiating interfascicular fiber cells of the transgenic plant stems suggested a link between the defective nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and the abnormal formation of the secondary cell wall. These findings not only clarified the evolutionary conservation of NMD3 functions in the nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits in yeast, animals and plants, but also revealed a new facet of the regulatory mechanism underlying secondary cell wall thickening in Arabidopsis. This new facet is that the nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and the formation of RER may play regulatory roles in coordinating protein synthesis in cytoplasm and transcription in nuclei. PMID:22558264

  1. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls in an urban riparian zone affected by wastewater treatment plant effluent and the transfer to terrestrial compartment by invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junchao; Wang, Thanh; Han, Shanlong; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a riparian zone affected by the effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). River water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates and samples from the surrounding terrestrial compartment such as soil, reed plants and several land based invertebrates were collected. A relatively narrow range of δ(13)C values was found among most invertebrates (except butterflies, grasshoppers), indicating a similar energy source. The highest concentration of total PCBs was observed in zooplankton (151.1 ng/g lipid weight), and soil dwelling invertebrates showed higher concentrations than phytophagous insects at the riparian zone. The endobenthic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex (54.28 ng/g lw) might be a useful bioindicator of WWTP derived PCBs contamination. High bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were observed in collected aquatic invertebrates, although the biota-sediment/soil accumulation factors (BSAF) remained relatively low. Emerging aquatic insects such as chironomids could carry waterborne PCBs to the terrestrial compartment via their lifecycles. The estimated annual flux of PCBs for chironomids ranged from 0.66 to 265 ng⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1). Although a high prevalence of PCB-11 and PCB-28 was found for most aquatic based samples in this riparian zone, the mid-chlorinated congeners (e.g. PCB-153 and PCB-138) became predominant among chironomids and dragonflies as well as soil dwelling invertebrates, which might suggest a selective biodriven transfer of different PCB congeners. PMID:23811358

  2. Interspecies nuclear transfer using fibroblasts from leopard, tiger, and lion ear piece collected postmortem as donor cells and rabbit oocytes as recipients.

    PubMed

    Yelisetti, Uma Mahesh; Komjeti, Suman; Katari, Venu Charan; Sisinthy, Shivaji; Brahmasani, Sambasiva Rao

    2016-06-01

    Skin fibroblast cells were obtained from a small piece of an ear of leopard, lion, and tiger collected postmortem and attempts were made to synchronize the skin fibroblasts at G0/G1 of cell cycle using three different approaches. Efficiency of the approaches was tested following interspecies nuclear transfer with rabbit oocytes as recipient cytoplasm. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that the proportion of G0/G1 cells increased significantly (P < 0.05) when cells subjected to serum starvation, contact inhibition, and 3 mM sodium butyrate (NaBu) treatment when compared with cycling cells. However, 3 mM NaBu treatment caused alterations in cell morphology and increase in dead cells. Thus, interspecies nuclear transfer was carried out using fibroblast cells subjected to contact inhibition for 72 h, serum starvation for 48 h, and cells treated with 1.0 mM NaBu for 48 h. The fusion rates, the proportion of fused couplets that cleaved to two-cell and developed to blastocyst, were highest in all three species when the donor cells were treated with 1.0 mM NaBu for 48 h. But, the blastocyst percentage of interspecies nuclear embryos (5-6%) was significantly lower when compared with rabbit-rabbit nuclear transfer embryos (22.9%). In conclusion, fibroblast cells of leopard, lion, and tiger were successfully synchronized and used for the development of blastocysts using rabbit oocytes as recipient cytoplasm. PMID:27071624

  3. Embryo aggregation does not improve the development of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Andrés; De Stéfano, Adrián; Jarazo, Javier; Buemo, Carla; Karlanian, Florencia; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-09-01

    The low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) makes it necessary to investigate new strategies to improve embryonic developmental competence. Embryo aggregation has been successfully applied to improve cloning efficiency in mammals, but it remains unclear whether it could also be beneficial for iSCNT. In this study, we first compared the effect of embryo aggregation over in vitro development and blastocyst quality of porcine, bovine, and feline zona-free (ZF) parthenogenetic (PA) embryos to test the effects of embryo aggregation on species that were later used as enucleated oocytes donors in our iSCNT study. We then assessed whether embryo aggregation could improve the in vitro development of ZF equine iSCNT embryos after reconstruction with porcine, bovine, and feline ooplasm. Bovine- and porcine-aggregated PA blastocysts had significantly larger diameters compared with nonaggregated embryos. On the other hand, feline- and bovine-aggregated PA embryos had higher blastocyst cell number. Embryo aggregation of equine-equine SCNT was found to be beneficial for embryo development as we have previously reported, but the aggregation of three ZF reconstructed embryos did not improve embryo developmental rates on iSCNT. In vitro embryo development of nonaggregated iSCNT was predominantly arrested around the stage when transcriptional activation of the embryonic genome is reported to start on the embryo of the donor species. Nevertheless, independent of embryo aggregation, equine blastocyst-like structures could be obtained in our study using domestic feline-enucleated oocytes. Taken together, these results reported that embryo aggregation enhance in vitro PA embryo development and embryo quality but effects vary depending on the species. Embryo aggregation also improves, as expected, the in vitro embryo development of equine-equine SCNT embryos; however, we did not observe positive effects on equine iSCNT embryo development. Among oocytes

  4. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  5. Technical aspects of the piezo, laser-assisted, and conventional methods for nuclear transfer of mouse oocytes and their efficiency and efficacy: Piezo minimizes damage of the ooplasmic membrane at injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shee-Uan; Chao, Kuang-Han; Chang, Chia-Yi; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2004-04-01

    Assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of the piezo, laser, and conventional methods for nuclear transfer has remained elusive. Furthermore, although the piezo method had been used by some investigators for research of sperm injection and nuclear transfer for several years, many researchers have failed to operate the technique smoothly and achieve reproducible results. The procedures of nuclear transfer using piezo were ascertained and described in detail. Mouse oocytes were enucleated, and injected with cumulus cells using the piezo, laser, or conventional methods. We investigated the time needed and survival of nuclear transfer. Development was compared among the three methods and parthenogenetic control specimens. The average time of nuclear transfer for each oocyte was significantly shorter using the piezo (118 +/- 9 s) and laser methods (120 +/- 11 s) than using the conventional method (170 +/- 11 s). The damage rate was smaller for the piezo group (10%) than the laser (37%) and conventional (40%) groups. The percentages of blastocyst formation (14%, 12%, and 11%) and the number of nuclei of blastocysts (54 +/- 13, 51 +/- 11, and 52 +/- 12) were similar among the piezo, laser, and conventional groups, but significantly lower than for the control group (83%, 105 +/- 14). The piezo technique is more efficient than the conventional method for nuclear transfer. The laser method is easy to operate, but the equipment is expensive. In addition, piezo induced fewer traumas while breaking the membrane than the aspiration techniques used in the laser and conventional methods. PMID:15039993

  6. Some Ways in Which Neighborhoods, Nuclear Families, Friendship Groups, and Schools Jointly Affect Changes in Early Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas D.; Herman, Melissa R.; Phillips, Meredith; Settersten, Richard A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed how schools, neighborhoods, nuclear families, and friendship groups jointly contribute to positive change during early adolescence. Analyses showed that the four context indices modestly intercorrelated at the individual student level, but clustered more tightly at the school and neighborhood levels. Joint influence of all four…

  7. Effect of nuclear factor κB inhibition on serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) minidystrophin gene transfer to the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Reay, Daniel P; Niizawa, Gabriela A; Watchko, Jon F; Daood, Molly; Reay, Ja'Nean C; Raggi, Eugene; Clemens, Paula R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy studies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have focused on viral vector-mediated gene transfer to provide therapeutic protein expression or treatment with drugs to limit dystrophic changes in muscle. The pathological activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway has emerged as an important cause of dystrophic muscle changes in muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB may inhibit gene transfer by promoting inflammation in response to the transgene or vector. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of pathological NF-κB activation in muscle would complement the therapeutic benefits of dystrophin gene transfer in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Systemic gene transfer using serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) vectors is promising for treatment of preclinical models of DMD because of vector tropism to cardiac and skeletal muscle. In quadriceps of C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J (mdx) mice, the addition of octalysine (8K)-NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (8K-NBD) peptide treatment to AAV9 minidystrophin gene delivery resulted in increased levels of recombinant dystrophin expression suggesting that 8K-NBD treatment promoted an environment in muscle tissue conducive to higher levels of expression. Indices of necrosis and regeneration were diminished with AAV9 gene delivery alone and to a greater degree with the addition of 8K-NBD treatment. In diaphragm muscle, high-level transgene expression was achieved with AAV9 minidystoophin gene delivery alone; therefore, improvements in histological and physiological indices were comparable in the two treatment groups. The data support benefit from 8K-NBD treatment to complement gene transfer therapy for DMD in muscle tissue that receives incomplete levels of transduction by gene transfer, which may be highly significant for clinical applications of muscle gene delivery. PMID:22231732

  8. ATP synthesis and degradation rates in the perfused rat heart. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance double saturation transfer measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, R G; Balschi, J A; Leigh, J S; Ingwall, J S

    1988-01-01

    A limitation of magnetization transfer techniques for studying enzyme kinetics in vivo has been the difficulty of treating systems with more than two exchanging species. This problem was addressed in the original papers describing saturation transfer. Since then, a number of approaches have been devised to study these complex situations. Here, we present a method based on the transient saturation transfer experiment in which spin-lattice relaxation time constants and reaction rates are obtained from the same magnetization transfer data. This technique is particularly suitable for biological samples. We apply the method to evaluate flux balance in the three-site linear exchange network composed of ATP, creatine phosphate, and inorganic phosphate in the isolated, perfused rat heart and show that the method yields reasonable values for the reaction velocities of ATP synthesis and degradation. PMID:3242635

  9. Leishmania major Telomerase TERT Protein Has a Nuclear/Mitochondrial Eclipsed Distribution That Is Affected by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Campelo, Riward; Díaz Lozano, Isabel; Figarella, Katherine; Osuna, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In its canonical role the reverse transcriptase telomerase recovers the telomeric repeats that are lost during DNA replication. Other locations and activities have been recently described for the telomerase protein subunit TERT in mammalian cells. In the present work, using biochemistry, molecular biology, and electron microscopy techniques, we found that in the human parasite Leishmania major, TERT (and telomerase activity) shared locations between the nuclear, mitochondrial, and cytoplasmic compartments. Also, some telomerase activity and TERT protein could be found in ∼100-nm nanovesicles. In the mitochondrial compartment, TERT appears to be mainly associated with the kinetoplast DNA. When Leishmania cells were exposed to H2O2, TERT changed its relative abundance and activity between the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments, with the majority of activity residing in the mitochondrion. Finally, overexpression of TERT in Leishmania transfected cells not only increased the parasitic cell growth rate but also increased their resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:25312950

  10. A comprehensive dose evaluation project concerning animals affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident: its set-up and progress.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shintaro; Inoue, Kazuya; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Gohei; Shiga, Soichiro; Fukumoto, Motoi; Kino, Yasushi; Sekine, Tsutomu; Abe, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Isogai, Emiko; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    It is not an exaggeration to say that, without nuclear accidents or the analysis of radiation therapy, there is no way in which we are able to quantify radiation effects on humans. Therefore, the livestock abandoned in the ex-evacuation zone and euthanized due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident are extremely valuable for analyzing the environmental pollution, its biodistribution, the metabolism of radionuclides, dose evaluation and the influence of internal exposure. We, therefore, sought to establish an archive system and to open it to researchers for increasing our understanding of radiation biology and improving protection against radiation. The sample bank of animals affected by the FNPP accident consists of frozen tissue samples, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, dose of radionuclides deposited, etc., with individual sampling data. PMID:26687285

  11. A comprehensive dose evaluation project concerning animals affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident: its set-up and progress

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shintaro; Inoue, Kazuya; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Gohei; Shiga, Soichiro; Fukumoto, Motoi; Kino, Yasushi; Sekine, Tsutomu; Abe, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Isogai, Emiko; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    It is not an exaggeration to say that, without nuclear accidents or the analysis of radiation therapy, there is no way in which we are able to quantify radiation effects on humans. Therefore, the livestock abandoned in the ex-evacuation zone and euthanized due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident are extremely valuable for analyzing the environmental pollution, its biodistribution, the metabolism of radionuclides, dose evaluation and the influence of internal exposure. We, therefore, sought to establish an archive system and to open it to researchers for increasing our understanding of radiation biology and improving protection against radiation. The sample bank of animals affected by the FNPP accident consists of frozen tissue samples, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, dose of radionuclides deposited, etc., with individual sampling data. PMID:26687285

  12. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 3: Nuclear thermal rocket vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the NTR concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  13. A Study of the Constraints Affecting Resumption in Turkish and Mandarin Chinese Relative Clauses, and the Transfer of These Constraints to English as a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitz, John

    2012-01-01

    Odlin (2003) observes that there is no consensus among researchers regarding the importance of L1 transfer in second-language acquisition (henceforth SLA). To test whether L1 transfer is a significant factor in SLA of English relative clauses (RCs), an English-language acceptability judgment task (AJT) with a four-point rating scale was…

  14. Post-translational regulation and nuclear entry of TIMELESS and PERIOD are affected in new timeless mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Taichi; Koh, Kyunghee; Combs, David J.; Sehgal, Amita

    2011-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock consists of a feedback loop in which canonical clock proteins negatively regulate transcription of their own genes. Timed nuclear entry of these proteins is critical, but regulation of this event is poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the idea that nuclear entry of PERIOD (PER) is controlled by its partner protein, TIMELESS (TIM), has been challenged by several studies. We identify here a novel mutation in the tim gene that eliminates behavioral rhythms while allowing robust expression of TIM and PER. Mutant TIM can bind to and stabilize PER. However, neither protein is expressed cyclically, and phosphorylation of both is reduced. In addition, TIM and PER are localized in the cytoplasm at all times of day and mutant TIM attenuates transcriptional feedback by PER in cultured cells, suggesting that it holds PER in the cytoplasm. In fact, much of the reduced phosphorylation of PER in the new tim mutant appears to result from the cytoplasmic localization of PER. Interestingly, mutating a threonine near the original mutation produces similar phenotypes, raising the possibility that defective phosphorylation is the basis of TIM dysfunction in the novel tim mutant. We also show that a stable form of PER is cytoplasmic in tim-null flies. These studies establish an essential role of TIM in the timed nuclear entry of PER. PMID:21734289

  15. Chemically Assisted Enucleation Results in Higher G6PD Expression in Early Bovine Female Embryos Obtained by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Clara Slade; Tetzner, Tatiane Almeida Drummond; de Lima, Marina Ragagnin; de Melo, Danilas Salinet; Niciura, Simone Cristina Méo; Garcia, Joaquim Mansano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite extensive efforts, low efficiency is still an issue in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The hypothesis of our study was that the use of cytoplasts produced by chemically assisted enucleation (EN) would improve nuclear reprogramming in nuclear transfer (NT)–derived embryos because it results in lower damage and higher cytoplasm content than conventional EN. For that purpose, we investigated the expression of two X-linked genes: X inactive-specific transcript (XIST) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In the first experiment, gene expression was assessed in day-7 female blastocysts from embryonic cell NT (ECNT) groups [conventional, ECNT conv; chemically assisted, ECNT deme (demecolcine)]. Whereas in the ECNT conv group, only one embryo (25%; n=4) expressed XIST transcripts, most embryos showed XIST expression (75%; n=4) in the ECNT deme group. However, no significant differences in transcript abundance of XIST and G6PD were found when comparing the embryos from all groups. In a second experiment using somatic cells as nuclear donors, we evaluated gene expression profiles in female SCNT-derived embryos. No significant differences in relative abundance (RA) of XIST transcripts were observed among the groups. Nonetheless, higher (p<0.05) levels of G6PD were observed in SCNT deme and in vitro–derived groups in comparison to SCNT conv. To know whether higher G6PD expression in embryos derived from SCNT chemically assisted EN indicates higher metabolism in embryos considered of superior quality or if the presence of higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels generated by the increased oxygen consumption triggers G6PD activation, the expression of genes related to stress response should be investigated in embryos produced by that technique. PMID:22908977

  16. Absence of internal radiation contamination by radioactive cesium among children affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Morita, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Amina; Gilmour, Stuart; Kami, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic internal radiation contamination accounts for a substantial fraction of long-term cumulative radiation exposure among residents in radiation-contaminated areas. However, little information is available on ongoing chronic internal radiation contamination among residents near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Using a whole body counter, internal radiation contamination levels among elementary and middle school students who commute to 22 schools located within Minamisoma city were assessed between May and July 2013 (26 to 28 mo after the disaster). Of 3,299 elementary and middle school students in the city, 3,255 individuals (98%) were screened through school health check-ups. Not a single student was detected with internal radiation contamination due to radioactive cesium. The study found no risk of chronic internal radiation exposure among residents near the crippled nuclear power plant. Current food inspection by local governments, volunteers, and farmers has been functioning well within Fukushima prefecture. However, food management by screening suspected contamination along with whole body counter screening are key public health interventions and should be continued to avoid further internal radiation exposure in radiation-contaminated areas. PMID:25437518

  17. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  18. Operational level for unconditional release of contaminated property from affected areas around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Haruyuki; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the surface contamination control of slightly contaminated property after the Fukushima nuclear accident. The operational level for the unconditional release of contaminated properties is calculated in counts per minute (cpm) to enable the use of a typical Geiger-Muller (GM) survey meter with a 50-mm bore, on the basis of the surficial clearance level of 10 Bq cm−2 for 134Cs and 137Cs derived in the previous studies of the authors. By applying a factor for the conversion of the unit surface contamination to the count rate of a survey meter widely used after the Fukushima accident, the operational level for the unconditional release of contaminated properties was calculated to be 2300 cpm on average and 23 000 cpm at the highest-contamination part. The calculated numerical values of the operational levels are effective as long as the typical GM survey meter is used in the radiation measurement. PMID:23778575

  19. 'CATT' A project on Co-operation and Technology Transfer on Long-Term Radioactive Waste Management for EU Member States with Small Nuclear Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieson, J.; Lindberg, C.

    2006-07-01

    Many of the European Union's (EU) 25 countries have considerable inventories of long-lived radioactive waste that will remain potentially hazardous for many thousands of years. Of these, several have advanced concepts and programmes for the treatment and disposal (and other long - term management options) for spent fuel and long-lived radioactive waste. Collectively, these Member States have spent the equivalent of many billions of euros in developing such concepts and some have further developed the concepts into proposed operational facilities. Member States with small nuclear programmes, face the expensive and daunting prospect o f developing their own concepts for dealing with their spent fuel and high level waste. One answer would be to seek solutions which could take advantage of the investment costs in the technology and underpinning science already incurred in the more established programmes. Thus technology transfer between Member States in areas of high level waste and spent fuel encapsulation, repository development etc. would allow the establishment of disposal facilities within any Member State for it to deal with its own wastes. The national waste management organisations of the UK (Mirex), Sweden (SKB), German y (DBE), Lithuania (RATA), Bulgaria (DPRAO) and Slovenia (ARAO), together with JRC of the Netherlands, are to undertake a project under the auspices of the EU's 6. R and D Framework Programme (FP6). The 18 month project will examine the technical, intellectual property, legal, financial and societal implications of the idea. It goes by the acronym 'CATT' - 'Cooperation and technology transfer on long term radioactive waste management for Member States with small nuclear programmes'. This paper describes the CATT project which will look at technology transfer methodologies by which Member States could co-operate. It covers the potential issues which may arise and ho w these may be addressed. (authors)

  20. Topographical analysis of regulatory and metal ion binding sites on glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli: 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence energy transfer study

    PubMed Central

    Villafranca, J. J.; Rhee, S. G.; Chock, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance signals from the [2-13C]ATP adenylylated glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming); EC 6.3.1.2] from Escherichia coli was measured. This effect permitted the determination of distances from the 2-C position and the phosphorus of covalently bound AMP to the two Mn(II) binding sites, n1 and n2. Binding of Mn(II) to the n1 site converts an inactive apo-enzyme to its active form, while the metal ion bound at n2 occupies the metal-nucleotide substrate site. The distances from Mn(II) at the n1 and n2 sites to phosphorus are ∼10 and ∼7 Å and to the 2-C position of the adenine ring are ∼12 and ∼11 Å, respectively. The fluorescence energy transfer method was used to determine distances between Co(II) at n1 and n2 and the adenylyl site. For this experiment the enzyme was adenylylated with ε-ATP. The distances between ε-adenine and Co(II) at n1 and n2 are ∼13 and ∼11 Å, respectively. Quantitation of the paramagnetic effect due to Co(II) on the 31P nuclear magnetic resonance signal yielded values of 8 and 6 Å for the distances between the phosphorus of the covalently bound AMP and the n1 and n2 sites, respectively. The results reveal that the covalent modification site is very close to the catalytic center of the enzyme. In this study both nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence energy transfer techniques have been used to determine distances between the same set of sites on an enzyme surface. PMID:26053

  1. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are an Attractive Donor Cell Type for Production of Cloned Pigs As Well As Genetically Modified Cloned Pigs by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zicong; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liwen; Shi, Junsong; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique has been widely applied to clone pigs or to produce genetically modified pigs. Currently, this technique relies mainly on using terminally differentiated fibroblasts as donor cells. To improve cloning efficiency, only partially differentiated multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), thought to be more easily reprogrammed to a pluripotent state, have been used as nuclear donors in pig SCNT. Although in vitro–cultured embryos cloned from porcine MSCs (MSCs-embryos) were shown to have higher preimplantation developmental ability than cloned embryos reconstructed from fibroblasts (Fs-embryos), the difference in in vivo full-term developmental rate between porcine MSCs-embryos and Fs-embryos has not been investigated so far. In this study, we demonstrated that blastocyst total cell number and full-term survival abilities of MSCs-embryos were significantly higher than those of Fs-embryos cloned from the same donor pig. The enhanced developmental potential of MSCs-embryos may be associated with their nuclear donors' DNA methylation profile, because we found that the methylation level of imprinting genes and repeat sequences differed between MSCs and fibroblasts. In addition, we showed that use of transgenic porcine MSCs generated from transgene plasmid transfection as donor cells for SCNT can produce live transgenic cloned pigs. These results strongly suggest that porcine bone marrow MSCs are a desirable donor cell type for production of cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs via SCNT. PMID:24033142

  2. DOCUMENTATION OF NATIONAL WEATHER CONDITIONS AFFECTING LONG-TERM DEGRADATION OF COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Poe, Jr.; P.F. Wise

    1998-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a proposal to construct, operate 2nd monitor, and eventually close a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, for the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). As part of this effort, DOE has prepared a viability assessment and an assessment of potential consequences that may exist if the repository is not constructed. The assessment of potential consequences if the repository is not constructed assumes that all SNF and HLW would be left at the generator sites. These include 72 commercial generator sites (three commercial facility pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine Mile Point, and Dresden and Morris--would share common storage due to their close proximity to each other) and five DOE sites across the country. DOE analyzed the environmental consequences of the effects of the continued storage of these materials at these sites in a report titled Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR; Reference 1 ) . The CSAR analysis includes a discussion of the degradation of these materials when exposed to the environment. This document describes the environmental parameters that influence the degradation analyzed in the CSAR. These include temperature, relative humidity, precipitation chemistry (pH and chemical composition), annual precipitation rates, annual number of rain-days, and annual freeze/thaw cycles. The document also tabulates weather conditions for each storage site, evaluates the degradation of concrete storage modules and vaults in different regions of the country, and provides a thermal analysis of commercial SNF in storage.

  3. Theories Supporting Transfer of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews theories about factors affecting the transfer of training, including theories on motivation (expectancy, equity, goal setting), training transfer design (identical elements, principle, near and far), and transfer climate (organizational). (Contains 36 references.) (SK)

  4. Erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity: genetic analysis in nuclear families with one child affected by Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brahe, C; Serra, A; Morton, N E

    1985-06-01

    Erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was measured in 142 members of 32 nuclear families in which one child had Down syndrome (DS). The mean activity in subjects with trisomy 21 appears higher than in parents and sibs, though not significantly so. However, this fact does not seem to modify the properties expected for a trait genetically controlled in a diploid population. The commingling analysis of the COMT activity in the whole group, and in each subgroup of relatives, suggests a mixture of two or, more likely, three components, the latter being in agreement with a transmission model of genes without dominance. The most parsimonious hypothesis supported by the mixed model segregation analysis is that of an additive major locus (d = 0.5) with an estimated frequency of 0.40 +/- 0.03 for the COMTH gene, to which a small polygenic effect (H = 0.067) can be added. This hypothesis is supported further by the analysis of family resemblance, r = 0.45 +/- 0.12 being the maximum likelihood estimator of the intraclass correlation among sibs. The higher COMT activity in DS subjects may reflect a situation of general enzyme disorder only indirectly connected with trisomy of chromosome 21. PMID:3160238

  5. Zearalenone Mycotoxin Affects Immune Mediators, MAPK Signalling Molecules, Nuclear Receptors and Genome-Wide Gene Expression in Pig Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Braicu, Cornelia; Motiu, Monica; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Stancu, Mariana; Calin, Loredana; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4) cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs), as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs) and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN). Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β) and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level. PMID:26011631

  6. Zearalenone mycotoxin affects immune mediators, MAPK signalling molecules, nuclear receptors and genome-wide gene expression in pig spleen.

    PubMed

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Braicu, Cornelia; Motiu, Monica; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Stancu, Mariana; Calin, Loredana; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4) cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs), as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs) and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN). Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β) and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level. PMID:26011631

  7. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone. PMID:27377355

  8. Concentration of radionuclides in hydrosphere affected by Temelín Nuclear Power Plant in Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Hanslík, E; Ivanovová, D; Jedináková-Krízová, V; Juranová, E; Simonek, P

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents results of a long-term field study of the possible impact of Temelín NPP on the Vltava and Elbe Rivers. The study was divided into 2 stages: before and after the operation of the NPP. The main goal of the investigation before the operation (1989-2000) was to determine the background levels of radionuclides resulting from the tests of nuclear weapons and the Chernobyl accident for different components of the environment. The paper discusses also the risk of a river radioactive contamination due to the tritium discharges in wastewater from Temelín NPP. During the operation period of 2001-2006, the results of the monitoring did not detect any impact of Temelín NPP on the concentrations of activation and fission products in the hydrosphere, apart from tritium. The annual average tritium concentrations in the Vltava River correspond with the previously calculated predictions for the conditions of the average and minimum guaranteed flows. The maximum concentration of tritium of 26.6 Bq/l in Vltava River at Prague was observed after dry period in 2003. PMID:19419807

  9. Genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins localized in the conjugative transfer region of plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 participate in modulating transfer and affect conjugation from different donors

    PubMed Central

    López-Fuentes, Eunice; Torres-Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Cervantes, Laura; Brom, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Among sequenced genomes, it is common to find a high proportion of genes encoding proteins that cannot be assigned a known function. In bacterial genomes, genes related to a similar function are often located in contiguous regions. The presence of genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins (chp) in such a region may suggest that they are related to that particular function. Plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 is a conjugative plasmid containing a segment of approximately 30 Kb encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer. In addition to genes responsible for Dtr (DNA transfer and replication), Mpf (Mating pair formation) and regulation, it has two chp-encoding genes (RHE_PA00163 and RHE_PA00164) and a transcriptional regulator (RHE_PA00165). RHE_PA00163 encodes an uncharacterized protein conserved in bacteria that presents a COG4634 conserved domain, and RHE_PA00164 encodes an uncharacterized conserved protein with a DUF433 domain of unknown function. RHE_PA00165 presents a HTH_XRE domain, characteristic of DNA-binding proteins belonging to the xenobiotic response element family of transcriptional regulators. Interestingly, genes similar to these are also present in transfer regions of plasmids from other bacteria. To determine if these genes participate in conjugative transfer, we mutagenized them and analyzed their conjugative phenotype. A mutant in RHE_PA00163 showed a slight (10 times) but reproducible increase in transfer frequency from Rhizobium donors, while mutants in RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 lost their ability to transfer the plasmid from some Agrobacterium donors. Our results indicate that the chp-encoding genes located among conjugation genes are indeed related to this function. However, the participation of RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 is only revealed under very specific circumstances, and is not perceived when the plasmid is transferred from the original host. RHE_PA00163 seems to be a fine-tuning modulator for conjugative transfer

  10. Dynamic epigenetic regulation of the Oct4 and Nanog regulatory regions during neural differentiation in rhesus nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Ying; Chang, Eun-Ah; Knott, Jason G; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-12-01

    Oct4 and Nanog are crucial for maintaining pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells and early-stage embryos. In the present study, the status of DNA methylation and of histone modifications in the regulatory regions of Oct4 and Nanog in rhesus nuclear transfer-derived ES (ntES) cells was compared with in vitro fertilized embryo-derived ES (IVFES) cell counterparts. Dynamic changes in DNA methylation during differentiation into neural lineage were also monitored and correlated with mRNA abundance and protein levels of both genes. In ntES cells Oct4 exhibited mono-allelic methylation along with relatively lower mRNA levels, and its transcription was seen predominantly from the unmethylated allele. In contrast, in IVFES cells Oct4 was hypomethylated on both alleles and had relatively higher transcript levels, suggesting incomplete reprogramming of DNA methylation on the Oct4 gene following somatic cell nuclear transfer. During neuronal differentiation, Oct4 underwent biallelic methylation and reduced amounts of Oct4 mRNA were detected in both types of ES cells. Analysis of Nanog regulatory regions revealed that both alleles were hypomethylated and similar levels of Nanog transcripts were expressed in ntES cells and IVFES cells. During neuronal differentiation both alleles were methylated and reduced amounts of Nanog mRNA were detected. Other epigenetic modifications including histone 3 lysine 4, 9, and 27 trimethylation (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3) showed similar patterns around the regulatory regions of Oct4 and Nanog in both kinds of ES cells. During neural differentiation, dramatic enrichment of H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 (repressive marks) was observed on Oct4 and Nanog regulatory regions. Differentiation of ntES and IVFES cells correlated with the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog, reactivation of the neural marker genes Pax6, N-Oct3, and Olig2, and dynamic changes in histone modifications in the upstream regions of Pax6 and N-Oct3. In short, although ES cells derived

  11. Analysis on radiocesium concentration in rivers that have catchment areas affected by the fallout from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Onda, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Due to Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radioactive materials including Cs-134 and Cs-137 were widely distributed in surrounded area. The radiocesiums have been transported in river networks. This study showed the monitoring results of radiocesium concentration in river waters and suspended sediments in Abukuma river basin and smaller coastal river catchments. The monitoring started at 6 sites from June 2011. Subsequently, additional 24 monitoring sites were installed between October 2012 and January 2013. Flow and turbidity (for calculation of suspended sediment concentration) were measured at each site, while suspended sediments and river water were collected every one or half month to measure Cs-134 and Cs-137 activity concentrations by gamma spectrometry. Activity concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs- 137 on suspended sediments were generally decreasing at all sites. The decreasing rate changed lower at about one year later from the accident. Activity concentration in river waters also showed the same tendency although there are only few data within 1 year from the accident. Activity concentrations measured at the same day are proportional to the mean catchment inventory. Therefore, the activity concentration can be normalized by the mean catchment inventory. The normalized activity can be fitted to following double exponential function: [At] = 1.551 exp (-5.265t) + 0.069 exp (-0.266 t), where t [year] is the time from the accident. There is no time evolution of Kd between suspended sediments and river water. Instead, Kd was varied spatially. Although the reason of the spatial variation is not clear for now, geology of the catchment (i.e. mineral composition of suspended particles) seems to relate to the variation.

  12. Nuclear α Spectrin Differentially Affects Monoubiquitinated Versus Non-Ubiquitinated FANCD2 Function After DNA Interstrand Cross-Link Damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan; Sridharan, Deepa; Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-03-01

    Nonerythroid α spectrin (αIISp) and the Fanconi anemia (FA) protein, FANCD2, play critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair during S phase. Both are needed for recruitment of repair proteins, such as XPF, to sites of damage and repair of ICLs. However, the relationship between them in ICL repair and whether αIISp is involved in FANCD2's function in repair is unclear. The present studies show that, after ICL formation, FANCD2 disassociates from αIISp and localizes, before αIISp, at sites of damage in nuclear foci. αIISp and FANCD2 foci do not co-localize, in contrast to our previous finding that αIISp and the ICL repair protein, XPF, co-localize and follow a similar time course for formation. Knock-down of αIISp has no effect on monoubiquitination of FANCD2 (FANCD2-Ub) or its localization to chromatin or foci, though it leads to decreased ICL repair. Studies using cells from FA patients, defective in ICL repair and αIISp, have elucidated an important role for αIISp in the function of non-Ub FANCD2. In FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells, in which FANCD2 is not monoubiquitinated and does not form damage-induced foci, we demonstrate that restoration of αIISp levels to normal, by knocking down the protease μ-calpain, leads to formation of non-Ub FANCD2 foci after ICL damage. Since restoration of αIISp levels in FA-A cells restores DNA repair and cell survival, we propose that αIISp is critical for recruitment of non-Ub FANCD2 to sites of damage, which has an important role in the repair response and ICL repair. PMID:26297932

  13. Do L2 Writing Courses Affect the Improvement of L1 Writing Skills via Skills Transfer from L2 to L1?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonca, Altmisdort

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship of second language (L2) writing skills proficiency with the first language (L1) writing skills, in light of the language transfer. The study aims to analyze the positive effects of L2 writing proficiency on L1 writing proficiency. Forty native Turkish-speaking university students participated in the study.…

  14. SOLID-LIQUID PHASE TRANSFER CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF CINNAMYL ACETATE-KINETICS AND ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE REACTION IN A BATCH REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis has an advantage of carrying out reaction between two immiscible substrates, one in solid phase and the other in liquid phase, with high selectivity and at relatively low temperatures. In this study we investigated the synthesis ci...

  15. Investigation of using a Porous Media Approximation for Flow and Heat Transfer through the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility Drywell Array

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Gregory, W.S.; Owen, A.C.

    1999-04-21

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) is being renovated to provide a safe and secure long-term facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory to store nuclear materials. The concept for storage uses vertical tubes that are called drywells that have nuclear bearing canisters inside the tubes. The NMSF facility may use up to 370 of these tubes containing up to 10 canisters producing 15 W each. Analysts at the Laboratory wish to use CFD computer codes to predict the flow and thermal effects of air flow through the facility and the tube array. However, the complexity and large number of storage tubes precludes modeling the facility in enough detail to resolve the boundary layers around each and every tube. Therefore, certain approximations have to be made. A major approximation that has been used in this modeling effort has been to simulate the array of tubes as a porous media, The assumption-in the use of porous media is that the resistance of the drywells can be accounted for in a general way. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the suitability of the porous media approximation for modeling the tube array in the NMSF. In this study we will compare porous media models results with results from models that resolve the boundary layer around tubes. Finally, we offer a compromise modeling approach to address with this problem.

  16. Evaluation of dose from external irradiation for individuals living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Naito, Wataru; Uesaka, Motoki; Yamada, Chie; Ishii, Hideki

    2015-02-01

    In order to effectively and appropriately manage external radiation doses in the affected areas of Fukushima, it is important to identify when, where and how much exposure occurred. It is also necessary to quantitatively measure external exposure and air dose rates for different activity patterns in individuals living and working in Japanese-style buildings. The authors used a new personal dosemeter (D-shuttle) along with a global positioning system and geographical information system to relate personal dose rate with activity patterns and air dose rate. Hourly individual doses obtained by D-shuttle can provide an effective communication tool for those who want to identify when and how much exposure occurs. Personal monitoring of 26 volunteers showed that personal doses obtained from D-shuttle were ∼30% of cumulative air dose estimated by data from the airborne monitoring survey. This analysis showed that, for most study volunteers, the exposure from staying at home represented about half of the total cumulative dose. This suggests that even though the peak exposure doses may be observed outside of working hours, to develop appropriate countermeasures for external dose reduction, it is thus important to identify the contributions of individuals' time-activities. This study provides a valuable basis for developing a realistic and pragmatic method to estimate external doses of individuals in Fukushima. PMID:24982262

  17. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  18. Retinoic acid affects the expression of nuclear retinoic acid receptors in tissues of retinol-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Haq, R; Pfahl, M; Chytil, F

    1991-01-01

    The multitude of biological effects of the vitamin A metabolite, retinoic acid, are mediated by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which are members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. RAR-alpha, -beta, and -gamma are encoded by three genes from which multiple isoforms can be generated. Recent studies suggest that the expression of at least some RAR isoforms can be regulated by retinoic acid in certain cell lines. Here we examined regulation of RAR expression in the adult animal. RARs were analyzed by Northern blots from lung, liver, and testes of retinol-deficient rats. Retinol deficiency caused a 65-70% decrease in the mRNA levels of lung and liver RAR-beta, whereas no change was observed in RAR-alpha and -gamma mRNA levels in these organs. In the testes of retinol-deficient animals, two transcripts, RAR-alpha 1 (3.7 kb) and RAR-alpha 2 (2.8 kb), were detected as compared with one RAR-alpha 1 (3.7 kb) transcript in retinol-sufficient testes. When retinol-deficient rats were orally administered 1 dose of retinoic acid (100 micrograms per rat), lung RAR-beta mRNA levels started to increase after 1 hr and reached a 16-fold higher level after 4 hr; after 4 hr these retinoic acid-fed rats also showed a 7-fold increase in liver RAR-beta mRNA levels as compared with levels in the retinol-deficient rats. In contrast, liver, lung, and testes RAR-alpha transcripts remained either unchanged or showed only a slight increase in response to retinoic acid. RAR-gamma was constitutively expressed in lung, and its mRNA levels were induced 2-fold by retinoic acid. These results show tissue diversity in the rapid induction of RAR-beta and RAR-gamma by retinoic acid in the adult animal and suggest distinct roles for the various receptor isoforms in the control of the retinoid response. Images PMID:1654565

  19. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) interacts with a meiosis-specific RecA homologues, Lim15/Dmc1, but does not stimulate its strand transfer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Fumika N.; Koshiyama, Akiyo; Namekawa, Satoshi H.; Ishii, Satomi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Hiroko; Nara, Takayuki Y.; Sakaguchi, Kengo . E-mail: kengo@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp; Sawado, Tomoyuki

    2007-01-26

    PCNA is a multi-functional protein that is involved in various nuclear events. Here we show that PCNA participates in events occurring during early meiotic prophase. Analysis of protein-protein interactions using surface plasmon resonance indicates that Coprinus cinereus PCNA (CoPCNA) specifically interacts with a meiotic specific RecA-like factor, C. cinereus Lim15/Dmc1 (CoLim15) in vitro. The binding efficiency increases with addition of Mg{sup 2+} ions, while ATP inhibits the interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the CoLim15 protein interacts with the CoPCNA protein in vitro and in the cell extracts. Despite the interaction between these two factors, no enhancement of CoLim15-dependent strand transfer activity by CoPCNA was found in vitro. We propose that the interaction between Lim15/Dmc1 and PCNA mediates the recombination-associated DNA synthesis during meiosis.

  1. How does gully recharge affect sediment transfers by debris flows? A numerical modelling study in steep mountainous terrain, coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Y. E.; Johnson, E. A.; Chaikina, O.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are a major process responsible for transferring sediment from high mountain locations to more downstream fluvial reaches. This sediment transfer begins on mountain hillslopes where various mass wasting processes move sediment from hillslopes to uppermost reaches of the channel system (these reaches are herein referred to as gullies and only experience water flow during high intensity precipitation events). Sediment recharge into gullies, which has received minimal attention in the scientific literature, refers to the transfer of sediment and other debris from surrounding hillslopes into gullies (Jakob and Oden, 2005). Debris flow occurrence and debris flow volumes depend on some precipitation threshold as well as volumes of material contained in the particular gully. For example, if one debris flow has removed all of the accumulated material from the gully, then any subsequent debris flow will be smaller if enough time has not yet passed for notable sediment recharge. Herein, we utilize the numerical model of landscape development, LandMod (Martin, 1998; Dadson and Church, 2005; Martin, 2007), to explore connections between hillslope processes, gully recharge rates, and transfer of sediment to downstream channel reaches in the Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Hillslope processes in the model include shallow landsliding, bedrock failures and weathering. The updated debris flow algorithm is based on extensive field data available for debris flows in Haida Gwaii (e.g., Rood, 1984; Oden, 1994; Jakob and Oden, 2005), as well as theoretical considerations based on debris flow studies. The most significant model extension is the calculation of gully recharge rates; for each gully, the total accumulated sediment in gullies at each time step is determined using a power-law relation for area-normalized recharge rate versus elapsed time since the last debris flow. Thus, when the stochastic driver for debris flow occurrence triggers an event, the amount of stored

  2. Vertical distribution of radiocesium in soils of the area affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, A. V.; Golosov, V. N.; Yoschenko, V. I.; Nanba, K.; Onda, Y.; Takase, T.; Wakiyama, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Presented are results of the study of radiocesium vertical distribution in the soils of the irrigation pond catchments in the near field 0.25 to 8 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, on sections of the Niida River floodplain, and in a forest ecosystem typical of the territory contaminated after the accident. It is shown that the vertical migration of radiocesium in undisturbed forest and grassland soils in the zone affected by the Fukushima accident is faster than it was in the soils of the 30-km zone of the Chernobyl NPP for a similar time interval after the accident. The effective dispersion coefficients in the Fukushima soils are several times higher than those for the Chernobyl soils. This may be associated with higher annual precipitation (by about 2.5 times) in Fukushima as compared to the Chernobyl zone. In the forest soils the radiocesium dispersion is faster as compared to grassland soils, both in the Fukushima and Chernobyl zones. The study and analysis of the vertical distribution of the Fukushima origin radiocesium in the Niida gawa floodplain soils has made it possible to identify areas of contaminated sediment accumulation on the floodplain. The average accumulation rate for sediments at the study locations on the Niida gawa floodplain varied from 0.3 to 3.3 cm/year. Taking into account the sediments accumulation leading to an increase in the radiocesium inventory in alluvial soils is key for predicting redistribution of radioactive contamination after the Fukushima accident on the river catchments, as well as for decision-making on contaminated territories remediation and clean-up. Clean-up of alluvial soils does not seem to be worthwhile because of the following accumulation of contaminated sediments originating from more contaminated areas, including the exclusion zone.

  3. High Prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Relation to Social Factors in Affected Population One Year after the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Tsujiuchi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Maya; Masuda, Kazutaka; Tsuchida, Marisa; Inomata, Tadashi; Kumano, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Augusterfer, Eugene F.; Mollica, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated post-traumatic stress symptoms in relation to the population affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, one year after the disaster. Additionally, we investigated social factors, such as forced displacement, which we hypothesize contributed to the high prevalence of post-traumatic stress. Finally, we report of written narratives that were collected from the impacted population. Design and Settings Using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), questionnaires were sent to 2,011 households of those displaced from Fukushima prefecture living temporarily in Saitama prefecture. Of the 490 replies; 350 met the criteria for inclusion in the study. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine several characteristics and variables of social factors as predictors of probable post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD. Results The mean score of IES-R was 36.15±21.55, with 59.4% having scores of 30 or higher, thus indicating a probable PTSD. No significant differences in percentages of high-risk subjects were found among sex, age, evacuation area, housing damages, tsunami affected, family split-up, and acquaintance support. By the result of multiple logistic regression analysis, the significant predictors of probable PTSD were chronic physical diseases (OR = 1.97), chronic mental diseases (OR = 6.25), worries about livelihood (OR = 2.27), lost jobs (OR = 1.71), lost social ties (OR = 2.27), and concerns about compensation (OR = 3.74). Conclusion Although there are limitations in assuming a diagnosis of PTSD based on self-report IES-R, our findings indicate that there was a high-risk of PTSD strongly related to the nuclear disaster and its consequent evacuation and displacement. Therefore, recovery efforts must focus not only on medical and psychological treatment alone, but also on social and economic issues related to the displacement, as well. PMID:27002324

  4. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient's somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT) combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system) this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is the question of

  5. Factors Affecting The Experimental Line Spread Function (Lsf) Measurement And Modulation Transfer Function (Mtf) Calculation Including Deviation In Characteristic Curve Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, Marcia E.; Haus, Arthur G.

    1980-08-01

    The major potential errors in the slit method measurement of the line spread function (LSF) and the modu-lation transfer function (MTF) of radiographic screen-film systems are reviewed. These errors are compared with the potential error introduced in the LSF due to an erroneous representation of the characteristic curve (sensitometric data). If a deviation in the sensitometric data results in a lower average gradient of the characteristic curve, the MTF will show higher resolution capabilities.

  6. Replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine affects the normal proton transfer pathways for the reduction of P680+ in oxygen-evolving photosystem II particles from Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Jeans, C; Schilstra, M J; Ray, N; Husain, S; Minagawa, J; Nugent, J H A; Klug, D R

    2002-12-31

    We have probed the electrostatics of P680(+) reduction in oxygenic photosynthesis using histidine-tagged and histidine-tagged Y(D)-less Photosystem II cores. We make two main observations: (i) that His-tagged Chlamydomonas cores show kinetics which are essentially identical to those of Photosystem II enriched thylakoid membranes from spinach; (ii) that the microsecond kinetics, previously shown to be proton/hydrogen transfer limited [Schilstra et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 3974-3981], are significantly different in Y(D)-less Chlamydomonas particles when compared with both the His-tagged Chlamydomonas particles and the spinach membranes. The oscillatory nature of the kinetics in both Chlamydomonas samples is normal, indicating that S-state cycling is unaffected by either the histidine-tagging or the replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine. We propose that the effects on the proton-coupled electron transfers of P680(+) reduction in the absence of Y(D) are likely to be due to pK shifts of residues in a hydrogen-bonded network of amino acids in the vicinity of Y(Z). Tyrosine D is 35 A from Y(Z) and yet has a significant influence on proton-coupled electron transfer events in the vicinity of Y(Z). This finding emphasizes the delicacy of the proton balance that Photosystem II has to achieve during the water splitting process. PMID:12501204

  7. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  8. Measuring ligand-dependent and ligand-independent interactions between nuclear receptors and associated proteins using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET2)

    PubMed Central

    Koterba, Kristen L.; Rowan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    Bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET2) is a recently developed technology for the measurement of protein-protein interactions in a live, cell-based system. BRET2 is characterized by the efficient transfer of excited energy between a bioluminescent donor molecule (Renilla luciferase) and a fluorescent acceptor molecule (a mutant of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP2)). The BRET2 assay offers advantages over fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) because it does not require an external light source thereby eliminating problems of photobleaching and autoflourescence. The absence of contamination by light results in low background that permits detection of very small changes in the BRET2 signal. BRET2 is dependent on the orientation and distance between two fusion proteins and therefore requires extensive preliminary standardization experiments to conclude a positive BRET2 signal independent of variations in protein titrations and arrangement in tertiary structures. Estrogen receptor (ER) signaling is modulated by steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1). To establish BRET2 in a ligand inducible system we used SRC-1 as the donor moiety and ER as the acceptor moiety. Expression and functionality of the fusion proteins were assessed by transient transfection in HEK-293 cells followed by Western blot analysis and measurement of ER-dependent reporter gene activity. These preliminary determinations are required prior to measuring nuclear receptor protein-protein interactions by BRET2. This article describes in detail the BRET2 methodology for measuring interaction between full-length ER and coregulator proteins in real-time, in an in vivo environment. PMID:17016546

  9. 8. Innovative Technologies: Two-Phase Heat Transfer in Water-Based Nanofluids for Nuclear Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-wen

    2009-07-31

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in water. Many studies have reported very significant enhancement (up to 200%) of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) in pool boiling of nanofluids (You et al. 2003, Vassallo et al. 2004, Bang and Chang 2005, Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2007). These observations have generated considerable interest in nanofluids as potential coolants for more compact and efficient thermal management systems. Potential Light Water Reactor applications include the primary coolant, safety systems and severe accident management strategies, as reported in other papers (Buongiorno et al. 2008 and 2009). However, the situation of interest in reactor applications is often flow boiling, for which no nanofluid data have been reported so far. In this project we investigated the potential of nanofluids to enhance CHF in flow boiling. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and CHF experiments were performed with low concentrations of alumina, zinc oxide, and diamond nanoparticles in water (≤ 0.1 % by volume) at atmospheric pressure. It was found that for comparable test conditions the values of the nanofluid and water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) are similar (within ±20%). The HTC increased with mass flux and heat flux for water and nanofluids alike, as expected in flow boiling. The CHF tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa and at three different mass fluxes (1500, 2000, 2500 kg/m2s) under subcooled conditions. The maximum CHF enhancement was 53%, 53% and 38% for alumina, zinc oxide and diamond, respectively, always obtained at the highest mass flux. A post-mortem analysis of the boiling surface reveals that its morphology is altered by deposition of the particles during nanofluids boiling. A confocal-microscopy-based examination of the test section revealed that nanoparticles deposition not only changes the number of micro-cavities on the surface, but also the surface wettability. A simple model was used to estimate the ensuing nucleation site

  10. Role of linker histone H1c during the reprogramming of Chinese swamp buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis) embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gao-Bo; Quan, Li; Zeng, Yong-Lian; Yang, Jian; Lu, Ke-Huan; Lu, Sheng-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    During reprogramming, there is exchange of histone H1c and the oocyte-specific linker histone, and H1c may play a critically important role in the reprogramming process of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the H1c gene in SCNT reprogramming in Chinese swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using RNA interference (RNAi). Chinese swamp buffalo H1c gene sequences were obtained and H1c-RNAi vectors were designed, synthesised and then transfected into a buffalo fetal skin fibroblast cell line. Expression of H1c was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to examine the efficiency of vector interference. These cells were then used as a nuclear donor for SCNT so as to observe the further development of SCNT embryos. Inhibition of H1c gene expression in donor cells significantly improved the developmental speed of embryos from the 1-cell to 8-cell stage. Furthermore, compared with the control group, inhibition of H1c gene expression significantly reduced the blastocyst formation rate. It is concluded that linker histone H1c is very important in SCNT reprogramming in Chinese swamp buffalo. Correct expression of the H1c gene plays a significant role in preimplantation embryonic development in B. bubalis. PMID:25145348

  11. Production of CFTR-null and CFTR-ΔF508 heterozygous pigs by adeno-associated virus–mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Christopher S.; Hao, Yanhong; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Samuel, Melissa; Stoltz, David A.; Li, Yuhong; Petroff, Elena; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Kabel, Amanda C.; Yan, Ziying; Spate, Lee; Wax, David; Murphy, Clifton N.; Rieke, August; Whitworth, Kristin; Linville, Michael L.; Korte, Scott W.; Engelhardt, John F.; Welsh, Michael J.; Prather, Randall S.

    2008-01-01

    Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and developing effective therapies has been hampered by lack of a relevant animal model. CF mice fail to develop the lung and pancreatic disease that cause most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Pigs may be better animals than mice in which to model human genetic diseases because their anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics are more similar to those of humans. However, to date, gene-targeted mammalian models of human genetic disease have not been reported for any species other than mice. Here we describe the first steps toward the generation of a pig model of CF. We used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors to deliver genetic constructs targeting the CF transmembrane conductance receptor (CFTR) gene to pig fetal fibroblasts. We generated cells with the CFTR gene either disrupted or containing the most common CF-associated mutation (ΔF508). These cells were used as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer to porcine oocytes. We thereby generated heterozygote male piglets with each mutation. These pigs should be of value in producing new models of CF. In addition, because gene-modified mice often fail to replicate human diseases, this approach could be used to generate models of other human genetic diseases in species other than mice. PMID:18324337

  12. Production of CFTR-null and CFTR-DeltaF508 heterozygous pigs by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S; Hao, Yanhong; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Samuel, Melissa; Stoltz, David A; Li, Yuhong; Petroff, Elena; Vermeer, Daniel W; Kabel, Amanda C; Yan, Ziying; Spate, Lee; Wax, David; Murphy, Clifton N; Rieke, August; Whitworth, Kristin; Linville, Michael L; Korte, Scott W; Engelhardt, John F; Welsh, Michael J; Prather, Randall S

    2008-04-01

    Progress toward understanding the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and developing effective therapies has been hampered by lack of a relevant animal model. CF mice fail to develop the lung and pancreatic disease that cause most of the morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Pigs may be better animals than mice in which to model human genetic diseases because their anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, size, and genetics are more similar to those of humans. However, to date, gene-targeted mammalian models of human genetic disease have not been reported for any species other than mice. Here we describe the first steps toward the generation of a pig model of CF. We used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors to deliver genetic constructs targeting the CF transmembrane conductance receptor (CFTR) gene to pig fetal fibroblasts. We generated cells with the CFTR gene either disrupted or containing the most common CF-associated mutation (DeltaF508). These cells were used as nuclear donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer to porcine oocytes. We thereby generated heterozygote male piglets with each mutation. These pigs should be of value in producing new models of CF. In addition, because gene-modified mice often fail to replicate human diseases, this approach could be used to generate models of other human genetic diseases in species other than mice. PMID:18324337

  13. The TOCATTA-χ model for assessing 14C transfers to grass: an evaluation for atmospheric operational releases from nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Aulagnier, Céline; Le Dizès, Séverine; Maro, Denis; Hébert, Didier; Lardy, Romain; Martin, Raphael

    2013-06-01

    Radioactive (14)C is formed as a by-product of nuclear power generation and from the operation of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants like AREVA-NC La Hague (North France), which releases about 15 TBq per year of (14)C into the atmosphere. This article evaluates a recently improved radioecology model (TOCATTA-χ) to assess (14)C transfers to grassland ecosystems under normal operating conditions. The new version of the TOCATTA model (TOCATTA-χ) includes developments that were derived from PaSiM, a pasture model for simulating grassland carbon and radiocarbon cycling. The TOCATTA-χ model has been tested against observations of (14)C activity concentrations in grass samples collected monthly from six plots which are located around the periphery of the reprocessing plant. Simulated (14)C activities are consistent with observations on both intensively managed and poorly managed grasslands, but an adaptation of the mean turn-over time for (14)C within the plant is necessary in the model to account for different management practices. When atmospheric (14)C activity concentrations are directly inferred from observations, TOCATTA-χ performs better than TOCATTA (the root mean square error is decreased by 45%), but when atmospheric (14)C activity concentrations are not known and must be calculated, the uncertainty associated with the TOCATTA-χ model outcomes is estimated to be larger than the standard deviation of the observations. PMID:23466654

  14. Transfer of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on transfer of training and human resources. "The Effect of Organizational Support, Management Support, and Peer Support on Transfer of Training" (Susan E. Cromwell, Judith A. Kolb) reports on a longitudinal study of work environment factors that affect transfer of training in a university supervisory skills…

  15. Supplementation with spermine during in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes improves early embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, J X; Lee, S; Khoirinaya, C; Oh, A; Kim, G A; Lee, B C

    2016-03-01

    Spermine plays an important role in protection from reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells, but there are few studies on the effects of spermine on porcine oocyte maturation and subsequent embryo development. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of spermine on in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine oocytes and their developmental competence after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We evaluated nuclear maturation, intracellular glutathione (GSH), and ROS levels in oocytes, and their subsequent embryonic development, as well as gene expression in mature oocytes, cumulus cells, and PA blastocysts. After treatment with various concentrations of spermine in IVM culture medium, there was no significant difference in nuclear maturation rate. However, spermine treatment groups (10- 500 µM) showed significantly increased intracellular GSH levels and decreased ROS levels compared to the control ( < 0.05). Furthermore, 10 µM spermine supported significantly higher blastocyst formation rates after PA than the control group ( < 0.05). According to the optimal condition from the PA results, we investigated the effects of 10 µM spermine on SCNT, and it also significantly improved blastocyst formation rates compared with the control group ( < 0.05). In evaluating the effects of 10 µM spermine on gene expression, there was significantly lower expression of a proapoptotic gene () and higher expression of an antiapoptotic gene () in cumulus cells ( < 0.05). was increased in spermine-treated oocytes. Levels of transcription for and were significantly increased in PA blastocysts. In conclusion, 10 µM spermine supplementation during IVM improved the development of porcine PA and SCNT embryos by increasing intracellular GSH, scavenging ROS levels, and regulating gene expression. PMID:27065258

  16. Transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.

    1979-01-01

    The vulnerability of electronic equipment to carbon fibers is studied. The effectiveness of interfaces, such as filters, doors, window screens, and cabinets, which affect the concentration, exposure, or deposition of carbon fibers on both (internal and external) sides of the interface is examined. The transfer function of multilayer aluminum mesh, wet and dry, polyurethane foam, and window screen are determined as a function of air velocity. FIlters installed in typical traffic control boxes and air conditioners are also considered.

  17. Frame-of-Reference Training Effectiveness: Effects of Goal Orientation and Self-Efficacy on Affective, Cognitive, Skill-Based, and Transfer Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierdorff, Erich C.; Surface, Eric A.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    Empirical evidence supporting frame-of-reference (FOR) training as an effective intervention for calibrating raters is convincing. Yet very little is known about who does better or worse in FOR training. We conducted a field study of how motivational factors influence affective, cognitive, and behavioral learning outcomes, as well as near transfer…

  18. Multidrug resistance after retroviral transfer of the human MDR1 gene correlates with P-glycoprotein density in the plasma membrane and is not affected by cytotoxic selection.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, K; Frommel, T O; Stern, R K; Perez, C F; Kriegler, M; Tsuruo, T; Roninson, I B

    1991-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells is associated with the expression of the MDR1 gene encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an and active efflux pump for various lipophilic compounds. MDR transfectants can be isolated after MDR1 gene transfer and selection with cytotoxic drugs; low levels of drug resistance have also been observed in unselected NIH 3T3 mouse cells after retrovirus-mediated transfer of mouse mdr1 cDNA. MDR cell lines possess multiple phenotypic changes, suggesting that P-gp function could be complemented by some additional mechanisms associated with cytotoxic selection. To determine whether cytotoxic selection contributes to the MDR phenotype of MDR1-expressing cells, NIH 3T3 cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus carrying the human MDR1 gene were selected by two different procedures: (i) noncytotoxic selection for increased P-gp expression on the cell surface by multiple rounds of immunofluorescence labeling and flow sorting or (ii) one or more steps of selection with a cytotoxic drug. The levels of MDR in both types of infectants showed an excellent correlation with the P-gp density in the plasma membrane, expressed as immunoreactivity with a P-gp-specific antibody normalized by reactivity with an antibody against an unrelated antigen. Cytotoxic selection conferred no additional increase in resistance relative to P-gp density. These results indicate that P-gp density in the plasma membrane may be sufficient to determine the level of MDR. Images PMID:1678523

  19. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  20. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  1. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  2. Retinoic acid differentially affects in vitro proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of two fish bone-derived cell lines: different gene expression of nuclear receptors and ECM proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; Tiago, Daniel M; Laizé, Vincent; Leonor Cancela, M; Gisbert, Enric

    2014-03-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active metabolite of vitamin A, regulates vertebrate morphogenesis through signaling pathways not yet fully understood. Such process involves the specific activation of retinoic acid and retinoid X receptors (RARs and RXRs), which are nuclear receptors of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. Teleost fish are suitable models to study vertebrate development, such as skeletogenesis. Cell systems capable of in vitro mineralization have been developed for several fish species and may provide new insights into the specific cellular and molecular events related to vitamin A activity in bone, complementary to in vivo studies. This work aims at investigating the in vitro effects of RA (0.5 and 12.5 μM) on proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization of two gilthead seabream bone-derived cell lines (VSa13 and VSa16), and at identifying molecular targets of its action through gene expression analysis. RA induced phenotypic changes and cellular proliferation was inhibited in both cell lines in a cell type-dependent manner (36-59% in VSa13 and 17-46% in VSa16 cells). While RA stimulated mineral deposition in VSa13 cell cultures (50-62% stimulation), it inhibited the mineralization of extracellular matrix in VSa16 cells (11-57% inhibition). Expression of hormone receptor genes (rars and rxrs), and extracellular matrix-related genes such as matrix and bone Gla proteins (mgp and bglap), osteopontin (spp1) and type I collagen (col1a1) were differentially regulated upon exposure to RA in proliferating, differentiating and mineralizing cultures of VSa13 and VSa16 cells. Altogether, our results show: (i) RA affects proliferative and mineralogenic activities in two fish skeletal cell types and (ii) that during phenotype transitions, specific RA nuclear receptors and bone-related genes are differentially expressed in a cell type-dependent manner. PMID:24291400

  3. Formant frequencies and bandwidths of the vocal tract transfer function are affected by the mechanical impedance of the vocal tract wall.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Mario; Pinkert, Silke; Mattheus, Willy; Mainka, Alexander; Mürbe, Dirk

    2015-08-01

    The acoustical properties of the vocal tract, the air-filled cavity between the vocal folds and the mouth opening, are determined by its individual geometry, the physical properties of the air and of its boundaries. In this article, we address the necessity of complex impedance boundary conditions at the mouth opening and at the border of the acoustical domain inside the human vocal tract. Using finite element models based on MRI data for spoken and sung vowels /a/, /i/ and /Ω(-1)/ and comparison of the transfer characteristics by analysis of acoustical data using an inverse filtering method, the global wall impedance showed a frequency-dependent behaviour and depends on the produced vowel and therefore on the individual vocal tract geometry. The values of the normalised inertial component (represented by the imaginary part of the impedance) ranged from 250 g/m(2) at frequencies higher than about 3 kHz up to about 2.5 × 10(5) g/m(2)in the mid-frequency range around 1.5-3 kHz. In contrast, the normalised dissipation (represented by the real part of the impedance) ranged from 65 to 4.5 × 10(5) Ns/m(3). These results indicate that structures enclosing the vocal tract (e.g. oral and pharyngeal mucosa and muscle tissues), especially their mechanical properties, influence the transfer of the acoustical energy and the position and bandwidth of the formant frequencies. It implies that the timbre characteristics of vowel sounds are likely to be tuned by specific control of relaxation and strain of the surrounding structures of the vocal tract. PMID:25416844

  4. Cloned embryos from semen. Part 2: Intergeneric nuclear transfer of semen-derived eland (Taurotragus oryx) epithelial cells into bovine oocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nel-Themaat, L.; Gomez, M.C.; Pope, C.E.; Lopez, M.; Wirtu, G.; Jenkins, J.A.; Cole, A.; Dresser, B.L.; Bondioli, K.R.; Godke, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The production of cloned offspring by nuclear transfer (NT) of semen-derived somatic cells holds considerable potential for the incorporation of novel genes into endangered species populations. Because oocytes from endangered species are scarce, domestic species oocytes are often used as cytoplasts for interspecies NT. In the present study, epithelial cells isolated from eland semen were used for intergeneric transfer (IgNT) into enucleated bovine oocytes and compared with bovine NT embryos. Cleavage rates of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos were similar (80 vs. 83%, respectively; p > 0.05); however, development to the morula and blastocyst stage was higher for bovine NT embryos (38 and 21%, respectively; p < 0.0001), than for eland IgNT embryos (0.5 and 0%, respectively). DNA synthesis was not observed in either bovine NT or eland IgNT cybrids before activation, but in 75 and 70% of bovine NT and eland igNT embryos, respectively, cell-cycle resumption was observed at 16 h postactivation (hpa). For eland IgNT embryos, 13% had ???8 cells at 84 hpa, while 32% of the bovine NT embryos had ???8 cells at the same interval. However, 100 and 66% of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos, respectively, that had ???8 cells synthesized DNA. From these results we concluded that (1) semen-derived epithelial cell nuclei can interact and be transcriptionally controlled by bovine cytoplast, (2) the first cell-cycle occurred in IgNT embryos, (3) a high frequency of developmental arrest occurs before the eight-cell stage in IgNT embryos, and (4) IgNT embryos that progress through the early cleavage stage arrest can (a) synthesize DNA, (b) progress through subsequent cell cycles, and (c) may have the potential to develop further. ?? 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  5. Cloned embryos from semen. Part 2: intergeneric nuclear transfer of semen-derived eland (Taurotragus oryx) epithelial cells into bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nel-Themaat, Liesl; Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle; Lopez, Monica; Wirtu, Gemechu; Jenkins, Jill A; Cole, Alex; Dresser, Betsy L; Bondioli, Kenneth R; Godke, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    The production of cloned offspring by nuclear transfer (NT) of semen-derived somatic cells holds considerable potential for the incorporation of novel genes into endangered species populations. Because oocytes from endangered species are scarce, domestic species oocytes are often used as cytoplasts for interspecies NT. In the present study, epithelial cells isolated from eland semen were used for intergeneric transfer (IgNT) into enucleated bovine oocytes and compared with bovine NT embryos. Cleavage rates of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos were similar (80 vs. 83%, respectively; p > 0.05); however, development to the morula and blastocyst stage was higher for bovine NT embryos (38 and 21%, respectively; p < 0.0001), than for eland IgNT embryos (0.5 and 0%, respectively). DNA synthesis was not observed in either bovine NT or eland IgNT cybrids before activation, but in 75 and 70% of bovine NT and eland igNT embryos, respectively, cell-cycle resumption was observed at 16 h postactivation (hpa). For eland IgNT embryos, 13% had > or = 8 cells at 84 hpa, while 32% of the bovine NT embryos had > or = 8 cells at the same interval. However, 100 and 66% of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos, respectively, that had > or = 8 cells synthesized DNA. From these results we concluded that (1) semen-derived epithelial cell nuclei can interact and be transcriptionally controlled by bovine cytoplast, (2) the first cell-cycle occurred in IgNT embryos, (3) a high frequency of developmental arrest occurs before the eight-cell stage in IgNT embryos, and (4) IgNT embryos that progress through the early cleavage stage arrest can (a) synthesize DNA, (b) progress through subsequent cell cycles, and (c) may have the potential to develop further. PMID:18241126

  6. Transfer of 137Cs and 134Cs from litter into soil's of Japanese cypress forest after Fukushima nuclear accident in Karasawayama catchment, Tochigi prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, T. T.; Onda, Y.; Kato, H.; Gomi, T.

    2011-12-01

    The mega earthquake that rampaged north-east Japan on March 11, 2011 and the triggered subsequent tsunami hit the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power plant and resulted the discharge of about 770,000 terabecquerel radionuclide materials to the atmosphere. The distribution and deposition of the radionucides are then governed by the wind and rain following the release. When the cloud of radionuclide material by-pass the forest ecosystem (as radiodust-sinker), radionuclides are trapped and deposited to the forest floor through dry, litter, wet depositions. Litter-fall, as a key process of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystem, plays a great role in transferring canopy-trapped radionuclides to the forest soil. And so, we are monitoring the of Fukushima derived 137Cs deposition rate through litter to forest soil's of Japanese cypress(Chamaecyparis obutsa Sieb.et Zucc.) forests located approximately 160 km from the crippled nuclear power plant. For this purpose, five litter traps (1m2 areas each) were set up at one meter above the ground in the forest stand at the end of March 2011. Fukushima-derived 137Cs is then estimated from 134Cs:137Cs ratio as all 134Cs is originated from Fukushima. Within the two months of the accident, mean 134Cs:137Cs ratio was 0.8 in cypress litter. The inventories of both 137Cs and 134Cs in the upper 2cm forest soil were found 5089 Bq m-2 and 3571 Bq m-2, respectively. As a result, the amount of Fukushima-derived 137Cs deposition in upper 2cm soil layer by cypress litter is 4464 Bq m-2. This value account 88% of the total inventories of 137Cs in the upper 2cm soils and the other depositional paths (dry and wet fall) including old 137Cs cover only 12%. The transfer rate of 137Cs and 134Cs from canopy-litter to soil could be depend on litter's radionuclide adsorption strength (canopy and leaves architecture), the rate, amount of litter fall and its residence time in the canopy and forest floor. However, the results strongly confirmed that litter is

  7. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient’s somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT) combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system) this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is the question of

  8. Scriptaid Treatment Decreases DNA Methyltransferase 1 Expression by Induction of MicroRNA-152 Expression in Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Choi, Jeong-woo; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Cui, Xiang-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is thought to be the main cause of low cloning efficiencies. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated a positive role of Scriptaid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that belongs to an existing class of hydroxamic acid-containing HDACis, on the development competence of cloned embryos in many species. The present study investigated the effects of Scriptaid on the development of porcine SCNT embryos in vitro and its mechanism. Treatment with 300 or 500 nM Scriptaid for 20 h after activation significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage and the total number of cells per blastocyst and significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells in blastocysts. Scriptaid treatment significantly increased the level of histone H3 acetylated at K9 and the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and significantly decreased the level of histone H3 trimethylated at K9 at the pronuclear stage. As a potential mechanism for the DNA methylation changes, our results showed that the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 was frequently down-regulated in Scriptaid-treated embryos in comparison with untreated embryos and was inversely correlated to endogenous microRNA-152 (miR-152). Taken together, these findings illustrated a crucial functional crosstalk between miR-152 and DNMT1. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein levels of POU5F1 and CDX2 were increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. mRNA levels of Caspase3, and Bax were significantly decreased and that of Bcl-xL was significantly increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. In conclusion, these observations would contribute to uncover the nuclear reprogramming mechanisms underlying the effects of Scriptaid on the improvement of porcine SCNT embryos. PMID:26261994

  9. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiuyang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Erlong; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26923071

  10. Monitoring the Coherent Vibrational Control of Electronic Excitation Transfer Using Ultrafast Pump-Probe Polarization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Jason; Cina, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom in molecular energy-transfer complexes is a subject of current interest. We have proposed a method to use coherent nuclear motion to control the transfer of electronic excitation energy between donor and acceptor moieties in electronically coupled dimers. The underlying electronic and nuclear motion at the level of quantum mechanical amplitudes can be observed using nonlinear wave-packet interferometry(nl-WPI), a form of fluorescence-detected multidimensional electronic spectroscopy. In our control scheme, coherent nuclear motion is induced in the acceptor chromophore prior to direct electronic excitation of the donor. This nuclear motion affects the instantaneous resonance conditions between donor and acceptor moieties and thus affects subsequent energy transfer dynamics. We have developed the framework to simulate four-pulse nl-WPI experiments, and the pump-probe limit thereof, on energy-transfer systems after interaction with a control pulse that induces nuclear motion. We present simulations in the pump-probe limit from model energy-transfer systems subjected to prior impulsive vibrational excitation, and show how pulse polarization can be used to infer electronic dynamics from isotropically oriented dimers.

  11. Paddy-field contamination with 134Cs and 137Cs due to Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and soil-to-rice transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi

    2013-02-01

    The transfer coefficient (TF) from soil to rice plants of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the form of radioactive deposition from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 was investigated in three rice paddy fields in Minami-Soma City. Rice crops were planted in the following May and harvested at the end of September. Soil cores of 30-cm depth were sampled from rice-planted paddy fields to measure (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity at 5-cm intervals. (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity was also measured in rice ears (rice with chaff), straws and roots. The rice ears were subdivided into chaff, brown rice, polished rice and rice bran, and the (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity concentration of each plant part was measured to calculate the respective TF from the soil. The TF of roots was highest at 0.48 ± 0.10 in the field where the (40)K concentration in the soil core was relatively low, in comparison with TF values of 0.31 and 0.38 in other fields. Similar trends could be found for the TF of whole rice plants, excluding roots. The TF of rice ears was relatively low at 0.019-0.026. The TF of chaff, rice bran, brown rice and polished rice was estimated to be 0.049, 0.10-0.16, 0.013-0.017 and 0.005-0.013, respectively. PMID:23103577

  12. The structure of a ring-opened proliferating cell nuclear antigen–replication factor C complex revealed by fluorescence energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhihao; Yoder, Bonita L.; Burgers, Peter M. J.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous proteins that function in DNA metabolic pathways are known to interact with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The important function of PCNA in stimulating various cellular activities requires its topological linkage with DNA. Loading of the circular PCNA onto duplex DNA requires the activity of a clamp-loader [replication factor C (RFC)] complex and the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The mechanistic and structural details regarding PCNA loading by the RFC complex are still developing. In particular, the positive identification of a long-hypothesized structure of an open clamp–RFC complex as an intermediate in loading has remained elusive. In this study, we capture an open yeast PCNA clamp in a complex with RFC through fluorescence energy transfer experiments. We also follow the topological transitions of PCNA in the various steps of the clamp-loading pathway through both steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence studies. We find that ATP effectively drives the clamp-loading process to completion with the formation of the closed PCNA bound to DNA, whereas ATPγS cannot. The information derived from this work complements that obtained from previous structural and mechanistic studies and provides a more complete picture of a eukaryotic clamp-loading pathway using yeast as a paradigm. PMID:16476998

  13. Distinct dendritic spine and nuclear phases of calcineurin activation after exposure to amyloid-β revealed by a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-Yan; Hudry, Eloise; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Uemura, Kengo; Fan, Zhan-Yun; Berezovska, Oksana; Grosskreutz, Cynthia L; Bacskai, Brian J; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-04-11

    Calcineurin (CaN) activation is critically involved in the regulation of spine morphology in response to oligomeric amyloid-β (Aβ) as well as in synaptic plasticity in normal memory, but no existing techniques can monitor the spatiotemporal pattern of CaN activity. Here, we use a spectral fluorescence resonance energy transfer approach to monitor CaN activation dynamics in real time with subcellular resolution. When oligomeric Aβ derived from Tg2576 murine transgenic neurons or human AD brains were applied to wild-type murine primary cortical neurons, we observe a dynamic progression of CaN activation within minutes, first in dendritic spines, and then in the cytoplasm and, in hours, in the nucleus. CaN activation in spines leads to rapid but reversible morphological changes in spines and in postsynaptic proteins; longer exposure leads to NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) translocation to the nucleus and frank spine loss. These results provide a framework for understanding the role of calcineurin in synaptic alterations associated with AD pathogenesis. PMID:22496575

  14. Telomere elongation and naïve pluripotent stem cells achieved from telomerase haplo-insufficient cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Li-Ying; Chang, Wei-Fang; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Chia-Chia; Liou, Jun-Yang; Chang, Chia-Chun; Ou-Yang, Huan; Guo, Renpeng; Fu, Haifeng; Cheng, Winston T.K.; Ding, Shih-Torng; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Okuka, Maja; Keefe, David L; Chen, Y. Eugene; Liu, Lin; Xu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Haplo-insufficiency of telomerase genes in humans leads to telomere syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenital and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from telomerase haplo-insufficient donor cells would provide unique opportunities towards the realization of patient-specific stem cell therapies. Recently, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) have been efficiently achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We tested the hypothesis that SCNT could effectively elongate shortening telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells in the ntESCs using relevant mouse models. Indeed, telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient (Terc+/−) mouse cells are elongated in ntESCs. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc+/− cells exhibit naïve pluripotency as evidenced by generation of Terc+/−ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation (TEC), the most stringent test of naïve pluripotency. These data suggest that SCNT could offer a powerful tool to reprogram telomeres and to discover the factors for robust restoration of telomeres and pluripotency of telomerase haplo-insufficient somatic cells. PMID:25464850

  15. Loss of Methylation at H19 DMD Is Associated with Biallelic Expression and Reduced Development in Cattle Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, J.; Therrien, J.; Filion, F.; Lefebvre, R.; Goff, A.K.; Perecin, F.; Meirelles, F.V.; Smith, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Although cloning of mammals has been achieved successfully, the percentage of live offspring is very low because of reduced fetal size and fewer implantation sites. Recent studies have attributed such pathological conditions to abnormal reprogramming of the donor cell used for cloning. The inability of the oocyte to fully restore the differentiated status of a somatic cell to its pluripotent and undifferentiated state is normally evidenced by aberrant DNA methylation patterns established throughout the genome during development to blastocyst. These aberrant methylation patterns are associated with abnormal expression of imprinted genes, which among other genes are essential for normal embryo development and gestation. We hypothesized that embryo loss and low implantation rates in cattle derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) are caused by abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted genes. To verify our hypothesis, we analyzed the parental expression and the differentially methylated domain (DMD) methylation status of the H19 gene. Using a parental-specific analysis, we confirmed for the first time that H19 biallelic expression is tightly associated with a severe demethylation of the paternal H19 DMD in SCNT embryos, suggesting that these epigenetic anomalies to the H19 locus could be directly responsible for the reduced size and low implantation rates of cloned embryos in cattle. PMID:21248292

  16. Risk and prevention of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) transmission through embryo production via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using oocytes from persistently infected donors.

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Riddell, K P; Chen, S H; Galik, P K; Xiang, T; Guerra, T; Marley, M S; Polejaeva, I; Givens, M D

    2010-07-01

    The objective was to assess the risk of transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) through embryo production via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), with oocytes obtained from persistently infected (PI) donors. Using ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration following superstimulation, oocytes were obtained from five female beef cattle, including three that were PI and two that were negative for BVDV. In the three PI cattle, seven aspirations yielded 32 oocytes (PI-1: three aspirations yielding six oocytes; PI-2: two aspirations yielding 14 oocytes; and PI-3: two aspirations yielding 12 oocytes). The oocyte recovery rate was better in negative control cattle, with 32 oocytes obtained from the two cattle in a single superstimulation and aspiration session. Oocytes were processed individually for SCNT, evaluated, and tested for BVDV. Nearly all (31/32) oocytes from the three PI donors were positive for BVDV by PCR, with detected viral RNA copy number ranging from 1 to 1.1 x 10(5). The proportion of oocytes acceptable for SCNT embryo production (based on oocyte quality and maturation status) was only 16 to 35% from PI donors, but was 81% from control donors. Therefore, routine testing of unacceptable (discarded) oocytes could be an effective approach to identify batches that might contain infected oocytes from PI donors. Identification and removal of high-risk batches of oocytes would minimize the risk of BVDV transmission through SCNT embryo production. PMID:20188405

  17. Generation of liver-specific TGF-α/c-Myc-overexpressing porcine induced pluripotent stem-like cells and blastocyst formation using nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Mee; Lee, Joohyeong; Hussein, Kamal Hany; Hong, Seok-Ho; Yang, Se-Ran; Lee, Eunsong; Woo, Heung-Myong

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic porcine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive cell sources for the development of genetically engineered pig models, because they can be expanded without senescence and have the potential for multiple gene manipulation. They are also useful cell sources for disease modeling and treatment. However, the generation of transgenic porcine iPS cells is rare, and their embryonic development after nuclear transfer (NT) has not yet been reported. We report here the generation of liver-specific oncogenes (TGF-α/c-Myc)-overexpressing porcine iPS (T/M iPS)-like cells. They expressed stem cell characteristics and were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells that express oncogenes. We also confirmed that NT embryos derived from T/M iPS-like cells successfully developed blastocysts in vitro. As an initial approach toward porcine transgenic iPS cell generation and their developmental competence after NT, this study provides foundations for the efficient generation of genetically modified porcine iPS cells and animal models. PMID:26725870

  18. Generation of liver-specific TGF-α/c-Myc-overexpressing porcine induced pluripotent stem-like cells and blastocyst formation using nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Kyung-Mee; LEE, Joohyeong; HUSSEIN, Kamal Hany; HONG, Seok-Ho; YANG, Se-Ran; LEE, Eunsong; WOO, Heung-Myong

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic porcine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive cell sources for the development of genetically engineered pig models, because they can be expanded without senescence and have the potential for multiple gene manipulation. They are also useful cell sources for disease modeling and treatment. However, the generation of transgenic porcine iPS cells is rare, and their embryonic development after nuclear transfer (NT) has not yet been reported. We report here the generation of liver-specific oncogenes (TGF-α/c-Myc)-overexpressing porcine iPS (T/M iPS)-like cells. They expressed stem cell characteristics and were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells that express oncogenes. We also confirmed that NT embryos derived from T/M iPS-like cells successfully developed blastocysts in vitro. As an initial approach toward porcine transgenic iPS cell generation and their developmental competence after NT, this study provides foundations for the efficient generation of genetically modified porcine iPS cells and animal models. PMID:26725870

  19. Production of transgenic goats expressing human coagulation factor IX in the mammary glands after nuclear transfer using transfected fetal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Amiri Yekta, Amir; Dalman, Azam; Eftekhari-Yazdi, Poopak; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Shahverdi, Abdol Hossein; Fakheri, Rahman; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Daneshzadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Vojgani, Mahdi; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Fatemi, Nayeralsadat; Vahabi, Zeinab; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Ataei, Fariba; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Masoudi, Najmehsadat; Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Mojtaba; Gourabi, Hamid

    2013-02-01

    There are growing numbers of recombinant proteins that have been expressed in milk. Thus one can consider the placement of any gene of interest under the control of the regulatory elements of a milk protein gene in a dairy farm animal. Among the transgene introducing techniques, only nuclear transfer (NT) allows 100 % efficiency and bypasses the mosaicism associated with counterpart techniques. In this study, in an attempt to produce a transgenic goat carrying the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) transgene, goat fetal fibroblasts were electroporated with a linearized marker-free construct in which the transgene was juxtaposed to β-casein promoter designed to secret the recombinant protein in goat milk. Two different lines of transfected cells were used as donors for NT to enucleated oocytes. Two transgenic goats were liveborn. DNA sequencing of the corresponding transgene locus confirmed authenticity of the cloning procedure and the complementary experiments on the whey demonstrated expression of human factor IX in the milk of transgenic goats. In conclusion, our study has provided the groundwork for a prosperous and promising approach for large-scale production and therapeutic application of hFIX expressed in transgenic goats. PMID:22869287

  20. Temperature-scanned magnetic resonance and the evidence of two-way transfer of a nitrogen nuclear spin hyperfine interaction in coupled NV-N pairs in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babunts, R. A.; Soltamova, A. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Soltamov, V. A.; Gurin, A. S.; Anisimov, A. N.; Preobrazhenskii, V. L.; Baranovi, P. G.

    2012-06-01

    New method for the detection of magnetic resonance signals versus temperature is developed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the paramagnetic system under investigation. The implementation of this technique is demonstrated on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds. Single NV defects and their ensembles are suggested to be almost inertialess temperature sensors. The hyperfine structure of the 14N nitrogen nuclei of the nitrogen-vacancy center appears to be resolved in the hyperfine structure characteristic of the hyperfine interaction between NV and an N s center (substitutional nitrogen impurity) in the optically detected magnetic resonance spectra of the molecular NV-N s complex. Thus, we show that a direct evidence of the two-way transfer of a nitrogen nuclear spin hyperfine interaction in coupled NV-N s pairs was observed. It is shown that more than 3-fold enhancement of the NV optically detected magnetic resonance signal can be achieved by using water as a collection optics medium.

  1. A Novel Syndrome Affecting Multiple Mitochondrial Functions, Located by Microcell-Mediated Transfer to Chromosome 2p14-2p13

    PubMed Central

    Seyda, Agnieszka; Newbold, Robert F.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Verner, Andrei; MacKay, Neviana; Winter, Susan; Feigenbaum, Annette; Malaney, Suzann; Gonzalez-Halphen, Diego; Cuthbert, Andrew P.; Robinson, Brian H.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied cultured skin fibroblasts from three siblings and one unrelated individual, all of whom had fatal mitochondrial disease manifesting soon after birth. After incubation with 1 mM glucose, these four cell strains exhibited lactate/pyruvate ratios that were six times greater than those of controls. On further analysis, enzymatic activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, NADH cytochrome c reductase, succinate dehydrogenase, and succinate cytochrome c reductase were severely deficient. In two of the siblings the enzymatic activity of cytochrome oxidase was mildly decreased (by ∼50%). Metabolite analysis performed on urine samples taken from these patients revealed high levels of glycine, leucine, valine, and isoleucine, indicating abnormalities of both the glycine-cleavage system and branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase. In contrast, the activities of fibroblast pyruvate carboxylase, mitochondrial aconitase, and citrate synthase were normal. Immunoblot analysis of selected complex III subunits (core 1, cyt c1, and iron-sulfur protein) and of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex subunits revealed no visible changes in the levels of all examined proteins, decreasing the possibility that an import and/or assembly factor is involved. To elucidate the underlying molecular defect, analysis of microcell-mediated chromosome-fusion was performed between the present study's fibroblasts (recipients) and a panel of A9 mouse:human hybrids (donors) developed by Cuthbert et al. (1995). Complementation was observed between the recipient cells from both families and the mouse:human hybrid clone carrying human chromosome 2. These results indicate that the underlying defect in our patients is under the control of a nuclear gene, the locus of which is on chromosome 2. A 5-cM interval has been identified as potentially containing the critical region for the unknown gene. This interval maps to region 2p14-2p13. PMID

  2. Relationship between Individual External Doses, Ambient Dose Rates and Individuals' Activity-Patterns in Affected Areas in Fukushima following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Naito, Wataru; Uesaka, Motoki; Yamada, Chie; Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Ishii, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011, released radioactive material into the atmosphere and contaminated the land in Fukushima and several neighboring prefectures. Five years after the nuclear disaster, the radiation levels have greatly decreased due to physical decay, weathering, and decontamination operations in Fukushima. The populations of 12 communities were forced to evacuate after the accident; as of March 2016, the evacuation order has been lifted in only a limited area, and permanent habitation is still prohibited in most of the areas. In order for the government to lift the evacuation order and for individuals to return to their original residential areas, it is important to assess current and future realistic individual external doses. Here, we used personal dosimeters along with the Global Positioning System and Geographic Information System to understand realistic individual external doses and to relate individual external doses, ambient doses, and activity-patterns of individuals in the affected areas in Fukushima. The results showed that the additional individual external doses were well correlated to the additional ambient doses based on the airborne monitoring survey. The results of linear regression analysis suggested that the additional individual external doses were on average about one-fifth that of the additional ambient doses. The reduction factors, which are defined as the ratios of the additional individual external doses to the additional ambient doses, were calculated to be on average 0.14 and 0.32 for time spent at home and outdoors, respectively. Analysis of the contribution of various activity patterns to the total individual external dose demonstrated good agreement with the average fraction of time spent daily in each activity, but the contribution due to being outdoors varied widely. These results are a valuable contribution to understanding realistic individual external doses and the corresponding

  3. Relationship between Individual External Doses, Ambient Dose Rates and Individuals’ Activity-Patterns in Affected Areas in Fukushima following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Ishii, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011, released radioactive material into the atmosphere and contaminated the land in Fukushima and several neighboring prefectures. Five years after the nuclear disaster, the radiation levels have greatly decreased due to physical decay, weathering, and decontamination operations in Fukushima. The populations of 12 communities were forced to evacuate after the accident; as of March 2016, the evacuation order has been lifted in only a limited area, and permanent habitation is still prohibited in most of the areas. In order for the government to lift the evacuation order and for individuals to return to their original residential areas, it is important to assess current and future realistic individual external doses. Here, we used personal dosimeters along with the Global Positioning System and Geographic Information System to understand realistic individual external doses and to relate individual external doses, ambient doses, and activity-patterns of individuals in the affected areas in Fukushima. The results showed that the additional individual external doses were well correlated to the additional ambient doses based on the airborne monitoring survey. The results of linear regression analysis suggested that the additional individual external doses were on average about one-fifth that of the additional ambient doses. The reduction factors, which are defined as the ratios of the additional individual external doses to the additional ambient doses, were calculated to be on average 0.14 and 0.32 for time spent at home and outdoors, respectively. Analysis of the contribution of various activity patterns to the total individual external dose demonstrated good agreement with the average fraction of time spent daily in each activity, but the contribution due to being outdoors varied widely. These results are a valuable contribution to understanding realistic individual external doses and the corresponding

  4. Characteristics of initial deposition and behavior of radiocesium in forest ecosystems of different locations and species affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Masabumi; Kaneko, Shinji; Ohashi, Shinta; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Shigeto; Saito, Satoshi; Kiyono, Yoshiyuki; Tonosaki, Mario; Miura, Satoru; Akama, Akio; Kajimoto, Takuya; Takahashi, Masamichi

    2016-09-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, information about stand-level spatial patterns of radiocesium initially deposited in the surrounding forests was essential for predicting the future dynamics of radiocesium and suggesting a management plan for contaminated forests. In the first summer (approximately 6 months after the accident), we separately estimated the amounts of radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs; Bq m(-2)) in the major components (trees, organic layers, and soils) in forests of three sites with different contamination levels. For a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) forest studied at each of the three sites, the radiocesium concentration greatly differed among the components, with the needle and organic layer having the highest concentrations. For these cedar forests, the proportion of the (137)Cs stock in the aboveground tree biomass varied from 22% to 44% of the total (137)Cs stock; it was 44% in highly contaminated sites (7.0 × 10(5) Bq m(-2)) but reduced to 22% in less contaminated sites (1.1 × 10(4) Bq m(-2)). In the intermediate contaminated site (5.0-5.8 × 10(4) Bq m(-2)), 34% of radiocesium was observed in the aboveground tree biomass of the Japanese cedar stand. However, this proportion was considerably smaller (18-19%) in the nearby mixed forests of the Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) and deciduous broad-leaved trees. Non-negligible amounts of (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected in both the sapwood and heartwood of all the studied tree species. This finding suggested that the uptake or translocation of radiocesium had already started within 6 months after the accident. The belowground compartments were mostly present in the organic layer and the uppermost (0-5 cm deep) mineral soil layer at all the study sites. We discussed the initial transfer process of radiocesium deposited in the forest and inferred that the type of initial deposition (i.e., dry versus wet radiocesium deposition), the amount of

  5. Polymorphisms at positions -22 and -348 in the promoter of the BAT1 gene affect transcription and the binding of nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia; Wong, Agnes M-L; Williamson, David; Voon, Dominic; Baltic, Svetlana; Allcock, Richard J N; Boodhoo, Alvin; Christiansen, Frank T

    2004-05-01

    BAT1 (D6S81E, UAP56) lies in the central MHC between TNF and HLA-B, a region containing genes that affect susceptibility to immunopathologic disorders. BAT1 protein may be directly responsible for the genetic association, as antisense studies show it can down-regulate inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigate polymorphisms at positions -22 and -348 relative to the BAT1 transcription start site. DNA samples from healthy donors were used to confirm haplotypic associations with the type 1 diabetes-susceptible 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH; HLA-A1,B8,BAT1-22*C,BAT1-348*C,DR3 ) and the diabetes-resistant 7.1 AH (HLA-A3,B7,BAT1-22*G,BAT1-348*T,DR15). Alleles carried at BAT1-22 and -348 were in linkage disequilibrium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear proteins from T-cells (Jurkat and HT2), monocytes (THP1, U937) and epithelial cells (HeLa and MDA468) demonstrated DNA : protein complexes binding oligonucleotides spanning positions -22 and -348 on the 7.1 AH only. Competition assays, supershifts and molecular weight determinations suggest the complexes include the transcription factors YY1 (at -348) and Oct1 (at -22). Promoter activity was demonstrated using 520 bp and 336 bp fragments cloned from immediately upstream of the transcription start site and carrying all combinations of -22 and -348 alleles, suggesting an unidentified non-polymorphic sequence within 336 bp of the start site drives transcription. The 520 bp fragment of the BAT1 promoter cloned from the 8.1 AH was slightly less efficient than the equivalent from the 7.1 AH, whilst the reverse was observed with 336 bp fragments. This suggests BAT1 transcription on the 7.1 AH is modified by interactions involving DNA flanking positions -22 and -348. PMID:15028669

  6. Kinetic evidence for the formation of discrete 1,4-dehydrobenzene intermediates. Trapping by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer and observation of high-temperature CIDNP (chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization). [Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, T.P.; Comita, P.B.; Bergman, R.G.

    1981-07-15

    Upon being heated, alkyl-substituted cis-1,2-diethynyl olefins undergo cyclization to yield reactive 1,4-dehydrobenzenes; the products isolated may be derived from either unimolecular or bimolecular reactions of the intermediate. (Z)-4,5-Diethynyl-4-octene (4) undergoes rearrangement to yield 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene (17). Solution pyrolysis of 4 in inert aromatic solvents produces three unimolecular products, (Z)-dodeca-4,8-diyn-6-ene (7), benzocycloctene (9), and o-allyl-n-propylbenzene (10), in high yield. When 1,4-cyclohexadiene is added to the pyrolysis solution as a trapping agent high yields of the reduced product o-di-n-propylbenzene (12) are obtained. The kinetics of solution pyrolysis of 4 in the presence and absence of trapping agent pyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene is a discrete intermediate on the pathway leading to products. When the reaction was run in the heated probe of an NMR spectrometer, chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization was observed in 10. This observation, along with kinetic and chemical trapping evidence, indicates the presence of two additional intermediates, formed from 17 by sequential intramolecular (1,5) hydrogen transfer, on the pathway to products. The observation of CIDNP, coupled with the reactivity exhibited by 17 and the other two intermediates, implicates a biradical description of these molecules.

  7. Heat transfer in energy problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushina, T.; Yang, W. J.

    Results of recent research are presented concerning heat transfer in energy problems, including high-temperature heat transfer, high-flux heat transfer, high-performance heat transfer, heat transfer in nonconventional energy (power and propulsion) systems, and novel heat transfer techniques. Topics discussed include studies of full-coverage film cooling, radiative properties of metals and alloys at high temperature, critical heat flux conditions in high-quality boiling systems, heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation of a liquid droplet on heated surfaces, high-performance surfaces for non-boiling heat transfer, and high performance heat transfer surfaces for boiling and condensation. Also examined are high flux heat transfer in gaseous solid suspension flow, nuclear process heat applications of high temperature heat exchange, heat transfer considerations in the use of new energy resources, and high performance mist-cooled condensers for geothermal binary cycle plants. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  8. Experimental investigations of heat transfer and temperature fields in models simulating fuel assemblies used in the core of a nuclear reactor with a liquid heavy-metal coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Genin, L. G.; Krylov, S. G.; Novikov, A. O.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is to obtain information on the temperature fields and heat transfer coefficients during flow of liquid-metal coolant in models simulating an elementary cell in the core of a liquid heavy metal cooled fast-neutron reactor. Two design versions for spacing fuel rods in the reactor core were considered. In the first version, the fuel rods were spaced apart from one another using helical wire wound on the fuel rod external surface, and in the second version spacer grids were used for the same purpose. The experiments were carried out on the mercury loop available at the Moscow Power Engineering Institute National Research University's Chair of Engineering Thermal Physics. Two experimental sections simulating an elementary cell for each of the fuel rod spacing versions were fabricated. The temperature fields were investigated using a dedicated hinged probe that allows temperature to be measured at any point of the studied channel cross section. The heat-transfer coefficients were determined using the wall temperature values obtained at the moment when the probe thermocouple tail end touched the channel wall. Such method of determining the wall temperature makes it possible to alleviate errors that are unavoidable in case of measuring the wall temperature using thermocouples placed in slots milled in the wall. In carrying out the experiments, an automated system of scientific research was applied, which allows a large body of data to be obtained within a short period of time. The experimental investigations in the first test section were carried out at Re = 8700, and in the second one, at five values of Reynolds number. Information about temperature fields was obtained by statistically processing the array of sampled probe thermocouple indications at 300 points in the experimental channel cross section. Reach material has been obtained for verifying the codes used for calculating velocity and temperature fields in channels with

  9. Mutant swarms of a totivirus-like entities are present in the red macroalga Chondrus crispus and have been partially transferred to the nuclear genome.

    PubMed

    Rousvoal, Sylvie; Bouyer, Betty; López-Cristoffanini, Camilo; Boyen, Catherine; Collén, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Chondrus crispus Stackhouse (Gigartinales) is a red seaweed found on North Atlantic rocky shores. Electrophoresis of RNA extracts showed a prominent band with a size of around 6,000 bp. Sequencing of the band revealed several sequences with similarity to totiviruses, double-stranded RNA viruses that normally infect fungi. This virus-like entity was named C. crispus virus (CcV). It should probably be regarded as an extreme viral quasispecies or a mutant swarm since low identity (<65%) was found between sequences. Totiviruses typically code for two genes: one capsid gene (gag) and one RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (pol) with a pseudoknot structure between the genes. Both the genes and the intergenic structures were found in the CcV sequences. A nonidentical gag gene was also found in the nuclear genome of C. crispus, with associated expressed sequence tags (EST) and upstream regulatory features. The gene was presumably horizontally transferred from the virus to the alga. Similar dsRNA bands were seen in extracts from different life cycle stages of C. crispus and from all geographic locations tested. In addition, similar bands were also observed in RNA extractions from other red algae; however, the significance of this apparently widespread phenomenon is unknown. Neither phenotype caused by the infection nor any virus particles or capsid proteins were identified; thus, the presence of viral particles has not been validated. These findings increase the known host range of totiviruses to include marine red algae. PMID:27151076

  10. Expression Profile of Genes as Indicators of Developmental Competence and Quality of In Vitro Fertilization and Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Monteleone, Melisa Carolina; Mucci, Nicolas; Kaiser, German Gustavo; Brocco, Marcela; Mutto, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive biotechnologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enable improved reproductive efficiency of animals. However, the birth rate of in vitro-derived embryos still lags behind that of their in vivo counterparts. Thus, it is critical to develop an accurate evaluation and prediction system of embryo competence, both for commercial purposes and for scientific research. Previous works have demonstrated that in vitro culture systems induce alterations in the relative abundance (RA) of diverse transcripts and thus compromise embryo quality. The aim of this work was to analyze the RA of a set of genes involved in cellular stress (heat shock protein 70-kDa, HSP70), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein, Bip; proteasome subunit β5, PSMB5) and apoptosis (BCL-2 associated X protein, Bax; cysteine aspartate protease-3, Caspase-3) in bovine blastocysts produced by IVF or SCNT and compare it with that of their in vivo counterparts. Poly (A) + mRNA was isolated from three pools of 10 blastocysts per treatment and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The RA of three of the stress indicators analyzed (Bax, PSMB5 and Bip) was significantly increased in SCNT embryos as compared with that of in vivo-derived blastocysts. No significant differences were found in the RA of HSP70 and Caspase-3 gene transcripts. This study could potentially complement morphological analyses in the development of an effective and accurate technique for the diagnosis of embryo quality, ultimately aiding to improve the efficiency of assisted reproductive techniques (ART). PMID:25269019

  11. Effects of the reproductive status on morphological oocyte quality and developmental competence of oocytes after in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer in cat.

    PubMed

    Naoi, H; Agung, B; Karja, N W K; Wongsrikeao, P; Shimizu, R; Taniguchi, M; Otoi, T

    2008-04-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of the reproductive cycle of donor cat on the quality of oocytes at recovery and developmental competence of oocytes after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT). Based on the presence or absence of follicles and corpora lutea, the ovarian pairs collected were classified into inactive, follicular or luteal stages. After collection of oocytes, the oocytes were classified into four grades according to the morphological condition of oocyte cytoplasm and cumulus cells. A total of 16 558 oocytes were obtained from 198 ovarian pairs. The total mean numbers of oocytes and the mean numbers of oocytes with high quality (grade I) were significantly higher in ovarian pairs at the inactive stage (111.1 and 19.0 oocytes, respectively) than in ovarian pairs at the follicular stage (67.1 and 11.4 oocytes, respectively). A significant difference in the proportions of oocytes with grade I out of the total examined oocytes was observed between the follicular and luteal stages of ovaries (14.9% vs 20.2%, p < 0.05). The proportions of IVF embryos cleaved and developed to blastocysts significantly decreased with decreased quality of oocytes at recovery, irrespective of the reproductive status of ovaries. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the proportions of cleavage and development to the blastocyst stage of IVF and NT embryos among three oestrous stages of ovaries. These results indicate that the reproductive cycle stage of donor cat ovaries has no apparent effects on the in vitro development of oocytes after IVF and NT, but the quality of oocytes at recovery influences the development of IVF embryos. PMID:18325005

  12. Developmental Outcome and Related Abnormalities in Goats: Comparison Between Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer- and In Vivo-Derived Concepti During Pregnancy Through Term.

    PubMed

    Martins, Leonardo Tondello; Neto, Saul Gaudêncio; Tavares, Kaio César Simiano; Calderón, Carlos Enrique Méndez; Aguiar, Luis Henrique; Lazzarotto, Cícera Regina; Ongaratto, Felipe Ledur; Rodrigues, Victor Hugo Vieira; Carneiro, Igor de Sá; Rossetto, Rafael; Almeida, Anderson Pinto; Fernandes, César Carneiro Linhares; Rondina, Davide; Dias, Ana Christina Oliveira; Chies, Jocelei Maria; Polejaeva, Irina A; Rodrigues, José Luiz; Forell, Fabiana; Bertolini, Luciana Relly; Bertolini, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is characterized by low efficiency and the occurrence of developmental abnormalities, which are rather poorly studied phenomena in goats. This study aimed at comparing overall SCNT efficiency in goats by using in vitro-matured (IVM) or in vivo-matured oocytes and fibroblast donor cells (mock transfected, transgenic, or wild type), also characterizing symptoms of the Abnormal Offspring Syndrome (AOS) in development, comparing results with pregnancies produced by artificial insemination (AI) and in vivo-derived (IVD) embryos. The SCNT group had lower pregnancy rate (18.3%, 11/60), total number of concepti (20.0%, 12/60), term births (3.3%, 2/60), and live births (1.7%, 1/60) than both the IVD (77.8%, 7/9; 155.5%, 14/9; 122.2%, 11/9; 88.8%, 8/9) and the AI (71.4%, 10/14; 121.4%, 17/14; 100%, 14/14; 78.5%, 11/14) groups, respectively (p < 0.05). No SCNT pregnancies reached term using IVM oocytes, but in vivo-matured oocytes resulted in two term transgenic cloned kids. The proportion fetal membrane (FM) weight/birth weight reflected an increase in FM size and cotyledonary enlargement in clones, for disproportionally bigger newborns in relation to cotyledonary numbers. Overall, goat cloning showed losses and abnormality patterns similar to the AOS in cloned cattle and sheep, which have not been previously well recognized in goats. PMID:27362734

  13. Identification of Valid Housekeeping Genes for Real-Time Quantitative PCR Analysis of Collapsed Lung Tissues of Neonatal Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer-Derived Cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yunhai; Jiang, Qiuling; Rao, Man; Sheng, Zheya; Zhang, Yu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Jianning; Zhu, Huabin

    2015-10-01

    Cloned calves produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer frequently suffer alveolar collapse as newborns. To study the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon, the expression profiles of numerous genes involved in lung development need to be investigated. Quantitative real-time PCR is commonly adopted in gene expression analysis. However, selection of an appropriate reference gene for normalization is critical for obtaining reliable and accurate results. Seven housekeeping genes-β-glucuronidase (GUSB), phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), β-2-microglobolin (B2M), peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), TATA-box binding protein (TBP), and 5.8S ribosomal RNA (5.8S rRNA)-were selected and evaluated as candidates. Their gene expression levels in the collapsed lungs of deceased neonate cloned calves and normal lung derived from normal calves were assessed. The ranking of gene expression stability was estimated by the geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper programs. 5.8S rRNA and PPIA were determined to be the most stable reference genes by geNorm and BestKeeper, whereas the combination of GAPDH and TBP was suggested as reference genes by NormFinder. Taking these results into account, we conclude that 5.8S rRNA and PPIA could be the most reliable reference genes for studying the genes involved in alveolar collapse. Moreover, 5.8S rRNA could be represented as a uniform reference gene in similar cases. PMID:26393896

  14. Relationships between the Life Values of U. S. College Students and their Cognitive/Affective Responses to the Threat of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Scott B.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relationships between life values of 399 American college students and their nuclear war-related thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Subjects completed four scales from Life Values Inventory, Satisfaction with Life Scale, four scales from Nuclear War Inventory, and single behavioral measure of approach toward information concerning nuclear…

  15. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium: Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in Southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaf, Christopher Leopold

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South-Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund (55.7°N, 13.2°E) between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half-time, Teff,eco, of fallout radiocaesium and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half-times, Ts, of 137Cs and 40K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of 137Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of 137Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for 137Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average (+/-1 WSE), 66 +/- 3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81 +/- 4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated in the group during the post-Chernobyl study period. The effective ecological half-time for 137Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8 +/- 0.2 y. The aggregate transfer of 137Cs from deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 1.7 Bq kg-1/kBq m-2. These vales may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the reference group in the 1960s, and an aggregate transfer factor of 9.8 Bq kg-1/kBq m-2. The average committed effective dose from ingested 137Cs Chernobyl fallout in the study group was estimated to be 0.02 mSv and from the nuclear weapons fallout to 0.20 mSv. The estimates of whole-body content of 137Cs in the Russian subjects obtained through

  16. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  17. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  18. Tumorigenesis of nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cells is reduced through differentiation and enrichment following transplantation in the infarcted rat heart.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Su, Dechun; Wang, Ke; Zhao, Yingjun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tumorigenic potential of nuclear transfer-derived (nt) mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) transplanted into infarcted rat hearts. The nt‑mESCs were cultured using a bioreactor system to develop embryoid bodies, which were induced with 1% ascorbic acid to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. The nt‑mESC‑derived cardiomyocytes (nt‑mESCs‑CMs) were enriched using Percoll density gradient separation to generate nt‑mESCs‑percoll‑enriched (PE)‑CMs. Ischemia was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in female Sprague‑Dawley rats. Immunosuppressed rats (daily intraperitoneal injections of cyclosporine A and methylprednisolone) were randomly assigned to receive an injection containing 5x106 mESCs, nt‑mESCs, nt‑mESC‑CMs or nt‑mESC‑PE‑CMs. Analysis performed 8 weeks following transplantation revealed teratoma formation in 80, 86.67 and 33.33% of the rats administered with the mESCs, nt‑mESCs and nt‑mESC‑CMs, respectively, indicating no significant difference between the mESCs and nt‑mESCs; but significance (P<0.05) between the nt‑mESC‑CMs and nt‑mESCs. The mean tumor volumes were 82.72±6.52, 83.17±3.58 and 50.40±5.98 mm3, respectively (P>0.05 mESCs, vs. nt‑mESCs; P<0.05 nt‑mESC‑CMs, vs. nt‑mESCs). By contrast, no teratoma formation was detected in the rats, which received nt‑mESC‑PE‑CMs. Octamer‑binding transcription factor‑4, a specific marker of undifferentiated mESCs, was detected using polymerase chain reaction in the rats, which received nt‑mESCs and nt‑mESC‑CMs, but not in rats administered with nt‑mESC‑PE‑CMs. In conclusion, nt‑mESCs exhibited the same pluripotency as mESCs, and teratoma formation following nt‑mESC transplantation was reduced by cell differentiation and enrichment. PMID:27082733

  19. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  20. Factors affecting production of transgenic rats by ICSI-mediated DNA transfer: effects of sonication and freeze-thawing of spermatozoa, rat strains for sperm and oocyte donors, and different constructs of exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Masumi; Kato, Megumi; Ishikawa, Ayako; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Yagi, Takeshi; Hochi, Shinichi

    2005-04-01

    Factors affecting the efficiency of producing transgenic rats by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-mediated DNA transfer were investigated. Epididymal spermatozoa from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were sonicated and/or frozen-thawed for cutting the tail and membrane disruption. The sperm heads were exposed for 1 min to different concentrations (0.02-2.5 microg/ml) of 3.0 kb enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) DNA solution, and then microinjected into the denuded F1 hybrid (Donryu x LEW) rat oocytes. The optimal concentration of EGFP DNA solution was 0.1 microg/ml, as determined by the in vitro developmental competence into morulae/blastocysts of the ICSI oocytes and the EGFP expression of the resultant embryos. The efficiency of producing transgenic rat offspring (per transferred zygote) was 2.8%, 1.6%, and 3.3% in the oocytes injected with sonicated, frozen-thawed, and sonicated + frozen-thawed sperm heads, respectively. The founder transgenic rats carrying the EGFP gene transmitted their transgenes to their progeny according to the Mendelian fashion, suggesting the stable incorporation of the transgenes into the rat genomes. Four rat strains (F344, LEW, Donryu, and SD) were compared for their suitability as sperm/oocyte donors for the production of transgenic rats by ICSI with sonicated, frozen-thawed and solution of EGFP DNA-exposed sperm heads. The efficiency of producing transgenic rats in the SD strain (8.2%) was higher than that in the LEW strain (0.9%), while those in the F344 and Donryu strains (4.3%-4.4%) were intermediate. One plasmid DNA (Fyn, 5.0 kb) and two BAC DNA (BAC/Fyn, 208 kb; Svet1/IRES-Cre, 186 kb) were successfully introduced into the SD rat genomes via ICSI, with the producing efficiencies of 2.8%, 0.9%, and 2.4%, respectively. PMID:15685640

  1. High-content screening identifies small molecules that remove nuclear foci, affect MBNL distribution and CELF1 protein levels via a PKC-independent pathway in myotonic dystrophy cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ketley, Ami; Chen, Catherine Z; Li, Xin; Arya, Sukrat; Robinson, Thelma E; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Udosen, Inyang; Morris, Glenn E; Holt, Ian; Furling, Denis; Chaouch, Soraya; Haworth, Ben; Southall, Noel; Shinn, Paul; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P; Hayes, Christopher J; Brook, J David

    2014-03-15

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-system neuromuscular disorder for which there is no treatment. We have developed a medium throughput phenotypic assay, based on the identification of nuclear foci in DM patient cell lines using in situ hybridization and high-content imaging to screen for potentially useful therapeutic compounds. A series of further assays based on molecular features of DM have also been employed. Two compounds that reduce and/or remove nuclear foci have been identified, Ro 31-8220 and chromomycin A3. Ro 31-8220 is a PKC inhibitor, previously shown to affect the hyperphosphorylation of CELF1 and ameliorate the cardiac phenotype in a DM1 mouse model. We show that the same compound eliminates nuclear foci, reduces MBNL1 protein in the nucleus, affects ATP2A1 alternative splicing and reduces steady-state levels of CELF1 protein. We demonstrate that this effect is independent of PKC activity and conclude that this compound may be acting on alternative kinase targets within DM pathophysiology. Understanding the activity profile for this compound is key for the development of targeted therapeutics in the treatment of DM. PMID:24179176

  2. Production of cloned NIBS (Nippon Institute for Biological Science) and α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout MGH miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer using the NIBS breed as surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Horii, Wataru; Hirakata, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Yuji; Waki, Shiori; Sano, Junichi; Saitoh, Toshiki; Sahara, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akira; Yazawa, Hajime; Sachs, David H.; Nunoya, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Background Nuclear transfer (NT) technologies offer a means for producing the genetically modified pigs necessary to develop swine models for mechanistic studies of disease processes as well as to serve as organ donors for xenotransplantation. Most previous studies have used commercial pigs as surrogates. Method and Results In this study, we established a cloning technique for miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pigs as surrogates. Moreover, utilizing this technique, we have successfully produced an α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine. Fibroblasts procured from a NIBS miniature pig fetus were injected into 1312 enucleated oocytes. The cloned embryos were transferred to 11 surrogates of which five successfully delivered 13 cloned offspring; the production efficiency was 1.0% (13/1312). In a second experiment, lung fibroblasts obtained from neonatal GalT-KO MGH miniature swine were used as donor cells and 1953 cloned embryos were transferred to 12 surrogates. Six cloned offspring were born from five surrogates, a production efficiency of 0.3% (6/1953). Conclusions These results demonstrate successful establishment of a miniature pig cloning technique by SCNT using NIBS miniature pigs as surrogates. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of successful production of GalT-KO miniature swine using miniature swine surrogates. This technique could help to ensure a stable supply of the cloned pigs through the use of miniature pig surrogates and could expand production in countries with limited space or in facilities with special regulations such as specific pathogen-free or good laboratory practice. PMID:23581451

  3. Lowering storage temperature during ovary transport is beneficial to the developmental competence of bovine oocytes used for somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y S; Zhao, X; Su, J M; An, Z X; Xiong, X R; Wang, L J; Liu, J; Quan, F S; Hua, S; Zhang, Y

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of storage temperature during ovary transport on the developmental competence of bovine oocytes for use in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Ovaries obtained from a slaughterhouse were stored in physiological saline for 3-4h at one of the three temperatures: 15 °C, 25 °C, or 35 °C. The developmental competence of oocytes used for SCNT was ascertained by cleavage and blastocyst formation rate, total cell number, apoptosis index, and the relative abundance of Bax and Hsp70.1 in day 7 blastocysts. Ovaries stored at 35 °C for 3-4h reduced the recovery rate of grade I and II oocytes compared with those stored at 25 °C or 15 °C (45.1±0.7% vs. 76.7±1.2% or 74.8±2.0%, P<0.05). The proportion of oocytes matured to the MII stage (maturation rate) for oocytes stored at 35 °C was significantly lower than those stored at 25 °C or 15 °C (51.3±0.9% vs. 75.1±1.4% or 71.7±1.3%, P<0.05). Cleavage rate (77.7±2.1%, 77.9±1.1% and 72.1±0.7% for 15 °C, 25 °C and 35 °C groups, respectively) and blastocyst formation rate (39.1±0.5%, 36.8±1.4% and 32.2±0.9% for 15 °C, 25 °C and 35 °C groups, respectively) following SCNT were not significantly different between treatments. Oocytes from ovaries stored at 15 °C, however, produced blastocysts with higher cell numbers (97.3±8.6 vs. 80.2±10.8 or 77.4±11.7; P<0.05) and lower apoptotic index (5.1±1.3 vs. 13.5±1.6 or 18.6±1.1, P<0.05) than those stored at 25 °C or 35 °C. The relative abundance of Bax and Hsp70.1 in day 7 blastocysts produced from oocytes derived from ovaries stored at 15 °C was lower than those stored at 25 °C or 35 °C (P<0.05). It was concluded that a storage temperature of 15 °C for a 3-4h period had a significant beneficial effect on the quality and developmental competence of oocytes used for SCNT due to the alleviation of stresses on the oocytes compared with those subjected to storage temperatures of 25 °C or 35 °C. PMID

  4. Particle and nuclear physics parameters—how do they affect the tracks of double beta events in a germanium detector, and their separation from gamma events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Krivosheina, I. V.; Titkova, I. V.

    2006-01-01

    The sizes of tracks of events of neutrinoless double beta decay in a germanium detector depend on particle physics and nuclear physics parameters such as neutrino mass, right-handed current parameters, etc., and nuclear matrix elements. The knowledge of this dependence is of importance, since the key to probe the existence of 0 νββ decay beyond observation of a signal at the Q value of the process, Qββ, is the discrimination of ββ events from background γ events (or other events), in almost any double beta decay experiment (see [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, I.V. Krivosheina, A. Dietz, et al., Phys. Lett. B 586 (2004) 198; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, A. Dietz, I.V. Krivosheina, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 522 (2004) 371]). In this Letter for the first time Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-accompanied (2 νββ) and neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) events, and of various kinds of background processes such as multiple and other γ interactions are reported for a Ge detector. The time history of the evolution of the individual events is followed and a systematic study has been performed of the sizes of the events (volumes in the detector inside which the energy of the event is released which determine the observed signals). Effects of the angular correlations of the two electrons in ββ decay, which again depend on the above nuclear and (for 0 νββ decay) particle physics parameters, are taken into account and have been calculated for this purpose for 76Ge for the first time on basis of the experimental half-life and of realistic nuclear matrix elements. A brief outlook is given on the potential of future experiments with respect to determination of the particle physics parameters , < λ >, < η >.

  5. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selectable marker for the microalgal chloroplast: a strategy for the isolation of nuclear mutations that affect chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2014-12-01

    Negative selectable markers are useful tools for forward-genetic screens aimed at identifying trans-acting factors that are required for expression of specific genes. Transgenic lines harbouring the marker fused to a gene element, such as a promoter, may be mutagenized to isolate loss-of-function mutants able to survive under selection. Such a strategy allows the molecular dissection of factors that are essential for expression of the gene. Expression of individual chloroplast genes in plants and algae typically requires one or more nuclear-encoded factors that act at the post-transcriptional level, often through interaction with the 5' UTR of the mRNA. To study such nuclear control further, we have developed the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase gene codA as a conditional negative selectable marker for use in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that a codon-optimized variant of codA with three amino acid substitutions confers sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) when expressed in the chloroplast under the control of endogenous promoter/5' UTR elements from the photosynthetic genes psaA or petA. UV mutagenesis of the psaA transgenic line allowed recovery of 5-FC-resistant, photosynthetically deficient lines harbouring mutations in the nuclear gene for the factor TAA1 that is required for psaA translation. Similarly, the petA line was used to isolate mutants of the petA mRNA stability factor MCA1 and the translation factor TCA1. The codA marker may be used to identify critical residues in known nuclear factors and to aid the discovery of additional factors required for expression of chloroplast genes. PMID:25234691

  6. Family Intimacy and Affection: A Sociology of Positive Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Floyd M.

    This paper deals with aspects of positive family affect in intimate family relationships such as: (1) the nuclear family of orientation, including the child-parent subgroup and the sibling subgroup; (2) the nuclear family of procreation, including the marital subgroup and parent-child subgroup; and (3) the dating relationship. Interpersonal…

  7. Pragmatic Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasper, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Attempting to clarify the concept of pragmatic transfer, this article proposes as a basic distinction Leech/Thomas' dichotomy of sociopragmatics versus pragmalinguistics, presenting evidence for transfer at both levels. Issues discussed include pragmatic universals in speech act realization, conditions for pragmatic transfer, communicative…

  8. 31 CFR 306.100 - Transferable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transferable securities. 306.100.... SECURITIES Transfer Through Judicial Proceedings § 306.100 Transferable securities. The Department will recognize valid judicial proceedings affecting the ownership of or interest in transferable securities,...

  9. 31 CFR 306.100 - Transferable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transferable securities. 306.100.... SECURITIES Transfer Through Judicial Proceedings § 306.100 Transferable securities. The Department will recognize valid judicial proceedings affecting the ownership of or interest in transferable securities,...

  10. 31 CFR 306.100 - Transferable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transferable securities. 306.100.... SECURITIES Transfer Through Judicial Proceedings § 306.100 Transferable securities. The Department will recognize valid judicial proceedings affecting the ownership of or interest in transferable securities,...

  11. 31 CFR 306.100 - Transferable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transferable securities. 306.100.... SECURITIES Transfer Through Judicial Proceedings § 306.100 Transferable securities. The Department will recognize valid judicial proceedings affecting the ownership of or interest in transferable securities,...

  12. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  13. Key Performance Criteria Affecting the Most the Safety of a Nuclear Waste Long Term Storage : A Case Study Commissioned by CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Marvy, A.; Lioure, A; Heriard-Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.; Schneider, T.; Schieber, C.

    2003-02-24

    As part of the work scope set in the French law on high level long lived waste R&D passed in 1991, CEA is conducting a research program to establish the scientific basis and assess the feasibility of long term storage as an option for the safe management of nuclear waste for periods as long as centuries. This goal is a significant departure from the current industrial practice where storage facilities are usually built to last only a few decades. From a technical viewpoint such an extension in time seems feasible provided care and maintenance is exercised. Considering such long periods of time, the risk for Society of loosing oversight and control of such a facility is real, which triggers the question of whether and how long term storage safety can be actually achieved. Therefore CEA commissioned a study (1) in which MUTADIS Consultants (2) and CEPN (3) were both involved. The case study looks into several past and actual human enterprises conducted over significant periods o f time, one of them dating back to the end of the 18th century, and all identified out of the nuclear field. Then-prevailing societal behavior and organizational structures are screened out to show how they were or are still able to cope with similar oversight and control goals. As a result, the study group formulated a set of performance criteria relating to issues like responsibility, securing funds, legal and legislative implications, economic sustainable development, all being areas which are not traditionally considered as far as technical studies are concerned. These criteria can be most useful from the design stage onward, first in an attempt to define the facility construction and operating guiding principles, and thereafter to substantiate the safety case for long term storage and get geared to the public dialogue on that undertaking should it become a reality.

  14. Making behavioral technology transferable

    PubMed Central

    Pennypacker, H. S.; Hench, Larry L.

    1997-01-01

    The paucity of transferred behavioral technologies is traced to the absence of strategies for developing technology that is transferable, as distinct from strategies for conducting research, whether basic or applied. In the field of engineering, the results of basic research are transformed to candidate technologies that meet standardized criteria with respect to three properties: quantification, repetition, and verification. The technology of vitrification and storage of nuclear waste is used to illustrate the application of these criteria. Examples from behavior analysis are provided, together with suggestions regarding changes in practice that will accelerate the development and application of behavioral technologies. PMID:22478284

  15. Cell cycle-dependent nuclear accumulation of the p94fer tyrosine kinase is regulated by its NH2 terminus and is affected by kinase domain integrity and ATP binding.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dor, I; Bern, O; Tennenbaum, T; Nir, U

    1999-02-01

    p94fer and p51ferT are two tyrosine kinases that are encoded by differentially spliced transcripts of the FER locus in the mouse. The two tyrosine kinases share identical SH2 and kinase domains but differ in their NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. Unlike p94fer, the presence of which has been demonstrated in most mammalian cell lines analyzed, the expression of p51ferT is restricted to meiotic cells. Here, we show that the two related tyrosine kinases also differ in their subcellular localization profiles. Although p51ferT accumulates constitutively in the cell nucleus, p94fer is cytoplasmic in quiescent cells and enters the nucleus concomitantly with the onset of S phase. The nuclear translocation of the FER proteins is driven by a nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is located within the kinase domain of these enzymes. The functioning of that NLS depends on the integrity of the kinase domain but was not affected by inactivation of the kinase activity. The NH2 terminus of p94fer dictated the cell cycle-dependent functioning of the NLS of FER kinase. This process was governed by coiled-coil forming sequences that are present in the NH2 terminus of the kinase. The regulatory effect of the p94fer NH2-terminal sequences was not affected by kinase activity but was perturbed by mutations in the kinase domain ATP binding site. Ectopic expression of the constitutively nuclear p51ferT in CHO cells interfered with S-phase progression in these cells. This was not seen in p94fer-overexpressing cells. The FER tyrosine kinases seem, thus, to be regulated by novel mechanisms that direct their different subcellular distribution profiles and may, consequently, control their cellular functioning. PMID:10074905

  16. Nucleocytoplasmic transfer of the NF2 tumor suppressor protein merlin is regulated by exon 2 and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in exon 15.

    PubMed

    Kressel, Michael; Schmucker, Beatrice

    2002-09-15

    The neurofibromatosis 2 protein merlin is a classical tumor suppressor protein. Germline mutations predispose to the development of schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas. Merlin has been implicated in cellular migration and adhesion. This function is reflected in its subcellular localization at the plasma membrane and known interacting partners. Merlin has been regarded as an exception in not exerting a functional role within the nucleus as other tumor suppressors do. Here, we show that detection of wild-type protein in the nucleus is a rare event. However, splicing out of exon 2 leads to unrestricted entry into the nucleus. Skipping of adjacent exon 3 has no comparable effect ruling out an unspecific effect due to misfolding of the 4.1/JEF domain. Exon 2 functions as a cytoplasmic retention factor as it is able to confer sole cytoplasmic localization to a GFP fusion protein. Nuclear entry of merlin is thus regulated by alternative splicing within the 4.1/JEF domain and analogous to band 4.1 protein. Merlin's ability to enter the nucleus is complemented by a full nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttle protein with a functional Rev-type nuclear export sequence (NES) within exon 15 that facilitates export via the CRM1/exportin pathway. Deletion of this NES or treatment with the CRM1-specific inhibitor leptomycin B leads to overall nuclear accumulation of merlin isoforms missing exon 2. A cellular function different to the wild-type protein is implied for naturally occurring splice variants lacking exon 2. A putative effect of merlin as a transcriptional regulator and identification of nuclear binding partners remains to be elucidated. PMID:12217955

  17. The criterion for blanking-off heat-transfer tubes in the steam generators at VVER-based nuclear power plants based on the results of eddy-current examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunin, V. P.; Zhdanov, A. G.; Chegodaev, V. V.; Stolyarov, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The problem of defining the criterion for blanking off heat-transfer tubes in the steam generators at nuclear power plants on the basis of signals obtained from the standard multifrequency eddy-current examination is considered. The decision about blanking off one or another tube is presently made with reference to one parameter of the relevant signal at the working frequency, namely, with reference to its phase, which directly depends on the depth of the flaw being detected, i.e., a crack in the tube. The crack depth equal to 60% of the tube wall thickness is regarded to be the critical one, at which a decision about withdrawing such a tube out from operation (blanking off) must be taken. However, since mechanical tensile rupture tests of heat-transfer tubes show the possibility of their further use with such flaws, the secondary parameter of the signal, namely, its amplitude, must be used for determining the blanking-off criterion. The signals produced by the standard flow-type transducers in response to flaws in the form of a longitudinal crack having the depth and length within the limits permitted by the relevant regulations were calculated using 3D finite-element modeling. Based on the obtained results, the values of the eddy-current signal amplitude were determined, which, together with the signal phase value, form a new amplitude-phase criterion for blanking off heat-transfer tubes. For confirming the effectiveness of this technique, the algorithm for revealing the signal indications satisfying the proposed amplitude-phase criterion was tested on real signals obtained from operational eddy-current examination of the state of steam generator heat-transfer tubes carried out within the framework of planned preventive repair.

  18. Pairing effects in nuclear dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume; Tanimura, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made to account for super-fluidity in time-dependent mean-field description of nuclear dynamic [1-5]. Inclusion of pairing is important to achieve a realistic description of static properties of nuclei. Here,we show that pairing can also affect the nuclear motion. State of the art TDHF approach can describe from small to large amplitude collective motion as well as the collision between nuclei. Very recently, this microscopic approach has been improved to include pairing either in the BCS or HFB framework. Recent applications of the 3D TDHF + BCS (TDHF+BCS) model introduced in [4] will be presented. The role of super-fluidity on collective motion [6, 7], on one- and two-particle transfer [8] and on fission [9, 10] will be illustrated.

  19. A new measurement of the energy dependence of nuclear transparency for large momentum transfer 12C(p,2p) scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leksanov, A.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtojarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Schetkovsky, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Malki, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Y.; Piasetzky, E.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2000-12-01

    We present a new measurement of the energy dependence of nuclear transparency from AGS experiment E850, performed using the EVA solenoidal spectrometer, upgraded since 1995. Using a secondary beam from the AGS accelerator, we simultaneously measured pp elastic scattering from hydrogen and (p,2p) quasi-elastic scattering in carbon at incoming momenta of 5.9, 8.0, 9.0, 11.7 and 14.4 GeV/c. This incident momentum range corresponds to a Q2 region between 4.8 and 12.7 (GeV/c)2. The detector allowed us to do a complete kinematic analysis for the center-of-mass polar angles in the range 85°-90°. We report on the measured variation of the nuclear transparency with energy and compare the new results with previous measurements.

  20. Isotopic ratio and vertical distribution of radionuclides in soil affected by the accident of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Saito, Takumi; Muroya, Yusa; Sawahata, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Yuji; Nagasaki, Shinya; Okamoto, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Katsumura, Yosuke; Tanaka, Satoru

    2012-11-01

    The results of γ analyses of soil samples obtained from 50 locations in Fukushima prefecture on April 20, 2011, revealed the presence of a spectrum of radionuclides resulted from the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). The sum γ radioactivity concentration ranged in more than 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the sampling locations. The contamination of soils in the northwest of the FDNPP was considerable. The (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratios of the soil samples plotted as a function of the distance from the F1 NPPs exhibited three distinctive patterns. Such patterns would reflect not only the different deposition behaviors of these radionuclides, but also on the conditions of associated release events such as temperature and compositions and physicochemical forms of released radionuclides. The (136)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio, on the other hand, was considered to only reflect the difference in isotopic compositions of source materials. Two locations close to the NPP in the northwest direction were found to be depleted in short-lived (136)Cs. This likely suggested the presence of distinct sources with different (136)Cs/(137)Cs isotopic ratios, although their details were unknown at present. Vertical γ activity profiles of (131)I and (137)Cs were also investigated, using 20-30 cm soil cores in several locations. About 70% or more of the radionuclides were present in the uppermost 2-cm regions. It was found that the profiles of (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratios showed maxima in the 2-4 cm regions, suggesting slightly larger migration of the former nuclide. PMID:22634028

  1. Electron transfer complex between nitrous oxide reductase and cytochrome c552 from Pseudomonas nautica: kinetic, nuclear magnetic resonance, and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Dell'acqua, Simone; Pauleta, Sofia R; Monzani, Enrico; Pereira, Alice S; Casella, Luigi; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2008-10-14

    The multicopper enzyme nitrous oxide reductase (N 2OR) catalyzes the final step of denitrification, the two-electron reduction of N 2O to N 2. This enzyme is a functional homodimer containing two different multicopper sites: CuA and CuZ. CuA is a binuclear copper site that transfers electrons to the tetranuclear copper sulfide CuZ, the catalytic site. In this study, Pseudomonas nautica cytochrome c 552 was identified as the physiological electron donor. The kinetic data show differences when physiological and artificial electron donors are compared [cytochrome vs methylviologen (MV)]. In the presence of cytochrome c 552, the reaction rate is dependent on the ET reaction and independent of the N 2O concentration. With MV, electron donation is faster than substrate reduction. From the study of cytochrome c 552 concentration dependence, we estimate the following kinetic parameters: K m c 552 = 50.2 +/- 9.0 muM and V max c 552 = 1.8 +/- 0.6 units/mg. The N 2O concentration dependence indicates a K mN 2 O of 14.0 +/- 2.9 muM using MV as the electron donor. The pH effect on the kinetic parameters is different when MV or cytochrome c 552 is used as the electron donor (p K a = 6.6 or 8.3, respectively). The kinetic study also revealed the hydrophobic nature of the interaction, and direct electron transfer studies showed that CuA is the center that receives electrons from the physiological electron donor. The formation of the electron transfer complex was observed by (1)H NMR protein-protein titrations and was modeled with a molecular docking program (BiGGER). The proposed docked complexes corroborated the ET studies giving a large number of solutions in which cytochrome c 552 is placed near a hydrophobic patch located around the CuA center. PMID:18803407

  2. Isolated transfer of analog signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, T.

    1974-01-01

    Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

  3. 10 CFR 52.105 - Transfer of combined license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of combined license. 52.105 Section 52.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.105 Transfer of combined license. A combined license may be transferred...

  4. 10 CFR 52.105 - Transfer of combined license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of combined license. 52.105 Section 52.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.105 Transfer of combined license. A combined license may be transferred...

  5. 10 CFR 52.105 - Transfer of combined license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of combined license. 52.105 Section 52.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.105 Transfer of combined license. A combined license may be transferred...

  6. 10 CFR 52.105 - Transfer of combined license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of combined license. 52.105 Section 52.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.105 Transfer of combined license. A combined license may be transferred...

  7. 10 CFR 52.105 - Transfer of combined license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of combined license. 52.105 Section 52.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.105 Transfer of combined license. A combined license may be transferred...

  8. The Time-Dependent Transfer Factor of Radiocesium from Soil to Game Animals in Japan after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keiko; Howard, Brenda J; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-09-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident, monitoring of tissues from hunted game animals ensures compliance with the standard food limits for radionuclides in Japan. We quantified the transfer of (137)Cs from contaminated land to game animals using the Aggregated transfer factor (Tag = activity concentration in meat [Bq kg(-1) fw]/amount in soil [Bq m(-2)]) of (137)Cs for Asian black bear, wild boar, sika deer, green pheasant, copper pheasant and wild duck, collected between 2011 and 2015. Open data sources were used from Fukushima, Miyagi, Ibaraki, Tochigi, and Gunma prefectures. Our initially compiled data showed that the maximum reported (137)Cs activity concentration in wild boar after the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident were lower than those reported after the Chernobyl accident. The geometric mean Tag values (m(2)kg(-1) fw) of (137)Cs in 2015 for Asian black bear, wild boar, sika deer and copper pheasant were similar (1.9-5.1) × 10(-3) while those for green pheasant and wild duck were about 1 order of magnitude lower at (1.0-2.2) × 10(-4). Effective half-lives were 1.2-6.9 y except for sika deer and copper pheasant where no decreases were found. In contrast to the Chernobyl accident, no seasonal change occurred in the meat (137)Cs activity concentrations of the wild animals during the study period. PMID:27513196

  9. Reduction of High Levels of Internal Radio-Contamination by Dietary Intervention in Residents of Areas Affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Disaster: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Gilmour, Stuart; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro; Hayano, Ryugo

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining low levels of chronic internal contamination among residents in radiation-contaminated areas after a nuclear disaster is a great public health concern. However, the efficacy of reduction measures for individual internal contamination remains unknown. To reduce high levels of internal radiation exposure in a group of individuals exposed through environmental sources, we performed careful dietary intervention with identification of suspected contaminated foods, as part of mass voluntary radiation contamination screenings and counseling program in Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital and Hirata Central Hospital. From a total of 30,622 study participants, only 9 residents displayed internal cesium-137 (Cs-137) levels of more than 50 Bq/kg. The median level of internal Cs-137 contamination in these residents at the initial screening was 4,830 Bq/body (range: 2,130–15,918 Bq/body) and 69.6 Bq/kg (range: 50.7–216.3 Bq/kg). All these residents with high levels of internal contamination consumed homegrown produce without radiation inspection, and often collected mushrooms in the wild or cultivated them on bed-logs in their homes. They were advised to consume distributed food mainly and to refrain from consuming potentially contaminated foods without radiation inspection and local produces under shipment restrictions such as mushrooms, mountain vegetables, and meat of wild life. A few months after the intervention, re-examination of Cs levels revealed remarkable reduction of internal contamination in all residents. Although the levels of internal radiation exposure appear to be minimal amongst most residents in Fukushima, a subset of the population, who unknowingly consumed highly contaminated foodstuffs, experienced high levels of internal contamination. There seem to be similarities in dietary preferences amongst residents with high internal contamination levels, and intervention based on pre- and post-test counseling and dietary advice from medical care

  10. Reduction of high levels of internal radio-contamination by dietary intervention in residents of areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Gilmour, Stuart; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro; Hayano, Ryugo

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining low levels of chronic internal contamination among residents in radiation-contaminated areas after a nuclear disaster is a great public health concern. However, the efficacy of reduction measures for individual internal contamination remains unknown. To reduce high levels of internal radiation exposure in a group of individuals exposed through environmental sources, we performed careful dietary intervention with identification of suspected contaminated foods, as part of mass voluntary radiation contamination screenings and counseling program in Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital and Hirata Central Hospital. From a total of 30,622 study participants, only 9 residents displayed internal cesium-137 (Cs-137) levels of more than 50 Bq/kg. The median level of internal Cs-137 contamination in these residents at the initial screening was 4,830 Bq/body (range: 2,130-15,918 Bq/body) and 69.6 Bq/kg (range: 50.7-216.3 Bq/kg). All these residents with high levels of internal contamination consumed homegrown produce without radiation inspection, and often collected mushrooms in the wild or cultivated them on bed-logs in their homes. They were advised to consume distributed food mainly and to refrain from consuming potentially contaminated foods without radiation inspection and local produces under shipment restrictions such as mushrooms, mountain vegetables, and meat of wild life. A few months after the intervention, re-examination of Cs levels revealed remarkable reduction of internal contamination in all residents. Although the levels of internal radiation exposure appear to be minimal amongst most residents in Fukushima, a subset of the population, who unknowingly consumed highly contaminated foodstuffs, experienced high levels of internal contamination. There seem to be similarities in dietary preferences amongst residents with high internal contamination levels, and intervention based on pre- and post-test counseling and dietary advice from medical care

  11. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls affected by U.S. nuclear testing: all exposure pathways, remedial measures, and environmental loss of (137)Cs.

    PubMed

    Robison, William L; Hamilton, Terry F

    2010-01-01

    Radiation doses calculated for people resettling Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll, Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll, Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll, and Utrōk Island at Utrōk Atoll are presented. Residence is assumed to begin in 2010. In previous dose assessments it was shown that (137)Cs accounts for about 98% of the total dose for returning residents. About 85 to 90% (depending on the atoll) is via consumption of locally grown foods containing (137)Cs, and about 10 to 15% is due to external exposure from (137)Cs in the soil. These assessments were made using only the radiological half-life of (137)Cs (30.1 y). We have shown since that there is an environmental loss of (137)Cs from soil to groundwater that results in a more rapid loss of (137)Cs from the atoll ecosystem. The mean effective half-life of (137)Cs at the atolls is 8.5 y. Moreover, treatment of coconut trees with potassium (K) reduces (137)Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat at Bikini Atoll to about 5% of pretreatment concentrations. The magnitude of reduction is dependent on the concentration of (137)Cs in soil, and thereby in food crops, and is less for Enjebi and Rongelap Islands than for Bikini Island. Treatment of food crops and fruit trees with K and removal of the top 15 cm of soil around houses and community buildings prior to construction to reduce external exposure where people spend most of their time has been presented to the communities as a "Combined Option" remediation strategy. Doses presented here are calculated using the Combined Option, effective half-life of (137)Cs at the atolls, and a diet of both imported and local foods. The average natural background dose in the Marshall Islands, plus the anthropogenic nuclear test-related dose at Bikini, Enjebi, and Rongelap Islands, is less for each of the islands than the average background dose in the U.S. and Europe. PMID:19959945

  12. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, Frank E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: international comparison of R&D expenditures in 1989; NASA Technology Transfer Program; NASA Technology Utilization Program thrusts for FY 1992 and FY 1993; National Technology Transfer Network; and NTTC roles.

  13. Whole body counter assessment of internal radiocontamination in patients with end-stage renal disease living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nomura, Shuhei; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokiwa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess internal radiocontamination of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were regularly taking haemodialysis (HD) and living in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the Great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011. Methods Internal radiocontamination in 111 patients with ESRD regularly taking HD at Jyoban Hospital in Iwaki city, Fukushima from July 2012 to November 2012 was assessed with a whole body counter (WBC). The maximum annual effective dose was calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels. Interviews concerning patient dietary preferences and outdoor activities were also conducted. Results Among the 111 patients tested, internal radiocontamination with Cs-137 was detected in two participants, but the levels were marginal and just exceeded the detection limit (250 Bq/body). The tentatively calculated maximum annual effective dose ranged from 0.008 to 0.009 mSv/year, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Relative to 238 non-ESRD participants, patients with ERSD had significantly more opportunities to consume locally grown produce that was not distributed to the market (p<0.01). However, the percentage of patients with ESRD with detectable Cs (1.8%) was lower than that for non-ESRD participants (3.8%), although this difference was not significant (p=0.51). Conclusions These findings suggest that internal radiocontamination levels and the calculated annual additional effective doses were negligible for patients with ESRD taking HD in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Although HD is suggested to promote Cs-137 excretion, continuous inspection of locally grown produce together with WBC screening for radiocontamination should be continued for patients with ESRD regularly taking HD. PMID:26644125

  14. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33% was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  15. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  16. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-31

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  17. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at

  18. Establishment of a bovine blastocyst-derived cell line collection for the comparative analysis of embryos created in vivo and by in vitro fertilization, somatic cell nuclear transfer, or parthenogenetic activation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Neil C; Powell, Anne M; Camp, Mary; Ealy, Alan D

    2007-02-01

    Tools and methods for analyzing differences in embryos resulting from somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) in comparison to those derived from normal fertilization are needed to define better the nature of the nuclear reprogramming that occurs after NT. To this end, a collection of bovine blastocyst-derived cell lines was created. In vitro expanded or hatched blastocysts, used as primary culture tissue, were from NT; in vitro maturation, fertilization, and culture (IVF); or parthenogenetic (P) activation. Also, five in vivo-fertilized and developed blastocysts were collected by uterine flushing on the eighth d postfertilization. Whole blastocysts were physically attached to STO feeder layers to initiate all of the cell lines generated. The majority of the cell lines in the collection are trophectoderm, 38 NT-derived, 6 in vivo-derived, 20 IVF-derived, and 13 P-derived. Trophectoderm identity was ascertained by morphology and, in many cases, interferon-tau production. Several visceral endoderm cell lines and putative parietal endoderm cell lines were also established. At approximately 5% efficiency, epiblast masses from NT and IVF blastocysts survived and were isolated in culture. Two epiblast masses were also isolated from P blastocysts. Spontaneous differentiation from the epiblast outgrowths resulted in the establishment of fibroblast cell lines. The use of the trophectoderm cell lines as a comparative in vitro model of bovine trophectoderm and placental function is discussed in relation to NT reprogramming. PMID:17570020

  19. A nuclear localization signal in the matrix of spleen necrosis virus (SNV) does not allow efficient gene transfer into quiescent cells with SNV-derived vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Marie-Christine; Caruso, Manuel . E-mail: manuel.caruso@crhdq.ulaval.ca

    2005-08-01

    A major limitation in gene therapy for vectors derived from Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) is that they only deliver genes into dividing cells. In this study, a careful comparison of spleen necrosis virus (SNV)-derived vectors with MLV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 retroviral vectors indicated that SNV vectors can deliver genes 4-fold more efficiently than MLV vectors into aphidicolin-arrested cells, although at a 25-fold lower efficiency than HIV-1-derived vectors. Furthermore, the addition of a NLS in the SNV matrix (MA) that mimics the one located in HIV-1 MA did not increase the ability of SNV vectors to transfer genes into arrested cells. Also, we found that the RD114 envelope was able to pseudotype SNV viral particles in a very efficient manner.

  20. A users manual for a computer program which calculates time optical geocentric transfers using solar or nuclear electric and high thrust propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackett, L. L.; Edelbaum, T. N.; Malchow, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    This manual is a guide for using a computer program which calculates time optimal trajectories for high-and low-thrust geocentric transfers. Either SEP or NEP may be assumed and a one or two impulse, fixed total delta V, initial high thrust phase may be included. Also a single impulse of specified delta V may be included after the low thrust state. The low thrust phase utilizes equinoctial orbital elements to avoid the classical singularities and Kryloff-Boguliuboff averaging to help insure more rapid computation time. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 in double precision for use on an IBM 360 computer. The manual includes a description of the problem treated, input/output information, examples of runs, and source code listings.